Science.gov

Sample records for monopyrrolide map complexes

  1. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred

  2. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Evans, G.A.

    1993-06-15

    A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

  3. Grammatical complexity for two-dimensional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Ryouichi; Shudo, Akira

    2004-11-01

    We calculate the grammatical complexity of the symbol sequences generated from the Hénon map and the Lozi map using the recently developed methods to construct the pruning front. When the map is hyperbolic, the language of symbol sequences is regular in the sense of the Chomsky hierarchy and the corresponding grammatical complexity takes finite values. It is found that the complexity exhibits a self-similar structure as a function of the system parameter, and the similarity of the pruning fronts is discussed as an origin of such self-similarity. For non-hyperbolic cases, it is observed that the complexity monotonically increases as we increase the resolution of the pruning front.

  4. Hamiltonian maps in the complex plane

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.M.; Percival, I.C.

    1981-01-01

    Following Arnol'd's proof of the KAM theorem, an analogy with the vertical pendulum, and some general arguments concerning maps in the complex plane, detailed calculations are presented and illustrated graphically for the standard map at the golden mean frequency. The functional dependence of the coordinate q on the canonical angle variable theta is analytically continued into the complex theta-plane, where natural boundaries are found at constant absolute values of Im theta. The boundaries represent the appearance of chaotic motion in the complex plane. Two independent numerical methods based on Fourier analysis in the angle variable were used, one based on a variation-annihilation method and the other on a double expansion. The results were further checked by direct solution of the complex equations of motion. The numerically simpler, but intrinsically complex, semipendulum and semistandard map are also studied. We conjecture that natural boundaries appear in the analogous analytic continuation of the invariant tori or KAM surfaces of general nonintegrable systems.

  5. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  6. Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lidan; Wu, Rongling

    2015-06-01

    Despite increasing emphasis on the genetic study of quantitative traits, we are still far from being able to chart a clear picture of their genetic architecture, given an inherent complexity involved in trait formation. A competing theory for studying such complex traits has emerged by viewing their phenotypic formation as a "system" in which a high-dimensional group of interconnected components act and interact across different levels of biological organization from molecules through cells to whole organisms. This system is initiated by a machinery of DNA sequences that regulate a cascade of biochemical pathways to synthesize endophenotypes and further assemble these endophenotypes toward the end-point phenotype in virtue of various developmental changes. This review focuses on a conceptual framework for genetic mapping of complex traits by which to delineate the underlying components, interactions and mechanisms that govern the system according to biological principles and understand how these components function synergistically under the control of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to comprise a unified whole. This framework is built by a system of differential equations that quantifies how alterations of different components lead to the global change of trait development and function, and provides a quantitative and testable platform for assessing the multiscale interplay between QTLs and development. The method will enable geneticists to shed light on the genetic complexity of any biological system and predict, alter or engineer its physiological and pathological states.

  7. Mapping ecological states in a complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C. M.; Bestelmeyer, B.; Burkett, L. M.; Ayers, E.; Romig, K.; Slaughter, A.

    2013-12-01

    analysis provides a platform for classification that more closely resembles human recognition of objects within a remotely sensed image. The analysis presented here compares multiple thematic maps created for test locations on the USDA-ARS Jornada Experimental Range ranch. Three study sites in different pastures, each 300 ha in size, were selected for comparison on the basis of their ecological site type (';Clayey', ';Sandy' and a combination of both) and the degree of complexity of vegetation cover. Thematic maps were produced for each study site using (i) manual interpretation of digital aerial photography (by five independent interpreters); (ii) object-oriented, decision-tree classification of fine and moderate spatial resolution imagery (Quickbird; Landsat Thematic Mapper) and (iii) ground survey. To identify areas of uncertainty, we compared agreement in location, areal extent and class assignation between 5 independently produced, manually-digitized ecological state maps and with the map created from ground survey. Location, areal extent and class assignation of the map produced by object-oriented classification was also assessed with reference to the ground survey map.

  8. Complex Mapping of Aerofoils--A Different Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Miccal T.

    2012-01-01

    In this article an application of conformal mapping to aerofoil theory is studied from a geometric and calculus point of view. The problem is suitable for undergraduate teaching in terms of a project or extended piece of work, and brings together the concepts of geometric mapping, parametric equations, complex numbers and calculus. The Joukowski…

  9. A fast algorithm for functional mapping of complex traits.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Wu, Rongling; Ma, Chang-Xing; Casella, George

    2004-01-01

    By integrating the underlying developmental mechanisms for the phenotypic formation of traits into a mapping framework, functional mapping has emerged as an important statistical approach for mapping complex traits. In this note, we explore the feasibility of using the simplex algorithm as an alternative to solve the mixture-based likelihood for functional mapping of complex traits. The results from the simplex algorithm are consistent with those from the traditional EM algorithm, but the simplex algorithm has considerably reduced computational times. Moreover, because of its nonderivative nature and easy implementation with current software, the simplex algorithm enjoys an advantage over the EM algorithm in the dynamic modeling and analysis of complex traits. PMID:15342547

  10. Mapping mechanical force propagation through biomolecular complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeler, Constantin; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Malinowska, Klara H.; Durner, Ellis; Ott, Wolfgang; Bayer, Edward A.; Schulten, Klaus; Nash, Michael A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2015-08-11

    In this paper, we employ single-molecule force spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope (AFM) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to reveal force propagation pathways through a mechanically ultrastable multidomain cellulosome protein complex. We demonstrate a new combination of network-based correlation analysis supported by AFM directional pulling experiments, which allowed us to visualize stiff paths through the protein complex along which force is transmitted. Finally, the results implicate specific force-propagation routes nonparallel to the pulling axis that are advantageous for achieving high dissociation forces.

  11. Nomenclature for physical mapping of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Among these issues, that of establishing nomenclature conventions, was seen to be fundamental to the development of useful data management systems and essential for the orderly and efficient development of such systems. Therefore, the present workshop was convened, as the first in the recommended series, to identify the issues involved in establishing nomenclature standards and to develop a set of recommendations for such standards. This report summarizes the proceedings of the workshop and lays out specific proposals for naming DNA entities for physical mapping. The scientific community should discuss and develop these proposals so that naming conventions can be established. The proposals apply specifically to human DNA entities; however, the relevance to nomenclature in other systems should be part of the broader discussion. 13 refs.

  12. Quantifying the complexity of the delayed logistic map.

    PubMed

    Masoller, Cristina; Rosso, Osvaldo A

    2011-01-28

    Statistical complexity measures are used to quantify the degree of complexity of the delayed logistic map, with linear and nonlinear feedback. We employ two methods for calculating the complexity measures, one with the 'histogram-based' probability distribution function and the other one with ordinal patterns. We show that these methods provide complementary information about the complexity of the delay-induced dynamics: there are parameter regions where the histogram-based complexity is zero while the ordinal pattern complexity is not, and vice versa. We also show that the time series generated from the nonlinear delayed logistic map can present zero missing or forbidden patterns, i.e. all possible ordinal patterns are realized into orbits.

  13. The Limits of Some Infinite Families of Complex Contracting Mappings

    SciTech Connect

    Pagon, Dusan

    2008-11-13

    Self-similarity is strongly presented in modern mathematics and physics. We study a broad class of planar fractals--strongly self-similar sets of points in complex plane, obtained from a unit interval as geometric limits of certain infinite families of contracting mappings. Different 1-1 correspondences between the constructed set and the initial unit interval are established.

  14. The Limits of Some Infinite Families of Complex Contracting Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagon, Dušan

    2008-11-01

    Self-similarity is strongly presented in modern mathematics and physics. We study a broad class of planar fractals—strongly self-similar sets of points in complex plane, obtained from a unit interval as geometric limits of certain infinite families of contracting mappings. Different 1-1 correspondences between the constructed set and the initial unit interval are established.

  15. 3D Gel Map of Arabidopsis Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katrin; Belt, Katharina; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Complex I has a unique structure in plants and includes extra subunits. Here, we present a novel study to define its protein constituents. Mitochondria were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, leaves, and roots. Subunits of complex I were resolved by 3D blue-native (BN)/SDS/SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. Overall, 55 distinct proteins were found, seven of which occur in pairs of isoforms. We present evidence that Arabidopsis complex I consists of 49 distinct types of subunits, 40 of which represent homologs of bovine complex I. The nine other subunits represent special proteins absent in the animal linage of eukaryotes, most prominently a group of subunits related to bacterial gamma-type carbonic anhydrases. A GelMap http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis-3d-complex-i/ is presented for promoting future complex I research in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:23761796

  16. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Jessica J.; Castelhano, Marta G.; Oliveira, Kyle C.; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L.; Casal, Margret L.; Center, Sharon A.; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J.; Kalla, Sara E.; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Moise, N. S.; Shannon, Laura M.; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Todhunter, Rory J.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies. PMID:26795439

  17. RDF SKETCH MAPS - KNOWLEDGE COMPLEXITY REDUCTION FOR PRECISION MEDICINE ANALYTICS.

    PubMed

    Thanintorn, Nattapon; Wang, Juexin; Ersoy, Ilker; Al-Taie, Zainab; Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Duolin; Verma, Megha; Joshi, Trupti; Hammer, Richard; Xu, Dong; Shin, Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Realization of precision medicine ideas requires significant research effort to be able to spot subtle differences in complex diseases at the molecular level to develop personalized therapies. It is especially important in many cases of highly heterogeneous cancers. Precision diagnostics and therapeutics of such diseases demands interrogation of vast amounts of biological knowledge coupled with novel analytic methodologies. For instance, pathway-based approaches can shed light on the way tumorigenesis takes place in individual patient cases and pinpoint to novel drug targets. However, comprehensive analysis of hundreds of pathways and thousands of genes creates a combinatorial explosion, that is challenging for medical practitioners to handle at the point of care. Here we extend our previous work on mapping clinical omics data to curated Resource Description Framework (RDF) knowledge bases to derive influence diagrams of interrelationships of biomarker proteins, diseases and signal transduction pathways for personalized theranostics. We present RDF Sketch Maps - a computational method to reduce knowledge complexity for precision medicine analytics. The method of RDF Sketch Maps is inspired by the way a sketch artist conveys only important visual information and discards other unnecessary details. In our case, we compute and retain only so-called RDF Edges - places with highly important diagnostic and therapeutic information. To do this we utilize 35 maps of human signal transduction pathways by transforming 300 KEGG maps into highly processable RDF knowledge base. We have demonstrated potential clinical utility of RDF Sketch Maps in hematopoietic cancers, including analysis of pathways associated with Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) where we achieved up to 20-fold reduction in the number of biological entities to be analyzed, while retaining most likely important entities. In experiments with pathways associated with HCL a generated RDF

  18. Simulating and mapping spatial complexity using multi-scale techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Cola, L.

    1994-01-01

    A central problem in spatial analysis is the mapping of data for complex spatial fields using relatively simple data structures, such as those of a conventional GIS. This complexity can be measured using such indices as multi-scale variance, which reflects spatial autocorrelation, and multi-fractal dimension, which characterizes the values of fields. These indices are computed for three spatial processes: Gaussian noise, a simple mathematical function, and data for a random walk. Fractal analysis is then used to produce a vegetation map of the central region of California based on a satellite image. This analysis suggests that real world data lie on a continuum between the simple and the random, and that a major GIS challenge is the scientific representation and understanding of rapidly changing multi-scale fields. -Author

  19. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-15

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  20. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-01

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  1. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-01

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  2. Target Enrichment Improves Mapping of Complex Traits by Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianjun; Fan, Jue; Hauser, Bernard A; Rhee, Seung Y

    2015-11-03

    Complex traits such as crop performance and human diseases are controlled by multiple genetic loci, many of which have small effects and often go undetected by traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Recently, bulked segregant analysis with large F2 pools and genome-level markers (named extreme-QTL or X-QTL mapping) has been used to identify many QTL. To estimate parameters impacting QTL detection for X-QTL mapping, we simulated the effects of population size, marker density, and sequencing depth of markers on QTL detectability for traits with differing heritabilities. These simulations indicate that a high (>90%) chance of detecting QTL with at least 5% effect requires 5000× sequencing depth for a trait with heritability of 0.4-0.7. For most eukaryotic organisms, whole-genome sequencing at this depth is not economically feasible. Therefore, we tested and confirmed the feasibility of applying deep sequencing of target-enriched markers for X-QTL mapping. We used two traits in Arabidopsis thaliana with different heritabilities: seed size (H(2) = 0.61) and seedling greening in response to salt (H(2) = 0.94). We used a modified G test to identify QTL regions and developed a model-based statistical framework to resolve individual peaks by incorporating recombination rates. Multiple QTL were identified for both traits, including previously undiscovered QTL. We call our method target-enriched X-QTL (TEX-QTL) mapping; this mapping approach is not limited by the genome size or the availability of recombinant inbred populations and should be applicable to many organisms and traits.

  3. Molecular mapping within the mouse albino-deletion complex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D K; Hand, R E; Rinchik, E M

    1989-11-01

    Induced germ-line deletion mutations in the mouse provide a malleable experimental system for in-depth molecular and functional analysis of large segments of the mammalian genome. To obtain an initial bank of molecular probes for the region of mouse chromosome 7 associated with the albino-deletion complex, random anonymous DNA clones, derived from a library constructed from flow-sorted chromosomes, were screened on DNAs from Mus musculus-Mus spretus F1 hybrids carrying large, multilocus, lethal albino deletions. Clones falling within a given deletion interval can easily be recognized because hybridization bands that represent restriction fragment length polymorphisms specific for the mutant (deleted) chromosome inherited from the M. musculus parent will be absent. Among 72 informative clones used as probes, one, which defines the locus D7OR1, mapped within two deletions that are 6-11 centimorgans in length. Submapping of this anonymous clone across a panel of 27 smaller deletions localized D7OR1 distal to a chromosomal subregion important for survival of the preimplantation embryo, proximal to globin [beta-chain (Hbb)], and near the shaker-1 (sh-1) locus. The results of these deletion-mapping experiments were also confirmed by standard three-point linkage analysis. This strategy for selection and rapid mapping of anonymous DNA probes to chromosomal segments corresponding to germ-line deletion mutations should contribute to the generation of more detailed physical and functional maps of genomic regions associated with mutant developmental phenotypes.

  4. 2D Potential theory using complex functions and conformal mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maire, Pauline; Munschy, Marc

    2016-04-01

    For infinitely horizontally extended bodies, functions that describe potential and field equations (gravity and magnetics) outside bodies are 2D and harmonic. The consequence of this property is that potential and field equations can be written as complex analytic functions. We define these complex functions whose real part is the commonly used real function and imaginary part is its Hilbert transform. Using data or synthetic cases the transformation is easily performed in the Fourier domain by setting to zero all values for negative frequencies. Written as complex functions of the complex variable, equations of potential and field in gravity and magnetics for different kinds of geometries are simple and correspond to powers of the inverse of the distance. For example, it is easily shown that for a tilted dyke, the dip and the apparent inclination have the same effect on the function and consequently that it is not possible, with data, to compute one of both values without knowing the other. Conformal mapping is an original way to display potential field functions. Considering that the complex variable corresponds to the real axis, complex potential field functions resume to a limaçon, a curve formed by the path of the point fixed to a circle when that circle rolls around the outside of another circle. For example, the point corresponding to the maximum distance to the origin of the complex magnetic field due to a cylinder, corresponds to the maximum of the analytic signal as defined by Nabighan in 1972 and its phase corresponds to the apparent inclination. Several applications are shown in different geological contexts using aeromagnetic data.

  5. Tales of the City: Understanding Urban Complexity through the Medium of Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, John R.; Coaffee, Jon

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of concept mapping in teaching complex notions in urban geography. Discusses the nature and characteristics of concept mapping, course context, three experimental exercises, and student responses in evaluations. Finds that concept-mapping techniques increased students' understanding. Emphasizes the continuing potential of this…

  6. On the mapping associated with the complex representation of functions and processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    The mapping between function spaces that is implied by the representation of a real 'bandpass' function by a complex 'low-pass' function is explicitly accepted. The discussion is extended to the representation of stationary random processes where the mapping is between spaces of random processes. This approach clarifies the nature of the complex representation, especially in the case of random processes and, in addition, derives the properties of the complex representation.-

  7. Complexity and properties of a multidimensional Cat-Hadamard map for pseudo random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim Hue, Ta Thi; Hoang, Thang Manh

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to extend the Cat map from 2-dimension to higher dimension using the fast pseudo Hadamard Transform, and the resulted maps are called Cat-Hadamard maps. The complexity and properties of Cat-Hadamard maps are investigated under the point of view for cryptographic applications. In addition, we propose a method for constructing a pseudo random number generator using a novel design concept of the high dimensional Cat map. The simulation results show that the proposed generator fulfilled all the statistic tests of the NIST SP 800-90 A.

  8. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  9. Concept Maps for Improved Science Reasoning and Writing: Complexity Isn’t Everything

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Jason E.; Duncan, Tanya; Reynolds, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    A pervasive notion in the literature is that complex concept maps reflect greater knowledge and/or more expert-like thinking than less complex concept maps. We show that concept maps used to structure scientific writing and clarify scientific reasoning do not adhere to this notion. In an undergraduate course for thesis writers, students use concept maps instead of traditional outlines to define the boundaries and scope of their research and to construct an argument for the significance of their research. Students generate maps at the beginning of the semester, revise after peer review, and revise once more at the end of the semester. Although some students revised their maps to make them more complex, a significant proportion of students simplified their maps. We found no correlation between increased complexity and improved scientific reasoning and writing skills, suggesting that sometimes students simplify their understanding as they develop more expert-like thinking. These results suggest that concept maps, when used as an intervention, can meet the varying needs of a diverse population of student writers. PMID:26538388

  10. Concept Maps for Improved Science Reasoning and Writing: Complexity Isn't Everything.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Jason E; Duncan, Tanya; Reynolds, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    A pervasive notion in the literature is that complex concept maps reflect greater knowledge and/or more expert-like thinking than less complex concept maps. We show that concept maps used to structure scientific writing and clarify scientific reasoning do not adhere to this notion. In an undergraduate course for thesis writers, students use concept maps instead of traditional outlines to define the boundaries and scope of their research and to construct an argument for the significance of their research. Students generate maps at the beginning of the semester, revise after peer review, and revise once more at the end of the semester. Although some students revised their maps to make them more complex, a significant proportion of students simplified their maps. We found no correlation between increased complexity and improved scientific reasoning and writing skills, suggesting that sometimes students simplify their understanding as they develop more expert-like thinking. These results suggest that concept maps, when used as an intervention, can meet the varying needs of a diverse population of student writers.

  11. Overcoming complexities for consistent, continental-scale flood mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Helen; Zaidman, Maxine; Davison, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    The EU Floods Directive requires all member states to produce flood hazard maps by 2013. Although flood mapping practices are well developed in Europe, there are huge variations in the scale and resolution of the maps between individual countries. Since extreme flood events are rarely confined to a single country, this is problematic, particularly for the re/insurance industry whose exposures often extend beyond country boundaries. Here, we discuss the challenges of large-scale hydrological and hydraulic modelling, using our experience of developing a 12-country model and set of maps, to illustrate how consistent, high-resolution river flood maps across Europe can be produced. The main challenges addressed include: data acquisition; manipulating the vast quantities of high-resolution data; and computational resources. Our starting point was to develop robust flood-frequency models that are suitable for estimating peak flows for a range of design flood return periods. We used the index flood approach, based on a statistical analysis of historic river flow data pooled on the basis of catchment characteristics. Historical flow data were therefore sourced for each country and collated into a large pan-European database. After a lengthy validation these data were collated into 21 separate analysis zones or regions, grouping smaller river basins according to their physical and climatic characteristics. The very large continental scale basins were each modelled separately on account of their size (e.g. Danube, Elbe, Drava and Rhine). Our methodology allows the design flood hydrograph to be predicted at any point on the river network for a range of return periods. Using JFlow+, JBA's proprietary 2D hydraulic hydrodynamic model, the calculated out-of-bank flows for all watercourses with an upstream drainage area exceeding 50km2 were routed across two different Digital Terrain Models in order to map the extent and depth of floodplain inundation. This generated modelling for

  12. Distinct cortical circuit mechanisms for complex forelimb movement and motor map topography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas C; Ayling, Oliver G S; Murphy, Timothy H

    2012-04-26

    Cortical motor maps are the basis of voluntary movement, but they have proven difficult to understand in the context of their underlying neuronal circuits. We applied light-based motor mapping of Channelrhodopsin-2 mice to reveal a functional subdivision of the forelimb motor cortex based on the direction of movement evoked by brief (10 ms) pulses. Prolonged trains of electrical or optogenetic stimulation (100-500 ms) targeted to anterior or posterior subregions of motor cortex evoked reproducible complex movements of the forelimb to distinct positions in space. Blocking excitatory cortical synaptic transmission did not abolish basic motor map topography, but the site-specific expression of complex movements was lost. Our data suggest that the topography of movement maps arises from their segregated output projections, whereas complex movements evoked by prolonged stimulation require intracortical synaptic transmission.

  13. Joined up Thinking? Evaluating the Use of Concept-Mapping to Develop Complex System Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    In the physical and natural sciences, the complexity of natural systems and their interactions is becoming better understood. With increased emphasis on learning about complex systems, students will be encountering concepts that are dynamic, ill-structured and interconnected. Concept-mapping is a method considered particularly valuable for…

  14. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  15. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  16. Epigenetic map and genetic map basis of complex traits in cassava population

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meiling; Lu, Cheng; Zhang, Shengkui; Chen, Qing; Sun, Xianglai; Ma, Pingan; Hu, Meizhen; Peng, Ming; Ma, Zilong; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Xincheng; Wang, Haiyan; Feng, Subin; Fang, Kaixin; Xie, Hairong; Li, Zaiyun; Liu, Kede; Qin, Qiongyao; Pei, Jinli; Wang, Shujuan; Pan, Kun; Hu, Wenbin; Feng, Binxiao; Fan, Dayong; Zhou, Bin; Wu, Chunling; Su, Ming; Xia, Zhiqiang; Li, Kaimian; Wang, Wenquan

    2017-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important tropical starchy root crop that is adapted to drought but extremely cold sensitive. A cold-tolerant, high-quality, and robust supply of cassava is urgently needed. Here, we clarify genome-wide distribution and classification of CCGG hemi-methylation and full-methylation, and detected 77 much candidate QTLsepi for cold stress and 103 much candidate QTLsepi for storage root quality and yield in 186 cassava population, generated by crossing two non-inbred lines with female parent KU50 and male parent SC124 (KS population). We developed amplified-fragment single nucleotide polymorphism and methylation (AFSM) genetic map in this population. We also constructed the AFSM QTL map, identified 260 much candidate QTL genes for cold stress and 301 much candidate QTL genes for storage root quality and yield, based on the years greenhouse and field trials. This may accounted for a significant amount of the variation in the key traits controlling cold tolerance and the high quality and yield of cassava. PMID:28120898

  17. Feature level fusion for enhanced geological mapping of ophiolile complex using ASTER and Landsat TM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pournamdari, M.; Hashim, M.

    2014-02-01

    Chromite ore deposit occurrence is related to ophiolite complexes as a part of the oceanic crust and provides a good opportunity for lithological mapping using remote sensing data. The main contribution of this paper is a novel approaches to discriminate different rock units associated with ophiolite complex using the Feature Level Fusion technique on ASTER and Landsat TM satellite data at regional scale. In addition this study has applied spectral transform approaches, consisting of Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) to distinguish the concentration of high-potential areas of chromite and also for determining the boundary between different rock units. Results indicated both approaches show superior outputs compared to other methods and can produce a geological map for ophiolite complex rock units in the arid and the semi-arid region. The novel technique including feature level fusion and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) discriminated ophiolitic rock units and produced detailed geological maps of the study area. As a case study, Sikhoran ophiolite complex located in SE, Iran has been selected for image processing techniques. In conclusion, a suitable approach for lithological mapping of ophiolite complexes is demonstrated, this technique contributes meaningfully towards economic geology in terms of identifying new prospects.

  18. An integrated map of HIV-human protein complexes that facilitate viral infection.

    PubMed

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Olivieri, Kevin; Pache, Lars; Shih, Hsin Ling; Pustovalova, Olga; Bessarabova, Marina; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Recent proteomic and genetic studies have aimed to identify a complete network of interactions between HIV and human proteins and genes. This HIV-human interaction network provides invaluable information as to how HIV exploits the host machinery and can be used as a starting point for further functional analyses. We integrated this network with complementary datasets of protein function and interaction to nominate human protein complexes with likely roles in viral infection. Based on our approach we identified a global map of 40 HIV-human protein complexes with putative roles in HIV infection, some of which are involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription, translation, and cytoskeletal regulation. Targeted RNAi screens were used to validate several proteins and complexes for functional impact on viral infection. Thus, our HIV-human protein complex map provides a significant resource of potential HIV-host interactions for further study.

  19. Doppler mapping of an alternating-sign flow with complex geometry using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Yu; Frolov, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The method of sign-sensitive mapping of the given range of velocities in a flow with complex geometry based on the principles of optical coherence tomography is described. To produce an alternating-sign flow, the 1% aqueous intralipid solution and the tilted capillary entry with the contraction coefficient 4:1 are used. The mapping is controlled using two parameters, the value of one specific velocity (OSV) for mapping and the accuracy of its determination. The structure image and two OSV images (for positive and negative direction of motion) are obtained as a result of selecting and processing the relevant parts of the signal spectrum. The final image is a result of summing these three images and can be used as a Doppler equivelocity contour map.

  20. Doppler mapping of an alternating-sign flow with complex geometry using optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Proskurin, S G; Potlov, A Yu; Frolov, S V

    2014-01-31

    The method of sign-sensitive mapping of the given range of velocities in a flow with complex geometry based on the principles of optical coherence tomography is described. To produce an alternating-sign flow, the 1% aqueous intralipid solution and the tilted capillary entry with the contraction coefficient 4:1 are used. The mapping is controlled using two parameters, the value of one specific velocity (OSV) for mapping and the accuracy of its determination. The structure image and two OSV images (for positive and negative direction of motion) are obtained as a result of selecting and processing the relevant parts of the signal spectrum. The final image is a result of summing these three images and can be used as a Doppler equivelocity contour map. (radiation scattering)

  1. 1.0 Mm Maps and Radial Density Distributions of Southern Hii/molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, L. H.; Frogel, J. A.; Gezar, D. Y.; Hauser, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Several 1.0 continuum mapping observations were made of seven southern hemisphere h12/molecular cloud complexes with 65 arcsec resolution. The radial density distribution of the clouds with central luminosity sources was determined observationally. Strong similarities in morphology and general physical conditions were found to exist among all of the southern clouds in the sample.

  2. Physical mapping of complex genomes by sampled sequencing: A theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Smith, M.; Quackenbush, J.

    1995-05-01

    A method for high-throughput, high-resolution physical mapping of complex genomes and human chromosomes called Genomic Sequence Sampling (GSS) has recently been proposed. This mapping strategy employs high-density cosmid contig assembly over 200-kb to 1-Mb regions of the target genome coupled with DNA sequencing of the cosmid ends. The relative order and spacing of the sequence fragments is determined from the template contig, resulting in a physical map of 1-to 5-kb resolution that contains a substantial portion of the entire sequence at one-pass accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the theoretical parameters for GSS mapping, to evaluate the effectiveness of the contig-building strategy, and to calculate the expected fraction of the target genome that can be recovered as mapped sequence. A novel aspect of the cosmid fingerprinting and contig-building strategy involves determining the orientation of the genomic inserts relative to the cloning vectors, so that the sampled sequence fragments can be mapped with high resolution. The algorithm is based upon complete restriction enzyme digestion, contig assembly by matching fragments, and end-orientation of individual cosmids by determining the best consistent fit of the labeled cosmid end fragments in the consensus restriction map. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Towards a complex system understanding of bipolar disorder: A map based model of a complex winnerless competition.

    PubMed

    Hadaeghi, Fatemeh; Hashemi Golpayegani, Mohammad Reza; Murray, Greg

    2015-07-07

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by repeated erratic episodes of mania and depression, which can be understood as pathological complex system behavior involving cognitive, affective and psychomotor disturbance. In order to illuminate dynamical aspects of the longitudinal course of the illness, we propose here a novel complex model based on the notion of competition between recurrent maps, which mathematically represent the dynamics of activation in excitatory (Glutamatergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) pathways. We assume that manic and depressive states can be considered stable sub attractors of a dynamical system through which the mood trajectory moves. The model provides a theoretical framework which can account for a number of complex phenomena of bipolar disorder, including intermittent transition between the two poles of the disorder, rapid and ultra-rapid cycling of episodes and manicogenic effects of antidepressants.

  4. Efficient use of systems mapping without expert knowledge. Comment on "Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system" by L. Sun and R. Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J.

    2015-06-01

    Functional mapping [11], pioneered by Rongling Wu and his colleagues, is a statistical framework for studying the association between quantitative trait locus (QTL) and dynamic quantitative traits. Functional mapping integrate phenotype information over multiple time points as a smooth function/curve to study the genetic mechanism behind phenotype development and growth. The comprehensive review of Sun and Wu further generalize the concept of functional mapping to systems mapping and network mapping [8], in which the target output variable is not merely a single trait, but rather a complex biological system comprising various interactive components of a single trait or a set of correlated genes or proteins activating the same pathways/networks. With systems mapping, genetic influence on interactions, causal relationships and/or steady-state of the dynamic biological system behind the complex traits can be investigated.

  5. Next-Generation Mapping of Complex Traits with Phenotype-Based Selection and Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Eric J.; Jones, Corbin D.

    2011-01-01

    Finding the genes underlying complex traits is difficult. We show that new sequencing technology combined with traditional genetic techniques can efficiently identify genetic regions underlying a complex and quantitative behavioral trait. As a proof of concept we used phenotype-based introgression to backcross loci that control innate food preference in Drosophila simulans into the genomic background of D. sechellia, which expresses the opposite preference. We successfully mapped D. simulans introgression regions in a small mapping population (30 flies) with whole-genome resequencing using light coverage (∼1×). We found six loci contributing to D. simulans food preference, one of which overlaps a previously discovered allele. This approach is applicable to many systems, does not rely on laborious marker development or genotyping, does not require existing high quality reference genomes, and needs only small mapping populations. Because introgression is used, researchers can scale mapping population size, replication, and number of backcross generations to their needs. Finally, in contrast to more widely used mapping techniques like F2 bulk-segregant analysis, our method produces near-isogenic lines that can be kept and reused indefinitely. PMID:21940681

  6. A comprehensive archaeological map of the world's largest preindustrial settlement complex at Angkor, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Evans, Damian; Pottier, Christophe; Fletcher, Roland; Hensley, Scott; Tapley, Ian; Milne, Anthony; Barbetti, Michael

    2007-09-04

    The great medieval settlement of Angkor in Cambodia [9th-16th centuries Common Era (CE)] has for many years been understood as a "hydraulic city," an urban complex defined, sustained, and ultimately overwhelmed by a complex water management network. Since the 1980s that view has been disputed, but the debate has remained unresolved because of insufficient data on the landscape beyond the great temples: the broader context of the monumental remains was only partially understood and had not been adequately mapped. Since the 1990s, French, Australian, and Cambodian teams have sought to address this empirical deficit through archaeological mapping projects by using traditional methods such as ground survey in conjunction with advanced radar remote-sensing applications in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Here we present a major outcome of that research: a comprehensive archaeological map of greater Angkor, covering nearly 3,000 km2, prepared by the Greater Angkor Project (GAP). The map reveals a vast, low-density settlement landscape integrated by an elaborate water management network covering>1,000 km2, the most extensive urban complex of the preindustrial world. It is now clear that anthropogenic changes to the landscape were both extensive and substantial enough to have created grave challenges to the long-term viability of the settlement.

  7. High-Resolution Mapping of Complex Traits with a Four-Parent Advanced Intercross Yeast Population

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos, Francisco A.; Parts, Leopold; Salinas, Francisco; Bergström, Anders; Scovacricchi, Eugenio; Zia, Amin; Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Warringer, Jonas; Louis, Edward J.; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    A large fraction of human complex trait heritability is due to a high number of variants with small marginal effects and their interactions with genotype and environment. Such alleles are more easily studied in model organisms, where environment, genetic makeup, and allele frequencies can be controlled. Here, we examine the effect of natural genetic variation on heritable traits in a very large pool of baker’s yeast from a multiparent 12th generation intercross. We selected four representative founder strains to produce the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project (SGRP)-4X mapping population and sequenced 192 segregants to generate an accurate genetic map. Using these individuals, we mapped 25 loci linked to growth traits under heat stress, arsenite, and paraquat, the majority of which were best explained by a diverging phenotype caused by a single allele in one condition. By sequencing pooled DNA from millions of segregants grown under heat stress, we further identified 34 and 39 regions selected in haploid and diploid pools, respectively, with most of the selection against a single allele. While the most parsimonious model for the majority of loci mapped using either approach was the effect of an allele private to one founder, we could validate examples of pleiotropic effects and complex allelic series at a locus. SGRP-4X is a deeply characterized resource that provides a framework for powerful and high-resolution genetic analysis of yeast phenotypes and serves as a test bed for testing avenues to attack human complex traits. PMID:24037264

  8. Mapping the q-voter model: From a single chain to complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jȩdrzejewski, Arkadiusz; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Szwabiński, Janusz

    2016-03-01

    We propose and compare six different ways of mapping the modified q-voter model to complex networks. Considering square lattices, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz and real Twitter networks, we ask the question if always a particular choice of the group of influence of a fixed size q leads to different behavior at the macroscopic level. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that the answer depends on the relative average path length of the network and for real-life topologies the differences between the considered mappings may be negligible.

  9. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Lisa P.; Sousa, Ana I.; Alves, Fátima L.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2016-03-01

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping.

  10. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Lisa P.; Sousa, Ana I.; Alves, Fátima L.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping. PMID:26964892

  11. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Lisa P; Sousa, Ana I; Alves, Fátima L; Lillebø, Ana I

    2016-03-11

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping.

  12. Structure-function mapping of a heptameric module in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Phillips, Jeremy; Sekedat, Matthew D; Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; Velazquez-Muriel, Javier; Franke, Josef D; Williams, Rosemary; Stokes, David L; Chait, Brian T; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P

    2012-02-20

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a multiprotein assembly that serves as the sole mediator of nucleocytoplasmic exchange in eukaryotic cells. In this paper, we use an integrative approach to determine the structure of an essential component of the yeast NPC, the ~600-kD heptameric Nup84 complex, to a precision of ~1.5 nm. The configuration of the subunit structures was determined by satisfaction of spatial restraints derived from a diverse set of negative-stain electron microscopy and protein domain-mapping data. Phenotypic data were mapped onto the complex, allowing us to identify regions that stabilize the NPC's interaction with the nuclear envelope membrane and connect the complex to the rest of the NPC. Our data allow us to suggest how the Nup84 complex is assembled into the NPC and propose a scenario for the evolution of the Nup84 complex through a series of gene duplication and loss events. This work demonstrates that integrative approaches based on low-resolution data of sufficient quality can generate functionally informative structures at intermediate resolution.

  13. Megabase-scale mapping of the HLA gene complex by pulsed field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrance, S.K.; Smith, C.L.; Srivastava, R.; Cantor, C.R.; Weissman, S.M.

    1987-03-13

    In the study of the genetic structure of mammalian chromosomes, there exists a resolution gap between molecular cloning experiments and meiotic linkage analyses. This gap has discouraged attempts to construct full-scale genetic maps of mammalian chromosomes. The organization of the human major histocompatibility complex was examined within this range by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The data obtained indicate that the complex spans over 3000 kilobases and enable the construction of a megabase-scale molecular map. These results indicate that the techniques employed in DNA extraction, enzymatic digestion, electrophoresis, and hybridization are suitable for the efficient analysis of megabase regions of mammalian chromosomes and effectively bridge the resolution gap between molecular cloning and classical genetics.

  14. Mapping of a molecular complex in a northern spiral arm of M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoli, F.; Combes, F.; Stark, A. A.

    1987-02-01

    A restricted CO map at high resolution (22arcsec) has been obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope towards a North-East spiral arm of M31. The authors have detected 12CO emission in 17 positions out of 41 observed. All the detected lines appear at the same LSR velocity, which implies that they come from a well-defined entity: a giant molecular complex. It has an H2 mass of about 1.3×106M_sun; and extends over roughly 160 pc. This complex is gravitationally bound; its structure is elongated and inhomogeneous on the 35 pc scale. The authors have also obtained a 13CO spectrum towards one point of the map, and confirmed an earlier determination of the ratio of 12CO to 13CO integrated emissivities around 10.

  15. Geologic map of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, modified from the 1976 original map compilation of V.G. Cheremytsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Peters, Stephen G.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Renaud, Karine M.; Stettner, Will R.; Masonic, Linda M.; Packard, Patricia H.

    2011-01-01

    This map is a modified version of the Geological map of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, scale 1:10,000, which was compiled by V.G. Cheremytsin in 1976. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Afghan Geological Survey and the Task Force for Business and Stability Operations of the U.S. Department of Defense, studied the original map and also visited the field area in September 2009, August 2010, and February 2011. This modified map, which includes cross sections, illustrates the geologic structure of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex. The map reproduces the topology (contacts, faults, and so forth) of the original Soviet map and cross sections and includes modifications based on our examination of that map and a related report, and based on observations made during our field visits. (Refer to the References section in the Map PDF for complete citations of the original map and related report.) Elevations on the cross section are derived from the original Soviet topography and may not match the newer topography used on the current map. We have attempted to translate the original Russian terminology and rock classification into modern English geologic usage as literally as possible without changing any genetic or process-oriented implications in the original descriptions. We also use the age designations from the original map. The unit colors on the map and cross sections differ from the colors shown on the original version. The units are colored according to the color and pattern scheme of the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) (http://www.ccgm.org).

  16. Concept Mapping to Assess Learning and Understanding of Complexity in Courses on Global Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebich-Hespanha, S.; Gautier, C.

    2010-12-01

    The complex nature of climate change science poses special challenges for educators wishing to broaden and deepen student understanding of the climate system and its sensitivity to and impacts upon human activity. Learners have prior knowledge that may limit their perception and processing of the multiple relationships between processes (e.g., feedbacks) that arise in global change science, and these existing mental models serve as the scaffold for all future learning. Because adoption of complex scientific concepts is not likely if instruction includes presentation of information or concepts that are not compatible with the learners’ prior knowledge, providing effective instruction on this complex topic requires learning opportunities that are anchored upon an evaluation of the limitations and inaccuracies of the learners’ existing understandings of the climate system. The formative evaluation that serves as the basis for planning such instruction can also be useful as a baseline against which to evaluate subsequent learning. We will present concept-mapping activities that we have used to assess students’ knowledge and understanding about global climate change in courses that utilized multiple assessment methods including presentations, writings, discussions, and concept maps. The courses in which these activities were completed use a variety of instructional approaches (including standard lectures and lab assignments and a mock summit) to help students understand the inherently interdisciplinary topic of global climate change, its interwoven human and natural causes, and the connections it has with society through a complex range of political, social, technological and economic factors. Two instances of concept map assessment will be presented: one focused on evaluating student understanding of the major components of the climate system and their interconnections, and the other focused on student understanding of the connections between climate change and

  17. Plenoptic mapping for imaging and retrieval of the complex field amplitude of a laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C

    2016-12-26

    The plenoptic sensor has been developed to sample complicated beam distortions produced by turbulence in the low atmosphere (deep turbulence or strong turbulence) with high density data samples. In contrast with the conventional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, which utilizes all the pixels under each lenslet of a micro-lens array (MLA) to obtain one data sample indicating sub-aperture phase gradient and photon intensity, the plenoptic sensor uses each illuminated pixel (with significant pixel value) under each MLA lenslet as a data point for local phase gradient and intensity. To characterize the working principle of a plenoptic sensor, we propose the concept of plenoptic mapping and its inverse mapping to describe the imaging and reconstruction process respectively. As a result, we show that the plenoptic mapping is an efficient method to image and reconstruct the complex field amplitude of an incident beam with just one image. With a proof of concept experiment, we show that adaptive optics (AO) phase correction can be instantaneously achieved without going through a phase reconstruction process under the concept of plenoptic mapping. The plenoptic mapping technology has high potential for applications in imaging, free space optical (FSO) communication and directed energy (DE) where atmospheric turbulence distortion needs to be compensated.

  18. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  19. Interactome mapping for analysis of complex phenotypes: insights from benchmarking binary interaction assays.

    PubMed

    Braun, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    Protein interactions mediate essentially all biological processes and analysis of protein-protein interactions using both large-scale and small-scale approaches has contributed fundamental insights to the understanding of biological systems. In recent years, interactome network maps have emerged as an important tool for analyzing and interpreting genetic data of complex phenotypes. Complementary experimental approaches to test for binary, direct interactions, and for membership in protein complexes are used to explore the interactome. The two approaches are not redundant but yield orthogonal perspectives onto the complex network of physical interactions by which proteins mediate biological processes. In recent years, several publications have demonstrated that interactions from high-throughput experiments can be equally reliable as the high quality subset of interactions identified in small-scale studies. Critical for this insight was the introduction of standardized experimental benchmarking of interaction and validation assays using reference sets. The data obtained in these benchmarking experiments have resulted in greater appreciation of the limitations and the complementary strengths of different assays. Moreover, benchmarking is a central element of a conceptual framework to estimate interactome sizes and thereby measure progress toward near complete network maps. These estimates have revealed that current large-scale data sets, although often of high quality, cover only a small fraction of a given interactome. Here, I review the findings of assay benchmarking and discuss implications for quality control, and for strategies toward obtaining a near-complete map of the interactome of an organism.

  20. Mapping of West Siberian taiga wetland complexes using Landsat imagery: implications for methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgenievna Terentieva, Irina; Vladimirovich Glagolev, Mikhail; Dmitrievna Lapshina, Elena; Faritovich Sabrekov, Alexandr; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2016-08-01

    High-latitude wetlands are important for understanding climate change risks because these environments sink carbon dioxide and emit methane. However, fine-scale heterogeneity of wetland landscapes poses a serious challenge when generating regional-scale estimates of greenhouse gas fluxes from point observations. In order to reduce uncertainties at the regional scale, we mapped wetlands and water bodies in the taiga zone of The West Siberia Lowland (WSL) on a scene-by-scene basis using a supervised classification of Landsat imagery. Training data consist of high-resolution images and extensive field data collected at 28 test areas. The classification scheme aims at supporting methane inventory applications and includes seven wetland ecosystem types comprising nine wetland complexes distinguishable at the Landsat resolution. To merge typologies, mean relative areas of wetland ecosystems within each wetland complex type were estimated using high-resolution images. Accuracy assessment based on 1082 validation polygons of 10 × 10 pixel size indicated an overall map accuracy of 79 %. The total area of the WSL wetlands and water bodies was estimated to be 52.4 Mha or 4-12 % of the global wetland area. Ridge-hollow complexes prevail in WSL's taiga zone accounting for 33 % of the total wetland area, followed by pine bogs or "ryams" (23 %), ridge-hollow-lake complexes (16 %), open fens (8 %), palsa complexes (7 %), open bogs (5 %), patterned fens (4 %), and swamps (4 %). Various oligotrophic environments are dominant among wetland ecosystems, while poor fens cover only 14 % of the area. Because of the significant change in the wetland ecosystem coverage in comparison to previous studies, a considerable reevaluation of the total CH4 emissions from the entire region is expected. A new Landsat-based map of WSL's taiga wetlands provides a benchmark for validation of coarse-resolution global land cover products and wetland data sets in high latitudes.

  1. Geophysical Survey and Detailed Geologic Mapping of an Eroded Stratovolcano's Central Intrusive Complex, Summer Coon, Co.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Eroded volcanoes expose plumbing systems that provide important information on intrusive geometries, magma propagation directions, and the effects of host rock types and heterogeneities. Summer Coon Volcano, CO, is an Oligocene stratovolcano where erosion has removed much of the original edifice, revealing the intrusive stocks of the central intrusive complex (CIC). Surrounding the CIC are hundreds of radial dikes ranging from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition. Published geologic maps indicate most radial dikes do not connect to the intrusive stocks, supporting published theories that most did not emanate from the central intrusions. However, much of the area surrounding the CIC is covered by alluvium, suggesting that the lack of connection might be an artifact of exposure. We completed a ground magnetic survey and detailed geological mapping to determine if the dikes continue beneath the alluvium and into the intrusive stocks. Linear magnetic anomalies indicate four NW-SE trending rhyodacite dikes continue beneath the alluvium for up to 250 m, and mapping indicates that at least two of the rhyodacite dikes do extend into the CIC. Shorter linear anomalies are attributed to seven NW-SE trending basaltic dikes ~100-500-m-long which are sparsely exposed in the alluvium. Mapping shows that three rhyodacite dikes extend into the CIC and to within 200 m of their possible source, an 800-m-wide granodiorite stock. Additionally, three rhyolitic dikes extend to within several meters of a 200×500-m-wide tuff breccia zone of similar composition, likely their source. In summary, magnetic data and detailed mapping indicate that radial dikes do extend into the central intrusive complex in contrast to some model predictions.

  2. Aeromagnetic and aeromagnetic-based geologic maps of the Coastal Belt, Franciscan Complex, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; McLaughlin, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Coastal belt of the Franciscan Complex represents a Late Cretaceous to Miocene accretionary prism and overlying slope deposits. Its equivalents may extend from the offshore outer borderland of southern California to north of the Mendocino Triple Junction under the Eel River Basin and in the offshore of Cascadia. The Coastal belt is exposed on land in northern California, yet its structure and stratigraphy are incompletely known because of discontinuous exposure, structural disruption, and lithologically non-distinctive clastic rocks. The intent of this report is to make available, in map form, aeromagnetic data covering the Coastal belt that provide a new dataset to aid in mapping, understanding, and interpreting the incompletely understood geology and structure in northern California. The newly merged aeromagnetic data over the Coastal belt of the Franciscan Complex reveal long, linear anomalies that indicate remarkably coherent structure within a terrane where mapping at the surface indicates complex deformation and that has been described as "broken formation" and, even locally as "melange". The anomalies in the Coastal belt are primarily sourced by volcanic-rich graywackes and exotic blocks of basalt. Some anomalies along the contact of the Coastal belt with the Central belt are likely caused by local interleaving of components of the Coast Ranges ophiolite. These data can be used to map additional exotic blocks within the Coastal belt and to distinguish lithologically indistinct graywackes within the Coastal terrane. Using anomaly asymmetry allows projection of these "layers" into the subsurface. This analysis indicates predominant northeast dips consistent with tectonic interleaving of blocks within a subduction zone.

  3. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  4. A reciprocal cross design to map the genetic architecture of complex traits in apomictic plants.

    PubMed

    Yin, Danni; Zhu, Xuli; Jiang, Libo; Zhang, Jian; Zeng, Yanru; Wu, Rongling

    2015-02-01

    Many higher plants of economic and biological importance undergo apomixis in which the maternal tissue of the ovule forms a seed, without experiencing meiosis and fertilization. This feature of apomixis has made it difficult to perform linkage mapping which relies on meiotic recombination. Here, we describe a computational model for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control complex traits in apomictic plants. The model is founded on the mixture model-based likelihood in which maternal genotypes are dissolved into two possible components generated by meiotic and apomictic processes, respectively. The EM algorithm was implemented to discern meiotic and apomictic genotypes and, therefore, allow the marker-QTL linkage relationship to be estimated. By capitalizing on reciprocal crosses, the model is renovated to estimate and test imprinting effects of QTLs, providing a better gateway to characterize the genetic architecture of complex traits. The model was validated through computer simulation and further demonstrated for its usefulness by analyzing a real data for an apomictic woody plant. The model has for the first time provided a unique tool for genetic mapping in apomictic plants.

  5. An entropy-driven matrix completion (E-MC) approach to complex network mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koochakzadeh, Ali; Pal, Piya

    2016-05-01

    Mapping the topology of a complex network in a resource-efficient manner is a challenging problem with applications in internet mapping, social network inference, and so forth. We propose a new entropy driven algorithm leveraging ideas from matrix completion, to map the network using monitors (or sensors) which, when placed on judiciously selected nodes, are capable of discovering their immediate neighbors. The main challenge is to maximize the portion of discovered network using only a limited number of available monitors. To this end, (i) a new measure of entropy or uncertainty is associated with each node, in terms of the currently discovered edges incident on that node, and (ii) a greedy algorithm is developed to select a candidate node for monitor placement based on its entropy. Utilizing the fact that many complex networks of interest (such as social networks), have a low-rank adjacency matrix, a matrix completion algorithm, namely 1-bit matrix completion, is combined with the greedy algorithm to further boost its performance. The low rank property of the network adjacency matrix can be used to extrapolate a portion of missing edges, and consequently update the node entropies, so as to efficiently guide the network discovery algorithm towards placing monitors on the nodes that can turn out to be more informative. Simulations performed on a variety of real world networks such as social networks and peer networks demonstrate the superior performance of the matrix-completion guided approach in discovering the network topology.

  6. Mapping of drug-like chemical universe with reduced complexity molecular frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kontijevskis, Aleksejs

    2017-03-28

    The emergence of DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DEL) field in past decade has attracted attention of pharmaceutical industry as a powerful mechanism for the discovery of novel drug-like hits for various biological targets. Nuevolution Chemetics technology enables DNA encoded synthesis of billions of chemically diverse drug-like small molecule compounds, and the efficient screening and optimization of these, facilitating effective identification of drug candidates at an unprecedented speed and scale. Although many approaches have been developed by the cheminformatics community for the analysis and visualization of drug-like chemical space, most of them are restricted to the analysis of maximum few millions of compounds and cannot handle collections of 10(8)-10(12) compounds typical for DELs. To address this big chemical data challenge, we developed Reduced Complexity Molecular (RCM) frameworks methodology as an abstract and very general way of representing chemical structures. By further introducing RCM framework descriptors we constructed a global framework map of drug-like chemical space and demonstrate how chemical space occupied by multi-million-member drug-like Chemetics DNA-encoded libraries and virtual combinatorial libraries with >10(12) members could be analysed and mapped without a need for library enumeration. We further validate the approach by performing RCM framework-based searches in drug-like chemical universe and mapping Chemetics library selection outputs for LSD1 target on a global framework chemical space map.

  7. Link prediction based on hyperbolic mapping with community structure for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuxi; Wu, Yao; Li, Qingguang; Jin, Fengdong; Xiong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Link prediction is becoming a concerned topic in the complex network field in recent years. However, the existing link prediction methods are unsatisfactory for processing topological information and have high time complexity. This paper presents a novel method of Link Prediction with Community Structure (LPCS) based on hyperbolic mapping. Different from the existing link prediction methods, to utilize global structure information of the network, LPCS deals with the network from an overall perspective. LPCS takes full advantage of the community structure and its hierarchical organization to map networks into hyperbolic space, and obtains the hyperbolic coordinates which depict the global structure information of the network, then uses hyperbolic distance to describe the similarity between the nodes, finally predicts missing links according to the degree of the similarity between unconnected node pairs. The combination of the hyperbolic geometry framework and the community structure makes LPCS perform well in predicting missing links, and the time complexity of LPCS is linear, which makes LPCS can be applied to handle large scale networks in acceptable time. LPCS outperforms many state-of-the-art link prediction methods in the networks obeying power-law degree distribution.

  8. Evolution of genetic redundancy: the relevance of complexity in genotype-phenotype mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nen; Ishihara, Shuji; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-06-01

    Despite its ubiquity among organisms, genetic redundancy is presumed to reduce total population fitness and is therefore unlikely to evolve. This study evaluates an evolutionary model with high-dimensional genotype-phenotype mapping (GPM) by applying a replica method to deal with quenched randomness. From the method, the dependence of fitness on genetic redundancy is analytically calculated. The results demonstrate that genetic redundancy can have higher population fitness under complex GPM, which tends to favor gene duplication in selection processes, further enhancing the potential for evolutionary innovations.

  9. Statistical Power of Expression Quantitative Trait Loci for Mapping of Complex Trait Loci in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schliekelman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A number of recent genomewide surveys have found numerous QTL for gene expression, often with intermediate to high heritability values. As a result, there is currently a great deal of interest in genetical genomics—that is, the combination of genomewide expression data and molecular marker data to elucidate the genetics of complex traits. To date, most genetical genomics studies have focused on generating candidate genes for previously known trait loci or have otherwise leveraged existing knowledge about trait-related genes. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential for genetical genomics approaches in the context of genomewide scans for complex trait loci. I explore the expected strength of association between expression-level traits and a clinical trait, as a function of the underlying genetic model in natural populations. I give calculations of statistical power for detecting differential expression between affected and unaffected individuals. I model both reactive and causative expression-level traits with both additive and multiplicative multilocus models for the relationship between phenotype and genotype and explore a variety of assumptions about dominance, number of segregating loci, and other parameters. There are two key results. If a transcript is causative for the disease (in the sense that disease risk depends directly on transcript level), then the power to detect association between transcript and disease is quite good. Sample sizes on the order of 100 are sufficient for 80% power. On the other hand, if the transcript is reactive to a disease locus, then the correlation between expression-level traits and disease is low unless the expression-level trait shares several causative loci with the disease—that is, the expression-level trait itself is a complex trait. Thus, there is a trade-off between the power to show association between a reactive expression-level trait and the clinical trait of interest and the power to map expression

  10. In Vivo Flow Mapping in Complex Vessel Networks by Single Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; Inverso, Donato; D'Alfonso, Laura; Pozzi, Paolo; Cotelli, Franco; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method (FLICS, FLow Image Correlation Spectroscopy) to extract flow speeds in complex vessel networks from a single raster-scanned optical xy-image, acquired in vivo by confocal or two-photon excitation microscopy. Fluorescent flowing objects produce diagonal lines in the raster-scanned image superimposed to static morphological details. The flow velocity is obtained by computing the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) of the intensity fluctuations detected in pairs of columns of the image. The analytical expression of the CCF has been derived by applying scanning fluorescence correlation concepts to drifting optically resolved objects and the theoretical framework has been validated in systems of increasing complexity. The power of the technique is revealed by its application to the intricate murine hepatic microcirculatory system where blood flow speed has been mapped simultaneously in several capillaries from a single xy-image and followed in time at high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:25475129

  11. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  12. Drone based structural mapping at Holuhraun indicates fault reactivation and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Daniel; Walter, Thomas R.; Steinke, Bastian; Witt, Tanja; Schoepa, Anne; Duerig, Tobi; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.

    2016-04-01

    Accompanied by an intense seismic swarm in August 2014, a dike laterally formed, starting under Icelands Vatnajökull glacier, propagating over a distance of more than 45 km within only two weeks, leading to the largest eruption by volume since the 1783-84 Laki eruption. Along its propagation path, the dike caused intense surface displacements up to meters. Based on seismicity, GPS and InSAR, the propagation has already been analysed and described as segmented lateral dike growth. We now focus on few smaller regions of the dike. We consider the Terrasar-X tandem digital elevation map and aerial photos and find localized zones where structural fissures formed and curved. At these localized, regions we performed a field campaign in summer 2015, applying the close range remote sensing techniques Structure from Motion (SfM) and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). Over 4 TLS scan were collected, along with over 5,000 aerial images. Point clouds from SfM and TLS are merged and compared, and local structural lineaments analysed. As a result, we obtained an unprecedentedly high-resolution digital elevation map. With this map, we analyse the structural expression of the fissure eruption at the surface and improve understanding on the conditions that influenced the magma propagation path. We elaborate scenarios that lead to complexities of the surface structures and the link to the underlying dike intrusion.

  13. Web mapping system for complex processing and visualization of environmental geospatial datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Alexander; Gordov, Evgeny; Okladnikov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Environmental geospatial datasets (meteorological observations, modeling and reanalysis results, etc.) are used in numerous research applications. Due to a number of objective reasons such as inherent heterogeneity of environmental datasets, big dataset volume, complexity of data models used, syntactic and semantic differences that complicate creation and use of unified terminology, the development of environmental geodata access, processing and visualization services as well as client applications turns out to be quite a sophisticated task. According to general INSPIRE requirements to data visualization geoportal web applications have to provide such standard functionality as data overview, image navigation, scrolling, scaling and graphical overlay, displaying map legends and corresponding metadata information. It should be noted that modern web mapping systems as integrated geoportal applications are developed based on the SOA and might be considered as complexes of interconnected software tools for working with geospatial data. In the report a complex web mapping system including GIS web client and corresponding OGC services for working with geospatial (NetCDF, PostGIS) dataset archive is presented. There are three basic tiers of the GIS web client in it: 1. Tier of geospatial metadata retrieved from central MySQL repository and represented in JSON format 2. Tier of JavaScript objects implementing methods handling: --- NetCDF metadata --- Task XML object for configuring user calculations, input and output formats --- OGC WMS/WFS cartographical services 3. Graphical user interface (GUI) tier representing JavaScript objects realizing web application business logic Metadata tier consists of a number of JSON objects containing technical information describing geospatial datasets (such as spatio-temporal resolution, meteorological parameters, valid processing methods, etc). The middleware tier of JavaScript objects implementing methods for handling geospatial

  14. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Steven J.; Ma, Jiong; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE). Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D) movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT) techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms. PMID:25393401

  15. SBGNViz: A Tool for Visualization and Complexity Management of SBGN Process Description Maps

    PubMed Central

    Dogrusoz, Ugur; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Babur, Özgün; Demir, Emek

    2015-01-01

    Background Information about cellular processes and pathways is becoming increasingly available in detailed, computable standard formats such as BioPAX and SBGN. Effective visualization of this information is a key recurring requirement for biological data analysis, especially for -omic data. Biological data analysis is rapidly migrating to web based platforms; thus there is a substantial need for sophisticated web based pathway viewers that support these platforms and other use cases. Results Towards this goal, we developed a web based viewer named SBGNViz for process description maps in SBGN (SBGN-PD). SBGNViz can visualize both BioPAX and SBGN formats. Unique features of SBGNViz include the ability to nest nodes to arbitrary depths to represent molecular complexes and cellular locations, automatic pathway layout, editing and highlighting facilities to enable focus on sub-maps, and the ability to inspect pathway members for detailed information from EntrezGene. SBGNViz can be used within a web browser without any installation and can be readily embedded into web pages. SBGNViz has two editions built with ActionScript and JavaScript. The JavaScript edition, which also works on touch enabled devices, introduces novel methods for managing and reducing complexity of large SBGN-PD maps for more effective analysis. Conclusion SBGNViz fills an important gap by making the large and fast-growing corpus of rich pathway information accessible to web based platforms. SBGNViz can be used in a variety of contexts and in multiple scenarios ranging from visualization of the results of a single study in a web page to building data analysis platforms. PMID:26030594

  16. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R 2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  17. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  18. A complete DNA sequence map of the ovine Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ovine Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) harbors clusters of genes involved in overall resistance/susceptibility of an animal to infectious pathogens. However, only a limited number of ovine MHC genes have been identified and no adequate sequence information is available, as compared to those of swine and bovine. We previously constructed a BAC clone-based physical map that covers entire class I, class II and class III region of ovine MHC. Here we describe the assembling of a complete DNA sequence map for the ovine MHC by shotgun sequencing of 26 overlapping BAC clones. Results DNA shotgun sequencing generated approximately 8-fold genome equivalent data that were successfully assembled into a finished sequence map of the ovine MHC. The sequence map spans approximately 2,434,000 nucleotides in length, covering almost all of the MHC loci currently known in the sheep and cattle. Gene annotation resulted in the identification of 177 protein-coding genes/ORFs, among which 145 were not previously reported in the sheep, and 10 were ovine species specific, absent in cattle or other mammals. A comparative sequence analyses among human, sheep and cattle revealed a high conservation in the MHC structure and loci order except for the class II, which were divided into IIa and IIb subregions in the sheep and cattle, separated by a large piece of non-MHC autosome of approximately 18.5 Mb. In addition, a total of 18 non-protein-coding microRNAs were predicted in the ovine MHC region for the first time. Conclusion An ovine MHC DNA sequence map was successfully assembled by shotgun sequencing of 26 overlapping BAC clone. This makes the sheep the second ruminant species for which the complete MHC sequence information is available for evolution and functional studies, following that of the bovine. The results of the comparative analysis support a hypothesis that an inversion of the ancestral chromosome containing the MHC has shaped the MHC structures of ruminants

  19. Super-resolution mapping of scaffold nucleoporins in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Kelich, Joseph M; Junod, Samuel L; Yang, Weidong

    2017-02-15

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), composed of ∼30 different nucleoporins (Nups), is one of the largest supramolecular structures in eukaryotic cells. Its octagonal ring-scaffold perforates the nuclear envelope and features a unique molecular machinery that regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the precise copy number and the spatial location of each Nup in the native NPC remain obscure due to the inherent difficulty of counting and localizing proteins inside the sub-micrometer supramolecular complex. Here we combined super-resolution SPEED microscopy and nanobody specific labeling to reveal the spatial distribution of scaffold Nups within three separate layers in the native NPC with a precision of ∼3 nm. Our data reveals both the radial and axial spatial distributions for Pom121, Nup37 and Nup35 and provides evidence for their copy numbers of 8, 32, and 16 respectively per NPC. This approach can help pave the path for mapping the entirety of Nups in native NPCs and also other structural components of macromolecular complexes.

  20. Comprehensive QTL mapping survey dissects the complex fruit texture physiology in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Longhi, Sara; Moretto, Marco; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo; Costa, Fabrizio

    2012-02-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex physiological process in plants whereby cell wall programmed changes occur mainly to promote seed dispersal. Cell wall modification also directly regulates the textural properties, a fundamental aspect of fruit quality. In this study, two full-sib populations of apple, with 'Fuji' as the common maternal parent, crossed with 'Delearly' and 'Pink Lady', were used to understand the control of fruit texture by QTL mapping and in silico gene mining. Texture was dissected with a novel high resolution phenomics strategy, simultaneously profiling both mechanical and acoustic fruit texture components. In 'Fuji × Delearly' nine linkage groups were associated with QTLs accounting from 15.6% to 49% of the total variance, and a highly significant QTL cluster for both textural components was mapped on chromosome 10 and co-located with Md-PG1, a polygalacturonase gene that, in apple, is known to be involved in cell wall metabolism processes. In addition, other candidate genes related to Md-NOR and Md-RIN transcription factors, Md-Pel (pectate lyase), and Md-ACS1 were mapped within statistical intervals. In 'Fuji × Pink Lady', a smaller set of linkage groups associated with the QTLs identified for fruit texture (15.9-34.6% variance) was observed. The analysis of the phenotypic variance over a two-dimensional PCA plot highlighted a transgressive segregation for this progeny, revealing two QTL sets distinctively related to both mechanical and acoustic texture components. The mining of the apple genome allowed the discovery of the gene inventory underlying each QTL, and functional profile assessment unravelled specific gene expression patterns of these candidate genes.

  1. Electronic sensor and actuator webs for large-area complex geometry cardiac mapping and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Lu, Nanshu; Wang, Shuodao; Lee, Stephen P.; Keum, Hohyun; D’Angelo, Robert; Klinker, Lauren; Su, Yewang; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Yun-Soung; Ameen, Abid; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Yihui; de Graff, Bassel; Hsu, Yung-Yu; Liu, ZhuangJian; Ruskin, Jeremy; Xu, Lizhi; Lu, Chi; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Huang, Yonggang; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Rogers, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Curved surfaces, complex geometries, and time-dynamic deformations of the heart create challenges in establishing intimate, nonconstraining interfaces between cardiac structures and medical devices or surgical tools, particularly over large areas. We constructed large area designs for diagnostic and therapeutic stretchable sensor and actuator webs that conformally wrap the epicardium, establishing robust contact without sutures, mechanical fixtures, tapes, or surgical adhesives. These multifunctional web devices exploit open, mesh layouts and mount on thin, bio-resorbable sheets of silk to facilitate handling in a way that yields, after dissolution, exceptionally low mechanical moduli and thicknesses. In vivo studies in rabbit and pig animal models demonstrate the effectiveness of these device webs for measuring and spatially mapping temperature, electrophysiological signals, strain, and physical contact in sheet and balloon-based systems that also have the potential to deliver energy to perform localized tissue ablation. PMID:23150574

  2. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a transcription strategy for late genes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zoe H; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D; Krogan, Nevan J; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-01-22

    Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers, and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle.

  3. Extrinsic Sources of Cholinergic Innervation of the Striatal Complex: A Whole-Brain Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dautan, Daniel; Hacioğlu Bay, Husniye; Bolam, J. Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V.; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the striatal complex plays an important role in normal behavior and is affected in a number of neurological disorders. Although early studies suggested that acetylcholine in the striatum (STR) is derived almost exclusively from cholinergic interneurons (CIN), recent axonal mapping studies using conditional anterograde tracing have revealed the existence of a prominent direct cholinergic pathway from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. The identification of the importance of this pathway is essential for creating a complete model of cholinergic modulation in the striatum, and it opens the question as to whether other populations of cholinergic neurons may also contribute to such modulation. Here, using novel viral tracing technologies based on phenotype-specific fluorescent reporter expression in combination with retrograde tracing, we aimed to define other sources of cholinergic innervation of the striatum. Systematic mapping of the projections of all cholinergic structures in the brain (Ch1 to Ch8) by means of conditional tracing of cholinergic axons, revealed that the only extrinsic source of cholinergic innervation arises in the brainstem pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Our results thus place the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal nuclei in a key and exclusive position to provide extrinsic cholinergic modulation of the activity of the striatal systems. PMID:26834571

  4. Semi-automatic mapping for identifying complex geobodies in seismic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-C, Raymundo; Romero-Salcedo, Manuel; Velasquillo-Martínez, Luis G.; Shemeretov, Leonid

    2017-03-01

    Seismic images are composed of positive and negative seismic wave traces with different amplitudes (Robein 2010 Seismic Imaging: A Review of the Techniques, their Principles, Merits and Limitations (Houten: EAGE)). The association of these amplitudes together with a color palette forms complex visual patterns. The color intensity of such patterns is directly related to impedance contrasts: the higher the contrast, the higher the color intensity. Generally speaking, low impedance contrasts are depicted with low tone colors, creating zones with different patterns whose features are not evident for a 3D automated mapping option available on commercial software. In this work, a workflow for a semi-automatic mapping of seismic images focused on those areas with low-intensity colored zones that may be associated with geobodies of petroleum interest is proposed. The CIE L*A*B* color space was used to perform the seismic image processing, which helped find small but significant differences between pixel tones. This process generated binary masks that bound color regions to low-intensity colors. The three-dimensional-mask projection allowed the construction of 3D structures for such zones (geobodies). The proposed method was applied to a set of digital images from a seismic cube and tested on four representative study cases. The obtained results are encouraging because interesting geobodies are obtained with a minimum of information.

  5. Linkage mapping and physical localization of the major histocompatibility complex region of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, N; Deakin, J E; Miska, K B; Miller, R D; Kammerer, C M; Graves, J A M; VandeBerg, J L; Samollow, P B

    2006-01-01

    We used genetic linkage mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to conduct the first analysis of genic organization and chromosome localization of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of a marsupial, the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica. Family based linkage analyses of two M. domestica MHC Class I genes (UA1, UG) and three MHC Class II genes (DAB, DMA, and DMB) revealed that these genes were tightly linked and positioned in the central region of linkage group 3 (LG3). This cluster of MHC genes was physically mapped to the centromeric region of chromosome 2q by FISH using a BAC clone containing the UA1 gene. An interesting finding from the linkage analyses is that sex-specific recombination rates were virtually identical within the MHC region. This stands in stark contrast to the genome-wide situation, wherein males exhibit approximately twice as much recombination as females, and could have evolutionary implications for maintaining equality between males and females in the ability to generate haplotype diversity in this region. These analyses also showed that three non-MHC genes that flank the MHC region on human chromosome 6, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and prolactin (PRL), are split among two separate linkage groups (chromosomes) in M. domestica. Comparative analysis with eight other vertebrate species suggests strong conservation of the BMP6-PRL synteny among birds and mammals, although the BMP6-PRL-MHC-ME1 synteny is not conserved.

  6. LARGE-SCALE CO MAPS OF THE LUPUS MOLECULAR CLOUD COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Tothill, N. F. H.; Loehr, A.; Stark, A. A.; Lane, A. P.; Harnett, J. I.; Bourke, T. L.; Myers, P. C.; Parshley, S. C.; Wright, G. A.; Walker, C. K.

    2009-11-01

    Fully sampled degree-scale maps of the {sup 13}CO 2-1 and CO 4-3 transitions toward three members of the Lupus Molecular Cloud Complex-Lupus I, III, and IV-trace the column density and temperature of the molecular gas. Comparison with IR extinction maps from the c2d project requires most of the gas to have a temperature of 8-10 K. Estimates of the cloud mass from {sup 13}CO emission are roughly consistent with most previous estimates, while the line widths are higher, around 2 km s{sup -1}. CO 4-3 emission is found throughout Lupus I, indicating widespread dense gas, and toward Lupus III and IV. Enhanced line widths at the NW end and along the edge of the B 228 ridge in Lupus I, and a coherent velocity gradient across the ridge, are consistent with interaction between the molecular cloud and an expanding H I shell from the Upper-Scorpius subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB Association. Lupus III is dominated by the effects of two HAe/Be stars, and shows no sign of external influence. Slightly warmer gas around the core of Lupus IV and a low line width suggest heating by the Upper-Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen, without the effects of an H I shell.

  7. Airborne mapping of shallow water bathymetry in the optically complex waters of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahtmäe, Ele; Kutser, Tiit

    2016-04-01

    Accurate determination of the water depth is important for marine spatial planning, producing maritime charts for navigation, seabed morphology studies, and carrying out different activities in the coastal waters. Bathymetric data are lacking foremost in the shallow water regions as those areas are often inaccessible to the hydrographic ships carrying out echo sounding measurements. Remote sensing technology can be used as an alternative for shallow water bathymetry mapping. Varieties of empirical methods have been proposed for bathymetry retrieval, where the relationship between remotely sensed radiance of the water body and the water depth at sampled locations was established empirically. Two most widely used depth derivation methods, the linear band model proposed by Lyzenga (1978, 1985, 2006), and the log-transformed band ratio model proposed by Stumpf et al. (2003), were applied to the different preprocessing level airborne Hyspex hyperspectral images from the optically complex Baltic Sea area and evaluated for accuracy. Results showed that the Lyzenga linear band model outperformed the Stumpf log-transformed band ratio model. The best results were achieved with the atmospherically corrected images. The application of glint correction did not improve, but even reduced the accuracy of bathymetric maps.

  8. Mapping of Muslim Bagh ophiolite complex (Pakistan) using new remote sensing, and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Mahmood, Khalid; Casey, John F.

    2007-04-01

    TETHYS is a relational GIS database that combines geophysical, remote sensing, geochemical, and geochronological data, developed as a flexible resource for studying magmatic and geodynamic responses to continental collisions. In this paper, we demonstrate utility of our database by integrating field, remote sensing, and structural data, for detailed mapping and tectonic emplacement of Muslim Bagh ophiolite of western Pakistan. This ophiolite forms the uppermost part of a nappe pile which accreted onto the Indian continental margin during the closure of the Neo-Tethys during a pre-terminal collision that predated the final closure of Tethys during the major collision between India and Eurasia. Utilizing the TETHYS, Landsat, ASTER imagery, and a digital elevation model developed from the ASTER data are used to characterize the lithology and structure of the area. Use of image processing techniques improved the geologic map of the area, for a better understanding of the tectonic emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite. For the first time we report that the dikes in the Muslim Bagh ophiolite are cutting the metamorphic sole. Our preliminary geochemical data for sheeted dike complex suggest chemical affinities with arc-related rocks. This observation suggests that dikes were intruded in an island arc environment soon after the ophiolite was formed.

  9. Integrating aeromagnetic and Landsat™ 8 data into subsurface structural mapping of Precambrian basement complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayode, John Stephen; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Abdullah, Khiruddin B.; Khalil, Amin E.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of Aeromagnetic data and remotely sensed imagery with the intents of mapping the subsurface geological structures in part of the South-western basement complex of Nigeria was developed using the PCI Geomatica Software. 2013. The data obtained from the Nigerian Geological Survey Agency; was corrected using Regional Residual Separation of the Total Magnetic field anomalies enhanced, and International Geomagnetic Reference Field removed. The principal objective of this study is, therefore, to introduce a rapid and efficient method of subsurface structural depth estimate and structural index evaluation through the incorporation of the Euler Deconvolution technique into PCI Geomatica 2013 to prospect for subsurface geological structures. The shape and depth of burial helped to define these structures from the regional aeromagnetic map. The method enabled various structural indices to be automatically delineated for an index of between 0.5 SI and 3.0 SI at a maximum depth of 1.1 km that clearly showed the best depths estimate for all the structural indices. The results delineate two major magnetic belts in the area; the first belt shows an elongated ridge-like structure trending mostly along the NorthNortheast-SouthSouthwest and the other anomalies trends primarily in the Northeast, Northwest, Northeast-Southwest parts of the study area that could be attributed to basement complex granitic intrusions from the tectonic history of the area. The majority of the second structures showed various linear structures different from the first structure. Basically, a significant offset was delineated at the core segment of the study area, suggesting a major subsurface geological feature that controls mineralisation in this area.

  10. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  11. A velocity map ion imaging study of difluorobenzene-water complexes: binding energies and recoil distributions.

    PubMed

    Bellm, Susan M; Moulds, Rebecca J; van Leeuwen, Matthew P; Lawrance, Warren D

    2008-03-21

    The binding energies of the p-, m-, and o-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes have been measured by velocity map ion imaging to be 922+/-10, 945+/-10, and 891+/-4 cm(-1), respectively. The lack of variation provides circumstantial evidence for water binding to the three isomers via the same interaction, viz. an in-plane O-H...F hydrogen bond to one of the fluorine atoms on the ring, with a second, weaker interaction of the water O atom with an ortho hydrogen, as determined previously for the p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complex [Kang et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 767 (2005)]. The ground state binding energies for the difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are approximately 5%-11% larger than that for benzene-H(2)O, where binding occurs to the pi electrons out-of-plane. However, in the S(1) state the binding energies of the o- and p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are smaller than the benzene-H(2)O value, raising an interesting question about whether the geometry at the global energy minimum remains in-plane in the excited electronic states of these two complexes. Recoil energy distributions for dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O have been measured from the 3(1), 5(2), and 3(1)5(1) levels of the excited electronic state. These levels are 490, 880, and 1304 cm(-1), respectively, above the dissociation threshold. Within the experimental uncertainty, the recoil energy distributions are the same for dissociation from these three states, with average recoil energies of approximately 100 cm(-1). These recoil energies are 60% larger than was observed for the dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-Ar, which is a substantially smaller increase than the 400% seen in a comparable study of dissociation within the triplet state for pyrazine-Ar, -H(2)O complexes. The majority of the available energy is partitioned into vibration and rotation of the fragments.

  12. Improving wait times to care for individuals with multimorbidities and complex conditions using value stream mapping

    PubMed Central

    Sampalli, Tara; Desy, Michel; Dhir, Minakshi; Edwards, Lynn; Dickson, Robert; Blackmore, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recognizing the significant impact of wait times for care for individuals with complex chronic conditions, we applied a LEAN methodology, namely – an adaptation of Value Stream Mapping (VSM) to meet the needs of people with multiple chronic conditions and to improve wait times without additional resources or funding. Methods: Over an 18-month time period, staff applied a patient-centric approach that included LEAN methodology of VSM to improve wait times to care. Our framework of evaluation was grounded in the needs and perspectives of patients and individuals waiting to receive care. Patient centric views were obtained through surveys such as Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) and process engineering based questions. In addition, LEAN methodology, VSM was added to identify non-value added processes contributing to wait times. Results: The care team successfully reduced wait times to 2 months in 2014 with no wait times for care anticipated in 2015. Increased patient engagement and satisfaction are also outcomes of this innovative initiative. In addition, successful transformations and implementation have resulted in resource efficiencies without increase in costs. Patients have shown significant improvements in functional health following Integrated Chronic Care Service (ICCS) intervention. The methodology will be applied to other chronic disease management areas in Capital Health and the province. Conclusion: Wait times to care in the management of multimoribidities and other complex conditions can add a significant burden not only on the affected individuals but also on the healthcare system. In this study, a novel and modified LEAN methodology has been applied to embed the voice of the patient in care delivery processes and to reduce wait times to care in the management of complex chronic conditions. PMID:26188810

  13. QTL mapping - Current status and challenges: Comment on "Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system" by L. Sun and R. Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nianjun

    2015-06-01

    One of the important objectives of genetic study is to understand the underlying mechanism of complex traits. However, complex traits are complex in terms of their mechanisms. First, multiple genetic variants are involved in different ways. In addition to the main effects (such as additive and dominant effects), these genetic variants may interact with each other [1-4], they may have pleiotropic effects [5,6], there may be genomic imprinting (a phenomenon where some genes are expressed or repressed depending on their parental origin) [7-9] and epigenetic effects [10-14]. In addition, environment often fits in via gene by environment interaction [15,16]. A more complicated genetic interaction between QTLs is from different genomes, i.e. the genome-genome interaction which may involve genomes from the same organisms or even different organisms [17-19]. Biology is multifactorial and dynamic. Complex traits are closely related to developmental changes in an organism's ontogeny, giving time an important role in the formation of complex traits. From the point of view of ecology, the formation of complex traits is extremely complex involving not only the genes of an individual but also the genotypes of its neighbors that co-occur with it [17,18,20-23]. Such complexity makes QTL mapping very challenging.

  14. Multi-area visuotopic map complexes in macaque striate and extra-striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Polimeni, J.R.; Balasubramanian, M.; Schwartz, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    We propose that a simple, closed-form mathematical expression—the Wedge–Dipole mapping—provides a concise approximation to the full-field, two-dimensional topographic structure of macaque V1, V2, and V3. A single map function, which we term a map complex, acts as a simultaneous descriptor of all three areas. Quantitative estimation of the Wedge–Dipole parameters is provided via 2DG data of central-field V1 topography and a publicly available data set of full-field macaque V1 and V2 topography. Good quantitative agreement is obtained between the data and the model presented here. The increasing importance of fMRI-based brain imaging motivates the development of more sophisticated two-dimensional models of cortical visuotopy, in contrast to the one-dimensional approximations that have been in common use. One reason is that topography has traditionally supplied an important aspect of “ground truth,” or validation, for brain imaging, suggesting that further development of high-resolution fMRI will be facilitated by this data analysis. In addition, several important insights into the nature of cortical topography follow from this work. The presence of anisotropy in cortical magnification factor is shown to follow mathematically from the shared boundary conditions at the V1–V2 and V2–V3 borders, and therefore may not causally follow from the existence of columnar systems in these areas, as is widely assumed. An application of the Wedge–Dipole model to localizing aspects of visual processing to specific cortical areas—extending previous work in correlating V1 cortical magnification factor to retinal anatomy or visual psychophysics data—is briefly discussed. PMID:16831455

  15. Fine Mapping Major Histocompatibility Complex Associations in Psoriasis and Its Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Han, Buhm; Tsoi, Lam C.; Stuart, Philip E.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Chandran, Vinod; Pellett, Fawnda; Pollock, Remy; Bowcock, Anne M.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J.; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K.; Franke, Andre; Nair, Rajan P.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C∗06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10−364). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C∗06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C∗12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p < 5.0 × 10−8), but no apparent risk conferred by MICA. We further evaluated risk of two major clinical subtypes of PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (pomnibus = 2.2 × 10−11), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC. PMID:25087609

  16. Super-Interpolation With Edge-Orientation-Based Mapping Kernels for Low Complex 2× Upscaling.

    PubMed

    Jae-Seok Choi; Munchurl Kim

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of ultrahigh-definition (UHD) video services, super-resolution (SR) techniques are often required to generate high-resolution (HR) images from low-resolution (LR) images, such as HD images. To generate such HR images and a video of UHD resolutions in limited computing devices with hardware and software, low complex but excellent SR methods are particularly required. In this paper, we present a novel and fast SR method, called super-interpolation (SI), by unifying an interpolation step and a quality-enhancement step. The proposed SI method utilizes edge-orientation (EO)-based pre-learned kernels, which inherits the simplicity of interpolation and the quality enhancement of SR. It performs SR directly from the initial resolution of an input image to the target resolution of an up-scaled output image without requiring any intermediate interpolated image. The proposed SI method involves offline training and online up-scaling phases. In the offline training phase, training LR image patches are clustered based on their edge orientations into different EO classes for which class-dependent linear mapping functions are learned between training LR and HR image patches. In up-scaling phase, an HR output image patch for each LR input image patch is generated by applying an appropriate linear mapping function selected based on the EO of LR input image patch. Our proposed SI method is intensively compared with the ten state-of-the-art SR methods for common image sets and many HD/UHD images. The experimental results show that the SI method yields the smallest running time and requires relatively small hardware resources. It outperforms the six state-of-the-art methods in average (peak signal-to-noise ratio) PSNR/(structural similarity) SSIM, and exhibits competitive or somewhat lower PSNR/SSIM performance compared with the others.

  17. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Mapping Vesta South Polar Quadrangle V-15SP: A Complex Geological Structure Dominates Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Yingst, R.; Schenk, P.; Schmedemann, N.; Williams, D. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Buczkowski, D.; Stephan, K.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Neukum, G.; O'Brien, D. P.; Mest, S. C.; Krohn, K.; Marchi, S.; Filacchione, G.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; De Sanctis, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    Images of the asteroid and protoplanet 4Vesta by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1994 and 1996 revealed a ~460 km diameter feature at its south pole that was interpreted to be a large impact structure. NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid Vesta on July 15, 2011 and collected science data during the approach to Vesta, a circular polar orbit at an altitude of 2700 km providing ~ 230 m/pix camera resolution and a lower main mapping orbit, at 700 km altitude with a camera resolution of ~ 65 m/pixel. As part of the geological analysis of Vesta's surface, a series of 15 quadrangle maps are being produced. We present the results of the geological mapping achieved for quadrangle V-15SP. Unit boundaries and feature characteristics were determined primarily using morphologic data. Color and spectral data was utilized to refine unit contacts and to separate compositional or mineralogical distinctions. Those units that could be discerned both in morphology and in the color data were interpreted as geologically derived units. The south polar feature is a semi-circular structure with a central hill that is characterized by a white-grey color and smoother texture distinctive from the surrounding terrain. Some images show patches of bright, smooth terrain on the central hill, perhaps indicative of impact melt or ponded volcanic flows. A complex network of deep grooves and ridges is the primary characteristic on the feature floor; these grooves appear radial to the central mound or trend along a north-south line. The structure also has a distinctive color from both the central hill and surrounding terrain, consistent with a different composition or texture. A steep semi-arcuate scarp bounds part of the outer perimeter of the south polar feature. Although asymmetric in general form, these characteristics do not contradict an impact origin but may also allow endogenic processes like convective downwelling or hybrid modification of an impact. Rapid rotation of Vesta during

  19. Does Visualization Enhance Complex Problem Solving? The Effect of Causal Mapping on Performance in the Computer-Based Microworld Tailorshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öllinger, Michael; Hammon, Stephanie; von Grundherr, Michael; Funke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Causal mapping is often recognized as a technique to support strategic decisions and actions in complex problem situations. Such drawing of causal structures is supposed to particularly foster the understanding of the interaction of the various system elements and to further encourage holistic thinking. It builds on the idea that humans make use…

  20. The Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits in Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis): New Evidence from Association Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous association analyses showed that variation at major regulatory genes contributes to standing variation for complex traits in Balsas teosinte, the progenitor of maize. This study expands our previous association mapping effort in teosinte by testing 123 markers in 52 candidate genes for ...

  1. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  2. Mapping Complexity: the Wavy Edges of the Encke and Keeler Gaps in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrey, Paul A.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Burns, J. A.; Porco, C. C.

    2008-05-01

    The edges of the Keeler and Encke gaps of Saturn's A Ring are significantly disturbed as the embedded moons (Daphnis and Pan, respectively) interact with the adjacent dense rings. Cassini images of these edges reveal the structure to be much more complex than predicted by analytical perturbation theory (Tiscareno et al 2005, DPS). In the Encke Gap, we see both amplitude and frequency modulations of the expected monochromatic sinusoid, as well as some sharper "glitches” in the pattern. In the Keeler Gap, the expected 32-lobed pattern in the inner edge due to a resonance with Prometheus is "lumpy” and asymmetric, while the outer edge features sharp-edged asymmetric "wisps". Much of the unexpected structure may be due to the superposition of multiple patterns, each moving with its own frequency. Determination of these pattern speeds will help us to identify the source of the perturbations, and may help us better appreciate the transfer of angular momentum between dense particle disks and embedded moons. We will present high-resolution maps of these edges covering all longitudes and at many points in time.

  3. Spectral transformation of ASTER and Landsat TM bands for lithological mapping of Soghan ophiolite complex, south Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pournamdari, Mohsen; Hashim, Mazlan; Pour, Amin Beiranvand

    2014-08-01

    Spectral transformation methods, including correlation coefficient (CC) and Optimum Index Factor (OIF), band ratio (BR) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to ASTER and Landsat TM bands for lithological mapping of Soghan ophiolitic complex in south of Iran. The results indicated that the methods used evidently showed superior outputs for detecting lithological units in ophiolitic complexes. CC and OIF methods were used to establish enhanced Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color combination bands for discriminating lithological units. A specialized band ratio (4/1, 4/5, 4/7 in RGB) was developed using ASTER bands to differentiate lithological units in ophiolitic complexes. The band ratio effectively detected serpentinite dunite as host rock of chromite ore deposits from surrounding lithological units in the study area. Principal component images derived from first three bands of ASTER and Landsat TM produced well results for lithological mapping applications. ASTER bands contain improved spectral characteristics and higher spatial resolution for detecting serpentinite dunite in ophiolitic complexes. The developed approach used in this study offers great potential for lithological mapping using ASTER and Landsat TM bands, which contributes in economic geology for prospecting chromite ore deposits associated with ophiolitic complexes.

  4. Remote mineralogic and lithologic mapping of the Ice River alkaline complex, British Columbia, Canada, using AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, T.L.; Rowan, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Ice River Alkaline Complex is a late Paleozoic intrusion of mafic alkaline rocks, syenite, and carbonatite exposed in southeastern British Columbia, Canada. The complex intrudes Cambrian and Ordovician shales, slates, and limestones of the Chancellor and Ottertail Formations and the McKay Group. We examined the alkaline complex and adjacent country rocks using Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. The data were first calibrated to relative reflectance and then used to spectrally map mineralogies in the study area by using a linear spectral unmixing program. This technique models each pixel spectrum in an AVIRIS image as a linear combination of unique endmember spectra. We selected endmember spectra from well-exposed and spectrally distinct mineralogic units, vegetation, and snow. Four of the endmembers reflect mineralogic variations within the McKay group in the study area, and may represent lateral and vertical variations of sedimentary or metamorphic facies. Otherwise, the resultant spatial distribution of endmembers shows generally close agreement with the published geologic map, although, in several places, our image-map is more accurate than the published map.

  5. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03–0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem. PMID:26482794

  6. Genome-wide association mapping of leaf metabolic profiles for dissecting complex traits in maize

    PubMed Central

    Riedelsheimer, Christian; Lisec, Jan; Czedik-Eysenberg, Angelika; Sulpice, Ronan; Flis, Anna; Grieder, Christoph; Altmann, Thomas; Stitt, Mark; Willmitzer, Lothar; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of metabolites found in plants is by far greater than in most other organisms. Metabolic profiling techniques, which measure many of these compounds simultaneously, enabled investigating the regulation of metabolic networks and proved to be useful for predicting important agronomic traits. However, little is known about the genetic basis of metabolites in crops such as maize. Here, a set of 289 diverse maize inbred lines was genotyped with 56,110 SNPs and assayed for 118 biochemical compounds in the leaves of young plants, as well as for agronomic traits of mature plants in field trials. Metabolite concentrations had on average a repeatability of 0.73 and showed a correlation pattern that largely reflected their functional grouping. Genome-wide association mapping with correction for population structure and cryptic relatedness identified for 26 distinct metabolites strong associations with SNPs, explaining up to 32.0% of the observed genetic variance. On nine chromosomes, we detected 15 distinct SNP–metabolite associations, each of which explained more then 15% of the genetic variance. For lignin precursors, including p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, we found strong associations (P values to ) with a region on chromosome 9 harboring cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in monolignol synthesis and a target for improving the quality of lignocellulosic biomass by genetic engineering approaches. Moreover, lignin precursors correlated significantly with lignin content, plant height, and dry matter yield, suggesting that metabolites represent promising connecting links for narrowing the genotype–phenotype gap of complex agronomic traits. PMID:22615396

  7. Advances in Complex-Resistivity Mapping and Characterization of Permafrost (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.; Stillman, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    the pathway. Temperature also strongly affects the inferred ice content but the frequency of the dielectric relaxation gives an independent temperature estimate. Complex resistivity is therefore a promising approach to permafrost monitoring and mapping of lateral and vertical variations in ice content.

  8. Sex Differences in Infants' Mapping of Complex Occlusion Sequences: Further Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Recently, infant researchers have reported sex differences in infants' capacity to map their representation of an occlusion sequence onto a subsequent no-occlusion display. The research reported here sought to identify the extent to which these sex differences are observed in event-mapping tasks and to identify the underlying basis for these…

  9. Proteome map of the neural complex of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, the closest living relative to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Dupont, Sam; Meghah, Vuppalapaty; Lakshmi, Mula G Meena; Singh, Sachin K; Swamy, Cherukuvada V Brahmendra; Idris, Mohammed M

    2013-03-01

    Ciona intestinalis (the common sea squirt) is the closest living chordate relative to vertebrates with cosmopolitan presence worldwide. It has a relatively simple nervous system and development, making it a widely studied alternative model system in neuroscience and developmental biology. The use of Ciona as a model organism has increased significantly after the draft genome was published. In this study, we describe the first proteome map of the neural complex of C. intestinalis. A total of 544 proteins were identified based on 1DE and 2DE FTMS/ITMSMS analyses. Proteins were annotated against the Ciona database and analyzed to predict their molecular functions, roles in biological processes, and position in constructed network pathways. The identified Ciona neural complex proteome was found to map onto vertebrate nervous system pathways, including cytoskeleton remodeling neurofilaments, cell adhesion through the histamine receptor signaling pathway, γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor life cycle neurophysiological process, glycolysis, and amino acid metabolism. The proteome map of the Ciona neural complex is the first step toward a better understanding of several important processes, including the evolution and regeneration capacity of the Ciona nervous system.

  10. Mapping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Genetic Diversity Profiles in Tanzania and Other African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mbugi, Erasto V.; Katale, Bugwesa Z.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Keyyu, Julius D.; Kendall, Sharon L.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Michel, Anita L.; Rweyemamu, Mark M.; Warren, Robin M.; Matee, Mecky I.; van Helden, Paul D.; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotypic diversity in Tanzania, as well as in neighbouring East and other several African countries. We used spoligotyping to identify a total of 293 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (one isolate per patient) collected in the Bunda, Dar es Salaam, Ngorongoro and Serengeti areas in Tanzania. The results were compared with results in the SITVIT2 international database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Genotyping and phylogeographical analyses highlighted the predominance of the CAS, T, EAI, and LAM MTBC lineages in Tanzania. The three most frequent Spoligotype International Types (SITs) were: SIT21/CAS1-Kili (n = 76; 25.94%), SIT59/LAM11-ZWE (n = 22; 7.51%), and SIT126/EAI5 tentatively reclassified as EAI3-TZA (n = 18; 6.14%). Furthermore, three SITs were newly created in this study (SIT4056/EAI5 n = 2, SIT4057/T1 n = 1, and SIT4058/EAI5 n = 1). We noted that the East-African-Indian (EAI) lineage was more predominant in Bunda, the Manu lineage was more common among strains isolated in Ngorongoro, and the Central-Asian (CAS) lineage was more predominant in Dar es Salaam (p-value<0.0001). No statistically significant differences were noted when comparing HIV status of patients vs. major lineages (p-value = 0.103). However, when grouping lineages as Principal Genetic Groups (PGG), we noticed that PGG2/3 group (Haarlem, LAM, S, T, and X) was more associated with HIV-positive patients as compared to PGG1 group (Beijing, CAS, EAI, and Manu) (p-value = 0.03). This study provided mapping of MTBC genetic diversity in Tanzania (containing information on isolates from different cities) and neighbouring East African and other several African countries highlighting differences as regards to MTBC genotypic distribution between Tanzania and other African countries. This work also allowed underlining of spoligotyping patterns tentatively grouped within the newly designated EAI3-TZA

  11. Mapping water quality and substrate cover in optically complex coastal and reef waters: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Phinn, S R; Dekker, A G; Brando, V E; Roelfsema, C M

    2005-01-01

    Sustainable management of coastal and coral reef environments requires regular collection of accurate information on recognized ecosystem health indicators. Satellite image data and derived maps of water column and substrate biophysical properties provide an opportunity to develop baseline mapping and monitoring programs for coastal and coral reef ecosystem health indicators. A significant challenge for satellite image data in coastal and coral reef water bodies is the mixture of both clear and turbid waters. A new approach is presented in this paper to enable production of water quality and substrate cover type maps, linked to a field based coastal ecosystem health indicator monitoring program, for use in turbid to clear coastal and coral reef waters. An optimized optical domain method was applied to map selected water quality (Secchi depth, Kd PAR, tripton, CDOM) and substrate cover type (seagrass, algae, sand) parameters. The approach is demonstrated using commercially available Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper image data over a coastal embayment exhibiting the range of substrate cover types and water quality conditions commonly found in sub-tropical and tropical coastal environments. Spatially extensive and quantitative maps of selected water quality and substrate cover parameters were produced for the study site. These map products were refined by interactions with management agencies to suit the information requirements of their monitoring and management programs.

  12. Thermal mapping: the hydrothermal system of a volcano used to map faults and palaeostructures within stratified ground. The Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Vanuatu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Peltier, Aline; Finizola, Anthony; Brothelande, Elodie; Garaebiti, Esline

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements provide a valuable tool to map hydrothermal-fluid release zones in activevolcanic areas. On explosive volcanoes, where ash fall layers deposit parallel to the ground surface, hydrothermal fluids are trapped in the stratification due to the variations in permeability in deposits of the different explosive phases. Thermal fluids thus travel parallel to the surface close to the ground. This horizontal flux can only escape when faults break the seals of stratification. On the Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Tanna Island, Vanuatu archipelago), fumaroles andhot springs abound, signs of upraising heat fluxes associated to a well-developed hydrothermal activity. Combinationof high resolution mapping of ground thermal anomalies with geomorphological analysis allows thecharacterization of the structural relationships between the active Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome. A complex system of heat release and hydrothermal fluid circulation below the Yasur-Yenkahe complex isevidenced. Circulation, though propagating vertically as a whole, is funneled by stratification. Thus, the main thermal fluid release is almost exclusively concentrated along structural limits that break the seals inducedby the stratified nature of the ground. Three types of medium/high temperature anomalies have beenevidenced: (1) broad hydrothermalized areas linked with planar stratification that favor lateral spreading,(2) linear segments that represent active faults, and (3) arcuate segments related to paleo-crater rims. Thelimit between the Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome is characterized by an active fault systemaccommodating both the rapid uplift of the Yenkahe block and the overloading induced by the volcanoweight. In such a setting, faults converge below the cone of Yasur, which acts as a focus for the faults. Evidenceof such structures, sometimes hidden in the landscape but detected by thermal measurements, iscritical for risk assessment of

  13. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  14. Mapping the Gulf of Maine with side-scan sonar: A new bottom-type classification for complex seafloors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Kelley, J.T.; Dickson, S.M.; Belknap, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bedrock-framed seafloor in the northwestern Gulf of Maine is characterized by extreme changes in bathymetric relief and covered with a wide variety of surficial materials. Traditional methods of mapping cannot accurately represent the great heterogeneity of such a glaciated region. A new mapping scheme for complex seafloors, based primarily on the interpretation of side-scan sonar imagery, utilizes four easily recognized units: rock, gravel, sand and mud. In many places, however, the seafloor exhibits a complicated mixture or extremely 'patchy' distribution of the four basic units, which are too small to map individually. Twelve composite units, each a two-component mixture of the basic units, were established to represent this patchiness at a small scale (1:100,000). Using a geographic information system, these and all other available data (seismic profiles, grab samples, submersible dives and cores) were referenced to a common geographic base, superimposed on bathymetric contours and then integrated into surficial geologic maps of the regional inner continental shelf. This digital representation of the seafloor comprises a multidimensional, interactive model complete with explicit attributes (depth, bottom type) that allow for detailed analysis of marine environments.

  15. Extensive recombination rate variation in the house mouse species complex inferred from genetic linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Beth L; White, Michael A; Steffy, Brian; Wiltshire, Tim; Payseur, Bret A

    2011-01-01

    The rate of recombination is a key genomic parameter that displays considerable variation among taxa. Species comparisons have demonstrated that the rate of evolution in recombination rate is strongly dependent on the physical scale of measurement. Individual recombination hotspots are poorly conserved among closely related taxa, whereas genomic-scale recombination rate variation bears a strong signature of phylogenetic history. In contrast, the mode and tempo of evolution in recombination rates measured on intermediate physical scales is poorly understood. Here, we conduct a detailed statistical comparison between two whole-genome F₂ genetic linkage maps constructed from experimental intercrosses between closely related house mouse subspecies (Mus musculus). Our two maps profile a common wild-derived inbred strain of M. m. domesticus crossed to distinct wild-derived inbred strains representative of two other house mouse subspecies, M. m. castaneus and M. m. musculus. We identify numerous orthologous genomic regions with significant map length differences between these two crosses. Because the genomes of these recently diverged house mice are highly collinear, observed differences in map length (centimorgans) are suggestive of variation in broadscale recombination rate (centimorgans per megabase) within M. musculus. Collectively, these divergent intervals span 19% of the house mouse genome, disproportionately aggregating on the X chromosome. In addition, we uncover strong statistical evidence for a large effect, sex-linked, site-specific modifier of recombination rate segregating within M. musculus. Our findings reveal considerable variation in the megabase-scale recombination landscape among recently diverged taxa and underscore the continued importance of genetic linkage maps in the post-genome era.

  16. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, Natalie E.; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  17. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets.

    PubMed

    Latysh, Natalie E; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  18. Heritability and Demographic Analyses in the Large Isolated Population of Val Borbera Suggest Advantages in Mapping Complex Traits Genes

    PubMed Central

    Masciullo, Corrado; Cverhova, Valeria; Lori, Francesca; Pistis, Giorgio; Bione, Silvia; Gasparini, Paolo; Ulivi, Sheila; Ciullo, Marina; Nutile, Teresa; Bosi, Emanuele; Sirtori, Marcella; Mignogna, Giovanna; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Buetti, Iwan; Camaschella, Clara; Petretto, Enrico; Toniolo, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Background Isolated populations are a useful resource for mapping complex traits due to shared stable environment, reduced genetic complexity and extended Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) compared to the general population. Here we describe a large genetic isolate from the North West Apennines, the mountain range that runs through Italy from the North West Alps to the South. Methodology/Principal Findings The study involved 1,803 people living in 7 villages of the upper Borbera Valley. For this large population cohort, data from genealogy reconstruction, medical questionnaires, blood, anthropometric and bone status QUS parameters were evaluated. Demographic and epidemiological analyses indicated a substantial genetic component contributing to each trait variation as well as overlapping genetic determinants and family clustering for some traits. Conclusions/Significance The data provide evidence for significant heritability of medical relevant traits that will be important in mapping quantitative traits. We suggest that this population isolate is suitable to identify rare variants associated with complex phenotypes that may be difficult to study in larger but more heterogeneous populations. PMID:19847309

  19. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  20. An Argument for the Use of Chaos Theory To Map the Complexity of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaten, James A.; And Others

    Noting that the chance to utilize a new paradigm is an opportunity that rarely presents itself, this paper suggests that chaos theory and communication can be combined to help understand human communication. The paper begins by examining the complexity of human communication--that is, the internal and external factors that affect the complexity of…

  1. Intracortical Microstimulation Maps of Motor, Somatosensory, and Posterior Parietal Cortex in Tree Shrews (Tupaia belangeri) Reveal Complex Movement Representations.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mary K L; Cooke, Dylan F; Krubitzer, Leah

    2017-02-01

    Long-train intracortical microstimulation (LT-ICMS) is a popular method for studying the organization of motor and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in mammals. In primates, LT-ICMS evokes both multijoint and multiple-body-part movements in primary motor, premotor, and PPC. In rodents, LT-ICMS evokes complex movements of a single limb in motor cortex. Unfortunately, very little is known about motor/PPC organization in other mammals. Tree shrews are closely related to both primates and rodents and could provide insights into the evolution of complex movement domains in primates. The present study investigated the extent of cortex in which movements could be evoked with ICMS and the characteristics of movements elicited using both short train (ST) and LT-ICMS in tree shrews. We demonstrate that LT-ICMS and ST-ICMS maps are similar, with the movements elicited with ST-ICMS being truncated versions of those elicited with LT-ICMS. In addition, LT-ICMS-evoked complex movements within motor cortex similar to those in rodents. More complex movements involving multiple body parts such as the hand and mouth were also elicited in motor cortex and PPC, as in primates. Our results suggest that complex movement networks present in PPC and motor cortex were present in mammals prior to the emergence of primates.

  2. From the Cover: Simplifying the representation of complex free-energy landscapes using sketch-map.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Tribello, Gareth A; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-08-09

    A new scheme, sketch-map, for obtaining a low-dimensional representation of the region of phase space explored during an enhanced dynamics simulation is proposed. We show evidence, from an examination of the distribution of pairwise distances between frames, that some features of the free-energy surface are inherently high-dimensional. This makes dimensionality reduction problematic because the data does not satisfy the assumptions made in conventional manifold learning algorithms We therefore propose that when dimensionality reduction is performed on trajectory data one should think of the resultant embedding as a quickly sketched set of directions rather than a road map. In other words, the embedding tells one about the connectivity between states but does not provide the vectors that correspond to the slow degrees of freedom. This realization informs the development of sketch-map, which endeavors to reproduce the proximity information from the high-dimensionality description in a space of lower dimensionality even when a faithful embedding is not possible.

  3. Dynamic semiparametric Bayesian models for genetic mapping of complex trait with irregular longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Das, Kiranmoy; Li, Jiahan; Fu, Guifang; Wang, Zhong; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2013-02-10

    Many phenomena of fundamental importance to biology and biomedicine arise as a dynamic curve, such as organ growth and HIV dynamics. The genetic mapping of these traits is challenged by longitudinal variables measured at irregular and possibly subject-specific time points, in which case nonnegative definiteness of the estimated covariance matrix needs to be guaranteed. We present a semiparametric approach for genetic mapping within the mixture-model setting by jointly modeling mean and covariance structures for irregular longitudinal data. Penalized spline is used to model the mean functions of individual quantitative trait locus (QTL) genotypes as latent variables, whereas an extended generalized linear model is used to approximate the covariance matrix. The parameters for modeling the mean-covariances are estimated by MCMC, using the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We derive the full conditional distributions for the mean and covariance parameters and compute Bayes factors to test the hypothesis about the existence of significant QTLs. We used the model to screen the existence of specific QTLs for age-specific change of body mass index with a sparse longitudinal data set. The new model provides powerful means for broadening the application of genetic mapping to reveal the genetic control of dynamic traits.

  4. Feasibility of DINSAR for mapping complex motion fields of alpine ice- and rock-glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Thomas; Mayer, Christoph; Rott, Helmut

    2002-01-01

    Possibilities and methods of differential SAR interferometry (DINSAR) for mapping the motion of alpine ice and rock glaciers of small spatial extent were investigated. Test sites for these studies were the glacier Hintereisferner (covering 8 km2 in area) and several of its small side glaciers, and the rock glaciers Inner and Outer Hochebenkar, located in the Ötztaler mountains, Austria. For mapping the motion of the ice glaciers only one-day repeat pass SAR images from the ERS Tandem Mission, acquired during winter, were useful. 35-day repeat pass interferometric images did not show sufficient coherence. On the rock glaciers the coherence is preserved over longer periods. 35-day ERS SAR repeat pass interferograms from summer were used for motion analysis. The topographic phase was derived by differential methods using several one-day tandem pairs and applying the multi-baseline technique. The surface-parallel flow assumption was used for estimating the velocity vectors. The accuracy of the interferometric motion is assessed by comparison with field measurements and aerial photogrammetric analysis. The detail of the interferometric maps, but spaceborne DINSAR is a very cost-effective tool for comprehensive regional surveys and monitoring of ice and rock glaciers with good accuracy.

  5. Mapping the UV Photophysics of Platinum Metal Complexes Bound to Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ananya; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    We report the first UV laser spectroscopic study of isolated gas-phase complexes of Platinum metal complex anions bound to a nucleobase as model systems for exploring at the molecular level the key photophysical processes involved in photodynamic therapy. Spectra of the PtIV CN 6 2 - • Uracil and PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil complexes were acquired across the 220 -320 nm range using mass-selective photodepletion and photofragment action spectroscopy. The spectra of both complexes reveal prominent UV absorption bands that we assign primarily to excitation of the Uracil π - π * localized chromophore. Distinctive UV photofragments are observed for the complexes, with PtIV CN 6 2 - • Uracil photoexcitation resulting in complex fission, while PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil photoexcitation initiates a nucleobase proton-transfer reaction across 4.4 -5.2 eV and electron detachment above 5.2 eV. The observed photofragments are consistent with ultrafast decay of a Uracil localized excited state back to the electronic ground state followed by intramolecular vibrational relaxation and ergodic complex fragmentation. In addition, we present recent results to explore how the photophysics of the Platinum complex-nucleobase clusters evolves as a function of nucleobase. Results are presented for PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil complexed to Cytosine, Thymine and Adenine, reveal distinctive decay dynamics which we attribute to the intrinsic decay dynamics of the nucleobase. JPC. Lett. 2014, 5, 3281 to 3285 and PCCP 2014, 16, 15490 to 15500.

  6. Using geomorphology to map plant community distribution in complex polygonal tundra landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, V. L.; Gangodagamage, C.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change over the next century is expected to substantially alter Arctic ecosystem structure and function, resulting in important feedbacks to global climate. Representing Arctic landscapes in the carbon cycle and climate models, however, is challenging because vegetation and soils vary over small spatial scales. Robust approaches are needed for identifying distinct plant communities for fine-scale model parameterizations, and for mapping the distribution of these communities to enable scaling from plot to grid-cell. Here, we demonstrate how a novel technique using LiDAR-derived metrics to delineate micro-topographic features can also be applied to mapping plant community distribution in a polygonal tundra landscape on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), Alaska. We recorded species composition in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located across contrasting ice-wedge polygon types on the BEO in July 2012. One-way cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling identified four major plant communities, namely i) tall Carex (sedge) dominated communities, ii) mixed tall graminoid-forb-moss communities, iii) dry graminoid-lichen communities and iv) low-stature, lichen dominated-communities. These communities were strongly linked to micro-topography, corresponding with i) low centers ii) troughs, iii) rims and transitional polygon centers, and iv) high centers. We therefore combined plant community type with geomorphological analyses using high-resolution LiDAR-derived metrics (e.g. slope, curvature, flowpath distances) to delineate micro-topographic features to produce a vegetation map. The map was verified using 24 field survey transects in which plant community boundaries were mapped using DGPS. The approach performed well, with only a small (5%) over-estimate of the extent of trough communities and a corresponding under-estimate of rim and transitional center communities. Overall, these analyses provide a framework which can be used for parameterizing fine

  7. Studying Spectral Variability of an Igneous Stratified Complex as a Tool to Map Lunar Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Sgavetti, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Serventi, G.

    2012-07-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper data have revealed different portion of magmatic chambers or separate plutons. We analysed Stillwater Complex (SWC) rock suite. Spectral signatures and spectral parameters could help to interpret the new spectral lunar data.

  8. Use of Tabu Search in a Solver to Map Complex Networks onto Emulab Testbeds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    nodes [3]. Non-random distribution of connectivity among nodes, associativity among nodes, node clustering and evidence of a hierarchical structure ...hierarchical structures . 8 • Complex networks usually have a large number of nodes. The number of nodes can sometimes total in the hundreds, thousands...from the network. Complex networks are used to describe numerous systems found throughout na- ture and society. The routing structure of the Internet

  9. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  10. Near-real-time mapping of GNSS products from an area of complex topography for operational meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradellas, E.; Téllez, B.; Valdés, M.

    2009-04-01

    Triggering of severe convection is often focalized in areas of moisture convergence. On the other hand, the inflow of wet air usually plays an important role in the fog onset, even in typical events of radiation fog. Therefore, knowledge of the spatial distribution of atmospheric humidity is crucial to the operational forecaster, especially in the weather nowcasting at regions of complex topography. Radiosonde measurements are very sparse and present a limited time resolution of 6 or 12 hours. Near-real-time mapping of the vertically-integrated water vapour (IWV) retrieved from ground-based GNSS observations is an alternative way to present information on the horizontal distribution of humidity with a high time resolution. On average, nearly half the total atmospheric water is between sea level and a 1.5-km height. Therefore, the horizontal distribution of water vapour is strongly modulated by the topography. In the Iberian Peninsula, an area of complex topography, the penetration of shallow air masses of maritime origin through passes underneath mountain ranges is a common mechanism of moistening the air of inland regions. This fact makes difficult to build a realistic map of IWV without a high-resolution network of GNSS receivers. A method to smooth the dependence on height of the magnitude to be interpolated is presented here. The method is based on the decomposition of any IWV value into a constant statistical average and a variable part. The mean geographical distribution of IWV is computed from the dataset of daily averages at the different stations. Since this dataset usually presents some gaps, the estimation of the mean values and covariance matrix is performed together with the imputation of the missing values using an iterative method based on a regularized maximization-expectation algorithm. A linear regression yields a model accounting for the statistical dependence of the mean values on latitude, longitude and altitude. The model residuals are then

  11. CauseMap: fast inference of causality from complex time series.

    PubMed

    Maher, M Cyrus; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Background. Establishing health-related causal relationships is a central pursuit in biomedical research. Yet, the interdependent non-linearity of biological systems renders causal dynamics laborious and at times impractical to disentangle. This pursuit is further impeded by the dearth of time series that are sufficiently long to observe and understand recurrent patterns of flux. However, as data generation costs plummet and technologies like wearable devices democratize data collection, we anticipate a coming surge in the availability of biomedically-relevant time series data. Given the life-saving potential of these burgeoning resources, it is critical to invest in the development of open source software tools that are capable of drawing meaningful insight from vast amounts of time series data. Results. Here we present CauseMap, the first open source implementation of convergent cross mapping (CCM), a method for establishing causality from long time series data (≳25 observations). Compared to existing time series methods, CCM has the advantage of being model-free and robust to unmeasured confounding that could otherwise induce spurious associations. CCM builds on Takens' Theorem, a well-established result from dynamical systems theory that requires only mild assumptions. This theorem allows us to reconstruct high dimensional system dynamics using a time series of only a single variable. These reconstructions can be thought of as shadows of the true causal system. If reconstructed shadows can predict points from opposing time series, we can infer that the corresponding variables are providing views of the same causal system, and so are causally related. Unlike traditional metrics, this test can establish the directionality of causation, even in the presence of feedback loops. Furthermore, since CCM can extract causal relationships from times series of, e.g., a single individual, it may be a valuable tool to personalized medicine. We implement CCM in Julia, a

  12. The Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits in Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis): New Evidence From Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Allison L.; Briggs, William H.; Rucker, Jesse; Baltazar, Baltazar M.; de Jesús Sánchez-Gonzalez, José; Feng, Ping; Buckler, Edward S.; Doebley, John

    2008-01-01

    Previous association analyses showed that variation at major regulatory genes contributes to standing variation for complex traits in Balsas teosinte, the progenitor of maize. This study expands our previous association mapping effort in teosinte by testing 123 markers in 52 candidate genes for association with 31 traits in a population of 817 individuals. Thirty-three significant associations for markers from 15 candidate genes and 10 traits survive correction for multiple testing. Our analyses suggest several new putative causative relationships between specific genes and trait variation in teosinte. For example, two ramosa genes (ra1 and ra2) associate with ear structure, and the MADS-box gene, zagl1, associates with ear shattering. Since zagl1 was previously shown to be a target of selection during maize domestication, we suggest that this gene was under selection for its effect on the loss of ear shattering, a key domestication trait. All observed effects were relatively small in terms of the percentage of phenotypic variation explained (<10%). We also detected several epistatic interactions between markers in the same gene that associate with the same trait. Candidate-gene-based association mapping appears to be a promising method for investigating the inheritance of complex traits in teosinte. PMID:18791250

  13. Regional heritability mapping and genome-wide association identify loci for complex growth, wood and disease resistance traits in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Azevedo, Camila Ferreira; Takahashi, Elizabete Keiko; Silva-Junior, Orzenil Bonfim; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the decoding of the relationships between sequence variation and complex phenotypes, they have explained little heritability. Regional heritability mapping (RHM) provides heritability estimates for genomic segments containing both common and rare allelic effects that individually contribute too little variance to be detected by GWAS. We carried out GWAS and RHM for seven growth, wood and disease resistance traits in a breeding population of 768 Eucalyptus hybrid trees using EuCHIP60K. Total genomic heritabilities accounted for large proportions (64-89%) of pedigree-based trait heritabilities, providing additional evidence that complex traits in eucalypts are controlled by many sequence variants across the frequency spectrum, each with small contributions to the phenotypic variance. RHM detected 26 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encompassing 2191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whereas GWAS detected 13 single SNP-trait associations. RHM and GWAS QTLs individually explained 5-15% and 4-6% of the genomic heritability, respectively. RHM was superior to GWAS in capturing larger proportions of genomic heritability. Equated to previously mapped QTLs, our results highlighted genomic regions for further examination towards gene discovery. RHM-QTLs bearing a combination of common and rare variants could be useful enhancements to incorporate prior knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture in genomic prediction models.

  14. Lithologic mapping of the Mordor, NT, Australia ultramafic complex by using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Mars, J.C.; Simpson, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral measurements made in the Mordor Pound, NT, Australia study area using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), in the laboratory and in situ show dominantly Al-OH and ferric-iron VNIR-SWIR absorption features in felsic rock spectra and ferrous-iron and Fe,Mg-OH features in the mafic-ultramafic rock spectra. ASTER ratio images, matched-filter, and spectral-angle mapper processing (SAM) were evaluated for mapping the lithologies. Matched-filter processing in which VNIR + SWIR image spectra were used for reference resulted in 4 felsic classes and 4 mafic-ultramafic classes based on Al-OH or Fe,Mg-OH absorption features and, in some, subtle reflectance differences related to differential weathering and vegetation. These results were similar to those obtained by match-filter analysis of HyMap data from a previous study, but the units were more clearly demarcated in the HyMap image. ASTER TIR spectral emittance data and laboratory emissivity measurements document a wide wavelength range of Si-O spectral features, which reflect the lithological diversity of the Mordor ultramafic complex and adjacent rocks. SAM processing of the spectral emittance data distinguished 2 classes representing the mafic-ultramafic rocks and 4 classes comprising the quartzose to intermediate composition rocks. Utilization of the complementary attributes of the spectral reflectance and spectral emittance data resulted in discrimination of 4 mafic-ultramafic categories; 3 categories of alluvial-colluvial deposits; and a significantly more completely mapped quartzite unit than could be accomplished by using either data set alone. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mapping of the epitopes of poliovirus type 2 in complex with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Ludovic; Girerd-Chambaz, Yves; Arteni, Ana; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Ronzon, Frederic; Manin, Catherine; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) contains poliovirus (PV) samples that belong to serotypes 1, 2 and 3. All three serotypes contain the D-antigen, which induces protective antibodies. The antigenic structure of PVs consists of at least four different antigenic sites and the D-antigen content represents the combined activity of multiple epitopes (Ferguson et al., 1993; Minor, 1990; Minor et al., 1986). The potency of IPV vaccines is determined by measuring the D-antigen content. Several ELISA methods have been developed using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in order to quantify the D-antigen content. Characterization of the epitopes recognized by the different Mabs is crucial to map the entire virus surface and ensure the presence of epitopes able to induce neutralizing antibodies. Using a new approach that we developed to study the interaction between monoclonal antibodies and poliovirus type 2, which combines cryo-electron microscopy, image analysis and X-ray crystallography along with identification of exposed amino acids, we have mapped in 3D the epitope sites recognized by three specific Fabs at the surface of poliovirus type 2 (PV2) and characterized precisely the antigenic sites for these Fabs.

  16. Human Interactive Analysis Using Video: Mapping the Dynamics of Complex Work Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, William R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains human interactive analysis as an architecture for using computer interactive technologies in the analysis of complex work environments. A project at the Naval Training Systems Center that used video-audio data to develop a multimedia database is described; the analysis and management of data are discussed; and decision processes are…

  17. Unraveling the Complex Trait of Harvest Index with Association Mapping in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobai; Yan, Wengui; Agrama, Hesham; Jia, Limeng; Jackson, Aaron; Moldenhauer, Karen; Yeater, Kathleen; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Harvest index is a measure of success in partitioning assimilated photosynthate. An improvement of harvest index means an increase in the economic portion of the plant. Our objective was to identify genetic markers associated with harvest index traits using 203 O. sativa accessions. The phenotyping for 14 traits was conducted in both temperate (Arkansas) and subtropical (Texas) climates and the genotyping used 154 SSRs and an indel marker. Heading, plant height and weight, and panicle length had negative correlations, while seed set and grain weight/panicle had positive correlations with harvest index across both locations. Subsequent genetic diversity and population structure analyses identified five groups in this collection, which corresponded to their geographic origins. Model comparisons revealed that different dimensions of principal components analysis (PCA) affected harvest index traits for mapping accuracy, and kinship did not help. In total, 36 markers in Arkansas and 28 markers in Texas were identified to be significantly associated with harvest index traits. Seven and two markers were consistently associated with two or more harvest index correlated traits in Arkansas and Texas, respectively. Additionally, four markers were constitutively identified at both locations, while 32 and 24 markers were identified specifically in Arkansas and Texas, respectively. Allelic analysis of four constitutive markers demonstrated that allele 253 bp of RM431 had significantly greater effect on decreasing plant height, and 390 bp of RM24011 had the greatest effect on decreasing panicle length across both locations. Many of these identified markers are located either nearby or flanking the regions where the QTLs for harvest index have been reported. Thus, the results from this association mapping study complement and enrich the information from linkage-based QTL studies and will be the basis for improving harvest index directly and indirectly in rice. PMID:22291889

  18. X-ray fluorescence microscopy artefacts in elemental maps of topologically complex samples: Analytical observations, simulation and a map correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billè, Fulvio; Kourousias, George; Luchinat, Enrico; Kiskinova, Maya; Gianoncelli, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    XRF spectroscopy is among the most widely used non-destructive techniques for elemental analysis. Despite the known angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), topological artefacts remain an unresolved issue when using X-ray micro- or nano-probes. In this work we investigate the origin of the artefacts in XRF imaging of topologically complex samples, which are unresolved problems in studies of organic matter due to the limited travel distances of low energy XRF emission from the light elements. In particular we mapped Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK293T) cells. The exemplary results with biological samples, obtained with a soft X-ray scanning microscope installed at a synchrotron facility were used for testing a mathematical model based on detector response simulations, and for proposing an artefact correction method based on directional derivatives. Despite the peculiar and specific application, the methodology can be easily extended to hard X-rays and to set-ups with multi-array detector systems when the dimensions of surface reliefs are in the order of the probing beam size.

  19. Interactome Mapping Reveals the Evolutionary History of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Obado, Samson O.; Brillantes, Marc; Uryu, Kunihiro; Zhang, Wenzhu; Ketaren, Natalia E.; Chait, Brian T.; Field, Mark C.; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport and constitutes a hub for control of gene expression. The components of NPCs from several eukaryotic lineages have been determined, but only the yeast and vertebrate NPCs have been extensively characterized at the quaternary level. Significantly, recent evidence indicates that compositional similarity does not necessarily correspond to homologous architecture between NPCs from different taxa. To address this, we describe the interactome of the trypanosome NPC, a representative, highly divergent eukaryote. We identify numerous new NPC components and report an exhaustive interactome, allowing assignment of trypanosome nucleoporins to discrete NPC substructures. Remarkably, despite retaining similar protein composition, there are exceptional architectural dissimilarities between opisthokont (yeast and vertebrates) and excavate (trypanosomes) NPCs. Whilst elements of the inner core are conserved, numerous peripheral structures are highly divergent, perhaps reflecting requirements to interface with divergent nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. Moreover, the trypanosome NPC has almost complete nucleocytoplasmic symmetry, in contrast to the opisthokont NPC; this may reflect divergence in RNA export processes at the NPC cytoplasmic face, as we find evidence supporting Ran-dependent mRNA export in trypanosomes, similar to protein transport. We propose a model of stepwise acquisition of nucleocytoplasmic mechanistic complexity and demonstrate that detailed dissection of macromolecular complexes provides fuller understanding of evolutionary processes. PMID:26891179

  20. Modeling and hazard mapping of complex cascading mass movement processes: the case of glacier lake 513, Carhuaz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Demian; Huggel, Christian; García, Javier; Ludeña, Sebastian; Cochachin, Alejo

    2013-04-01

    that complex cascades of mass movement processes can realistically be modeled using different models and model parameters. The method to semi-automatically produce hazard maps is promising and should be applied in other case studies. Verification of model based results in the field remains an important requirement. Results from this study are important for the GLOF early warning system that is currently in an implementation phase, and for risk reduction efforts in general.

  1. Mapping Microbial Populations Relative to Sites of Ongoing Serpentinization: Results from the Tablelands Ophiolite Complex, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Brazelton, W. J.; Woodruff, Q.; Szponar, N.; Morrill, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    The aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks (serpentinization) has been suggested to be a favorable process for the habitability of astrobodies in our solar system including subsurface environments of Mars and Europa. Serpentinization produces copious quantities of hydrogen and small organic molecules, and leads to highly reducing, highly alkaline conditions (up to pH 12) and a lack of dissolved inorganic carbon, which both stimulates and challenges microbial activities. Several environments on Earth provide insight into the relationships between serpentinization and microbial life including slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and ophiolite materials emplaced along continental margins. The Tablelands, an ophiolite in western Newfoundland, Canada provides an opportunity to carefully document and map the relationships between geochemical energy, microbial growth, and physiology. Alkaline fluids at the Tablelands originate from 500-million year old oceanic crust and accumulate in shallow pools or seep from beneath serpentinized talus. Fluids, rocks, and gases were collected from the Tablelands during a series of field excursions in 2009 and 2010, and geochemical, microscopic, molecular, and cultivation-based approaches were used to study the serpentinite microbial ecosystem. These samples provide an opportunity to generate a comprehensive map of microbial communities and their activities in space and time. Data indicate that a low but detectable stock of microorganisms inhabit high pH pools associated with end-member serpentinite fluids. Enrichment cultures yielded brightly pigmented colonies related to Alphaproteobacteria, presumably carrying out anoxygenic photosynthesis, and Firmicutes, presumably catalyzing the fermentation of organic matter. Culture-independent analyses of SSU rRNA using T-RFLP indicated low diversity communities of Firmicutes and Archaea in standing alkaline pools, communities of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria at high pH seeps, and

  2. Large-Scale In Silico Mapping of Complex Quantitative Traits in Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengyuan; Vikis, Haris; Lu, Yan; Wang, Daolong; You, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of common disease and disease-related quantitative traits will aid in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. The processs of gene discovery can be sped up by rapid and effective integration of well-defined mouse genome and phenome data resources. We describe here an in silico gene-discovery strategy through genome-wide association (GWA) scans in inbred mice with a wide range of genetic variation. We identified 937 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from a survey of 173 mouse phenotypes, which include models of human disease (atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, cancer and obesity) as well as behavioral, hematological, immunological, metabolic, and neurological traits. 67% of QTLs were refined into genomic regions <0.5 Mb with ∼40-fold increase in mapping precision as compared with classical linkage analysis. This makes for more efficient identification of the genes that underlie disease. We have identified two QTL genes, Adam12 and Cdh2, as causal genetic variants for atherogenic diet-induced obesity. Our findings demonstrate that GWA analysis in mice has the potential to resolve multiple tightly linked QTLs and achieve single-gene resolution. These high-resolution QTL data can serve as a primary resource for positional cloning and gene identification in the research community. PMID:17653278

  3. Mapping the HLA-DO/HLA-DM complex by FRET and mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Taejin; Macmillan, Henriette; Mortimer, Sarah E.; Jiang, Wei; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H.; Stern, Lawrence J.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DO (DO) is a nonclassic class II heterodimer that inhibits the action of the class II peptide exchange catalyst, HLA-DM (DM), and influences DM localization within late endosomes and exosomes. In addition, DM acts as a chaperone for DO and is required for its egress from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These reciprocal functions are based on direct DO/DM binding, but the topology of DO/DM complexes is not known, in part, because of technical limitations stemming from DO instability. We generated two variants of recombinant soluble DO with increased stability [zippered DOαP11A (szDOv) and chimeric sDO-Fc] and confirmed their conformational integrity and ability to inhibit DM. Notably, we found that our constructs, as well as wild-type sDO, are inhibitory in the full pH range where DM is active (4.7 to ∼6.0). To probe the nature of DO/DM complexes, we used intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and mutagenesis and identified a lateral surface spanning the α1 and α2 domains of szDO as the apparent binding site for sDM. We also analyzed several sDM mutants for binding to szDOv and susceptibility to DO inhibition. Results of these assays identified a region of DM important for interaction with DO. Collectively, our data define a putative binding surface and an overall orientation of the szDOv/sDM complex and have implications for the mechanism of DO inhibition of DM. PMID:22733780

  4. The genotype-phenotype map of yeast complex traits: basic parameters and the role of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wei-Chin; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-06-01

    Most phenotypic traits are controlled by many genes, but a global picture of the genotype-phenotype map (GPM) is lacking. For example, in no species do we know generally how many genes affect a trait and how large these effects are. It is also unclear to what extent GPMs are shaped by natural selection. Here we address these fundamental questions using the reverse genetic data of 220 morphological traits in 4,718 budding yeast strains, each of which lacks a nonessential gene. We show that 1) the proportion of genes affecting a trait varies from <1% to >30%, averaging 6%, 2) most traits are impacted by many more small-effect genes than large-effect genes, and 3) the mean effect of all nonessential genes on a trait decreases precipitously as the estimated importance of the trait to fitness increases. An analysis of 3,116 yeast gene expression traits in 754 gene-deletion strains reveals a similar pattern. These findings illustrate the power of genome-wide reverse genetics in genotype-phenotype mapping, uncover an enormous range of genetic complexity of phenotypic traits, and suggest that the GPM of cellular organisms has been shaped by natural selection for mutational robustness.

  5. Mapping the spatial overlap of excitons in a photosynthetic complex via coherent nonlinear frequency generation.

    PubMed

    Dawlaty, Jahan M; Bennett, Doran I G; Huxter, Vanessa M; Fleming, Graham R

    2011-07-28

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear spectroscopic method that is sensitive to exciton-exciton interactions in a Frenkel exciton system. Spatial overlap of one-exciton wavefunctions leads to coupling between them, resulting in two-exciton eigenstates that have the character of many single-exciton pairs. The mixed character of the two-exciton wavefunctions gives rise to a four-wave-mixing nonlinear frequency generation signal. When only part of the linear excitation spectrum of the complex is excited with three spectrally tailored pulses with separate spatial directions, a frequency-shifted third-order nonlinear signal emerges in the phase-matched direction. We employ the nonlinear response function formalism to show that the emergence of the signal is mediated by and carries information about the two-exciton eigenstates of the system. We report experimental results for nonlinear frequency generation in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic pigment-protein complex. Our theoretical analysis of the signal from FMO confirms that the emergence of the frequency-shifted signal is due to the interaction of spatially overlapped excitons. In this method, the signal intensity is directly measured in the frequency domain and does not require scanning of pulse delays or signal phase retrieval. The wavefunctions of the two-exciton states contain information about the spatial overlap of excitons and can be helpful in identifying coupling strengths and relaxation pathways. We propose this method as a facile experimental means of studying exciton correlations in systems with complicated electronic structures.

  6. Genomic mapping of binding regions for the Ecdysone receptor protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Gauhar, Zareen; Sun, Ling V.; Hua, Sujun; Mason, Christopher E.; Fuchs, Florian; Li, Tong-Ruei; Boutros, Michael; White, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the physical locations of the heterodimeric Ecdysone receptor/Ultraspiracle (ECR/USP) nuclear hormone receptor complex throughout the entire nonrepetitive genome of Drosophila melanogaster using a cell line (Kc167) that differentiates in response to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE). 20-HE, the natural ligand of this complex, controls major aspects of insect development, including molting, metamorphosis, and reproduction. Direct gene targets of 20-HE signaling were identified by combining this physical binding-site profiling with gene expression profiling after treatment with 20-HE. We found 502 significant regions of ECR/USP binding throughout the genome. Only 42% of these regions are nearby genes that are 20-HE responsive in these cells. However, at least three quarters of the remaining ECR/USP regions are near 20-HE-regulated genes in other tissue and cell types during metamorphosis, suggesting that binding at many regulatory elements in the genome is largely noncell-type specific. The majority (21/26) of the early targets of 20-HE encode transcriptional regulatory factors. To determine whether any of these targets are required for the morphological differentiation of these cells, we used RNAi to reduce the expression of each of the 26 early genes. Accordingly, we found that three direct targets of ECR/USP—hairy, vrille, and Hr4—are required for cellular differentiation in response to the hormone. Initial mutational analysis of vrille in vivo reveals that it is required for metamorphosis. PMID:19237466

  7. How to dissect complex traits and how to choose suitable mapping resources for system genetics?. Comment on "Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system" by L. Sun and R. Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eeuwijk, Fred

    2015-06-01

    Sun and Wu [1] present an integral approach to the mapping of complex traits. Phenotypic traits are components belonging to a system together with other components, with all these components being interconnected and interacting over time and across levels of biological organisation. Following the terminology of Sun and Wu, the system initiates with variation at the level of DNA sequences and terminates with variation at the level of end point phenotypes. In between, we find variation at the levels of gene-expression, proteins, and metabolites. Before arriving at the end point phenotypes, many biochemical pathways need to be regulated and endophenotypes synthesised. To resolve the genetic architecture of complex traits, they need to be studied in relation to their underlying components, their interactions with other traits, and their development over time. Crucial is the identification of the mechanisms that govern the system and how quantitative trait loci (QTL) influence those mechanisms. Sun and Wu propose for any biological system a methodological framework that predicts physiological and pathological phenotypes as well as the consequences of genetic and environmental changes and interventions. This framework consists in a system of differential equations that drives variation in components and their mutual interactions and leads to developmental and functional changes. The differential equations allow capturing the dynamics of end point phenotypes and endophenotypes in relation to time and/or environmental factors. Simultaneously, QTLs underlie the constants in the differential equations and thereby can change developmental trajectories and environmental dependencies.

  8. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 [sup 32]P- or [sup 33]P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  9. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-12-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  10. Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 2. Complexity of plume structures and its implications for mapping mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Chuan; van Keken, Peter E.

    2006-03-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis provides explanations for several major observations of surface volcanism. The dynamics of plumes with purely thermal origin has been well established, but our understanding of the role of compositional variations in the Earth's mantle on plume formation is still incomplete. In this study we explore the structures of plumes originating from a thermochemical boundary layer at the base of the mantle in an attempt to complement fluid dynamical studies of purely thermal plumes. Our numerical experiments reveal diverse characteristics of thermochemical plumes that frequently deviate from the classic features of plumes. In addition, owing to the interplay between the thermal and compositional buoyancy forces, the morphology, temperature, and flow fields in both the plume head and plume conduit are strongly time-dependent. The entrainment of the dense layer and secondary instabilities developed in the boundary layer contribute to lateral heterogeneities and enhance stirring processes in the plume head. Our models show that substantial topography of the compositional layer can develop simultaneously with the plumes. In addition, plumes may be present in the lower mantle for more than 70 million years. These features may contribute to the large low seismic velocity provinces beneath the south central Pacific, the southern Atlantic Ocean, and Africa. Our model results support the idea that the dynamics of mantle plumes is much more complicated than conventional thinking based on studies of purely thermal plumes. The widely used criteria for mapping mantle plumes, such as a vertically continuous low seismic velocity signature and strong surface topography swell, may not be universally applicable. We propose that the intrinsic density contrast of the distinct composition may reduce the associated topography of some large igneous provinces such as Ontong Java.

  11. Radiological Mapping of the Alkaline Intrusive Complex of Jombo, South Coastal Kenya by In-Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniu, Ian; Darby, Iain G.; Kalambuka Angeyo, Hudson

    2016-04-01

    Carbonatites and alkaline intrusive complexes are rich in a variety of mineral deposits such as rare earth elements (REEs), including Nb, Zr and Mn. These are often associated with U and Th bearing minerals, including monazite, samarskite and pyrochlore. Mining waste resulting from mineral processing activities can be highly radioactive and therefore poses a risk to human health and environment. The Jombo complex located in Kenya's south coastal region is potentially one of the richest sources of Nb and REEs in the world. It consists of the main intrusion at Jombo hill, three associated satellite intrusions at Mrima, Kiruku and Nguluku hills, and several dykes. The complex is highly heterogeneous with regard to its geological formation as it is characterized by alkaline igneous rocks and carbonatites which also influence its radio-ecological dynamics. In-situ gamma spectrometry offers a low-cost, rapid and spatially representative radioactivity estimate across a range of landscapes compared to conventional radiometric techniques. In this work, a wide ranging radiological survey was conducted in the Jombo complex as follow up on previous studies[1,2], to determine radiation exposure levels and source distributions, and perform radiological risk assessments. The in-situ measurements were carried out using a 2.0 l NaI(Tl) PGIS-2 portable detector from Pico Envirotec Inc integrated with GPS, deployed for ground (back-pack) and vehicular gamma-ray spectrometry. Preliminary results of radiological distribution and mapping will be presented. [1] Patel, J. P. (1991). Discovery and Innovation, 3(3): 31-35. [2] Kebwaro, J. M. et. al. (2011). J. Phys. Sci., 6(13): 3105-3110.

  12. Mapping the structure and dynamics of genomics-related MeSH terms complex networks.

    PubMed

    Siqueiros-García, Jesús M; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Robina-Galatas, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that the history and evolution of scientific ideas may reflect certain aspects of the underlying socio-cognitive frameworks in which science itself is developing. Systematic analyses of the development of scientific knowledge may help us to construct models of the collective dynamics of science. Aiming at scientific rigor, these models should be built upon solid empirical evidence, analyzed with formal tools leading to ever-improving results that support the related conclusions. Along these lines we studied the dynamics and structure of the development of research in genomics as represented by the entire collection of genomics-related scientific papers contained in the PubMed database. The analyzed corpus consisted in more than 49,000 articles published in the years 1987 (first appearance of the term Genomics) to 2011, categorized by means of the Medical Subheadings (MeSH) content-descriptors. Complex networks were built where two MeSH terms were connected if they are descriptors of the same article(s). The analysis of such networks revealed a complex structure and dynamics that to certain extent resembled small-world networks. The evolution of such networks in time reflected interesting phenomena in the historical development of genomic research, including what seems to be a phase-transition in a period marked by the completion of the first draft of the Human Genome Project. We also found that different disciplinary areas have different dynamic evolution patterns in their MeSH connectivity networks. In the case of areas related to science, changes in topology were somewhat fast while retaining a certain core-structure, whereas in the humanities, the evolution was pretty slow and the structure resulted highly redundant and in the case of technology related issues, the evolution was very fast and the structure remained tree-like with almost no overlapping terms.

  13. Geological Mapping of Impact Melt Deposits at Lunar Complex Craters: New Insights into Morphological Diversity, Distribution and the Cratering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, D.; Head, J. W., III; Pieters, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have completed high resolution geological mapping of impact melt deposits at the young lunar complex craters (<1 billion years) Copernicus, Jackson and Tycho using data from recent missions. Crater floors being the largest repository of impact melt, we have mapped their morphological diversity expressed in terms of varied surface texture, albedo, character and occurrence of boulder units as well as relative differences in floor elevation. Examples of wall and rim impact melt units and their relation to floor units have also been mapped. Among the distinctive features of these impact melt deposits are: 1) Impact Melt Wave Fronts: These are extensive (sometimes several kilometers in length) and we have documented their occurrence and distribution in different parts of the crater floor at Jackson and Tycho. These features emphasize melt mobility and style of emplacement during the modification stage of the craters. 2) Variations in Floor Elevations: Spatially extensive and coherent sections of crater floors have different elevations at all the three craters. The observed elevation differences could be caused by subsidence due to cooling of melt and/or structural failure, together with a contribution from regional slope. 3) Melt-Covered Megablocks: We also observe large blocks/rock-fragments (megablocks) covered in impact melt, which could be sections of collapsed wall or in some cases, subdued sections of central peaks. 4) Melt-Covered Central Peaks: Impact melt has also been mapped on the central peaks but varies in spatial extent among the craters. The presence of melt on peaks must be taken into account when interpreting peak mineralogy as exposures of deeper crust. 5) Boulder Distribution: Interesting trends are observed in the distribution of boulder units of various sizes; some impact melt units have spatially extensive boulders, while boulder distribution is very scarce in other units on the floor. We interpret these distributions to be influenced by a) the

  14. Mapping forest stand complexity for woodland caribou habitat assessment using multispectral airborne imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Hu, B.; Woods, M.

    2014-11-01

    The decline of the woodland caribou population is a result of their habitat loss. To conserve the habitat of the woodland caribou and protect it from extinction, it is critical to accurately characterize and monitor its habitat. Conventionally, products derived from low to medium spatial resolution remote sensing data, such as land cover classification and vegetation indices are used for wildlife habitat assessment. These products fail to provide information on the structure complexities of forest canopies which reflect important characteristics of caribou's habitats. Recent studies have employed the LiDAR system (Light Detection And Ranging) to directly retrieve the three dimensional forest attributes. Although promising results have been achieved, the acquisition cost of LiDAR data is very high. In this study, utilizing the very high spatial resolution imagery in characterizing the structural development the of forest canopies was exploited. A stand based image texture analysis was performed to predict forest succession stages. The results were demonstrated to be consistent with those derived from LiDAR data.

  15. A scheme for the uniform mapping and monitoring of earth resources and environmental complexes using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulton, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Welch, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Progress on plans for the development and testing of a practical procedure and system for the uniform mapping and monitoring of natural ecosystems and environmental complexes from space-acquired imagery is discussed. With primary emphasis on ERTS-1 imagery, but supported by appropriate aircraft photography as necessary, the objectives are to accomplish the following: (1) Develop and test in a few selected sites and areas of the western United States a standard format for an ecological and land use legend for making natural resource inventories on a simulated global basis. (2) Based on these same limited geographic areas, identify the potentialities and limitations of the legend concept for the recognition and annotation of ecological analogs and environmental complexes. An additional objective is to determine the optimum combination of space photography, aerial photography, ground data, human data analysis, and automatic data analysis for estimating crop yield in the rice growing areas of California and Louisiana.

  16. Disentangling regular and chaotic motion in the standard map using complex network analysis of recurrences in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yong; Donner, Reik V.; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Recurrence in the phase space of complex systems is a well-studied phenomenon, which has provided deep insights into the nonlinear dynamics of such systems. For dissipative systems, characteristics based on recurrence plots have recently attracted much interest for discriminating qualitatively different types of dynamics in terms of measures of complexity, dynamical invariants, or even structural characteristics of the underlying attractor's geometry in phase space. Here, we demonstrate that the latter approach also provides a corresponding distinction between different co-existing dynamical regimes of the standard map, a paradigmatic example of a low-dimensional conservative system. Specifically, we show that the recently developed approach of recurrence network analysis provides potentially useful geometric characteristics distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits. We find that chaotic orbits in an intermittent laminar phase (commonly referred to as sticky orbits) have a distinct geometric structure possibly differing in a subtle way from those of regular orbits, which is highlighted by different recurrence network properties obtained from relatively short time series. Thus, this approach can help discriminating regular orbits from laminar phases of chaotic ones, which presents a persistent challenge to many existing chaos detection techniques.

  17. Interpreting participatory Fuzzy Cognitive Maps as complex networks in the social-ecological systems of the Amazonian forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Consuelo; Tarquis, Ana M.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, Irene; Estebe, Paloma; Toledo, Marisol; Martorano, Lucieta

    2015-04-01

    Social-ecological systems are linked complex systems that represent interconnected human and biophysical processes evolving and adapting across temporal and spatial scales. In the real world, social-ecological systems pose substantial challenges for modeling. In this regard, Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCMs) have proven to be a useful method for capturing the functioning of this type of systems. FCMs are a semi-quantitative type of cognitive map that represent a system composed of relevant factors and weighted links showing the strength and direction of cause-effects relationships among factors. Therefore, FCMs can be interpreted as complex system structures or complex networks. In this sense, recent research has applied complex network concepts for the analysis of FCMs that represent social-ecological systems. Key to FCM the tool is its potential to allow feedback loops and to include stakeholder knowledge in the construction of the tool. Also, previous research has demonstrated their potential to represent system dynamics and simulate the effects of changes in the system, such as policy interventions. For illustrating this analysis, we have developed a series of participatory FCM for the study of the ecological and human systems related to biodiversity conservation in two case studies of the Amazonian region, the Bolivia lowlands of Guarayos and the Brazil Tapajos National forest. The research is carried out in the context of the EU project ROBIN1 and it is based on the development of a series of stakeholder workshops to analyze the current state of the socio-ecological environment in the Amazonian forest, reflecting conflicts and challenges for biodiversity conservation and human development. Stakeholders included all relevant actors in the local case studies, namely farmers, environmental groups, producer organizations, local and provincial authorities and scientists. In both case studies we illustrate the use of complex networks concepts, such as the adjacency

  18. Spatial digital database of the geologic map of Catalina Core Complex and San Pedro Trough, Pima, Pinal, Gila, Graham, and Cochise counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, William R.; digital database by Hirschberg, Douglas M.; Pitts, G. Stephen; Bolm, Karen S.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of Catalina Core Complex and San Pedro Trough by Dickinson (1992) was digitized for input into a geographic information system (GIS) by the U.S. Geological Survey staff and contractors in 2000-2001. This digital geospatial database is one of many being created by the U.S. Geological Survey as an ongoing effort to provide geologic information in a geographic information system (GIS) for use in spatial analysis. The resulting digital geologic map database data can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps and derivative products. Digital base map data (topography, roads, towns, rivers, lakes, and so forth) are not included; they may be obtained from a variety of commercial and government sources. This database is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale larger than 1:125,000 (for example, 1:100,000 or 1:24,000). The digital geologic map plot files that are provided herein are representations of the database. The map area is located in southern Arizona. This report lists the geologic map units, the methods used to convert the geologic map data into a digital format, the ArcInfo GIS file structures and relationships, and explains how to download the digital files from the U.S. Geological Survey public access World Wide Web site on the Internet. The manuscript and digital data review by Lorre Moyer (USGS) is greatly appreciated.

  19. Biochemical mapping of interactions within the intraflagellar transport (IFT) B core complex: IFT52 binds directly to four other IFT-B subunits.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Vetter, Melanie; Morawetz, Michaela; Lorentzen, Esben

    2011-07-29

    Cilia and flagella are complex structures emanating from the surface of most eukaroytic cells and serve important functions including motility, signaling, and sensory reception. A process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) is of central importance to ciliary assembly and maintenance. The IFT complex is required for this transport and consists of two distinct multisubunit subcomplexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. Despite the importance of the IFT complex, little is known about its overall architecture. This paper presents a biochemical dissection of the molecular interactions within the IFT-B core complex. Two stable subcomplexes consisting of IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25 were recombinantly co-expressed and purified. We identify a novel interaction between IFT70/52 and map the interaction domains between IFT52 and the other subunits within the IFT88/70/52/46 complex. Additionally, we show that IFT52 binds directly to the IFT81/74/27/25 complex, indicating that it could mediate the interaction between the two subcomplexes. Our data lead to an improved architectural map for the IFT-B core complex with new interactions as well as domain resolution mapping for several subunits.

  20. Colorado Late Cenozoic Fault and Fold Database and Internet Map Server: User-friendly technology for complex information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, K.S.; Pattyn, G.J.; Morgan, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Internet mapping applications for geologic data allow simultaneous data delivery and collection, enabling quick data modification while efficiently supplying the end user with information. Utilizing Web-based technologies, the Colorado Geological Survey's Colorado Late Cenozoic Fault and Fold Database was transformed from a monothematic, nonspatial Microsoft Access database into a complex information set incorporating multiple data sources. The resulting user-friendly format supports easy analysis and browsing. The core of the application is the Microsoft Access database, which contains information compiled from available literature about faults and folds that are known or suspected to have moved during the late Cenozoic. The database contains nonspatial fields such as structure type, age, and rate of movement. Geographic locations of the fault and fold traces were compiled from previous studies at 1:250,000 scale to form a spatial database containing information such as length and strike. Integration of the two databases allowed both spatial and nonspatial information to be presented on the Internet as a single dataset (http://geosurvey.state.co.us/pubs/ceno/). The user-friendly interface enables users to view and query the data in an integrated manner, thus providing multiple ways to locate desired information. Retaining the digital data format also allows continuous data updating and quick delivery of newly acquired information. This dataset is a valuable resource to anyone interested in earthquake hazards and the activity of faults and folds in Colorado. Additional geologic hazard layers and imagery may aid in decision support and hazard evaluation. The up-to-date and customizable maps are invaluable tools for researchers or the public.

  1. High resolution magnetic field mapping of complex magmatic rock suites and associated tectonic structures in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Michelena, Marina; Kilian, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Magmatic and metamorphic rocks of the southernmost Andes (50 to 55°S) document a complex magmatic and tectonic history of an active continental margin during the past >140 Ma [1]. However, the regional distribution of the multiple magmatic intrusive rock suites and younger systems of basaltic dykes as well as the tectonic control of associated hydrothermal systems are widely unexplored. Since the rocks are often bare exposed they represent an ideal test site for a magnetic field investigation with significant implication for future aeromagnetic mapping. Thus we performed a high resolution near-surface grid of measurements with a scalar and vector magnetometer at selected sites which include different intrusive rocks, tectonic lineaments and hydrothermal alteration with an associated mineralization. The magnetic signature corresponding to the Natural Remanent Magnetisation (NRM) was measured on Mesozoic and Cenozoic gabbroid to granitic plutons with large range chemical and mineralogical variations [1], on distinct basaltic dykes, as well as on mylonites, gneisses and hornfels rocks. The whole-rock chemistry of the selected rock types was determined by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence. The analysed and mapped rocks include the SiO2 range from 45 to 76 wt.%, FeO (tot) contents from 2 to 18 wt.% and Ti2O contents from 0.2 to 2.5 wt.%. The mineral assemblages were analysed by polarization microscopy, with an electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction. In the plutonic rocks the whole rock chemistry often is related to the amount of magnetite and NRM intensities [2]. However, measured magnetic intensities let us estimate the degree of chloritization and associated demagnetisation by magnetite alteration and transformation to maghemite and/or iron-hydroxides. For Miocene basaltic dyke systems of decimetre to several meters extension within granitic plutons, a high resolution magnetic mapping has been also performed. We expected a relationship of

  2. Mapping the human translation elongation factor eEF1H complex using the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Francisco; Friis, Irene; Jadidi, Mandana; Nielsen, Karen M; Clark, Brian F C; Knudsen, Charlotte R

    2002-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A responsible for transporting amino-acylated tRNA to the ribosome forms a higher-order complex, eEF1H, with its guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor eEF1B. In metazoans, eEF1B consists of three subunits: eEF1B alpha, eEF1B eta and eEF1B gamma. The first two subunits possess the nucleotide-exchange activity, whereas the role of the last remains poorly defined. In mammals, two active tissue-specific isoforms of eEF1A have been identified. The reason for this pattern of differential expression is unknown. Several models on the basis of in vitro experiments have been proposed for the macromolecular organization of the eEF1H complex. However, these models differ in various aspects. This might be due to the difficulties of handling, particularly the eEF1B beta and eEF1B gamma subunits in vitro. Here, the human eEF1H complex is for the first time mapped using the yeast two-hybrid system, which is a powerful in vivo technique for analysing protein-protein interactions. The following complexes were observed: eEF1A1:eEF1B alpha, eEF1A1:eEF1B beta, eEF1B beta:eEF1B beta, eEF1B alpha:eEF1B gamma, eEF1B beta:eEF1B gamma and eEF1B alpha:eEF1B gamma:eEF1B beta, where the last was observed using a three-hybrid approach. Surprisingly, eEF1A2 showed no or only little affinity for the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors. Truncated versions of the subunits of eEF1B were used to orientate these subunits within the resulting model. The model unit is a pentamer composed of two molecules of eEF1A, each interacting with either eEF1B alpha or eEF1B beta held together by eEF1B gamma. These units can dimerize via eEF1B beta. Our model is compared with other models, and structural as well as functional aspects of the model are discussed. PMID:11985494

  3. Nanobodies: site-specific labeling for super-resolution imaging, rapid epitope-mapping and native protein complex isolation

    PubMed Central

    Pleiner, Tino; Bates, Mark; Trakhanov, Sergei; Lee, Chung-Tien; Schliep, Jan Erik; Chug, Hema; Böhning, Marc; Stark, Holger; Urlaub, Henning; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Nanobodies are single-domain antibodies of camelid origin. We generated nanobodies against the vertebrate nuclear pore complex (NPC) and used them in STORM imaging to locate individual NPC proteins with <2 nm epitope-label displacement. For this, we introduced cysteines at specific positions in the nanobody sequence and labeled the resulting proteins with fluorophore-maleimides. As nanobodies are normally stabilized by disulfide-bonded cysteines, this appears counterintuitive. Yet, our analysis showed that this caused no folding problems. Compared to traditional NHS ester-labeling of lysines, the cysteine-maleimide strategy resulted in far less background in fluorescence imaging, it better preserved epitope recognition and it is site-specific. We also devised a rapid epitope-mapping strategy, which relies on crosslinking mass spectrometry and the introduced ectopic cysteines. Finally, we used different anti-nucleoporin nanobodies to purify the major NPC building blocks – each in a single step, with native elution and, as demonstrated, in excellent quality for structural analysis by electron microscopy. The presented strategies are applicable to any nanobody and nanobody-target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11349.001 PMID:26633879

  4. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  5. Oxygen isotope mapping of the Archean Sturgeon Lake caldera complex and VMS-related hydrothermal system, Northwestern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holk, Gregory J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Galley, Alan G.

    2008-08-01

    The hydrothermal and magmatic evolution of the Sturgeon Lake caldera complex is graphically documented by a regional-scale (525 km2) analysis of oxygen isotopes. Spatial variations in whole-rock oxygen isotope compositions provide a thermal map of the cumulative effects of multiple stages of hydrothermal metasomatism before, during, and after volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) mineralization. There is a progressive, upward increase in δ18O from less than 2‰ to greater than 15‰ through a 5-km-thick section above the Biedelman Bay subvolcanic intrusive complex. This isotopic trend makes it clear that at least the earlier phases of this intrusive complex were coeval with the overlying VMS-hosting cauldron succession and provided thermal energy to drive a convective hydrothermal circulation system. The sharp contrast in δ18O values between late stage phases of the Biedelman Bay intrusion and immediate hanging wall strata indicates that the main phase of VMS-related hydrothermal activity took place before late-stage resurgence in the cauldron-related magmatic activity. Mineralogical and isotopic evidence indicates the presence of both syn- and postmineralization hydrothermal activity defined by the presence of widespread semiconformable and more restricted discordant alteration zones that affect the pre- and syncauldron strata. The semiconformable alteration zones formed during early stages of hydrothermal circulation and are defined by widespread silicification and carbonatization in association with relatively high δ18O values. The discordant alteration assemblages, containing Al-silicate minerals with chloritoid and/or Fe-rich carbonate or chlorite, centered on synvolcanic faults represent restricted zones of both seawater inflow and hydrothermal fluid upflow. A rapid increase in δ18O values (˜7-9‰) over a short distance (<200 m) suggests marked cooling of hydrothermal fluid from ˜350°C to less than 130°C either just before or during discharge onto the

  6. Molecular cloning and mapping of the ecotropic leukemia provirus Emv-23 provides molecular access to the albino-deletion complex in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Machanoff, R; Cummings, C C; Johnson, D K

    1989-04-01

    Genetic analysis of radiation-induced deletion mutations involving the chromosome 7 albino (c) locus has expanded the functional map of this 6 to 11-cM region of the mouse genome. To generate one of many points of molecular access necessary for intensifying the analysis of the genes and phenotypes associated with this particular complex of deletions, we have cloned an endogenous ecotropic leukemia provirus (Emv-23), known to be closely linked to c, along with its flanking chromosome 7 sequences. A unique-sequence probe (23.3), derived from a region immediately 5' to the proviral integration site, was found to map less than 0.5 cM from c in a standard backcross analysis. Southern blot analysis of DNAs from animals carrying homozygous or overlapping albino deletions demonstrated that the 23.3 probe was deleted in several relatively small c-region deletions. The deletion mapping of the 23.3 probe places the Emv-23 locus between c and Mod-2, just proximal to a region important for male fertility and juvenile fitness. Mapping of this locus also provides a refinement of the genetic/deletion map for several mutations within this deletion complex.

  7. Complex B1 mapping and electrical properties imaging of the human brain using a 16-channel transceiver coil at 7T.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The electric properties of biological tissue provide important diagnostic information within radio and microwave frequencies, and also play an important role in specific absorption rate calculation which is a major safety concern at ultrahigh field. The recently proposed electrical properties tomography (EPT) technique aims to reconstruct electric properties in biological tissues based on B1 measurement. However, for individual coil element in multichannel transceiver coil which is increasingly utilized at ultrahigh field, current B1-mapping techniques could not provide adequate information (magnitude and absolute phase) of complex transmit and receive B1 which are essential for electrical properties tomography, electric field, and quantitative specific absorption rate assessment. In this study, using a 16-channel transceiver coil at 7T, based on hybrid B1-mapping techniques within the human brain, a complex B1-mapping method has been developed, and in vivo electric properties imaging of the human brain has been demonstrated by applying a logarithm-based inverse algorithm. Computer simulation studies as well as phantom and human experiments have been conducted at 7T. The average bias and standard deviation for reconstructed conductivity in vivo were 28% and 67%, and 10% and 43% for relative permittivity, respectively. The present results suggest the feasibility and reliability of proposed complex B1-mapping technique and electric properties reconstruction method.

  8. Complex B1 Mapping and Electrical Properties Imaging of the Human Brain using a 16-channel Transceiver Coil at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The electric properties (EPs) of biological tissue provide important diagnostic information within radio and microwave frequencies, and also play an important role in specific absorption rate (SAR) calculation which is a major safety concern at ultrahigh field (UHF). The recently proposed electrical properties tomography (EPT) technique aims to reconstruct EPs in biological tissues based on B1 measurement. However, for individual coil element in multi-channel transceiver coil which is increasingly utilized at UHF, current B1-mapping techniques could not provide adequate information (magnitude and absolute phase) of complex transmit and receive B1 which are essential for EPT, electric field, and quantitative SAR assessment. In this study, using a 16-channel transceiver coil at 7T, based on hybrid B1-mapping techniques within the human brain, a complex B1-mapping method has been developed, and in-vivo EPs imaging of the human brain has been demonstrated by applying a logarithm-based inverse algorithm. Computer simulation studies as well as phantom and human experiments have been conducted at 7T. The average bias and standard deviation for reconstructed conductivity in vivo were 28% and 67%, and 10% and 43% for relative permittivity, respectively. The present results suggest the feasibility and reliability of proposed complex B1-mapping technique and EPs reconstruction method. PMID:22692921

  9. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-05-07

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hilary C.; O’Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. PMID:25953959

  11. Thermographic mapping of a complex vernacular settlement: the case study of Casalnuovo District within the Sassi of Matera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, Tiziana; Balestra, Alessandro; Cardinale, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    appropriate cognitive apparatus has been set up for the entire technical process, first of all making use of infrared thermography. It is an affordable, fast and hence widespread method to detect temperature distributions on the surfaces of buildings. In the investigation of historical structures, where a restoration or conservation treatment can cause irreversible damage to the structure, it is considered to be of most importance. So we have made a thermographic mapping and we have analyzed the thermal conditions of approximately 15 caves, with the presence of rising moisture and condensation moisture. The ability to investigate a so complex reality offers an important opportunity for the knowledge, valorization and fruition of the cultural landscape of Matera, where you can disassemble the constituents of full and empty spaces with the consideration that the whole is not merely the sum of the parts.

  12. Isolation and characterization of human and mouse ZIRTL, a member of the IRT1 family of transporters, mapping within the epidermal differentiation complex.

    PubMed

    Lioumi, M; Ferguson, C A; Sharpe, P T; Freeman, T; Marenholz, I; Mischke, D; Heizmann, C; Ragoussis, J

    1999-12-01

    We report the precise mapping and characterization of ZIRTL (zinc-iron regulated transporter-like) gene, the first mammalian member of an extensive family of divalent metal ion transporters, comprising IRT1 and ZIP1, ZIP2, ZIP3, and ZIP4 in plants and ZRT1 and ZRT2 in yeast. The human gene maps at the telomeric end of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), within chromosomal band 1q21, while the mouse gene maps within the mouse EDC, on mouse chromosome 3, between S100A9 and S100A13. The structure of the human gene has been determined, and message was detected in most adult and fetal tissues including the epidermis. The mouse gene is developmentally regulated and found expressed in fetal and adult suprabasal epidermis, osteoblasts, small intestine, and salivary gland.

  13. Lz-0 × Berkeley: a new Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population for the mapping of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Shi, Chun; Beatson, Rodger; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the generation and test of a genetic resource suited to identify determinants of cell biological traits in plants. The use of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for a better genetic understanding of cell biological traits is still at an early stage, even for biotechnologically important cell properties, such as the dimensions of fiber cells. A common strategy, the mapping of QTLs in recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, is limited by the fact that the existing RIL populations exploit only a small fraction of the existing natural variation. Here, we report the mapping of QTLs impacting on the length of fiber cells in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems in a newly generated RIL population derived from a cross between the accessions Berkeley and the little known Lz-0. Through inbreeding of individual F(2) plants, a total of 159 new F8 lines were produced and genotyped with a set of 49 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The population was successfully used not only for the mapping of three QTLs controlling fiber length, but also to map five QTL controlling flowering time under short and long-day conditions. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of this new genetic resource by mapping in it QTLs underlying a poorly explored cellular trait as well as an already better explored regulatory pathway. The new RIL population and an online platform for the continuous supplementation of genetic markers will be generally available to substantially broaden the genetic diversity through which loci with impact on plant quantitative traits can be identified.

  14. Proteomic analysis of cellular soluble proteins from human bronchial smooth muscle cells by combining nondenaturing micro 2DE and quantitative LC‐MS/MS. 2. Similarity search between protein maps for the analysis of protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ya; Yuan, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Manabe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle cell soluble proteins were analyzed by a combined method of nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel‐cutting, and quantitative LC‐MS/MS and a native protein map was prepared for each of the identified 4323 proteins [1]. A method to evaluate the degree of similarity between the protein maps was developed since we expected the proteins comprising a protein complex would be separated together under nondenaturing conditions. The following procedure was employed using Excel macros; (i) maps that have three or more squares with protein quantity data were selected (2328 maps), (ii) within each map, the quantity values of the squares were normalized setting the highest value to be 1.0, (iii) in comparing a map with another map, the smaller normalized quantity in two corresponding squares was taken and summed throughout the map to give an “overlap score,” (iv) each map was compared against all the 2328 maps and the largest overlap score, obtained when a map was compared with itself, was set to be 1.0 thus providing 2328 “overlap factors,” (v) step (iv) was repeated for all maps providing 2328 × 2328 matrix of overlap factors. From the matrix, protein pairs that showed overlap factors above 0.65 from both protein sides were selected (431 protein pairs). Each protein pair was searched in a database (UniProtKB) on complex formation and 301 protein pairs, which comprise 35 protein complexes, were found to be documented. These results demonstrated that native protein maps and their similarity search would enable simultaneous analysis of multiple protein complexes in cells. PMID:26031785

  15. Proteomic analysis of cellular soluble proteins from human bronchial smooth muscle cells by combining nondenaturing micro 2DE and quantitative LC-MS/MS. 2. Similarity search between protein maps for the analysis of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Yuan, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle cell soluble proteins were analyzed by a combined method of nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS and a native protein map was prepared for each of the identified 4323 proteins [1]. A method to evaluate the degree of similarity between the protein maps was developed since we expected the proteins comprising a protein complex would be separated together under nondenaturing conditions. The following procedure was employed using Excel macros; (i) maps that have three or more squares with protein quantity data were selected (2328 maps), (ii) within each map, the quantity values of the squares were normalized setting the highest value to be 1.0, (iii) in comparing a map with another map, the smaller normalized quantity in two corresponding squares was taken and summed throughout the map to give an "overlap score," (iv) each map was compared against all the 2328 maps and the largest overlap score, obtained when a map was compared with itself, was set to be 1.0 thus providing 2328 "overlap factors," (v) step (iv) was repeated for all maps providing 2328 × 2328 matrix of overlap factors. From the matrix, protein pairs that showed overlap factors above 0.65 from both protein sides were selected (431 protein pairs). Each protein pair was searched in a database (UniProtKB) on complex formation and 301 protein pairs, which comprise 35 protein complexes, were found to be documented. These results demonstrated that native protein maps and their similarity search would enable simultaneous analysis of multiple protein complexes in cells.

  16. Exploring the Impact of Visual Complexity Levels in 3d City Models on the Accuracy of Individuals' Orientation and Cognitive Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenbach, V.; Çöltekin, A.; Coetzee, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we report results from a qualitative user experiment (n=107) designed to contribute to understanding the impact of various levels of complexity (mainly based on levels of detail, i.e., LoD) in 3D city models, specifically on the participants' orientation and cognitive (mental) maps. The experiment consisted of a number of tasks motivated by spatial cognition theory where participants (among other things) were given orientation tasks, and in one case also produced sketches of a path they `travelled' in a virtual environment. The experiments were conducted in groups, where individuals provided responses on an answer sheet. The preliminary results based on descriptive statistics and qualitative sketch analyses suggest that very little information (i.e., a low LoD model of a smaller area) might have a negative impact on the accuracy of cognitive maps constructed based on a virtual experience. Building an accurate cognitive map is an inherently desired effect of the visualizations in planning tasks, thus the findings are important for understanding how to develop better-suited 3D visualizations such as 3D city models. In this study, we specifically discuss the suitability of different levels of visual complexity for development planning (urban planning), one of the domains where 3D city models are most relevant.

  17. A methodology for eliciting, representing, and analysing stakeholder knowledge for decision making on complex socio-ecological systems: from cognitive maps to agent-based models.

    PubMed

    Elsawah, Sondoss; Guillaume, Joseph H A; Filatova, Tatiana; Rook, Josefine; Jakeman, Anthony J

    2015-03-15

    This paper aims to contribute to developing better ways for incorporating essential human elements in decision making processes for modelling of complex socio-ecological systems. It presents a step-wise methodology for integrating perceptions of stakeholders (qualitative) into formal simulation models (quantitative) with the ultimate goal of improving understanding and communication about decision making in complex socio-ecological systems. The methodology integrates cognitive mapping and agent based modelling. It cascades through a sequence of qualitative/soft and numerical methods comprising: (1) Interviews to elicit mental models; (2) Cognitive maps to represent and analyse individual and group mental models; (3) Time-sequence diagrams to chronologically structure the decision making process; (4) All-encompassing conceptual model of decision making, and (5) computational (in this case agent-based) Model. We apply the proposed methodology (labelled ICTAM) in a case study of viticulture irrigation in South Australia. Finally, we use strengths-weakness-opportunities-threats (SWOT) analysis to reflect on the methodology. Results show that the methodology leverages the use of cognitive mapping to capture the richness of decision making and mental models, and provides a combination of divergent and convergent analysis methods leading to the construction of an Agent Based Model.

  18. Complexing of the CD-3 subunit by a monoclonal antibody activates a microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) serine kinase in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanekom, C; Nel, A; Gittinger, C; Rheeder, A; Landreth, G

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of Jurkat T-cells with anti-CD-3 monoclonal antibodies resulted in the rapid and transient activation of a serine kinase which utilized the microtubule-associated protein, MAP-2, as a substrate in vitro. The kinase was also activated on treatment of Jurkat cells with phytohaemagglutinin, but with a different time course. The activation of the MAP-2 kinase by anti-CD-3 antibodies was dose-dependent, with maximal activity observed at concentrations of greater than 500 ng/ml. Normal human E-rosette-positive T-cells also exhibited induction of MAP-2 kinase activity during anti-CD-3 treatment. The enzyme was optimally active in the presence of 2 mM-Mn2+; lower levels of activity were observed with Mg2+, even at concentrations up to 20 mM. The kinase was partially purified by passage over DE-52 Sephacel with the activity eluting as a single peak at 0.25 M-NaCl. The molecular mass was estimated to be 45 kDa by gel filtration. The activation of the MAP-2 kinase was probably due to phosphorylation of this enzyme as treatment with alkaline phosphatase diminished its activity. These data demonstrate that the stimulation of T-cells through the CD-3 complex results in the activation of a novel serine kinase which may be critically involved in signal transduction in these cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2552997

  19. Quantitative trait locus mapping reveals complex genetic architecture of quantitative virulence in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ethan L; Croll, Daniel; Lendenmann, Mark H; Sanchez-Vallet, Andrea; Hartmann, Fanny E; Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Ma, Xin; McDonald, Bruce A

    2016-11-21

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of virulence in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. High-throughput phenotyping based on automated image analysis allowed the measurement of pathogen virulence on a scale and with a precision that was not previously possible. Across two mapping populations encompassing more than 520 progeny, 540 710 pycnidia were counted and their sizes and grey values were measured. A significant correlation was found between pycnidia size and both spore size and number. Precise measurements of percentage leaf area covered by lesions provided a quantitative measure of host damage. Combining these large and accurate phenotypic datasets with a dense panel of restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) genetic markers enabled us to genetically dissect pathogen virulence into components related to host damage and those related to pathogen reproduction. We showed that different components of virulence can be under separate genetic control. Large- and small-effect QTLs were identified for all traits, with some QTLs specific to mapping populations, cultivars and traits and other QTLs shared among traits within the same mapping population. We associated the presence of four accessory chromosomes with small, but significant, increases in several virulence traits, providing the first evidence for a meaningful function associated with accessory chromosomes in this organism. A large-effect QTL involved in host specialization was identified on chromosome 7, leading to the identification of candidate genes having a large effect on virulence.

  20. A genetic interaction map of RNA-processing factors reveals links between Sem1/Dss1-containing complexes and mRNA export and splicing.

    PubMed

    Wilmes, Gwendolyn M; Bergkessel, Megan; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Shales, Michael; Braberg, Hannes; Cagney, Gerard; Collins, Sean R; Whitworth, Gregg B; Kress, Tracy L; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ideker, Trey; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J

    2008-12-05

    We used a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map, or E-MAP (Epistatic MiniArray Profile), to interrogate the relationships within and between RNA-processing pathways. Due to their complexity and the essential roles of many of the components, these pathways have been difficult to functionally dissect. Here, we report the results for 107,155 individual interactions involving 552 mutations, 166 of which are hypomorphic alleles of essential genes. Our data enabled the discovery of links between components of the mRNA export and splicing machineries and Sem1/Dss1, a component of the 19S proteasome. In particular, we demonstrate that Sem1 has a proteasome-independent role in mRNA export as a functional component of the Sac3-Thp1 complex. Sem1 also interacts with Csn12, a component of the COP9 signalosome. Finally, we show that Csn12 plays a role in pre-mRNA splicing, which is independent of other signalosome components. Thus, Sem1 is involved in three separate and functionally distinct complexes.

  1. Comparison of copper and zinc in vitro bioaccessibility from cyanobacteria rich in proteins and a synthetic supplement containing gluconate complexes: LC-MS mapping of bioaccessible copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Justyna; Witkoś, Katarzyna; Ruzik, Lena; Pawlak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    An analytical procedure was proposed to estimate bioaccessibility of copper and zinc in Spirulina Pacifica tablets with respect to that of copper and zinc in gluconate complexes. Spirulina is the common name for diet supplements produced primarily from two species of cyanobacteria, namely Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima. Spirulina tablets are an excellent source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. To obtain information about the bioavailability of these elements, an in vitro bioaccessibility test was performed by application of a two-step protocol which simulated the gastric (pepsin) and intestinal (pancreatin) digestion. The species obtained were investigated by size exclusion chromatography on a chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer with inductively coupled plasma (SEC-ICP-MS) and an on-capillary liquid chromatograph coupled to an electrospray mass spectrometer (μ-HPLC-ESI-MS). Both copper and zinc were found to be highly bioaccessible in Spirulina tablets (90-111%) and those containing gluconate complexes (103% for Cu and 62% for Zn). In Spirulina tablets, copper was found to form two types of complex: (1) polar ones with glycine and aspartic acid and (2) more hydrophobic ones containing amino acids with cyclic hydrocarbons (phenylalanine, histidine, proline and tyrosine). Zinc and copper were also proved to form complexes during the digestion process with products of pepsin digestion, but the stability of these complexes is lower than that of the complexes formed in Spirulina. The results proving the involvement of proteins in the enhancement of copper and zinc bioaccessibility will be useful for the design of new copper and zinc supplements.

  2. Low-Cost Optical Mapping Systems for Panoramic Imaging of Complex Arrhythmias and Drug-Action in Translational Heart Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Peter; Calvo, Conrado J.; Alfonso-Almazán, José M.; Quintanilla, Jorge G.; Chorro, Francisco J.; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M.; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Millet, José

    2017-02-01

    Panoramic optical mapping is the primary method for imaging electrophysiological activity from the entire outer surface of Langendorff-perfused hearts. To date, it is the only method of simultaneously measuring multiple key electrophysiological parameters, such as transmembrane voltage and intracellular free calcium, at high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the impact it has already had on the fields of cardiac arrhythmias and whole-heart computational modeling, present-day system designs precludes its adoption by the broader cardiovascular research community because of their high costs. Taking advantage of recent technological advances, we developed and validated low-cost optical mapping systems for panoramic imaging using Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, a clinically-relevant model in basic research and bioengineering. By significantly lowering financial thresholds, this powerful cardiac electrophysiology imaging modality may gain wider use in research and, even, teaching laboratories, which we substantiated using the lower-cost Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model.

  3. Low-Cost Optical Mapping Systems for Panoramic Imaging of Complex Arrhythmias and Drug-Action in Translational Heart Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter; Calvo, Conrado J.; Alfonso-Almazán, José M.; Quintanilla, Jorge G.; Chorro, Francisco J.; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M.; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Millet, José

    2017-01-01

    Panoramic optical mapping is the primary method for imaging electrophysiological activity from the entire outer surface of Langendorff-perfused hearts. To date, it is the only method of simultaneously measuring multiple key electrophysiological parameters, such as transmembrane voltage and intracellular free calcium, at high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the impact it has already had on the fields of cardiac arrhythmias and whole-heart computational modeling, present-day system designs precludes its adoption by the broader cardiovascular research community because of their high costs. Taking advantage of recent technological advances, we developed and validated low-cost optical mapping systems for panoramic imaging using Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, a clinically-relevant model in basic research and bioengineering. By significantly lowering financial thresholds, this powerful cardiac electrophysiology imaging modality may gain wider use in research and, even, teaching laboratories, which we substantiated using the lower-cost Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model. PMID:28240274

  4. Low-Cost Optical Mapping Systems for Panoramic Imaging of Complex Arrhythmias and Drug-Action in Translational Heart Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter; Calvo, Conrado J; Alfonso-Almazán, José M; Quintanilla, Jorge G; Chorro, Francisco J; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Millet, José

    2017-02-27

    Panoramic optical mapping is the primary method for imaging electrophysiological activity from the entire outer surface of Langendorff-perfused hearts. To date, it is the only method of simultaneously measuring multiple key electrophysiological parameters, such as transmembrane voltage and intracellular free calcium, at high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the impact it has already had on the fields of cardiac arrhythmias and whole-heart computational modeling, present-day system designs precludes its adoption by the broader cardiovascular research community because of their high costs. Taking advantage of recent technological advances, we developed and validated low-cost optical mapping systems for panoramic imaging using Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, a clinically-relevant model in basic research and bioengineering. By significantly lowering financial thresholds, this powerful cardiac electrophysiology imaging modality may gain wider use in research and, even, teaching laboratories, which we substantiated using the lower-cost Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model.

  5. A novel approach to land-cover maps updating in complex scenarios based on multitemporal remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahirat, K.; Bovolo, F.; Bruzzone, L.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays, an ever increasing number of multi-temporal images is available, giving the possibility of having with high temporal frequency information about the land-cover evolution on the ground. In general, the production of accurate land-cover maps requires the availability of reliable ground truth information on the considered area for each image to be classified. Unfortunately the rate of ground truth information collection will never equal the remote sensing image acquisition rate, making supervised classification unfeasible for land-cover maps updating. This problem has been faced according to domain adaptation methods that update land-cover maps under the assumption that: i) training data are available for one of the considered multi-temporal acquisitions while they are not for the others and ii) set of land-cover classes is same for all considered acquisitions. In real applications, the latter assumption represents a constraint which is often not satisfied due to possible changes occurred on the ground and associated with the presence of new classes or the absence of old classes in the new images. In this work, we propose an approach that removes this constraint by automatically identifying whether there exist differences between classes in multi-temporal images and properly handling these differences in the updating process. Experimental results on a real multi-temporal remote sensing data set confirm the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach.

  6. Geological mapping of impact melt deposits at lunar complex craters Jackson and Tycho: Morphologic and topographic diversity and relation to the cratering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Head, James W.; Pieters, Carle M.

    2017-02-01

    High resolution geological mapping, aided by imagery and elevation data from the lunar reconnaissance orbiter (LRO) and Kaguya missions, has revealed the scientifically rich character of impact melt deposits at two young complex craters: Jackson (71 km) and Tycho (85 km). The morphology and distribution of mapped impact melt units provide several insights into the cratering process. We report elevation differences (>200 m) among large, coherent floor sections within a single crater and interpret them to be caused by crater wall collapse and/or large scale structural failure of the floor region. Clast-poor, smooth melt deposits are correlated with floor sections at lower elevations and likely represent ponded deposits sourced from higher elevation regions (viz. crater walls). In addition, these deposits are also located in the inferred downrange direction of the impact. Melt-coated large blocks spanning several kilometers are common on the crater floors and may represent collapsed wall sections or in some cases, subdued sections of the central peaks. Spatial trends in the mapped impact melt units at the two craters provide clues to decipher the conditions during each impact event and subsequent evolution of the crater floor.

  7. Mapping Proteoforms and Protein Complexes From King Cobra Venom Using Both Denaturing and Native Top-down Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Melani, Rafael D; Skinner, Owen S; Fornelli, Luca; Domont, Gilberto B; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing whole proteins by top-down proteomics avoids a step of inference encountered in the dominant bottom-up methodology when peptides are assembled computationally into proteins for identification. The direct interrogation of whole proteins and protein complexes from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) provides a sharply clarified view of toxin sequence variation, transit peptide cleavage sites and post-translational modifications (PTMs) likely critical for venom lethality. A tube-gel format for electrophoresis (called GELFrEE) and solution isoelectric focusing were used for protein fractionation prior to LC-MS/MS analysis resulting in 131 protein identifications (18 more than bottom-up) and a total of 184 proteoforms characterized from 14 protein toxin families. Operating both GELFrEE and mass spectrometry to preserve non-covalent interactions generated detailed information about two of the largest venom glycoprotein complexes: the homodimeric l-amino acid oxidase (∼130 kDa) and the multichain toxin cobra venom factor (∼147 kDa). The l-amino acid oxidase complex exhibited two clusters of multiproteoform complexes corresponding to the presence of 5 or 6 N-glycans moieties, each consistent with a distribution of N-acetyl hexosamines. Employing top-down proteomics in both native and denaturing modes provides unprecedented characterization of venom proteoforms and their complexes. A precise molecular inventory of venom proteins will propel the study of snake toxin variation and the targeted development of new antivenoms or other biotherapeutics.

  8. A Flexible Computational Framework Using R and Map-Reduce for Permutation Tests of Massive Genetic Analysis of Complex Traits.

    PubMed

    Mahjani, Behrang; Toor, Salman; Nettelblad, Carl; Holmgren, Sverker

    2017-01-01

    In quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping significance of putative QTL is often determined using permutation testing. The computational needs to calculate the significance level are immense, 10(4) up to 10(8) or even more permutations can be needed. We have previously introduced the PruneDIRECT algorithm for multiple QTL scan with epistatic interactions. This algorithm has specific strengths for permutation testing. Here, we present a flexible, parallel computing framework for identifying multiple interacting QTL using the PruneDIRECT algorithm which uses the map-reduce model as implemented in Hadoop. The framework is implemented in R, a widely used software tool among geneticists. This enables users to rearrange algorithmic steps to adapt genetic models, search algorithms, and parallelization steps to their needs in a flexible way. Our work underlines the maturity of accessing distributed parallel computing for computationally demanding bioinformatics applications through building workflows within existing scientific environments. We investigate the PruneDIRECT algorithm, comparing its performance to exhaustive search and DIRECT algorithm using our framework on a public cloud resource. We find that PruneDIRECT is vastly superior for permutation testing, and perform 2 ×10(5) permutations for a 2D QTL problem in 15 hours, using 100 cloud processes. We show that our framework scales out almost linearly for a 3D QTL search.

  9. Extending systems thinking in planning and evaluation using group concept mapping and system dynamics to tackle complex problems.

    PubMed

    Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Urban, Jennifer Brown; Frerichs, Leah; Dave, Gaurav

    2017-02-01

    Group concept mapping (GCM) has been successfully employed in program planning and evaluation for over 25 years. The broader set of systems thinking methodologies (of which GCM is one), have only recently found their way into the field. We present an overview of systems thinking emerging from a system dynamics (SD) perspective, and illustrate the potential synergy between GCM and SD. As with GCM, participatory processes are frequently employed when building SD models; however, it can be challenging to engage a large and diverse group of stakeholders in the iterative cycles of divergent thinking and consensus building required, while maintaining a broad perspective on the issue being studied. GCM provides a compelling resource for overcoming this challenge, by richly engaging a diverse set of stakeholders in broad exploration, structuring, and prioritization. SD provides an opportunity to extend GCM findings by embedding constructs in a testable hypothesis (SD model) describing how system structure and changes in constructs affect outcomes over time. SD can be used to simulate the hypothesized dynamics inherent in GCM concept maps. We illustrate the potential of the marriage of these methodologies in a case study of BECOMING, a federally-funded program aimed at strengthening the cross-sector system of care for youth with severe emotional disturbances.

  10. The Monster and Lover?Girl: Mapping Complex Relations in Preschool Children's Digital Video Productions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Marissa

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I propose that research which focuses on young children's experiences with the interactivity of new media not only furthers findings about young children's digital lives but also enriches the conclusion that children's engagement with artmaking--in general and in traditional ways--is richly complex, affective, and…

  11. Methylation-sensitive linking libraries enhance gene-enriched sequencing of complex genomes and map DNA methylation domains

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William; Luo, Meizhong; Ma, Jianxin; Estep, Matt; Estill, James; He, Ruifeng; Talag, Jayson; Sisneros, Nicholas; Kudrna, David; Kim, HyeRan; Ammiraju, Jetty SS; Collura, Kristi; Bharti, Arvind K; Messing, Joachim; Wing, Rod A; SanMiguel, Phillip; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Soderlund, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Background Many plant genomes are resistant to whole-genome assembly due to an abundance of repetitive sequence, leading to the development of gene-rich sequencing techniques. Two such techniques are hypomethylated partial restriction (HMPR) and methylation spanning linker libraries (MSLL). These libraries differ from other gene-rich datasets in having larger insert sizes, and the MSLL clones are designed to provide reads localized to "epigenetic boundaries" where methylation begins or ends. Results A large-scale study in maize generated 40,299 HMPR sequences and 80,723 MSLL sequences, including MSLL clones exceeding 100 kb. The paired end reads of MSLL and HMPR clones were shown to be effective in linking existing gene-rich sequences into scaffolds. In addition, it was shown that the MSLL clones can be used for anchoring these scaffolds to a BAC-based physical map. The MSLL end reads effectively identified epigenetic boundaries, as indicated by their preferential alignment to regions upstream and downstream from annotated genes. The ability to precisely map long stretches of fully methylated DNA sequence is a unique outcome of MSLL analysis, and was also shown to provide evidence for errors in gene identification. MSLL clones were observed to be significantly more repeat-rich in their interiors than in their end reads, confirming the correlation between methylation and retroelement content. Both MSLL and HMPR reads were found to be substantially gene-enriched, with the SalI MSLL libraries being the most highly enriched (31% align to an EST contig), while the HMPR clones exhibited exceptional depletion of repetitive DNA (to ~11%). These two techniques were compared with other gene-enrichment methods, and shown to be complementary. Conclusion MSLL technology provides an unparalleled approach for mapping the epigenetic status of repetitive blocks and for identifying sequences mis-identified as genes. Although the types and natures of epigenetic boundaries are barely

  12. CREB, AP‐1, ternary complex factors and MAP kinases connect transient receptor potential melastatin‐3 (TRPM3) channel stimulation with increased c‐Fos expression

    PubMed Central

    Rubil, Sandra; Rössler, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The rise in intracellular Ca2+ stimulates the expression of the transcription factor c‐Fos. Depending on the mode of entry of Ca2+ into the cytosol, distinct signal transducers and transcription factors are required. Here, we have analysed the signalling pathway connecting a Ca2+ influx via activation of transient receptor potential melastatin‐3 (TRPM3) channels with enhanced c‐Fos expression. Experimental Approach Transcription of c‐Fos promoter/reporter genes that were integrated into the chromatin via lentiviral gene transfer was analysed in HEK293 cells overexpressing TRPM3. The transcriptional activation potential of c‐Fos was measured using a GAL4‐c‐Fos fusion protein. Key Results The signalling pathway connecting TRPM3 stimulation with enhanced c‐Fos expression requires the activation of MAP kinases. On the transcriptional level, three Ca2+‐responsive elements, the cAMP‐response element and the binding sites for the serum response factor (SRF) and AP‐1, are essential for the TRPM3‐mediated stimulation of the c‐Fos promoter. Ternary complex factors are additionally involved in connecting TRPM3 stimulation with the up‐regulation of c‐Fos expression. Stimulation of TRPM3 channels also increases the transcriptional activation potential of c‐Fos. Conclusions and Implications Signalling molecules involved in connecting TRPM3 with the c‐Fos gene are MAP kinases and the transcription factors CREB, SRF, AP‐1 and ternary complex factors. As c‐Fos constitutes, together with other basic region leucine zipper transcription factors, the AP‐1 transcription factor complex, the results of this study explain TRPM3‐induced activation of AP‐1 and connects TRPM3 with the biological functions regulated by AP‐1. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society PMID:26493679

  13. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  14. A complex recombination pattern in the genome of allotetraploid Brassica napus as revealed by a high-density genetic map.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guangqin; Yang, Qingyong; Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus.

  15. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-03-12

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located.

  16. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located. Images PMID:6200830

  17. Fluorescence mapping of mitochondrial TIM23 complex reveals a water-facing, substrate-interacting helix surface.

    PubMed

    Alder, Nathan N; Jensen, Robert E; Johnson, Arthur E

    2008-08-08

    Protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by the TIM23 complex. While its central component, Tim23, is believed to form a protein-conducting channel, the regions of this subunit that face the imported protein are unknown. To examine Tim23 structure and environment in intact membranes at high resolution, various derivatives, each with a single, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe positioned at a specific site, were assembled into functional TIM23 complexes in active mitochondria and analyzed by multiple spectral techniques. Probes placed sequentially throughout a transmembrane region that was identified by crosslinking as part of the protein-conducting channel revealed an alpha helix in an amphipathic environment. Probes on the aqueous-facing helical surface specifically underwent spectral changes during protein import, and their accessibility to hydrophilic quenching agents is considered in terms of channel gating. This approach has therefore provided an unprecedented view of a translocon channel structure in an intact, fully operational, membrane-embedded complex.

  18. Structural and Biochemical Analyses of Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Complexes and Prediction of the Epitope Map of Important Influenza A Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuhua; Wu, Yanan; Wang, Song; Wang, Zhenbao; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yanjie; Liang, Ruiying; Zhou, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of a peptide-swine leukocyte antigen class I (pSLA I) complex structure presents difficulties for the study of swine cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity and molecule vaccine development to eliminate important swine viral diseases, such as influenza A virus (IAV). Here, after cloning and comparing 28 SLA I allelic genes from Chinese Heishan pigs, pSLA-3*hs0202 was crystalized and solved. SLA-3*hs0202 binding with sβ2m and a KMNTQFTAV (hemagglutinin [HA]-KMN9) peptide from the 2009 pandemic swine H1N1 strain clearly displayed two distinct conformations with HA-KMN9 peptides in the structures, which are believed to be beneficial to stimulate a broad spectrum of CTL immune responses. Notably, we found that different HA-KMN9 conformations are caused, not only by the flexibility of the side chains of residues in the peptide-binding groove (PBG), but also by the skewing of α1 and α2 helixes forming the PBG. In addition, alanine scanning and circular-dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the B, D, and F pockets play critical biochemical roles in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-3*hs0202. Based on biochemical parameters and comparisons to similar pockets in other known major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) structures, the fundamental motif for SLA-3*hs0202 was determined to be X-(M/A/R)-(N/Q/R/F)-X-X-X-X-X-(V/I) by refolding in vitro and multiple mutant peptides. Finally, 28 SLA-3*hs0202-restricted epitope candidates were identified from important IAV strains, and two of them have been found in humans as HLA-A*0201-specific IAV epitopes. Structural and biochemical illumination of pSLA-3*hs0202 can benefit vaccine development to control IAV in swine. IMPORTANCE We crystalized and solved the first SLA-3 structure, SLA-3*hs0202, and found that it could present the same IAV peptide with two distinct conformations. Unlike previous findings showing that variable peptide conformations are caused only by the flexibility of the side

  19. Improved Discrimination of Volcanic Complexes, Tectonic Features, and Regolith Properties in Mare Serenitatis from Earth-Based Radar Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Hawke, B. Ray; Morgan, Gareth A.; Carter, Lynn M.; Campbell, Donald B.; Nolan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Radar images at 70 cm wavelength show 4-5 dB variations in backscatter strength within regions of relatively uniform spectral reflectance properties in central and northern Mare Serenitatis, delineating features suggesting lava flow margins, channels, and superposition relationships. These backscatter differences are much less pronounced at 12.6 cm wavelength, consistent with a large component of the 70 cm echo arising from the rough or blocky transition zone between the mare regolith and the intact bedrock. Such deep probing is possible because the ilmenite content, which modulates microwave losses, of central Mare Serenitatis is generally low (2-3% by weight). Modeling of the radar returns from a buried interface shows that an average regolith thickness of 10m could lead to the observed shifts in 70 cm echo power with a change in TiO2 content from 2% to 3%. This thickness is consistent with estimates of regolith depth (10-15m) based on the smallest diameter for which fresh craters have obvious blocky ejecta. The 70 cm backscatter differences provide a view of mare flow-unit boundaries, channels, and lobes unseen by other remote sensing methods. A localized pyroclastic deposit associated with Rima Calippus is identified based on its low radar echo strength. Radar mapping also improves delineation of units for crater age dating and highlights a 250 km long, east-west trending feature in northern Mare Serenitatis that we suggest is a large graben flooded by late-stage mare flows.

  20. Physical map of human 6p21.2-6p21.3: region flanking the centromeric end of the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Tripodis, N; Mason, R; Humphray, S J; Davies, A F; Herberg, J A; Trowsdale, J; Nizetic, D; Senger, G; Ragoussis, J

    1998-06-01

    We have physically mapped and cloned a 2.5-Mb chromosomal segment flanking the centromeric end of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We characterized in detail 27 YACs, 144 cosmids, 51 PACs, and 5 BACs, which will facilitate the complete genomic sequencing of this region of chromosome 6. The contig contains the genes encoding CSBP, p21, HSU09564 serine kinase, ZNF76, TCP-11, RPS10, HMGI(Y), BAK, and the human homolog of Tctex-7 (HSET). The GLO1 gene was mapped further centromeric in the 6p21.2-6p21.1 region toward TCTE-1. The gene order of the GLO1-HMGI(Y) segment in respect to the centromere is similar to the gene order in the mouse t-chromosome distal inversion, indicating that there is conservation in gene content but not gene order between humans and mice in this region. The close linkage of the BAK and CSBP genes to the MHC is of interest because of their possible involvement in autoimmune disease.

  1. Tetramer-guided epitope mapping: rapid identification and characterization of immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Novak, E J; Liu, A W; Gebe, J A; Falk, B A; Nepom, G T; Koelle, D M; Kwok, W W

    2001-06-01

    T cell responses to Ags involve recognition of selected peptide epitopes contained within the antigenic protein. In this report, we describe a new approach for direct identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of complex Ags that uses human class II tetramers to identify reactive cells. With a panel of 60 overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of the VP16 protein, a major Ag for HSV-2, we generated a panel of class II MHC tetramers loaded with peptide pools that were used to stain peripheral lymphocytes of an HSV-2 infected individual. With this approach, we identified four new DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401- and two DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404-restricted, VP16-specific epitopes. By using tetramers to sort individual cells, we easily obtained a large number of clones specific to these epitopes. Although DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 and DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404 are structurally very similar, nonoverlapping VP16 epitopes were identified, illustrating high selectivity of individual allele polymorphisms within common MHC variants. This rapid approach to detecting CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex Ags can be applied to any known Ag that gives a T cell response.

  2. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) Marker Platforms for Diversity Analysis and Linkage Mapping in a Complex Crop, the Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Horvath, Aniko; Botella, Miguel A.; Gaston, Amèlia; Folta, Kevin; Kilian, Andrzej; Denoyes, Beatrice; Amaya, Iraida

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is a genetically complex allo-octoploid crop with 28 pairs of chromosomes (2n = 8x = 56) for which a genome sequence is not yet available. The diploid Fragaria vesca is considered the donor species of one of the octoploid sub-genomes and its available genome sequence can be used as a reference for genomic studies. A wide number of strawberry cultivars are stored in ex situ germplasm collections world-wide but a number of previous studies have addressed the genetic diversity present within a limited number of these collections. Here, we report the development and application of two platforms based on the implementation of Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for high-throughput genotyping in strawberry. The first DArT microarray was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 62 strawberry cultivars that represent a wide range of variation based on phenotype, geographical and temporal origin and pedigrees. A total of 603 DArT markers were used to evaluate the diversity and structure of the population and their cluster analyses revealed that these markers were highly efficient in classifying the accessions in groups based on historical, geographical and pedigree-based cues. The second DArTseq platform took benefit of the complexity reduction method optimized for strawberry and the development of next generation sequencing technologies. The strawberry DArTseq was used to generate a total of 9,386 SNP markers in the previously developed ‘232’ × ‘1392’ mapping population, of which, 4,242 high quality markers were further selected to saturate this map after several filtering steps. The high-throughput platforms here developed for genotyping strawberry will facilitate genome-wide characterizations of large accessions sets and complement other available options. PMID:26675207

  3. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) Marker Platforms for Diversity Analysis and Linkage Mapping in a Complex Crop, the Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Horvath, Aniko; Botella, Miguel A; Gaston, Amèlia; Folta, Kevin; Kilian, Andrzej; Denoyes, Beatrice; Amaya, Iraida

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is a genetically complex allo-octoploid crop with 28 pairs of chromosomes (2n = 8x = 56) for which a genome sequence is not yet available. The diploid Fragaria vesca is considered the donor species of one of the octoploid sub-genomes and its available genome sequence can be used as a reference for genomic studies. A wide number of strawberry cultivars are stored in ex situ germplasm collections world-wide but a number of previous studies have addressed the genetic diversity present within a limited number of these collections. Here, we report the development and application of two platforms based on the implementation of Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for high-throughput genotyping in strawberry. The first DArT microarray was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 62 strawberry cultivars that represent a wide range of variation based on phenotype, geographical and temporal origin and pedigrees. A total of 603 DArT markers were used to evaluate the diversity and structure of the population and their cluster analyses revealed that these markers were highly efficient in classifying the accessions in groups based on historical, geographical and pedigree-based cues. The second DArTseq platform took benefit of the complexity reduction method optimized for strawberry and the development of next generation sequencing technologies. The strawberry DArTseq was used to generate a total of 9,386 SNP markers in the previously developed '232' × '1392' mapping population, of which, 4,242 high quality markers were further selected to saturate this map after several filtering steps. The high-throughput platforms here developed for genotyping strawberry will facilitate genome-wide characterizations of large accessions sets and complement other available options.

  4. Mapping of second-nearest-neighbor fluoride ions of orthorhombic Gd 3+-Ag + complexes in CaF 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, R.; Den Hartog, H. W.

    The ENDOR technique is applied to determine the positions of 24 second-nearest-neighbor F - ions around an orthorhombic Gd 3+-Ag + complex in CaF 2 crystals. Experimental ENDOR data of the second-nearest-neighbor F - ions are analyzed by using the usual spin Hamiltonian and a least-squares fitting method. The best fits of the experimental results give superhyperfine (shf) constants and the F - directions ( K, L, M) with respect to the Gd 3+ ion, from which the distance between the second-nearest-neighbor F - ion and the Gd 3+ ion is determined by assuming that the hyperfine interaction is due to the classical dipole-dipole interaction. The displacements of the F - ions are estimated and compared with the theoretical values calculated by Bijvank and den Hartog on the basis of a polarizable point charge model.

  5. Selection, characterisation and mapping of complex electrochemical processes at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes: the case of serotonin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Meadows, Katherine E; Dudin, Petr V; Ebejer, Neil; Byers, Joshua C; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical (EC) oxidation of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated at high resolution using a novel platform that combines flow-aligned SWNTs with atomic force microscopy, Raman microscopy, electronic conductance measurements, individual SWNT electrochemistry and high-resolution scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM). SECCM has been used to visualise the EC activity along side-wall sections of metallic SWNTs to assess the extent to which side-walls promote the electrochemistry of this complex multi-step process. Uniform and high EC activity is observed that is consistent with significant reaction at the side-wall, rather than electrochemistry being driven by defects alone. By scanning forward and reverse (trace and retrace) over the same region of a SWNT, it is also possible to assess any blocking of EC activity by serotonin oxidation reaction products. At a physiologically relevant concentration (5 μM), there is no detectable blocking of SWNTs, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the high diffusion rate to an individual, isolated SWNT in the SECCM format. At higher serotonin concentration (2 mM), oligomer formation from oxidation products is much more significant and major blocking of the EC process is observed from line profiles recorded as the SECCM meniscus moves over an SWNT. The SECCM line profile morphology is shown to be highly diagnostic of whether blocking occurs during EC processes. The studies herein add to a growing body of evidence that various EC processes at SWNTs, from simple outer sphere redox reactions to complex multi-step processes, occur readily at pristine SWNTs. The platform described is of general applicability to various types of nanostructures and nanowires.

  6. Disentangling different functional roles of evoked K-complex components: Mapping the sleeping brain while quenching sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Bedini, Remo; Allegrini, Paolo; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-02-01

    During non-REM sleep the largest EEG response evoked by sensory stimulation is the K-complex (eKC), composed of an initial positive bump (P200) followed by a bistable cortical response: a giant negative deflection (N550) and a large positive one (P900), respectively reflecting down states and up states of < 1 Hz oscillations.Sensory-modality-independent topology of N550 and P900, with maximal detection rate on fronto-central areas, has been consistently reported, suggesting that sensory inputs arise to the cortex avoiding specific primary sensory areas. However, these studies neglected latencies of all KC components as a function of electrode sites.Our aim is to identify, component by component, which topological/dynamical properties of eKCs depend on stimulus modality and which are mainly related to local cortical properties. We measured temporal and morphological features of acoustic, tactile and visual eKCs to disentangle specific sensory excitatory activities from aspecific responses due to local proneness to bistability, measured by means of the N550 descending steepness (synchronization in falling into down state).While confirming the sensory-modality independence of N550 and P900 topology with maximal detection rate in fronto-central areas, four main original results emerge from this study: (i) the topology of P200 latency depends on the sensory modality with earliest waves in the stimulation-related primary sensory areas; (ii) P200 rapidly travels as a cortical excitation; (iii) P200-like excitations when KCs are not evoked are detected over the scalp with significantly smaller amplitudes in fronto-central areas, compared to eKC P200s; and (iv) N550 latency mirrors its mean local steepness which is a function of topological proneness to bistability.From these results we can describe the emergence N550/P900 complex as the interplay between a waxing P200 cortical travel and higher fronto-central proneness to bistability.In conclusion, eKCs exhibit a

  7. Brain imaging genetics in ADHD and beyond - mapping pathways from gene to disorder at different levels of complexity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marieke; Onnink, Marten; van Donkelaar, Marjolein; Wolfers, Thomas; Harich, Benjamin; Shi, Yan; Dammers, Janneke; Arias-Va Squez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara

    2017-01-31

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and often persistent neurodevelopmental disorder. Beyond gene-finding, neurobiological parameters, such as brain structure, connectivity, and function, have been used to link genetic variation to ADHD symptomatology. We performed a systematic review of brain imaging genetics studies involving 62 ADHD candidate genes in childhood and adult ADHD cohorts. Fifty-one eligible research articles described studies of 13 ADHD candidate genes. Almost exclusively, single genetic variants were studied, mostly focussing on dopamine-related genes. While promising results have been reported, imaging genetics studies are thus far hampered by methodological differences in study design and analysis methodology, as well as limited sample sizes. Beyond reviewing imaging genetics studies, we also discuss the need for complementary approaches at multiple levels of biological complexity and emphasize the importance of combining and integrating findings across levels for a better understanding of biological pathways from gene to disease. These may include multi-modal imaging genetics studies, bioinformatic analyses, and functional analyses of cell and animal models.

  8. Mapping of Genetic Factors That Elicit Intermale Aggressive Behavior on Mouse Chromosome 15: Intruder Effects and the Complex Genetic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kato, Shogo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Despite high estimates of the heritability of aggressiveness, the genetic basis for individual differences in aggression remains unclear. Previously, we showed that the wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms (MSM) exhibits highly aggressive behaviors, and identified chromosome 15 (Chr 15) as the location of one of the genetic factors behind this escalated aggression by using a panel of consomic strains of MSM in a C57BL/6J (B6) background. To understand the genetic effect of Chr 15 derived from MSM in detail, this study examined the aggressive behavior of a Chr 15 consomic strain towards different types of opponent. Our results showed that both resident and intruder animals had to have the same MSM Chr 15 genotype in order for attack bites to increase and attack latency to be reduced, whereas there was an intruder effect of MSM Chr 15 on tail rattle behavior. To narrow down the region that contains the genetic loci involved in the aggression-eliciting effects on Chr 15, we established a panel of subconsomic strains of MSM Chr 15. Analysis of these strains suggested the existence of multiple genes that enhance and suppress aggressive behavior on Chr 15, and these loci interact in a complex way. Regression analysis successfully identified four genetic loci on Chr 15 that influence attack latency, and one genetic locus that partially elicits aggressive behaviors was narrowed down to a 4.1-Mbp region (from 68.40 Mb to 72.50 Mb) on Chr 15. PMID:26389588

  9. Genotype-based association mapping of complex diseases: gene-environment interactions with multiple genetic markers and measurement error in environmental exposures.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong; Carroll, Raymond J

    2010-12-01

    With the advent of dense single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, population-based association studies have become the major tools for identifying human disease genes and for fine gene mapping of complex traits. We develop a genotype-based approach for association analysis of case-control studies of gene-environment interactions in the case when environmental factors are measured with error and genotype data are available on multiple genetic markers. To directly use the observed genotype data, we propose two genotype-based models: genotype effect and additive effect models. Our approach offers several advantages. First, the proposed risk functions can directly incorporate the observed genotype data while modeling the linkage disequilibrium information in the regression coefficients, thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase. Compared with the haplotype-based approach, an estimating procedure based on the proposed methods can be much simpler and significantly faster. In addition, there is no potential risk due to haplotype phase estimation. Further, by fitting the proposed models, it is possible to analyze the risk alleles/variants of complex diseases, including their dominant or additive effects. To model measurement error, we adopt the pseudo-likelihood method by Lobach et al. [2008]. Performance of the proposed method is examined using simulation experiments. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development.

  10. Genotype-Based Association Mapping of Complex Diseases: Gene-Environment Interactions with Multiple Genetic Markers and Measurement Error in Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, Irvna; Fan, Ruzone; Carroll, Raymond T.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of dense single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, population-based association studies have become the major tools for identifying human disease genes and for fine gene mapping of complex traits. We develop a genotype-based approach for association analysis of case-control studies of gene-environment interactions in the case when environmental factors are measured with error and genotype data are available on multiple genetic markers. To directly use the observed genotype data, we propose two genotype-based models: genotype effect and additive effect models. Our approach offers several advantages. First, the proposed risk functions can directly incorporate the observed genotype data while modeling the linkage disequihbrium information in the regression coefficients, thus eliminating the need to infer haplotype phase. Compared with the haplotype-based approach, an estimating procedure based on the proposed methods can be much simpler and significantly faster. In addition, there is no potential risk due to haplotype phase estimation. Further, by fitting the proposed models, it is possible to analyze the risk alleles/variants of complex diseases, including their dominant or additive effects. To model measurement error, we adopt the pseudo-likelihood method by Lobach et al. [2008]. Performance of the proposed method is examined using simulation experiments. An application of our method is illustrated using a population-based case-control study of association between calcium intake with the risk of colorectal adenoma development. PMID:21031455

  11. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    .e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be used for the classification of more complex spectra of unknown origin. More specifically, the addition of mesocosm data from fig and birch tree experiments shows that isoprene and monoterpene emitting sources, respectively, can be mapped onto the statistical model structure and their positional vectors can provide insight into their biological sources and controlling oxidative chemistry. The potential to extend the methodology to the analysis of ambient air is discussed using results obtained from a zero-dimensional box model incorporating mechanistic data obtained from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.2). Such an extension to analysing ambient air would prove a powerful asset in assisting with the identification of SOA sources and the elucidation of the underlying chemical mechanisms involved.

  12. Application of remote sensing to the photogeologic mapping of the region of the Itatiaia alkaline complex. M.S. Thesis; [Minas Gerais, Rio De Janeiro, Sao Paulo, and Itatiaia, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Rodrigues, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing methods applied to geologically complex areas, through interaction of ground truth and information obtained from multispectral LANDSAT images and radar mosaics were evaluated. The test area covers parts of Minos Gerais, Rio De Janeiro and Sao Paulo states and contains the alkaline complex of Itatiaia and surrounding Precambrian terrains. Geological and structural mapping was satisfactory; however, lithological varieties which form the massif's could not be identified. Photogeological lineaments were mapped, some of which represent the boundaries of stratigraphic units. Automatic processing was used to classify sedimentary areas, which includes the talus deposits of the alkaline massifs.

  13. Fine mapping of complex traits in non-model species: using next generation sequencing and advanced intercross lines in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As for other non-model species, genetic analyses in quail will benefit greatly from a higher marker density, now attainable thanks to the evolution of sequencing and genotyping technologies. Our objective was to obtain the first genome wide panel of Japanese quail SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and to use it for the fine mapping of a QTL for a fear-related behaviour, namely tonic immobility, previously localized on Coturnix japonica chromosome 1. To this aim, two reduced representations of the genome were analysed through high-throughput 454 sequencing: AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) fragments as representatives of genomic DNA, and EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) as representatives of the transcriptome. Results The sequencing runs produced 399,189 and 1,106,762 sequence reads from cDNA and genomic fragments, respectively. They covered over 434 Mb of sequence in total and allowed us to detect 17,433 putative SNP. Among them, 384 were used to genotype two Advanced Intercross Lines (AIL) obtained from three quail lines differing for duration of tonic immobility. Despite the absence of genotyping for founder individuals in the analysis, the previously identified candidate region on chromosome 1 was refined and led to the identification of a candidate gene. Conclusions These data confirm the efficiency of transcript and AFLP-sequencing for SNP discovery in a non-model species, and its application to the fine mapping of a complex trait. Our results reveal a significant association of duration of tonic immobility with a genomic region comprising the DMD (dystrophin) gene. Further characterization of this candidate gene is needed to decipher its putative role in tonic immobility in Coturnix. PMID:23066875

  14. Lesion-symptom mapping of a complex figure copy task: A large-scale PCA study of the BCoS trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobo; Pan, Xiaoping; Lau, Johnny King Lam; Bickerton, Wai-Ling; Pradeep, Boddana; Taheri, Maliheh; Humphreys, Glyn; Rotshtein, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Complex figure copying is a commonly used neuropsychological test. Here we explored the neural basis of the factors underlying complex figure copying (CFC), using data from the Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS) in a large group of sub-acute, ischemic stroke patients (239). We computed two analyses: in the first we assessed the contribution of co-morbid deficits (i.e. in gesture processing, object use, visual neglect, pictures naming and sustained attention) to the lesions associated with CFC. In a second analysis a Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to isolate different underlying task components and to link to clinical neuroimaging scans. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis showed that poor CFC performance was associated with lesions to bi-lateral thalamus, lingual, right fusiform and right inferior parietal cortices (rIPC). The latter association with the posterior parietal cortex was diminished after controlling for neglect. Follow up analysis showed the neglect partially mediated the correlation of CFC and rIPC. The PCA revealed three main underlying components: (1) a component associated with high-level motor control common to different measures of apraxia and linked to the left postcentral gyrus, the right thalamus and middle frontal gyrus; (2) a visuo-motor transformation component unique to the CFC and associated with lesions to the posterior occipital and sensory cortices; (3) a component associated with multistep object use tasks which was correlated with lesions to the left inferior frontal orbital gyrus, the right fusiform and cerebellum. Using clinical symptoms, cognitive profiles and lesion mapping we showed that beyond visual perception, CFC performance is supported by three functional networks: one for high-level motor control, a visuo-motor transformation component, and multistep object use network. PMID:27182489

  15. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modeling in order, ultimately, to identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Furthermore, a holistic view of results across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidized gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i.e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be

  16. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  17. Remote sensing aids geologic mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Marrs, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques were applied to general geologic mapping along the Rio Grande rift zone in central Colorado. A geologic map of about 1,100 square miles was prepared utilizing (1) prior published and unpublished maps, (2) detailed and reconnaissance field maps made for this study, and (3) remote sensor data interpretations. The map is used for interpretation of the complex Cenozoic tectonic and geomorphic histories of the area.

  18. SNP-Based QTL Mapping of 15 Complex Traits in Barley under Rain-Fed and Well-Watered Conditions by a Mixed Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Mora, Freddy; Quitral, Yerko A; Matus, Ivan; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; Del Pozo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    This study identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with 15 complex traits in a breeding population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) consisting of 137 recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSL), evaluated under contrasting water availability conditions in the Mediterranean climatic region of central Chile. Given that markers showed a very strong segregation distortion, a quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping mixed model was used to account for the heterogeneity in genetic relatedness between genotypes. Fifty-seven QTL were detected under rain-fed conditions, which accounted for 5-22% of the phenotypic variation. In full irrigation conditions, 84 SNPs were significantly associated with the traits studied, explaining 5-35% of phenotypic variation. Most of the QTL were co-localized on chromosomes 2H and 3H. Environment-specific genomic regions were detected for 12 of the 15 traits scored. Although most QTL-trait associations were environment and trait specific, some important and stable associations were also detected. In full irrigation conditions, a relatively major genomic region was found underlying hectoliter weight (HW), on chromosome 1H, which explained between 27% (SNP 2711-234) and 35% (SNP 1923-265) of the phenotypic variation. Interestingly, the locus 1923-265 was also detected for grain yield at both environmental conditions, accounting for 9 and 18%, in the rain-fed and irrigation conditions, respectively. Analysis of QTL in this breeding population identified significant genomic regions that can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of barley in areas where drought is a significant constraint.

  19. Somatotopic mapping of chordotonal organ neurons in a primitive ensiferan, the New Zealand tree weta Hemideina femorata: II. complex tibial organ.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Field, Laurence H

    2003-09-22

    Most ensiferan insects possess sets of highly specialized chordotonal organs in the proximal tibiae to detect conspecific auditory/vibratory signals or approach of predators. To date, most auditory/vibratory afferents have been classified according to their physiological properties and axonal projection morphology, but not to somatotopic origins. Hence, the functional specialization of identified receptor cells in the tibial organs remains uncertain. To address this question from an anatomical aspect, we investigated the structure of the weta, Hemideina femorata, tibial organs (the most elaborated tibial chordotonal organs among ensiferans) and their central projections by staining small numbers of receptor afferents from identified tibial organs. These organs comprise the "complex tibial organ," including the subgenual organ (primary vibration detector) and its posterior complement, the accessory organ, and the crista acustica (primary auditory organ) and its proximal complement, the intermediate organ. Unlike reports of a membranous organ structure for homologs in other ensiferans, weta tibial organs contain receptor cells embedded in thick solid masses. Primary afferents project ipsilaterally to the medial ventral association center of thoracic ganglia, where axon terminals are arrayed topographically in different areas specific to each organ, except for almost complete overlap of afferents originating from the distal part of the crista acustica and from the intermediate organ. In contrast to somatotopic reflection of sensilla position on limbs, as known for mechanoreceptor hairs, the somatotopic projection map of the insect ear reveals topographic association with acoustic tracheae or tibial cuticular attachment sites, which in turn must reflect determinants of response sensitivity (e.g., frequency or threshold).

  20. SNP-Based QTL Mapping of 15 Complex Traits in Barley under Rain-Fed and Well-Watered Conditions by a Mixed Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Freddy; Quitral, Yerko A.; Matus, Ivan; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; del Pozo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    This study identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with 15 complex traits in a breeding population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) consisting of 137 recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSL), evaluated under contrasting water availability conditions in the Mediterranean climatic region of central Chile. Given that markers showed a very strong segregation distortion, a quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping mixed model was used to account for the heterogeneity in genetic relatedness between genotypes. Fifty-seven QTL were detected under rain-fed conditions, which accounted for 5–22% of the phenotypic variation. In full irrigation conditions, 84 SNPs were significantly associated with the traits studied, explaining 5–35% of phenotypic variation. Most of the QTL were co-localized on chromosomes 2H and 3H. Environment-specific genomic regions were detected for 12 of the 15 traits scored. Although most QTL-trait associations were environment and trait specific, some important and stable associations were also detected. In full irrigation conditions, a relatively major genomic region was found underlying hectoliter weight (HW), on chromosome 1H, which explained between 27% (SNP 2711-234) and 35% (SNP 1923-265) of the phenotypic variation. Interestingly, the locus 1923-265 was also detected for grain yield at both environmental conditions, accounting for 9 and 18%, in the rain-fed and irrigation conditions, respectively. Analysis of QTL in this breeding population identified significant genomic regions that can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of barley in areas where drought is a significant constraint. PMID:27446139

  1. Genetic mapping of Cmv1 in the region of mouse chromosome 6 encoding the NK gene complex-associated loci Ly49 and musNKR-P1

    SciTech Connect

    Scalzo, A.A.; Lyons, P.A.; Fitzgerald, N.A.

    1995-06-10

    The Cmv1 resistance gene controls splenic replication of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and confers natural killer (NK) cell-mediated resistance to otherwise lethal infection. The Cmv1 phenotypes of 13 inbred mouse strains have been assessed, and it was found that the Cmv1{sup r} resistance phenotype was restricted to the C57BL/6J and Ma/MyJ strains. We have further analyzed the linkage of Cmv1 to the NK gene complex (NKC) mapping to distal mouse chromosome 6 in 99 (BALB/c x C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross mice using cloned gene probes and microsatellite markers from this region. No recombinants were observed between Cmv1 and the NKC-associated Ly49 and musNKR-P1 multigene families, nor the Kap locus, nor with 7 microsatellite markers, indicating that Cmv1 is closely linked (<1 cM) to all of these markers. Analysis of the genotype of the MCMV-susceptible BXD8 RI strain around the NKC region revealed that it had C57BL/6J alleles at microsatellite markers immediately proximal and distal to Cmv1. This suggests that the Cmv1{sup s} phenotype of this strain is due to a germ-line mutation. Thus, the close linkage of Cmv1 to the Ly49 and musNK-R-P1 multigene families suggests that it may represent an NK cell recognition structure encoded in the NKC region. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An autosomal dominant locus, Nka, mapping to the Ly-49 region of a rat natural killer (NK) gene complex, controls NK cell lysis of allogeneic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells can recognize and kill MHC-incompatible normal bone marrow-derived cells. Presently characterized MHC-binding receptors on NK cells, including the Ly-49 family in the mouse, transmit inhibitory signals upon binding to cognate class I MHC ligands. Here we study in vivo NK-mediated lysis of normal allogeneic lymphocytes in crosses between alloreactivity-competent PVG rats and alloreactivity-deficient DA rats. NK cells from both strains are able to lyse standard tumor targets. We identify an autosomal dominant locus, Nka, that controls NK-mediated alloreactivity. Individuals carrying the dominant PVG allele in single dose were fully competent in eliminating allogeneic target cells, suggesting that Nka encodes or regulates a gene product inducing or activating alloreactivity. By linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, a natural killer gene complex (NKC) on rat chromosome 4 is described that contains the rat NKR-P1 and Ly-49 multigene families plus a rat NKG2D homologue. Nka maps within the NKC, together with the most telomeric Ly-49 family members, but separate from NKG2D and the NKR-P1 family. The Nka-encoded response, moreover, correlates with the expression of transcripts for Ly-49 receptors in NK cell populations, as Northern blot analysis demonstrated low expression of Ly-49 genes in DA NK cells, in contrast to high expression in alloreactivity-competent PVG, (DA X PVG)F1, and PVG.1AVI NK cells. The low Ly-49 expression in DA is not induced by MHC haplotype, as demonstrated by high expression of Ly-49 in the DA MHC- congenic PVG.1AVI strain. Finally, we have cloned and characterized the first four members of the rat Ly-49 gene family. Their cytoplasmic domains demonstrate substantial heterogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that different Ly-49 family members may subserve different signaling functions. PMID:8642329

  3. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current limitations in genome sequencing technology require the construction of physical maps for high-quality draft sequences of large plant genomes, such as that of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor. To construct a physical map of the Ae. tauschii genome, we fingerprinted 461,70...

  4. GIS-mapping of environmental assessment of the territories in the region of intense activity for the oil and gas complex for achievement the goals of the Sustainable Development (on the example of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    The uniform system of complex scientific-reference ecological-geographical should act as a base for the maintenance of the Sustainable Development (SD) concept in the territories of the Russian Federation subjects or certain regions. In this case, the assessment of the ecological situation in the regions can be solved by the conjugation of the two interrelated system - the mapping and the geoinformational. The report discusses the methodological aspects of the Atlas-mapping for the purposes of SD in the regions of Russia. The Republic of Tatarstan viewed as a model territory where a large-scale oil-gas complex "Tatneft" PLC works. The company functions for more than 60 years. Oil fields occupy an area of more than 38 000 km2; placed in its territory about 40 000 oil wells, more than 55 000 km of pipelines; more than 3 billion tons of oil was extracted. Methods for to the structure and requirements for the Atlas's content were outlined. The approaches to mapping of "an ecological dominant" of SD conceptually substantiated following the pattern of a large region of Russia. Several trends of thematically mapping were suggested to be distinguished in the Atlas's structure: • The background history of oil-fields mine working; • The nature preservation technologies while oil extracting; • The assessment of natural conditions of a humans vital activity; • Unfavorable and dangerous natural processes and phenomena; • The anthropogenic effect and environmental surroundings change; • The social-economical processes and phenomena. • The medical-ecological and geochemical processes and phenomena; Within these groups the other numerous groups can distinguished. The maps of unfavorable and dangerous processes and phenomena subdivided in accordance with the types of processes - of endogenous and exogenous origin. Among the maps of the anthropogenic effects on the natural surroundings one can differentiate the maps of the influence on different nature's spheres

  5. Planetary maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    An important goal of the USGS planetary mapping program is to systematically map the geology of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and the satellites of the outer planets. These geologic maps are published in the USGS Miscellaneous Investigations (I) Series. Planetary maps on sale at the USGS include shaded-relief maps, topographic maps, geologic maps, and controlled photomosaics. Controlled photomosaics are assembled from two or more photographs or images using a network of points of known latitude and longitude. The images used for most of these planetary maps are electronic images, obtained from orbiting television cameras, various optical-mechanical systems. Photographic film was only used to map Earth's Moon.

  6. 1-Quasiconformal mappings and CR mappings on Goursat groups.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing Yan; Fu, Zun Wei

    2014-01-01

    We show that 1-quasiconformal mappings on Goursat groups are CR or anti-CR mappings. This can reduce the determination of 1-quasiconformal mappings to the determination of CR automorphisms of CR manifolds, which is a fundamental problem in the theory of several complex variables.

  7. 1-Quasiconformal Mappings and CR Mappings on Goursat Groups

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing Yan; Fu, Zun Wei

    2014-01-01

    We show that 1-quasiconformal mappings on Goursat groups are CR or anti-CR mappings. This can reduce the determination of 1-quasiconformal mappings to the determination of CR automorphisms of CR manifolds, which is a fundamental problem in the theory of several complex variables. PMID:24895673

  8. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  9. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  10. Cytogenetic Analysis of the South American Fruit Fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera:Tephritidae) Species Complex: Construction of Detailed Photographic Polytene Chromosome Maps of the Argentinian Af. sp.1 Member

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A.; Drosopoulou, Elena; Lanzavecchia, Silvia B.; Cladera, Jorge L.; Caceres, Carlos; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and cytogenetic studies constitute a significant basis for understanding the biology of insect pests and the design and the construction of genetic tools for biological control strategies. Anastrepha fraterculus is an important pest of the Tephritidae family. It is distributed from southern Texas through eastern Mexico, Central America and South America causing significant crop damage and economic losses. Currently it is considered as a species complex; until now seven members have been described based on multidisciplinary approaches. Here we report the cytogenetic analysis of an Argentinian population characterized as Af. sp.1 member of the Anastrepha fraterculus species complex. The mitotic karyotype and the first detailed photographic maps of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes are presented. The mitotic metaphase complement consists of six (6) pairs of chromosomes, including one pair of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, with the male being the heterogametic sex. The analysis of the salivary gland polytene complement shows a total number of five long chromosomes that correspond to the five autosomes of the mitotic karyotype and a heterochromatic network corresponding to the sex chromosomes. Comparison of the polytene chromosome maps between this species and Anastrepha ludens shows significant similarity. The polytene maps presented here are suitable for cytogenetic studies that could shed light on the species limits within this species complex and support the development of genetic tools for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications. PMID:27362546

  11. Cytogenetic Analysis of the South American Fruit Fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera:Tephritidae) Species Complex: Construction of Detailed Photographic Polytene Chromosome Maps of the Argentinian Af. sp.1 Member.

    PubMed

    Gariou-Papalexiou, Angeliki; Giardini, María Cecilia; Augustinos, Antonios A; Drosopoulou, Elena; Lanzavecchia, Silvia B; Cladera, Jorge L; Caceres, Carlos; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and cytogenetic studies constitute a significant basis for understanding the biology of insect pests and the design and the construction of genetic tools for biological control strategies. Anastrepha fraterculus is an important pest of the Tephritidae family. It is distributed from southern Texas through eastern Mexico, Central America and South America causing significant crop damage and economic losses. Currently it is considered as a species complex; until now seven members have been described based on multidisciplinary approaches. Here we report the cytogenetic analysis of an Argentinian population characterized as Af. sp.1 member of the Anastrepha fraterculus species complex. The mitotic karyotype and the first detailed photographic maps of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes are presented. The mitotic metaphase complement consists of six (6) pairs of chromosomes, including one pair of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, with the male being the heterogametic sex. The analysis of the salivary gland polytene complement shows a total number of five long chromosomes that correspond to the five autosomes of the mitotic karyotype and a heterochromatic network corresponding to the sex chromosomes. Comparison of the polytene chromosome maps between this species and Anastrepha ludens shows significant similarity. The polytene maps presented here are suitable for cytogenetic studies that could shed light on the species limits within this species complex and support the development of genetic tools for sterile insect technique (SIT) applications.

  12. Constructing a Theory- and Evidence-Based Treatment Rationale for Complex eHealth Interventions: Development of an Online Alcohol Intervention Using an Intervention Mapping Approach

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Ayna; Nesvåg, Sverre; Kok, Gerjo; Duckert, Fanny

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to limited reporting of intervention rationale, little is known about what distinguishes a good intervention from a poor one. To support improved design, there is a need for comprehensive reports on novel and complex theory-based interventions. Specifically, the emerging trend of just-in-time tailoring of content in response to change in target behavior or emotional state is promising. Objective The objective of this study was to give a systematic and comprehensive description of the treatment rationale of an online alcohol intervention called Balance. Methods We used the intervention mapping protocol to describe the treatment rationale of Balance. The intervention targets at-risk drinking, and it is delivered by email, mobile phone text messaging, and tailored interactive webpages combining text, pictures, and prerecorded audio. Results The rationale of the current treatment was derived from a self-regulation perspective, and the overarching idea was to support continued self-regulation throughout the behavior change process. Maintaining the change efforts over time and coping adaptively during critical moments (eg, immediately before and after a lapse) are key factors to successful behavior change. Important elements of the treatment rationale to achieving these elements were: (1) emotion regulation as an inoculation strategy against self-regulation failure, (2) avoiding lapses by adaptive coping, and (3) avoiding relapse by resuming the change efforts after a lapse. Two distinct and complementary delivery strategies were used, including a day-to-day tunnel approach in combination with just-in-time therapy. The tunnel strategy was in accordance with the need for continuous self-regulation and it functions as a platform from which just-in-time therapy was launched. Just-in-time therapy was used to support coping during critical moments, and started when the client reports either low self-efficacy or that they were drinking above target levels

  13. Chromite deposits in central part Stillwater Complex, Sweet Grass County, Montana: a digital database for the geologic map of the east slope of Iron Mountain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howland, A.L.; Moyer, Lorre A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1940, A.L. Howland and J. W. Peoples, assisted by W.R. Jones and M.G. Bennett, mapped the geology of the east slope of Iron Mountain, Montana. The map was revised and extended by Howland in 1942 and published in 1955 as plate 10 of the U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1015-D (Howland, 1955). In 2000, the USGS contracted Optronics Specialty Co., Inc. of Northridge, CA to prepare a scanned digital version of plate 10. Geospatial editing and attributing of the scanned map of the east slope of Iron Mountain was performed by the USGS in order to produce an interim digital product. This digital geospatial database is one of many being created by the U.S. Geological Survey as an ongoing effort to provide geologic information in a geographic information system (GIS) for use in spatial analysis.

  14. Digital field mapping and the interpretation of the complex geomorphologcal setting of the Flims and Tamins Landslides ((Rhein River valley Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Masera, Diego; Perotti, Luigi; Poschinger, Andreas; Clague, John; Calhoun, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    We analyze landforms and deposits related to the Flims and Tamins landslides (Rhein Valley, Switzerland) using an integrated geomorphologic-geomatic approach that includes literature analysis, field mapping and remote sensing. These huge landslides (estimated volumes of 9.3 km3 for Flims and 1.6 km3 for Tamins) occurred at a time of large slope instabilities in the Rhein valley around 9000 years ago. Our focus is peculiar landforms called "Tomas" that occur as a series of distributed hills in the vicinity of and downstream of the Vorderrhein-Hinterrhein confluence. Their origin has been debated for more than one and one-half centuries, but current thinking is that they are, depending on the area, intact rootless masses of Flims or Tamins landslide debris rafted downvalley in a thick layer of liquefied valley fill ("Bonaduz gravel" for the ones upstram) during the Flims landslide event. Our analysis of the features involved: 1) analysis of a LiDAR-derived DTM (Swissmap) and base maps produced from the DTM for field work (hillshade and 1 m spacing contour maps); and 2) field data collection and digital GIS mapping of deposits and landforms with a pocket PC and GPS. We created a geo-database that includes morphometric, structural and sedimentological data on the Tomas. We produced a digital map from the DTM and field data, along with a comprehensive legend linked to our kinematic and dynamic interpretations. We recognize and describe four groups of Tomas, which provide new insights into the genesis of these peculiar features. Remote sensing and field data also allow us to precisely map the eastern boundary of the Flims landslide deposit and to interpret the spatial relation between the Tomas and the Bonaduz gravel.

  15. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  16. USGS maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Discover a small sample of the millions of maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in its mission to map the Nation and survey its resources. This booklet gives a brief overview of the types of maps sold and distributed by the USGS through its Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC) and also available from business partners located in most States. The USGS provides a wide variety of maps, from topographic maps showing the geographic relief and thematic maps displaying the geology and water resources of the United States, to special studies of the moon and planets.

  17. RICH MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Michael Goodchild recently gave eight reasons why traditional maps are limited as communication devices, and how interactive internet mapping can overcome these limitations. In the past, many authorities in cartography, from Jenks to Bertin, have emphasized the importance of sim...

  18. Historical Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps become out of date over time. Maps that are out of date, however, can be useful to historians, attorneys, environmentalists, genealogists, and others interested in researching the background of a particular area. Local historians can compare a series of maps of the same area compiled over a long period of time to learn how the area developed. A succession of such maps can provide a vivid picture of how a place changed over time.

  19. Image processing for optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Prabu; Gupta, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Optical Mapping is an established single-molecule, whole-genome analysis system, which has been used to gain a comprehensive understanding of genomic structure and to study structural variation of complex genomes. A critical component of Optical Mapping system is the image processing module, which extracts single molecule restriction maps from image datasets of immobilized, restriction digested and fluorescently stained large DNA molecules. In this review, we describe robust and efficient image processing techniques to process these massive datasets and extract accurate restriction maps in the presence of noise, ambiguity and confounding artifacts. We also highlight a few applications of the Optical Mapping system.

  20. Monoaryloxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Imido Alkylidene Complexes of Molybdenum and Tungsten That Contain 2,6-Bis(2,5-R2-pyrrolyl)phenoxide (R = i-Pr, Ph) Ligands and an Unsubstituted Metallacyclobutane on Its Way to Losing Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of Mo and W MAP complexes that contain O-2,6-(2,5-R2-pyrrolyl)2C6H3 (2,6-dipyrrolylphenoxide or ODPPR) ligands in which R = i-Pr, Ph. W(NAr)(CH-t-Bu)(Pyr)(ODPPPh) (4a; Ar = 2,6-disopropylphenyl, Pyr = pyrrolide) reacts readily with ethylene to yield a metallacyclobutane complex, W(NAr)(C3H6)(Pyr)(ODPPPh) (5). The structure of 5 in the solid state shows that it is approximately a square pyramid with the WC4 ring spanning apical and basal positions. This SP′ structure, which has never been observed as an actual intermediate, must now be regarded as an integral feature of the metathesis reaction. PMID:23794779

  1. Topographic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  2. Vitiligo road map.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian W; Schwartz, Robert A; Hercogová, Jana; Valle, Yan; Lotti, Torello M

    2012-01-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmenting disorder stemming from melanocyte loss or dysfunction. It has a complex, multifaceted etiology. We constructed a "vitiligo road map," consisting of basic science, clinical, and treatment components, in order to better portray our current understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and reflect upon novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for future research. The melanocyte map elaborates on the molecular processes and intracellular signaling pathways initiated by various external autocrine/paracrine factors in representing normal melanocyte homeostatic functions modulating its viability, proliferation, differentiation, dendricity, migration, and melanogenic processes. This vitiligo map identifies known inducers/triggers of vitiligo onset and progression that cultivate a microenvironment for melanocyte disappearance, real or functional. This map describes the molecular mechanisms of currently utilized clinical and experimental treatments of vitiligo that facilitate repigmentation.

  3. Building maps from maps in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Nauhaus, Ian; Nielsen, Kristina J

    2014-02-01

    Neurons in the visual system respond to more complex and holistic features at each new stage of processing. Often, these features are organized into continuous maps. Could there be a fundamental link between continuous maps and functional hierarchies? Here, we review recent studies regarding V1 maps providing some of the most noteworthy advances in our understanding of how and why maps exist. In particular, we focus on the common theme that some maps are inherited from the input of parallel pathways, which are then intimately linked to the emergence of new functional properties and their corresponding maps. These results on V1 maps may prove to be a unifying framework for hierarchical representations in the visual cortex.

  4. Native Top‐Down Mass Spectrometry of TAR RNA in Complexes with a Wild‐Type tat Peptide for Binding Site Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Eva‐Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ribonucleic acids (RNA) frequently associate with proteins in many biological processes to form more or less stable complex structures. The characterization of RNA–protein complex structures and binding interfaces by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X‐ray crystallography, or strategies based on chemical crosslinking, however, can be quite challenging. Herein, we have explored the use of an alternative method, native top‐down mass spectrometry (MS), for probing of complex stoichiometry and protein binding sites at the single‐residue level of RNA. Our data show that the electrostatic interactions between HIV‐1 TAR RNA and a peptide comprising the arginine‐rich binding region of tat protein are sufficiently strong in the gas phase to survive phosphodiester backbone cleavage of RNA by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), thus allowing its use for probing tat binding sites in TAR RNA by top‐down MS. Moreover, the MS data reveal time‐dependent 1:2 and 1:1 stoichiometries of the TAR–tat complexes and suggest structural rearrangements of TAR RNA induced by binding of tat peptide. PMID:28000363

  5. Particle complexation of mitochondrial iron produces superoxide generation and activates MAP kinases, NF-kappa B, nrf-2 in human respiratory epithelial cell

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effect of particles is associated with a disruption in cell iron homeostasis. We tested the postulate that complexation of cell iron by silica (Si02) results in both an oxidative stress and biological effect. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to either media or 100 ug/ml....

  6. A 4-gigbase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilop tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomes of wheat and its relatives in the tribe Triticeae are large, containing nearly 90% repetitive DNA, and some are polyploid. These genomes can currently be completely sequenced only by the ordered-clone genome sequencing approach, which reduces the complexity of sequence assembly from th...

  7. Bedrock geologic map of Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.; Stanley, Rolfe S.; Gale, Marjorie H.; Thompson, Peter J.; Walsh, Gregory J.; With contributions by Hatch, Norman L.; Rankin, Douglas W.; Doolan, Barry L.; Kim, Jonathan; Mehrtens, Charlotte J.; Aleinikoff, John N.; McHone, J. Gregory; Cartography by Masonic, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Bedrock Geologic Map of Vermont is the result of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Vermont. The State's complex geology spans 1.4 billion years of Earth's history. The new map comes 50 years after the most recent map of the State by Charles G. Doll and others in 1961 and a full 150 years since the publication of the first geologic map of Vermont by Edward Hitchcock and others in 1861. At a scale of 1:100,000, the map shows an uncommon level of detail for State geologic maps. Mapped rock units are primarily based on lithology, or rock type, to facilitate derivative studies in multiple disciplines. The 1961 map was compiled from 1:62,500-scale or smaller maps. The current map was created to integrate more detailed (1:12,000- to 1:24,000-scale) modern and older (1:62,500-scale) mapping with the theory of plate tectonics to provide a framework for geologic, tectonic, economic, hydrogeologic, and environmental characterization of the bedrock of Vermont. The printed map consists of three oversize sheets (52 x 76 inches). Sheets 1 and 2 show the southern and northern halves of Vermont, respectively, and can be trimmed and joined so that the entire State can be displayed as a single entity. These sheets also include 10 cross sections and a geologic structure map. Sheet 3 on the front consists of descriptions of 486 map units, a correlation of map units, and references cited. Sheet 3 on the back features a list of the 195 sources of geologic map data keyed to an index map of 7.5-minute quadrangles in Vermont, as well as a table identifying ages of rocks dated by uranium-lead zircon geochronology.

  8. Mapping of a region of the paramyxovirus L protein required for the formation of a stable complex with the viral phosphoprotein P.

    PubMed

    Parks, G D

    1994-08-01

    The paramyxovirus large protein (L) and phosphoprotein (P) are both required for viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. Previous biochemical experiments have shown that L and P can form a complex when expressed from cDNA plasmids in vivo. In this report, L and P proteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) were coexpressed in HeLa T4 cells from cDNA plasmids, and L-P complexes were examined. To identify regions of the SV5 L protein that are required for L-P complex formation, 16 deletion mutants were constructed by mutagenesis of an SV5 L cDNA. Following coexpression of these L mutants with cDNA-derived P and radiolabeling with 35S-amino acids, cell lysates were analyzed for stable L-P complexes by a coimmunoprecipitation assay and by sedimentation on 5 to 20% glycerol gradients. Mutant forms of L containing deletions that removed as much as 1,008 residues from the C-terminal half of the full-length 2,255-residue L protein were detected in complexes with P by these two assays. In contrast, large deletions in the N-terminal half of L resulted in proteins that were defective in the formation of stable L-P complexes. Likewise, L mutants containing smaller deletions that individually removed N-terminal regions which are conserved among paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus L proteins (domain I, II, or III) were also defective in stable interactions with P. These results suggest that the N-terminal half of the L protein contains sequences important for stable L-P complex formation and that the C-terminal half of L is not directly involved in these interactions. SV5-infected HeLa T4 cells were pulse-labeled with 35S-amino acids, and cell extracts were examined by gradient sedimentation. Solubilized L protein was detected as an approximately 8 to 10S species, while the P protein was found as both a approximately 4S form (approximately 85%) and a species that cosedimented with L (approximately 15%). These data provide the first biochemical evidence in support of a

  9. New geologic mapping combined with geochemical, paleomagnetic, and high-precision 40Ar/39Ar analyses reveal multiple overlapping calderas formed 16.4-15.7 Ma at High Rock caldera complex, northwestern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, M. A.; Mahood, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present new evidence from 1:100,000- and 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping for the presence of at least four overlapping calderas, 24 to 40 km in diameter, that formed in an interval of only 0.7 m.y. during the mid-Miocene at High Rock caldera complex in northwest Nevada and southern Oregon. In total, an estimated minimum volume of ~725 km3 of rhyolitic magma erupted from the complex between 16.5 and 15.5 Ma, covering an area of ~9,000 km2. Rapid eruption of numerous units at volumetric rates as high as 3,000-4,000 km3/m.y., strong welding of lithic-poor ignimbrites, extensive vapor-phase alteration of lavas and ignimbrites alike, a limited range of phenocryst content and assemblage, silicification along faults, and a lack of well-exposed stratigraphic sections has hindered previous reconnaissance-scale mapping and identification of caldera centers. Calderas are located based on truncation of precaldera rhyolitic lavas by caldera topographic walls, by arcuate patterns of rhyolite lavas that erupted along buried caldera ring faults, and by the presence of pumiceous caldera lake sediments. We attribute formation of the Virgin Valley, Badger Mountain, Hanging Rock, and Cottonwood Creek Calderas to collapse on eruption, respectively, of the ca. 16.37 Ma Idaho Canyon Tuff, the 16.34 Ma Summit Lake Tuff, the 16.0 Ma Soldier Meadows Tuff, and the 15.7 Ma Tuff of Yellow Rock Canyon. Additional smaller-volume pyroclastic units erupted during emplacement of geochemically similar rhyolitic lavas. More than 60 new 40Ar/39Ar ages were obtained on ignimbrites, fall deposits, and rhyolitic, trachytic and basaltic lavas. Many of the eruptive units in the HRCC differ in age by less than 100 k.y., which, at ca. 16 Ma, requires precision at the 1-2‰ (2σ standard error) level to distinguish units using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. The high-precision of the analyses of sanidine in the rhyolites, coupled with geochemical and paleomagnetic measurements, allowed us to correlate far

  10. Mapping Van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) - developed system for satellite mapping has been commercialized for the first time. Global Visions, Inc. maps an area while driving along a road in a sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. Data is fed into a computerized geographic information system (GIS). The resulting amps can be used for tax assessment purposes, emergency dispatch vehicles and fleet delivery companies as well as other applications.

  11. Integrative Structure–Function Mapping of the Nucleoporin Nup133 Suggests a Conserved Mechanism for Membrane Anchoring of the Nuclear Pore Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Martel, Anne; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Weiss, Thomas M.; Shi, Yi; Markina-Inarrairaegui, Ane; Bonanno, Jeffery B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Chait, Brian T.; Almo, Steven C.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole passageway for the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope. Nup133, a major component in the essential Y-shaped Nup84 complex, is a large scaffold protein of the NPC's outer ring structure. Here, we describe an integrative modeling approach that produces atomic models for multiple states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Nup133, based on the crystal structures of the sequence segments and their homologs, including the related Vanderwaltozyma polyspora (Vp) Nup133 residues 55 to 502 (VpNup13355–502) determined in this study, small angle X-ray scattering profiles for 18 constructs of ScNup133 and one construct of VpNup133, and 23 negative-stain electron microscopy class averages of ScNup1332–1157. Using our integrative approach, we then computed a multi-state structural model of the full-length ScNup133 and validated it with mutational studies and 45 chemical cross-links determined via mass spectrometry. Finally, the model of ScNup133 allowed us to annotate a potential ArfGAP1 lipid packing sensor (ALPS) motif in Sc and VpNup133 and discuss its potential significance in the context of the whole NPC; we suggest that ALPS motifs are scattered throughout the NPC's scaffold in all eukaryotes and play a major role in the assembly and membrane anchoring of the NPC in the nuclear envelope. Our results are consistent with a common evolutionary origin of Nup133 with membrane coating complexes (the protocoatomer hypothesis); the presence of the ALPS motifs in coatomer-like nucleoporins suggests an ancestral mechanism for membrane recognition present in early membrane coating complexes. PMID:25139911

  12. Integrative structure-function mapping of the nucleoporin Nup133 suggests a conserved mechanism for membrane anchoring of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Martel, Anne; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Weiss, Thomas M; Shi, Yi; Markina-Inarrairaegui, Ane; Bonanno, Jeffery B; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Chait, Brian T; Almo, Steven C; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole passageway for the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope. Nup133, a major component in the essential Y-shaped Nup84 complex, is a large scaffold protein of the NPC's outer ring structure. Here, we describe an integrative modeling approach that produces atomic models for multiple states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Nup133, based on the crystal structures of the sequence segments and their homologs, including the related Vanderwaltozyma polyspora (Vp) Nup133 residues 55 to 502 (VpNup133(55-502)) determined in this study, small angle X-ray scattering profiles for 18 constructs of ScNup133 and one construct of VpNup133, and 23 negative-stain electron microscopy class averages of ScNup133(2-1157). Using our integrative approach, we then computed a multi-state structural model of the full-length ScNup133 and validated it with mutational studies and 45 chemical cross-links determined via mass spectrometry. Finally, the model of ScNup133 allowed us to annotate a potential ArfGAP1 lipid packing sensor (ALPS) motif in Sc and VpNup133 and discuss its potential significance in the context of the whole NPC; we suggest that ALPS motifs are scattered throughout the NPC's scaffold in all eukaryotes and play a major role in the assembly and membrane anchoring of the NPC in the nuclear envelope. Our results are consistent with a common evolutionary origin of Nup133 with membrane coating complexes (the protocoatomer hypothesis); the presence of the ALPS motifs in coatomer-like nucleoporins suggests an ancestral mechanism for membrane recognition present in early membrane coating complexes.

  13. Mapping small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci for complex traits in backcross or DH populations via a multi-locus GWAS methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Wen, Yang-Jun; Ren, Wen-Long; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Composite interval mapping (CIM) is the most widely-used method in linkage analysis. Its main feature is the ability to control genomic background effects via inclusion of co-factors in its genetic model. However, the result often depends on how the co-factors are selected, especially for small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). To address this issue, here we proposed a new method under the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). First, a single-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model method for GWAS was used to scan each putative QTL on the genome in backcross or doubled haploid populations. Here, controlling background via selecting markers in the CIM was replaced by estimating polygenic variance. Then, all the peaks in the negative logarithm P-value curve were selected as the positions of multiple putative QTL to be included in a multi-locus genetic model, and true QTL were automatically identified by empirical Bayes. This called genome-wide CIM (GCIM). A series of simulated and real datasets was used to validate the new method. As a result, the new method had higher power in QTL detection, greater accuracy in QTL effect estimation, and stronger robustness under various backgrounds as compared with the CIM and empirical Bayes methods. PMID:27435756

  14. The Effects of Theta Precession on Spatial Learning and Simplicial Complex Dynamics in a Topological Model of the Hippocampal Spatial Map

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Mamiko; Brandt, Vicky; Dabaghian, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Learning arises through the activity of large ensembles of cells, yet most of the data neuroscientists accumulate is at the level of individual neurons; we need models that can bridge this gap. We have taken spatial learning as our starting point, computationally modeling the activity of place cells using methods derived from algebraic topology, especially persistent homology. We previously showed that ensembles of hundreds of place cells could accurately encode topological information about different environments (“learn” the space) within certain values of place cell firing rate, place field size, and cell population; we called this parameter space the learning region. Here we advance the model both technically and conceptually. To make the model more physiological, we explored the effects of theta precession on spatial learning in our virtual ensembles. Theta precession, which is believed to influence learning and memory, did in fact enhance learning in our model, increasing both speed and the size of the learning region. Interestingly, theta precession also increased the number of spurious loops during simplicial complex formation. We next explored how downstream readout neurons might define co-firing by grouping together cells within different windows of time and thereby capturing different degrees of temporal overlap between spike trains. Our model's optimum coactivity window correlates well with experimental data, ranging from ∼150–200 msec. We further studied the relationship between learning time, window width, and theta precession. Our results validate our topological model for spatial learning and open new avenues for connecting data at the level of individual neurons to behavioral outcomes at the neuronal ensemble level. Finally, we analyzed the dynamics of simplicial complex formation and loop transience to propose that the simplicial complex provides a useful working description of the spatial learning process. PMID:24945927

  15. Genome mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome maps can be thought of much like road maps except that, instead of traversing across land, they traverse across the chromosomes of an organism. Genetic markers serve as landmarks along the chromosome and provide researchers information as to how close they may be to a gene or region of inter...

  16. Undersea Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a cooperative learning activity in which students assume different roles in an effort to produce a relief map of the ocean floor. Materials, procedures, definitions, student roles, and questions are discussed. A reproducible map for the activity is provided. (CW)

  17. Question Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  18. Map Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet about maps, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for students in grades K-3. Students learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand and use maps. Lessons in the packet center on a story about a little girl, Nikki, who rides in a hot-air balloon that gives her, and…

  19. Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  20. Collection Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  1. A scheme for the uniform mapping and monitoring of earth resources and environmental complexes: An assessment of natural vegetation, environmental, and crop analogs. [Sierra-Lahontan and Colorado Plateaus, Northern Great Valley (CA), and Louisiana Coastal Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulton, C. E.; Welch, R. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A study was performed to develop and test a procedure for the uniform mapping and monitoring of natural ecosystems in the semi-arid and wood regions of the Sierra-Lahontan and Colorado Plateau areas, and for the estimating of rice crop production in the Northern Great Valley (Ca.) and the Louisiana Coastal Plain. ERTS-1 and high flight and low flight aerial photos were used in a visual photointerpretation scheme to identify vegetation complexes, map acreages, and evaluate crop vigor and stress. Results indicated that the vegetation analog concept is valid; that depending on the kind of vegetation and its density, analogs are interpretable at different levels in the hierarchical classification from second to the fourth level. The second level uses physiognomic growth form-structural criteria, and the fourth level uses floristic or taxonomic criteria, usually at generic level. It is recommended that analog comparisons should be made in relatively small test areas where large homogeneous examples can be found of each analog.

  2. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, D.S.; Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CA repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.

  3. Pygmy squids and giant brains: mapping the complex cephalopod CNS by phalloidin staining of vibratome sections and whole-mount preparations.

    PubMed

    Wollesen, T; Loesel, R; Wanninger, A

    2009-04-30

    Among bilaterian invertebrates, cephalopod molluscs (e.g., squids, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a central nervous system (CNS) that rivals in complexity that of the phylogenetically distant vertebrates (e.g., mouse and human). However, this prime example of convergent evolution has rarely been the subject of recent developmental and evolutionary studies, which may partly be due to the lack of suitable neural markers and the large size of cephalopod brains. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence-coupled phalloidin to characterize the CNS of cephalopods using histochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whole-mount preparations of developmental stages as well as vibratome sections of embryonic and adult brains were analyzed and the benefits of this technique are illustrated. Compared to classical neuroanatomical and antibody-based studies, phalloidin labeling experiments are less time-consuming and allow a high throughput of samples. Besides other advantages summarized here, phalloidin reliably labels the entire neuropil of the CNS of all squids, cuttlefish and octopuses investigated. This facilitates high-resolution in toto reconstructions of the CNS and contributes to a better understanding of the organization of neural networks. Amenable for multi-labeling experiments employing antibodies against neurotransmitters, proteins and enzymes, phalloidin constitutes an excellent neuropil marker for the complex cephalopod CNS.

  4. Large-scale Spectroscopic Mapping of the ρ Ophiuchi Molecular Cloud Complex. I. The C2H-to-N2H+ Ratio as a Signpost of Cloud Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhichen; Li, Di; Chang, Qiang; Qian, Lei; Bergin, Edwin A.; Wang, Junzhi

    2017-02-01

    We present 2.5-square-degree C2H N = 1–0 and N2H+ J = 1–0 maps of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud complex. These are the first large-scale maps of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud complex with these two tracers. The C2H emission is spatially more extended than the N2H+ emission. One faint N2H+ clump, Oph-M, and one C2H ring, Oph-RingSW, are identified for the first time. The observed C2H-to-N2H+ abundance ratio ([C2H]/[N2H+]) varies between 5 and 110. We modeled the C2H and N2H+ abundances with 1D chemical models, which show a clear decline of [C2H]/[N2H+] with chemical age. Such an evolutionary trend is little affected by temperatures when they are below 40 K. At high density (n H > 105 cm‑3), however, the time it takes for the abundance ratio to drop at least one order of magnitude becomes less than the dynamical time (e.g., turbulence crossing time of ∼105 yr). The observed [C2H]/[N2H+] difference between L1688 and L1689 can be explained by L1688 having chemically younger gas in relatively less dense regions. The observed [C2H]/[N2H+] values are the results of time evolution, accelerated at higher densities. For the relatively low density regions in L1688 where only C2H emission was detected, the gas should be chemically younger.

  5. Quantitative trait locus mapping based on resampling in a vast maize testcross experiment and its relevance to quantitative genetics for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Schön, Chris C; Utz, H Friedrich; Groh, Susanne; Truberg, Bernd; Openshaw, Steve; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2004-05-01

    From simulation studies it is known that the allocation of experimental resources has a crucial effect on power of QTL detection as well as on accuracy and precision of QTL estimates. In this study, we used a very large experimental data set composed of 976 F(5) maize testcross progenies evaluated in 19 environments and cross-validation to assess the effect of sample size (N), number of test environments (E), and significance threshold on the number of detected QTL, the proportion of the genotypic variance explained by them, and the corresponding bias of estimates for grain yield, grain moisture, and plant height. In addition, we used computer simulations to compare the usefulness of two cross-validation schemes for obtaining unbiased estimates of QTL effects. The maximum, validated genotypic variance explained by QTL in this study was 52.3% for grain moisture despite the large number of detected QTL, thus confirming the infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics. In both simulated and experimental data, the effect of sample size on power of QTL detection as well as on accuracy and precision of QTL estimates was large. The number of detected QTL and the proportion of genotypic variance explained by QTL generally increased more with increasing N than with increasing E. The average bias of QTL estimates and its range were reduced by increasing N and E. Cross-validation performed well with respect to yielding asymptotically unbiased estimates of the genotypic variance explained by QTL. On the basis of our findings, recommendations for planning of QTL mapping experiments and allocation of experimental resources are given.

  6. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed.

  7. Tracking the complex flow of chromosome rearrangements from the Hominoidea Ancestor to extant Hylobates and Nomascus Gibbons by high-resolution synteny mapping.

    PubMed

    Misceo, Doriana; Capozzi, Oronzo; Roberto, Roberta; Dell'oglio, Maria P; Rocchi, Mariano; Stanyon, Roscoe; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2008-09-01

    In this study we characterized the extension, reciprocal arrangement, and orientation of syntenic chromosomal segments in the lar gibbon (Hylobates lar, HLA) by hybridization of a panel of approximately 1000 human BAC clones. Each lar gibbon rearrangement was defined by a splitting BAC clone or by two overlapping clones flanking the breakpoint. A reconstruction of the synteny arrangement of the last common ancestor of all living lesser apes was made by combining these data with previous results in Nomascus leucogenys, Hoolock hoolock, and Symphalangus syndactylus. The definition of the ancestral synteny organization facilitated tracking the cascade of chromosomal changes from the Hominoidea ancestor to the present day karyotype of Hylobates and Nomascus. Each chromosomal rearrangement could be placed within an approximate phylogenetic and temporal framework. We identified 12 lar-specific rearrangements and five previously undescribed rearrangements that occurred in the Hylobatidae ancestor. The majority of the chromosomal differences between lar gibbons and humans are due to rearrangements that occurred in the Hylobatidae ancestor (38 events), consistent with the hypothesis that the genus Hylobates is the most recently evolved lesser ape genus. The rates of rearrangements in gibbons are 10 to 20 times higher than the mammalian default rate. Segmental duplication may be a driving force in gibbon chromosome evolution, because a consistent number of rearrangements involves pericentromeric regions (10 events) and centromere inactivation (seven events). Both phenomena can be reasonably supposed to have strongly contributed to the euchromatic dispersal of segmental duplications typical of pericentromeric regions. This hypothesis can be more fully tested when the sequence of this gibbon species becomes available. The detailed synteny map provided here will, in turn, substantially facilitate sequence assembly efforts.

  8. High-resolution mapping of the protein interaction network for the human transcription machinery and affinity purification of RNA polymerase II-associated complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Philippe; Al-Khoury, Racha; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Faubert, Denis; Jiang, Heng; Poitras, Christian; Bouchard, Annie; Forget, Diane; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years of research on gene transcription has uncovered a myriad of factors that regulate, directly or indirectly, the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) during mRNA synthesis. Yet many regulatory factors remain to be discovered. Using protein affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS), we recently unraveled a high-density interaction network formed by RNAPII and its accessory factors from the soluble fraction of human cell extracts. Validation of the dataset using a machine learning approach trained to minimize the rate of false positives and false negatives yielded a high-confidence dataset and uncovered novel interactors that regulate the RNAPII transcription machinery, including a new protein assembly we named the RNAPII-Associated Protein 3 (RPAP3) complex. PMID:19450687

  9. Mapping Children--Mapping Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, Herbert L., Jr.

    Research is underway concerning the way the perception, conception, and representation of spatial layout develops. Three concepts are important here--space itself, frame of reference, and cognitive map. Cognitive map refers to a form of representation of the behavioral space, not paired associate or serial response learning. Other criteria…

  10. Radiation hybrid mapping in crop plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Map-based cloning and manipulation of genes controlling important traits for crop remains a great challenge due to the complex of crop genomes and lack of a high resolution of genetic and physical maps. In this review article, we compared the various mapping methods available for plant research and ...

  11. LA-ICP-MS mapping of olivine from the Brahin and Brenham meteorites: Complex elemental distributions in the pallasite olivine precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibbin, Seann J.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.; Mallmann, Guilherme; Halfpenny, Angela

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the early history of olivine from the Main-Group pallasites Brahin and Brenham, we have spatially mapped their trace-element distributions using laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Brahin olivine interiors contain ∼100-200 μm patches enriched in Cr, Al, Ti, V, Sc and Ga, separated by linear enrichments of P; these structures bear no relation to current crystal morphologies. Rather, cross-cutting relationships suggest they predate olivine-metal mixing. Brenham olivine also has internal variations for these elements. By contrast, Ni and Co concentrations in olivine from both meteorites decrease near crystal margins, as expected for freezing-in of profiles formed during diffusive re-equilibration with metal during cooling. Brenham olivine also has decreasing Al, Cr and Ti near the margin. Correlations between concentrations of Cr and Al exist for individual Brahin olivine grains, but do not hold over multiple grains, indicating a heterogeneous precursor. Al and Ti are correlated over multiple grains in Brahin, interpreted as Ti cations decorating pre-existing Al-defects. In Brenham olivine, similar geochemical trends exist, but the Cr-Al relationship probably represents both grain margin effects and pre-existing internal heterogeneity. The preservation of structure for elements which are normally fast diffusers in olivine hinges on coupled substitutions involving Al, which along with P diffuses much more slowly than most other elements under some conditions. Al concentrations in olivine are low and variable (3-33 ppm) which is inconsistent with crystallisation from a normal silicate melt; Al-in-olivine thermometers indicate that pallasite olivine was formed in a low-temperature environment. Following its delivery to the magma ocean/core-mantle boundary, Al-P systematics were not substantially modified. Assuming diffusivities for Al and P that are similar to Si (since they reside in the same crystallographic site

  12. MAPS of Cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Lincoln

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to produce an interactive visualization from a mathematical model that successfully predicts metastases from head and neck cancer. We met this goal early in the project. The visualization is available for the public to view. Our work appears to fill a need for more information about this deadly disease. The idea of this project was to make an easily interpretable visualization based on what we call "functional maps" of disease. A functional map is a graphic summary of medical data, where distances between parts of the body are determined by the probability of disease, not by anatomical distances. Functional maps often beat little resemblance to anatomical maps, but they can be used to predict the spread of disease. The idea of modeling the spread of disease in an abstract multidimensional space is difficult for many people. Our goal was to make the important predictions easy to see. NASA must face this problem frequently: how to help laypersons and professionals see important trends in abstract, complex data. We took advantage of concepts perfected in NASA's graphics libraries. As an analogy, consider a functional map of early America. Suppose we choose travel times, rather than miles, as our measures of inter-city distances. For Abraham Lincoln, travel times would have been the more meaningful measure of separation between cities. In such a map New Orleans would be close to Memphis because of the Mississippi River. St. Louis would be close to Portland because of the Oregon Trail. Oklahoma City would be far from Little Rock because of the Cheyenne. Such a map would look puzzling to those of us who have always seen physical maps, but the functional map would be more useful in predicting the probabilities of inter-site transit. Continuing the analogy, we could predict the spread of social diseases such as gambling along the rivers and cattle rustling along the trails. We could simply print the functional map of America, but it would be more interesting

  13. Mapping Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC.

    This document features a lesson plan that examines how maps help scientists protect biodiversity and how plants and animals are adapted to specific ecoregions by comparing biome, ecoregion, and habitat. Samples of instruction and assessment are included. (KHR)

  14. Genome-Wide Mapping of Uncapped and Cleaved Transcripts Reveals a Role for the Nuclear mRNA Cap-Binding Complex in Cotranslational RNA Decay in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA turnover is necessary for controlling proper mRNA levels posttranscriptionally. In general, RNA degradation is via exoribonucleases that degrade RNA either from the 5′ end to the 3′ end, such as XRN4, or in the opposite direction by the multisubunit exosome complex. Here, we use genome-wide mapping of uncapped and cleaved transcripts to reveal the global landscape of cotranslational mRNA decay in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. We found that this process leaves a clear three nucleotide periodicity in open reading frames. This pattern of cotranslational degradation is especially evident near the ends of open reading frames, where we observe accumulation of cleavage events focused 16 to 17 nucleotides upstream of the stop codon because of ribosomal pausing during translation termination. Following treatment of Arabidopsis plants with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide, cleavage events accumulate 13 to 14 nucleotides upstream of the start codon where initiating ribosomes have been stalled with these sequences in their P site. Further analysis in xrn4 mutant plants indicates that cotranslational RNA decay is XRN4 dependent. Additionally, studies in plants lacking CAP BINDING PROTEIN80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1, the largest subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap binding complex, reveal a role for this protein in cotranslational decay. In total, our results demonstrate the global prevalence and features of cotranslational RNA decay in a plant transcriptome. PMID:27758893

  15. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  16. Venus mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Morgan, H. F.; Sucharski, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Semicontrolled image mosaics of Venus, based on Magellan data, are being compiled at 1:50,000,000, 1:10,000,000, 1:5,000,000, and 1:1,000,000 scales to support the Magellan Radar Investigator (RADIG) team. The mosaics are semicontrolled in the sense that data gaps were not filled and significant cosmetic inconsistencies exist. Contours are based on preliminary radar altimetry data that is subjected to revision and improvement. Final maps to support geologic mapping and other scientific investigations, to be compiled as the dataset becomes complete, will be sponsored by the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and/or the Venus Data Analysis Program. All maps, both semicontrolled and final, will be published as I-maps by the United States Geological Survey. All of the mapping is based on existing knowledge of the spacecraft orbit; photogrammetric triangulation, a traditional basis for geodetic control on planets where framing cameras were used, is not feasible with the radar images of Venus, although an eventual shift of coordinate system to a revised spin-axis location is anticipated. This is expected to be small enough that it will affect only large-scale maps.

  17. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  18. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    DOE PAGES

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Velazquez, Hector; ...

    2016-07-22

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the interconversion of CO 2 and HCO 3 − , and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM) and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM) are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II) has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an R cryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along withmore » only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity ( K i ) for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 n M ). The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.« less

  19. Automated geologic mapping using rock reflectances.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.; Rowan, L. C.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the feasibility of preparing geologic maps automatically through computer processing of calibrated narrow-band visible and near IR reflectivity data collected with a 12-channel scanner. Five procedures were followed in the computer analysis of the radiances recorded as voltages on analog magnetic tape. Three recognition maps have been generated iteratively using a progressively more complex classification scheme. The overall accuracy of the first recognition map was 80%, but the discrimination of the limestone and dolomite was only 50-60%. All three maps are very accurate outcrop maps. The results demonstrate the feasibility of automated geologic mapping in this relatively simple setting.

  20. The High Rock caldera complex, NW Nevada: Geologic mapping, volcanology, geochemistry, and ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausback, B.; Smith, J.; Henry, C. D.; Hilton, R. P.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Noble, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Our new work reveals a complex evolution of the High Rock caldera, one of the oldest calderas related to initiation of the Yellowstone hotspot. The caldera formed at 16.43±0.01 Ma (n=2, Fish Canyon sanidine = 28.201 Ma; all ages reported here agree with stratigraphy) during eruption of the zoned (metaluminous, high-silica dacite to slightly peralkaline, low-silica rhyolite), abundantly porphyritic Summit Lake Tuff. The only exposed precaldera rocks are a suite of intermediate lavas along the western margin. They are undated but compositionally similar to 30 Ma rocks in the region, so probably unrelated to the caldera. The caldera margin is entirely buried by moat domes and post-collapse lavas and tuff. Sparsely porphyritic rhyolite lavas erupted at 16.30±0.01 Ma (n=1) north of the caldera, possibly along the ring fracture. A large suite of petrographically and compositionally nearly indistinguishable, abundantly porphyritic, peralkaline rhyolite lavas and tuffs, the Soldier Meadow (SM) rock type, erupted from vents around the entire caldera margin in two pulses at 16.14±0.01 and 16.09±0.01 Ma (n=6 and 3). The first pulse includes lavas along the western and eastern margin; the Soldier Meadow Tuff (SMT, a moderately peralkaline, crystal-rich welded ignimbrite that is thinly-layered with coarse lag breccias in the proximal area and massive in distal locations), which erupted along the eastern caldera margin; and accidental blocks (up to 3m) of SMT brought up in the interior of the caldera by later eruptions. The second pulse includes several more lavas and associated small-volume flow, fall, and surge(?) tuffs along the northeastern and southwestern margin. Distribution of the SM rock type suggests that its magma chamber underlay the entire caldera. Rocks of the second pulse are distinguished only by higher incompatible element concentrations (Rb, Zr, Nb, Th), which suggests the magma body continued to differentiate between pulses. The tuffs of Alkali Flat and

  1. Generating Multi-destination Maps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junsong; Fan, Jiepeng; Luo, Zhenshan

    2016-08-03

    Multi-destination maps are a kind of navigation maps aimed to guide visitors to multiple destinations within a region, which can be of great help to urban visitors. However, they have not been developed in the current online map service. To address this issue, we introduce a novel layout model designed especially for generating multi-destination maps, which considers the global and local layout of a multi-destination map. We model the layout problem as a graph drawing that satisfies a set of hard and soft constraints. In the global layout phase, we balance the scale factor between ROIs. In the local layout phase, we make all edges have good visibility and optimize the map layout to preserve the relative length and angle of roads. We also propose a perturbation-based optimization method to find an optimal layout in the complex solution space. The multi-destination maps generated by our system are potential feasible on the modern mobile devices and our result can show an overview and a detail view of the whole map at the same time. In addition, we perform a user study to evaluate the effectiveness of our method, and the results prove that the multi-destination maps achieve our goals well.

  2. Automated mapping of hammond's landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallant, A.L.; Brown, D.D.; Hoffer, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We automated a method for mapping Hammond's landforms over large landscapes using digital elevation data. We compared our results against Hammond's published landform maps, derived using manual interpretation procedures. We found general agreement in landform patterns mapped by the manual and the automated approaches, and very close agreement in characterization of local topographic relief. The two approaches produced different interpretations of intermediate landforms, which relied upon quantification of the proportion of landscape having gently sloping terrain. This type of computation is more efficiently and consistently applied by computer than human. Today's ready access to digital data and computerized geospatial technology provides a good foundation for mapping terrain features, but the mapping criteria guiding manual techniques in the past may not be appropriate for automated approaches. We suggest that future efforts center on the advantages offered by digital advancements in refining an approach to better characterize complex landforms. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  3. Disaggregation of Soil Map Units for Improved Ecological Site Mapping in Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland soils are often mapped with soil map units consisting of associations, complexes, and undifferentiated groups composed of varied soil components. Because different components may be related to different ecological sites, the unmapped heterogeneity within map units limits the potential uses...

  4. Disaggregation of soil map units for improved ecological site mapping in rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland soils are often mapped with soil map units consisting of associations, complexes, and undifferentiated groups composed of varied soil components. Because different components may be related to different ecological sites, the unmapped heterogeneity within map units limits the potential uses...

  5. The Circumpolar Arctic vegetation map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Donald A.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Daniels, F.J.A.; Einarsson, E.; Elvebakk, A.; Gould, W.A.; Katenin, A.E.; Kholod, S.S.; Markon, C.J.; Melnikov, E.S.; Moskalenko, N.G.; Talbot, S. S.; Yurtsev, B.A.; Bliss, L.C.; Edlund, S.A.; Zoltai, S.C.; Wilhelm, M.; Bay, C.; Gudjonsson, G.; Ananjeva, G.V.; Drozdov, D.S.; Konchenko, L.A.; Korostelev, Y.V.; Ponomareva, O.E.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Safranova, I.N.; Shelkunova, R.; Polezhaev, A.N.; Johansen, B.E.; Maier, H.A.; Murray, D.F.; Fleming, Michael D.; Trahan, N.G.; Charron, T.M.; Lauritzen, S.M.; Vairin, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Question: What are the major vegetation units in the Arctic, what is their composition, and how are they distributed among major bioclimate subzones and countries? Location: The Arctic tundra region, north of the tree line. Methods: A photo-interpretive approach was used to delineate the vegetation onto an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) base image. Mapping experts within nine Arctic regions prepared draft maps using geographic information technology (ArcInfo) of their portion of the Arctic, and these were later synthesized to make the final map. Area analysis of the map was done according to bioclimate subzones, and country. The integrated mapping procedures resulted in other maps of vegetation, topography, soils, landscapes, lake cover, substrate pH, and above-ground biomass. Results: The final map was published at 1:7 500 000 scale map. Within the Arctic (total area = 7.11 x 106 km 2), about 5.05 ?? 106 km2 is vegetated. The remainder is ice covered. The map legend generally portrays the zonal vegetation within each map polygon. About 26% of the vegetated area is erect shrublands, 18% peaty graminoid tundras, 13% mountain complexes, 12% barrens, 11% mineral graminoid tundras, 11% prostrate-shrub tundras, and 7% wetlands. Canada has by far the most terrain in the High Arctic mostly associated with abundant barren types and prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, whereas Russia has the largest area in the Low Arctic, predominantly low-shrub tundra. Conclusions: The CAVM is the first vegetation map of an entire global biome at a comparable resolution. The consistent treatment of the vegetation across the circumpolar Arctic, abundant ancillary material, and digital database should promote the application to numerous land-use, and climate-change applications and will make updating the map relatively easy. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  6. Geological mapping in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.L. . Dept. of Geology); Kulander, B.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Lessing, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Geological mapping at 1:24,000 scale in the Valley and Ridge province of West Virginia is an ongoing program to up-date 75-year old 1:62,500 scale county geological maps. Large-scale topographic maps, remote-sensing imagery, geophysical data, well-log data, and advances in structural concepts provide information leading to thin-skinned tectonic interpretations. The five maps displayed (22 7.5-minute quadrangles) illustrate the complex deformational styles in the Paleozoic section of the Massanutten/Blue Ridge, Waynesboro, and Martinsburg sheets. Detailed field mapping reveals that many previously mapped anticlines, such as Great North Mountain and Adams run, are complex anticlinoria and that large expanses of Lower Mississippian clastics were overlooked in the Sector and Lost River State Park quadrangles. Furthermore, prevalent thrust and strike-slip faulting in the Cambrian-Ordovician carbonates of the Great Valley and extensive folding, faulting, and pre-fold layer-parallel shortening have occurred in the upper sheet to an extent not previously reported. Finally, imbrication of the underlying Waynesboro sheet forms a duplex that defines major anticlinoria and synclinoria in the Valley and Ridge. Complete maps have proven beneficial to government and the public. Examples are the siting of high-yield water wells, delineation of wellheat protection areas, and providing maps suitable for GIS systems. The maps have also been used to organize regional and local field trips and have served as the basis for the further structural and stratigraphic investigations. The West Virginia Geological Survey places high priority on detailed geological mapping. However, continuation of the program is dependent upon adequate funding.

  7. Mining Concept Maps to Understand University Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Jin Soung; Cho, Moon-Heum

    2012-01-01

    Concept maps, visual representations of knowledge, are used in an educational context as a way to represent students' knowledge, and identify mental models of students; however there is a limitation of using concept mapping due to its difficulty to evaluate the concept maps. A concept map has a complex structure which is composed of concepts and…

  8. Discrete Conformal Approximation of Complex Earthquake Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Distribution Unlimited Edward . Allen Accepted John Borrelli Dean of the Graduate School AUGUST, 2005 20050802 092 __ rUt2 7_205 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY AT LUBBOCK REPORT NUMBER CI04-1143 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING THE DEPARTMENT...corner on the first day of Math 5320 laughing to yourself as we wondered, "Where is the professor?" Thank you, sir . To the United States Air Force, the

  9. Harvesting geographic features from heterogeneous raster maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yao-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Raster maps offer a great deal of geospatial information and are easily accessible compared to other geospatial data. However, harvesting geographic features locked in heterogeneous raster maps to obtain the geospatial information is challenging. This is because of the varying image quality of raster maps (e.g., scanned maps with poor image quality and computer-generated maps with good image quality), the overlapping geographic features in maps, and the typical lack of metadata (e.g., map geocoordinates, map source, and original vector data). Previous work on map processing is typically limited to a specific type of map and often relies on intensive manual work. In contrast, this thesis investigates a general approach that does not rely on any prior knowledge and requires minimal user effort to process heterogeneous raster maps. This approach includes automatic and supervised techniques to process raster maps for separating individual layers of geographic features from the maps and recognizing geographic features in the separated layers (i.e., detecting road intersections, generating and vectorizing road geometry, and recognizing text labels). The automatic technique eliminates user intervention by exploiting common map properties of how road lines and text labels are drawn in raster maps. For example, the road lines are elongated linear objects and the characters are small connected-objects. The supervised technique utilizes labels of road and text areas to handle complex raster maps, or maps with poor image quality, and can process a variety of raster maps with minimal user input. The results show that the general approach can handle raster maps with varying map complexity, color usage, and image quality. By matching extracted road intersections to another geospatial dataset, we can identify the geocoordinates of a raster map and further align the raster map, separated feature layers from the map, and recognized features from the layers with the geospatial

  10. Map projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features. Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion. This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.

  11. Advanced Electrophysiologic Mapping Systems

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and demand in Ontario for catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias guided by advanced nonfluoroscopy mapping systems. Particular attention was paid to ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinical Need Tachycardia Tachycardia refers to a diverse group of arrhythmias characterized by heart rates that are greater than 100 beats per minute. It results from abnormal firing of electrical impulses from heart tissues or abnormal electrical pathways in the heart because of scars. Tachycardia may be asymptomatic, or it may adversely affect quality of life owing to symptoms such as palpitations, headaches, shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness, and syncope. Atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained arrhythmia, affects about 99,000 people in Ontario. It is associated with higher morbidity and mortality because of increased risk of stroke, embolism, and congestive heart failure. In atrial fibrillation, most of the abnormal arrhythmogenic foci are located inside the pulmonary veins, although the atrium may also be responsible for triggering or perpetuating atrial fibrillation. Ventricular tachycardia, often found in patients with ischemic heart disease and a history of myocardial infarction, is often life-threatening; it accounts for about 50% of sudden deaths. Treatment of Tachycardia The first line of treatment for tachycardia is antiarrhythmic drugs; for atrial fibrillation, anticoagulation drugs are also used to prevent stroke. For patients refractory to or unable to tolerate antiarrhythmic drugs, ablation of the arrhythmogenic heart tissues is the only option. Surgical ablation such as the Cox-Maze procedure is more invasive. Catheter ablation, involving the delivery of energy (most commonly radiofrequency) via a percutaneous catheter system guided by X-ray fluoroscopy, has been used in place of surgical ablation for many patients. However, this conventional approach in catheter ablation

  12. Cat-Map: putting cataract on the map

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Thomas M.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2010-01-01

    Lens opacities, or cataract(s), may be inherited as a classic Mendelian disorder usually with early-onset or, more commonly, acquired with age as a multi-factorial or complex trait. Many genetic forms of cataract have been described in mice and other animal models. Considerable progress has been made in mapping and identifying the genes and mutations responsible for inherited forms of cataract, and genetic determinants of age-related cataract are beginning to be discovered. To provide a convenient and accurate summary of current information focused on the increasing genetic complexity of Mendelian and age-related cataract we have created an online chromosome map and reference database for cataract in humans and mice (Cat-Map). PMID:21042563

  13. A map of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gott III, J. Richard; Juric, Mario; Schlegel, David; Hoyle, Fiona; Vogeley, Michael; Tegmark, Max; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon

    2003-10-20

    We have produced a new conformal map of the universe illustrating recent discoveries, ranging from Kuiper belt objects in the Solar system, to the galaxies and quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This map projection, based on the logarithm map of the complex plane, preserves shapes locally, and yet is able to display the entire range of astronomical scales from the Earth s neighborhood to the cosmic microwave background. The conformal nature of the projection, preserving shapes locally, may be of particular use for analyzing large scale structure. Prominent in the map is a Sloan Great Wall of galaxies 1.37 billion light years long, 80 percent longer than the Great Wall discovered by Geller and Huchra and therefore the largest observed structure in the universe.

  14. The MAP Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary T.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, integration, test, performance, and lessons learned of NASA's Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) propulsion subsystem. MAP was launched on a Delta-II launch vehicle from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 30, 2001. Due to instrument thermal stability requirements, the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point was selected for the mission orbit. The L2 trajectory incorporated phasing loops and a lunar gravity assist. The propulsion subsystem's requirements are to manage momentum, perform maneuvers during the phasing loops to set up the lunar swingby, and perform stationkeeping at L2 for 2 years. MAP's propulsion subsystem uses 8 thrusters which are located and oriented to provide attitude control and momentum management about all axes, and delta-V in any direction without exposing the instrument to the sun. The propellant tank holds 72 kg of hydrazine, which is expelled by unregulated blowdown pressurization. Thermal management is complex because no heater cycling is allowed at L2. Several technical challenges presented themselves during I and T, such as in-situ weld repairs and in-situ bending of thruster tubes to accommodate late changes in the observatory CG. On-orbit performance has been nominal, and all phasing loop, mid-course correction, and stationkeeping maneuvers have been successfully performed to date.

  15. Autonomous exploration and mapping of unknown environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jason; Osteen, Phil; Fields, MaryAnne

    2012-06-01

    Autonomous exploration and mapping is a vital capability for future robotic systems expected to function in arbitrary complex environments. In this paper, we describe an end-to-end robotic solution for remotely mapping buildings. For a typical mapping system, an unmanned system is directed to enter an unknown building at a distance, sense the internal structure, and, barring additional tasks, while in situ, create a 2-D map of the building. This map provides a useful and intuitive representation of the environment for the remote operator. We have integrated a robust mapping and exploration system utilizing laser range scanners and RGB-D cameras, and we demonstrate an exploration and metacognition algorithm on a robotic platform. The algorithm allows the robot to safely navigate the building, explore the interior, report significant features to the operator, and generate a consistent map - all while maintaining localization.

  16. Mapping the Natchez Trace Parkway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a National Park Service (NPS) landcover classification, a landcover map of the 715-km (444-mile) NPS Natchez Trace Parkway (hereafter referred to as the "Parkway") was created. The NPS landcover classification followed National Vegetation Classification (NVC) protocols. The landcover map, which extended the initial landcover classification to the entire Parkway, was based on color-infrared photography converted to 1-m raster-based digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles, according to U.S. Geological Survey mapping standards. Our goal was to include as many alliance classes as possible in the Parkway landcover map. To reach this goal while maintaining a consistent and quantifiable map product throughout the Parkway extent, a mapping strategy was implemented based on the migration of class-based spectral textural signatures and the congruent progressive refinement of those class signatures along the Parkway. Progressive refinement provided consistent mapping by evaluating the spectral textural distinctiveness of the alliance-association classes, and where necessary, introducing new map classes along the Parkway. By following this mapping strategy, the use of raster-based image processing and geographic information system analyses for the map production provided a quantitative and reproducible product. Although field-site classification data were severely limited, the combination of spectral migration of class membership along the Parkway and the progressive classification strategy produced an organization of alliances that was internally highly consistent. The organization resulted from the natural patterns or alignments of spectral variance and the determination of those spectral patterns that were compositionally similar in the dominant species as NVC alliances. Overall, the mapped landcovers represented the existent spectral textural patterns that defined and encompassed the complex variety of compositional alliances and associations of the Parkway. Based

  17. The National Map: from geography to mapping and back again

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelmelis, John A.; DeMulder, Mark L.; Ogrosky, Charles E.; Van Driel, J. Nicholas; Ryan, Barbara J.

    2003-01-01

    When the means of production for national base mapping were capital intensive, required large production facilities, and had ill-defined markets, Federal Government mapping agencies were the primary providers of the spatial data needed for economic development, environmental management, and national defense. With desktop geographic information systems now ubiquitous, source data available as a commodity from private industry, and the realization that many complex problems faced by society need far more and different kinds of spatial data for their solutions, national mapping organizations must realign their business strategies to meet growing demand and anticipate the needs of a rapidly changing geographic information environment. The National Map of the United States builds on a sound historic foundation of describing and monitoring the land surface and adds a focused effort to produce improved understanding, modeling, and prediction of land-surface change. These added dimensions bring to bear a broader spectrum of geographic science to address extant and emerging issues. Within the overarching construct of The National Map, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is making a transition from data collector to guarantor of national data completeness; from producing paper maps to supporting an online, seamless, integrated database; and from simply describing the Nation’s landscape to linking these descriptions with increased scientific understanding. Implementing the full spectrum of geographic science addresses a myriad of public policy issues, including land and natural resource management, recreation, urban growth, human health, and emergency planning, response, and recovery. Neither these issues nor the science and technologies needed to deal with them are static. A robust research agenda is needed to understand these changes and realize The National Map vision. Initial successes have been achieved. These accomplishments demonstrate the utility of

  18. Geologic Mapping of Athabasca Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jaeger, W. L.; Tanaka, K.; Hare, T.

    2008-01-01

    Two factors drive us to map the Athabasca Valles area in unusual detail: (1) the extremely well-preserved and exposed surface morphologies and (2) the extensive high resolution imaging. In particular, the near-complete CTX coverage of Athabasca Valles proper and the extensive coverage of its surroundings have been invaluable. The mapping has been done exclusively in ArcGIS, using individual CTX, THEMIS VIS, and MOC frames overlying the THEMIS IR daytime basemap. MOLA shot points and gridded DTMs are also included. It was found that CTX images processed through ISIS are almost always within 300 m of the MOLA derived locations, and usually within tens of meters, with no adjustments to camera pointing. THEMIS VIS images appear to be systematically shifted to the southwest of their correct positions and MOC images are often kilometers off. The good SNR and minimal artifacts make the CTX images vastly more useful than the THEMIS VIS or MOC images. The bulk of the mapping was done at 1:50,000 scale on CTX images. In more complex areas, mapping at 1:24,000 proved necessary. The CTX images were usually simultaneously viewed on a second monitor using the ISIS3 qview program to display the full dynamic range of the CTX data. Where CTX data was not available, mapping was often done at 1:100,000 and most contacts are mapped as approximate.

  19. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  20. Geologic mapping of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, R.; Figueredo, P.H.; Williams, D.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Kadel, S.D.; Prockter, L.M.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J. W.; Collins, G.C.; Spaun, N.A.; Sullivan, R.J.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Senske, D.A.; Tufts, B.R.; Johnson, T.V.; Belton, M.J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo data enable the major geological units, structures, and surface features to be identified on Europa. These include five primary units (plains, chaos, band, ridge, and crater materials) and their subunits, along with various tectonic structures such as faults. Plains units are the most widespread. Ridged plains material spans a wide range of geological ages, including the oldest recognizable features on Europa, and appears to represent a style of tectonic resurfacing, rather than cryovolcanism. Smooth plains material typically embays other terrains and units, possibly as a type of fluid emplacement, and is among the youngest material units observed. At global scales, plains are typically mapped as undifferentiated plains material, although in some areas differences can be discerned in the near infrared which might be related to differences in ice grain size. Chaos material is composed of plains and other preexisting materials that have been severely disrupted by inferred internal activity; chaos is characterized by blocks of icy material set in a hummocky matrix. Band material is arrayed in linear, curvilinear, wedge-shaped, or cuspate zones with contrasting albedo and surface textures with respect to the surrounding terrain. Bilateral symmetry observed in some bands and the relationships with the surrounding units suggest that band material forms by the lithosphere fracturing, spreading apart, and infilling with material derived from the subsurface. Ridge material is mapped as a unit on local and some regional maps but shown with symbols at global scales. Ridge material includes single ridges, doublet ridges, and ridge complexes. Ridge materials are considered to represent tectonic processes, possibly accompanied by the extrusion or intrusion of subsurface materials, such as diapirs. The tectonic processes might be related to tidal flexing of the icy lithosphere on diurnal or longer timescales. Crater materials include various interior (smooth central

  1. Beebook: light field mapping app

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Di Pietro, Gianfranco; Rinnone, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade the mobile systems for field digital mapping were developed (see Wikipedia for "Digital geologic mapping"), also against many skeptic traditional geologists. Until now, hardware was often heavy (tablet PC) and software sometime difficult also for expert GIS users. At present, the advent of light tablet and applications makes things easier, but we are far to find a whole solution for a complex survey like the geological one where you have to manage complexities such information, hypothesis, data, interpretation. Beebook is a new app for Android devices, has been developed for fast ad easy mapping work in the field trying to try to solve this problem. The main features are: • off-line raster management, GeoTIFF ed other raster format using; • on-line map visualisation (Google Maps, OSM, WMS, WFS); • SR management and conversion using PROJ.4; • vector file mash-up (KML and SQLite format); • editing of vector data on the map (lines, points, polygons); • augmented reality using "Mixare" platform; • export of vector data in KML, CSV, SQLite (Spatialite) format; • note: GPS or manual point inserting linked to other application files (pictures, spreadsheet, etc.); • form: creation, edition and filling of customized form; • GPS: status control, tracker and positioning on map; • sharing: synchronization and sharing of data, forms, positioning and other information can be done among users. The input methods are different from digital keyboard to fingers touch, from voice recording to stylus. In particular the most efficient way of inserting information is the stylus (or pen): field geologists are familiar with annotation and sketches. Therefore we suggest the use of devices with stylus. The main point is that Beebook is the first "transparent" mobile GIS for tablet and smartphone deriving from previous experience as traditional mapping and different previous digital mapping software ideation and development (MapIT, BeeGIS, Geopaparazzi

  2. Concept Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura K.; Brownson, Ross C.; Kelly, Cheryl; Ivey, Melissa K.; Leviton, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2003 to 2008, 25 cross-sector, multidisciplinary community partnerships funded through the Active Living by Design (ALbD) national program designed, planned, and implemented policy and environmental changes, with complementary programs and promotions. This paper describes the use of concept-mapping methods to gain insights into promising active living intervention strategies based on the collective experience of community representatives implementing ALbD initiatives. Methods Using Concept Systems software, community representatives (n=43) anonymously generated actions and changes in their communities to support active living (183 original statements, 79 condensed statements). Next, respondents (n=26, from 23 partnerships) sorted the 79 statements into self-created categories, or active living intervention approaches. Respondents then rated statements based on their perceptions of the most important strategies for creating community changes (n=25, from 22 partnerships) and increasing community rates of physical activity (n=23, from 20 partnerships). Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to describe data patterns. Results ALbD community partnerships identified three active living intervention approaches with the greatest perceived importance to create community change and increase population levels of physical activity: changes to the built and natural environment, partnership and collaboration efforts, and land-use and transportation policies. The relative importance of intervention approaches varied according to subgroups of partnerships working with different populations. Conclusions Decision makers, practitioners, and community residents can incorporate what has been learned from the 25 community partnerships to prioritize active living policy, physical project, promotional, and programmatic strategies for work in different populations and settings. PMID:23079266

  3. Maps & minds : mapping through the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1984-01-01

    Throughout time, maps have expressed our understanding of our world. Human affairs have been influenced strongly by the quality of maps available to us at the major turning points in our history. "Maps & Minds" traces the ebb and flow of a few central ideas in the mainstream of mapping. Our expanding knowledge of our cosmic neighborhood stems largely from a small number of simple but grand ideas, vigorously pursued.

  4. Mapping: A Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of cartography. Describes the contributions of Strabo and Ptolemy in early maps. Identifies the work of Gerhard Mercator as the most important advancement in mapping. Discusses present mapping standards from history. (CW)

  5. Cryptanalysis of a family of 1D unimodal maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Mohamad Rushdan Md; Hina, Aliyu Danladi; Banerjee, Santo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a topologically conjugate map, equivalent to the well known logistic map. This constructed map is defined on the integer domain [0, 2 n ) with a view to be used as a random number generator (RNG) based on an integer domain as is the required in classical cryptography. The maps were found to have a one to one correspondence between points in their respective defining intervals defined on an n-bits precision. The dynamics of the proposed map similar with that of the logistic map, in terms of the Lyapunov exponents with the control parameter. This similarity between the curves indicates topological conjugacy between the maps. With a view to be applied in cryptography as a Pseudo-Random number generator (PRNG), the complexity of the constructed map as a source of randomness is determined using both the permutation entropy (PE) and the Lempel-Ziv (LZ-76) complexity measures, and the results are compared with numerical simulations.

  6. Resultant as the determinant of a Koszul complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhina, A. S.; Morozov, A. Yu.; Shakirov, Sh. R.

    2009-09-01

    The determinant is a very important characteristic of a linear map between vector spaces. Two generalizations of linear maps are intensively used in modern theory: linear complexes (nilpotent chains of linear maps) and nonlinear maps. The determinant of a complex and the resultant are then the corresponding generalizations of the determinant of a linear map. It turns out that these two quantities are related: the resultant of a nonlinear map is the determinant of the corresponding Koszul complex. We give an elementary introduction into these notions and relations, which will definitely play a role in the future development of theoretical physics.

  7. Mapping Hesperia Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Crown, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Hesperia Planum, characterized by a high concentration of mare-type wrinkle ridges and ridge rings [1-4], encompasses > 2 million km2 in the southern highlands of Mars (Fig. 1). The most common interpretation is that the plains were emplaced as flood lavas with total thicknesses of <3 km [4-10]. The wrinkle ridges on its surface make Hesperia Planum the type locale for Hesperian-aged ridged plains on Mars [e.g., 9], and recent investigations reveal that wrinkle-ridge formation occurred in more than one episode [4]. Hesperia Planum s stratigraphic position and crater-retention age [e.g., 9, 11-12] define the base of the Hesperian System. However, preliminary results of geologic mapping reveal that the whole of Hesperia Planum is unlikely to be composed of the same materials, emplaced at the same geologic time. To unravel these complexities, we are generating a 1:1.5M-scale geologic map of Hesperia Planum and its surroundings (Fig. 1). To date, we have identified 4 distinct plains units within Hesperia Planum and are attempting to determine the nature and relative ages of these materials (Fig. 2) [13-15].

  8. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  9. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-05-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ∼11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape.

  10. Hemispherical map for the human brain cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Duygu; Prince, Jerry L.

    2001-07-01

    Understanding the function of the human brain cortex is a primary goal in human brain mapping. Methods to unfold and flatten the cortical surface for visualization and measurement have been described in previous literature; but comparison across multiple subjects is still difficult because of the lack of a standard mapping technique. We describe a new approach that maps each hemisphere of the cortex to a portion of a sphere in a standard way, making comparison of anatomy and function across different subjects possible. Starting with a three-dimensional magnetic resonance image of the brain, the cortex is segmented and represented as a triangle mesh. Defining a cut around the corpus collosum identifies the left and right hemispheres. Together, the two hemispheres are mapped to the complex plane using a conformal mapping technique. A Mobius transformation, which is conformal, is used to transform the points on the complex plane so that a projective transformation maps each brain hemisphere onto a spherical segment comprising a sphere with a cap removed. We determined the best size of the spherical cap by minimizing the relative area distortion between hemispherical maps and original cortical surfaces. The relative area distortion between the hemispherical maps and the original cortical surfaces for fifteen human brains is analyzed.

  11. Efficient and selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted Z alkenes by ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions catalyzed by Mo- or W-based monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complexes: applications to total syntheses of epilachnene, yuzu lactone, ambrettolide, epothilone C, and nakadomarin A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenbo; Yu, Miao; Kyle, Andrew F; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2013-02-18

    The first broadly applicable set of protocols for efficient Z-selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted alkenes through catalytic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) is described. Cyclizations are performed with 1.2-7.5 mol% of a Mo- or W-based monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex at 22 °C and proceed to complete conversion typically within two hours. Utility is demonstrated by synthesis of representative macrocyclic alkenes, such as natural products yuzu lactone (13-membered ring: 73% Z) epilachnene (15-membered ring: 91% Z), ambrettolide (17-membered ring: 91% Z), an advanced precursor to epothilones C and A (16-membered ring: up to 97% Z), and nakadomarin A (15-membered ring: up to 97% Z). We show that catalytic Z-selective cyclizations can be performed efficiently on gram-scale with complex molecule starting materials and catalysts that can be handled in air. We elucidate several critical principles of the catalytic protocol: 1) The complementary nature of the Mo catalysts, which deliver high activity but can be more prone towards engendering post-RCM stereoisomerization, versus W variants, which furnish lower activity but are less inclined to cause loss of kinetic Z selectivity. 2) Reaction time is critical to retaining kinetic Z selectivity not only with MAP species but with the widely used Mo bis(hexafluoro-tert-butoxide) complex as well. 3) Polycyclic structures can be accessed without significant isomerization at the existing Z alkenes within the molecule.

  12. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  13. National Atlas maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    The National Atlas of the United States of America was published by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1970. Its 765 maps and charts are on 335 14- by 19-inch pages. Many of the maps span facing pages. It's worth a quick trip to the library just to leaf through all 335 pages of this book. Rapid scanning of its thematic maps yields rich insights to the geography of issues of continuing national interest. On most maps, the geographic patterns are still valid, though the data are not current. The atlas is out of print, but many of its maps can be purchased separately. Maps that span facing pages in the atlas are printed on one sheet. The maps dated after 1970 are either revisions of original atlas maps, or new maps published in atlas format. The titles of the separate maps are listed here.

  14. Global order and local disorder in brain maps.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Gideon; Mizrahi, Adi

    2015-07-08

    Maps serve as a ubiquitous organizing principle in the mammalian brain. In several sensory systems, such as audition, vision, and somatosensation, topographic maps are evident throughout multiple levels of brain pathways. Topographic maps, like retinotopy and tonotopy, persist from the receptor surface up to the cortex. Other maps, such as those of orientation preference in the visual cortex, are first created in the cortex itself. Despite the prevalence of topographic maps, it is still not clear what function they subserve. Although maps are topographically smooth at the macroscale, they are often locally heterogeneous. Here, we review studies describing the anatomy and physiology of topographic maps across various spatial scales, from the smooth macroscale to the heterogeneous local microarchitecture, with emphasis on maps of the visual and auditory systems. We discuss the potential advantages of local heterogeneity in brain maps, how they reflect complex cortical connectivity, and how they may impact sensory coding and local computations.

  15. Google Maps: You Are Here

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  16. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  17. The APPL "Learning Map"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Root Learning, a learning consulting organization with a background in strategic planning, recognizes the knowledge gap that frequently exists between a leadership team and the rest of an organization. Team members supposedly working toward the same goal don't always have the same vision as to where the organization is headed, and they may not understand how the piece they are accountable for fits into the big picture. To address these complex problems, Root Learning utilizes the age-old tools of sarcasm, metaphor and graphics (much in the same way that ASK uses a traditional storytelling format.) The company is best known for creating "Learning Maps" like this one: humorous drawings based on the inner workings of an organization. Their purpose is to put complex topics on the table, to stimulate discussion, and to ultimately give team members a common vision of where the organization is going and what role they personally play in getting there. APPL knows how effective it is to incorporate new and engaging techniques into its knowledge sharing programs. By collaborating with Root Learning, we were able to expand the knowledge of the organization and add one more of these techniques to our repertoire.

  18. Mapping the distribution of the main host for plague in a complex landscape in Kazakhstan: An object-based approach using SPOT-5 XS, Landsat 7 ETM+, SRTM and multiple Random Forests.

    PubMed

    Wilschut, L I; Addink, E A; Heesterbeek, J A P; Dubyanskiy, V M; Davis, S A; Laudisoit, A; M Begon; Burdelov, L A; Atshabar, B B; de Jong, S M

    2013-08-01

    Plague is a zoonotic infectious disease present in great gerbil populations in Kazakhstan. Infectious disease dynamics are influenced by the spatial distribution of the carriers (hosts) of the disease. The great gerbil, the main host in our study area, lives in burrows, which can be recognized on high resolution satellite imagery. In this study, using earth observation data at various spatial scales, we map the spatial distribution of burrows in a semi-desert landscape. The study area consists of various landscape types. To evaluate whether identification of burrows by classification is possible in these landscape types, the study area was subdivided into eight landscape units, on the basis of Landsat 7 ETM+ derived Tasselled Cap Greenness and Brightness, and SRTM derived standard deviation in elevation. In the field, 904 burrows were mapped. Using two segmented 2.5 m resolution SPOT-5 XS satellite scenes, reference object sets were created. Random Forests were built for both SPOT scenes and used to classify the images. Additionally, a stratified classification was carried out, by building separate Random Forests per landscape unit. Burrows were successfully classified in all landscape units. In the 'steppe on floodplain' areas, classification worked best: producer's and user's accuracy in those areas reached 88% and 100%, respectively. In the 'floodplain' areas with a more heterogeneous vegetation cover, classification worked least well; there, accuracies were 86 and 58% respectively. Stratified classification improved the results in all landscape units where comparison was possible (four), increasing kappa coefficients by 13, 10, 9 and 1%, respectively. In this study, an innovative stratification method using high- and medium resolution imagery was applied in order to map host distribution on a large spatial scale. The burrow maps we developed will help to detect changes in the distribution of great gerbil populations and, moreover, serve as a unique empirical

  19. Map reading tools for map libraries.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenberg, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Engineers, navigators and military strategists employ a broad array of mechanical devices to facilitate map use. A larger number of map users such as educators, students, tourists, journalists, historians, politicians, economists and librarians are unaware of the available variety of tools which can be used with maps to increase the speed and efficiency of their application and interpretation. This paper identifies map reading tools such as coordinate readers, protractors, dividers, planimeters, and symbol-templets according to a functional classification. Particularly, arrays of tools are suggested for use in determining position, direction, distance, area and form (perimeter-shape-pattern-relief). -from Author

  20. Mesh generation by conformal and quasiconformal mappings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Thompson, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that many recent advances in the finite-difference solution of elliptic equations have been limited to regions whose boundary contours coincide with coordinate lines of the Cartesian coordinate system. The reason for this is related to the fact that in the case of an arbitrary curvilinear coordinate system the original equation becomes much more complex. However, there is no added complexity if an orthogonal coordinate system is generated from a conformal mapping. In the present investigation, a finite difference method developed for the construction of conformal mappings has been generalized to construct quasi-conformal mappings. It is expected that the use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms could lead to improvements in both speed and accuracy. Quasi-conformal mappings have applications not only in the solution of elliptic equations but also in other areas such as orthogonal mesh generation on surfaces and the solution of certain fluid flow problems.

  1. Special surgical considerations for functional brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Kekhia, Hussein; Rigolo, Laura; Norton, Isaiah; Golby, Alexandra J

    2011-04-01

    The development of functional mapping techniques gives neurosurgeons many options for preoperative planning. Integrating functional and anatomic data can inform patient selection and surgical planning and makes functional mapping more accessible than when only invasive studies were available. However, the applications of functional mapping to neurosurgical patients are still evolving. Functional imaging remains complex and requires an understanding of the underlying physiologic and imaging characteristics. Neurosurgeons must be accustomed to interpreting highly processed data. Successful implementation of functional image-guided procedures requires efficient interactions between neurosurgeon, neurologist, radiologist, neuropsychologist, and others, but promises to enhance the care of patients.

  2. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  3. Perils of gene mapping with microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.A.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Vieland, V.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The discovery of microsatellite polymorphisms has revitalized the genetic mapping of the human genome and promises to have a dramatic effect on human disease gene mapping. The high polymorphicity, relative abundance, and amenability of these markers to assay by PCR amplification gives them a significant advantage over previous markers, which explains their general acceptance and widespread use (Litt and Luty 1989; Weber and May 1989). Preliminary chromosome maps have been constructed using microsatellites exclusively (Weber et al. 1991; Hazen et al. 1992; Kwiatkowski et al. 1992), and disease loci have been mapped by linkage to these markers (Wijmenga et al. 1991). The markers provide new optimism for the mapping of disease genes, particularly for the mapping of complex genetic disorders. The authors present evidence that the very qualities that render these markers so efficient for chromosome mapping in large reference pedigrees can lead to dramatic lod score bias when applied to the typical pedigrees used to study genetic disorders, particularly when the disorder under study is complex. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mapping the distribution of the main host for plague in a complex landscape in Kazakhstan: An object-based approach using SPOT-5 XS, Landsat 7 ETM+, SRTM and multiple Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wilschut, L.I.; Addink, E.A.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Dubyanskiy, V.M.; Davis, S.A.; Laudisoit, A.; M.Begon; Burdelov, L.A.; Atshabar, B.B.; de Jong, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Plague is a zoonotic infectious disease present in great gerbil populations in Kazakhstan. Infectious disease dynamics are influenced by the spatial distribution of the carriers (hosts) of the disease. The great gerbil, the main host in our study area, lives in burrows, which can be recognized on high resolution satellite imagery. In this study, using earth observation data at various spatial scales, we map the spatial distribution of burrows in a semi-desert landscape. The study area consists of various landscape types. To evaluate whether identification of burrows by classification is possible in these landscape types, the study area was subdivided into eight landscape units, on the basis of Landsat 7 ETM+ derived Tasselled Cap Greenness and Brightness, and SRTM derived standard deviation in elevation. In the field, 904 burrows were mapped. Using two segmented 2.5 m resolution SPOT-5 XS satellite scenes, reference object sets were created. Random Forests were built for both SPOT scenes and used to classify the images. Additionally, a stratified classification was carried out, by building separate Random Forests per landscape unit. Burrows were successfully classified in all landscape units. In the ‘steppe on floodplain’ areas, classification worked best: producer's and user's accuracy in those areas reached 88% and 100%, respectively. In the ‘floodplain’ areas with a more heterogeneous vegetation cover, classification worked least well; there, accuracies were 86 and 58% respectively. Stratified classification improved the results in all landscape units where comparison was possible (four), increasing kappa coefficients by 13, 10, 9 and 1%, respectively. In this study, an innovative stratification method using high- and medium resolution imagery was applied in order to map host distribution on a large spatial scale. The burrow maps we developed will help to detect changes in the distribution of great gerbil populations and, moreover, serve as a unique

  5. Creative Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Recommends the use of concept mapping in science teaching and proposes that it be presented as a creative activity. Includes a sample lesson plan of a potato stamp concept mapping activity for astronomy. (DDR)

  6. RadMap

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    RadMap is an interactive desktop tool featuring a nationwide geographic information systems (GIS) map of long-term radiation monitoring locations across the United States with access to key information about the monitor and the area surrounding it.

  7. Using maps in genealogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1994-01-01

    In genealogy, maps are most often used as clues to where public or other records about an ancestor are likely to be found. Searching for maps seldom begins until a newcomer to genealogy has mastered basic genealogical routines

  8. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  9. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  10. Some additional considerations in modelling the dynamic traits and genome-wide association studies. Comments on "Mapping complex traits as a dynamic system" by L. Sun and R. Wu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kiranmoy

    2015-06-01

    The revolution in the genetic research in our time is mainly due to (i) the successful completion of human genome project (2003) and its derivative hapmap project (2005), (ii) advanced statistical methodologies for analyzing ultrahigh dimensional data and (iii) the availability of statistical softwares (R, SAS etc.) to analyze large datasets. When complex traits are to be modeled as dynamic systems, the statistical issues regarding the complexity in the model, predictive power of the model, computational cost etc. are to be addressed adequately for powerful inferences. I will mention two additional considerations (statistical) which make dynamic models more meaningful and the results from GWAS more reliable.

  11. Mapping of wildlife habitat in Farmington Bay, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaynes, R. A.; Willie, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Mapping was accomplished through the interpretation of high-altitude color infrared photography. The feasibility of utilizing LANDSAT digital data to augment the analysis was explored; complex patterns of wildlife habitat and confusion of spectral classes resulted in the decision to make limited use of LANDSAT data in the analysis. The final product is a map which delineates wildlife habitat at a scale of 1:24,000. The map is registered to and printed on a screened U.S.G.S. quadrangle base map. Screened delineations of shoreline contours, mapped from a previous study, are also shown on the map. Intensive field checking of the map was accomplished for the Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area in August 1981; other areas on the map received only spot field checking.

  12. Modeling of GPS tropospheric delay wet Neill mapping function (NMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakidin, Hamzah; Ahmad, Asmala; Bugis, Ismadi

    2014-10-01

    The modeling of the GPS tropospheric delay mapping function should be revised by modifying or simplify its mathematical model. Some current mapping functions models are separated into hydrostatic and the wet part. The current tropospheric delay models use mapping functions in the form of continued fractions. This model is quite complex and need to be simplified. By using regression method, the wet mapping function models has been selected to be simplified. There are eleven operations for wet mapping function component of Neill Mapping Function (NMF), to be carried out before getting the mapping function scale factor. So, there is a need to simplify the mapping function models to allow faster calculation and also better understanding of the models.

  13. The Seismotectonic Map of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    We present the Seismotectonic Map of Africa based on a geological, geophysical and geodetic database including the instrumental seismicity and re-appraisal of large historical events with harmonization and homogenization of earthquake parameters in catalogues. Although the seismotectonic framework and mapping of the African continent is a difficult task, several previous and ongoing projects provide a wealth of data and outstanding results. The database of large and moderate earthquakes in different geological domains includes the coseismic and Quaternary faulting that reveals the complex nature of the active tectonics in Africa. The map also benefits from previous works on local and regional seismotectonic maps that needed to be integrated with the lithospheric and upper mantle structures from tomographic anisotropy and gravity anomaly into a continental framework. The synthesis of earthquake and volcanic studies with the analysis of long-term (late Quaternary) and short-term (last decades and centuries) active deformation observed with geodetic and other approaches presented along with the seismotectonic map serves as a basis for hazard calculations and the reduction of seismic risks. The map may also be very useful in the assessment of seismic hazard and mitigation of earthquake risk for significant infrastructures and their implications in the socio-economic impact in Africa. In addition, the constant population increase and infrastructure growth in the continent that exacerbate the earthquake risk justify the necessity for a continuous updating of the seismotectonic map. The database and related map are prepared in the framework of the IGC Project-601 "Seismotectonics and Seismic Hazards in Africa" of UNESCO-IUGS, funded by the Swedish International Development Agency and UNESCO-Nairobi for a period of 4 years (2011 - 2014), extended to 2016. * Mustapha Meghraoui (Coordinator) EOST - IPG Strasbourg CNRS-UMR 7516 m.meghraoui@unistra.fr corresponding author

  14. Oil Exploration Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    After concluding an oil exploration agreement with the Republic of Yemen, Chevron International needed detailed geologic and topographic maps of the area. Chevron's remote sensing team used imagery from Landsat and SPOT, combining images into composite views. The project was successfully concluded and resulted in greatly improved base maps and unique topographic maps.

  15. Adventures with Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofferber, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Orienteering--the game of following a map to find predetermined locations--can spark interest and develop skills in map making and map reading. This article gives background on orienteering; describes indoor and outdoor orienteering activities; offers suggestions for incorporating orienteering into science, math, and language arts; and provides a…

  16. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  17. Using maps in genealogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps are one of many sources you may need to complete a family tree. In genealogical research, maps can provide clues to where our ancestors may have lived and where to look for written records about them. Beginners should master basic genealogical research techniques before starting to use topographic maps.

  18. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  19. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  20. Mapping a Changing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltman, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the importance of maps for instruction in both history and geography. Suggests that maps have gotten recent attention because of the rapid political changes occurring in Europe and the quincentenary of Columbus' voyage. Discusses different map projections and the importance of media and satellite display of real pictures of the world.…

  1. Mapping Sociological Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepagnier, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the use of cognitive mapping within sociology. Describes an assignment where students created a cognitive map that focused on names of theorists and concepts related to them. Discusses sociological imagination in relation to cognitive mapping and the assessment of the assignment. (CMK)

  2. Adaptive Composite Map Projections.

    PubMed

    Jenny, B

    2012-12-01

    All major web mapping services use the web Mercator projection. This is a poor choice for maps of the entire globe or areas of the size of continents or larger countries because the Mercator projection shows medium and higher latitudes with extreme areal distortion and provides an erroneous impression of distances and relative areas. The web Mercator projection is also not able to show the entire globe, as polar latitudes cannot be mapped. When selecting an alternative projection for information visualization, rivaling factors have to be taken into account, such as map scale, the geographic area shown, the map's height-to-width ratio, and the type of cartographic visualization. It is impossible for a single map projection to meet the requirements for all these factors. The proposed composite map projection combines several projections that are recommended in cartographic literature and seamlessly morphs map space as the user changes map scale or the geographic region displayed. The composite projection adapts the map's geometry to scale, to the map's height-to-width ratio, and to the central latitude of the displayed area by replacing projections and adjusting their parameters. The composite projection shows the entire globe including poles; it portrays continents or larger countries with less distortion (optionally without areal distortion); and it can morph to the web Mercator projection for maps showing small regions.

  3. A Three-Tier System for Assessing Concept Map Links: A Methodological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll, Gayle; Francisco, Joseph; Nakhleh, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Describes a novel method for analyzing concept maps for research and analysis purposes. Examines 56 complex concept maps generated from student interviews on the topic of chemical bonding. (Contains 32 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Efficient and Selective Formation of Macrocyclic Disubstituted Z Alkenes by Ring-Closing Metathesis (RCM) Reactions Catalyzed by Mo- or W-Based Monoaryloxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Complexes. Applications to Total Syntheses of Epilachnene, Yuzu Lactone, Ambrettolide, Epothilone C and Nakadomarin A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenbo; Yu, Miao; Kyle, Andrew F.; Jakubec, Jakubec; Dixon, Darren J.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2014-01-01

    The first broadly applicable set of protocols for efficient and highly Z-selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted alkenes through catalytic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) is described. Cyclizations are performed in the presence of 1.2–7.5 mol % of a Mo- or W-based mono-aryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complex at 22 °C and typically proceed to complete conversion within two hours. The utility of the catalytic strategy is demonstrated by stereoselective synthesis of representative macrocyclic alkenes, including natural products yuzu lactone (13-membered ring: 73% Z) epilachnene (15-membered ring: 91% Z), ambrettolide (17-membered ring: 91% Z), an advanced precursor to epothilones C and A (16-membered ring: up to 97% Z) and nakadomarin A (polycyclic 15-membered ring: up to 97% Z). We demonstrate the complementary nature of the Mo-based catalysts, which deliver high activity but can be more prone to causing post-RCM stereoisomerization, versus W-based variants, which furnish lower activity but are less inclined towards causing loss of kinetic Z selectivity; a number of catalytic Z-selective cases are provided to elucidate which catalyst class is best suited for which substrate and particular type of alkene RCM process. Mechanistic models that rationalize the origin and the trends in Z selectivity as a function of alterations in the catalyst structure (i.e., Mo vs W and different imido and aryloxide or alkoxide ligands) are provided; we show that reaction time can be critical in retaining the Z selectivity attained not only with MAP complexes but with the original Mo-based bis-alkoxides as well. The W-based catalysts are sufficiently stable to be manipulated in air even with humidity levels of up to 80%; the catalytic Z-selective cyclizations can be performed on gram scale with complex molecule starting materials. PMID:23345004

  5. Map projections for larger-scale mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    For the U.S. Geological Survey maps at 1:1,000,000-scale and larger, the most common projections are conformal, such as the Transverse Mercator and Lambert Conformal Conic. Projections for these scales should treat the Earth as an ellipsoid. In addition, the USGS has conceived and designed some new projections, including the Space Oblique Mercator, the first map projection designed to permit low-distortion mapping of the Earth from satellite imagery, continuously following the groundtrack. The USGS has programmed nearly all pertinent projection equations for inverse and forward calculations. These are used to plot maps or to transform coordinates from one projection to another. The projections in current use are described.

  6. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Cartographic mapping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, C.; Dye, R.; Reed, L.

    1982-01-01

    The errors associated with planimetric mapping of the United States using satellite remote sensing techniques are analyzed. Assumptions concerning the state of the art achievable for satellite mapping systems and platforms in the 1995 time frame are made. An analysis of these performance parameters is made using an interactive cartographic satellite computer model, after first validating the model using LANDSAT 1 through 3 performance parameters. An investigation of current large scale (1:24,000) US National mapping techniques is made. Using the results of this investigation, and current national mapping accuracy standards, the 1995 satellite mapping system is evaluated for its ability to meet US mapping standards for planimetric and topographic mapping at scales of 1:24,000 and smaller.

  8. Complex higher order derivative theories

    SciTech Connect

    Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David

    2012-08-24

    In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

  9. Can a Healthcare "Lean Sweep" Deliver on What Matters to Patients? Comment on "Improving Wait Times to Care for Individuals with Multimorbidities and Complex Conditions Using Value Stream Mapping".

    PubMed

    Verma, Jennifer Y; Amar, Claudia

    2015-07-28

    Disconnects and defects in care - such as duplication, poor integration between services or avoidable adverse events - are costly to the health system and potentially harmful to patients and families. For patients living with multiple chronic conditions, such disconnects can be particularly detrimental. Lean is an approach to optimizing value by reducing waste (eg, duplication and defects) and containing costs (eg, improving integration of services) as well as focusing on what matters to patients. Lean works particularly well to optimize existing processes and services. However, as the burden of chronic illness and frailty overtake episodic care needs, health systems require far greater complex, adaptive change. Such change ought to take into account outcomes in population health in addition to care experiences and costs (together, comprising the Triple Aim); and involve patients and families in co-designing new models of care that better address complex, longer-term health needs.

  10. Comparing Image-Based Methods for Assessing Visual Clutter in Generalized Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touya, G.; Decherf, B.; Lalanne, M.; Dumont, M.

    2015-08-01

    Map generalization abstracts and simplifies geographic information to derive maps at smaller scales. The automation of map generalization requires techniques to evaluate the global quality of a generalized map. The quality and legibility of a generalized map is related to the complexity of the map, or the amount of clutter in the map, i.e. the excessive amount of information and its disorganization. Computer vision research is highly interested in measuring clutter in images, and this paper proposes to compare some of the existing techniques from computer vision, applied to generalized maps evaluation. Four techniques from the literature are described and tested on a large set of maps, generalized at different scales: edge density, subband entropy, quad tree complexity, and segmentation clutter. The results are analyzed against several criteria related to generalized maps, the identification of cluttered areas, the preservation of the global amount of information, the handling of occlusions and overlaps, foreground vs background, and blank space reduction.

  11. Orthogonal Mapping in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraiswami, Ramani; Prosperetti, Andrea

    1992-02-01

    A method for the generation of orthogonal boundary-fitted curvilinear coordinates for arbitrary simply- and doubly-connected domains is developed on the basis of the theory of quasi-conformal mappings of quadrilaterals and of previous work by Ryskin and Leal. The method has useful applications in orthogonal grid generation in two-dimensional and axi-symmetric domains and in the extension of rapid elliptic solvers and spectral methods to complex geometries. A new technique for the calculation of the conformal module of quadrilaterals is also presented.

  12. Semigroup Actions of Expanding Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Maria; Rodrigues, Fagner B.; Varandas, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    We consider semigroups of Ruelle-expanding maps, parameterized by random walks on the free semigroup, with the aim of examining their complexity and exploring the relation between intrinsic properties of the semigroup action and the thermodynamic formalism of the associated skew-product. In particular, we clarify the connection between the topological entropy of the semigroup action and the growth rate of the periodic points, establish the main properties of the dynamical zeta function of the semigroup action and relate these notions to recent research on annealed and quenched thermodynamic formalism. Meanwhile, we examine how the choice of the random walk in the semigroup unsettles the ergodic properties of the action.

  13. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  14. A fast image encryption algorithm based on chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenhao; Sun, Kehui; Zhu, Congxu

    2016-09-01

    Derived from Sine map and iterative chaotic map with infinite collapse (ICMIC), a new two-dimensional Sine ICMIC modulation map (2D-SIMM) is proposed based on a close-loop modulation coupling (CMC) model, and its chaotic performance is analyzed by means of phase diagram, Lyapunov exponent spectrum and complexity. It shows that this map has good ergodicity, hyperchaotic behavior, large maximum Lyapunov exponent and high complexity. Based on this map, a fast image encryption algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, the confusion and diffusion processes are combined for one stage. Chaotic shift transform (CST) is proposed to efficiently change the image pixel positions, and the row and column substitutions are applied to scramble the pixel values simultaneously. The simulation and analysis results show that this algorithm has high security, low time complexity, and the abilities of resisting statistical analysis, differential, brute-force, known-plaintext and chosen-plaintext attacks.

  15. TRENDS IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC AND RELATED MAPPING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, David J.; Keaton, Jeffrey R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reviewed that has been made during the period 1972-1982 in producing medium- and small-scale engineering geologic maps with a variety of content. Improved methods to obtain and present information are evolving. Standards concerning text and map content, soil and rock classification, and map symbols have been proposed. Application of geomorphological techniques in terrain evaluation has increased, as has the use of aerial photography and other remote sensing. Computers are being used to store, analyze, retrieve, and print both text and map information. Development of offshore resources, especially petroleum, has led to marked improvement and growth in marine engineering geology and geotechnology. Coordinated planning for societal needs has required broader scope and increased complexity of both engineering geologic and environmental geologic studies. Refs.

  16. Comparing landslide inventory maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Mirco; Ardizzone, Francesca; Cardinali, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto; Reichenbach, Paola

    Landslide inventory maps are effective and easily understandable products for both experts, such as geomorphologists, and for non experts, including decision-makers, planners, and civil defense managers. Landslide inventories are essential to understand the evolution of landscapes, and to ascertain landslide susceptibility and hazard. Despite landslide maps being compiled every year in the word at different scales, limited efforts are made to critically compare landslide maps prepared using different techniques or by different investigators. Based on the experience gained in 20 years of landslide mapping in Italy, and on the limited literature on landslide inventory assessment, we propose a general framework for the quantitative comparison of landslide inventory maps. To test the proposed framework we exploit three inventory maps. The first map is a reconnaissance landslide inventory prepared for the Umbria region, in central Italy. The second map is a detailed geomorphological landslide map, also prepared for the Umbria region. The third map is a multi-temporal landslide inventory compiled for the Collazzone area, in central Umbria. Results of the experiment allow for establishing how well the individual inventories describe the location, type and abundance of landslides, to what extent the landslide maps can be used to determine the frequency-area statistics of the slope failures, and the significance of the inventory maps as predictors of landslide susceptibility. We further use the results obtained in the Collazzone area to estimate the quality and completeness of the two regional landslide inventory maps, and to outline general advantages and limitations of the techniques used to complete the inventories.

  17. Assessing the Structure of a Concept Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giouvanakis, Thanasis; Samaras, Haido; Kehris, Evangelos; Mpakavos, Asterios

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for the evaluation of concept maps. We focus on supporting the student in dealing with ill-structured and complex problems. We argue that these problems require the application of "the modularity approach." In view of this, the paper describes ways of providing student support for the implementation of…

  18. Symbolic Dynamics and Grammatical Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bai-Lin; Zheng, Wei-Mou

    The following sections are included: * Formal Languages and Their Complexity * Formal Language * Chomsky Hierarchy of Grammatical Complexity * The L-System * Regular Language and Finite Automaton * Finite Automaton * Regular Language * Stefan Matrix as Transfer Function for Automaton * Beyond Regular Languages * Feigenbaum and Generalized Feigenbaum Limiting Sets * Even and Odd Fibonacci Sequences * Odd Maximal Primitive Prefixes and Kneading Map * Even Maximal Primitive Prefixes and Distinct Excluded Blocks * Summary of Results

  19. A technology mapping of boolean functions for CPLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Dariusz

    2014-10-01

    The effective technology mapping for PAL-based Complex PLDs is presented. The aim of this approach is to cover a multiple-output function by a minimal number of PAL-based logic blocks. Proposed algorithm, implemented within the PALDec system, has been used for synthesizing the benchmarks. The obtained results are compared with the classical technology mapping.

  20. Partnership in Teacher Education--A Research Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillejord, Sølvi; Børte, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    This mapping of research on partnership in teacher education provides an overview of themes and analyses problems identified in the studies that were included. The mapping gives a status of research in the field; identifies knowledge gaps and suggests improvements in partnership models. Studies included describe partnerships as complex and…

  1. Ripple Effect Mapping: A "Radiant" Way to Capture Program Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollock, Debra Hansen; Flage, Lynette; Chazdon, Scott; Paine, Nathan; Higgins, Lorie

    2012-01-01

    Learn more about a promising follow-up, participatory group process designed to document the results of Extension educational efforts within complex, real-life settings. The method, known as Ripple Effect Mapping, uses elements of Appreciative Inquiry, mind mapping, and qualitative data analysis to engage program participants and other community…

  2. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  3. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2) with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bachiller, María Isabel; Brzozowska, Iwona; Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI) site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay. PMID:27438853

  4. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  5. Exploring Students' Mapping Behaviors and Interactive Discourses in a Case Diagnosis Problem: Sequential Analysis of Collaborative Causal Map Drawing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Woon Jee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the nature of students' mapping and discourse behaviors while constructing causal maps to articulate their understanding of a complex, ill-structured problem. In this study, six graduate-level students were assigned to one of three pair groups, and each pair used the causal mapping software program,…

  6. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  7. BOREAS Hardcopy Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nelson, Elizabeth; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) hardcopy maps are a collection of approximately 1,000 hardcopy maps representing the physical, climatological, and historical attributes of areas covering primarily the Manitoba and Saskatchewan provinces of Canada. These maps were collected by BOREAS Information System (BORIS) and Canada for Remote Sensing (CCRS) staff to provide basic information about site positions, manmade features, topography, geology, hydrology, land cover types, fire history, climate, and soils of the BOREAS study region. These maps are not available for distribution through the BOREAS project but may be used as an on-site resource. Information is provided within this document for individuals who want to order copies of these maps from the original map source. Note that the maps are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. An inventory listing file is supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of the maps that are available. This inventory listing is available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). For hardcopies of the individual maps, contact the sources provided.

  8. Denali image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binnie, Douglas R.; Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1987-01-01

    The Denali National Park and Preserve 1:250,000-scale image map has been prepared and published as part of the US Geological Survey's (USGS) continuing research to improve image mapping techniques. Nine multispectral scanner (MSS) images were geometrically corrected, digitally mosaicked, and enhanced at the National Mapping Division's (NMD) EROS Data Center (EDC). This process involves ground control and digital resampling to the Universal Tranverse Mercator (UTM) projection. This paper specifically discusses the preparation of the digital mosaic and the production peculiarities associated with the Denali National Park and Preserve image map.

  9. Bad pixel mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Roger M.; Hale, David; Wizinowich, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Bad pixels are generally treated as a loss of useable area and then excluded from averaged performance metrics. The definition and detection of "bad pixels" or "cosmetic defects" are seldom discussed, perhaps because they are considered self-evident or of minor consequence for any scientific grade detector, however the ramifications can be more serious than generally appreciated. While the definition of pixel performance is generally understood, the classification of pixels as useable is highly application-specific, as are the consequences of ignoring or interpolating over such pixels. CMOS sensors (including NIR detectors) exhibit less compact distributions of pixel properties than CCDs. The extended tails in these distributions result in a steeper increase in bad pixel counts as performance thresholds are tightened which comes as a surprise to many users. To illustrate how some applications are much more sensitive to bad pixels than others, we present a bad pixel mapping exercise for the Teledyne H2RG used as the NIR tip-tilt sensor in the Keck-1 Adaptive Optics system. We use this example to illustrate the wide range of metrics by which a pixel might be judged inadequate. These include pixel bump bond connectivity, vignetting, addressing faults in the mux, severe sensitivity deficiency of some pixels, non linearity, poor signal linearity, low full well, poor mean-variance linearity, excessive noise and high dark current. Some pixels appear bad by multiple metrics. We also discuss the importance of distinguishing true performance outliers from measurement errors. We note how the complexity of these issues has ramifications for sensor procurement and acceptance testing strategies.

  10. Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer: Software for quantitative analysis of sketch maps.

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2016-03-01

    Sketch maps are effective tools for assessing spatial memory. However, despite their widespread use in cognitive science research, sketch map analysis techniques remain unstandardized and carry limitations. In the present article, we present the Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer (GMDA), an open-source software package for sketch map analysis. GMDA combines novel and established analysis techniques into a graphical user interface that permits rapid computational sketch map analysis. GMDA calculates GMDA-unique measures based on pairwise comparisons between landmarks, as well as bidimensional regression parameters (Friedman & Kohler, 2003), which together reflect sketch map quality at two levels: configural and individual landmark. The configural measures assess the overall landmark configuration and provide a whole-map analysis. Individual landmark measures, introduced in GMDA, assess individual landmark placement and indicate how individual landmarks contribute to the configural scores. Together, these measures provide a more complete psychometric picture of sketch map analysis, allowing for comparisons between sketch maps and between landmarks. The calculated measures reflect specific and cognitively relevant aspects of interlandmark spatial relationships, including distance and angular representation. GMDA supports complex environments (up to 48 landmarks) and two software modes that capture aspects of maps not addressed by existing techniques, such as landmark size and shape variation and interlandmark containment relationships. We describe the software and its operation and present a formal specification of calculation procedures for its unique measures. We then validate the software by demonstrating the capabilities and reliability of its measures using simulation and experimental data. The most recent version of GMDA is available at www.aarongardony.com/tools/map-drawing-analyzer.

  11. Outcome mapping for health system integration.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care.

  12. Outcome mapping for health system integration

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

  13. Statistical and computational challenges in physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-06-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like Huntington`s disease, cystic fibrosis, and myotonic dystrophy. Instrumental in these efforts has been the construction of so-called {open_quotes}physical maps{close_quotes} of large regions of human chromosomes. Constructing a physical map of a chromosome presents a number of interesting challenges to the computational statistician. In addition to the general ill-posedness of the problem, complications include the size of the data sets, computational complexity, and the pervasiveness of experimental error. The nature of the problem and the presence of many levels of experimental uncertainty make statistical approaches to map construction appealing. Simultaneously, however, the size and combinatorial complexity of the problem make such approaches computationally demanding. In this paper we discuss what physical maps are and describe three different kinds of physical maps, outlining issues which arise in constructing them. In addition, we describe our experience with powerful, interactive statistical computing environments. We found that the ability to create high-level specifications of proposed algorithms which could then be directly executed provided a flexible rapid prototyping facility for developing new statistical models and methods. The ability to check the implementation of an algorithm by comparing its results to that of an executable specification enabled us to rapidly debug both specification and implementation in an environment of changing needs.

  14. Zeeman Doppler Maps: Always Unique, Never Spurious?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stift, Martin J.; Leone, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Numerical models of atomic diffusion in magnetic atmospheres of ApBp stars predict abundance structures that differ from the empirical maps derived with (Zeeman) Doppler mapping (ZDM). An in-depth analysis of this apparent disagreement investigates the detectability by means of ZDM of a variety of abundance structures, including (warped) rings predicted by theory, but also complex spot-like structures. Even when spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio are available, it can prove difficult or altogether impossible to correctly recover shapes, positions, and abundances of a mere handful of spots, notwithstanding the use of all four Stokes parameters and an exactly known field geometry; the recovery of (warped) rings can be equally challenging. Inversions of complex abundance maps that are based on just one or two spectral lines usually permit multiple solutions. It turns out that it can by no means be guaranteed that any of the regularization functions in general use for ZDM (maximum entropy or Tikhonov) will lead to a true abundance map instead of some spurious one. Attention is drawn to the need for a study that would elucidate the relation between the stratified, field-dependent abundance structures predicted by diffusion theory on the one hand, and empirical maps obtained by means of “canonical” ZDM, i.e., with mean atmospheres and unstratified abundances, on the other hand. Finally, we point out difficulties arising from the three-dimensional nature of the atomic diffusion process in magnetic ApBp star atmospheres.

  15. Occupancy Grid Map Merging Using Feature Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Gonzalez, “Toward a unified bayesian approach to hybrid metric-topological SLAM,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 24(2), April 2008, 259-270. [14] G...Risetti, C. Stachniss, and W. Burgard, “Improved Techniques for grid mapping with Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 23

  16. Maps and Map Learning in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Acheson, Gillian; Bednarz, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of maps and other graphic representations has become more important to geography and geographers. This is due to the development and widespread diffusion of geographic (spatial) technologies. As computers and silicon chips have become more capable and less expensive, geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning satellite…

  17. Geologic Map of the Thaumasia Region, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, Janes M.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Hare, Trent M.

    2001-01-01

    The geology of the Thaumasia region (fig. 1, sheet 3) includes a wide array of rock materials, depositional and erosional landforms, and tectonic structures. The region is dominated by the Thaumasia plateau, which includes central high lava plains ringed by highly deformed highlands; the plateau may comprise the ancestral center of Tharsis tectonism (Frey, 1979; Plescia and Saunders, 1982). The extensive structural deformation of the map region, which is without parallel on Mars in both complexity and diversity, occurred largely throughout the Noachian and Hesperian periods (Tanaka and Davis, 1988; Scott and Dohm, 1990a). The deformation produced small and large extensional and contractional structures (fig. 2, sheet 3) that resulted from stresses related to the formation of Tharsis (Frey, 1979; Wise and others, 1979; Plescia and Saunders, 1982; Banerdt and others, 1982, 1992; Watters and Maxwell, 1986; Tanaka and Davis, 1988; Francis, 1988; Watters, 1993; Schultz and Tanaka, 1994), from magmatic-driven uplifts, such as at Syria Planum (Tanaka and Davis, 1988; Dohm and others, 1998; Dohm and Tanaka, 1999) and central Valles Marineris (Dohm and others, 1998, Dohm and Tanaka, 1999), and from the Argyre impact (Wilhelms, 1973; Scott and Tanaka, 1986). In addition, volcanic, eolian, and fluvial processes have highly modified older surfaces in the map region. Local volcanic and tectonic activity often accompanied episodes of valley formation. Our mapping depicts and describes the diverse terrains and complex geologic history of this unique ancient tectonic region of Mars. The geologic (sheet 1), paleotectonic (sheet 2), and paleoerosional (sheet 3) maps of the Thaumasia region were compiled on a Viking 1:5,000,000-scale digital photomosaic base. The base is a combination of four quadrangles: the southeast part of Phoenicis Lacus (MC–17), most of the southern half of Coprates (MC–18), a large part of Thaumasia (MC–25), and the northwest margin of Argyre (MC–26

  18. Sao Paulo Map Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, G. Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes geographical, subject, and chronological aspects of 25 cartographic collections housed in university, public, special, state, and semi-state libraries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three size categories of map holdings (more than 10,000, 1,000-10,000, less than 1,000) are distinguished. A list of 27 Sao Paulo institutions housing map collections…

  19. Managing Vocabulary Mapping Services

    PubMed Central

    Che, Chengjian; Monson, Kent; Poon, Kasey B.; Shakib, Shaun C.; Lau, Lee Min

    2005-01-01

    The efficient management and maintenance of large-scale and high-quality vocabulary mapping is an operational challenge. The 3M Health Information Systems (HIS) Healthcare Data Dictionary (HDD) group developed an information management system to provide controlled mapping services, resulting in improved efficiency and quality maintenance. PMID:16779203

  20. Map of Nasca Geoglyphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzalová, K.; Pavelka, K.

    2013-07-01

    The Czech Technical University in Prague in the cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Dresden (Germany) work on the Nasca Project. The cooperation started in 2004 and much work has been done since then. All work is connected with Nasca lines in southern Peru. The Nasca project started in 1995 and its main target is documentation and conservation of the Nasca lines. Most of the project results are presented as WebGIS application via Internet. In the face of the impending destruction of the soil drawings, it is possible to preserve this world cultural heritage for the posterity at least in a digital form. Creating of Nasca lines map is very useful. The map is in a digital form and it is also available as a paper map. The map contains planimetric component of the map, map lettering and altimetry. Thematic folder in this map is a vector layer of the geoglyphs in Nasca/Peru. Basis for planimetry are georeferenced satellite images, altimetry is created from digital elevation model. This map was created in ArcGis software.

  1. Chizu Task Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Chizu is a tool for Mapping MPI processes or tasks to physical processors or nodes for optimizing communication performance. It takes the communication graph of a High Performance Computing (HPC) application and the interconnection topology of a supercomputer as input. It outputs a new MPI rand to processor mapping, which can be used when launching the HPC application.

  2. Mapping the Llano Estacado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early maps of North America, prepared in the 18th and early 19th centuries, often depicted the Llano Estacado as a conspicuous blank spot - a terra incognita. A good example is a map of the southwest sketched by Alexander von Humboldt in 1804. In 1830, Stephen F. Austin added little detail to the ...

  3. Handmade Multitextured Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevelyan, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Tactile maps for visually impaired persons can be made by drawing lines with an aqueous adhesive solution, dusting with thermoengraving powder, and exposing the card to a source of intense heat (such as a heat gun or microwave oven). A raised line map results. (CL)

  4. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  5. What do maps show?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the teaching package is to help students understand and use maps. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has provided the package as a service to educators so that more Americans will learn to understand the world of information on maps. Everything in the package teaches and reinforces geographic skills that are required in your curriculum.

  6. BenMAP Downloads

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Download the current and legacy versions of the BenMAP program. Download configuration and aggregation/pooling/valuation files to estimate benefits. BenMAP-CE is free and open source software, and the source code is available upon request.

  7. The Map Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyney, Arnold B.; Capone, Donald L.

    This teaching resource is aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to locate places on the earth. Designed as a collection of map skill exercises rather than a sequential program of study, this program expects that students have access to and some knowledge of how to use globes, maps, atlases, and encyclopedias. The volume contains 6…

  8. Coupled trivial maps.

    PubMed

    Bunimovich, L. A.; Livi, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Ruffo, S.

    1992-07-01

    The first nontrivial example of coupled map lattices that admits a rigorous analysis in the whole range of the strength of space interactions is considered. This class is generated by one-dimensional maps with a globally attracting superstable periodic trajectory that are coupled by a diffusive nearest-neighbor interaction.

  9. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  10. World Stress Map Published

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbach, Oliver; Müller, Birgit; Fuchs, Karl; Wenzel, Friedemann; Reinecker, John; Tingay, Mark; Sperner, Blanka; Cadet, Jean-Paul; Rossi, Philipp

    2007-11-01

    The World Stress Map (WSM), published in April 2007 by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World and the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, displays the tectonic regime and the orientation of the contemporary maximum horizontal compressional stress at more than 12,000 locations within the Earth's crust. The Mercator projection is a scale of 1:46,000,000.

  11. Geologic map of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  12. Bodily maps of emotions

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  13. Iconicity as structure mapping

    PubMed Central

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience. PMID:25092669

  14. Bodily maps of emotions.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions.

  15. Maximally Informative Statistics for Localization and Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for localization and mapping for a mobile robot using monocular vision and odometry as its means of sensing. The approach uses the Variable State Dimension filtering (VSDF) framework to combine aspects of Extended Kalman filtering and nonlinear batch optimization. This paper describes two primary improvements to the VSDF. The first is to use an interpolation scheme based on Gaussian quadrature to linearize measurements rather than relying on analytic Jacobians. The second is to replace the inverse covariance matrix in the VSDF with its Cholesky factor to improve the computational complexity. Results of applying the filter to the problem of localization and mapping with omnidirectional vision are presented.

  16. Getting Results with Curriculum Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi Hayes

    2004-01-01

    This helpful resource will speed the mapping effort along and apply curriculum mapping to special situations. In this book teachers and administrators offer concrete advice on how to get the most out of curriculum mapping in districts and schools: (1) Steps to implementing mapping procedures and leading the mapping process; (2) Tools and resources…

  17. Visualising interactive flood risk maps in a dynamic Geobrowser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaw Manful, Desmond; He, Yi; Cloke, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian; Li, Zhijia; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Huang, Yingchun; Hu, Yuzhong

    2010-05-01

    Communicating flood forecast products effectively to end-users is the final step in the flood event simulation process. A prototype of the Novel Flood Early Warning System (NEWS) based on the TIGGE (THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) database explores new avenues to visualise flood forecast products in a dynamic and interactive manner. One of the possibilities NEWS is currently assessing is Google Maps. Google Maps is a basic web mapping service application and technology provided by Google, free (for non-commercial use). It powers many map-based services including maps embedded on third-party websites via the Google Maps API. Creating a customized map interface requires adding the Google JavaScript code to a page, and then using Javascript functions to add points to the map. Flood maps allow end-users to visualise and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly. The NEWS software will attempt to deal with the following issues: • Uncertainty visualization in hazards maps • Visualizing uncertainty for sector specific risk managers • Uncertainty representation of point and linear data The objective is improve the information content of flood risk maps making them more useful to specific end-users.

  18. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  19. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct.

  20. Color on emergency mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  1. The geologic mapping of asteroid Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Yingst, A.; Garry, B.

    2014-07-01

    As part of NASA's Dawn mission [1,2] we conducted a geologic mapping campaign to provide a systematic, cartography-based initial characterization of the global and regional geology of asteroid Vesta. The goal of geological maps is to place observations of surface features into their stratigraphic context to develop a geologic history of the evolution of planetary surfaces. Geologic mapping reduces the complexity of heterogeneous planetary surfaces into comprehensible portions, defining and characterizing discrete material units based upon physical attributes related to the geologic processes that produced them, and enabling identification of the relative roles of various processes (impact cratering, tectonism, volcanism, erosion and deposition) in shaping planetary surfaces [3,4]. The Dawn Science Team produced cartographic products of Vesta from the Framing Camera images, including global mosaics as well as 15 regional quadrangles [5], which served as bases for the mapping. We oversaw the geologic mapping campaign during the Nominal Mission, including production of a global geologic map at scale 1:500,000 using images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit [6] and 15 quadrangle geologic maps at scale 1:250,000 using images from the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit [7]. The goal was to support the Dawn Team by providing geologic and stratigraphic context of surface features and supporting the analysis of data from the Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (VIR) and the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND). Mapping was done using ArcGIS™ software, in which quadrangle mapping built on interpretations derived from the global geologic map but were updated and modified to take advantage of the highest spatial resolution data. Despite challenges (e.g., Vesta's highly sloped surface [8] deforms impact craters and produces mass movements that buries contacts), we were successfully able to map the whole surface of Vesta and identify a geologic history as represented in our maps and

  2. Coastal mapping handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,; Ellis, Melvin Y.

    1978-01-01

    Passage of the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 focused attention on the Nation's coastal land and water areas. As plans for more effective management of the coastal zone evolved, it soon became apparent that improved maps and charts of these areas were needed. This handbook was prepared with the requirements of the entire coastal community in mind, giving greatest attention to the needs of coastal zone managers and planners at the State and local levels. Its principal objective is to provide general information and guidance; it is neither a textbook nor a technical manual, but rather a primer on coastal mapping. This handbook should help planners and managers of coastal programs to determine their mapping requirements, select the best maps and charts for their particular needs, and to deal effectively with personnel who gather data and prepare maps. The sections on "Sources of Assistance and Advice" and "Product and Data Sources" should be especially useful to all involved in mapping the coastal zone. Brief summaries of the mapping efforts of several State coastal zone management programs are included. "Future outlook" discusses anticipated progress and changes in mapping procedures and techniques. Illustrations are inserted, where appropriate, to illustrate the products and equipment discussed. Because of printing restrictions, the colors in map illustrations may vary from those in the original publication. The appendixes include substantial material which also should be of interest. In addition a glossary and an index are included to provide easy and quick access to the terms and concepts used in the text. For those interested in more technical detail than is provided in this handbook, the "Selected references" will be useful. Also, the publications of the professional societies listed in appendix 4 will provide technical information in detail.

  3. Reducing GWAS Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hazelett, Dennis J.; Conti, David V.; Han, Ying; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Easton, Doug; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Haiman, Christopher A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous genomic 'hits' associated with complex phenotypes. In most cases these hits, along with surrogate genetic variation as measure by numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are in linkage disequilibrium, are not in coding genes making assignment of functionality or causality intractable. Here we propose that fine-mapping along with the matching of risk SNPs at chromatin biofeatures lessen this complexity by reducing the number of candidate functional/causal SNPs. For example, we show here that only on average 2 SNPs per prostate cancer risk locus are likely candidates for functionality/causality; we further propose that this manageable number should be taken forward in mechanistic studies. The candidate SNPs can be looked up for each prostate cancer risk region in 2 recent publications in 20151,2 from our groups. PMID:26771711

  4. Three-dimensional mapping of differential amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4/MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic activation by lipid A, antagonism by Eritoran and species-dependent activities of Lipid IVA in the mammalian LPS sensor system.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Lozano-Aponte, Jorge; Figueroa-Vazquez, Vianihuini; Yunes-Rojas, Julian A; Zähringer, Ulrich; Alexander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A literature review concerning the unexpected species differences of the vertebrate innate immune response to lipid IVA was published in CSBJ prior to the present computational study to address the unpaired activity-sequence correlation of prototypic E. coli -type lipid A and its precursor lipid IVA regarding human, murine, equine and canine species. To this end, their sequences and structures of hitherto known Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complexes were aligned and their differential side chain patterns studied. If required due to the lack of the corresponding X-ray crystallographic data, three-dimensional models of TLR4/MD-2/ligand complexes were generated using mono and dimeric crystal structures as templates and in silico docking of the prototypic ligands lipid A, lipid IVA and Eritoran. All differential amino acids were mapped to pinpoint species dependency on an atomic scale, i.e. the possible concert of mechanistically relevant side chains. In its most abstract and general form the three-dimensional (3D-) models devise a triangular interface or "wedge" where molecular interactions between TLR4, MD-2 and ligand itself take place. This study identifies two areas in the wedge related to either agonism or antagonism reflecting why ligands like lipid IVA can possess a species dependent dual activity. Lipid IVA represents an imperfect (underacylated and backbone-flipped), low affinity ligand of mammalian TLR4/MD-2 complexes. Its specific but weak antagonistic activity in the human system is in particular due to the loss of phosphate attraction in the wedge-shaped region conferred by nonhomologous residue changes when compared to crystal and modeled structures of the corresponding murine and equine TLR4/MD-2 complexes. The counter-TLR4/MD-2 unit was also taken into account since agonist-mediated dimerization in a defined m-shaped complex composed of two TLR4/MD-2/agonist subunits triggers intracellular signaling during the

  5. Automatic cloud cover mapping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, J. P., III; Rosenfeld, A.

    1971-01-01

    A method of converting a picture into a 'cartoon' or 'map' whose regions correspond to differently textured regions is described. Texture edges in the picture are detected, and solid regions surrounded by these (usually broken) edges are 'colored in' using a propagation process. The resulting map is cleaned by comparing the region colors with the textures of the corresponding regions in the picture, and also by merging some regions with others according to criteria based on topology and size. The method has been applied to the construction of cloud cover maps from cloud cover pictures obtained by satellites.

  6. Mapping the Baby Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In June, NASA plans to launch the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) to survey the ancient radiation in unprecedented detail. MAP will map slight temperature fluctuations within the microwave background that vary by only 0.00001 C across a chilly radiation that now averages 2.73 C above absolute zero. The temperature differences today point back to density differences in the fiery baby universe, in which there was a little more matter here and a little less matter there. Areas of slightly enhanced density had stronger gravity than low-density areas. The high-density areas pulled back on the background radiation, making it appear slightly cooler in those directions.

  7. Reliable Radiation Hybrid Maps: An Efficient Scalable Clustering-based Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of mapping markers from radiation hybrid mapping (RHM) experiments is equivalent to the traveling salesman problem and, thereby, has combinatorial complexity. As an additional problem, experiments typically result in some unreliable markers that reduce the overall quality of the map. We ...

  8. Map and Compass Skills for the Elementary School. Instructional Activities Series IA/E-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Robert P.; Grogger, Paul K.

    Twenty activities are described that can be used to develop map and compass skills in elementary grades. The activities range from simple, beginners' projects to more complex tasks as students acquire more skills. Most can be carried out in the classroom, schoolyard, or local neighborhood. Map activities include drawing maps of the classroom,…

  9. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  10. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  11. Complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  12. Partial turbo detection with reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouardi, Aissa; Djebbari, A.; Bouazza, B. S.

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we propose a novel method for reducing the complexity of the turbo detector MAP (maximum a posteriori). The basic idea consists in turbo detecting a part of intersymbol interference (ISI) after decomposing the channel in two parts. We show that we can reduce the trellis complexity in the turbo process at a certain cost, i.e. performance loss.

  13. Submap joining smoothing and mapping for camera-based indoor localization and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjärkefur, J.; Karlsson, A.; Grönwall, C.; Rydell, J.

    2011-06-01

    Personnel positioning is important for safety in e.g. emergency response operations. In GPS-denied environments, possible positioning solutions include systems based on radio frequency communication, inertial sensors, and cameras. Many camera-based systems create a map and localize themselves relative to that. The computational complexity of most such solutions grows rapidly with the size of the map. One way to reduce the complexity is to divide the visited region into submaps. This paper presents a novel method for merging conditionally independent submaps (generated using e.g. EKF-SLAM) by the use of smoothing. Using this approach it is possible to build large maps in close to linear time. The method is demonstrated in two indoor scenarios, where data was collected with a trolley-mounted stereo vision camera.

  14. Ordered and isomorphic mapping of periodic structures in the parametrically forced logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranhão, Dariel M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the periodic domains found in the parametrically forced logistic map, the classical logistic map when its control parameter changes dynamically. Phase diagrams in two-parameter spaces reveal intricate periodic structures composed of patterns of intersecting superstable orbits curves, defining the cell of a periodic window. Cells appear multifoliated and ordered, and they are isomorphically mapped when one changes the map parameters. Also, we identify the characteristics of simplest cell and apply them to other more complex, discussing how the topography on parameter space is affected. By use of the winding number as defined in periodically forced oscillators, we show that the hierarchical organization of the periodic domains is manifested in global and local scales.

  15. Geological mapping goes 3-D in response to societal needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorleifson, H.; Berg, R.C.; Russell, H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to 3-D mapping has been made possible by technological advances in digital cartography, GIS, data storage, analysis, and visualization. Despite various challenges, technological advancements facilitated a gradual transition from 2-D maps to 2.5-D draped maps to 3-D geological mapping, supported by digital spatial and relational databases that can be interrogated horizontally or vertically and viewed interactively. Challenges associated with data collection, human resources, and information management are daunting due to their resource and training requirements. The exchange of strategies at the workshops has highlighted the use of basin analysis to develop a process-based predictive knowledge framework that facilitates data integration. Three-dimensional geological information meets a public demand that fills in the blanks left by conventional 2-D mapping. Two-dimensional mapping will, however, remain the standard method for extensive areas of complex geology, particularly where deformed igneous and metamorphic rocks defy attempts at 3-D depiction.

  16. Brain-mapping projects using the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hideyuki; Mitra, Partha

    2015-04-01

    Globally, there is an increasing interest in brain-mapping projects, including the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative project in the USA, the Human Brain Project (HBP) in Europe, and the Brain Mapping by Integrated Neurotechnologies for Disease Studies (Brain/MINDS) project in Japan. These projects aim to map the structure and function of neuronal circuits to ultimately understand the vast complexity of the human brain. Brain/MINDS is focused on structural and functional mapping of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) brain. This non-human primate has numerous advantages for brain mapping, including a well-developed frontal cortex and a compact brain size, as well as the availability of transgenic technologies. In the present review article, we discuss strategies for structural and functional mapping of the marmoset brain and the relation of the common marmoset to other animals models.

  17. Individualized diffeomorphic mapping of brains with large cortical infarcts.

    PubMed

    Soon, Hock Wei; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    Whole brain mapping of stroke patients with large cortical infarcts is not trivial due to the complexity of infarcts' anatomical location and appearance in magnetic resonance image. In this study, we proposed an individualized diffeomorphic mapping framework for solving this problem. This framework is based on our recent work of large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) in Du et al. (2011) and incorporates anatomical features, such as sulcal/gyral curves, cortical surfaces, brain intensity image, and masks of infarcted regions, in order to align a normal brain to the brain of stroke patients. We applied this framework to synthetic data and data of stroke patients and validated the mapping accuracy in terms of the alignment of gyral/sulcal curves, sulcal regions, and brain segmentation. Our results revealed that this framework provided comparable mapping results for stroke patients and healthy controls, suggesting the importance of incorporating individualized anatomical features in whole brain mapping of brains with large cortical infarcts.

  18. MAPPING IN MICRONESIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Randle W.; Swinnerton, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has recently completed a series of new topographic maps of Micronesia in cooperation with the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Federal agency administering the islands. Monocolor 1:10,000-scale manuscripts were compiled, from which 1:25,000-scale metric quadrangles were derived with symbology consistent with USGS quadrangle mapping. The publication of these new maps coincides with the impending political changes resulting from self-determination referendums held in Micronesia. Local sources have helped considerably with field logistics and resolution of geographic name controversies. Technical aspects of this project included development of tropical feature symbology, location of cadastral subdivisions and associated boundaries and mapping of many outlying coral reefs.

  19. Map of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    Based on bibliometric data from information-services provider Thomson Reuters, this map reveals "core areas" of physics, shown as coloured circular nodes, and the relationship between these subdisciplines, shown as lines.

  20. DAM - detection and mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Integrated set of manual procedures, computer programs, and graphic devices processes multispectral scanner data from orbiting Landsat into precisely registered and formatted maps of surface water and other resources at variety of scales, sheet formats, and tick intervals.

  1. Dating the Vinland Map

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  2. Dating the Vinland Map

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-04

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  3. Automated mapping system patented

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A patent on a satellite system dubbed Mapsat, which would be able to map the earth from space and would thereby reduce the time and cost of mapping on a smaller scale, has been issued to the U.S. Geological Survey.The Mapsat concept, invented by Alden F. Colvocoresses, a research cartographer at the USGS National Center, is based on Landsat technology but uses sensors that acquire higher-resolution image data in either a stereo or monoscopic mode. Stereo data can be processed relatively simply with automation to produce images for interpretation or to produce maps. Monoscopic and multispectral data can be processed in a computer to derive information on earth resources. Ground control, one of the most expensive phases of mapping, could be kept to a minimum.

  4. enceladus_stress_map

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a map of the changing stress on the surface of Enceladus' icy crust from the wobble and gravitational tides. Blue lines show the direction of forces pulling the crust apart, and red lines s...

  5. Air Data - Concentration Map

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Make a map of daily concentrations over several days. The daily air quality can be displayed in terms of the Air Quality Index or in concentration ranges for certain PM species like organic carbon, nitrates, and sulfates.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counseling About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  7. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  8. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  9. Functional mapping of ontogeny in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiyang; Tong, Chunfa; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhong; Guo, Yunqian; Du, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2012-05-01

    All organisms face the problem of how to perform a sequence of developmental changes and transitions during ontogeny. We revise functional mapping, a statistical model originally derived to map genes that determine developmental dynamics, to take into account the entire process of ontogenetic growth from embryo to adult and from the vegetative to reproductive phase. The revised model provides a framework that reconciles the genetic architecture of development at different stages and elucidates a comprehensive picture of the genetic control mechanisms of growth that change gradually from a simple to a more complex level. We use an annual flowering plant, as an example, to demonstrate our model by which to map genes and their interactions involved in embryo and postembryonic growth. The model provides a useful tool to study the genetic control of ontogenetic growth in flowering plants and any other organisms through proper modifications based on their biological characteristics.

  10. Building Better Volcanic Hazard Maps Through Scientific and Stakeholder Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Lindsay, J. M.; Calder, E.

    2015-12-01

    All across the world information about natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunami is shared and communicated using maps that show which locations are potentially exposed to hazards of varying intensities. Unlike earthquakes and tsunami, which typically produce one dominant hazardous phenomenon (ground shaking and inundation, respectively) volcanic eruptions can produce a wide variety of phenomena that range from near-vent (e.g. pyroclastic flows, ground shaking) to distal (e.g. volcanic ash, inundation via tsunami), and that vary in intensity depending on the type and location of the volcano. This complexity poses challenges in depicting volcanic hazard on a map, and to date there has been no consistent approach, with a wide range of hazard maps produced and little evaluation of their relative efficacy. Moreover, in traditional hazard mapping practice, scientists analyse data about a hazard, and then display the results on a map that is then presented to stakeholders. This one-way, top-down approach to hazard communication does not necessarily translate into effective hazard education, or, as tragically demonstrated by Nevado del Ruiz, Columbia in 1985, its use in risk mitigation by civil authorities. Furthermore, messages taken away from a hazard map can be strongly influenced by its visual design. Thus, hazard maps are more likely to be useful, usable and used if relevant stakeholders are engaged during the hazard map process to ensure a) the map is designed in a relevant way and b) the map takes into account how users interpret and read different map features and designs. The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk has recently launched a Hazard Mapping Working Group to collate some of these experiences in graphically depicting volcanic hazard from around the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean, with the aim of preparing some Considerations for Producing Volcanic Hazard Maps that may help map makers in the future.

  11. Maps and (no) Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, Etienne

    As the title suggests, I examine the role of maps in accelerator theory, conveniently leaving simulation out of the picture for lack of time and space. This is really a primer on the map-based "Courant Snyder" theory as independently proposed by Dragt's group (author included) and Turchetti's group at Bologna. Quite obviously it is viewed here from the author's own perspective and prejudices.

  12. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  13. Fundamentals of petroleum maps

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Elroy, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    It's a complete guide to the fundamentals of reading, using, and making petroleum maps. The topics covered are well spotting, lease posting, contouring, hanging cross sections, and ink drafting. This book not only tells the how of petroleum mapping, but it also tells the why to better understand the principles and techniques. The books does not teach ''drafting,'' but does describe the proper care and use of drafting equipment for those who are totally new to the task.

  14. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  15. Mars Gravity Anomoly Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is a vertical gravity map of Mars color-coded in mgals based on radio tracking. Note correlations and lack of correlations with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) global topography.

    This map was created using MGS data under the direction of Bill Sjogren, a member of the MGS Radio Science Team. The Radio Science Team is led by G. Leonard Tyler of Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA.

  16. Geological and Hydrogeological Mapping on the Oak Ridges Moraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holysh, S.; Gerber, R.; Doughty, M.

    2009-05-01

    Ontario's Source Water Protection Program requires the production of Assessment Reports that are to be utilized for land use decision making. The reports are to provide maps of wellhead capture zones, significant recharge areas and areas of aquifer vulnerability. Many of the ongoing projects are hampered by the scale of investigation and the lack of aquifer mapping within Ontario. It is not surprising to find that aquifer mapping is absent given the complex glacial stratigraphy found in many areas of the province. There has never been a systematic approach within Ontario to investigate aquifer mapping at various scales of investigation. Ongoing work in the Oak Ridges Moraine area has provided some advanced geological and hydrogeological mapping that has provided significant advancements to support flow system understanding, however work is still needed to investigate scale and data quality issues. This paper explores some of the trials and tribulations in mapping the necessary for source water protection Ontario's Source Water Protection Program requires the production of Assessment Reports that are to be utilized for land use decision making. The reports are to provide maps of wellhead capture zones, significant recharge areas and areas of aquifer vulnerability. Many of the ongoing projects are hampered by the scale of investigation and the lack of aquifer mapping within Ontario. It is not surprising to find that aquifer mapping is absent given the complex glacial stratigraphy found in many areas of the province. There has never been a systematic approach within Ontario to investigate aquifer mapping at various scales of investigation. Ongoing work in the Oak Ridges Moraine area has provided some advanced geological and hydrogeological mapping within the area. Significant advancements have been made in terms of supporting flow system understanding, however work is still needed to investigate scale and data quality issues. This paper explores some of the trials and

  17. The National Map - Orthoimagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mauck, James; Brown, Kim; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Orthorectified digital aerial photographs and satellite images of 1-meter (m) pixel resolution or finer make up the orthoimagery component of The National Map. The process of orthorectification removes feature displacements and scale variations caused by terrain relief and sensor geometry. The result is a combination of the image characteristics of an aerial photograph or satellite image and the geometric qualities of a map. These attributes allow users to: *Measure distance *Calculate areas *Determine shapes of features *Calculate directions *Determine accurate coordinates *Determine land cover and use *Perform change detection *Update maps The standard digital orthoimage is a 1-m or finer resolution, natural color or color infra-red product. Most are now produced as GeoTIFFs and accompanied by a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant metadata file. The primary source for 1-m data is the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) leaf-on imagery. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilizes NAIP imagery as the image layer on its 'Digital- Map' - a new generation of USGS topographic maps (http://nationalmap.gov/digital_map). However, many Federal, State, and local governments and organizations require finer resolutions to meet a myriad of needs. Most of these images are leaf-off, natural-color products at resolutions of 1-foot (ft) or finer.

  18. Global Water Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.; Salas, F.; Teng, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A global water map is a coverage of the earth that describes the state of water circulation in a phase of the hydrologic cycle. This information can be published as a map showing the state of the water variable at a particular point in time, or charted as a time series showing the temporal variation of that variable at a point in space. Such maps can be created through the NASA Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) for precipitation, evaporation, soil moisture, and other parameters describing the vertical exchange of water between the land and atmosphere, through a combination of observations and simulation modeling. Point observations of water variables such as precipitation and streamflow are carried out by local hydrologic measurement agencies associated with a particular area. These point observations are now being published as web services in the WaterML language and federated using the Global Earth Observing System of Systems to enable the publication of water observations maps for these variables. By combining water maps derived from LDAS with those from federated point observations, a deeper understanding of global water conditions and movement can be created. This information should be described in a Hydrologic Data Book that specifies the information content of each of these map layers so that they can be appropriately used and combined.

  19. Creating Heliophysics Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.; Mendez, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for Science Education at University of California Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory is creating concept maps for Heliophysics and would like to get input from scientists. The purpose of this effort is to identify key concepts related to Heliophysics and map their progression to show how students' understanding of Heliophysics might develop from Kindergarten through higher education. These maps are meant to tie into the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy and National Science Education Standards. It is hoped that the results of this effort will be useful for curriculum designers developing Heliophysics-related curriculum materials and classroom teachers using Heliophysics materials. The need for concept maps was identified as a result of product analysis undertaken by the NASA Heliophysics Forum Team. The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have as two of their goals to improve the characterization of the contents of the Science Mission Directorate and Public Outreach (SMD E/PO) portfolio (Objective 2.1) and assist SMD in addressing gaps in the portfolio of SMD E/PO products and project activities (Objective 2.2). An important part of this effort is receiving feedback from solar scientists regarding the inclusion of key concepts and their progression in the maps. This session will introduce the draft concept maps and elicit feedback from scientists.

  20. Geologic Mapping of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katherine H.

    1998-05-01

    Planetary geologic mapping involves integrating a terrestrial-based understanding of surface and subsurface processes and mapping principles to investigate scientific questions. Mars mappers must keep in mind that physical processes, such as wind and flowing water on Mars, are or were different from terrestrial processes because the planetary atmospheres have changed differently over time. Geologic mapping of Mars has traditionally been done by hand using overlays on photomosaics of Viking Orbiter and Mariner images. Photoclinometry and shadow measurements have been used to determine elevations, and the distribution and size of craters have been used to determine the relative ages of surfaces- more densely cratered surfaces are older. Some mappers are now using computer software (ranging from Photoshop to ArcInfo) to facilitate mapping, though their applications must be carefully executed so that registration of the images remains true. Images and some mapping results are now available on the internet, and new data from recent missions to Mars (Pathfinder and Surveyor) will offer clarifying information to mapping efforts. This paper consists chiefly of pictures and diagrams.

  1. Mars synthetic topographic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Topographic contour maps of Mars are compiled by the synthesis of data acquired from various scientific experiments of the Mariner 9 mission, including S-band radio-occulation, the ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS), the infrared radiometer (IRR), the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) and television imagery, as well as Earth-based radar information collected at Goldstone, Haystack, and Arecibo Observatories. The entire planet is mapped at scales of 1:25,000,000 and 1:25,000,000 using Mercator, Lambert, and polar stereographic map projections. For the computation of map projections, a biaxial spheroid figure is adopted. The semimajor and semiminor axes are 3393.4 and 3375.7 km, respectively, with a polar flattening of 0.0052. For the computation of elevations, a topographic datum is defined by a gravity field described in terms of spherical harmonics of fourth order and fourth degree combined with a 6.1-mbar occulation pressure surface. This areoid can be approximated by a triaxial ellipsoid with semimajor axes of A = 3394.6 km and B = 3393.3 km and a semiminor axis of C = 3376.3 km. The semimajor axis A intersects the Martian surface at longitude 105??W. The dynamic flattening of Mars is 0.00525. The contour intercal of the maps is 1 km. For some prominent features where overlapping pictures from Mariner 9 are available, local contour maps at relatively larger scales were also compiled by photogrammetric methods on stereo plotters. ?? 1978.

  2. Mapping wildland fuels for fire management across multiple scales: integrating remote sensing, GIS, and biophysical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, Robert E.; Burgan, Robert E.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel maps are essential for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. However, fuel mapping is an extremely difficult and complex process requiring expertise in remotely sensed image classification, fire behavior, fuels modeling, ecology, and geographical information systems (GIS). This paper first presents the challenges of mapping fuels: canopy concealment, fuelbed complexity, fuel type diversity, fuel variability, and fuel model generalization. Then, four approaches to mapping fuels are discussed with examples provided from the literature: (1) field reconnaissance; (2) direct mapping methods; (3) indirect mapping methods; and (4) gradient modeling. A fuel mapping method is proposed that uses current remote sensing and image processing technology. Future fuel mapping needs are also discussed which include better field data and fuel models, accurate GIS reference layers, improved satellite imagery, and comprehensive ecosystem models.

  3. MAP Algorithms for Decoding Linear Block Codes Based on Sectionalized Trellis Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ye; Lin, Shu; Fossorier, Marc P. C.

    2000-01-01

    The maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) algorithm is a trellis-based MAP decoding algorithm. It is the heart of turbo (or iterative) decoding that achieves an error performance near the Shannon limit. Unfortunately, the implementation of this algorithm requires large computation and storage. Furthermore, its forward and backward recursions result in long decoding delay. For practical applications, this decoding algorithm must be simplified and its decoding complexity and delay must be reduced. In this paper, the MAP algorithm and its variations, such as log-MAP and max-log-MAP algorithms, are first applied to sectionalized trellises for linear block codes and carried out as two-stage decodings. Using the structural properties of properly sectionalized trellises, the decoding complexity and delay of the MAP algorithms can be reduced. Computation-wise optimum sectionalizations of a trellis for MAP algorithms are investigated. Also presented in this paper are bidirectional and parallel MAP decodings.

  4. High-Resolution Mapping in Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, C. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2006-12-01

    Near-bottom seafloor mapping with precisely navigated deep submergence vehicles has become increasingly common in a range of oceanographic settings. Recent mapping efforts at deep-water hydrothermal vent sites have resulted in high-resolution (sub-meter) bathymetry datasets that can be used to identify morphological features associated with volcanic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes. The resolution of these maps, and our ability to accurately quantify the complex morphologic details of hydrothermal structures has been limited by a number of variables including navigational accuracy, sonar settings (e.g. acoustic wavelength, sonar orientation, ping rate), survey parameters (e.g. altitude, speed), data density, and data processing techniques (e.g. gridding algorithms). We present the results of two near-bottom surveys conducted in August 2006 at the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea-Australia-Canada Manus) hydrothermal field in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea, south of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Data were simultaneously acquired with two high-resolution multibeam sonar systems mounted on the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason 2. A Simrad SM2000 (200 kHz) multibeam system was mounted in down-looking mode, and an Imagenex DeltaT (675 kHz) multibeam system was mounted on the brow of the vehicle in a forward-looking orientation. Surveys were conducted in parallel survey lines at 15 m altitude (15 m line spacing), and the can be used to generate sub-meter resolution maps of the seafloor. The maps were assembled using a terrain registration algorithm designed to minimize the affects of navigation error. Together, these sonars provide a complementary dataset that allows us to better quantify the 3-dimensional morphological characteristics of complex hydrothermal vent structures. This information can be used to more accurately estimate the volume of hydrothermal deposits, and render a more complete environmental picture that is less hindered by occlusions and

  5. Comparative gene map of hypertriglyceridaemia.

    PubMed

    Seda, O

    2004-01-01

    Elevated triglyceride levels in the circulation are currently recognized as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Hypertriglyceridaemia represents one of the attributes of metabolic syndrome and is present in the most common genetic dyslipidaemia, the familial combined hyperlipidaemia. The factual concentration of triglycerides is determined by a complex interaction of environmental and genetic components. Deeper understanding of the causative gene variants and the mode of their participation in the pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridaemia is required for devising efficient therapy of hypertriglyceridaemia. This is the first systematic review of linkage and candidate gene studies dealing with the dissection of genetic determinants of (hyper)triglyceridaemia in human and two major mammalian model species, mouse and rat. Based on the merged sets of data, a synthetic view of the genetic component of triglyceridaemia, the "hypertriglyceridaemia gene map", is presented.

  6. Development of base maps' role in soil mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brad; Brevik, Eric

    2014-05-01

    One of the ultimate goals of soil science is the production of accurate soil maps, but historically these thematic maps have relied upon base maps for positional reference and later for parameters that help predict soil properties. This presentation reviews the history of base maps and the dependence of soil mapping on them. The availability of geographic technology for producing these base maps has constrained and directed the geographic study of soil. A lack of accurate methods for determining location limited early geographic description of soils to narratives. The availability of accurate topographic maps in the late 18th century, fueled by governments' interests in documenting national boundaries and popular interest in world atlases, provided the first base maps for soil geographers. These soil maps primarily used the topographic maps as a spatial reference onto which the thematic details were drawn. Due to the late start of a systematic topographic survey in the United States, early Soil Survey maps depended upon plat maps for spatial reference. The adoption of aerial photographs in the process of soil mapping increased the role of base maps as predictive parameters. In the current geospatial revolution, global positioning systems and geographic information systems have nearly replaced the need for base maps to provide spatial reference. Today, base maps are more likely to be used as parameters in landscape models for predicting the spatial distribution of soil properties and classes. As model parameters for digital soil maps, base maps constitute the library of predictive variables and constrain the supported resolution of the soil map. This change in the relationship between base maps and the soil map is a paradigm shift that affects fundamental definitions of geography, such as scale, resolution, and detectable features. These concepts are the essential tools used to study the spatial characteristics of Earth Systems.

  7. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High- Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  8. Geologic mapping of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  9. Parcellating connectivity in spatial maps

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Diane M.; Fei-Fei, Li

    2015-01-01

    A common goal in biological sciences is to model a complex web of connections using a small number of interacting units. We present a general approach for dividing up elements in a spatial map based on their connectivity properties, allowing for the discovery of local regions underlying large-scale connectivity matrices. Our method is specifically designed to respect spatial layout and identify locally-connected clusters, corresponding to plausible coherent units such as strings of adjacent DNA base pairs, subregions of the brain, animal communities, or geographic ecosystems. Instead of using approximate greedy clustering, our nonparametric Bayesian model infers a precise parcellation using collapsed Gibbs sampling. We utilize an infinite clustering prior that intrinsically incorporates spatial constraints, allowing the model to search directly in the space of spatially-coherent parcellations. After showing results on synthetic datasets, we apply our method to both functional and structural connectivity data from the human brain. We find that our parcellation is substantially more effective than previous approaches at summarizing the brain’s connectivity structure using a small number of clusters, produces better generalization to individual subject data, and reveals functional parcels related to known retinotopic maps in visual cortex. Additionally, we demonstrate the generality of our method by applying the same model to human migration data within the United States. This analysis reveals that migration behavior is generally influenced by state borders, but also identifies regional communities which cut across state lines. Our parcellation approach has a wide range of potential applications in understanding the spatial structure of complex biological networks. PMID:25737822

  10. Dynamic Map: Representation of interactions between robots

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardi, C.

    1996-12-31

    As robotics applications become more complex, the need for tools to analyze and explain interactions between robots has become more acute. We introduce the concept of Dynamic Map (DM), which can serve as a generic tool to analyze interactions between robots or with their environment. We show that this concept can be applied to different kinds of applications, like a predator-prey situation, or collision avoidance.

  11. Reachability Maps for In Situ Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Leger, Patrick C.; Robinson, Matthew L.; Bonitz, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    This work covers two programs that accomplish the same goal: creation of a "reachability map" from stereo imagery that tells where operators of a robotic arm can reach or touch the surface, and with which instruments. The programs are "marsreach" (for MER) and "phxreach." These programs make use of the planetary image geometry (PIG) library. However, unlike the other programs, they are not multi-mission. Because of the complexity of arm kinematics, the programs are specific to each mission.

  12. Geologic Mapping in Southern Margaritifer Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. P., III; Grant, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Margaritifer Terra records a complex geologic history [1-5], and the area from Holden crater through Ladon Valles, Ladon basin, and up to Morava Valles is no exception [e.g., 6-13]. The 1:500,000 geologic map of MTM quadrangles -15027, -20027, -25027, and -25032 (Figs. 1 and 2 [14]) identifies a range of units that delineate the history of water-related activity and regional geologic context.

  13. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  14. Plasmon and compositional mapping of plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringe, Emilie; Collins, Sean M.; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Skrabalak, Sara E.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, co-reduction of Au and Pd has allowed the synthesis of complex Au core/AuPd shell nanoparticles with elongated tips and cubic-like symmetry. Optical studies have shown strong plasmonic behavior and high refractive index sensitivities. In this paper, we describe the composition and the near-field plasmonic behavior of those complex structures. Monochromated STEM-EELS, Cathodoluminescence, and EDS mapping reveals the different resonant modes in these particles, and shows that Pd, a poor plasmonic metal, does not prevent strong resonances and could actually be extremely helpful for plasmon-enhanced catalysis.

  15. Electronically-implemented coupled logistic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Her, Alexandre; Amil, Pablo; Rubido, Nicolás; Marti, Arturo C.; Cabeza, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The logistic map is a paradigmatic dynamical system originally conceived to model the discrete-time demographic growth of a population, which shockingly, shows that discrete chaos can emerge from trivial low-dimensional non-linear dynamics. In this work, we design and characterize a simple, low-cost, easy-to-handle, electronic implementation of the logistic map. In particular, our implementation allows for straightforward circuit-modifications to behave as different one-dimensional discrete-time systems. Also, we design a coupling block in order to address the behavior of two coupled maps, although, our design is unrestricted to the discrete-time system implementation and it can be generalized to handle coupling between many dynamical systems, as in a complex system. Our findings show that the isolated and coupled maps' behavior has a remarkable agreement between the experiments and the simulations, even when fine-tuning the parameters with a resolution of ~10-3. We support these conclusions by comparing the Lyapunov exponents, periodicity of the orbits, and phase portraits of the numerical and experimental data for a wide range of coupling strengths and map's parameters.

  16. MAP65/Ase1 promote microtubule flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Portran, D.; Zoccoler, M.; Gaillard, J.; Stoppin-Mellet, V.; Neumann, E.; Arnal, I.; Martiel, J. L.; Vantard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are dynamic cytoskeletal elements involved in numerous cellular processes. Although they are highly rigid polymers with a persistence length of 1–8 mm, they may exhibit a curved shape at a scale of few micrometers within cells, depending on their biological functions. However, how MT flexural rigidity in cells is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we ask whether MT-associated proteins (MAPs) could locally control the mechanical properties of MTs. We show that two major cross-linkers of the conserved MAP65/PRC1/Ase1 family drastically decrease MT rigidity. Their MT-binding domain mediates this effect. Remarkably, the softening effect of MAP65 observed on single MTs is maintained when MTs are cross-linked. By reconstituting physical collisions between growing MTs/MT bundles, we further show that the decrease in MT stiffness induced by MAP65 proteins is responsible for the sharp bending deformations observed in cells when they coalign at a steep angle to create bundles. Taken together, these data provide new insights into how MAP65, by modifying MT mechanical properties, may regulate the formation of complex MT arrays. PMID:23615441

  17. Novice to Expert Cognition During Geologic Bedrock Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcovic, H. L.; Libarkin, J.; Hambrick, D. Z.; Baker, K. M.; Elkins, J. T.; Callahan, C. N.; Turner, S.; Rench, T. A.; LaDue, N.

    2011-12-01

    Bedrock geologic mapping is a complex and cognitively demanding task. Successful mapping requires domain-specific content knowledge, visuospatial ability, navigation through the field area, creating a mental model of the geology that is consistent with field data, and metacognition. Most post-secondary geology students in the United States receive training in geologic mapping, however, not much is known about the cognitive processes that underlie successful bedrock mapping, or about how these processes change with education and experience. To better understand cognition during geologic mapping, we conducted a 2-year research study in which 67 volunteers representing a range from undergraduate sophomore to 20+ years professional experience completed a suite of cognitive measures plus a 1-day bedrock mapping task in the Rocky Mountains, Montana, USA. In addition to participants' geologic maps and field notes, the cognitive suite included tests and questionnaires designed to measure: (1) prior geologic experience, via a self-report survey; (2) geologic content knowledge, via a modified version of the Geoscience Concept Inventory; (3) visuospatial ability, working memory capacity, and perceptual speed, via paper-and-pencil and computerized tests; (4) use of space and time during mapping via GPS tracking; and (5) problem-solving in the field via think-aloud audio logs during mapping and post-mapping semi-structured interviews. Data were examined for correlations between performance on the mapping task and other measures. We found that both geological knowledge and spatial visualization ability correlated positively with accuracy in the field mapping task. More importantly, we found a Visuospatial Ability × Geological Knowledge interaction, such that visuospatial ability positively predicted mapping performance at low, but not high, levels of geological knowledge. In other words, we found evidence to suggest that visuospatial ability mattered for bedrock mapping for the

  18. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  19. Elementary maps on nest algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengtong

    2006-08-01

    Let , be algebras and let , be maps. An elementary map of is an ordered pair (M,M*) such that for all , . In this paper, the general form of surjective elementary maps on standard subalgebras of nest algebras is described. In particular, such maps are automatically additive.

  20. Genetic and physical map correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical maps illustrate the arrangement of genes and DNA markers on a chromosome. The relative distances between positions on a genetic map are calculated using recombination frequencies while a physical map is based on the actual number of nucleotide pairs between loci. These maps ar...

  1. Techniques of stapler-based navigational thoracoscopic segmentectomy using virtual assisted lung mapping (VAL-MAP)

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Tomonori; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical segmentectomies play an important role in oncological lung resection, particularly for ground-glass types of primary lung cancers. This operation can also be applied to metastatic lung tumors deep in the lung. Virtual assisted lung mapping (VAL-MAP) is a novel technique that allows for bronchoscopic multi-spot dye markings to provide “geometric information” to the lung surface, using three-dimensional virtual images. In addition to wedge resections, VAL-MAP has been found to be useful in thoracoscopic segmentectomies, particularly complex segmentectomies, such as combined subsegmentectomies or extended segmentectomies. There are five steps in VAL-MAP-assisted segmentectomies: (I) “standing” stitches along the resection lines; (II) cleaning hilar anatomy; (III) confirming hilar anatomy; (IV) going 1 cm deeper; (V) step-by-step stapling technique. Depending on the anatomy, segmentectomies can be classified into linear (lingular, S6, S2), V- or U-shaped (right S1, left S3, S2b + S3a), and three dimensional (S7, S8, S9, S10) segmentectomies. Particularly three dimensional segmentectomies are challenging in the complexity of stapling techniques. This review focuses on how VAL-MAP can be utilized in segmentectomy, and how this technique can assist the stapling process in even the most challenging ones. PMID:28066675

  2. The Perfect Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Veenu; Rauscher, Emily; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal phase curves and eclipses provide the best constraints on the atmospheric temperature and circulation of short-period planets. The temperature structure of a planet can be expressed as a sum of spherical harmonics. Each spherical harmonic has a corresponding harmonic light curve, which is a function of system geometry (orbital inclination, planet/star radius ratio, and orbital separation). Depending on system geometry, there may be significant degeneracies between harmonic light curves: very different maps may produce similar light curves. Here we use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify and quantify these degeneracies. Starting from a set of harmonic light curves, we use PCA to calculate the set of orthonormal "eigen-light-curves". In addition, PCA determines the importance of every eigen-light-curve, telling us which components provide the most information. From these eigen-curves we can then reconstruct corresponding "eigen-maps". These eigen-light-curves and eigen-maps are the mathematically ideal basis set for inverting phase curve and eclipse data to create maps of a planet's emission. We determine how many eigen-maps can be fit to full-orbit light curves, as a function of photometric precision and system geometry.

  3. Prioritising Infectious Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, David M.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Wiebe, Antoinette; Battle, Katherine E.; Golding, Nick; Gething, Peter W.; Dowell, Scott F.; Farag, Tamer H.; Garcia, Andres J.; Kimball, Ann M.; Krause, L. Kendall; Smith, Craig H.; Brooker, Simon J.; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing volumes of data and computational capacity afford unprecedented opportunities to scale up infectious disease (ID) mapping for public health uses. Whilst a large number of IDs show global spatial variation, comprehensive knowledge of these geographic patterns is poor. Here we use an objective method to prioritise mapping efforts to begin to address the large deficit in global disease maps currently available. Methodology/Principal Findings Automation of ID mapping requires bespoke methodological adjustments tailored to the epidemiological characteristics of different types of diseases. Diseases were therefore grouped into 33 clusters based upon taxonomic divisions and shared epidemiological characteristics. Disability-adjusted life years, derived from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 study, were used as a globally consistent metric of disease burden. A review of global health stakeholders, existing literature and national health priorities was undertaken to assess relative interest in the diseases. The clusters were ranked by combining both metrics, which identified 44 diseases of main concern within 15 principle clusters. Whilst malaria, HIV and tuberculosis were the highest priority due to their considerable burden, the high priority clusters were dominated by neglected tropical diseases and vector-borne parasites. Conclusions/Significance A quantitative, easily-updated and flexible framework for prioritising diseases is presented here. The study identifies a possible future strategy for those diseases where significant knowledge gaps remain, as well as recognising those where global mapping programs have already made significant progress. For many conditions, potential shared epidemiological information has yet to be exploited. PMID:26061527

  4. Mapping nanoscale light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2014-12-01

    The control of light fields on subwavelength scales in nanophotonic structures has become ubiquitous, driven by both curiosity and a multitude of applications in fields ranging from biosensing to quantum optics. Mapping these fields in detail is crucial, as theoretical modelling is far from trivial and highly dependent on nanoscale geometry. Recent developments of nanoscale field mapping, particularly with near-field microscopy, have not only led to a vastly increased resolution, but have also resulted in increased functionality. The phase and amplitude of different vector components of both the electric and magnetic fields are now accessible, as is the ultrafast temporal or spectral evolution of propagating pulses in nanostructures. In this Review we assess the current state-of-the-art of subwavelength light mapping, highlighting the new science and nanostructures that have subsequently become accessible.

  5. Bone Surface Mapping Method

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bone shape is an important factor to determine the bone's structural function. For the asymmetrically shaped and anisotropically distributed bone in vivo, a surface mapping method is proposed on the bases of its geometric transformation invariance and its uniqueness of the principal axes of inertia. Using spiral CT scanning, we can make precise measurements to bone in vivo. The coordinate transformations lead to the principal axes of inertia, with which the prime meridian and the contour can be set. Methods such as tomographic reconstruction and boundary development are employed so that the surface of bone in vivo can be mapped. Experimental results show that the surface mapping method can reflect the shape features and help study the surface changes of bone in vivo. This method can be applied to research into the surface characteristics and changes of organ, tissue or cell whenever its digitalized surface is obtained. PMID:22412952

  6. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  7. Resource Destroying Maps.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Wen; Hu, Xueyuan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-02-10

    Resource theory is a widely applicable framework for analyzing the physical resources required for given tasks, such as computation, communication, and energy extraction. In this Letter, we propose a general scheme for analyzing resource theories based on resource destroying maps, which leave resource-free states unchanged but erase the resource stored in all other states. We introduce a group of general conditions that determine whether a quantum operation exhibits typical resource-free properties in relation to a given resource destroying map. Our theory reveals fundamental connections among basic elements of resource theories, in particular, free states, free operations, and resource measures. In particular, we define a class of simple resource measures that can be calculated without optimization, and that are monotone nonincreasing under operations that commute with the resource destroying map. We apply our theory to the resources of coherence and quantum correlations (e.g., discord), two prominent features of nonclassicality.

  8. Resource Destroying Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Wen; Hu, Xueyuan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-02-01

    Resource theory is a widely applicable framework for analyzing the physical resources required for given tasks, such as computation, communication, and energy extraction. In this Letter, we propose a general scheme for analyzing resource theories based on resource destroying maps, which leave resource-free states unchanged but erase the resource stored in all other states. We introduce a group of general conditions that determine whether a quantum operation exhibits typical resource-free properties in relation to a given resource destroying map. Our theory reveals fundamental connections among basic elements of resource theories, in particular, free states, free operations, and resource measures. In particular, we define a class of simple resource measures that can be calculated without optimization, and that are monotone nonincreasing under operations that commute with the resource destroying map. We apply our theory to the resources of coherence and quantum correlations (e.g., discord), two prominent features of nonclassicality.

  9. Mapping your competitive position.

    PubMed

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G

  10. Geologic Map of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crafford, A. Elizabeth Jones

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Geologic Map of Nevada is to provide an integrated set of digital geologic information that can be used for regional geologic and rigorous spatial analysis. Two components of this map represent new information that has not been published in this form before. The new geology layer was created by merging into a single file individual digital Nevada county geologic maps (Hess and Johnson, 1997), published at a scale of 1:250,000. A new regional interpretation was created to unify all of the different county rock units, and then appropriate edits and modifications were made to the file to reflect additional geologic information and more current geologic interpretations. All possible sources of information were not utilized in the scope of this project, but rather the goal was to create a consistent Statewide 1:250,000-scale map that would facilitate regional geologic interpretation and be a foundation for future spatial analyses of digital data. Secondly, a new database of conodont biostratigraphic data compiled and analyzed by Anita Harris is also incorporated into the map. Information about many, but not all, of these conodont samples have been published separately elsewhere over the years, but they have not been presented together in a single digital database. Other previously published data layers are used in this map to enhance the usefulness of the geologic information. These layers include mineral deposit locations, oil well locations, and cartographic layers such as county boundaries, roads, towns, cities, rivers, water bodies, township, range and section grids, quadrangle grids, and topography. A summary of these components is given below, and complete descriptions of each layer are provided in the digital metadata.

  11. Maps and inverse maps in open quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Thomas F.

    2010-10-15

    Two kinds of maps that describe evolution of states of a subsystem coming from dynamics described by a unitary operator for a larger system, maps defined for fixed mean values and maps defined for fixed correlations, are found to be quite different for the same unitary dynamics in the same situation in the larger system. An affine form is used for both kinds of maps to find necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse maps. All the different maps with the same homogeneous part in their affine forms have inverses if and only if the homogeneous part does. Some of these maps are completely positive; others are not, but the homogeneous part is always completely positive. The conditions for an inverse are the same for maps that are not completely positive as for maps that are. For maps defined for fixed mean values, the homogeneous part depends only on the unitary operator for the dynamics of the larger system, not on any state or mean values or correlations. Necessary and sufficient conditions for an inverse are stated several different ways: in terms of the maps of matrices, basis matrices, density matrices, or mean values. The inverse maps are generally not tied to the dynamics the way the maps forward are. A trace-preserving completely positive map that is unital cannot have an inverse that is obtained from any dynamics described by any unitary operator for any states of a larger system.

  12. Lightning mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, C.; Maier, L.

    1991-01-01

    A Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System is being implemented at KSC in Florida. The first operational use is expected in the late summer of 1991. The system is designed to map the location of in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning based on the time of arrival (TOA) of electromagnetic radiation. The system detects very high frequency (VHF) radiation and designed to map the volumetric extent of lightning. The system implements two independent antenna arrays to provide a fast data quality check, as necessary for a real-time warning system. The system performance goals and a comparison with a similar system implemented in the mid-1970's is made.

  13. Holographic maps of quasiparticle interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; He, Yang; Demler, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of Fourier-transformed scanning tunnelling microscopy images with subatomic resolution is a common tool for studying the properties of quasiparticle excitations in strongly correlated materials. Although Fourier amplitudes are generally complex valued, earlier analysis primarily focused on their absolute values. Their complex phases were often deemed random, and thus irrelevant, due to the unknown positions of the impurities in the sample. Here we show how to factor out these random phases by analysing overlaps between Fourier amplitudes that differ by reciprocal lattice vectors. The resulting holographic maps provide important and previously unknown information about the electronic structures. When applied to superconducting cuprates, our method solves a long-standing puzzle of the dichotomy between equivalent wavevectors. We show that d-wave Wannier functions of the conduction band provide a natural explanation for experimental results that were interpreted as evidence for competing unconventional charge modulations. Our work opens a new pathway to identify the nature of electronic states in scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  14. Heat Map Visualization of Complex Environmental and Biomarker Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, the assessment of human systems interactions with the environment has permeated all phases of environmental and public health research. We are invoking lessons learned from the broad discipline of Systems Biology research that focuses primarily on molecular ...

  15. Clustering Systems with Kolmogorov Complexity and MapReduce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-02

    with very different software configuration and load. We chose as similarity metric between machines the Normalized Compression Distance or NCD [2... NCD offers the ability to quantify the similarity between any two objects, based on a description of the objects. The object description can include any...set of attributes, making NCD a flexible choice for similarity metric. In our experiments, we used as description the software run-tables of the

  16. Modal Mapping in a Complex Shallow Water Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Industry Co., and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries . In addition to the acoustic measurements, extensive environmental data were also acquired in...Seabed Sound Speed Profile,” in Proceedings of the V Encontro de Tecnologia em Acustica Submarina (V Underwater Acoustics Meeting), Rio de Janeiro

  17. Advances in Bayesian Multiple QTL Mapping in Experimental Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nengjun; Shriner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many complex human diseases and traits of biological and/or economic importance are determined by interacting networks of multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) and environmental factors. Mapping QTL is critical for understanding the genetic basis of complex traits, and for ultimate identification of responsible genes. A variety of sophisticated statistical methods for QTL mapping have been developed. Among these developments, the evolution of Bayesian approaches for multiple QTL mapping over the past decade has been remarkable. Bayesian methods can jointly infer the number of QTL, their genomic positions, and their genetic effects. Here, we review recently developed and still developing Bayesian methods and associated computer software for mapping multiple QTL in experimental crosses. We compare and contrast these methods to clearly describe the relationships among different Bayesian methods. We conclude this review by highlighting some areas of future research. PMID:17987056

  18. Geologic map of the Reyes Peak quadrangle, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    New 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping in the Cuyama 30' x 60' quadrangle, in support of the USGS Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), is contributing to a more complete understanding of the stratigraphy, structure, and tectonic evolution of the complex junction area between the NW-trending Coast Ranges and EW-trending western Transverse Ranges. The 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Reyes Peak quadrangle, located in the eastern part of the Cuyama map area, is the final of six contiguous 7 ?' quadrangle geologic maps compiled for a more detailed portrayal and reevaluation of geologic structures and rock units shown on previous maps of the region (Carman, 1964; Dibblee, 1972; Vedder and others, 1973). SCAMP digital geologic maps of the five other contiguous quadrangles have recently been published (Minor, 1999; Kellogg, 1999, 2003; Stone and Cossette, 2000; Kellogg and Miggins, 2002). This digital compilation presents a new geologic map database for the Reyes Peak 7?' quadrangle, which is located in southern California about 75 km northwest of Los Angeles. The map database is at 1:24,000-scale resolution.

  19. Complex Generalized Synchronization and Parameter Identification of Nonidentical Nonlinear Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shibing; Wang, Xingyuan; Han, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, generalized synchronization (GS) is extended from real space to complex space, resulting in a new synchronization scheme, complex generalized synchronization (CGS). Based on Lyapunov stability theory, an adaptive controller and parameter update laws are designed to realize CGS and parameter identification of two nonidentical chaotic (hyperchaotic) complex systems with respect to a given complex map vector. This scheme is applied to synchronize a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, a chaotic complex Chen system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, as well as a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a chaotic complex Lü system with fully unknown parameters. The corresponding numerical simulations illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:27014879

  20. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  1. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  2. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... corner, the edge of the Antarctic coastline and some sea ice can be seen through some thin, high cirrus clouds. The right-hand panel ...

  3. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  4. Complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the state of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, Gerda A.

    1993-01-01

    The Bouguer gravity anomaly map is part of a folio of maps of Colorado cosponsored by the National Mineral Resources Assessment Program (NAMRAP) and the National Geologic Mapping Program (COGEOMAP) and was produced to assist in studies of the mineral resource potential and tectonic setting of the State. Previous compilations of about 12,000 gravity stations by Behrendt and Bajwa (1974a,b) are updated by this map. The data was reduced at a 2.67 g/cm3 and the grid contoured at 3 mGal intervals. This map will aid in the mineral resource assessment by indicating buried intrusive complexes, volcanic fields, major faults and shear zones, and sedimentary basins; helping to identify concealed geologic units; and identifying localities that might be hydrothermically altered or mineralized.

  5. A physical map of 30,000 human genes.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Schuler, G D; Gyapay, G; Beasley, E M; Soderlund, C; Rodriguez-Tomé, P; Hui, L; Matise, T C; McKusick, K B; Beckmann, J S; Bentolila, S; Bihoreau, M; Birren, B B; Browne, J; Butler, A; Castle, A B; Chiannilkulchai, N; Clee, C; Day, P J; Dehejia, A; Dibling, T; Drouot, N; Duprat, S; Fizames, C; Fox, S; Gelling, S; Green, L; Harrison, P; Hocking, R; Holloway, E; Hunt, S; Keil, S; Lijnzaad, P; Louis-Dit-Sully, C; Ma, J; Mendis, A; Miller, J; Morissette, J; Muselet, D; Nusbaum, H C; Peck, A; Rozen, S; Simon, D; Slonim, D K; Staples, R; Stein, L D; Stewart, E A; Suchard, M A; Thangarajah, T; Vega-Czarny, N; Webber, C; Wu, X; Hudson, J; Auffray, C; Nomura, N; Sikela, J M; Polymeropoulos, M H; James, M R; Lander, E S; Hudson, T J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R; Weissenbach, J; Boguski, M S; Bentley, D R

    1998-10-23

    A map of 30,181 human gene-based markers was assembled and integrated with the current genetic map by radiation hybrid mapping. The new gene map contains nearly twice as many genes as the previous release, includes most genes that encode proteins of known function, and is twofold to threefold more accurate than the previous version. A redesigned, more informative and functional World Wide Web site (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genemap) provides the mapping information and associated data and annotations. This resource constitutes an important infrastructure and tool for the study of complex genetic traits, the positional cloning of disease genes, the cross-referencing of mammalian genomes, and validated human transcribed sequences for large-scale studies of gene expression.

  6. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Robert; Asai, M.; Brand, H.; Chiera, N. M.; Di Nitto, A.; Dressler, R.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Even, J.; Fangli, F.; Goetz, M.; Haba, H.; Hartmann, W.; Jäger, E.; Kaji, D.; Kanaya, J.; Kaneya, Y.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Komori, Y.; Kraus, B.; Kratz, J. V.; Krier, J.; Kudou, Y.; Kurz, N.; Miyashita, S.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Murakami, M.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Piguet, D.; Sato, N.; Sato, T. K.; Steiner, J.; Steinegger, P.; Sumita, T.; Takeyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tomitsuka, T.; Toyoshima, A.; Tsukada, K.; Türler, A.; Usoltsev, I.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wiehl, N.; Wittwer, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaki, S.; Yano, S.; Yamaki, S.; Qin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO)6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  7. Mapping the Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigner, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how aerial photography and photogrammetry technology can help schools create visual records of their campus, land, and properties. Addresses efficiency and cost effectiveness of this method. Discusses how to develop the digital photogrammetry method for mapping from aerial photos. (GR)

  8. Global Wind Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes a new global wind-power map that has quantified global wind power and may help planners place turbines in locations that can maximize power from the winds and provide widely available low-cost energy. The researchers report that their study can assist in locating wind farms in regions known for strong and consistent…

  9. Mapping World Hunger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vliet, Lucille W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to involve students in grades 6 through 8 in learning how geography was affected the problem of world hunger. Emphasis is placed on using maps, globes, atlases, and geographic dictionaries, as well as books, magazines, and other resources. (MES)

  10. Mapping Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The demand to cultivate global citizenship is frequently invoked as central to colleges' and universities' internationalization efforts. However, the term "global citizenship" remains undertheorized in the context of U.S. higher education. This article maps and engages three common global citizenship positions--entrepreneurial, liberal…

  11. "Total Deposition (TDEP) Maps"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an update on the use of a hybrid methodology that relies on measured values from national monitoring networks and modeled values from CMAQ to produce of maps of total deposition for use in critical loads and other ecological assessments. Additionally, c...

  12. Graphic Life Map.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Patricia

    This is a prewriting activity for personal memoir or autobiographical writing. Grade 6-8 students brainstorm for important memories, create graphics or symbols for their most important memories, and construct a life map on tag board or construction paper, connecting drawings and captions of high and low points with a highway. During four 50-minute…

  13. Optical Ionospheric Mapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-15

    0325 I OPTICAL IONOSPHERIC MAPPING Robert H. Eather KEO Consultants 00 27 Irving St. Lfl Brookline Massachusetts 02146 I J CI Final Report U July 28...Irving St. Brookline Ma. 02146 464306AL It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12 REPORT DA ,F Air Force Geophysics Laboratory December 15, 1983

  14. Jamaica on Early Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Columbus sighted Jamaica during his second voyage and was marooned there for more than a year during his fourth. The succession of early maps of Jamaica betrays its slow development and its unimportance to early colonizers. Modern tourism is the elusive "gold" which the Spanish fortune hunters did not find. (CS)

  15. Mapping Joint Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slawski, Carl

    The flow diagrams in this document provide cognitive maps to aid in synthesizing diverse areas of knowledge in a special brand of field theory. A model is presented which highlights the domains of structural functionalism (with concepts of cultural, personal and societal systems) and symbolic interactionism (with the concepts of self, sentiments…

  16. [Ethnolinguistic map of Peru].

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    To provide adequate health care with an intercultural approach is necessary for the health care personnel know the Peruvian ethnolinguistic diversity, so we present 76 ethnic groups that belong to 16 ethnolinguistic families and their geographical distribution on a map of Peru.

  17. Personal Food System Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilsey, David; Dover, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Personal food system mapping is a practical means to engage community participants and educators in individualized and shared learning about food systems, decisions, and behaviors. Moreover, it is a useful approach for introducing the food system concept, which is somewhat abstract. We developed the approach to capture diversity of personal food…

  18. The Power of Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    American Indians and other Native peoples are using maps to chart their resources, fight for their land, and remember their history. Describes the efforts of the Zuni Pueblo in the Southwest; the Gitxsan Nation (Canada); the Kuna, Embera, and Wounaan tribes (Panama); and the Mayas (Belize). A sidebar lists Geographic Information Systems (GIS)…

  19. Covariance mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  20. Maps and navigation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, A

    1922-01-01

    Different maps and scales are discussed with particular emphasis on their use in aviation. The author makes the observation that current navigation methods are slow and dangerous and should be replaced by scientific methods of navigation based on loxodromy and the use of the compass.