Science.gov

Sample records for monosodium glutamate msg-obese

  1. Effects of fibre-enriched diets on tissue lipid profiles of MSG obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rotimi, O A; Olayiwola, I O; Ademuyiwa, O; Balogun, E A

    2012-11-01

    In order to investigate the influence of some fibre-enriched diets on tissue lipids in an animal model of obesity induced by the administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG), obese rats were fed diets containing 30% of Acha, Cassava, Maize and Plantain for five weeks and weight gain, feed intake and lee index were recorded. The lipid profiles of plasma, erythrocytes, kidney, heart and liver as well as hepatic 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity were measured. The diets significantly (p<0.05) reduced weight gain and lee index in the obese rats. Obesity-induced increase in plasma and erythrocytes lipid levels was significantly (p<0.05) reduced by these diets. MSG-induced obesity also resulted in a significant increase (p<0.05) in hepatic cholesterol level which was reduced by the diets. MSG-obesity was characterised by a significant (p<0.05) increase in cholesterol, triacylglycerol and phospholipids in kidney and this was reversed by the diets except Maize which did not reverse the increased cholesterol level. Only Acha reversed the obesity-induced increase in heart cholesterol and phospholipids. The increased activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase associated with obesity was also significantly (p<0.05) reduced by the diets. In conclusion, dyslipidemia associated with MSG-induced obesity could be attenuated by consumption of fibre-enriched diets. PMID:22898616

  2. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Register of September 20, 2013 (78 FR 57881). The conference was held in Washington, DC, on October 23... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in...

  3. Reproductive alterations in hyperinsulinemic but normoandrogenic MSG obese female rats.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Benevides, Renata Ohana Alves; Fontelles, João Lucas de Lima; Vale, Caroline Castro; França, Lucas Martins; Barros, Paulo de Tarso Silva; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the common causes of reproductive and fertility disorders in women. In particular, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is clinically characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology, has been increasingly associated with metabolic disorders. However, given the broad interplay between metabolic and reproductive functions, this remains a field of intense research. In this study, we investigated the effect of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity on reproductive biology of female rats. Newborn female rats were subcutaneously injected with MSG (4g/kg/day) or equiosmolar saline (CTR) each 2 days up to postnatal day (pnd) 10. On pnd 60, estrous cycle was evaluated using vaginal smears twice a day for 15 days, which showed MSG rats to be oligocyclic. Thereafter, animals were killed on estrous phase for blood and tissue collection. MSG rats had increased body mass, accumulation of retroperitoneal and visceral fat pads, and visceral adipocyte hypertrophy compared with CTR rats. MSG rats were also dyslipidemic and hyperinsulinemic but were normoglycemic and normoandrogenic. Ovarian morphology analysis showed that MSG rats had a two-fold decrease in oocyte count but a six-fold increase on ovarian follicular cysts, along with a higher number of total primordial and atretic follicles. Moreover, MSG rats had a four-fold increase in anti-Müllerian hormone immunohistochemical staining on antral follicles. Taken together, data presented here characterize MSG obesity as a unique model to study the metabolic pathways underlying reproductive disorders in the absence of overactivated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  4. Reproductive alterations in hyperinsulinemic but normoandrogenic MSG obese female rats.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Benevides, Renata Ohana Alves; Fontelles, João Lucas de Lima; Vale, Caroline Castro; França, Lucas Martins; Barros, Paulo de Tarso Silva; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the common causes of reproductive and fertility disorders in women. In particular, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is clinically characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology, has been increasingly associated with metabolic disorders. However, given the broad interplay between metabolic and reproductive functions, this remains a field of intense research. In this study, we investigated the effect of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity on reproductive biology of female rats. Newborn female rats were subcutaneously injected with MSG (4g/kg/day) or equiosmolar saline (CTR) each 2 days up to postnatal day (pnd) 10. On pnd 60, estrous cycle was evaluated using vaginal smears twice a day for 15 days, which showed MSG rats to be oligocyclic. Thereafter, animals were killed on estrous phase for blood and tissue collection. MSG rats had increased body mass, accumulation of retroperitoneal and visceral fat pads, and visceral adipocyte hypertrophy compared with CTR rats. MSG rats were also dyslipidemic and hyperinsulinemic but were normoglycemic and normoandrogenic. Ovarian morphology analysis showed that MSG rats had a two-fold decrease in oocyte count but a six-fold increase on ovarian follicular cysts, along with a higher number of total primordial and atretic follicles. Moreover, MSG rats had a four-fold increase in anti-Müllerian hormone immunohistochemical staining on antral follicles. Taken together, data presented here characterize MSG obesity as a unique model to study the metabolic pathways underlying reproductive disorders in the absence of overactivated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26952035

  5. The efficacy of probiotics for monosodium glutamate-induced obesity: dietology concerns and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity becomes endemic today. Monosodium glutamate was proved as obesogenic food additive. Probiotics are discussed to impact on obesity development. Aims and objectives The aim was to study the effects of probiotics on the development of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity in rats. Material and methods We included 45 Wistar male rats and divided into three groups (n = 15). Newborn rats of group 1 (control) received subcutaneously 8 μl/g saline. Group 2 received 3 to 4 mg/g MSG subcutaneously on the second, fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth day of life. Within 4 months after birth, rats were on a standard diet. Group 3 received an aqueous solution of probiotics mixture (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, B. animalis VKB) at the dose of 5 × 109 CFU/kg (50 mg/kg) intragastrically. Administration of probiotics was started at the age of 4 weeks just after weaning and continued for 3 months during 2-week courses. Group 2 received intragastrically 2.5 ml/kg water. Organometric and biochemical parameters in all groups of rats were analyzed over 4 months. The concentration of adiponectin was determined in serum, and leptin - in adipose tissue. Results Administration of MSG led to the development of obesity in rats; body weight had increased by 7.9% vs controls (p < 0.05); body length had increased by 5.4% (p < 0.05). Body mass index and Lee index and visceral fat mass had increased (p < 0.001). Under the neonatal injection of MSG, the concentration of total cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol significantly increased (p < 0.001), in comparison with controls. Adipose-derived hormones changed in MSG obesity rats: adiponectin decreased by 58.8% (p < 0.01), and leptin concentration in adipose tissue had increased by 74.7% (p < 0.01). The probiotic therapy of rats from group 3 prevented obesity development. Parameters of rats treated with probiotic mixture did not differ from that in

  6. Recombinant murine fibroblast growth factor 21 ameliorates obesity-related inflammation in monosodium glutamate-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Fei; Li, Si-Ming; Ren, Gui-Ping; Zheng, Wei; Lu, Yu-Jia; Yu, Yin-Hang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Li, Tian-He; Zhou, Li-Hong; Liu, Yan; Li, De-Shan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of FGF21 in obesity-related inflammation in livers of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity rats. The MSG rats were injected with recombinant murine fibroblast growth factor 21(FGF21) or equal volumes of vehicle. Metabolic parameters including body weight, Lee's index, food intake, visceral fat and liver weight, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, glucose, and lipid levels were dynamically measured at specific time points. Liver function and routine blood test were also analyzed. Further, systemic inflammatory cytokines such as glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), leptin, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNAs were determined by real-time PCR. FGF21 independently decreased body weight and whole-body fat mass without reducing food intake in the MSG rats. FGF21 reduced blood glucose level, Lee's index, visceral fat, and liver weight, and improved glucose tolerance, lipid metabolic spectrum, and hepatic steatosis in the MSG-obesity rats. Liver function parameters including AST, ALT, ALP, TP, T.Bili, and D.Bili levels significantly reduced in the FGF21-treated obesity rats compared to the controls. Further, FGF21 ameliorated the total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, and TNF-α levels in adipose tissues of the obesity rats, suggesting inflammation amelioration in the in the obesity rats by FGF21. FGF21 improves multiple metabolic disorders and ameliorates obesity-related inflammation in the MSG-induced obesity rats.

  7. Vagotomy ameliorates islet morphofunction and body metabolic homeostasis in MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Lubaczeuski, C.; Balbo, S.L.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Santos-Silva, J.C.; Carneiro, E.M.; Bonfleur, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system is important for β-cell secretion and mass regulation. Here, we characterized involvement of the vagus nerve in pancreatic β-cell morphofunctional regulation and body nutrient homeostasis in 90-day-old monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese rats. Male newborn Wistar rats received MSG (4 g/kg body weight) or saline [control (CTL) group] during the first 5 days of life. At 30 days of age, both groups of rats were submitted to sham-surgery (CTL and MSG groups) or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (Cvag and Mvag groups). The 90-day-old MSG rats presented obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Their pancreatic islets hypersecreted insulin in response to glucose but did not increase insulin release upon carbachol (Cch) stimulus, despite a higher intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, while the pancreas weight was 34% lower in MSG rats, no alteration in islet and β-cell mass was observed. However, in the MSG pancreas, increases of 51% and 55% were observed in the total islet and β-cell area/pancreas section, respectively. Also, the β-cell number per β-cell area was 19% higher in MSG rat pancreas than in CTL pancreas. Vagotomy prevented obesity, reducing 25% of body fat stores and ameliorated glucose homeostasis in Mvag rats. Mvag islets demonstrated partially reduced insulin secretion in response to 11.1 mM glucose and presented normalization of Cch-induced Ca2+ mobilization and insulin release. All morphometric parameters were similar among Mvag and CTL rat pancreases. Therefore, the higher insulin release in MSG rats was associated with greater β-cell/islet numbers and not due to hypertrophy. Vagotomy improved whole body nutrient homeostasis and endocrine pancreatic morphofunction in Mvag rats. PMID:25714886

  8. Vagotomy ameliorates islet morphofunction and body metabolic homeostasis in MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Lubaczeuski, C; Balbo, S L; Ribeiro, R A; Vettorazzi, J F; Santos-Silva, J C; Carneiro, E M; Bonfleur, M L

    2015-05-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system is important for β-cell secretion and mass regulation. Here, we characterized involvement of the vagus nerve in pancreatic β-cell morphofunctional regulation and body nutrient homeostasis in 90-day-old monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese rats. Male newborn Wistar rats received MSG (4 g/kg body weight) or saline [control (CTL) group] during the first 5 days of life. At 30 days of age, both groups of rats were submitted to sham-surgery (CTL and MSG groups) or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (Cvag and Mvag groups). The 90-day-old MSG rats presented obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Their pancreatic islets hypersecreted insulin in response to glucose but did not increase insulin release upon carbachol (Cch) stimulus, despite a higher intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Furthermore, while the pancreas weight was 34% lower in MSG rats, no alteration in islet and β-cell mass was observed. However, in the MSG pancreas, increases of 51% and 55% were observed in the total islet and β-cell area/pancreas section, respectively. Also, the β-cell number per β-cell area was 19% higher in MSG rat pancreas than in CTL pancreas. Vagotomy prevented obesity, reducing 25% of body fat stores and ameliorated glucose homeostasis in Mvag rats. Mvag islets demonstrated partially reduced insulin secretion in response to 11.1 mM glucose and presented normalization of Cch-induced Ca(2+) mobilization and insulin release. All morphometric parameters were similar among Mvag and CTL rat pancreases. Therefore, the higher insulin release in MSG rats was associated with greater β-cell/islet numbers and not due to hypertrophy. Vagotomy improved whole body nutrient homeostasis and endocrine pancreatic morphofunction in Mvag rats.

  9. Biochemical Alterations during the Obese-Aging Process in Female and Male Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Bautista, René J.; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Escobar-Villanueva, María Del C.; Almanza-Pérez, Julio C.; Merino-Aguilar, Héctor; Konigsberg Fainstein, Mina; López-Diazguerrero, Norma E.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, from children to the elderly, has increased in the world at an alarming rate over the past three decades, implying long-term detrimental consequences for individual’s health. Obesity and aging are known to be risk factors for metabolic disorder development, insulin resistance and inflammation, but their relationship is not fully understood. Prevention and appropriate therapies for metabolic disorders and physical disabilities in older adults have become a major public health challenge. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate inflammation markers, biochemical parameters and glucose homeostasis during the obese-aging process, to understand the relationship between obesity and health span during the lifetime. In order to do this, the monosodium glutamate (MSG) obesity mice model was used, and data were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months in both female and male mice. Our results showed that obesity was a major factor contributing to premature alterations in MSG-treated mice metabolism; however, at older ages, obesity effects were attenuated and MSG-mice became more similar to normal mice. At a younger age (four months old), the Lee index, triglycerides, total cholesterol, TNF-α and transaminases levels increased; while adiponectin decreased and glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity levels were remarkably altered. However, from 16 months old-on, the Lee index and TNF-α levels diminished significantly, while adiponectin increased, and glucose and insulin homeostasis was recovered. In summary, MSG-treated obese mice showed metabolic changes and differential susceptibility by gender throughout life and during the aging process. Understanding metabolic differences between genders during the lifespan will allow the discovery of specific preventive treatment strategies for chronic diseases and functional decline. PMID:24979131

  10. Monosodium glutamate and aspartame in perceived pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vellisca, María Y; Latorre, José I

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of dietary elimination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame on perceived pain in fibromyalgia. A total of 72 female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame (n = 36) or waiting list (n = 36). Patients were requested to rate their pain using a seven-point scale. Comparisons between both groups showed no significant differences on pain referred during the baseline or after the elimination of dietary MSG and aspartame. The discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame did not improve the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  11. 78 FR 57881 - Monosodium Glutamate from China and Indonesia; Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate from China and Indonesia; Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty... Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading 2922.42.10 of the Harmonized Tariff...

  12. HPA axis and vagus nervous function are involved in impaired insulin secretion of MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Rosiane A; Torrezan, Rosana; de Oliveira, Júlio C; Barella, Luiz F; da Silva Franco, Claudinéia C; Lisboa, Patrícia C; Moura, Egberto G; Mathias, Paulo C F

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine dysfunctions such as the hyperactivity of the vagus nerve and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis greatly contribute to obesity and hyperinsulinemia; however, little is known about these dysfunctions in the pancreatic β-cells of obese individuals. We used a hypothalamic-obesity model obtained by neonatal treatment with monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) to induce obesity. To assess the role of the HPA axis and vagal tonus in the genesis of hypercorticosteronemia and hyperinsulinemia in an adult MSG-obese rat model, bilateral adrenalectomy (ADX) and subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VAG) alone or combined surgeries (ADX-VAG) were performed. To study glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) and the cholinergic insulinotropic process, pancreatic islets were incubated with different glucose concentrations with or without oxotremorine-M, a selective agonist of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3AChR) subtype. Protein expression of M3AChR in pancreatic islets, corticosteronemia, and vagus nerve activity was also evaluated. Surgeries reduced 80% of the body weight gain. Fasting glucose and insulin were reduced both by ADX and ADX-VAG, whereas VAG was only associated with hyperglycemia. The serum insulin post-glucose stimulation was lower in all animals that underwent an operation. Vagal activity was decreased by 50% in ADX rats. In the highest glucose concentration, both surgeries reduced GIIS by 50%, whereas ADX-VAG decreased by 70%. Additionally, M3AChR activity was recovered by the individual surgeries. M3AChR protein expression was reduced by ADX. Both the adrenal gland and vagus nerve contribute to the hyperinsulinemia in the MSG model, although adrenal is more crucial as it appears to modulate parasympathetic activity and M3AChR expression in obesity.

  13. Reduction of sodium content in spicy soups using monosodium glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Jinap, Selamat; Hajeb, Parvaneh; Karim, Roslina; Norliana, Sarian; Yibadatihan, Simayi; Abdul-Kadir, Razak

    2016-01-01

    Background Excessive dietary sodium intake causes several diseases, such as hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disease, etc. Hence, reducing sodium intake has been highly recommended. In this study the effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG), as an umami substance, on saltiness and sodium reduction was investigated. Methods and Results The trained panellists were presented with basic spicy soups (curry chicken and chili chicken) containing different amounts of sodium chloride (NaCl) (0–1.2%) and MSG (0–1.2%). They tasted the optimum concentrations of NaCl and MSG for the two spicy soups and the overall acceptability were 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively. There was no significant effect of spiciness level on the saltiness and umami taste of both soups. The optimum levels of combined NaCl and MSG for overall acceptance in the chili and curry soups were 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The results showed that with the addition of MSG, it is possible to reduce sodium intake without changing the overall acceptability of the spicy soup. A 32.5% reduction in sodium level is made feasible by adding 0.7% MSG to the spicy soups. Conclusions This study suggests that low-sodium soups can be developed by the addition of appropriate amounts of MSG, while maintaining the acceptability of the spicy soups. It was also proven that it is feasible to reduce sodium intake by replacing NaCl with MSG. PMID:27356909

  14. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  15. Neuroprotective Activity of Pongamia pinnata in Monosodium Glutamate-induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, A. H. M. VISWANATHA; Patel, N. L.; Gadad, P. C.; Koti, B. C.; Patel, U. M.; Thippeswamy, A. H. M.; Manjula, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark in monosodium glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Neurotoxicity was induced by intraperitoneal injection of monosodium glutamate 2 g per kg body weight daily for 7 days. Ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark (200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered orally after 1 h of monosodium glutamate treatment. Dextromethorphan (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as standard drug for the comparison. The degree of protection was determined by various behavioural, locomotor, muscle grip activity, lipid peroxidation and measurement of antioxidant status of glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Estimation of calcium, sodium and potassium ions in brain tissue and gamma aminobutyric acid level in serum was carried out. The histopathological study of brain tissue was also carried out. Treatment with Pongamia pinnata significantly improved monosodium glutamate-induced alteration in behavioural and locomotor activity and muscle strength. Significant decrease in lipid peroxidation and increase in glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase was observed in Pongamia pinnata treated group. Further, Pongamia pinnata also significantly reduced the monosodium glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by decreasing the level of Ca+2 and Na+ with concomitant increase in the level of K+. Serum gamma aminobutyric acid level was also increased in Pongamia pinnata treated animals. Further, the histopathological evidence supports the neuroprotective activity of Pongamia pinnata. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the ethanol extract of stem bark of Pongamia pinnata possesses significant neuroprotective activity in albino rats. PMID:24591740

  16. Neuroprotective Activity of Pongamia pinnata in Monosodium Glutamate-induced Neurotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Swamy, A H M Viswanatha; Patel, N L; Gadad, P C; Koti, B C; Patel, U M; Thippeswamy, A H M; Manjula, D V

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark in monosodium glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Neurotoxicity was induced by intraperitoneal injection of monosodium glutamate 2 g per kg body weight daily for 7 days. Ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark (200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered orally after 1 h of monosodium glutamate treatment. Dextromethorphan (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as standard drug for the comparison. The degree of protection was determined by various behavioural, locomotor, muscle grip activity, lipid peroxidation and measurement of antioxidant status of glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Estimation of calcium, sodium and potassium ions in brain tissue and gamma aminobutyric acid level in serum was carried out. The histopathological study of brain tissue was also carried out. Treatment with Pongamia pinnata significantly improved monosodium glutamate-induced alteration in behavioural and locomotor activity and muscle strength. Significant decrease in lipid peroxidation and increase in glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase was observed in Pongamia pinnata treated group. Further, Pongamia pinnata also significantly reduced the monosodium glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by decreasing the level of Ca(+2) and Na(+) with concomitant increase in the level of K(+). Serum gamma aminobutyric acid level was also increased in Pongamia pinnata treated animals. Further, the histopathological evidence supports the neuroprotective activity of Pongamia pinnata. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the ethanol extract of stem bark of Pongamia pinnata possesses significant neuroprotective activity in albino rats.

  17. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2004-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is both the basis of a trillion dollar worldwide industry and a presence in the diet of a majority of the inhabitants of the world. Some parts of the "story" of MSG that might be of most interest to chemists, chemistry teachers and their students are presented.

  18. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  19. [The effect of probiotic therapy on development of experimental obesity in rats caused by monosodium glutamate].

    PubMed

    Savcheniuk, O A; Virchenko, O V; Falalieieva, T M; Beregova, T V; Babenko, L P; Lazarenko, L M; Spivak, M Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a mixture of probiotic strains (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, Bifidobacterium animalis VKB) on the development of experimental obesity in rats induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate has been studied. It was shown that in rats of 4 months age, the injection of monosodium glutamate (4 mg/g) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 days after birth elicited abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. An intermittent administration of a probiotic mixture to rats treated with monosodium prevented the development of obesity. In the group of rats treated with probiotics, anthropometric parameters (weight and body length, Lee index, body mass index) did not differ from the level of intact rats. Visceral fat mass was decreased by probiotics by 38.5% (P < 0.05) compared to rats treated with water. Probiotics improved lipid metabolism: reduced the level of VLDL by 32.2% (P < 0,05), the level of LDL by 30.6% (P < 0.05), increased HDL by 25.7% (P <0,05) compared to obese control rats. Probiotic strains restored the secretion of adipocytes hormones (leptin and adiponectin) to the normal level of intact animals. The results show the effectiveness of probiotics for the prevention of obesity.

  20. Production of a newly isolated Paenibacillus polymyxa biocontrol agent using monosodium glutamate wastewater and potato wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gu, Likun; Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Jianyun; Li, Wenying; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    A phyllosphere bacterial strain EBL-06 was isolated from wheat leaves. The morphology, cultural characteristics, phospholipid fatty acids, physiological and antagonistic fungus activities of this strain were investigated. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by comparing with the published 16S rDNA sequences of the relevant bacteria. The results showed that the isolate EBL-06 was a strain of Paenibacillus polymyxa; this strain performed a high level of antagonistic fungus activity toward a broad spectrum of phytopathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium cucumerinum, Fusarium spp. The isolate EBL-06 can grow well using monosodium glutamate wastewater (MGW) and potato wastewater (PW) as culture medium. The maximum yield of 6.5 x 10(9) CFU/mL of the isolate EBL-06 anti-fungus biocontrol agent was reached in 15 hr cultivation at 28 degrees C, pH 6.0-7.5 using the mixture of MGW and PW (1:9).

  1. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  2. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals.

  3. Monosodium glutamate in chicken and beef stock cubes using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Buket Er; Demirhan, Burak; Sönmez, Ceren; Torul, Hilal; Tamer, Uğur; Yentür, Gülderen

    2015-01-01

    In this survey monosodium glutamate (MSG) levels in chicken and beef stock cube samples were determined. A total number of 122 stock cube samples (from brands A, B, C, D) were collected from local markets in Ankara, Turkey. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was used for quantitative MSG determination. Mean MSG levels (±SE) in samples of A, B, C and D brands were 14.6 ± 0.2 g kg⁻¹, 11.9 ± 0.3 g kg⁻¹, 9.7 ± 0.1 g kg⁻¹ and 7.2 ± 0.1 g kg⁻¹, respectively. Differences between mean levels of brands were significant. Also, mean levels of chicken stock cube samples were lower than in beef stock cubes. Maximum limits for MSG in stock cubes are not specified in the Turkish Food Codex (TFC). Generally the limit for MSG in foods (except some foods) is established as 10 g kg⁻¹ (individually or in combination).

  4. Condensation of supersaturated water vapor on charged/neutral nanoparticles of glucose and monosodium glutamate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Cheng; Tao, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Hsiu-Chin

    2002-11-01

    The effects of size, charge, dissolution, and dissociation on the condensation of supersaturated water vapor on monodisperse nanoparticles of glucose and monosodium glutamate (MSG) were investigated in a flow cloud chamber (FCC). The dependence of the critical supersaturation, S(cr), on particle size in the range of 30 to 90 nm and on temperature in the range of 10 to 50 degrees C were determined experimentally. The results show that the experimental S(cr) decreases with increasing particle size at a rate in reasonable agreement with the predictions of the Kohler and Volmer theories of nucleation for soluble particles, but decreases with increasing temperature at a rate higher than the prediction of the Volmer theory. The dissociation of MSG into ions lowers the experimental S(cr) to a value smaller than that for the more soluble glucose, agreeing with predictions. The experimental S(cr) is smaller than the predictions of both theories, and the discrepancy cannot be fully explained by the reductions in surface tension due to the dissolution of particles and curvature dependence. The condensation of supersaturated vapor on singly positively charged particles with diameters of 30, 60, and 90 nm was also examined, and no obvious charge effect on S(cr) was observed. PMID:12702381

  5. Antihyperlipidemic potential of Cedrus deodara extracts in monosodium glutamate induced obesity in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sudhir; Prakash, T.; Kotresha, D.; Rao, N. Rama; Pandy, Naitik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the antihyperlipidemic effect of Cedrus deodara (C. deodara) against monosodium glutamate (MSG) induced obesity in neonatal rats. Materials and Methods: The studies were carried out on newborn neonatal rats and were injected intraperitoneally with 2 mg/g of MSG on the 2nd and 4th postnatal days and 4 mg/g on 6th, 8th and 10th postnatal days. Ethanolic extract (EE) and acetone extract (AE) of C. deodara was administered in a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o./day at the age of 65 days. On day 60 of treatment, body weight, locomotor activity, body temperature, and various biochemical parameters like serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and organs weights were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction in body weight, organs and increased body temperature, locomotor activity after treatment with extracts. C. deodara decreased serum glucose, total cholesterol and triglyceride, low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) significantly has compared to MSG-control rats. Conclusion: C. deodara extracts exhibited antihyperlipidemic effect and it possesses anti-obesity properties in MSG induced obese rats. PMID:22144766

  6. Metabolomic profiling of urinary changes in mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Pelantová, Helena; Bártová, Simona; Anýž, Jiří; Holubová, Martina; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Novák, Daniel; Lacinová, Zdena; Šulc, Miroslav; Haluzík, Martin; Kuzma, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Obesity with related complications represents a widespread health problem. The etiopathogenesis of obesity is often studied using numerous rodent models. The mouse model of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity was exploited as a model of obesity combined with insulin resistance. The aim of this work was to characterize the metabolic status of MSG mice by NMR-based metabolomics in combination with relevant biochemical and hormonal parameters. NMR analysis of urine at 2, 6, and 9 months revealed altered metabolism of nicotinamide and polyamines, attenuated excretion of major urinary proteins, increased levels of phenylacetylglycine and allantoin, and decreased concentrations of methylamine in urine of MSG-treated mice. Altered levels of creatine, citrate, succinate, and acetate were observed at 2 months of age and approached the values of control mice with aging. The development of obesity and insulin resistance in 6-month-old MSG mice was also accompanied by decreased mRNA expressions of adiponectin, lipogenetic and lipolytic enzymes and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in fat while mRNA expressions of lipogenetic enzymes in the liver were enhanced. At the age of 9 months, biochemical parameters of MSG mice were normalized to the values of the controls. This fact pointed to a limited predictive value of biochemical data up to age of 6 months as NMR metabolomics confirmed altered urine metabolic composition even at 9 months.

  7. Effect of aspartame plus monosodium L-glutamate ingestion on plasma and erythrocyte amino acid levels in normal adult subjects fed a high protein meal.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1982-12-01

    It has been suggested that aspartame addition to meals already containing large amounts of monosodium L-glutamate would result in an early rapid rise in plasma glutamate and/or aspartate concentrations and increase the potential for dicarboxylic amino acid-induced toxicity. Six normal adult subjects were fed hamburger and milk shake meals providing protein at 1 g/kg body weight in a randomized cross-over design. One meal had no additions while the other contained added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame (each present at 34 mg/kg body weight). The addition of aspartame plus glutamate had little effect on either plasma or erythrocyte concentrations of glutamate or aspartate beyond those arising from the meal itself. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations were significantly higher (p less than 0.05, paired t test) after ingestion of meals containing aspartame plus glutamate reflecting the increased phenylalanine load.

  8. Adjusting irradiance to enhance growth and lipid production of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with monosodium glutamate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Ji, Yan; Hu, Wenrong; Pei, Haiyan; Nie, Changliang; Ma, Guixia; Song, Mingming

    2016-09-01

    Light is one of the most important factors affecting microalgae growth and biochemical composition. The influence of illumination on Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with diluted monosodium glutamate wastewater (MSGW) was investigated. Six progressive illumination intensities (0, 30, 90, 150, 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1)), were used for C. vulgaris cultivation at 25°C. Under 150μmol·m(-2)s(-1), the corresponding specific light intensity of 750×10(-6)μmol·m(-2)s(-1) per cell, algae obtained the maximum biomass concentration (1.46g·L(-1)) on the 7th day, which was 3.5 times of that under 0μmol·m(-2)s(-1), and the greatest average specific growth rate (0.79 d(-1)) in the first 7days. The results showed the importance role of light in mixotrophic growth of C. vulgaris. High light intensities of 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1) would inhibit microalgae growth to a certain degree. The algal lipid content was the greatest (30.5%) at 150μmol·m(-2)s(-1) light intensity, which was 2.42 times as high as that cultured in dark. The protein content of C. vulgaris decreased at high light intensities of 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1). The effect of irradiance on carbohydrate content was inversely correlated with that on protein. The available light at an appropriate intensity, not higher than 200μmol·m(-2)s(-1), was feasible for economical cultivation of C. vulgaris in MSGW. PMID:27484967

  9. Flavor preferences conditioned by post-oral infusion of monosodium glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), the prototypical umami source, can enhance preference for associated flavors in humans and rodents. Although MSG flavor preference has been attributed to its taste, vagally-mediated post-oral detection has also been demonstrated. Recent studies showed that water-restricted rats acquired a preference for a flavor paired with intragastric (IG) infusion of 60 mM MSG in rats. The present study extends this work by comparing MSG-based flavor conditioning in water- and food-restricted rats and testing the persistence of flavor preferences. Rats with IG catheters drank flavored solutions paired with volume-matched infusions of 60 mM MSG or water in daily 30-min sessions. Two training/test cycles were conducted, each with eight one-bottle training sessions followed by two two-bottle preference tests without infusions. Food- and water-restricted groups displayed similar preferences for the MSG-paired flavor. When non-reinforced testing was continued after the second cycle, the food-restricted group sustained its preference across three 2-day tests, but water-restricted rats lost their preference. Other food-restricted rats learned to prefer a flavor paired with intraduodenal infusion, indicating that gastric stimulation by MSG is not required. A third experiment showed that adding 2 mM of the nucleotide inosine monophosphate to the IG infusion of MSG did not significantly enhance flavor conditioning. Because MSG-based flavor preferences can be obtained with infusions that bypass the stomach, the site for detecting MSG reinforcement may be intestinal. PMID:21605576

  10. Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and binding sites in the rat mediobasal hypothalamus: effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) lesions.

    PubMed

    Meister, B; Ceccatelli, S; Hökfelt, T; Andén, N E; Andén, M; Theodorsson, E

    1989-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence histochemistry and receptor autoradiography were used to study the localization of transmitter-/peptide-containing neurons and peptide binding sites in the mediobasal hypothalamus in normal rats and in rats treated neonatally with repeated doses of the neurotoxin monosodium-glutamate (MSG). In the arcuate nucleus, the results showed a virtually complete loss of cell bodies containing immunoreactivity for growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), galanin (GAL), dynorphin (DYN), enkephalin (ENK), corticotropin-like intermediate peptide (CLIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and neuropeptide K (NPK). Tyrosine hydroxylase(TH)-glutamic acid decarboxylase(GAD)-, neurotensin(NT)- and somatostatin(SOM)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were, however, always detected in the ventrally dislocated, dorsomedial division of the arcuate nucleus. In the median eminence, marked decreases in numbers of GAD-, NT-, GAL-, GRF-, DYN-, and ENK-IR fibers were observed. The numbers of TH-, SOM- and NPY-IR fibers were in contrast not or only affected to a very small extent, as revealed with the immunofluorescence technique. Biochemical analysis showed a tendency for MSG to reduce dopamine levels in the median eminence of female rats, whereas no effect was observed in male rats. Autoradiographic studies showed high to moderate NT binding sites, including strong binding over presumably dorsomedial dopamine cells. In MSG-treated rats, there was a marked reduction in GAL binding in the ventromedial nucleus. The findings implicate that most neurons in the ventrolateral and ventromedial arcuate nucleus are sensitive to the toxic effects of MSG, whereas a subpopulation of cells in the dorsomedial division of the arcuate nucleus, including dopamine neurons, are not susceptible to MSG-neurotoxicity. The results indicate, moreover that the very dense TH-IR fiber network in the median eminence predominantly arises from the dorsomedial TH-IR arcuate cells, whereas the GAD-, NT-, GAL-, GRF- and

  11. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults fed meals with added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1983-09-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide sweetener containing aspartate. It has been suggested that aspartame addition to meals containing large amounts of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) would result in a rapid rise in plasma glutamate and/or aspartate concentrations and increase the potential for dicarboxylic amino acid--induced toxicity. Sic normal adult subjects were fed three hamburger and milk shake meals providing protein at 1 g/kg body weight in a Latin square design. One meal had no additions, the second provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight, and the third provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight and aspartame at 23 mg/kg body weight. The addition of MSG alone significantly increased plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone. Aspartame addition to meals already containing MSG did not further significantly increase plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted when only MSG was added. However, aspartame addition did significantly increase the mean plasma phenylalanine concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone or the meal with added MSG, reflecting aspartame's phenylalanine content. The data do not support the suggestion that aspartame addition to high protein meals already containing large amounts of MSG, will promote a rapid and dangerous rise in plasma glutamate and aspartate concentrations.

  12. Immunohistochemical evaluation of hippocampal CA1 region astrocytes in 10-day-old rats after monosodium glutamate treatment.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, A; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Rycerz, K

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of glutamate (Glu) is excitotoxic for nervous system structures. This may lead to glial reactivity ie. increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100β protein, and also to hypertrophy and proliferation of cells which are determined by the presence of Ki-67 antigen. The aim of the study was to analyse the immunoreactivity of the GFAP, S100β and Ki-67 proteins in astrocytes of hippocampal CA1 region in young rats after administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) at two doses: 2 g/kg b.w. (I group) and 4 g/kg b.w. (II group). In rats from I and II group morphologically altered astrocytes with the GFAP expression were observed in the SLM of the hippocampal CA1 region. The cells had eccentrically located nuclei and on the opposite site of the nuclei there were single or double, long and weakly branched processes. Moreover, in the SLM the increase of the number of GFAP and S100β immunopositive astrocytes and nuclei with Ki-67 expression, in contrary to control individuals, was observed. These results suggest the increased expression of the proteins in early reactions or hyperplasia which, together with cell hypertrophy, indicate late reactivity of astroglia in response to glutamate noxious effect. PMID:26812818

  13. A new automated approach to determine monosodium glutamate in dehydrated broths by using the flow-batch methodology.

    PubMed

    Acebal, Carolina C; Insausti, Matías; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Lista, Adriana G; Band, Beatriz S Fernández

    2010-04-15

    The advantages of the flow-batch methodology were exploited to implement a simple system with nephelometric detection for the determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in food samples. The method is based on the inhibitory effect of the MSG over the crystallization of L-lysine in an isopropanol/acetone mixture. The calibration curve was prepared on-line. The method was linear over the range of 2.8 x 10(-3) to 1.1 x 10(-2)gL(-1) and a detection limit of 9.7 x 10(-5)gL(-1) was achieved. It was successfully applied to determine the MSG concentration in food samples, without a previous treatment. A recovery study was carried out on real samples and the percentages were between 98 and 106%.

  14. The feasibility of using complex wastewater from a monosodium glutamate factory to cultivate Spirulina subsalsa and accumulate biochemical composition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Ji, Yan; Han, Lin; Ma, Guixia

    2015-03-01

    This paper is mainly observations on the growth and biomass accumulation of Spirulina subsalsa in modified Zarrouk medium supplemented with complex wastewater (CW, from a monosodium glutamate factory) in different concentrations. High ammonia in 75% and 100% CW inhibits algae growth, but maximum biomass production (2.86mgL(-1)) was obtained in 25% CW (concentration of CW in medium was 25%). Different CW concentration promoted biomass composition accumulation at different degrees, 41% of protein content in 25% CW and 18% of carbohydrate in 50% CW. In terms of economy, a concentration of 25% CW was suitable for protein production and 50% for lipid and carbohydrate production. These results suggested that CW is a feasible replacement in part for cultivation of S. subsalsa to economize input of water and nutrients. PMID:25621725

  15. Monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine improve the sensory quality of fermented cooked sausages with 50% and 75% replacement of NaCl with KCl.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fermented cooked sausages were produced by replacing 50% and 75% of NaCl with KCl and adding monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine. The manufacturing process was monitored by pH and water activity measurements. The sodium and potassium contents of the resulting products were measured. The color values (L*, a* and b*), texture profiles and sensory profiles were also examined. Replacing 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl depreciated the sensory quality of the products. The reformulated sausages containing monosodium glutamate combined with lysine, taurine, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate masked the undesirable sensory attributes associated with the replacement of 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl, allowing the production of fermented cooked sausages with good sensory acceptance and approximately 68% sodium reduction. PMID:24008059

  16. Antinociceptive action of diphenyl diselenide in the nociception induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Suzan G; Quines, Caroline B; da Rocha, Juliana T; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Duarte, Thiago; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2015-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a neuroexcitatory amino acid commonly used as flavoring of foods. MSG neonatal administration to animals leads to behavioral and physiological disorders in adulthood, including increased pain sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, on nociception induced by MSG. Newborn Wistar rats received 10 subcutaneous injections of MSG at a dose of 4.0g/kg or saline (once daily). At the 60th day of life, the rats were daily treated with (PhSe)2 (1mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) by the intragastric route for 7 days. The behavioral tests (locomotor activity, hot plate, tail-immersion and mechanical allodynia) were carried out. Ex vivo assays were performed in samples of hippocampus to determine Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, cytokine levels and [(3)H]glutamate uptake. The results demonstrated that MSG increased nociception in the hot plate test and in the mechanical allodynia stimulated by Von-Frey hair but did not alter the tail immersion test. (PhSe)2 reversed all nociceptive behaviors altered by MSG. MSG caused an increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities and in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and a decrease in the anti-inflammatory cytokine and in the [(3)H]glutamate uptake. (PhSe)2 was effective in reversing all alterations caused by MSG. The results indicate that (PhSe)2 had a potential antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action in the MSG model.

  17. Protective Effect of Calendula officinalis L. Flowers Against Monosodium Glutamate Induced Oxidative Stress and Excitotoxic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shivasharan, B D; Nagakannan, P; Thippeswamy, B S; Veerapur, V P

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a popular flavour enhancer used in food industries; however, excess MSG is neurotoxic. Oxidative stress is well documented in MSG induced neurotoxicity. The compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties reportedly possess beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Calendula officinalis Linn. flower extract (COE) is known for its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of COE on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Adult Wistar rats were administered systemically for 7 days with MSG and after one h of MSG injection, rats were treated with COE (100 and 200 mg/kg) orally. At the end the treatment period, animals were assessed for locomotor activity and were sacrificed; brains were isolated for estimation of LPO, GSH, CAT, TT, GST, Nitrite and histopathological studies. MSG caused a significant alteration in animal behavior, oxidative defense (raised levels of LPO, nitrite concentration, depletion of antioxidant levels) and hippocampal neuronal histology. Treatment with COE significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, and hippocampal damage in MSG-treated animals. Hence, this study demonstrates that COE protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of COE may be responsible for its observed neuroprotective action. PMID:24426226

  18. Stability of monosodium glutamate in green table olives and pickled cucumbers as a function of packing conditions and storage time.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio Higinio; Beato, Víctor Manuel; Casado, Francisco Javier; Montaño, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different packing conditions and storage times on the stability of monosodium glutamate (MSG) added to two different fermented vegetables (Spanish-type green table olives and pickled cucumbers) were studied. Factors such as packaging material (glass bottle versus plastic pouch), heat treatment (pasteurisation versus non-pasteurisation), and the presence or not of a preservative compound (potassium sorbate) were considered. The MSG content of pickled cucumbers was stable for up to 1 year of storage in all packing conditions studied. The MSG content also remained stable in pasteurised green table olives. On the contrary, MSG was extensively degraded (>75% degradation) after 54 weeks of storage in unpasteurised green olives with a higher degradation rate in glass bottles compared with plastic pouches. In the presence of potassium sorbate, MSG was also considerably degraded in olives packed in plastic pouches (>50% degradation), but hardly degraded in glass bottles. The results indicate that MSG degradation in olives is due to the action of both lactic acid bacteria and yeasts, with the formation of γ-aminobutyric acid as the major end-product. PMID:24720705

  19. High dosage of monosodium glutamate causes deficits of the motor coordination and the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Prastiwi, D; Djunaidi, A; Partadiredja, G

    2015-11-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been widely used throughout the world as a flavoring agent of food. However, MSG at certain dosages is also thought to cause damage to many organs, including cerebellum. This study aimed at investigating the effects of different doses of MSG on the motor coordination and the number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of Wistar rats. A total of 24 male rats aged 4 to 5 weeks were divided into four groups, namely, control (C), T2.5, T3, and T3.5 groups, which received intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 2.5 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG, 3.0 mg/g bw of MSG, and 3.5 mg/g bw of MSG, respectively, for 10 consecutive days. The motor coordination of the rats was examined prior and subsequent to the treatment. The number of cerebellar Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. It has been found that the administration of MSG at a dosage of 3.5 mg/g bw, but not at lower dosages, caused a significant decrease of motor coordination and the estimated total number of Purkinje cells of rats. There was also a significant correlation between motor coordination and the total number of Purkinje cells.

  20. Deficits in water escape performance and alterations in hippocampal cholinergic mechanisms associated with neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, P T; Neo, L H; Teo, W L; Feng, H; Xue, Y D; Loke, W H

    1997-01-01

    Mice treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG) were found to have learning and memory deficits in performing a non-spatial water escape task. Scopolamine impaired the water-escape performance of the control mice but not that of the MSG-treated mice. It was suggested that the water-escape performance deficit in the MSG-treated mice was a result of impaired central cholinergic mechanisms. As such, scopolamine was unable to further incapacitate an already impaired cholinergic system. This is strongly supported by the decreased affinity of the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake observed in the hippocampus. D-Cycloserine, a partial agonist at the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, did not affect the water-escape performance of the MSG-treated and control mice; nor did it alter the effects of scopolamine. This lack of effect of D-Cycloserine may imply that the NMDA receptors are not involved in non-spatial learning, in contrast to their reported involvement in spatial learning.

  1. Effect of different doses of monosodium glutamate on the thyroid follicular cells of adult male albino rats: a histological study

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Hanaa A; Arafat, Eetmad A

    2015-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a major flavor enhancer used as a food additive. The present study investigates the effects of different doses of MSG on the morphometric and histological changes of the thyroid gland. 28 male albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: group I control, group II, III and IV treated with MSG (0.25 g/kg, 3 g/kg, 6 g/kg daily for one month) respectively. The thyroid glands were dissected out and prepared for light and electron microscopic examination. Light microscopic examination of thyroid gland of group II revealed increase in follicular epithelial height. Groups III & IV showed decrease in the follicular diameter and irregularity in the shape of some follicles with discontinuity of basement membrane. Follicular hyperplasia was detected in some follicles with appearance of multiple pyknotic nuclei in follicular and interfollicular cells and multiple exfoliated cells in the colloid. In addition, areas of loss of follicular pattern were appeared in group IV. Immunohistochemical examination of BCL2 immunoexpression of the thyroid glands of groups III & IV reveals weak positive reaction in the follicular cells cytoplasm. Ultrathin sections examination of groups III & IV revealed follicular cells with irregular hyperchromatic nuclei, marked dilatation of rER and increased lysosomes with areas of short or lost apical microvilli. In addition, vacuolation of mitochondria was detected in group IV. The results displayed that MSG even at low doses is capable of producing alterations in the body weights and thyroid tissue function and histology. PMID:26884820

  2. Does information about MSG (monosodium glutamate) content influence consumer ratings of soups with and without added MSG?

    PubMed

    Prescott, John; Young, Ariane

    2002-08-01

    Responses to recent concerns about perceived adverse health effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) have included using prominent labels, e.g., "No added MSG", on products. Label information has been shown to create expectations for a food's sensory properties and acceptability, and influence evaluations of the product. To assess the impact of information about MSG content, subjects evaluated saltiness, richness, natural taste of, and liking for, vegetable soups with (MSG+) and without (MSG-) added MSG. Their attitudes to MSG were evaluated and found to be generally negative. Subjects tasted both soups under three information conditions, presented as an ingredient list: contains added MSG, does not contain added MSG, or no mention of MSG. The expected changes in liking and sensory properties due to added MSG were found, but there were no effects of information. A second experiment used a more obvious manipulation of information on added MSG content, as well as two soup flavors to reduce the obvious differences between the MSG+ and MSG- soups. Again, there were no effects of information. These data suggest that sensory properties are weighted more than information when products are evaluated during tasting, even when the information is highly relevant to beliefs and attitudes.

  3. Protective Effect of Calendula officinalis L. Flowers Against Monosodium Glutamate Induced Oxidative Stress and Excitotoxic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shivasharan, B D; Nagakannan, P; Thippeswamy, B S; Veerapur, V P

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a popular flavour enhancer used in food industries; however, excess MSG is neurotoxic. Oxidative stress is well documented in MSG induced neurotoxicity. The compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties reportedly possess beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Calendula officinalis Linn. flower extract (COE) is known for its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of COE on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Adult Wistar rats were administered systemically for 7 days with MSG and after one h of MSG injection, rats were treated with COE (100 and 200 mg/kg) orally. At the end the treatment period, animals were assessed for locomotor activity and were sacrificed; brains were isolated for estimation of LPO, GSH, CAT, TT, GST, Nitrite and histopathological studies. MSG caused a significant alteration in animal behavior, oxidative defense (raised levels of LPO, nitrite concentration, depletion of antioxidant levels) and hippocampal neuronal histology. Treatment with COE significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, and hippocampal damage in MSG-treated animals. Hence, this study demonstrates that COE protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of COE may be responsible for its observed neuroprotective action.

  4. Heterogeneous Nucleation of n-Butanol Vapor on Submicrometer Charged and Neutral Particles of Lactose and Monosodium Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Chen; Tao; Shu

    2000-04-01

    Condensation of a supersaturated vapor of n-butanol on monodisperse submicrometer particles of lactose and monosodium glutamate is investigated in a flow cloud chamber (FCC). The dependence of critical supersaturation S(cr) on the particle size in the range 30 to 90 nm is experimentally examined. The results show that the size dependence of S(cr) qualitatively agrees with that predicted by the Fletcher version of the Volmer theory of heterogeneous nucleation, but to a lesser degree. The experimental S(cr) is smaller than the theoretical prediction even with the line tension and surface diffusion taken into account, and they induce heterogeneous nucleation better than perfectly wetted particles. The discrepancy can not be fully accounted for by the effects of line tension and surface diffusion and the existing theory concerning the curvature-dependent surface tension. The condensation on single positive-charged particles of diameter 30, 60, and 90 nm is also examined. A lowering of S(cr) at an efficiency much larger than the prediction by Volmer's theory for ion-induced nucleation is observed, and the charge effect fades away as particle size increases. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10708489

  5. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption. PMID:27437400

  6. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  7. Sex differences in brain cholinergic activity in MSG-obese rats submitted to exercise.

    PubMed

    Sagae, Sara Cristina; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Raineki, Charlis; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Marques da Silva, Ana Carla

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is an epidemic disease most commonly caused by a combination of increased energy intake and lack of physical activity. The cholinergic system has been shown to be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Moreover, physical exercise promotes a reduction of fat pads and body mass by increasing energy expenditure, but also influences the cholinergic system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction between physical exercise (swimming) and central cholinergic activity in rats treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG, a model for obesity) during infancy. Our results show that MSG treatment is able to induce obesity in male and female rats. Specifically, MSG-treated rats presented a reduced body mass and nasoanal length, and increased perigonadal and retroperitoneal fat pads in relation to the body mass. Physical exercise was able to reduce body mass in both male and female rats, but did not change the fat pads in MSG-treated rats. Increased food intake was only seen in MSG-treated females submitted to exercise. Cholinergic activity was increased in the cortex of MSG-treated females and physical exercise was able to reduce this activity. Thalamic cholinergic activity was higher in sedentary MSG-treated females and exercised MSG-treated males. Hypothalamic cholinergic activity was higher in male and female MSG-treated rats, and was not reduced by exercise in the 2 sexes. Taken together, these results show that MSG treatment and physical exercise have different effects in the cholinergic activity of males and females. PMID:22039988

  8. Cognitive and biochemical effects of monosodium glutamate and aspartame, administered individually and in combination in male albino mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-Taweel, Gasem M; A, Zyadah M; Ajarem, Jamaan S; Ahmad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame (ASM) individually and in combination on the cognitive behavior and biochemical parameters like neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices in the brain tissue of mice. Forty male Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into four groups of ten each and were exposed to MSG and ASM through drinking water for one month. Group I was the control and was given normal tap water. Groups II and III received MSG (8 mg/kg) and ASM (32 mg/kg) respectively dissolved in tap water. Group IV received MSG and ASM together in the same doses. After the exposure period, the animals were subjected to cognitive behavioral tests in a shuttle box and a water maze. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and the neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices were estimated in their forebrain tissue. Both MSG and ASM individually as well as in combination had significant disruptive effects on the cognitive responses, memory retention and learning capabilities of the mice in the order (MSG+ASM)>ASM>MSG. Furthermore, while MSG and ASM individually were unable to alter the brain neurotransmitters and the oxidative stress indices, their combination dose (MSG+ASM) decreased significantly the levels of neurotransmitters (dopamine and serotonin) and it also caused oxidative stress by increasing the lipid peroxides measured in the form of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and decreasing the level of total glutathione (GSH). Further studies are required to evaluate the synergistic effects of MSG and ASM on the neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices and their involvement in cognitive dysfunctions.

  9. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  10. Supplementing chicken broth with monosodium glutamate reduces hunger and desire to snack but does not affect energy intake in women.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brett E; Monsivais, Pablo; Perrigue, Martine M; Drewnowski, Adam

    2011-11-01

    The effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) supplementation in soup or broth on satiety is not well understood. In the present study, the relative effects of four chicken broths with or without added MSG on motivational ratings and energy intakes at the next meal were compared using a double-blinded, within-subject design. A total of thirty-five normal-weight women, aged 20-40 years, took part in four study sessions. The four broths were base chicken broth (63 kJ), broth with added MSG (1.19 g) and nucleotides (0.03 g), broth with added MSG (1.22 g), and broth with added fat (BAF; 681 kJ). The preloads were presented twice at 09.00 and 11.15 hours for a maximum cumulative dose of 2.44 g MSG. Motivational ratings were collected before and at 15 min intervals post-ingestion for a total of 210 min. A test lunch meal was served at 12.00 hours, and plate waste was measured. The addition of MSG to chicken broth did not increase energy intakes at lunch or affect motivational ratings over the entire testing session. Both hunger and desire to snack between the second preload exposure and the test meal were significantly reduced in the MSG condition relative to the base broth condition (both, P = 0.03). However, only the BAF significantly suppressed energy intakes at lunch compared with the base broth control condition. Supplementing chicken broth with MSG can increase subjective ratings for satiety but does not alter energy intake at the next meal relative to an equal energy broth without added MSG.

  11. Obese Women Have Lower Monosodium Glutamate Taste Sensitivity and Prefer Higher Concentrations Than Do Normal-weight Women

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Finkbeiner, Susana; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether obese women exhibit altered umami and sweet taste perception compared to normal-weight women. A total of 57 subjects (23 obese and 34 normal weight) participated in a 2-day study separated by 1 week. Half of the women in each group were evaluated using monosodium glutamate (MSG; prototypical umami stimulus) on the first test day and sucrose on the second test day; the order was reversed for the remaining women. We used two-alternative forced-choice staircase procedures to measure taste detection thresholds, forced-choice tracking technique to measure preferences, the general Labeled Magnitude Scale (gLMS) to measure perceived intensity of suprathreshold concentrations, and a triangle test to measure discrimination between 29 mmol/l MSG and 29 mmol/l NaCl. Obese women required higher MSG concentrations to detect a taste and preferred significantly higher MSG concentrations in a soup-like vehicle. However, their perception of MSG at suprathreshold concentrations, their ability to discriminate MSG from salt, and their preference for sucrose were similar to that observed in normal-weight women. Regardless of their body weight category, 28% of the women did not discriminate 29 mmol/l MSG from 29 mmol/l NaCl (nondiscriminators). Surprisingly, we found that, relative to discriminators, nondiscriminators perceived less savoriness when tasting suprathreshold MSG concentrations and less sweetness from suprathreshold sucrose concentrations but had similar MSG and sucrose detection thresholds. Taken together, these data suggest that body weight is related to some components of umami taste and that different mechanisms are involved in the perception of threshold and suprathreshold MSG concentrations. PMID:20075854

  12. Effect of NaCl/Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) Mixture on the Sensorial Properties and Quality Characteristics of Model Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    Sodium chloride is an important ingredient added to most of foods which contributes to flavor enhancement and food preservation but excess intake of sodium chloride may also cause various diseases such as heart diseases, osteoporosis and so on. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a salty flavor enhancer on the quality and sensorial properties of the NaCl/MSG complex and actual food system. For characterizing the spray-dried NaCl/MSG complex, surface dimension, morphology, rheology, and saltiness intensity were estimated by increasing MSG (0-2.0%) levels at a fixed NaCl concentration (2.0%). MSG levels had no effect of the characteristics of the NaCl/MSG complex, although the addition of MSG increased the surface dimension of the NaCl/MSG complex significantly (p<0.05). Furthermore, the effect of MSG on enhancing the salty flavor was not observed in the solution of the NaCl/MSG complex. In the case of an actual food system, model meat products (pork patties) were prepared by replacing NaCl with MSG. MSG enhanced the salty flavor, thereby increasing overall acceptability of pork patties. Replacement of NaCl with MSG (<1.0%) did not result in negative sensorial properties of pork patties, although quality deterioration such as high cooking loss was found. Nevertheless, MSG had a potential application in meat product formulation as a salty flavor enhancer or a partial NaCl replacer when meat products were supplemented with binding agents. PMID:26761490

  13. Beta-galactosidase staining in the nucleus of the solitary tract of Fos-Tau-LacZ mice is unaffected by monosodium glutamate taste stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Jennifer M; Thompson, John A

    2014-01-01

    Fos-Tau-LacZ (FTL) transgenic mice are used to visualize the anatomical connectivity of neurons that express c-Fos, an immediate early gene, in response to activation. In contrast to typical c-Fos protein expression, which is localized to the nucleus of stimulated neurons, activation of the c-Fos gene results in beta galactosidase (β-gal) expression throughout the entire cytoplasm of activated cells in FTL mice; thereby making it possible to discern the morphology of c-Fos expressing cells. This can be an especially important tool in brain areas in which function may be related to cell morphology, such as the primary taste/viscerosensory brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). Thus, to further characterize FTL activity in the brain, the current study quantified both β-gal enzymatic activity as well as c-Fos protein expression in the nTS under a variety of experimental conditions (no stimulation, no stimulation with prior overnight food and water restriction, monosodium glutamate taste stimulation, and monosodium glutamate taste stimulation with perfusion 5 h post stimulation). Contrary to previous research, we found that β-gal activity (both labeled cell bodies and overall number of labeled pixels) was unchanged across all experimental conditions. However, traditional c-Fos protein activity (both cell bodies and number of activated pixels) varied significantly across experimental conditions, with the greatest amount of c-Fos protein label found in the group that received monosodium glutamate taste stimulation. Interestingly, although many c-Fos positive cells were also β-gal positive in the taste stimulated group, some c-Fos protein labeled cells were not co-labeled with β-gal. Together, these data suggest that β-gal staining within the nTS reflects a stable population of β-gal- positive neurons whose pattern of expression is unaffected by experimental condition.

  14. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults ingesting aspartame and monosodium L-glutamate as part of a soup/beverage meal.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1987-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ingestion of monosodium L-glutamate with aspartame produces a marked increase in plasma glutamate and aspartate concentrations. Twelve normal adults (6 males, 6 females) ingested three different soup/beverage meals in a balanced Latin square design. One meal (A) provided no aspartame (APM) or monosodium L-glutamate (MSG); a second (B) provided 50 mg MSG/kg body weight; while the third (C) provided 50 mg MSG and 34 mg APM per kg body weight. Plasma glutamate (Glu) concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly after meals B and C (no significant difference between B and C). Plasma aspartate (Asp) concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly after meals B and C (values significantly higher after meal C than meal B). Plasma Glu + Asp concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly from a mean (+/- SD) baseline value of 5.64 +/- 2.62 mumol/dL to high mean values of 23.1 +/- 7.29 and 26.8 +/- 9.74 mumol/dL after ingestion of meals B and C, respectively (no significant difference between meals B and C). Similarly, the area under the plasma Glu + Asp concentration-time curve did not differ significantly between meals B and C (624 +/- 197 v 763 +/- 277 mumol/dL x min, respectively). Peak plasma Glu + Asp concentrations for each subject (ignoring time) were also examined. The mean peak plasma Glu + Asp concentrations were 7.39 +/- 2.77, 23.0 +/- 6.61, and 27.3 +/- 9.07 mumol/dL, respectively after meals A, B, and C.

  15. Marked reduction in gonadal steroid hormone levels in rats treated neonatally with monosodium L-glutamate: further evidence for disruption of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation.

    PubMed

    Nemeroff, C B; Lamartiniere, C A; Mason, G A; Squibb, R E; Hong, J S; Bondy, S C

    1981-11-01

    Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin, estradiol-17 beta and testosterone were determined in adult rats that were treated in the neonatal period with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) which has previously been shown to reliably produce destruction of arcuate nucleus perikarya. MSG-treated males had significantly smaller accessory sexual organs (seminal vesicles and ventral prostate) and tests and had significantly lower serum concentrations of FSH and testosterone than sex-matched controls. MSG-treated females had significantly lower serum concentrations of LH, FSH and estradiol-17 beta. Prolactin levels of MSG-treated rats were no different than sex-matched controls. This marked reduction in gonadal steroid levels (decreases 68%) and inappropriately low gonadotropin levels further characterizes the deficit of feedback regulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in MSG-treated rats.

  16. Mesophilic batch anaerobic co-digestion of pulp and paper sludge and monosodium glutamate waste liquor for methane production in a bench-scale digester.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yunqin; Wang, Dehan; Li, Qing; Xiao, Minquan

    2011-02-01

    This paper presented results from anaerobic co-digestion of pulp and paper sludge (PPS) and monosodium glutamate waste liquor (MGWL). A bench-scale anaerobic digester, 10 L in volume was developed, to operate under mesophilic (37 ± 2°C) batch condition. Under versatile and reliable anaerobic conduct, high efficiency for bioconversion of PPS and MGWL were obtained in the system. The accumulative methane yield attained to 200 mL g(-1) VS(added) and the peak value of methane daily production was 0.5m(3)/(m(3)d). No inhibitions of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ammonia on anaerobic co-digestion were found. pH 6.0-8.0 and alkalinity 1000-4000 mg CaCO(3)/L were got without adjustment. This work showed that there was a good potential to the use of PPS and MGWL to anaerobic co-digestion for methane production.

  17. Neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment counteracts circadian arrhythmicity induced by phase shifts of the light-dark cycle in female and male Siberian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Onishi, Kenneth G.; Zucker, Irving

    2013-01-01

    Studies of rats and voles suggest that distinct pathways emanating from the anterior hypothalamic-retrochiasmatic area and the mediobasal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus independently generate ultradian rhythms (URs) in hormone secretion and behavior. We evaluated the hypothesis that destruction of arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, in concert with dampening of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian rhythmicity, would compromise the generation of ultradian rhythms (URs) of locomotor activity. Siberian hamsters of both sexes treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG) that destroys ARC neurons were subjected in adulthood to a circadian disrupting phase-shift protocol (DPS) that produces SCN arrhythmia. MSG treatments induced hypogonadism and obesity, and markedly reduced the size of the optic chiasm and primary optic tracts. MSG-treated hamsters exhibited normal entrainment to the light-dark cycle, but MSG treatment counteracted the circadian arrhythmicity induced by the DPS protocol: only 6% of MSG-treated hamsters exhibited circadian arrhythmia, whereas 50% of control hamsters were circadian disrupted. In MSG-treated hamsters that retained circadian rhythmicity after DPS treatment, quantitative parameters of URs appeared normal, but in the 2 MSG-treated hamsters that became circadian arrhythmic after DPS, both dark-phase and light-phase URs were abolished. Although preliminary, these data are consistent with reports in voles suggesting that the combined disruption of SCN and ARC function impairs the expression of behavioral URs. The data also suggest that light thresholds for entrainment of circadian rhythms may be lower than those required to disrupt circadian organization. PMID:23701725

  18. Neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment counteracts circadian arrhythmicity induced by phase shifts of the light-dark cycle in female and male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Zucker, Irving

    2013-07-12

    Studies of rats and voles suggest that distinct pathways emanating from the anterior hypothalamic-retrochiasmatic area and the mediobasal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus independently generate ultradian rhythms (URs) in hormone secretion and behavior. We evaluated the hypothesis that destruction of arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, in concert with dampening of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian rhythmicity, would compromize the generation of ultradian rhythms (URs) of locomotor activity. Siberian hamsters retain-->of both sexes treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG) that destroys ARC neurons were subjected in adulthood to a circadian disrupting phase-shift protocol (DPS) that produces SCN arrhythmia. MSG treatments induced hypogonadism and obesity, retain-->and markedly reduced the size of the optic chiasm and optic nerves. MSG-treated hamsters exhibited normal entrainment to the light-dark cycle, but MSG treatretain-->ment counteracted the circadian arrhythmicity induced by the DPS protocol: only 6% of retain-->MSG-treated hamsters exhibited circadian arrhythmia, whereas 50% of control hamsters were circadian disrupted. In MSG-treated hamsters that retained circadian rhythmicity after DPS treatment, quantitative parameters of URs appeared normal, but in the two MSG-treated hamsters that became circadian arrhythmic after DPS, both dark-phase and light-phase URs were abolished. Although preliminary, these data are consistent with reports in voles suggesting that the combined disruption of SCN and ARC function impairs the expression of behavioral URs. The data also suggest that light thresholds for entrainment of circadian rhythms may be lower than those required to disrupt circadian organization.

  19. Long-term ingestion of monosodium L-glutamate did not induce obesity, dyslipidemia or insulin resistance: a two-generation study in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Smriga, Miro; Sakai, Ryosei

    2013-01-01

    The use of monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a flavor enhancer spans more than 100 y and there are many studies indicating the safety of general use of MSG. Recently, however, Collison et al. (2010) reported a two-generation study with a low dose of MSG that caused abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. Due to public health concerns over metabolic syndrome, their report merits careful analysis. The present study attempted to repeat the Collison et al. findings. Groups of male or female C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet or one supplemented with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) at a level of 20%. Drinking water control was provided or treatment groups were given 0.064% MSG solution (w/v). Diets and MSG administration continued throughout mating and during gestation and lactation periods. To further investigate the effects of ingestion of MSG, the offspring were continued on the same dosing conditions until they reached 32 wk of age. MSG administration in mice fed a normal or a HFCS diet throughout gestation and for 32 wk after birth, did not affect growth, girth size, abdominal fat weight or body composition. This study reports that MSG did not trigger insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis, regardless of the diet, not reproducing the results of the above-mentioned study (Collison et al., 2010). PMID:23727643

  20. The Neuroprotective Effect of Dark Chocolate in Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Nontransgenic Alzheimer Disease Model Rats: Biochemical, Behavioral, and Histological Studies.

    PubMed

    Madhavadas, Sowmya; Kapgal, Vijaya Kumar; Kutty, Bindu M; Subramanian, Sarada

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability to oxidative stress and cognitive decline continue to increase during both normal and pathological aging. Dietary changes and sedentary life style resulting in mid-life obesity and type 2 diabetes, if left uncorrected, further add to the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease (AD) in the later stages of life. Certain antioxidant agents such as dietary polyphenols, taken in adequate quantities, have been suggested to improve the cognitive processes. In this study, we examined the effect of oral administration of dark chocolate (DC) containing 70% cocoa solids and 4% total polyphenol content for three months at a dose of 500 mg/Kg body weight per day to 17-month-old monosodium glutamate treated obese Sprague-Dawley rats, earlier characterized as a nontransgenic AD (NTAD) rat model after reversal of obesity, diabetes, and consequent cognitive impairments. The results demonstrated that DC reduced the hyperglycemia, inhibited the cholinesterase activity in the hippocampal tissue homogenates, and improved the cognitive performance in spatial memory related Barnes maze task. Histological studies revealed an increase in cell volume in the DC treated rats in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. These findings demonstrated the benefits of DC in enhancing cognitive function and cholinergic activity in the hippocampus of the aged NTAD rats while correcting their metabolic disturbances. PMID:26673833

  1. Effects of monosodium-L-glutamate administration on serum levels of reproductive hormones and cholesterol, epididymal sperm reserves and testicular histomorphology of male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ochiogu, Izuchukwu S; Ogwu, David; Uchendu, Chukwuka N; Okoye, Chidozie N; Ihedioha, John I; Mbegbu, Edmund C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of administration of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) on serum gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinising hormone (LH), testosterone and total cholesterol (TC), cauda epididymal sperm reserves (CESR) and testicular histomorphology of adult male albino rats. Eighty-four rats, randomly assigned to 7 groups of 12 rats each, were used for the study. Varying low doses (0.25, 0.50 or 1.00 g/kg body weight) of MSG were administered orally or subcutaneously at 48-h intervals for six weeks. Serum GnRH, LH, testosterone and TC, and CESR were evaluated on days 14, 28 and 42 of MSG administration. Testicular histomorphology was evaluated on day 42. The results showed that the mean serum GnRH, LH and testosterone levels, and the CESR of all the treated groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those of the untreated control on days 14, 28 and 42 of MSG administration. The mean serum TC levels of all the treated groups were also significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those of the control group on days 14 and 28. No lesions were observed on sections of the testes. It was concluded that MSG administration for 14, 28 and 42 days led to significantly lower serum levels of GnRH, LH, testosterone and TC, and significantly lower CESR. PMID:25655420

  2. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms. PMID:21526994

  3. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats.

  4. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Jonas R; França, Lucas M; Chagas, Vinicyus T; Gaspar, Renato S; Dos Santos, Kayque A; Gonçalves, Luciana M; Sloboda, Deborah M; Holloway, Alison C; Dutra, Richard P; Carneiro, Everardo M; Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10-1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  5. Monosodium L-glutamate in soup reduces subsequent energy intake from high-fat savoury food in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Takashi; Imada, Toshifumi; Hao, Susan Shuzhen; Kimura, Eiichiro

    2016-01-14

    The umami seasoning, monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), has been shown to increase satiety in normal body weight adults, although the results have not been consistent. The satiety effect of MSG in overweight and obese adults has not been examined yet. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSG in a vegetable soup on subsequent energy intakes as well as food selection in overweight and obese adult women without eating disorders. A total of sixty-eight overweight and obese women (BMI range: 25·0-39·9 kg/m²), otherwise healthy, were recruited to our study. A fixed portion (200 ml) of control vegetable soup or the same soup with added MSG (0·5 g/100 ml) was provided 10 min before an ad libitum lunch and an ad libitum snack in the mid-afternoon. The control soup had equivalent amount of Na to the soup with added MSG. Energy intakes at the ad libitum lunch and ad libitum snack time after the soup preload were assessed using a randomised, double-blind, two-way cross-over design. The soup with MSG in comparison with the control soup resulted in significantly lower consumption of energy at lunch. The addition of MSG in the soup also reduced energy intake from high-fat savoury foods. The soup with MSG showed lower but no significant difference in energy intake at mid-afternoon. The addition of umami seasoning MSG in a vegetable soup may decrease subsequent energy intake in overweight and obese women who do not have eating disorders. PMID:26455957

  6. Sub-chronic concomitant ingestion of L-arginine and monosodium glutamate improves feed efficiency, lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Egbuonu, Anthony C Cemaluk

    2012-03-15

    The use of L-arginine (ARG) is common in supplements, whereas, Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is widely used as flavor enhancing food additive. Thus, ARG and MSG may be present together in human diets, warranting this study aimed at investigating the effect of concomitant ingestion of ARG and MSG on some biochemical indices in male rats. Twelve male albino rats were grouped into three (n = 4) and concomitantly exposed to 0:0, 20:5 and 60:15 mg kg(-1) of ARG:MSG. Exposure was peroral and every twenty four h for 28 days. ARG plus MSG treatment caused a significant (p < or = 0.05) increase in Feed Efficiency (FE) (Low dose: 5.23 +/- 22%; High dose: 5.60 +/- 11%), whereas, it decreased (p < or = 0.05) the serum Total Cholesterol (T-Chol) (low dose: 80.83 +/- 0.11 mg/100 mL, high dose: 92.55 +/- 0.14 mg/100 mL), triacylglycerol (TAG) (low dose: 179.91 +/- 0.09 mg/100 mL, high dose: 119.77 +/- 0.32 mg/100 mL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (low dose: 5.00 +/- 0.07 mg/100 mL, high dose: 24.36 +/- 0.10 mg/100 mL) concentrations of the rats in a dose dependent manner. However, (at the high dose) the increase in Body Weight (BW) (0.08 +/- 0.07 kg), Feed Intake (FI) (0.40 +/- 0.03 kg) and Water Intake (WI) (0.65 +/- 0.18 L) induced by ARG plus MSG exposure was not significant (p < or = 0.05), suggesting non treatment related effect on these routine parameters. However, exposure to ARG plus MSG may significantly improve feed efficiency, lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity in the male rats. PMID:24175428

  7. Monosodium L-glutamate in soup reduces subsequent energy intake from high-fat savoury food in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Takashi; Imada, Toshifumi; Hao, Susan Shuzhen; Kimura, Eiichiro

    2016-01-14

    The umami seasoning, monosodium L-glutamate (MSG), has been shown to increase satiety in normal body weight adults, although the results have not been consistent. The satiety effect of MSG in overweight and obese adults has not been examined yet. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSG in a vegetable soup on subsequent energy intakes as well as food selection in overweight and obese adult women without eating disorders. A total of sixty-eight overweight and obese women (BMI range: 25·0-39·9 kg/m²), otherwise healthy, were recruited to our study. A fixed portion (200 ml) of control vegetable soup or the same soup with added MSG (0·5 g/100 ml) was provided 10 min before an ad libitum lunch and an ad libitum snack in the mid-afternoon. The control soup had equivalent amount of Na to the soup with added MSG. Energy intakes at the ad libitum lunch and ad libitum snack time after the soup preload were assessed using a randomised, double-blind, two-way cross-over design. The soup with MSG in comparison with the control soup resulted in significantly lower consumption of energy at lunch. The addition of MSG in the soup also reduced energy intake from high-fat savoury foods. The soup with MSG showed lower but no significant difference in energy intake at mid-afternoon. The addition of umami seasoning MSG in a vegetable soup may decrease subsequent energy intake in overweight and obese women who do not have eating disorders.

  8. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Jonas R.; França, Lucas M.; Chagas, Vinicyus T.; Gaspar, Renato S.; dos Santos, Kayque A.; Gonçalves, Luciana M.; Sloboda, Deborah M.; Holloway, Alison C.; Dutra, Richard P.; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Cappelli, Ana Paula G.; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A.

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10–1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  9. Prediabetic changes in gene expression induced by aspartame and monosodium glutamate in Trans fat-fed C57Bl/6 J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human diet has altered markedly during the past four decades, with the introduction of Trans hydrogenated fat, which extended the shelf-life of dietary oils and promoted a dramatic increase in elaidic acid (Trans-18.1) consumption. Food additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame (ASP) were introduced to increase food palatability and reduce caloric intake. Nutrigenomics studies in small-animal models are an established platform for analyzing the interactions between various macro- and micronutrients. We therefore investigated the effects of changes in hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression induced by the food additives ASP, MSG or a combination of both additives in C57Bl/6 J mice fed a Trans fat-enriched diet. Methods Hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression profiles, together with body characteristics, glucose parameters, serum hormone and lipid profiles were examined in C57Bl/6 J mice consuming one of the following four dietary regimens, commencing in utero via the mother’s diet: [A] Trans fat (TFA) diet; [B] MSG + TFA diet; [C] ASP + TFA diet; [D] ASP + MSG + TFA diet. Results Whilst dietary MSG significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and serum leptin levels in TFA-fed mice, the combination of ASP + MSG promoted the highest increase in visceral adipose tissue deposition, serum free fatty acids, fasting blood glucose, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol and TNFα levels. Microarray analysis of significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed a reduction in hepatic and adipose tissue PPARGC1a expression concomitant with changes in PPARGC1a-related functional networks including PPARα, δ and γ. We identified 73 DEGs common to both adipose and liver which were upregulated by ASP + MSG in Trans fat-fed mice; and an additional 51 common DEGs which were downregulated. Conclusion The combination of ASP and MSG may significantly alter adiposity, glucose homeostasis, hepatic and adipose tissue gene

  10. Monosodium glutamate neonatal intoxication associated with obesity in adult stage is characterized by chronic inflammation and increased mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Roman-Ramos, Ruben; Almanza-Perez, Julio C; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Blancas-Flores, Gerardo; Fortis-Barrera, Angeles; Jasso, Edgar I; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario; Campos-Sepulveda, Alfonso E; Cruz, Miguel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J

    2011-06-01

    The monosodium glutamate (MSG) neonatal administration in mice provides a model of obesity with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance. However, the inflammatory profile of cytokines produced from fat tissue and its relationship to the metabolic dysfunction induced by MSG have not yet been revealed. The aim of this study was to establish the inflammatory profile attributed to MSG by measuring the expression of adipokines in visceral fat and serum of 19-week-old mice as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARα and γ). Some metabolic and biochemical parameters were also quantified. The MSG increased mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), resistin and leptin, but adiponectin did not exhibit any changes. In addition, impaired glucose tolerance, increased levels of insulin, resistin and leptin were observed in serum. Both PPARα and PPARγ were activated in MSG-induced obese mice, which might explain its inflammatory profile. However, liver transaminases were severely depressed, indicating that MSG may also induce liver injury, contributing to inflammation. The MSG neonatal neuro-intoxication in mice may thus provide a model of obesity and inflammation characterized by the dual activation of PPARα and PPARγ, which might offer new insights into the mechanism of inflammatory diabetes in obesity leading to steatohepatitis, as well as a suitable model to study the role of new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce insulin resistance, the inflammatory state and liver steatosis.

  11. In-capillary derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid for the simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid in food samples via capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin-Pwint; Pyell, Ute

    2016-06-01

    For the rapid simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG), benzoic acid (BA), and sorbic acid (SA) in canned food and other processed food samples, we developed a method that combines in-capillary derivatization with separation by capillary electrophoresis. This method employs the rapid derivatization of MSG with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and enables the detection of the resulting OPA-MSG derivative and of non-derivatized BA and SA at 230nm. The composition of the background electrolyte and the parameters of derivatization and separation are as follows: 25mM borax containing 5mM OPA and 6mM 3-MPA, separation voltage 25mV, injection at 30mbar for 20s, and column temperature 25°C. Because of the high reaction rate and suitably adapted effective electrophoretic mobilities, band broadening due to the derivatization reaction at the start of the separation process is kept to a minimum. The optimized method is validated with respect to LOD, LOQ, linearity, recovery, and precision. This method can be applied to real samples such as soy, fish, oyster and sweet and sour chili sauces after application of appropriate clean-up steps. Mechanisms of zone broadening and zone focusing are discussed showing the validity of the employed theoretical approach regarding the dependence of the peak shape for OPA-MSG on the concentration of MSG in the sample. PMID:27156753

  12. In-capillary derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid for the simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid in food samples via capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin-Pwint; Pyell, Ute

    2016-06-01

    For the rapid simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG), benzoic acid (BA), and sorbic acid (SA) in canned food and other processed food samples, we developed a method that combines in-capillary derivatization with separation by capillary electrophoresis. This method employs the rapid derivatization of MSG with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and enables the detection of the resulting OPA-MSG derivative and of non-derivatized BA and SA at 230nm. The composition of the background electrolyte and the parameters of derivatization and separation are as follows: 25mM borax containing 5mM OPA and 6mM 3-MPA, separation voltage 25mV, injection at 30mbar for 20s, and column temperature 25°C. Because of the high reaction rate and suitably adapted effective electrophoretic mobilities, band broadening due to the derivatization reaction at the start of the separation process is kept to a minimum. The optimized method is validated with respect to LOD, LOQ, linearity, recovery, and precision. This method can be applied to real samples such as soy, fish, oyster and sweet and sour chili sauces after application of appropriate clean-up steps. Mechanisms of zone broadening and zone focusing are discussed showing the validity of the employed theoretical approach regarding the dependence of the peak shape for OPA-MSG on the concentration of MSG in the sample.

  13. The effects of black garlic (Allium sativum L.) ethanol extract on the estimated total number of Purkinje cells and motor coordination of male adolescent Wistar rats treated with monosodium glutamate.

    PubMed

    Aminuddin, M; Partadiredja, G; Sari, D C R

    2015-03-01

    A number of studies have indicated that monosodium glutamate (MSG) might cause negative effects on the nervous system, including in the cerebellum. Garlic (Allium sativum) has long been known as a flavouring agent and a traditional remedy for various illnesses. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of garlic on the motor coordination and the number of Purkinje cells present in rats treated with MSG. A total of 25 male Wistar rats aged 4 to 5 weeks old were used in this study and were divided into five groups, namely a negative control (C-) group, which received 0.9 % NaCl solution, a positive control (C+) group, which received MSG, and three treated groups, which received 2 mg/g bw of MSG and 2.5 mg (T2.5), 5 mg (T5), or 10 mg (T10) of black garlic solution per oral administration (per 200 g bw), respectively. All treatments were carried out for 10 days. Upon the end of the treatment, the motor performance of all rats were tested using the rotarod apparatus. The rats were subsequently sacrificed, and the cerebella of the rats were processed for stereological analyses. It has been found that the number of Purkinje cells of the cerebella of all treated groups were significantly higher than that of the group treated with MSG only. No changes in motor coordination function were observed as a result of MSG treatment. PMID:24737450

  14. The effects of black garlic ethanol extract on the spatial memory and estimated total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of monosodium glutamate-exposed adolescent male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hermawati, Ery; Sari, Dwi Cahyani Ratna; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-09-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is believed to exert deleterious effects on various organs, including the hippocampus, likely via the oxidative stress pathway. Garlic (Alium sativum L.), which is considered to possess potent antioxidant activity, has been used as traditional remedy for various ailments since ancient times. We have investigated the effects of black garlic, a fermented form of garlic, on spatial memory and estimated the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in adolescent male Wistar rats treated with MSG. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: C- group, which received normal saline; C+ group, which was exposed to 2 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG; three treatment groups (T2.5, T5, T10), which were treated with black garlic extract (2.5, 5, 10 mg/200 g bw, respectively) and MSG. The spatial memory test was carried out using the Morris water maze (MWM) procedure, and the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus was estimated using the physical disector design. The groups treated with black garlic extract were found to have a shorter path length than the C- and C+ groups in the escape acquisition phase of the MWM test. The estimated total number of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was higher in all treated groups than that of the C+ group. Based on these results, we conclude that combined administration of black garlic and MSG may alter the spatial memory functioning and total number of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus of rats.

  15. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  16. Monosodium Titanate Sludge Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    2000-11-07

    Good filterability of tetraphenylborate (TPB) slurry is attributed to the hydrophobic nature of crystalline organic TPB that forms a firm but porous filter cake, allowing salt solution to pass through without unduly compressing the cake. Addition of inorganic sludge or monosodium titanate (MST) has an adverse effect on filtration, but the overall filtration rate with TPB is satisfactory. Poor cross-flow filtration performance for the Salt Disposition Alternatives requiring MST filtration is attributed primarily to the difficulty in filtering the residual inorganic sludge rich in iron and aluminum precipitates. Ferric hydrolysis products and colloids form a bulky and sticky filter cake significantly reducing filtration rate. Similarly poor filtration rates were observed in the BNFL ferric/ferrous precipitation process, necessitating a change to permanganate precipitation. This report, based on a few sludge settling observations, does not resolve the MST/Sludge filterability issue. However, it does identify the need for a change in emphasis from cross-flow optimization to understanding and controlling the chemistry and physics of alkaline inorganic particle suspensions and filterability. Promising potential exists to identify or develop surfactants or flocculants to enhance filterability of SRS sludge and monosodium titanate. Additional work is needed to provide a basic understanding of the nature of caustic sludge filter cake formation.

  17. Effect of the umami peptides on the ligand binding and function of rat mGlu4a receptor might implicate this receptor in the monosodium glutamate taste transduction.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskaia, K; Lundstrom, K; Plahl, D; Acuna, G; Schweitzer, C; Malherbe, P; Mutel, V

    1999-11-01

    1. The effect of several metabotropic ligands and di- or tripeptides were tested on the binding of [3H]-L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid ([3H]-L-AP4) on rat mGlu4 receptor. For selected compounds, the functional activity was determined on this receptor using the guanosine-5'[gamma-35S]-thiotriphosphate [gamma-35S]-GTP binding assay. 2. Using the scintillation proximity assay, [3H]-L-AP4 saturation analysis gave binding parameters K(D) and Bmax values of 150 nM and 9.3 pmoles mg-1 protein, respectively. The specific binding was inhibited concentration-dependently by several mGlu receptor ligands, and their rank order of affinity was established. 3. Several peptides inhibited the [3H]-L-AP4 binding with the following rank order of potency: glutamate-glutamate>glutamate-glutamate-leucine=aspartate - glutamate>glutamate - glutamate-aspartate>lactoyl-glutamate>aspartate-aspartate. Aspartate-phenylalanine-methyl ester (aspartame) was inactive up to 1 mM and guanosine-5'-monophosphate and inosine-5'-monophosphate were inactive up to 100 micronM. 4. The [gamma-35S]-GTP binding functional assay was used to determine the agonist activities of the different compounds. For the rat mGlu4 agonists, L-AP4 and L-glutamate, the correlation between their occupancy and activation of the receptor was close to one. The peptides, Glu-Glu, Asp-Glu and Glu-Glu-Asp failed to stimulate the [gamma-35S]-GTP binding at receptor occupancy greater than 80% and Glu-Glu-Leu appeared to be a weak partial agonist. These peptides did not elicit a clear dose-dependent umami perception. However, Glu-lac showed a good correlation between its potency to stimulate the [gamma-35S]-GTP binding and its affinity for displacement of [3H]-L-AP4 binding. These data are in agreement with the peptide taste assessment in human subjects, which showed that the acid derivatives of glutamate had characteristics similar to umami.

  18. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000619120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-09-06

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000619120 qualification and the 13 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  19. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #052511

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-08-22

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.052511 qualification and 14 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process.

  20. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #071311

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-10-04

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.071311 qualification and 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process.

  1. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000524120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-29

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.46000524120 qualification and the 14 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  2. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000824120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  3. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000908120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  4. Possible significance of adverse reactions to glutamate in humans.

    PubMed

    Reif-Lehrer, L

    1976-09-01

    Of those exposed to Chinese restaurant food, our studies indicate that 25% report adverse reactions (Chinese restaurant syndrome (CRS)), presumably to the mono-sodium glutamate (MSG) content. The possible significance of the symptoms is discussed in the light of the known neuroexcitatory activity of MSG. It is suggested that CRS may result from a "benign" inborn "error" of metabolism that is deserving of further study, particularly in individuals with certain other metabolic abnormalities or who are on certain types of drug therapy.

  5. Flavor Preferences Conditioned by Dietary Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding of the molecular basis of umami taste and its appetitive qualities has been greatly aided by studies in laboratory rodents. This review describes methods for testing responses to the prototypical umami substance monosodium glutamate (MSG) in rodents. Two techniques, forced exposure to MSG and 2-bottle choice tests with ascending concentrations, were used to evaluate the responses to the taste of umami itself, and 2 other methods used oral or postoral MSG to modify the responses to other flavors. Intake and preference for MSG are enhanced in mice by experience with MSG and with other nutrients with positive postoral effects. In addition, flavor preferences are enhanced in mice and rats by gastric or intestinal MSG infusions via an associative learning process. Even mice with an impaired or absent ability to taste MSG can learn to prefer a flavor added to an MSG solution, supporting the notion that glutamate acts postorally. The more complex flavor of dashi seasoning, which includes umami substances (inosinate, glutamate), is attractive to rodents, but dashi does not condition flavor preferences. Details of the postoral glutamate detection process and the nature of the signal involved in learned preferences are still uncertain but probably involve gastric or intestinal sensors or both and vagal transmission. Some findings suggest that postoral glutamate effects may enhance food preferences in humans, but this requires further study. PMID:27422522

  6. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #120111

    SciTech Connect

    Shehee, T.

    2012-02-21

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.120111 qualification and the first 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process. Analyses of Pail 125 verification sample fails the criteria for solids content and has measurably lower pH, density, and total bottle weight. The verification sample for Pail 125 was retested for weight percent solids after checking that all of the solids had been suspended. The sample again failed to meet acceptance criteria. SRNL recommends accepting Pails 1 through 120. Pails 121 through 125 should be rejected and returned to the vendor.

  7. Preliminary Report on Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1998-12-11

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk for several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort. The Flow Sheet Team requested that the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) examine the adsorption kinetics of MST for several process alternatives.This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the rate of adsorption of strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium as a function of temperature, MST concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. Additional tests incorporated into the design assess the effects of mixing as well as the influence from the presence of sludge solids and sodium tetraphenylborate.

  8. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000908120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in October 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 16 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  9. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000824120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in September 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 14 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  10. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  11. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #03031

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-05-16

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot 030311 qualification and 9 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process. Harrell Industries is under contract with Savannah River Remediation to provide MST for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). A 500-mL qualification sample for Lot 030311 was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to confirm the material meets the requirements specified in the purchase specification. The vendor is also obligated to send verification samples from {approx}10% or more of the pails of MST product for each lot (distributed roughly evenly through the entire lot of pails). For the verification of this lot, Harrell Industries sent 9 samples, one each from pails 1, 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 45, and 55 of 59 total pails.

  12. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #081811

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fink, S.

    2011-10-28

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.081811 qualification and 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification, with the possible exception of the geometric standard deviation for particle size. Two subsamples from the qualification sample were analyzed, giving results of 3.82 and 3.28, respectively, for the geometric standard deviation. The specification is {le}3.5. The results for both samples met the remaining particle size specifications, i.e. <10 vol% below 0.8 {mu}m and <1 vol% above 37 {mu}m. Filtration behavior of the current batch is expected to be near that of recent batches. SRNL recommends acceptance of this material. SRNL also recommends performing a statistical review of particle size data for the MST lots from this vendor to assess whether an improved material specification is appropriate.

  13. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #050411

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-06-28

    Harrell Industries is under contract with Savannah River Remediation to provide Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). A 500-mL qualification sample for Lot 050411 was sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to confirm the material meets the requirements specified in the purchase specification. The vendor is also obligated to send verification samples from {approx}10% or more of the pails of MST product for each lot (distributed roughly evenly through the entire lot of pails). For the verification of this lot, Harrell Industries sent 12 samples, one each from pails No.1, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 of 120 total pails. MST for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot 050411 qualification and 12 verification samples met all the requirements in the specification indicating the material is acceptable for use in the process.

  14. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3848 - Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, monosodium salt. 721.3848 Section 721.3848 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3848 Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt. (a... glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-N-dodecyl-, monosodium salt (PMN P-00-469; CAS No. 141321-68-8) is subject...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE (MST) PURCHASE SPECIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D

    2006-04-30

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the previous monosodium titanate (MST) purchase specifications for particle size and strontium decontamination factor. Based on the measured particle size and filtration performance characteristics of several MST samples with simulated waste solutions and various filter membranes we recommend changing the particle size specification as follows. The recommended specification varies with the size and manufacturer of the filter membrane as shown below. We recommend that future batches of MST received at SRS be tested for particle size and filtration performance. This will increase the available database and provide increased confidence that particle size parameters are an accurate prediction of filtration performance. Testing demonstrated the feasibility of a non-radiochemical method for evaluating strontium removal performance of MST samples. Using this analytical methodology we recommend that the purchase specification include the requirement that the MST exhibits a strontium DF factor of >1.79 upon contact with a simulated waste solution with composition as reported for simulated waste solution SWS-7-2005-1 in Table 1 and containing 5.2 to 5.7 mg L{sup -1} strontium with 0.1 g L{sup -1} of the MST. We also recommend performing additional tests with these simulants and MST samples and, if available, new MST samples, to determine the reproducibility and increase the available database for the measurements by the ICP-ES instrument. These measurements will provide increased confidence that the non-radiological method provides a reliable method for evaluating the strontium and actinide removal performance for MST samples.

  20. 78 FR 65278 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China, and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Antidumping Duties; Countervailing Duties; Final Rule, 62 FR 27296, 27323 (May 19, 1997). \\8\\ See Antidumping... Procedures, 76 FR 39263 (July 6, 2011) for details of the Department's electronic filing requirements, which...- comparison criteria. We base product-comparison criteria on meaningful commercial differences among...

  1. 78 FR 74115 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... China and the Republic of Indonesia: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigations, 78 FR 65269... Administrative Determination Deadlines Pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930, as Amended, 70 FR 24533 (May 10, 2005... Indonesia: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the Countervailing Duty Investigations...

  2. 78 FR 65269 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Duties; Final Rule, 62 FR 27296, 27323 (May 19, 1997). \\7\\ See Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Electronic Filing Procedures; Administrative Protective Order Procedures, 76 FR 39263 (July 6... Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual Information: Final Rule, 78 FR 21246 (April 10,...

  3. Decreased glutamate, glutamine and citrulline concentrations in plasma and muscle in endotoxemia cannot be reversed by glutamate or glutamine supplementation: a primary intestinal defect?

    PubMed

    Boutry, Claire; Matsumoto, Hideki; Bos, Cécile; Moinard, Christophe; Cynober, Luc; Yin, Yulong; Tomé, Daniel; Blachier, François

    2012-10-01

    Endotoxemia affects intestinal physiology. A decrease of circulating citrulline concentration is considered as a reflection of the intestinal function. Citrulline can be produced in enterocytes notably from glutamate and glutamine. The aim of this work was to determine if glutamate, glutamine and citrulline concentrations in blood, intestine and muscle are decreased by endotoxemia, and if supplementation with glutamate or glutamine can restore normal concentrations. We induced endotoxemia in rats by an intraperitoneal injection of 0.3 mg kg(-1) lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This led to a rapid anorexia, negative nitrogen balance and a transient increase of the circulating level of IL-6 and TNF-α. When compared with the values measured in pair fed (PF) animals, almost all circulating amino acids (AA) including citrulline decreased, suggesting a decrease of intestinal function. However, at D2 after LPS injection, most circulating AA concentrations were closed to the values recorded in the PF group. At that time, among AA, only glutamate, glutamine and citrulline were decreased in gastrocnemius muscle without change in intestinal mucosa. A supplementation with 4% monosodium glutamate (MSG) or an isomolar amount of glutamine failed to restore glutamate, glutamine and citrulline concentrations in plasma and muscle. However, MSG supplementation led to an accumulation of glutamate in the intestinal mucosa. In conclusion, endotoxemia rapidly but transiently decreased the circulating concentrations of almost all AA and more durably of glutamate, glutamine and citrulline in muscle. Supplementation with glutamate or glutamine failed to restore glutamate, glutamine and citrulline concentrations in plasma and muscles. The implication of a loss of the intestinal capacity for AA absorption and/or metabolism in endotoxemia (as judged from decreased citrulline plasma concentration) for explaining such results are discussed.

  4. Severe peripheral neuropathy after exposure to monosodium methyl arsonate.

    PubMed

    Hessl, S M; Berman, E

    1982-05-01

    A case of severe peripheral neuropathy after several days of exposure to a pesticide spray containing monosodium methyl arsonate (MSMA) is reported. The clinical manifestations of symmetrical peripheral neuropathy with stocking-glove sensory deficit, decreased position sense, decreased and absent deep tendon reflexes, and muscle wasting are consistent with those described in other cases of arsenic intoxication. The anemia, leukopenia, and bone marrow changes of dyserythropoiesis in this case are also similar to those previously described with arsenic intoxication. The authors discuss the possible contribution of toxicity from exposure to other pesticides.

  5. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Glutamate signalling in roots.

    PubMed

    Forde, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    As a signalling molecule, glutamate is best known for its role as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian nervous system, a role that requires the activity of a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). The unexpected discovery in 1998 that Arabidopsis thaliana L. possesses a family of iGluR-related (GLR) genes laid the foundations for an assessment of glutamate's potential role as a signalling molecule in plants that is still in progress. Recent advances in elucidating the function of Arabidopsis GLR receptors has revealed similarities with iGluRs in their channel properties, but marked differences in their ligand specificities. The ability of plant GLR receptors to act as amino-acid-gated Ca(2+) channels with a broad agonist profile, combined with their expression throughout the plant, makes them strong candidates for a multiplicity of amino acid signalling roles. Although root growth is inhibited in the presence of a number of amino acids, only glutamate elicits a specific sequence of changes in growth, root tip morphology, and root branching. The recent finding that the MEKK1 gene is a positive regulator of glutamate sensitivity at the root tip has provided genetic evidence for the existence in plants of a glutamate signalling pathway analogous to those found in animals. This short review will discuss the most recent advances in understanding glutamate signalling in roots, considering them in the context of previous work in plants and animals.

  7. II. Glutamine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, H; Mathé, G; Couvreur, P; Tew, K D

    2002-11-01

    Glutamine and glutamate with proline, histidine, arginine and ornithine, comprise 25% of the dietary amino acid intake and constitute the "glutamate family" of amino acids, which are disposed of through conversion to glutamate. Although glutamine has been classified as a nonessential amino acid, in major trauma, major surgery, sepsis, bone marrow transplantation, intense chemotherapy and radiotherapy, when its consumption exceeds its synthesis, it becomes a conditionally essential amino acid. In mammals the physiological levels of glutamine is 650 micromol/l and it is one of the most important substrate for ammoniagenesis in the gut and in the kidney due to its important role in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. In cells, glutamine is a key link between carbon metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins and plays an important role in the growth of fibroblasts, lymphocytes and enterocytes. It improves nitrogen balance and preserves the concentration of glutamine in skeletal muscle. Deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase produces glutamate a precursor of gamma-amino butyric acid, a neurotransmission inhibitor. L-Glutamic acid is a ubiquitous amino acid present in many foods either in free form or in peptides and proteins. Animal protein may contain from 11 to 22% and plants protein as much as 40% glutamate by weight. The sodium salt of glutamic acid is added to several foods to enhance flavor. L-Glutamate is the most abundant free amino acid in brain and it is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the vertebrate central nervous system. Most free L-glutamic acid in brain is derived from local synthesis from L-glutamine and Kreb's cycle intermediates. It clearly plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, migration and survival in the developing brain via facilitated Ca++ transport. Glutamate also plays a critical role in synaptic maintenance and plasticity. It contributes to learning and memory through use-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy and

  8. LEACHING OF TITANIUM FROM MONOSODIUM TITANATE AND MODIFIED MST

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-01

    Analysis of a fouled coalescer and pre-filters from Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) operations showed evidence of Ti containing solids. Based on these results a series of tests were planned to examine the extent of Ti leaching from monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) in various solutions. The solutions tested included a series of salt solutions with varying free hydroxide concentrations, two sodium hydroxide concentrations, 9 wt % and 15 wt %, nitric and oxalic acid solutions. Overall, the amount of Ti leached from the MST and mMST was much greater in the acid solutions compared to the sodium hydroxide or salt solutions, which is consistent with the expected trend. The leaching data also showed that increasing hydroxide concentration, whether pure NaOH solution used for filter cleaning in ARP or the waste salt solution, increased the amount of Ti leached from both the MST and mMST. For the respective nominal contact times with the MST solids - for filter cleaning or the normal filter operation, the dissolved Ti concentrations are comparable suggesting either cause may contribute to the increased Ti fouling on the MCU coalescers. Tests showed that Ti containing solids could be precipitated from solution after the addition of scrub acid and a decrease in temperature similar to expected in MCU operations. FTIR analysis of these solids showed some similarity to the solids observed on the fouled coalescer and pre-filters. Although only a cursory study, this information suggests that the practice of increasing free hydroxide in feed solutions to MCU as a mitigation to aluminosilicate formation may be offset by the impact of formation of Ti solids in the overall process. Additional consideration of this finding from MCU and SWPF operation is warranted.

  9. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  10. Production of D-Glutamate from L-Glutamate with Glutamate Racemase and L-Glutamate Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, T; Watanabe, M; Makiura, H; Kusakabe, H; Yamade, K; Soda, K

    1999-01-01

    We studied production of D-glutamate from L-glutamate using a bioreactor consisting of two columns of sequentially connected immobilized glutamate racemase (EC 5.1.1.3, from Bacillus subtilis IFO 3336) and L-glutamate oxidase (EC 1.4.3.11, from Streptomyces sp. X119-6): L-glutamate was racemized by the glutamate racemase column, and then L-glutamate was oxidized by the L-glutamate oxidase column. Consequently only D-glutamate remained, and was easily separated from the α-ketoglutarate formed by anion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes were highly stabilized by immobilization. The pH and temperature optima of immobilized glutamate racemase (pH 8, 40°C) were similar to those of immobilized L-glutamate oxidase (pH 7, 50°C). Accordingly, we connected the two columns tandemly to do both enzyme reactions under the same conditions. Actually 4.5 μmol of D-glutamate was produced and isolated from 10 μmol of L-glutamate, about 90% of the theoretical yield. PMID:27373918

  11. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract ameliorates monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yun Ju; Joo, Young Bin; Jung, Young Ok; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Oh, Hye Jwa; Jhun, Joo Youn; Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Jin Sil; Kang, Chang Min; Sung, Mi Sook; Park, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ho Youn

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an age-related joint disease that is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and chronic pain. Oxidative stress is considered one of the pathophysiological factors in the progression of OA. We investigated the effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE), which is an antioxidant, on monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced arthritis of the knee joint of rat, which is an animal model of human OA. GSPE (100 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg) or saline was given orally three times per week for 4 weeks after the MIA injection. Pain was measured using the paw withdrawal latency (PWL), the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and the hind limb weight bearing ability. Joint damage was assessed using histological and microscopic analysis and microcomputerized tomography. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) and nitrotyrosine were detected using immunohistochemistry. Administration of GSPE to the MIA-treated rats significantly increased the PWL and PWT and this resulted in recovery of hind paw weight distribution (P < 0.05). GSPE reduced the loss of chondrocytes and proteoglycan, the production of MMP13, nitrotyrosine and IL-1β and the formation of osteophytes, and it reduced the number of subchondral bone fractures in the MIA-treated rats. These results indicate that GSPE is antinociceptive and it is protective against joint damage in the MIA-treated rat model of OA. GSPE could open up novel avenues for the treatment of OA. PMID:21795829

  12. Synthesis and characterization of monosodium urate (MSU) nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Nirali S.; Rathod, K. R.; Parekh, B. B.; Parikh, K. D.; Joshi, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In Gout the deposition of crystals of Monosodium Urate (MSU) in various connective tissues and joints occurs, which is very painful with immflamation. The deposition likely to begin with nano particles form and expected to grow in to micro-paricles and hence it is important to synthesize and characrterize MSU nano-particles. The MSU nano particles were synthesized by wet chemical method using NaOH and uric acid (C5H4N4O3) and then characterized by powder XRD, TEM, FT-IR and thermal analysis. From the powder XRD the triclinic structure was found and 40 nm average particle size was estimated by using Scherrer's formula. From TEM the particle size was found to be in the range of 20 to 60 nm. The FT-IR spectrum for the MSU nano particles confirmed the presence of O-H stretching, N-H stretching, N-H rocking, C = O, C = C Enol or Keto and C = N vibrations. The thermal analysis was carried out from room temperature to 900°C. With comparison to the bulk MSU the thermal stability of MSU nano particles was slightly higher and 1.5 water molecules were found to be associated with MSU nano particles. Present results are compared with the bulk MSU.

  13. Adsorption of biometals to monosodium titanate in biological environments

    SciTech Connect

    HOBBS, D.T.; MESSER, R. L. W.; LEWIS, J. B.; CLICK, D. R. LOCKWOOD, P. E.; WATAHA, J. C.

    2005-06-06

    Monosodium titanate (MST) is an inorganic sorbent/ion exchanger developed for the removal of radionuclides from nuclear wastes. We investigated the ability of MST to bind Cd(II), Hg(II), or Au(III) to establish the utility of MST for applications in environmental decontamination or medical therapy (drug delivery). Adsorption isotherms for MST were determined at pH 7-7.5 in water or phosphate-buffered saline. The extent of metal binding was determined spectroscopically by measuring the concentrations of the metals in solution before and after contact with the MST. Cytotoxic responses to MST were assessed using THP1 monocytes and succinate dehydrogenase activity. Monocytic activation by MST was assessed by TNF{alpha} secretion (ELISA) with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation. MST sorbed Cd(II), Hg(II), and Au(III) under conditions similar to that in physiological systems. MST exhibited the highest affinity for Cd(II) followed by Hg(II) and Au (III). MST (up to 100 mg/L) exhibited only minor (< 25% suppression of succinate dehydrogenase) cytotoxicity and did not trigger TNF{alpha} secretion nor modulate LPS-induced TNF{alpha} secretion from monocytes. MST exhibits high affinity for biometals with no significant biological liabilities in these introductory studies. MST deserves further scrutiny as a substance with the capacity to decontaminate biological environments or deliver metals in a controlled fashion.

  14. Adsorption of biometals to monosodium titanate in biological environments.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, D T; Messer, R L W; Lewis, J B; Click, D R; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C

    2006-08-01

    Monosodium titanate (MST) is an inorganic sorbent/ion exchanger developed for the removal of radionuclides from nuclear wastes. We investigated the ability of MST to bind Cd(II), Hg(II), Au(III), or the Au-organic compound auranofin to establish the utility of MST for applications in environmental decontamination or medical therapy (drug delivery). Adsorption isotherms for MST were determined at pH 7-7.5 in water or phosphate-buffered saline. The extent of metal binding was determined spectroscopically by measuring the concentrations of the metals in solution before and after contact with the MST. Cytotoxic responses to MST were assessed using THP1 monocytes and succinate dehydrogenase activity. Monocytic activation by MST was assessed by TNFalpha secretion (ELISA) with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation. MST adsorbed Cd(II), Hg(II), and Au(III) under conditions similar to those in physiological systems. MST exhibited the highest affinity for Cd(II) followed by Hg(II) and Au (III). MST (up to 100 mg/L) exhibited only minor (<25% suppression of succinate dehydrogenase) cytotoxicity and did not trigger TNFalpha secretion nor modulate LPS-induced TNFalpha secretion from monocytes. MST exhibits high affinity for biometals with no significant biological liabilities in these introductory studies. MST deserves further scrutiny as a substance with the capacity to decontaminate biological environments or deliver metals or metal compounds for therapeutic applications. PMID:16362965

  15. Characterization of Glutamate Decarboxylase (GAD) from Lactobacillus sakei A156 Isolated from Jeot-gal.

    PubMed

    Sa, Hyun Deok; Park, Ji Yeong; Jeong, Seon-Ju; Lee, Kang Wook; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganism was isolated from jeot-gal (anchovy), a Korean fermented seafood. The isolate, A156, produced GABA profusely when incubated in MRS broth with monosodium glutamate (3% (w/v)) at 37°C for 48 h. A156 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The GABA conversion yield was 86% as determined by GABase enzyme assay. The gadB gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) was cloned by PCR. gadC encoding a glutamate/GABA antiporter was located immediately upstream of gadB. The operon structure of gadCB was confirmed by RT-PCR. gadB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and recombinant GAD was purified. The purified GAD was 54.4 kDa in size by SDS-PAGE. Maximum GAD activity was observed at pH 5.0 and 55°C and the activity was dependent on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The Km and Vmax of GAD were 0.045 mM and 0.011 mM/min, respectively, when glutamate was used as the substrate.

  16. 21 CFR 582.4521 - Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. 582.4521 Section 582.4521 Food and... Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. (a) Product. Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats...

  17. 21 CFR 582.4521 - Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. 582.4521 Section 582.4521 Food and... Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. (a) Product. Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats...

  18. 21 CFR 582.4521 - Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. 582.4521 Section 582.4521 Food and... Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. (a) Product. Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats...

  19. 21 CFR 582.4521 - Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. 582.4521 Section 582.4521 Food and... Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. (a) Product. Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats...

  20. Evidence for synergistic control of glutamate biosynthesis by glutamate dehydrogenases and glutamate in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Stannek, Lorena; Thiele, Martin J; Ischebeck, Till; Gunka, Katrin; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Commichau, Fabian M

    2015-09-01

    In the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis glutamate is synthesized by the glutamine synthetase and the glutamate synthase (GOGAT). During growth with carbon sources that exert carbon catabolite repression, the rocG glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene is repressed and the transcription factor GltC activates the expression of the GOGAT encoding gltAB genes. In the presence of amino acids of the glutamate family, the GDH RocG is synthesized and the enzyme prevents GltC from binding to DNA. The dual control of glutamate biosynthesis allows the efficient utilization of the available nutrients. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that, like RocG, also the paralogous GDH GudB can inhibit the transcription factor GltC, thereby controlling glutamate biosynthesis. Contradictory previous observations show that high level of GDH activity does not result in permanent inhibition of GltC. By controlling the intracellular levels of glutamate through feeding with exogenous arginine, we observed that the GDH-dependent control of GltC and thus expression of the gltAB genes inversely correlates with the glutamate pool. These results suggest that the B. subtilis GDHs RocG and GudB in fact act as glutamate sensors. In conclusion, the GDH-mediated control of glutamate biosynthesis seems to depend on the intracellular glutamate concentration. PMID:25711804

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-15

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step.

  2. Growth and adhesion properties of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Clare M.

    The presence of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid has long been associated with the joint disease gout. To elucidate the molecular level growth mechanism and adhesive properties of MSU crystals, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques were employed in the characterization of the (010) and (1-10) faces of MSU, as well as physiologically relevant solutions supersaturated with urate. Topographical AFM imaging of both MSU (010) and (1-10) revealed the presence of crystalline layers of urate arranged into v-shaped features of varying height. Growth rates were measured for both monolayers (elementary steps) and multiple layers (macrosteps) on both crystal faces under a wide range of urate supersaturation in physiologically relevant solutions. Step velocities for monolayers and multiple layers displayed a second order polynomial dependence on urate supersaturation on MSU (010) and (1-10), with step velocities on (1-10) generally half of those measured on MSU (010) in corresponding growth conditions. Perpendicular step velocities on MSU (010) were obtained and also showed a second order polynomial dependence of step velocity with respect to urate supersaturation, which implies a 2D-island nucleation growth mechanism for MSU (010). Extensive topographical imaging of MSU (010) showed island adsorption from urate growth solutions under all urate solution concentrations investigated, lending further support for the determined growth mechanism. Island sizes derived from DLS experiments on growth solutions were in agreement with those measured on MSU (010) topographical images. Chemical force microscopy (CFM) was utilized to characterize the adhesive properties of MSU (010) and (1-10). AFM probes functionalized with amino acid derivatives and bio-macromolecules found in the synovial fluid were brought into contact with both crystal faces and adhesion forces were tabulated into

  3. Final Report on Phase III Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29

    This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the extent and rate of adsorption of strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium as a function of temperature, monosodium titanate (MST) concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium.

  4. Behavioral deficits in adult rats treated neonatally with glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hlinák, Zdenek; Gandalovicová, Dana; Krejcí, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated long-term behavioral consequences of neonatal monosodium-l-glutamate (MSG) treatment in rats. The pups received MSG (3 mg/g sc) daily from postnatal day (PD) 5-12. Data from an automatic activity monitor showed that locomotion of MSG-treated females and males aged 56 and 84 days was significantly reduced. Beginning PD 120, three behavioral tests were performed. As compared to the controls, in the elevated plus maze test, modified to evaluate the adaptive form of spatial memory, MSG-treated animals of both sex had significantly prolonged start and transfer latencies. In the social recognition test, assessing olfactory working memory, MSG-treated males displayed a reduced interest in the juvenile conspecific as the stimulus partner during both the initial exposure and re-exposure performed 30 min later. In the open field test, a significant decrease in the habituation rate was found in MSG-treated animals. Sex-dependent differences in behavioral performance were suggested in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Behavioral changes are discussed in light of the deficits in perception and processing of visual and olfactory stimuli.

  5. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  6. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Setiadi, Jeffry; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review. PMID:26569328

  7. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide. PMID:16596563

  8. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  9. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h.

  10. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  11. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  12. SORPTION BEHAVIOR OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE AND AMORPHOUS PEROXOTITANATE MATERIALS UNDER WEAKLY ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Elvington, M.; Click, D.

    2009-11-11

    Inorganic, titanate-based sorbents are tested with respect to adsorption of a variety of sorbates under weakly acidic conditions (pH 3). Specifically, monosodium titanate (MST) and amorphous peroxotitanate (APT) sorption characteristics are initially probed through a screening process consisting of a pair of mixed metal solutions containing a total of 29 sorbates including alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, metalloids and nonmetals. MST and APT sorption characteristics are further analyzed individually with chromium(III) and cadmium(II) using a batch method at ambient laboratory temperature, varying concentrations of the sorbents and sorbates and contact times. Maximum sorbate loadings are obtained from the respective adsorption isotherms.

  13. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #s 46000606120, 46000722120, AND 46000808120

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-10-08

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #s 46000706120, 46000722120, and 460008081120 qualification and verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested with the exception of a few pails being marginally below the lower weight percent solids limit. These deviations from the specifications are viewed as negligible since the corresponding density of the slurries indicates no appreciable shortage of MST solids. Therefore, SRNL recommends acceptance and use of these pails.

  14. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  19. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  16. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  19. Brain neuroprotection by scavenging blood glutamate.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Gurevich, Boris; Tkachov, Sergei; Maoz, Ilana; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I

    2007-01-01

    Excess glutamate in brain fluids characterizes acute brain insults such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As blood glutamate scavenging has been demonstrated to increase the efflux of excess glutamate from brain into blood, we tested the prediction that oxaloacetate-mediated blood glutamate scavenging causes neuroprotection in a pathological situation such as closed head injury (CHI), in which there is a well established deleterious increase of glutamate in brain fluids. We observed highly significant improvements of the neurological status of rats submitted to CHI following an intravenous treatment with 1 mmol oxaloacetate/100 g rat weight which decreases blood glutamate levels by 40%. No detectable therapeutic effect was obtained when rats were treated IV with 1 mmol oxaloacetate together with 1 mmol glutamate/100 g rat. The treatment with 0.005 mmol/100 g rat oxaloacetate was no more effective than saline but when it was combined with the intravenous administration of 0.14 nmol/100 g of recombinant glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, recovery was almost complete. Oxaloacetate provided neuroprotection when administered before CHI or at 60 min post CHI but not at 120 min post CHI. Since neurological recovery from CHI was highly correlated with the decrease of blood glutamate levels (r=0.89, P=0.001), we conclude that blood glutamate scavenging affords brain neuroprotection Blood glutamate scavenging may open now new therapeutic options.

  20. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  1. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-12-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to {mu}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time ({approx}30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from {mu}M to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  2. 21 CFR 582.4521 - Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monosodium phosphate derivatives of mono- and diglycerides of edible fats or oils, or edible fat-forming fatty acids. 582.4521 Section 582.4521 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  3. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  4. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  5. Glutamate racemization and catabolism in Fusobacterium varium.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Resmer, Kelly L; White, Robert L

    2011-07-01

    The pathways of glutamate catabolism in the anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium varium, grown on complex, undefined medium and chemically defined, minimal medium, were investigated using specifically labelled (13)C-glutamate. The metabolic end-products acetate and butyrate were isolated from culture fluids and derivatized for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. On complex medium, labels from L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and L-[4-(13)C]glutamate were incorporated into C1 of acetate and equally into C1/C3 of butyrate, while label derived from L-[5-(13)C]glutamate was not incorporated. The isotopic incorporation results and the detection of glutamate mutase and 3-methylaspartate ammonia lyase in cell extracts are most consistent with the methylaspartate pathway, the best known route of glutamate catabolism in Clostridium species. When F. varium was grown on defined medium, label from L-[4-(13)C]glutamate was incorporated mainly into C4 of butyrate, demonstrating a major role for the hydroxyglutarate pathway. Upon addition of coenzyme B(12) or cobalt ion to the defined medium in replicate experiments, isotope was located equally at C1/C3 of butyrate in accord with the methylaspartate pathway. Racemization of D-glutamate and subsequent degradation of L-glutamate via the methylaspartate pathway are supported by incorporation of label into C2 of acetate and equally into C2/C4 of butyrate from D-[3-(13)C]glutamate and the detection of a cofactor-independent glutamate racemase in cell extracts. Together the results demonstrate a major role for the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate catabolism in F. varium and substantial participation of the hydroxyglutarate pathway when coenzyme B(12) is not available.

  6. Oral administration of MSG increases expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the gastrointestinal tract of young piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Yulong; Shu, Xu Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Wu, Zhenlong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    Glutamate receptors and transporters, including T1R1 and T1R3 (taste receptor 1, subtypes 1 and 3), mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), EAAC-1 (excitatory amino acid carrier-1), GLAST-1 (glutamate-aspartate transporter-1), and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1), are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. This study determined effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate [MSG; 0, 0.06, 0.5, or 1 g/kg body weight (BW)/day] for 21 days on expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the stomach and jejunum of sow-reared piglets. Both mRNA and protein levels for gastric T1R1, T1R3, mGluR1, mGluR4, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 and mRNA levels for jejunal T1R1, T1R3, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3 and EAAT4 were increased (P < 0.05) by MSG supplementation. Among all groups, mRNA levels for gastric EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 were highest (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day. EAAT1 and EAAT2 mRNA levels in the stomach and jejunum of piglets receiving 0.5 g MSG/kg BW/day, as well as jejunal EAAT3 and EAAT4 mRNA levels in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day, were higher (P < 0.05) than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Furthermore, protein levels for jejunal T1R1 and EAAT3 were higher (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Collectively, these findings indicate that dietary MSG may beneficially stimulate glutamate signaling and sensing in the stomach and jejunum of young pigs, as well as their gastrointestinal function.

  7. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in adipocyte is Cys-specific and affected by obesity.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Viana, Luciana Godoy; Yamanouye, Norma; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-08-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP, EC 3.4.11.3) in adipocytes is well known to traffic between high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal fractions toward the plasma membrane (MF) under stimulation by insulin. However, its catalytic preference for aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Leu or Cys is controversial. Furthermore, possible changes in its traffic under metabolic challenges are unknown. The present study investigated the catalytic activity attributable to EC 3.4.11.3 in HDM, LDM and MF from isolated adipocytes of healthy (C), food deprived (FD) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats on aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Cys or Leu, in absence or presence of insulin. Efficacy and reproducibility of subcellular adipocyte fractionation procedure were demonstrated. Comparison among HDM vs LDM vs MF intragroup revealed that hydrolytic activity trafficking from LDM to MF under influence of insulin in C, MSG and FD is only on N-terminal Cys. In MSG the same pattern of anterograde traffic and aminoacyl preference occurred independently of insulin stimulation. The pathophysiological significance of IRAP in adipocytes seems to be linked to comprehensive energy metabolism related roles of endogenous substrates with N-terminal cysteine pair such as vasopressin and oxytocin.

  8. Chronic effects of arsenic on American red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed to monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) herbicide

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.M. ); Flagge, C.T. )

    1990-07-01

    Bioaccumulative and biomagnifying effects of arsenic on crayfish have been reported. However, no work has been done on the chronic effects of this heavy metal on crayfish populations. There is a great concern for MSMA (Monosodium Methanearsonate) herbicide in the vicinity of natural waters due to its high water solubility and bioaccumulative potential. American red crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) account for 98% of the annual crayfish harvest in North America. Those pesticides which have greater water solubility (i.e. MSMA) than other less soluble compounds may cause higher mortalities of aquatic organisms, or cause adverse chronic effects if the non-target animals are sublethally exposed. This work was conducted in the laboratory to assess the possible chronic effects of arsenic on crayfish.

  9. Arsenic levels in blood, urine, and hair of workers applying monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelghani, A.A.; Anderson, A.C.; Jaghabir, M.; Mather, F.

    1986-05-01

    Uptake and excretion of total arsenic from monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) in workers who applied the herbicide was followed during the spraying season. Urine, blood, and hair samples were collected and air samples were taken from the workers' breathing zone. Arsenic concentrations in air samples ranged from 0.001-1.086 micrograms/m3. Blood and urine arsenic values ranged from 0.0-0.2 mg/L and 0.002-1.725 mg/L, respectively. The geometric mean arsenic concentration in urine increased during the week but returned to base levels on weekends. Hair arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.02-358.0 mg/kg, increased during the spraying season, and returned to pre-season levels once herbicide application ceased. Three workers had higher than normal pre-exposure hair values. However, only one of the three workers had consistently above normal values throughout the study period.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE - AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; Missimer, D.

    2010-12-21

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. An inorganic sorbent, monosodium titanate (MST), is currently used to remove {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides, while a caustic-side solvent extraction process is used for removing {sup 134,137}Cs. A new peroxotitanate material, modified MST, or mMST, has recently been developed and has shown increased removal kinetics and capacity for {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the current baseline material, MST. This paper describes recent results focused on further characterization of this material.

  11. The glutamate homeostasis hypothesis of addiction.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    Addiction is associated with neuroplasticity in the corticostriatal brain circuitry that is important for guiding adaptive behaviour. The hierarchy of corticostriatal information processing that normally permits the prefrontal cortex to regulate reinforcement-seeking behaviours is impaired by chronic drug use. A failure of the prefrontal cortex to control drug-seeking behaviours can be linked to an enduring imbalance between synaptic and non-synaptic glutamate, termed glutamate homeostasis. The imbalance in glutamate homeostasis engenders changes in neuroplasticity that impair communication between the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens. Some of these pathological changes are amenable to new glutamate- and neuroplasticity-based pharmacotherapies for treating addiction. PMID:19571793

  12. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  13. Scavenging of blood glutamate for enhancing brain-to-blood glutamate efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Qi, Qi; Wang, Le; Luo, Lan; Yang, Shaoqi; Zhang, Yumei; Miao, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Weidong; Wang, Zhenhai; Shen, Ying; Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of excess glutamate in the brain interstitial fluid characterizes several acute pathological conditions of the brain, including traumatic brain injury and stroke. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to eliminate excess glutamate in the brain by decreasing blood glutamate levels and, accordingly, accelerating the brain-to-blood glutamate efflux. It is feasible to accomplish this process by activating blood resident enzymes in the presence of the respective glutamate cosubstrates. In the present study, several glutamate cosubstrates and cofactors were studied in an attempt to identify the optimal conditions to reduce blood glutamate levels. The administration of a mixture of 1 mM pyruvate and oxaloacetate (Pyr/Oxa) for 1 h decreased blood glutamate levels by ≤50%. The addition of lipoamide to this mixture resulted in a further reduction in blood glutamate levels of >80%. In addition, in vivo experiments showed that lipoamide together with Pyr/Oxa is able to decrease blood glutamate levels to a greater extent than Pyr/Oxa alone, and accordingly, this enhances the glutamate efflux from the brain to the blood. These results may outline a novel neuroprotective strategy with increased effectiveness for the removal of excess brain glutamate in various neurodegenerative conditions.

  14. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  15. Novel flavours paired with glutamate condition increased intake in older adults in the absence of changes in liking.

    PubMed

    Dermiki, Maria; Prescott, John; Sargent, Laura J; Willway, Joanne; Gosney, Margot A; Methven, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Previous research on the repeat exposure to a novel flavour combined with monosodium glutamate (MSG) has shown an increase in liking and consumption for the particular flavour. The aim of the current work was to investigate whether this could also be observed in the case of older people, since they are most affected by undernutrition in the developed world and ways to increase consumption of food are of significant importance for this particular age group. For this study, 40 older adults (age 65-88) repeatedly consumed potato soup with two novel flavours (lemongrass and cumin) which were either with or without a high level of MSG (5% w/w). A randomized single blind within-subject design was implemented, where each participant was exposed to both soup flavours three times over 6 days, with one of the soup flavours containing MSG. After three repeat exposures, consumption increased significantly for the soups where the flavours had contained MSG during the repeated exposure (mean weight consumed increased from 123 to 164 g, p = 0.017), implying that glutamate conditioned for increased wanting and consumption, despite the fact that the liking for the soup had not increased.

  16. Conversion of agroindustrial residues for high poly(γ-glutamic acid) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 via solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bao; Xu, Hong; Xu, Zongqi; Xu, Cen; Xu, Zheng; Lei, Peng; Qiu, Yibin; Liang, Jinfeng; Feng, Xiaohai

    2015-04-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 was carried out through solid-state fermentation with dry mushroom residues (DMR) and monosodium glutamate production residues (MGPR; a substitute of glutamate) for the first time. Dry shiitake mushroom residue (DSMR) was found to be the most suitable solid substrate among these DMRs; the optimal DSMR-to-MGPR ratio was optimized as 12:8. To increase γ-PGA production, industrial waste glycerol was added as a carbon source supplement to the solid-state medium. As a result, γ-PGA production increased by 34.8%. The batch fermentation obtained an outcome of 115.6 g kg(-1) γ-PGA and 39.5×10(8) colony forming units g(-1) cells. Furthermore, a satisfactory yield of 107.7 g kg(-1) γ-PGA was achieved by compost experiment on a scale of 50 kg in open air, indicating that economically large-scale γ-PGA production was feasible. Therefore, this study provided a novel method to produce γ-PGA from abundant and low-cost agroindustrial residues.

  17. Effect of insulin on muscle glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T. T.; Brennan, M. F.; Müller, W. A.; Moore, F. D.; Cahill, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    For decades, investigators concerned with protein metabolism in man have performed detailed amino acid analyses of human plasma obtained under a wide range of experimental situations. A large body of information has been used to calculated rates of protein synthesis and proteolysis. During the course of an investigation of the effect of intrabrachial artery infusion of insulin (70 μU/min per kg body weight) on glutamate uptake by human forearm muscle, it was discovered that plasma arterio-deep venous glutamate difference analysis failed to document any increase in the uptake of this amino acid, suggesting that insulin had little influence on glutamate uptake by muscle. However, whole blood glutamate analyses, performed on the same blood samples, revealed that (a) the resting muscle uptake of glutamate is smaller than previously reported and (b) insulin is capable of markedly increasing glutamate uptake by muscle from whole blood. Since the hematocrit was obtained on all samples, detailed analyses of the various compartments in which glutamate could be found were performed. It was determined that circulating blood cells have a dynamic role in glutamate transport. These data underscore the need for both whole blood and plasma amino acid analysis in investigations concerned with protein synthesis and/or amino acid flux, for analysis of plasma samples alone could be misleading as illustrated in the present study. Images PMID:5080414

  18. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. PMID:27422519

  19. Glutamate Transporter-Mediated Glutamate Secretion in the Mammalian Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Uehara, Shunsuke; Muroyama, Akiko; Hille, Bertil; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Koh, Duk-Su

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are expressed throughout the central nervous system where their major role is to clear released glutamate from presynaptic terminals. Here we report a novel function of the transporter in rat pinealocytes. This electrogenic transporter conducted inward current in response to L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate and depolarized the membrane in patch clamp experiments. Ca2+ imaging demonstrated that the transporter-mediated depolarization induced a significant Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ rise finally evoked glutamate exocytosis as detected by carbon-fiber amperometry and by high-performance liquid chromatography. In pineal slices with densely packed pinealocytes, glutamate released from the cells effectively activated glutamate transporters in neighboring cells. The Ca2+ signal generated by KCl depolarization or acetylcholine propagated through several cell layers by virtue of the regenerative ‘glutamate-induced glutamate release’. Therefore we suggest that glutamate transporters mediate synchronized elevation of L-glutamate and thereby efficiently down-regulate melatonin secretion via previously identified inhibitory metabotropic glutamate receptors in the pineal gland. PMID:18945893

  20. Glutamate-based antidepressants: preclinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-06-15

    Over the past 20 years, converging lines of evidence have both linked glutamatergic dysfunction to the pathophysiology of depression and demonstrated that the glutamatergic synapse presents multiple targets for developing novel antidepressants. The robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists ketamine and traxoprodil provide target validation for this family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This article reviews the preclinical evidence that it may be possible to develop glutamate-based antidepressants by not only modulating ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, including mGlu2/3, mGLu5 and mGlu7 receptors, but also by altering synaptic concentrations of glutamate via specialized transporters such as glial glutamate transporter 1 (excitatory amino-acid transporter 2).

  1. Monosodium glutamate-induced arcuate nucleus damage affects both natural torpor and 2DG-induced torpor-like hypothermia in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Kimberly M; Routman, David; Driscoll, Joseph R; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Dark, John

    2008-01-01

    Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) have the ability to express daily torpor and decrease their body temperature to approximately 15 degrees C, providing a significant savings in energy expenditure. Daily torpor in hamsters is cued by winterlike photoperiods and occurs coincident with the annual nadirs in body fat reserves and chronic leptin concentrations. To better understand the neural mechanisms underlying torpor, Siberian hamster pups were postnatally treated with saline or MSG to ablate arcuate nucleus neurons that likely possess leptin receptors. Body temperature was studied telemetrically in cold-acclimated (10 degrees C) male and female hamsters moved to a winterlike photoperiod (10:14-h light-dark cycle) (experiments 1 and 2) or that remained in a summerlike photoperiod (14:10-h light-dark cycle) (experiment 3). In experiment 1, even though other photoperiodic responses persisted, MSG-induced arcuate nucleus ablations prevented the photoperiod-dependent torpor observed in saline-treated Siberian hamsters. MSG-treated hamsters tended to possess greater fat reserves. To determine whether reductions in body fat would increase frequency of photoperiod-induced torpor after MSG treatment, hamsters underwent 2 wk of food restriction (70% of ad libitum) in experiment 2. Although food restriction did increase the frequency of torpor in both MSG- and saline-treated hamsters, it failed to normalize the proportion of MSG-treated hamsters undergoing photoperiod-dependent torpor. In experiment 3, postnatal MSG treatments reduced the proportion of hamsters entering 2DG-induced torpor-like hypothermia by approximately 50% compared with saline-treated hamsters (38 vs. 72%). In those MSG-treated hamsters that did become hypothermic, their minimum temperature during hypothermia was significantly greater than comparable saline-treated hamsters. We conclude that 1) arcuate nucleus mechanisms mediate photoperiod-induced torpor, 2) food-restriction-induced torpor may also be reduced by MSG treatments, and 3) arcuate nucleus neurons make an important, albeit partial, contribution to 2DG-induced torpor-like hypothermia.

  2. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  3. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Kim, Junesun; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  4. Effect of monosodium methanarsonate application on cuticle wax content of cocklebur and cotton plants.

    PubMed

    Keese, Renee J; Camper, N Dwight

    2006-01-01

    Leaf cuticle waxes were extracted from monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA)-resistant (R) and -susceptible (S) common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) plants at 0, 3, 5, and 7 days after treatment (DAT) following 1x and 2x MSMA applications. Wax constituents were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection and compared to alkane and alcohol standards of carbon lengths varying from C21 to C30. Differences in waxes were calculated and reported as change per ng mm2-1. Tricosane (C23) was found to increase following MSMA applications. All other alkanes decreased by 7 DAT, with some showing a linear effect over time in the R-cocklebur. Alcohol constituents were also observed to decrease by 7 DAT. Total arsenic in the extracted wax fraction was determined, with greatest quantities detected in the R-cocklebur. Wax changes are not believed to play a role in cotton tolerance, since changes in cuticle concentrations were minimal. Cocklebur resistance to MSMA is not due to cuticle constituents; the wax changes are a secondary effect in response to herbicide application. PMID:16893783

  5. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  6. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  7. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  8. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    FEATHERSTONE, DAVID E.; SHIPPY, SCOTT A.

    2008-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μM of glutamate is high enough to cause constitutive desensitization of most glutamate receptors. Therefore, most glutamate receptors in vivo may be constitutively desensitized, and ambient extracellular glutamate and receptor desensitization may be potent but generally unrecognized regulators of synaptic transmission. Unfortunately, the mechanisms regulating ambient extracellular glutamate and glutamate receptor desensitization remain poorly understood and understudied. PMID:17947494

  9. Construction of a potentiometric glutamate biosensor for determination of glutamate in some real samples.

    PubMed

    Y Lmaz, Demet; Karaku, Emine

    2011-12-01

    The potentiometric glutamate biosensor based on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode was constructed by chemically immobilizing glutamate oxidase. Ammonium ions produced after an enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. We determined the optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range, kinetic constants (K(m) and V(max)) of glutamate oxidase enzyme used for biosensor construction values, and other response characteristics. Additionally, glutamate assay in some real samples such as chicken bullion, healthy human serum, and commercial multipower amino acid mixture were also successfully carried out. The results showed good agreement with previously reported values.

  10. Brain glutamate decarboxylase and pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Choi, S Y; Khemlani, L S; Churchich, J E

    1992-01-01

    Porcine brain glutamate decarboxylase was examined for the presence of covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). HPLC analysis of pure glutamate decarboxylase subjected to the hexanol extraction procedure gave negative results when monitored at 320 nm, the maximum of absorbance of 4-hydroxy-5-hexoxy-PQQ. Resolved glutamate decarboxylase exhibits a structureless absorption band at wavelengths longer than 300 nm which cannot be attributed to PQQ. The holoenzyme is not a pyridoxal-quinoprotein; its catalytic mechanism involves the participation of only one cofactor, i.e. pyridoxal-5-P. Free PQQ is a strong inhibitor of the decarboxylase (Ki = 13 microM) and the reaction with the protein results in spectral changes resembling those of polylysine treated with PQQ. If the concentration of free PQQ in some regions of the brain reaches the micromolar level, then PQQ might play a role in the regulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity.

  11. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  12. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  13. [Glutamate transporter dysfunction and major mental illnesses].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohichi

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and plays an important role in most aspects of normal brain function. In spite of its importance as a neurotransmitter, excess glutamate is toxic to neurons. Clearance of extracellular glutamate is critical for maintenance of low extracellular glutamate concentration, and occurs in large part through the activity of GLT1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1), which are primarily expressed by astrocytes. Rare variants and down-regulation of GLT1 and GLAST, in psychiatric disorders have been reported. In this review, we demonstrate that various kinds of GLT1 and/or GLAST knockout mice replicate many aspects of the behavioral abnormalities seen in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, obsessive -compulsive disorders, autism, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:26793898

  14. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  15. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  16. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  17. Medroxyprogesterone acetate exacerbates glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon; Morales, Alison; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2006-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone functions as a neuroprotective agent whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; Provera) does not. Moreover, MPA antagonized the neuroprotective and neurotrophic outcomes induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). Towards developing effective hormone therapies for protection against neurodegeneration, we sought to determine whether formulation, chemical features or prevention versus treatment mode of exposure affected the outcome of MPA treatment in survival of primary hippocampal neurons. Results of these analyses indicated that both crystalline MPA and a pharmaceutical formulation (Depo-Provera) lacked neuroprotective efficacy, indicating that the effects were not dependent upon MPA formulation. Likewise, MPA in the prevention and treatment paradigms were equally ineffective at promoting neuronal survival, indicating that timing of MPA administration was not a factor. Further, the detrimental effects of MPA were not due to the presence of the acetate group, as medroxyprogesterone was as ineffective as MPA in promoting neuronal survival. Moreover, MPA pretreatment exacerbated neuron death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity as indicated by a 40% increase in neuron death determined by direct live/dead cell count and a commensurate increase in the number of positive cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling. Collectively these results predict that the progestin formulation of hormone therapy will affect the vulnerability of the central nervous system to degenerative insults.

  18. RADIUM AND THORIUM SORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE (MST) AND MODIFIED MST (mMST)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-02-15

    A series of tests were planned to examine the removal of Ra and Th by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST). Simulated waste solutions were prepared containing Ra and Th, along with Sr, Np, Pu, and U. Following simulant preparation the simulants were filtered through 0.45-m filters. Analysis of the simulants indicated no Th in the filtered solution. This is due to the very low solubility of Th in alkaline solutions. Based on the reported detection limits for {sup 228}Th by gamma analyses, the solubility of Th in the simulant solutions is < 3.0E-10 g/L or < 1.3E-12 M. Therefore, data could not be obtained regarding the removal of Th by MST and mMST; however, testing proceeded to examine the removal of Ra. Sorption testing indicated that Ra, like Sr, is very rapidly removed from solution by both MST and mMST. The Ra concentration in solution fell below the method detection limit (MDL) within 30 minutes of contact with MST, and within 2 hours of contact with mMST, when tested at 25 C using a 5.6 M Na simulant. Additional testing examined the effects of ionic strength and temperature on the MST and mMST performance. Results from these tests showed that the majority of samples still reached a Ra concentration below the MDL, indicating excellent removal. For the highest ionic strength solution (6.6 M Na), there did appear to be a slight decrease in the Ra removal by mMST, as indicated by a larger number of samples just above the MDL. The effect of temperature on {sup 226}Ra removal is indeterminate for either MST or mMST in the temperature range (25-60 C) and concentrations studied since the final soluble concentration of Ra remained at or below the detection limits for all tests. Desorption testing was also performed using decontaminated salt solution (DSS) diluted to sodium concentrations of 2 M and 0.5 M, to represent the intermediate and final stages of washing. Results from these tests indicated no desorption of any sorbents, with the

  19. Arsenic Retention in Foliage and Soil after Monosodium Methyl Arsenate (MSMA) Application to Turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Matteson, Audrey R; Gannon, Travis W; Jeffries, Matthew D; Haines, Stephanie; Lewis, Dustin F; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2014-01-01

    Monosodium methyl arsenate (MSMA) is a commonly used herbicide for weed control in turfgrass systems. There is concern that arsenic from applied MSMA could leach to groundwater or run off into surface water, thereby threatening human and ecosystem health. The USEPA has proposed a phase-out of the herbicide but is seeking additional research about the toxicity and environmental impacts of MSMA before establishing a final ruling. Little research has systematically investigated MSMA in field-based settings; instead, risks have been inferred from isolated field measurements or model-system studies. Accordingly, the overall goal of this study was to quantify the fate of arsenic after MSMA application to a managed turfgrass system. After MSMA application to turfgrass-covered and bareground lysimeters, the majority of arsenic was retained in turfgrass foliage and soils throughout year-long experiments, with 50 to 101% of the applied arsenic recovered in turfgrass systems and 55 to 66% recovered in bareground systems. Dissolved arsenic concentrations from 76.2-cm-depth pore water in the MSMA-treated soils were consistently <2 μg L, indistinguishable from background concentrations. As measured by adsorption isotherm experiments, MSMA retention by the sandy soil from our field site was markedly less than retention by a washed sand and a clay loam. Collectively, these results suggest that under aerobic conditions, minimal arsenic leaching to groundwater would occur after a typical application of MSMA to turfgrass. However, repeated MSMA application may pose environmental risks. Additional work is needed to examine arsenic cycling near the soil surface and to define arsenic speciation changes under different soil conditions. PMID:25602572

  20. Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Denis J; Gannon, Travis W; Jeffries, Matthew D; Matteson, Audrey R; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2015-03-01

    Monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) is an organic arsenical herbicide currently utilized in turfgrass and cotton systems. In recent years, concerns over adverse impacts of arsenic (As) from MSMA applications have emerged; however, little research has been conducted in controlled field experiments using typical management practices. To address this knowledge gap, a field lysimeter experiment was conducted during 2012-2013 to determine the fate of As following MSMA applications to a bareground and an established turfgrass system. Arsenic concentrations in soil, porewater, and aboveground vegetation, were measured through one yr after treatment. Aboveground vegetation As concentration was increased compared to nontreated through 120 d after initial treatment (DAIT). In both systems, increased soil As concentrations were observed at 0-4 cm at 30 and 120 DAIT and 0-8 cm at 60 and 365 DAIT, suggesting that As was bound in shallow soil depths. Porewater As concentrations in MSMA-treated lysimeters from a 30-cm depth (22.0-83.8 μg L(-1)) were greater than those at 76-cm depth (0.4-5.1 μg L(-1)). These results were combined with previous research to devise management considerations in systems where MSMA is utilized. MSMA should not be applied if rainfall is forecasted within 7 DAIT and/or in areas with shallow water tables. Further, disposing of MSMA-treated turfgrass aboveground vegetation in a confined area - a common management practice for turfgrass clippings - may be of concern due to As release to surface water or groundwater as the vegetation decomposes. Finally, long-term MSMA use may cause soil As accumulation and thus downward migration of As over time; therefore, MSMA should be used in rotation with other herbicides.

  1. Management considerations to minimize environmental impacts of arsenic following monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) applications to turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Denis J; Gannon, Travis W; Jeffries, Matthew D; Matteson, Audrey R; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2015-03-01

    Monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA) is an organic arsenical herbicide currently utilized in turfgrass and cotton systems. In recent years, concerns over adverse impacts of arsenic (As) from MSMA applications have emerged; however, little research has been conducted in controlled field experiments using typical management practices. To address this knowledge gap, a field lysimeter experiment was conducted during 2012-2013 to determine the fate of As following MSMA applications to a bareground and an established turfgrass system. Arsenic concentrations in soil, porewater, and aboveground vegetation, were measured through one yr after treatment. Aboveground vegetation As concentration was increased compared to nontreated through 120 d after initial treatment (DAIT). In both systems, increased soil As concentrations were observed at 0-4 cm at 30 and 120 DAIT and 0-8 cm at 60 and 365 DAIT, suggesting that As was bound in shallow soil depths. Porewater As concentrations in MSMA-treated lysimeters from a 30-cm depth (22.0-83.8 μg L(-1)) were greater than those at 76-cm depth (0.4-5.1 μg L(-1)). These results were combined with previous research to devise management considerations in systems where MSMA is utilized. MSMA should not be applied if rainfall is forecasted within 7 DAIT and/or in areas with shallow water tables. Further, disposing of MSMA-treated turfgrass aboveground vegetation in a confined area - a common management practice for turfgrass clippings - may be of concern due to As release to surface water or groundwater as the vegetation decomposes. Finally, long-term MSMA use may cause soil As accumulation and thus downward migration of As over time; therefore, MSMA should be used in rotation with other herbicides. PMID:25556868

  2. Doliroside A attenuates monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation by targeting NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Han; Hu, Chao; Xie, Jinbo; Yang, Chao; Zhao, Yue; Guo, Yaqi; Mei, Zhinan; Chen, Lvyi; Lan, Zhou

    2014-10-01

    Our previous study demonstrates that Dolichos falcata Klein (DF) ameliorates the gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, and one of the active components, doliroside A, contributed to the anti-gouty arthritis effect of DF according to the in vitro study. However, there is still little known about the potential beneficial effects and possible mechanism of action of doliroside A on gouty arthritis. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism of action of doliroside A in vitro and the anti-inflammatory effects of doliroside A in vivo. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages were treated with doliroside A before or after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and then stimulated with MSU crystals, nigericin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The expressions of proteins related to activation of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome were analyzed. The results manifested that doliroside A (15, 30, 45 and 60 μM) suppressed both LPS-induced priming and inflammasome activation in macrophages. Moreover, doliroside A was administered to the rats treated by MSU crystals. The results demonstrated that doliroside A (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) ameliorated the symptoms of gouty arthritis, decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and inhibited the expressions of caspase-1 and pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) proteins in MSU crystals-treated rats. These findings indicate that doliroside A exhibits a prominent effect on ameliorating gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals. The action of doliroside A on gouty arthritis exerts via inhibiting the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1β secretion by affecting both LPS-induced priming and inflammasome activation.

  3. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Attenuates Monosodium Urate-induced Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Tae-Jin; Dan, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Young-Je

    2011-01-01

    The present study elucidated the effect of the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine (L-NIL) on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet. L-NIL (5 or 10 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally 4 h before injection of MSU (4 mg) into the soles of mice hindlimb feet. Twenty-four hours after MSU injection, foot thickness was increased by 160% and L-NIL pretreatment reduced food pad swelling in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of 10 mg/kg/day L-NIL significantly suppressed the foot pad swelling by MSU. Plasma level of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites and gene expression and protein level of iNOS in feet were increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. Similar pattern of change was observed in nitrotyrosine level. MSU increased the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and L-NIL pretreatment suppressed MSU-induced cytokines expression. The mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase1 were increased by MSU and L-NIL pretreatment normalized the gene expression. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 was increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. The mRNA levels of iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-1β were increased by MSU in human dermal fibroblasts, C2C12 myoblasts, and human fetal osteoblasts in vitro, which was attenuated by L-NIL in a dose dependent manner. This study shows that L-NIL inhibits MSU-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet suggesting that iNOS might be involved in MSU-induced inflammation. PMID:22359474

  4. Bonding the foe - NETting neutrophils immobilize the pro-inflammatory monosodium urate crystals.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Christine; Janko, Christina; Krenn, Veit; Zhao, Yi; Munoz, Luis E; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the presence of sodium, uric acid from purine metabolism precipitates as monosodium urate (MSU) needles and forms renal calculi or causes gouty arthritis in kidneys and joints, respectively. The latter is characterized by red, hot, and swollen arthritic joints. Here we report the in vitro effect of MSU crystals on blood granulocytes and analyze their contribution to granuloma formation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation (NETosis) in synovial fluid of patients with gouty arthritis in vivo. We observed that MSU crystals induce NETosis in vitro in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. Indeed, blocking ROS (e.g., the oxidative burst) by various anti-oxidants partially inhibited NETosis induced by MSU crystals. Analyses of synovial fluids and of tissue sections of patients suffering from gout revealed that NETs are also formed in vivo, especially during acute gouty flares and/or granuloma formation. Since prolonged exposure to NETs carries the risk for the development of chronic inflammation we also studied the opsonization of NETs, as a prerequisite for their clearance. The established dead cells' opsonins C3b, galectin-9, and CRP decorated the residual dead cells' corpses and opsonized these for disposal. Surprisingly, all three soluble pattern recognizing molecules spared the spread NET structures. We conclude that (i) MSU crystals are strong inducers of ROS-dependent NETosis and (ii) that the prolonged presence of NET-pathogen or NET-crystal aggregates observed in patients with systemic autoimmunity, especially in those with low serum DNase-1 activity, cannot be compensated by CRP, complement, and galectin-mediated phagocytic clearance.

  5. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  6. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  7. In vitro biological response of micro- and nano-sized monosodium titanates and titanate-metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Drury, Jeanie L; Jang, Yoonji; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M L; Elvington, Mark; Hobbs, David T; Wataha, John C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies report that microsized monosodium titanates (MSTs) deliver metal ions and species to mammalian cells and bacteria with cell-specific and metal-specific effects. In this study, we explored the use of MST and a new synthesized nanosized monosodium titanate (nMST) to deliver gold(III), cisplatin, or platinum(IV) to two human cell lines with different population doubling times, in vitro. The effect was measured using a fluorescent mitochondrial activity assay (CellTiter-Blue(®) Assay). This fluorescence assay was implemented to mitigate optical density measurement errors owing to particulate titanate interference and allowed for the studies to be extended to higher titanate concentrations than previously possible. Overall, native MST significantly (p < 0.05) decreased mitochondrial activity of both cell types by 50% at concentrations of >50 mg/L. Native nMST significantly suppressed the rapidly dividing cell line (by 50%) over untreated cultures, but had no effect on the more slowly dividing cells. For both cell types, increased titanate concentrations resulted in increased effects from delivered metals. However, there was no difference in the effect of metal delivered from micro- versus nano-sized MST.

  8. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  9. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  10. Mood disorders: regulation by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nowak, Gabriel; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2008-03-01

    Medicinal therapies for mood disorders neither fully serve the efficacy needs of patients nor are they free of side-effect issues. Although monoamine-based therapies are the primary current treatment approaches, both preclinical and clinical findings have implicated the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders. The present commentary focuses on the metabotropic glutamate receptors and their relationship to mood disorders. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors regulate glutamate transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter and/or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Convergent biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and clinical data will be reviewed that establish glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors as a biologically relevant process in the regulation of mood and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. Specifically, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3, and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MGS0039, MPEP, MTEP) exhibit biochemical effects indicative of antidepressant effects as well as in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical data have previously been presented to define NMDA and AMPA receptors as important targets for the modulation of major depression. In the present review, we present a model suggesting how the interplay of glutamate at the mGlu and at the ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors might account for the antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic- and monoaminergic-based drugs affecting mood in patients. The current data lead to the hypothesis that mGlu-based compounds and conventional antidepressants impact a network of interactive effects that converge upon a down regulation of NMDA receptor function and an enhancement in AMPA receptor signaling. PMID:18164691

  11. Sorption Modeling of Strontium, Plutonium, Uranium and Neptunium Adsorption on Monosodium Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2003-10-30

    We examined the ability of various equilibrium isotherms to replicate the available data for the adsorption of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), uranium (U) and neptunium (Np) on monosodium titanate (MST) during the treatment of simulated and actual Savannah River Site high-level waste. The analysis considered 29 isotherm models from the literature. As part of this study, we developed a general method for selecting the best isotherm models. The selection criteria for rating the isotherms considered the relative error in predicting the experimental data, the complexity of the mathematical expressions, the thermodynamic validity of the expressions, and statistical significance for the expressions. The Fowler Guggenheim-Jovanovic Freundlich (FG-JF), the Fowler Guggenheim-Langmuir Freundlich (FG-LF) and the Dubinin-Astashov (DA) models each reliably predicted the actinide and strontium adsorption on MST. The first two models describe the adsorption process by single layer formation and later al interactions between adsorbed sorbates while the Dubinin-Astashov model assumes volume filling of micropores (by osmotic pressure difference). These two mechanisms include mutually exclusive assumptions. However, we can not determine which model best represents the various adsorption mechanisms on MST. Based on our analysis, the DA model predicted the data well. The DA model assumes that an initial sorption layer forms after which networking begins in the pore spaces, filling the volume by a second mechanism. If this mechanism occurs in MST, as the experimental data suggests, then we expect all the empty and closed spaces of MST to contain actinides and strontium when saturated. Prior microstructure analyses determined that the MST surface is best described as heterogeneous (i.e., a semi-crystalline outer layer on an amorphous core) or composite material for adsorption. Therefore, we expect the empty spaces (of nanometer size) between the crystalline units in the fibrous material

  12. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these

  13. Neural correlates of hyperalgesia in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Abaei, Maryam; Sagar, Devi R; Stockley, Elizabeth G; Spicer, Clare H; Prior, Malcolm; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms driving osteoarthritic pain remain poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence for a role of the central nervous system in the chronification of pain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of a model of unilateral knee osteoarthritis on nociceptive processing. Results Four to five weeks post intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 1 mg) into the left knee, Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural response to a noxious stimulus (intra-articular capsaicin injection). In a two-arm cross-over design, 5 µM/50 µl capsaicin was injected into either the left knee (n = 8, CAPS-MIA) or right control knee (n = 8, CAPS-CON), preceded by contralateral vehicle (SAL) injection. To assess neural correlates of mechanical hyperalgesia, hindpaws were stimulated with von Frey hairs (8 g: MIA; 15 g: control knee, based on behavioral withdrawal responses). The CAPS-MIA group exhibited significant activation of the periaqueductal gray, unilateral thalamus and bilateral mensencephalon, superior-colliculus, and hippocampus, with no significant activation in the other groups/conditions. Capsaicin injection increased functional connectivity in the mid-brain network and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and globus pallidus, which was significantly stronger in CAPS-MIA compared to CAPS-CON groups. Mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic (ipsilateral to MIA knee) and normalgesic (contralateral) hindpaws evoked qualitatively different brain activation with more widespread brainstem and anterior cingulate (ACC) activation when stimulating the hyperalgesic paw, and clearer frontal sensory activation from the normalgesic paw. Conclusions We provide evidence for modulation of nociceptive processing in a chronic knee osteoarthritis pain model with stronger brain activation and alteration of brain networks

  14. Exposure to enriched environment decreases neurobehavioral deficits induced by neonatal glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabor; Reglodi, Dora; Vadasz, Gyongyver; Farkas, Jozsef; Kiss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is a popular strategy to enhance motor and cognitive performance and to counteract the effects of various harmful stimuli. The protective effects of enriched environment have been shown in traumatic, ischemic and toxic nervous system lesions. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly used taste enhancer causing excitotoxic effects when given in newborn animals. We have previously demonstrated that MSG leads to a delay in neurobehavioral development, as shown by the delayed appearance of neurological reflexes and maturation of motor coordination. In the present study we aimed at investigating whether environmental enrichment is able to decrease the neurobehavioral delay caused by neonatal MSG treatment. Newborn pups were treated with MSG subcutaneously on postnatal days 1, 5 and 9. For environmental enrichment, we placed rats in larger cages, supplemented with different toys that were altered daily. Normal control and enriched control rats received saline treatment only. Physical parameters such as weight, day of eye opening, incisor eruption and ear unfolding were recorded. Animals were observed for appearance of reflexes such as negative geotaxis, righting reflexes, fore- and hindlimb grasp, fore- and hindlimb placing, sensory reflexes and gait. In cases of negative geotaxis, surface righting and gait, the time to perform the reflex was also recorded daily. For examining motor coordination, we performed grid walking, footfault, rope suspension, rota-rod, inclined board and walk initiation tests. We found that enriched environment alone did not lead to marked alterations in the course of development. On the other hand, MSG treatment caused a slight delay in reflex development and a pronounced delay in weight gain and motor coordination maturation. This delay in most signs and tests could be reversed by enriched environment: MSG-treated pups kept under enriched conditions showed no weight retardation, no reflex delay in some signs and

  15. Luminal l-glutamate enhances duodenal mucosal defense mechanisms via multiple glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chikako; Mizumori, Misa; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Presence of taste receptor families in the gastrointestinal mucosa suggests a physiological basis for local and early detection of a meal. We hypothesized that luminal l-glutamate, which is the primary nutrient conferring fundamental umami or proteinaceous taste, influences mucosal defense mechanisms in rat duodenum. We perfused the duodenal mucosa of anesthetized rats with l-glutamate (0.1–10 mM). Intracellular pH (pHi) of the epithelial cells, blood flow, and mucus gel thickness (MGT) were simultaneously and continuously measured in vivo. Some rats were pretreated with indomethacin or capsaicin. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) was measured with flow-through pH and CO2 electrodes. We tested the effects of agonists or antagonists for metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 or 4 or calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on defense factors. Luminal l-glutamate dose dependently increased pHi and MGT but had no effect on blood flow in the duodenum. l-glutamate (10 mM)-induced cellular alkalinization and mucus secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with indomethacin or capsaicin. l-glutamate effects on pHi and MGT were mimicked by mGluR4 agonists and inhibited by an mGluR4 antagonist. CaSR agonists acidified cells with increased MGT and DBS, unlike l-glutamate. Perfusion of l-glutamate with inosinate (inosine 5′-monophosphate, 0.1 mM) enhanced DBS only in combination, suggesting synergistic activation of the l-glutamate receptor, typical of taste receptor type 1. l-leucine or l-aspartate had similar effects on DBS without any effect on pHi and MGT. Preperfusion of l-glutamate prevented acid-induced cellular injury, suggesting that l-glutamate protects the mucosa by enhancing mucosal defenses. Luminal l-glutamate may activate multiple receptors and afferent nerves and locally enhance mucosal defenses to prevent subsequent injury attributable to acid exposure in the duodenum. PMID:19643955

  16. Extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate scavenging: a novel therapeutic modality.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Agzam; Boyko, Matthew; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Brotfain, Evgeny; Bilotta, Federico; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Pathologically elevated glutamate concentrations in the brain's extracellular fluid are associated with several acute and chronic brain insults. Studies have demonstrated that by decreasing the concentration of glutamate in the blood, thereby increasing the concentration gradient between the brain and the blood, the rate of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux can be increased. Blood glutamate scavengers, pyruvate and oxaloacetate have shown great promise in providing neuroprotection in many animal models of acute brain insults. However, glutamate scavengers' potential systemic toxicity, side effects and pharmacokinetic properties may limit their use in clinical practice. In contrast, extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate reduction, in which glutamate is filtered from the blood and eliminated, may be an advantageous adjunct in treating acute brain insults. Here, we review the current evidence for the glutamate-lowering effects of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and hemofiltration. The evidence reviewed here highlights the need for clinical trials.

  17. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  18. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  19. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  20. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  1. Localization of L-glutamate and glutamate-like receptors at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Cosmo, A; Nardi, G; Di Cristo, C; De Santis, A; Messenger, J B

    1999-08-28

    HPLC analysis of the amino acid contents of the second- and third-order giant fibres at the giant synapse in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo vulgaris shows that there are significantly higher amounts of L-glutamate and L-aspartate in the second-order (presynaptic) fibre than in the third-order (postsynaptic) fibre. Immunocytochemical staining of sections of the ganglion with an antibody raised against L-glutamate produces specific positive staining in the synaptic region of the second-order fibre. In contrast, staining with antibodies raised against glutamate-receptors (mammalian GluR1 with GluR2/3) produces positive staining in the third-order fibre at the postsynaptic region. These data provide further evidence for the hypothesis that L-glutamate is an excitatory transmitter at the giant synapse.

  2. Circuit mapping by ultraviolet uncaging of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Gordon M G

    2012-09-01

    In laser photostimulation, small clusters of neurons in brain slices are induced to fire action potentials by focal glutamate uncaging, and synaptic connectivity between photoexcited presynaptic neurons and individual postsynaptic neurons is assessed by intracellular recording of synaptic events. With a scanner, this process can be repeated sequentially across a patterned array of stimulus locations, generating maps of neurons' local sources of synaptic inputs. Laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) based on patterned glutamate uncaging offers an efficient, quantitative, optical-electrophysiological way to map synaptic circuits in brain slices. The efficacy of glutamate-based photostimulation for circuit mapping (in contrast to electrical stimulation) derives from the ability to stimulate neurons with high precision and speed, and without stimulating axons of passage. This protocol describes the components, assembly, and operation of a laser scanning microscope for ultraviolet (UV) uncaging, along with experimental methods for circuit mapping in brain slices. It presents a general approach and a set of guidelines for quantitative circuit mapping using "standard" LSPS methods based on single-photon glutamate uncaging using a UV laser, a pair of scanning mirror galvanometers, a patch-clamp setup, and open-source data acquisition software. PMID:22949715

  3. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  4. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  5. Structural Features of the Glutamate Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Konings, Wil N.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity. The proteins belong to a large and widespread family of secondary transporters, including bacterial glutamate, serine, and C4-dicarboxylate transporters; mammalian neutral-amino-acid transporters; and an increasing number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic proteins that have not yet been functionally characterized. Sixty members of the glutamate transporter family were found in the databases on the basis of sequence homology. The amino acid sequences of the carriers have diverged enormously. Homology between the members of the family is most apparent in a stretch of approximately 150 residues in the C-terminal part of the proteins. This region contains four reasonably well-conserved sequence motifs, all of which have been suggested to be part of the translocation pore or substrate binding site. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal stretch revealed the presence of five subfamilies with characterized members: (i) the eukaryotic glutamate transporters, (ii) the bacterial glutamate transporters, (iii) the eukaryotic neutral-amino-acid transporters, (iv) the bacterial C4-dicarboxylate transporters, and (v) the bacterial serine transporters. A number of other subfamilies that do not contain characterized members have been defined. In contrast to their amino acid sequences, the hydropathy profiles of the members of the family are extremely well conserved. Analysis of the hydropathy profiles has suggested that the glutamate transporters have a global structure that is unique among secondary transporters. Experimentally, the unique structure of the transporters was recently confirmed by membrane topology studies. Although there is still controversy about part of the topology, the most likely model predicts the presence of eight membrane-spanning α-helices and a loop-pore structure which is unique among secondary

  6. Glutamate Receptor Agonists and Glutamate Transporter Antagonists Regulate Differentiation of Osteoblast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-08-01

    Development and function of osteoblast lineage cells are regulated by a complex microenvironment consisting of the bone extracellular matrix, cells, systemic hormones and cytokines, autocrine and paracrine factors, and mechanical load. Apart from receptors that transduce extracellular signals into the cell, molecular transporters play a crucial role in the cellular response to the microenvironment. Transporter molecules are responsible for cellular uptake of nutritional components, elimination of metabolites, ion transport, and cell-cell communication. In this report, the expression of molecular transporters in osteoblast lineage cells was investigated to assess their roles in cell development and activity. Low-density arrays, covering membrane and vesicular transport molecules, were used to assess gene expression in osteoblasts representing early and late differentiation states. Receptors and transporters for the amino acid glutamate were found to be differentially expressed during osteoblast development. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and the mechanisms of its release, signal transduction, and cellular reabsorption in the synaptic cleft are well understood. Less clear, however, is the control of equivalent processes in peripheral tissues. In primary osteoblasts, inhibition of glutamate transporters with nonselective inhibitors leads to an increase in the concentration of extracellular glutamate. This change was accompanied by a decrease in osteoblast proliferation, stimulation of alkaline phosphatase, and the expression of transcripts encoding osteocalcin. Enzymatic removal of extracellular glutamate abolished these pro-differentiation effects, as did the inhibition of PKC- and Erk1/2-signaling pathways. These findings demonstrate that glutamate signaling promotes differentiation and activation of osteoblast lineage cells. Consequently, the glutamate system may represent a putative therapeutic target to induce an anabolic response

  7. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  8. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. PMID:26073813

  9. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method

  10. Monosodium Urate Crystals Promote Innate Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity and Improve BCG Efficacy as a Vaccine against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Taus, Francesco; Santucci, Marilina B.; Greco, Emanuela; Morandi, Matteo; Palucci, Ivana; Mariotti, Sabrina; Poerio, Noemi; Nisini, Roberto; Delogu, Giovanni; Fraziano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A safer and more effective anti-Tuberculosis vaccine is still an urgent need. We probed the effects of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) on innate immunity to improve the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. Results showed that in vitro MSU cause an enduring macrophage stimulation of the anti-mycobacterial response, measured as intracellular killing, ROS production and phagolysosome maturation. The contribution of MSU to anti-mycobacterial activity was also shown in vivo. Mice vaccinated in the presence of MSU showed a lower number of BCG in lymph nodes draining the vaccine inoculation site, in comparison to mice vaccinated without MSU. Lastly, we showed that MSU improved the efficacy of BCG vaccination in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), measured in terms of lung and spleen MTB burden. These results demonstrate that the use of MSU as adjuvant may represent a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of BCG vaccination. PMID:26023779

  11. 3-Aminoglutarate is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons.

    PubMed

    Foster, Alan C; Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen; Dinh, Tim; Venadas, Steven; Ehring, George R; Li, Yong-Xin; Staubli, Ursula

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the storage and release of the excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate by synaptic vesicles has lagged behind receptor characterizations due to a lack of pharmacological agents. We report that the glutamate analog, 3-aminoglutarate (3-AG) is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons that may be a useful tool to study storage and release mechanisms. Like L-glutamate itself, 3-AG is a high-affinity substrate for both the plasma membrane (EAATs) and vesicular (vGLUT) glutamate transporters. As such, EAATs facilitate 3-AG entry into neuronal cytoplasm allowing 3-AG to compete with L-glutamate for transport into vesicles thus reducing glutamate content. In a synaptosomal preparation, 3-AG inhibited calcium-dependent endogenous L-glutamate release. Unlike L-glutamate, 3-AG had low affinity for both ionotropic (NMDA and AMPA) and G-protein coupled (mGlu1-8) receptors. Consequently, 3-AG behaves as a "silent" false transmitter that may be used in physiological experiments to probe synaptic vesicle storage and release mechanisms for L-glutamate. The companion paper by Wu et al. (2015) describes initial experiments that explore the effects of 3-AG on glutamate synaptic transmission under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  12. Understanding safety of glutamate in food and brain.

    PubMed

    Mallick, H N

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is ubiquitous in nature and is present in all living organisms. It is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. Glutamate is being used as food additive for enhancing flavour for over last 1200 years imparting a unique taste known as "umami" in Japanese. It is being marketed for about last 100 years. The taste of umami is now recognized as the fifth basic taste. Many of the foods used in cooking for enhancing flavour contain high amount of glutamate. Breast milk has the highest concentration of glutamate amongst all amino acids. Glutamate in high doses as gavage or parenteral injection have been reported to produce neurodegeneration in infant rodents. The neurodegeneration was not produced when gluamate was given with food. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, based on enumerable scientific evidence, has declared that, "glutamate as an additive in food" is not an health hazard to human being. Glutamate is used as signaling molecule not only in neuronal but also in non-neuronal tissues. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the synaptic cleft has been associated with excitotoxicty and glutamate is implicated in number of neurological disorders. Excessive accumulation could be attributed to increase release, failure of transport system for uptake mechanism, neuronal injury due to hypoxia-ischemia, trauma and associated metabolic failures. The role blood brain barrier, vesicular glutamate and sodium dependent excitatory amino acid transporters in glutamate homeostasis are emphasized in the review.

  13. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  14. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  15. Concentration-Dependent Processivity of Multiple Glutamate Ligations Catalyzed by Folylpoly-γ-glutamate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Tomsho, John W.; Moran, Richard G.; Coward, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Folylpoly-γ-glutamate synthetase (FPGS, EC 6.3.2.17) is an ATP-dependent ligase that catalyzes formation of poly-γ-glutamate derivatives of reduced folates and anti-folates such as methotrexate and 5,10-dideaza-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (DDAH4PteGlu1). While the chemical mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by FPGS is known, it is unknown whether single or multiple glutamate residues are added following each folate binding event. A very sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been used to analyze the multiple ligation reactions onto radiolabeled DDAH4PteGlu1 catalyzed by FPGS in order to distinguish between distributive or processive mechanisms of catalysis. Reaction time courses, substrate trapping, and pulse-chase experiments were used to measure folate release during multiple glutamate additions. Together, the results of these experiments indicate that hFPGS can catalyze the processive addition of approximately four glutamate residues onto DDAH4PteGlu1. The degree of processivity was determined to be dependent on the concentration of the folate substrate, thus suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of folate polyglutamate synthesis in cells. PMID:18672898

  16. Ketamine and other potential glutamate antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arpan; McKie, Shane; Deakin, J F William

    2015-01-30

    The need for rapid acting antidepressants is widely recognised. There has been much interest in glutamate mechanisms in major depressive disorder (MDD) as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. A single intravenous infusion of ketamine, a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist anaesthetic agent, can alleviate depressive symptoms in patients within hours of administration. The mechanism of action appears to be in part through glutamate release onto non-NMDA receptors including α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptors. However these are also reported effects on 5-HT, dopamine and intracellular effects on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The effects of SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) antidepressants may also involve alterations in NMDA function. The article reviews the effect of current antidepressants on NMDA and examines the efficacy and mechanism of ketamine. Response to ketamine is also discussed and comparison with other glutamate drugs including lamotrigine, amantadine, riluzole, memantine, traxoprodil, GLYX-13, MK-0657, RO4917523, AZD2066 and Coluracetam. Future studies need to link the rapid antidepressant effects seen with ketamine to inflammatory theories in MDD.

  17. New perspectives in glutamate and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Riaza Bermudo-Soriano, Carlos; Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes; Vaquero-Lorenzo, Concepcion; Baca-Garcia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Anxiety and stress-related disorders, namely posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (ODC), social and specific phobias, and panic disorder, are a major public health issue. A growing body of evidence suggests that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be involved in the biological mechanisms underlying stress response and anxiety-related disorders. The glutamatergic system mediates the acquisition and extinction of fear-conditioning. Thus, new drugs targeting glutamatergic neurotransmission may be promising candidates for new pharmacological treatments. In particular, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) antagonists (AP5, AP7, CGP37849, CGP39551, LY235959, NPC17742, and MK-801), NMDAR partial agonists (DCS, ACPC), α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs) antagonists (topiramate), and several allosteric modulators targeting metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5, have shown anxiolytic-like effects in several animal and human studies. Several studies have suggested that polyamines (agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) may be involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying stress-response and anxiety-related disorders. This could mainly be attributed to their ability to modulate ionotropic glutamate receptors, especially NR2B subunits. The aim of this review is to establish that glutamate neurotransmission and polyaminergic system play a fundamental role in the onset of anxiety-related disorders. This may open the way for new drugs that may help to treat these conditions.

  18. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  19. Glutamate involvement in calcium–dependent migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. Methods The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. Results We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca2+ oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca2+ oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca2+]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  20. Transcriptional regulation through glutamate receptors: Involvement of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguirre, Adán; Ortega, Arturo

    2003-12-01

    Glutamate receptors play a key role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in several neuropathologies. Short-term and long-term changes in synaptic efficacy are triggered by glutamate. Although an enhanced glutamate-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation has been described in several systems, its role in membrane-to-nuclei signaling is unclear. Taking advantage of the fact that the gene encoding the chick kainate-binding protein undergoes a glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation via an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site, we evaluated the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this process. We describe here the participation of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases in the signaling cascade triggered by glutamate. Our results suggest that in Bergmann glia cells, glutamate receptors transactivate receptor tyrosine kinases, favoring the idea of a complex network of signals activated by this excitatory neurotransmitter that results in regulation of gene expression.

  1. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  2. Effects of Berberine on NLRP3 and IL-1β Expressions in Monocytic THP-1 Cells with Monosodium Urate Crystals-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urate crystals-induced inflammation is a critical factor during the initiation of gouty arthritis. Berberine is well known for its anti-inflammatory activity. However, the underlying effects of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation remain obscure. Objectives. This study is set to explore the protective effect and mechanism of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation in human monocytic THP-1 cells. Methods. The mRNA levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were measured by Real-Time PCR, and the protein levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were determined by ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. Results. The NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions were significantly increased in model group compared to that in normal group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there was significant reduction in the expressions of NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA in groups 6.25 μM berberine and 25 μM berberine when compared with model group (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Therefore, berberine alleviates monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation by downregulating NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions. The regulatory effects of berberine may be related to the inactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27689075

  3. Effects of Berberine on NLRP3 and IL-1β Expressions in Monocytic THP-1 Cells with Monosodium Urate Crystals-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urate crystals-induced inflammation is a critical factor during the initiation of gouty arthritis. Berberine is well known for its anti-inflammatory activity. However, the underlying effects of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation remain obscure. Objectives. This study is set to explore the protective effect and mechanism of berberine on monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation in human monocytic THP-1 cells. Methods. The mRNA levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were measured by Real-Time PCR, and the protein levels of NLRP3 and IL-1β were determined by ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. Results. The NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions were significantly increased in model group compared to that in normal group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there was significant reduction in the expressions of NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA in groups 6.25 μM berberine and 25 μM berberine when compared with model group (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Therefore, berberine alleviates monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation by downregulating NLRP3 and IL-1β expressions. The regulatory effects of berberine may be related to the inactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome.

  4. Astroglial glutamate transporters coordinate excitatory signaling and brain energetics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael B; Jackson, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian brain, a family of sodium-dependent transporters maintains low extracellular glutamate and shapes excitatory signaling. The bulk of this activity is mediated by the astroglial glutamate transporters GLT-1 and GLAST (also called EAAT2 and EAAT1). In this review, we will discuss evidence that these transporters co-localize with, form physical (co-immunoprecipitable) interactions with, and functionally couple to various 'energy-generating' systems, including the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, glycogen metabolizing enzymes, glycolytic enzymes, and mitochondria/mitochondrial proteins. This functional coupling is bi-directional with many of these systems both being regulated by glutamate transport and providing the 'fuel' to support glutamate uptake. Given the importance of glutamate uptake to maintaining synaptic signaling and preventing excitotoxicity, it should not be surprising that some of these systems appear to 'redundantly' support the energetic costs of glutamate uptake. Although the glutamate-glutamine cycle contributes to recycling of neurotransmitter pools of glutamate, this is an over-simplification. The ramifications of co-compartmentalization of glutamate transporters with mitochondria for glutamate metabolism are discussed. Energy consumption in the brain accounts for ∼20% of the basal metabolic rate and relies almost exclusively on glucose for the production of ATP. However, the brain does not possess substantial reserves of glucose or other fuels. To ensure adequate energetic supply, increases in neuronal activity are matched by increases in cerebral blood flow via a process known as 'neurovascular coupling'. While the mechanisms for this coupling are not completely resolved, it is generally agreed that astrocytes, with processes that extend to synapses and endfeet that surround blood vessels, mediate at least some of the signal that causes vasodilation. Several studies have shown that either genetic deletion or

  5. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:27184881

  6. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  7. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  8. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  9. Extracellular glutamate alters mature osteoclast and osteoblast functions.

    PubMed

    Seidlitz, Eric P; Sharma, Mohit K; Singh, Gurmit

    2010-09-01

    Glutamatergic intercellular communication is involved in many aspects of metabolic homeostasis in normal bone. In bone metastasis, the balance between bone formation and degradation is disrupted. Although the responsible mechanisms are not clear, we have previously identified that cancer cell lines used in bone tumour models secrete glutamate, suggesting that tumour-derived glutamate may disrupt sensitive signalling systems in bone. This study examines the role of glutamate in mature osteoclastic bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation, and bone nodule formation. Glutamate was found to have no effect on the survival or activity of mature osteoclasts, although glutamate transporter inhibition and receptor blockade increased the number of bone resorption pits. Furthermore, transporter inhibition increased the area of resorbed bone while significantly decreasing the number of osteoclasts. Alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization were used as measurements of osteoblast differentiation. Glutamate significantly increased osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, but transport inhibitors had no effect. These studies support earlier findings suggesting that glutamate may be more important for osteoclastogenesis than for osteoclast proliferation or functions. Since glutamate is capable of changing the differentiation and activities of both osteoclast and osteoblast cell types in bone, it is reasonable to postulate that tumour-derived glutamate may impact bone homeostasis in bone metastasis.

  10. Glutamate and neurotrophic factors in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate's role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell-surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca(2+) influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores, which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signaling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca(2+)-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer's disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signaling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signaling and protect against neurological disorders.

  11. The Relevance of Group II Glutamate Receptors Expression to Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Jonathan D; Mostofsky, David I

    2016-01-01

    The interface of receptor-mediated regulation of cellular signaling and neurological outputs remains an active field of investigation. The metabotropic G protein-coupled glutamate receptors, and in particular, the group II cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP)-lowering metabotropic glutamate receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors), have gained interest as therapeutic targets in different forms of neurological disorders. This review explores mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors expression, pharmacological activation, and signaling links to anxiety, as assessed in animal models and in clinical trials. PMID:27650988

  12. Emotional Learning and Glutamate: Translational Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Charles F.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a common focus of clinical concern and certain forms of anxiety may be conceptualized as disorders of emotional learning. Behavior therapies effective in the treatment of anxiety are modeled on extinction training as a means of reducing pathological anxiety. The present understanding of human anxiety has been informed by preclinical research using rodent models to study the acquisition and extinction of fear. Glutamate appears to have a central role in both of these processes. The authors review this literature and discuss novel applications of D-cycloserine, a partial N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, for the treatment of anxiety. PMID:16400246

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells protect CNS neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity by inhibiting glutamate receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Voulgari-Kokota, A; Fairless, R; Karamita, M; Kyrargyri, V; Tseveleki, V; Evangelidou, M; Delorme, B; Charbord, P; Diem, R; Probert, L

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) promote functional recovery in experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) pathology and are currently being tested in clinical trials for stroke, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Their beneficial effects are attributed to the activation of endogenous CNS protection and repair processes as well as immune regulation but their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we investigated the neuroprotective effects of mouse MSC in rodent MSC-neuron co-cultures and mice using models of glutamate excitotoxicity. A 24h pre-culture of mouse primary cortical neurons with MSC protected them against glutamate (NMDA) receptor-induced death and conditioned medium from MSC (MSC CM) was sufficient for this effect. Protection by MSC CM was associated with reduced mRNA levels of genes encoding NMDA receptor subunits, and increased levels for genes associated with non-neuronal and stem cell types, as shown by RT-PCR and cDNA microarray analyses. Changes in gene expression were not associated with alterations in cell lineage representation within the cultures. Further, MSC CM-mediated neuroprotection in rat retinal ganglion cells was associated with reduced glutamate-induced calcium influx. The adoptive transfer of EGFP(+)MSC in a mouse kainic acid epilepsy model also provided neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo, as shown by reduced neuron damage and glial cell activation in the hippocampus. These results show that MSC mediate direct neuroprotection by reducing neuronal sensitivity to glutamate receptor ligands and altering gene expression, and suggest a link between the therapeutic effects of MSC and the activation of cell plasticity in the damaged CNS. PMID:22561409

  14. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity.

  15. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:27555550

  16. Ibuprofen-loaded porous microspheres suppressed the progression of monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Won; Yun, Young-Pil; Park, Kyeongsoon; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Hak-Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to fabricate ibuprofen-loaded porous microspheres (IBU/PMSs), (2) to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of the microspheres using LPS-induced inflammation in cultured synoviocytes, and (3) to evaluate the in vivo effect of the IBU/PMSs on the progression of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in a rat model. A dose-dependent in vitro anti-inflammatory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine markers (matrix metallopeptidase-3 (MMP-3), matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5)), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was observed by confirming with real-time PCR analyses. In vivo, treatment with IBU/PMSs reduced MIA-stimulated mRNA expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, COX-2, ADAMTS-5, IL-6, and TNF-α in rat synoviocytes. In addition, we demonstrated that intra-articular IBU/PMSs suppressed the progression of MIA-induced OA in the rat model via anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In conclusion, IBU/PMSs are a promising therapeutic material to control the pain and progression of OA.

  17. THE HYDROTHERMAL REACTIONS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE, CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE AND SLUDGE IN THE MODULAR SALT PROCESS: A LITERATURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Pennebaker, F.; Fink, S.

    2010-11-11

    The use of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is proposed for an at-tank process to treat High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site. The proposed configuration includes deployment of ion exchange columns suspended in the risers of existing tanks to process salt waste without building a new facility. The CST is available in an engineered form, designated as IE-911-CW, from UOP. Prior data indicates CST has a proclivity to agglomerate from deposits of silica rich compounds present in the alkaline waste solutions. This report documents the prior literature and provides guidance for the design and operations that include CST to mitigate that risk. The proposed operation will also add monosodium titanate (MST) to the supernate of the tank prior to the ion exchange operation to remove strontium and select alpha-emitting actinides. The cesium loaded CST is ground and then passed forward to the sludge washing tank as feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Similarly, the MST will be transferred to the sludge washing tank. Sludge processing includes the potential to leach aluminum from the solids at elevated temperature (e.g., 65 C) using concentrated (3M) sodium hydroxide solutions. Prior literature indicates that both CST and MST will agglomerate and form higher yield stress slurries with exposure to elevated temperatures. This report assessed that data and provides guidance on minimizing the impact of CST and MST on sludge transfer and aluminum leaching sludge.

  18. Effects of RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Y.-Y.; Li, Y.-F.; Xu, M.; Li, W.-Y.; Yang, M.; Li, R.-L.

    2015-01-01

    RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses antigout, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperuricemic properties based on the traditional conceptions. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PRP15 in rat gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the present study, we found that treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg) in rats with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals significantly attenuated the knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and the elevated expressions of nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in synovial tissues were significantly inhibited, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) result showed that MSU-induced high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in synovial fluid were reduced by treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg). We conclude that RPP15 may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and its activity of antigout may be partially related to inhibiting TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and NF-κB p65 expression in the synovial tissues. PMID:26221174

  19. Anti-Osteoarthritic Effects of the Litsea japonica Fruit in a Rat Model of Osteoarthritis Induced by Monosodium Iodoacetate

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Won; Kwon, Jung Eun; Jung, Moon Won; Meng, Xue; Jo, Se Min; Song, Hae Seong; Cho, Young Mi; Song, Sang Mok; Ham, Young-Min; Jung, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Chang Sook; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative chronic disease that affects various tissues surrounding the joints, such as the subchondral bone and articular cartilage. The onset of OA is associated with uncontrolled catabolic and anabolic remodeling processes of the joints, including the cartilage and subchondral bone, to adapt to local biological and biochemical signals. In this study, we determined whether 70% ethanolic (EtOH) extract of Litsea japonica fruit (LJFE) had beneficial effects on the articular cartilage, including structural changes in the tibial subchondral bone, matrix degradation, and inflammatory responses, in OA by using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate-induced OA. Our results showed that administration of LJFE increased the bone volume and cross-section thickness, but the mean number of objects per slice in this group was lower than that in the OA control (OAC) group. In addition, the LJFE decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Compared to the OAC group, the group treated with high doses of LJFE (100 and 200 mg/kg) showed a more than 80% inhibition of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Our results suggest that LJFE can be used as a potential anti-osteoarthritic agent. PMID:26244981

  20. The prevalence of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid from wrist and finger joints.

    PubMed

    Galozzi, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Frallonardo, Paola; Favero, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Scanu, Anna; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in synovial fluids (SFs) aspirated from wrist and finger joints of patients with previously diagnosed joint diseases. We reviewed the results of SF analysis of 1593 samples and identified 126 patients with effusions in the small joints of the hands and wrists. We reported from patients' medical files data about sex, age, diagnosis, disease duration and the microscopic SF results. The prevalence of CPP crystals in SF was 85.71% in CPP-crystals arthritis (CPP-CA), 19.35% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13.89% in osteoarthritis (OA) and 0% in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), gout and miscellanea. The prevalence of MSU crystals in SF was 83.3% in gout, 10% in PsA, 2.8% in OA and 0% in RA, SpA, miscellanea and CPP-CA. Consistent with previously reported data concerning the big joints, microcrystals can be frequently found also in the small joints of patients with previous diagnosis. The finding underlines the importance of analyzing SF from the hand and wrist joints in the attempt to identify comorbidities associated with the presence of crystals and to develop targeted treatment strategies.

  1. Arsenic accumulation in bark beetles and forest birds occupying mountain pine beetle infested stands treated with monosodium methanearsonate.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Christy A; Albert, Courtney A; Dods, Patti L; Cullen, William R; Lai, Vivian W M; Elliott, John E

    2007-02-15

    The arsenic-based pesticide, monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA), is presently being evaluated for re-registration in Canada and the United States and has been widely used in British Columbia to help suppress Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) outbreaks. We assessed the availability and exposure of MSMA to woodpeckers and other forest birds that may prey directly on contaminated bark beetles. Total arsenic residues in MPB from MSMA treated trees ranged from 1.3-700.2 microg g(-1) dw (geometric mean 42.0 microg g(-1)) with the metabolite monomethyl arsonic acid (MMAA) contributing 90-97% to the total arsenic extracted. Live adult and larval beetles were collected from treated trees and reached concentrations up to 327 microg g(-1) dw. MPBs from reference trees had significantly lower arsenic concentrations averaging 0.19 microg g(-1) dw. Woodpeckers foraged more heavily on MSMAtreesthat contained beetles with lower arsenic residues, suggesting those trees had reduced MSMAtranslocation and possibly greater live beetle broods. Blood samples from five species of woodpeckers and other forest passerines breeding within 1 km of MSMA stands contained elevated levels of total arsenic but with large individual variability (geometric mean = 0.18 microg g(-1) dw, range 0.02-2.20 microg g(-1). The results indicate that there is significant accumulation and transfer of organic arsenic within the food chain at levels that may present a toxicity risk to avian wildlife.

  2. Permanent uncoupling of male-specific CYP2C11 transcription/translation by perinatal glutamate

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sarmistha; Das, Rajat Kumar; Giffear, Kelly A.; Shapiro, Bernard H.

    2015-04-01

    Perinatal exposure of rats and mice to the typically reported 4 mg/g bd wt dose of monosodium glutamate (MSG) results in a complete block in GH secretion as well as obesity, growth retardation and a profound suppression of several cytochrome P450s, including CYP2C11, the predominant male-specific isoform — all irreversible effects. In contrast, we have found that a lower dose of the food additive, 2 mg/g bd wt on alternate days for the first 9 days of life results in a transient neonatal depletion of plasma GH, a subsequent permanent overexpression of CYP2C11 as well as subnormal (mini) GH pulse amplitudes in an otherwise normal adult masculine episodic GH profile. The overexpressed CYP2C11 was characterized by a 250% increase in mRNA, but only a 40 to 50% increase in CYP2C11 protein and its catalytic activity. Using freshly isolated hepatocytes as well as primary cultures exposed to the masculine-like episodic GH profile, we observed normal induction, activation, nuclear translocation and binding to the CYP2C11 promoter of the GH-dependent signal transducers required for CYP2C11 transcription. The disproportionately lower expression levels of CYP2C11 protein were associated with dramatically high expression levels of an aberrant, presumably nontranslated CYP2C11 mRNA, a 200% increase in CYP2C11 ubiquitination and a 70–80% decline in miRNAs associated, at normal levels, with a suppression of CYP2C expression. Whereas the GH-responsiveness of CYP2C7 and CYP2C6 as well as albumin was normal in the MSG-derived hepatocytes, the abnormal expression of CYP2C11 was permanent and irreversible. - Highlights: • A “low” neonatal dose of MSG causes an immediate but transient growth hormone depletion. • Adult circulating growth hormone contains mini pulses in an otherwise male profile. • CYP2C11 is permanently overexpressed > 250%; CYP2C6, 2C7 and albumin remain normal. • The bulk of the overexpressed CYP2C11 mRNA consists of an intron-retained form. • SOCS2

  3. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  4. Postsynaptic activation at the squid giant synapse by photolytic release of L-glutamate from a 'caged' L-glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Corrie, J E; DeSantis, A; Katayama, Y; Khodakhah, K; Messenger, J B; Ogden, D C; Trentham, D R

    1993-01-01

    1. Pharmacological evidence suggests L-glutamate is a strong candidate as a transmitter at the giant synapse of the squid. Postsynaptic activation at the giant synapse cannot be effected by conventional application of putative neurotransmitters by iontophoresis or perfusion, apparently because the complex structure of the synapse prevents a sufficiently rapid change in concentration at the postsynaptic membrane. Flash photolytic release of L-glutamate from a pharmacologically inert 'caged' L-glutamate pre-equilibrated in the stellate ganglion of Alloteuthis or Loligo was used to determine whether L-glutamate can produce postsynaptic activation when released rapidly in the synaptic clefts. 2. The preparation, reaction mechanism and properties of the caged L-glutamate, N-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethoxycarbonyl-L-glutamate, are described. The product quantum yield on photolysis was 0.65 (+/- 0.05). On flash photolysis glutamate release followed a single exponential time-course in the pH range 5.5-7.8. The rate constant was proportional to [H+] and was 93 s-1 at pH 5.5 and 16 degrees C in artificial sea water (ionic strength, I = 0.68 M). 3. At pH 7.8 flash photolysis of caged glutamate pre-equilibrated in the synapse caused only a slow depolarization. A second photolytic release of L-glutamate or transsynaptic activation produced no further depolarization, suggesting desensitization and inactivation of postsynaptic mechanisms by the initial pulse of L-glutamate. 4. Synaptic transmission in the giant synapse was normal at pH 5.5. Flash photolysis at pH 5.5 caused rapid production of L-glutamate within the synaptic cleft and a fast postsynaptic depolarization which generated postsynaptic action potentials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7901400

  5. On the regulative role of the glutamate receptor in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Selin, Alexey A; Lobysheva, Natalia V; Nesterov, Semen V; Skorobogatova, Yulia A; Byvshev, Ivan M; Pavlik, Lyubov L; Mikheeva, Irina B; Moshkov, Dmitry A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the regulative role of the glutamate receptor found earlier in the brain mitochondria. In the present work a glutamate-dependent signaling system with similar features was detected in mitochondria of the heart. The glutamate-dependent signaling system in the heart mitochondria was shown to be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The GABA receptor presence in the heart mitochondria was shown by golding with the use of antibodies to α- and β-subunits of the receptor. The activity of glutamate receptor was assessed according to the rate of synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. The glutamate receptor in mitochondria could be activated only under conditions of hypoxic stress, which in model experiments was imitated by blocking Complex I by rotenone or fatty acids. The glutamate signal in mitochondria was shown to be calcium- and potential-dependent and the activation of the glutamate cascade was shown to be accompanied by production of hydrogen peroxide. It was discovered that H2O2 synthesis involves two complexes of the mitochondrial electron transfer system - succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and fatty acid dehydrogenase (ETF:QO). Thus, functions of the glutamate signaling system are associated with the system of respiration-glycolysis switching (the Pasteur-Crabtree) under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26812870

  6. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  7. Neuronal vs glial glutamate uptake: Resolving the conundrum.

    PubMed

    Danbolt, N C; Furness, D N; Zhou, Y

    2016-09-01

    Neither normal brain function nor the pathological processes involved in neurological diseases can be adequately understood without knowledge of the release, uptake and metabolism of glutamate. The reason for this is that glutamate (a) is the most abundant amino acid in the brain, (b) is at the cross-roads between several metabolic pathways, and (c) serves as the major excitatory neurotransmitter. In fact most brain cells express glutamate receptors and are thereby influenced by extracellular glutamate. In agreement, brain cells have powerful uptake systems that constantly remove glutamate from the extracellular fluid and thereby limit receptor activation. It has been clear since the 1970s that both astrocytes and neurons express glutamate transporters. However the relative contribution of neuronal and glial transporters to the total glutamate uptake activity, however, as well as their functional importance, has been hotly debated ever since. The present short review provides (a) an overview of what we know about neuronal glutamate uptake as well as an historical description of how we got there, and (b) a hypothesis reconciling apparently contradicting observations thereby possibly resolving the paradox. PMID:27235987

  8. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  11. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  12. Modulation of intestinal L-glutamate transport by luminal leptin.

    PubMed

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Lostao, María Pilar; Ducroc, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Leptin is secreted into the digestive tract and contributes to the absorption of dietary molecules by regulating transporters activity. Here, we studied the effect of luminal leptin on the intestinal transport of L-glutamate, an important component of human diet. We examined the effect of leptin on L-glutamate uptake in rat intestine in vitro measuring glutamate-induced short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chambers and L-[(3)H (U)]-glutamate uptake in jejunal everted rings. Glutamate-induced Isc was only observed in Na(+)-free conditions. This Isc was concentration (1-60 mmol L(-1)) and pH dependent. Luminal leptin increased glutamate Isc (∼100 %). Dose-response curve showed a biphasic pattern, with maximal stimulations observed at 10(-13) and 10(-10) mmol L(-1), that were sensitive to leptin receptor antagonist. In everted rings, two glutamate transport mechanisms were distinguished: a Na(+)-dependent, H(+)-independent, that was inhibited by leptin (∼20 %), and a Na(+)-independent but H(+)-dependent, that was enhanced by leptin (∼20 %), in line with data obtained in Ussing chambers. Altogether, these data reveal original non-monotonic effect of luminal leptin in the intestine and demonstrate a new role for this hormone in the modulation of L-glutamate transport, showing that luminal active gut peptides can influence absorption of amino acids.

  13. Glial glutamate transporters: new actors in brain signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-10-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate brain, is critically involved in most of the physiological functions of the central nervous system. It has traditionally been assumed that glutamate triggers a wide array of signaling cascades through the activation of specific membrane receptors. The extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent neurotoxic insults. Electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glial glutamate transporters remove the bulk of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. An exquisitely ordered coupling between glutamatergic neurons and surrounding glia cells is fundamental for excitatory transmission. The glutamate/glutamine and astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttles provide the biochemical framework of this compulsory association. In this context, recent advances show that glial glutamate transporters act as signal transducers that regulate the expression of proteins involved in their compartmentalization with neurons in the so-called tripartite synapse.

  14. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  15. A novel glutamate dehydrogenase from bovine brain: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, S W; Cho, S W

    1995-08-01

    A soluble form of novel glutamate dehydrogenase has been purified from bovine brain. The preparation was homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and composed of six identical subunits having a subunit size of 57,500 Da. The biochemical properties of glutamate dehydrogenase such as N-terminal amino acids sequences, kinetic parameters, amino acids analysis, and optimum pH were examined in both reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxidative deamination of glutamate. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the bovine brain enzyme showed the significant differences in the first 5 amino acids compared to other glutamate dehydrogenases from various sources. These results indicate that glutamate dehydrogenase isolated from bovine brain is a novel polypeptide.

  16. Influence of glutamic acid enantiomers on C-mineralization.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Vranová, Valerie; Lojková, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Seasonal dynamics in the mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils from selected ecosystems was determined and subjected to a range of treatments: ambient x elevated CO2 level and meadow x dense x thinned forest environment. Mineralization of glutamic acid was determined by incubation of the soil with 2 mg L- or D-glutamic acid g(-1) of dry soil to induce the maximum respiration rate. Mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils fluctuates over the course of a vegetation season, following a similar trend across a range of ecosystems. Mineralization is affected by environmental changes and management practices, including elevated CO2 level and thinning intensity. L-glutamic acid metabolism is more dependent on soil type as compared to metabolism of its D-enantiomer. The results support the hypothesis that the slower rate of D- compared to L- amino acid mineralization is due to different roles in anabolism and catabolism of the soil microbial community.

  17. Protection of the glutamate pool concentration in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dalai

    2007-05-29

    The central nitrogen metabolic circuit in enteric bacteria consists of three enzymes: glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase (GOGAT), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). With the carbon skeleton provided by 2-oxoglutarate, ammonia/ammonium (NH(4)(+)) is assimilated into two central nitrogen intermediates, glutamate and glutamine. Although both serve as nitrogen donors for all biosynthetic needs, glutamate and glutamine play different roles. Internal glutamine serves as a sensor of external nitrogen availability, and its pool concentration decreases upon nitrogen limitation. A high glutamate pool concentration is required to maintain the internal K(+) pool. The configuration of high glutamate and low glutamine pools was disrupted in GOGAT(-) mutants under low NH(4)(+) conditions: the glutamate pool was low, the difference between glutamate and glutamine was diminished, and growth was defective. When a GOGAT(-) mutant was cultured in an NH(4)(+)-limited chemostat, two sequential spontaneous mutations occurred. Each resulted in a suppressor mutant that outgrew its predecessor in the chemostat. The first suppressor overexpressed GDH, and the second also had a partially impaired glutamine synthetase. The result was a triple mutant in which NH(4)(+) was assimilated by two enzymes instead of the normal three and yet glutamate and glutamine pools and growth were essentially normal. The results indicate preference for the usual ratio of glutamate and glutamine and the resilient and compensatory nature of the circuit on pool control. Analysis of other suppressor mutants selected on solid medium suggests that increased GDH expression is the key for rescue of the growth defect of GOGAT(-) mutants under low NH(4)(+) conditions.

  18. Serum Glutamic-Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) Levels in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Lan-Ping; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or…

  19. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way.

  20. Elevated venous glutamate levels in (pre)catabolic conditions result at least partly from a decreased glutamate transport activity.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Stütz, O; Kinscherf, R; Schykowski, M; Kellerer, M; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    1996-06-01

    Abnormally high postabsorptive venous plasma glutamate levels have been reported for several diseases that are associated with a loss of body cell mass including cancer, human/simian immunodeficiency virus infection, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Studies on exchange rates in well-nourished cancer patients now show that high venous plasma glutamate levels may serve as a bona fide indicator for a decreased uptake of glutamate by the peripheral muscle tissue in the postabsorptive period and may be indicative for a precachectic state. High glutamate levels are also moderately correlated with a decreased uptake of glucose and ketone bodies. Relatively high venous glutamate levels have also been found in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to some extent also in the cubital vein of normal elderly subjects, i.e., in conditions commonly associated with a decreased glucose tolerance and progressive loss of body cell mass.

  1. Translating Glutamate: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Daniel C.; Schoepp, Darryle; Kalivas, Peter W.; Volkow, Nora D.; Zarate, Carlos; Merchant, Kalpana; Bear, Mark F.; Umbricht, Daniel; Hajos, Mihaly; Potter, William Z.; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The neurotransmitter glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain and is responsible for most corticocortical and corticofugal neurotransmission. Disturbances in glutamatergic function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders—including schizophrenia, drug abuse and addiction, autism, and depression—that were until recently poorly understood. Nevertheless, improvements in basic information regarding these disorders have yet to translate into Food and Drug Administration–approved treatments. Barriers to translation include the need not only for improved compounds but also for improved biomarkers sensitive to both structural and functional target engagement and for improved translational models. Overcoming these barriers will require unique collaborative arrangements between pharma, government, and academia. Here, we review a recent Institute of Medicine–sponsored meeting, highlighting advances in glutamatergic theories of neuropsychiatric illness as well as remaining barriers to treatment development. PMID:21957170

  2. Untangling the glutamate dehydrogenase allosteric nightmare.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is found in all living organisms, but only animal GDH is regulated by a large repertoire of metabolites. More than 50 years of research to better understand the mechanism and role of this allosteric network has been frustrated by its sheer complexity. However, recent studies have begun to tease out how and why this complex behavior evolved. Much of GDH regulation probably occurs by controlling a complex ballet of motion necessary for catalytic turnover and has evolved concomitantly with a long antenna-like feature of the structure of the enzyme. Ciliates, the 'missing link' in GDH evolution, might have created the antenna to accommodate changing organelle functions and was refined in humans to, at least in part, link amino acid catabolism with insulin secretion.

  3. Poly(γ-glutamic acid), coagulation? Anticoagulation?

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong; Mao, Chun; Feng, Shuaihui

    2016-11-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) powder was usually used as hemostatic agent because of its excellent physical properties of water-absorption and water-locking. However, if γ-PGA absorbs enough water, how about its blood compatibility? Here, the other side of the coin was investigated. The anticoagulant properties of γ-PGA were characterized by in vitro coagulation tests, hemolytic assay, platelet adhesion, and platelet activation. Moreover, cytotoxicity experiments of γ-PGA were also carried out by MTT assay. Results indicated that the sufficient water-absorbed γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property and non-cytotoxicity. It means γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property, non-cytotoxicity. If γ-PGA has absorbed enough water, it can be used as an anticoagulation biomaterial. With double effects (coagulation and anticoagulation), the γ-PGA with desirable bioproperties can be readily tailored to cater to various biomedical applications. PMID:27545694

  4. The cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc− drives breast tumor cell glutamate release and cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Slosky, Lauren M.; BassiriRad, Neemah M.; Symons, Ashley M.; Thompson, Michelle; Doyle, Timothy; Forte, Brittany L.; Staatz, William D.; Bui, Lynn; Neumann, William L.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Salvemini, Daniela; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bone is one of the leading sites of metastasis for frequently diagnosed malignancies, including those arising in the breast, prostate and lung. Although these cancers develop unnoticed and are painless in their primary sites, bone metastases result in debilitating pain. Deeper investigation of this pain may reveal etiology and lead to early cancer detection. Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is inadequately managed with current standard-of-care analgesics and dramatically diminishes patient quality of life. While CIBP etiology is multifaceted, elevated levels of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, in the bone-tumor microenvironment may drive maladaptive nociceptive signaling. Here, we establish a relationship between the reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite, tumor-derived glutamate, and CIBP. In vitro and in a syngeneic in vivo model of breast CIBP, murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells significantly elevated glutamate via the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−. The well-known system xc− inhibitor sulfasalazine significantly reduced levels of glutamate and attenuated CIBP-associated flinching and guarding behaviors. Peroxynitrite, a highly reactive species produced in tumors, significantly increased system xc− functional expression and tumor cell glutamate release. Scavenging peroxynitrite with the iron and mangano-based porphyrins, FeTMPyP and SRI10, significantly diminished tumor cell system xc− functional expression, reduced femur glutamate levels and mitigated CIBP. In sum, we demonstrate how breast cancer bone metastases upregulate a cystine/glutamate co-transporter to elevate extracellular glutamate. Pharmacological manipulation of peroxynitrite or system xc− attenuates CIBP, supporting a role for tumor-derived glutamate in CIBP and validating the targeting of system xc− as a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of metastatic bone pain. PMID:27482630

  5. Hippocampal glutamate receptors in fear memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Martín; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Bonini, Juliana S; Rossatto, Janine I; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, N

    2004-01-01

    It is thought that activity-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy driven by biochemical pathways responsive to the action of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate are critical components of the mechanisms responsible for memory formation. In particular, the early activation of the NMDA (rNMDA) and AMPA (rAMPA) subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been demonstrated to be a necessary event for the acquisition of several types of memory. In the rat, consolidation of the long-term memory for a one-trial, step-down inhibitory avoidance task is blocked by antagonists of the rNMDA and rAMPA infused into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus early after training and is associated with a rapid and reversible increase in the total number of [3H]AMPA binding sites. The learning-induced increase in [[3H]AMPA is accompanied by translocation of the GluR1 subunit of the rAMPA to the post-synaptic terminal together with its phosphorylation at Ser831. In addition, learning of the mentioned fear-motivated task induces the activation and rNMDA-dependent translocation of CaMKII to the post-synaptic density. Inhibition of this protein kinase as well as blockade of the rNMDA abolishes both the learning-induced translocation of GluR1 and its phosphorylation. Our data suggest that learning of an avoidance task enhances hippocampal rAMPA signaling through rNMDA and CaMKII-dependent mechanisms.

  6. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  7. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  8. Evidence for Glutamate as a Neuroglial Transmitter within Sensory Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T.; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (<30 µm) DRG neurons from intact DRGs (ex-vivo whole ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold. PMID:23844184

  9. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  10. Determination of Fissile Loadings onto Monosodium Titanate (MST) under Conditions Relevant to the Actinide Removal Process Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-11-15

    This report describes the results of an experimental study to measure the sorption of fissile actinides on monosodium titanate (MST) at conditions relevant to operation of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). The study examined the effect of a single contact of a large volume of radionuclide-spiked simulant solution with a small mass of MST. The volume of simulant to MST (8.5 L to 0.2 g of MST solids) was designed to mimic the maximum phase ratio that occurs between the multiple contacts of MST and waste solution and washing of the accumulated solids cycle of ARP. This work provides the following results. (1) After a contact time of {approx}2 weeks, we measured the following actinide loadings on the MST (average of solution and solids data), Pu: 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt %, U: 14.0 {+-} 1.04 wt %, and Np: 0.839 {+-} 0.0178 wt %. (2) The plutonium and uranium loadings reported above are considerably higher than previously reported values. The higher loading result from the very high phase ratio and the high initial mass concentrations of uranium and plutonium. A separate upcoming document details the predicted values for this system versus the results. (3) The strontium DF values measured in these tests proved much lower than those reported previously with simulants having the same bulk chemical composition. The low strontium DF values reflect the very low initial mass concentration of strontium in this simulant (<100 {micro}g/L) compared to that in previous testing (> 600 {micro}g/L).

  11. Monosodium urate activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 kinase and cathepsin dependent unconventional protein secretion from human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2013-03-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  12. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-07-31

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

  13. Relationship between increase in astrocytic GLT-1 glutamate transport and late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na+-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and late long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Four issues were addressed in this research: Which glutamate transporter is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP? In what cell type in the hippocampus does the increase in glutamate uptake occur? Does a single type of cell contain all the mechanisms to respond to an induction stimulus with a change in glutamate uptake? What role does the increase in glutamate uptake play during L-LTP? We have confirmed that GLT-1 is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP. Also, we found that astrocytes were responsible for much, if not all, of the increase in glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices during L-LTP. Additionally, we found that cultured astrocytes alone were able to respond to an induction stimulus with an increase in glutamate uptake. Inhibition of basal glutamate uptake did not affect the induction of L-LTP, but inhibition of the increase in glutamate uptake did inhibit both the expression of L-LTP and induction of additional LTP. It seems likely that heightened glutamate transport plays an ongoing role in the ability of hippocampal circuitry to code and store information. PMID:23166293

  14. Efficient synthesis of novel glutamate homologues and investigation of their affinity and selectivity profile at ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrea; Tamborini, Lucia; Mastronardi, Federica; Ettari, Roberta; Romano, Diego; Nielsen, Birgitte; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola

    2014-04-15

    A convenient synthesis of four new enantiomerically pure acidic amino acids is reported and their affinity at ionotropic glutamate receptors was determined. The new compounds are higher homologues of glutamic acid in which the molecular complexity has been increased by introducing an aromatic/heteroaromatic ring, that is a phenyl or a thiophene ring, that could give additional electronic interactions with the receptors. The results of the present investigation indicate that the insertion of an aromatic/heteroaromatic ring into the amino acid skeleton of glutamate higher homologues is well tolerated and this modification could be exploited to generate a new class of NMDA antagonists. PMID:24630559

  15. Glutamate neurons within the midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Morales, M; Root, D H

    2014-12-12

    Midbrain dopamine systems play important roles in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. The participation of midbrain dopamine systems in diverse clinical contexts suggests these systems are highly complex. Midbrain dopamine regions contain at least three neuronal phenotypes: dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic. Here, we review the locations, subtypes, and functions of glutamatergic neurons within midbrain dopamine regions. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2) mRNA-expressing neurons are observed within each midbrain dopamine system. Within rat retrorubral field (RRF), large populations of VGluT2 neurons are observed throughout its anteroposterior extent. Within rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), VGluT2 neurons are observed centrally and caudally, and are most dense within the laterodorsal subdivision. RRF and SNC rat VGluT2 neurons lack tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), making them an entirely distinct population of neurons from dopaminergic neurons. The rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains the most heterogeneous populations of VGluT2 neurons. VGluT2 neurons are found in each VTA subnucleus but are most dense within the anterior midline subnuclei. Some subpopulations of rat VGluT2 neurons co-express TH or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), but most of the VGluT2 neurons lack TH or GAD. Different subsets of rat VGluT2-TH neurons exist based on the presence or absence of vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter, or D2 dopamine receptor. Thus, the capacity by which VGluT2-TH neurons may release dopamine will differ based on their capacity to accumulate vesicular dopamine, uptake extracellular dopamine, or be autoregulated by dopamine. Rat VTA VGluT2 neurons exhibit intrinsic VTA projections and extrinsic projections to the accumbens and to the prefrontal cortex. Mouse VTA VGluT2 neurons project to accumbens shell, prefrontal cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and lateral habenula. Given their molecular

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  17. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W.; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Summary GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses. PMID:26711343

  18. A further experimental study of the antisilicotic effect of glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Morosova, K I; Katsnelson, B A; Rotenberg YuS; Belobragina, G V

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of rats were exposed to quartz dust for six months and in addition one group was given drinking water containing 1.5% sodium glutamate while the second received only water. In the rats receiving glutamate we observed (a) evidence for a considerably reduced cytotoxic effect of the quartz on cells obtained by bronchopulmonary lavage, (b) a reduction in dust retention in the lungs, especially in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, (c) a considerable reduction in the weight gain in the lungs and in their hydroxyproline and lipid contents, and (d) the inhibition of the formation of silicotic nodules. Polarographic studies of the oxygen consumption of peritoneal macrophages from rats receiving glutamate showed that glutamate prevents the adverse effects of quartz on mitochondrial oxidative processes. PMID:6093851

  19. Transport Mechanism of a Bacterial Homologue of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.; Ginter, C; Boudker, O

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are integral membrane proteins that catalyse a thermodynamically uphill uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft into the cytoplasm of glia and neuronal cells by harnessing the energy of pre-existing electrochemical gradients of ions. Crucial to the reaction is the conformational transition of the transporters between outward and inward facing states, in which the substrate binding sites are accessible from the extracellular space and the cytoplasm, respectively. Here we describe the crystal structure of a double cysteine mutant of a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii, GltPh, which is trapped in the inward facing state by cysteine crosslinking. Together with the previously determined crystal structures of Glt{sub Ph} in the outward facing state, the structure of the crosslinked mutant allows us to propose a molecular mechanism by which Glt{sub Ph} and, by analogy, mammalian glutamate transporters mediate sodium-coupled substrate uptake.

  20. Metabolic Control of Vesicular Glutamate Transport and Release

    PubMed Central

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A.; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl−. Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl− acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl− at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses, and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. PMID:20920794

  1. Vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in white matter

    PubMed Central

    Ziskin, Jennifer L; Nishiyama, Akiko; Rubio, Maria; Fukaya, Masahiro; Bergles, Dwight E

    2007-01-01

    Directed fusion of transmitter-laden vesicles enables rapid intercellular signaling in the central nervous system and occurs at synapses within gray matter. Here we show that action potentials also induce the release of glutamate from axons in the corpus callosum, a white matter region responsible for interhemispheric communication. Callosal axons release glutamate by vesicular fusion, which induces quantal AMPA receptor–mediated currents in NG2+ glial progenitors at anatomically distinct axo–glial synaptic junctions. Glutamate release from axons was facilitated by repetitive stimulation and could be inhibited through activation of metabotropic autoreceptors. Although NG2+ cells form associations with nodes of Ranvier in white matter, measurements of conduction velocity indicated that unmyelinated fibers are responsible for glutamatergic signaling with NG2+ glia. This activity-dependent secretion of glutamate was prevalent in the developing and mature mouse corpus callosum, indicating that axons within white matter both conduct action potentials and engage in rapid neuron-glia communication. PMID:17293857

  2. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  3. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L.G.; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  4. Functional architecture of olfactory ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, Liliane; Bargeton, Benoîte; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Kellenberger, Stephan; Benton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate chemical communication between neurons at synapses. A variant iGluR subfamily, the Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), was recently proposed to detect environmental volatile chemicals in olfactory cilia. Here we elucidate how these peripheral chemosensors have evolved mechanistically from their iGluR ancestors. Using a Drosophila model, we demonstrate that IRs act in combinations of up to three subunits, comprising individual odor-specific receptors and one or two broadly expressed co-receptors. Heteromeric IR complex formation is necessary and sufficient for trafficking to cilia and mediating odor-evoked electrophysiological responses in vivo and in vitro. IRs display heterogeneous ion conduction specificities related to their variable pore sequences, and divergent ligand-binding domains function in odor recognition and cilia localization. Our results provide insights into the conserved and distinct architecture of these olfactory and synaptic ion channels and offer perspectives into use of IRs as genetically encoded chemical sensors. PMID:21220098

  5. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  6. Reduced hippocampal glutamate in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rupsingh, R; Borrie, M; Smith, M; Wells, J L; Bartha, R

    2011-05-01

    Altered neurometabolic profiles have been detected in Alzheimer disease (AD) using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), but no definitive biomarker of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD has been established. This study used MRS to compare hippocampal metabolite levels between normal elderly controls (NEC) and subjects with MCI and AD. Short echo-time (TE=46 ms) (1)H spectra were acquired at 4T from the right hippocampus of 23 subjects with AD, 12 subjects with MCI and 15 NEC. Absolute metabolite levels and metabolite ratios were compared between groups using a multivariate analysis of covariance (covariates: age, sex) followed by post hoc Tukey's test (p<0.05 significant). Subjects with AD had decreased glutamate (Glu) as well as decreased Glu/creatine (Cr), Glu/myo-inositol (mI), Glu/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and NAA/Cr ratios compared to NEC. Subjects with AD also had decreased Glu/mI ratio compared to MCI. There were no differences between subjects with MCI and NEC. Therefore, in addition to NAA/Cr, decreased hippocampal Glu may be an indicator of AD.

  7. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  8. Podocytes: a new player for glutamate signaling.

    PubMed

    Armelloni, S; Li, M; Messa, P; Rastaldi, M P

    2012-12-01

    In the renal glomerulus, podocytes envelop the external side of the capillary basement membrane with their intertwining ramifications, and ensure elimination of metabolic waste within the urine, while proteins and important blood components are retained into the circulation. To preserve the integrity of the glomerular filter, which is constantly exposed to a high variety of stimuli, podocytes need to communicate by rapid and precise signaling, likely similar to that used by neuronal cells. In the last years, we and others have shown that podocytes are indeed molecularly equipped for communicating in a synaptic-like way, where glutamate and its receptors seem to have a pivotal role, because altering glutamatergic communication leads to podocyte damage and increased filter permeability. Major components of glutamatergic signaling are organized at foot process junctions by adhesion molecules, chiefly by nephrin, and are connected to the actin cytoskeleton, that governs the health of podocytes. Further advances in understanding podocyte physiological behavior and signaling properties have the potential to improve the knowledge of podocyte diseases, first among them idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis that still needs more precise molecular-based diagnosis and targeted treatment. PMID:23018105

  9. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  10. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, M; Teng, C; Wilkening, R B; Fennessey, P; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    2000-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying mechanisms, hepatic amino acid uptake and conversion of L-[1-(13)C]glutamine to L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and (13)CO(2) were measured in six sheep fetuses before and in the last 2 h of a 26-h Dex infusion. Dex decreased hepatic glutamine and alanine uptakes (P < 0.01) and hepatic glutamate output (P < 0.001). Hepatic outputs of the glutamate (R(Glu,Gln)) and CO(2) formed from plasma glutamine decreased to 21 (P < 0.001) and 53% (P = 0.009) of control, respectively. R(Glu,Gln), expressed as a fraction of both outputs, decreased (P < 0.001) from 0.36 +/- 0.02 to 0.18 +/- 0.04. Hepatic glucose output remained virtually zero throughout the experiment. We conclude that Dex decreases fetal hepatic glutamate output by increasing the routing of glutamate carbon into the citric acid cycle and by decreasing the hepatic uptake of glucogenic amino acids. PMID:10780940

  11. Glutamate biosensors based on diamond and graphene platforms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Wisetsuwannaphum, Sirikarn; Foord, John S

    2014-01-01

    l-Glutamate is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes and implicated in several neurological disorders, for which monitoring of dynamic levels of extracellular glutamate in the living brain tissues may contribute to medical understanding and treatments. Electrochemical sensing of glutamate has been developed recently mainly using platinum, carbon fibre and carbon nanotube electrodes. In the present work, we explore the fabrication and properties of electrochemical glutamate sensors fabricated on doped chemical vapour deposition diamond electrodes and graphene nanoplatelet structures. The sensors incorporate platinum nanoparticles to catalyse the electrooxidation of hydrogen peroxide, glutamate oxidase to oxidise glutamate, and a layer of poly-phenylenediamine to impart selectivity. The performance of the devices was compared to a similar sensor fabricated on glassy carbon. Both the diamond and the graphene sensor showed very competitive performance compared to the majority of existing electrochemical sensors. The graphene based sensor showed the best performance of the three investigated in terms of sensitivity, linear dynamic range and long term stability, whereas it was found that the diamond device showed the best limit of detection.

  12. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  13. Glutamate biosensors based on diamond and graphene platforms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Wisetsuwannaphum, Sirikarn; Foord, John S

    2014-01-01

    l-Glutamate is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes and implicated in several neurological disorders, for which monitoring of dynamic levels of extracellular glutamate in the living brain tissues may contribute to medical understanding and treatments. Electrochemical sensing of glutamate has been developed recently mainly using platinum, carbon fibre and carbon nanotube electrodes. In the present work, we explore the fabrication and properties of electrochemical glutamate sensors fabricated on doped chemical vapour deposition diamond electrodes and graphene nanoplatelet structures. The sensors incorporate platinum nanoparticles to catalyse the electrooxidation of hydrogen peroxide, glutamate oxidase to oxidise glutamate, and a layer of poly-phenylenediamine to impart selectivity. The performance of the devices was compared to a similar sensor fabricated on glassy carbon. Both the diamond and the graphene sensor showed very competitive performance compared to the majority of existing electrochemical sensors. The graphene based sensor showed the best performance of the three investigated in terms of sensitivity, linear dynamic range and long term stability, whereas it was found that the diamond device showed the best limit of detection. PMID:25427169

  14. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  15. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1) trigger the gating of GluD2 delta glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Visou; Perroy, Julie; Tricoire, Ludovic; Piochon, Claire; Dadak, Selma; Chen, Xiaoru; Dusart, Isabelle; Fagni, Laurent; Lambolez, Bertrand; Levenes, Carole

    2014-01-01

    The orphan GluD2 receptor belongs to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family but does not bind glutamate. Ligand-gated GluD2 currents have never been evidenced, and whether GluD2 operates as an ion channel has been a long-standing question. Here, we show that GluD2 gating is triggered by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, both in a heterologous expression system and in Purkinje cells. Thus, GluD2 is not only an adhesion molecule at synapses but also works as a channel. This gating mechanism reveals new properties of glutamate receptors that emerge from their interaction and opens unexpected perspectives regarding synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:24357660

  16. Identification of novel monosodium urate crystal regulated mRNAs by transcript profiling of dissected murine air pouch membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pessler, Frank; Mayer, Christian T; Jung, Sung Mun; Behrens, Ed M; Dai, Lie; Menetski, Joseph P; Schumacher, H Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The murine air pouch is a bursa-like space that resembles the human synovial membrane. Injection of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals into the pouch elicits an acute inflammatory response similar to human gout. We conducted the present study to identify mRNAs that were highly regulated by MSU crystals in the pouch membrane. Methods Air pouch membranes were meticulously dissected away from the overlying skin. Gene expression differences between MSU crystal stimulated and control membranes were determined by oligonucleotide microarray analysis 9 hours after injection of MSU crystals or buffer only. Differential regulation of selected targets was validated by relative quantitative PCR in time course experiments with dissected air pouch membranes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Results Eleven of the 12 most highly upregulated mRNAs were related to innate immunity and inflammation. They included mRNAs encoding histidine decarboxylase (the enzyme that synthesizes histamine), IL-6, the cell surface receptors PUMA-g and TREM-1, and the polypeptides Irg1 and PROK-2. IL-6 mRNA rose 108-fold 1 hour after crystal injection, coinciding with a surge in mRNAs encoding IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α and the immediate early transcription factor Egr-1. The other mRNAs rose up to 200-fold within the subsequent 3 to 8 hours. MSU crystals induced these mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner in cultured macrophages, with similar kinetics but lower fold changes. Among the downregulated mRNAs, quantitative PCR confirmed significant decreases in mRNAs encoding TREM-2 (an inhibitor of macrophage activation) and granzyme D (a constituent of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells) within 50 hours after crystal injection. Conclusion This analysis identified several genes that were previously not implicated in MSU crystal inflammation. The marked rise of the upregulated mRNAs after the early surge in cytokine and Egr-1 mRNAs suggests that they may be part of a 'second wave' of factors

  17. Bacterial cell-surface displaying of thermo-tolerant glutamate dehydrogenase and its application in L-glutamate assay.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianxia; Liang, Bo; Han, Dongfei; Tang, Xiangjiang; Lang, Qiaolin; Feng, Ruirui; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh) is reported to efficiently display on Escherichia coli cell surface by using N-terminal region of ice the nucleation protein as an anchoring motif. The presence of Gldh was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and enzyme activity assay. Gldh was detected mainly in the outer membrane fraction, suggesting that the Gldh was displayed on the bacterial cell surface. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacteria cell-surface displayed Gldh (bacteria-Gldh) were 70°C and 9.0, respectively. Additionally, the fusion protein retained almost 100% of its initial enzymatic activity after 1 month incubation at 4°C. Transition metal ions could inhibit the enzyme activity to different extents, while common anions had little adverse effect on enzyme activity. Importantly, the displayed Gldh is most specific to l-glutamate reported so far. The bacterial Gldh was enabled to catalyze oxidization of l-glutamate with NADP(+) as cofactor, and the resultant NADPH can be detected spectrometrically at 340nm. The bacterial-Gldh based l-glutamate assay was established, where the absorbance at 340nm increased linearly with the increasing l-glutamate concentration within the range of 10-400μM. Further, the proposed approach was successfully applied to measure l-glutamate in real samples. PMID:25659635

  18. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  20. Current approaches to enhance glutamate transporter function and expression.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Andréia C K

    2015-09-01

    L-glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS and has a central role in a variety of brain functions. The termination of glutamate neurotransmission by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) is essential to maintain glutamate concentration low in extracellular space and avoid excitotoxicity. EAAT2/GLT-1, being the most abundant subtype of glutamate transporter in the CNS, plays a key role in regulation of glutamate transmission. Dysfunction of EAAT2 has been correlated with various pathologies such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, among others. Therefore, activators of the function or enhancers of the expression of EAAT2/GLT-1 could serve as a potential therapy for these conditions. Translational activators of EAAT2/GLT-1, such as ceftriaxone and LDN/OSU-0212320, have been described to have significant protective effects in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and epilepsy. In addition, pharmacological activators of the activity of EAAT2/GLT-1 have been explored for decades and are currently emerging as promising tools for neuroprotection, having potential advantages over expression activators. This review describes the current status of the search for EAAT2/GLT-1 activators and addresses challenges and limitations that this approach might encounter. Termination of glutamate neurotransmission by glutamate transporter EAAT2 is essential to maintain homeostasis in the brain and to avoid excitotoxicity. Dysfunction of EAAT2 has been correlated with various neurological pathologies. Therefore, activators of the function or enhancers of the expression of EAAT2 (green arrows) could serve as a potential therapy for these conditions. This review describes the current status of the search for EAAT2 activators and addresses challenges and limitations of this approach. PMID:26096891

  1. Therapeutic effects of glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition.

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition. PMID:24984001

  3. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocyte Glutamate Regulation: Combined Excitotoxic Implications for Neuro-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection. PMID:22591363

  4. HIV-1, methamphetamine and astrocyte glutamate regulation: combined excitotoxic implications for neuro-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection.

  5. Electrogenic Steps Associated with Substrate Binding to the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter EAAC1.

    PubMed

    Tanui, Rose; Tao, Zhen; Silverstein, Nechama; Kanner, Baruch; Grewer, Christof

    2016-05-27

    Glutamate transporters actively take up glutamate into the cell, driven by the co-transport of sodium ions down their transmembrane concentration gradient. It was proposed that glutamate binds to its binding site and is subsequently transported across the membrane in the negatively charged form. With the glutamate binding site being located partially within the membrane domain, the possibility has to be considered that glutamate binding is dependent on the transmembrane potential and, thus, is electrogenic. Experiments presented in this report test this possibility. Rapid application of glutamate to the wild-type glutamate transporter subtype EAAC1 (excitatory amino acid carrier 1) through photo-release from caged glutamate generated a transient inward current, as expected for the electrogenic inward movement of co-transported Na(+) In contrast, glutamate application to a transporter with the mutation A334E induced transient outward current, consistent with movement of negatively charged glutamate into its binding site within the dielectric of the membrane. These results are in agreement with electrostatic calculations, predicting a valence for glutamate binding of -0.27. Control experiments further validate and rule out other possible explanations for the transient outward current. Electrogenic glutamate binding can be isolated in the mutant glutamate transporter because reactions, such as glutamate translocation and/or Na(+) binding to the glutamate-bound state, are inhibited by the A334E substitution. Electrogenic glutamate binding has to be considered together with other voltage-dependent partial reactions to cooperatively determine the voltage dependence of steady-state glutamate uptake and glutamate buffering at the synapse. PMID:27044739

  6. Mediator-less highly sensitive voltammetric detection of glutamate using glutamate dehydrogenase/vertically aligned CNTs grown on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Azam; Shahrokhian, Saeed; zad, Azam Iraji; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin; Vosoughi, Manouchehr; Darbari, Sara; Sanaee, Zeinab

    2012-01-15

    A sensitive glutamate biosensor is prepared based on glutamate dehydrogenase/vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (GLDH, VACNTs). Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on a silicon substrate by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) method. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized VACNTs was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic methods. Glutamate dehydrogenase covalently attached on tip of VACNTs. The electrochemical performance of the electrode for detection of glutamate was investigated by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. Differential pulse voltammetric determinations of glutamate are performed in mediator-less condition and also, in the presence of 1 and 5 μM thionine as electron mediator. The linear calibration curve of the concentration of glutamate versus peak current is investigated in a wide range of 0.1-500 μM. The mediator-less biosensor has a low detection limit of 57 nM and two linear ranges of 0.1-20 μM with a sensitivity of 0.976 mA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 20-300 μM with a sensitivity of 0.182 mA mM(-1) cm(-2). In the presence of 1 μM thionine as an electron mediator, the prepared biosensor shows a low detection limit of 68 nM and two linear ranges of 0.1-20 with a calibration sensitivity of 1.17 mA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 20-500 μM with a sensitivity of 0.153 mA mM(-1) cm(-2). The effects of the other biological compounds on the voltammetric behavior of the prepared biosensor and its response stability are investigated. The results are demonstrated that the GLDH/VACNTs electrode even without electron mediator is a suitable basic electrode for detection of glutamate. PMID:22040749

  7. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  8. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  9. 4-Hydroxyhexenal (HHE) impairs glutamate transport in astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Mark A; Bradley, Melissa A; Fister, Shuling X

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies show elevations of α,β-unsaturated aldehydic by-products of lipid peroxidation including 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein in vulnerable brain regions of subjects throughout the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More recently 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE), a diffusible α,β-unsaturated aldehyde resulting from peroxidation of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, was shown to be elevated in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus (HPG) of subjects with preclinical AD (PCAD) and in late stage AD (LAD). HHE treatment of primary rat cortical neuron cultures led to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in survival and glucose uptake. To determine if HHE also impairs glutamate uptake, primary rat astrocyte cultures were exposed to HHE for 4 hours and glutamate transport measured. Results show subtoxic (2.5 μM) HHE concentrations significantly (p < 0.05) impair glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT-2), the primary glutamate transporter in brain, from normal control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), PCAD, and LAD HPG followed by quantification of HHE immunolabeling showed a significant increase in HHE positive EAAT-2 in MCI and LAD HPG. Together these data suggest HHE can significantly impair glutamate uptake and may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22766736

  10. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  11. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  12. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  13. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  14. Frontal glutamate and reward processing in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Lorenz, Robert C; Pöhland, Lydia; Raufelder, Diana; Deserno, Lorenz; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The fronto-limbic network interaction, driven by glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, represents a core mechanism of motivated behavior and personality traits. Reward seeking behavior undergoes tremendous changes in adolescence paralleled by neurobiological changes of this network including the prefrontal cortex, striatum and amygdala. Since fronto-limbic dysfunctions also underlie major psychiatric diseases beginning in adolescence, this investigation focuses on network characteristics separating adolescents from adults. To investigate differences in network interactions, the brain reward system activity (slot machine task) together with frontal glutamate concentration (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) was measured in 28 adolescents and 26 adults employing functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. An inverse coupling of glutamate concentrations in the ACC and activation of the ventral striatum was observed in adolescents. Further, amygdala response in adolescents was negatively correlated with the personality trait impulsivity. For adults, no significant associations of network components or correlations with impulsivity were found. The inverse association between frontal glutamate concentration and striatal activation in adolescents is in line with the triadic model of motivated behavior stressing the important role of frontal top-down inhibition on limbic structures. Our data identified glutamate as the mediating neurotransmitter of this inhibitory process and demonstrates the relevance of glutamate on the reward system and related behavioral traits like impulsivity. This fronto-limbic coupling may represent a vulnerability factor for psychiatric disorders starting in adolescence but not in adulthood.

  15. The role of glutamate on the action of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-08-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common, chronic, recurrent mental illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Currently available antidepressants are known to affect the monoaminergic (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine) systems in the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmission via the excitatory amino acid glutamate also plays an important role in the neurobiology and treatment of this disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients with MDD, suggesting the role of glutamate in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant MDD. Furthermore, a number of preclinical studies demonstrated that the agents which act at glutamate receptors such as NMDA receptors, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) might have antidepressant-like activities in animal models of depression. In this article, the author reviews the role of glutamate in the neuron-glia communication induced by potential antidepressants.

  16. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Jeitner, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration—typically 10–12 mM—far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low—typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate

  17. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration-typically 10-12 mM-far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low-typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase

  18. [Features of glutamate dehydrogenase in fetal and adult rumen tissue].

    PubMed

    Kalachniuk, H I; Fomenko, I S; Kalachniuk, L H; Kavai, Sh; Marounek, M; Savka, O H

    2001-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from rumen mucosa of cow fetus, liver and two forms from mucosa (bacterial and tissue) of the adult animal were partly purified and characterized. The activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase was shown to depend on qualities of a biomass of microbes, adhered on surface of rumen mucosa. All enzymes from tissues (GDHTRF, TRC, TLC), revealed the hypersensibility to increase in the concentration medium of Zn2+, guanosine triphosphate (GTP), acting here in a role of negative modulators, and also adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and leucine, which acted as activators. However, in the same concentrations these effectors do not influence the activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase. And if all tissues enzymes are highly specific to coenzyme NADH, the bacterial ones almost in 3 times is more active at NADPH use. PMID:11642036

  19. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  20. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives.

  1. Glutamate transporters in brain ischemia: to modulate or not?

    PubMed Central

    Krzyżanowska, Weronika; Pomierny, Bartosz; Filip, Małgorzata; Pera, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we briefly describe glutamate (Glu) metabolism and its specific transports and receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Thereafter, we focus on excitatory amino acid transporters, cystine/glutamate antiporters (system xc-) and vesicular glutamate transporters, specifically addressing their location and roles in CNS and the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Glu transporters. We provide evidence from in vitro or in vivo studies concerning alterations in Glu transporter expression in response to hypoxia or ischemia, including limited human data that supports the role of Glu transporters in stroke patients. Moreover, the potential to induce brain tolerance to ischemia through modulation of the expression and/or activities of Glu transporters is also discussed. Finally we present strategies involving the application of ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological agents, eg β-lactam antibiotics, amitriptyline, riluzole and N-acetylcysteine, which result in the significant protection of nervous tissues against ischemia. PMID:24681894

  2. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor.

  3. Inflammation, glutamate, and glia in depression: a literature review.

    PubMed

    McNally, Leah; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Hannestad, Jonas

    2008-06-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that inflammation and glutamate dysfunction contribute to the pathophysiology of depression. In this review we provide an overview of how these two systems may interact. Excess levels of inflammatory mediators occur in a subgroup of depressed patients. Studies of acute experimental activation of the immune system with endotoxin and of chronic activation during interferon-alpha treatment show that inflammation can cause depression. Peripheral inflammation leads to microglial activation which could interfere with excitatory amino acid metabolism leading to inappropriate glutamate receptor activation. Loss of astroglia, a feature of depression, upsets the balance of anti- and pro-inflammatory mediators and further impairs the removal of excitatory amino acids. Microglia activated by excess inflammation, astroglial loss, and inappropriate glutamate receptor activation ultimately disrupt the delicate balance of neuroprotective versus neurotoxic effects in the brain, potentially leading to depression. PMID:18567974

  4. Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid from l-glutamic acid via l-glutamate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Niu, Panqing; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-10

    In this study, a novel strategy for α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) production from l-glutamic acid using recombinant l-glutamate oxidase (LGOX) was developed. First, by analyzing the molecular structure characteristics of l-glutamic acid and α-KG, LGOX was found to be the best catalyst for oxidizing the amino group of l-glutamic acid to a ketonic group without the need for exogenous cofactor. Then the LGOX gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a soluble and active form, and the recombinant LGOX activity reached to a maximum value of 0.59U/mL at pH 6.5, 30°C. Finally, the maximum α-KG concentration reached 104.7g/L from 110g/L l-glutamic acid in 24h, under the following optimum conditions: 1.5U/mL LGOX, 250U/mL catalase, 3mM MnCl2, 30°C, and pH 6.5.

  5. Glutamate Signaling in Benign and Malignant Disorders: Current Status, Future Perspectives, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stacey S.; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate, a nonessential amino acid, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. As such, glutamate has been shown to play a role in not only neural processes, such as learning and memory, but also in bioenergetics, biosynthetic and metabolic oncogenic pathways. Glutamate has been the target of intense investigation for its involvement not only in the pathogenesis of benign neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, and amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but also in carcinogenesis and progression of malignant diseases. In addition to its intracellular activities, glutamate in secreted form is a phylogenetically conserved cell signaling molecule. Glutamate binding activates multiple major receptor families including the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), both of which have been implicated in various signaling pathways in cancer. Inhibition of extracellular glutamate release or glutamate receptor activation via competitive or non-competitive antagonists decreases growth, migration and invasion and induces apoptosis in breast cancer, melanoma, glioma and prostate cancer cells. In this review, we discuss the current state of glutamate signaling research as it relates to benign and malignant diseases. In addition, we provide a synopsis of clinical trials using glutamate antagonists for the treatment of NDD and malignant diseases. We conclude that in addition to its potential role as a metabolic biomarker, glutamate receptors and glutamate-initiated signaling pathways may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for cancer. PMID:23983606

  6. Electrogenic glutamate uptake in glial cells is activated by intracellular potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Boris; Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1988-09-01

    Uptake of glutamate into glial cells in the CNS maintains the extracellular glutamate concentration below neurotoxic levels and helps terminate its action as a neurotransmitter 1. The co-transport of two sodium ions on the glutamate carrier is thought to provide the energy needed to transport glutamate into cells2,3. We have shown recently that glutamate uptake can be detected electrically because the excess of Na+ ions transported with each glutamate anion results in a net current flow into the cell4. We took advantage of the control of the environment, both inside and outside the cell, provided by whole-cell patch-clamping and now report that glutamate uptake is activated by intracellular potassium and inhibited by extracellular potassium. Our results indicate that one K+ ion is transported out of the cell each time a glutamate anion and three Na+ ions are transported in. A carrier with this stoichiometry can accumulate glutamate against a much greater concentration gradient than a carrier co-transporting one glutamate anion and two Na+ ions. Pathological rises in extracellular potassium concentration will inhibit glutamate uptake by depolarizing glial cells and by preventing the loss of K+ from the glutamate carrier. This will facilitate a rise in the extracellular glutamate concentration to neurotoxic levels and contribute to the neuronal death occurring in brain anoxia and ischaemia.

  7. Chronic Glutamate Toxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases—What is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lewerenz, Jan; Maher, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors) and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors). Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26733784

  8. FATE OF FISSILE MATERIAL BOUND TO MONOSODIUM TITANATE DURING COOPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), Tank 48H currently holds approximately 240,000 gallons of slurry which contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (TPB). A copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) reaction is currently being examined as a method for destroying the TPB present in Tank 48H. Part of the development of that process includes an examination of the fate of the Tank 48H fissile material which is adsorbed onto monosodium titanate (MST) particles. This report details results from experiments designed to examine the potential degradation of MST during CCPO processing and the subsequent fate of the adsorbed fissile material. Experiments were conducted to simulate the CCPO process on MST solids loaded with sorbates in a simplified Tank 48H simulant. Loaded MST solids were placed into the Tank 48H simplified simulant without TPB, and the experiments were then carried through acid addition (pH adjustment to 11), peroxide addition, holding at temperature (50 C) for one week, and finally NaOH addition to bring the free hydroxide concentration to a target concentration of 1 M. Testing was conducted without TPB to show the maximum possible impact on MST since the competing oxidation of TPB with peroxide was absent. In addition, the Cu catalyst was also omitted, which will maximize the interaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the MST; however, the results may be non-conservative assuming the Cu-peroxide active intermediate is more reactive than the peroxide radical itself. The study found that both U and Pu desorb from the MST when the peroxide addition begins, although to different extents. Virtually all of the U goes into solution at the beginning of the peroxide addition, whereas Pu reaches a maximum of {approx}34% leached during the peroxide addition. Ti from the MST was also found to come into solution during the peroxide addition. Therefore, Ti is present with the fissile in solution. After the peroxide addition is complete, the Pu and Ti are found to

  9. Glutamate Excitotoxicity Mediates Neuronal Apoptosis After Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Elaine E.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Lange, Mary S.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Blue, Mary E.; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Johnston, Michael V.; Baumgartner, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prolonged hypothermic circulatory arrest results in neuronal cell death and neurologic injury. We have previously shown that hypothermic circulatory arrest causes both neuronal apoptosis and necrosis in a canine model. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase reduced neuronal apoptosis, while glutamate receptor antagonism reduced necrosis in our model. This study was undertaken to determine whether glutamate receptor antagonism reduces nitric oxide formation and neuronal apoptosis after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Methods Sixteen hound dogs underwent 2 hours of circulatory arrest at 18°C and were sacrificed after 8 hours. Group 1 (n=8) was treated with MK-801, 0.75 mg/kg IV prior to arrest followed by 75 μg/kg/hr infusion. Group 2 dogs (n=8) received vehicle only. Intracerebral levels of excitatory amino acids and citrulline, an equal co-product of nitric oxide, were measured. Apoptosis, identified by H&E staining and confirmed by electron microscopy, was blindly scored from 0 (normal) to 100 (severe injury), while nick-end labeling demonstrated DNA fragmentation. Results Group 1 and 2 dogs had similar intracerebral levels of glutamate. However, MK-801 significantly reduced intracerebral glycine and citrulline levels as compared to HCA controls. MK-801 significantly inhibited apoptosis (7.92 ± 7.85 vs. 62.08 ± 6.28, Group 1 vs. 2, p<0.001). Conclusions Our results showed that glutamate receptor antagonism significantly reduced nitric oxide formation and neuronal apoptosis. We provide evidence that glutamate excitotoxicity mediates neuronal apoptosis in addition to necrosis after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Clinical glutamate receptor antagonists may have therapeutic benefit in ameliorating both types of neurologic injury after hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:20103318

  10. Glutamate-dopamine-GABA interactions in the aging basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Francisco; Segovia, Gregorio; Del Arco, Alberto

    2008-08-01

    The study of neurotransmitter interactions gives a better understanding of the physiology of specific circuits in the brain. In this review we focus mostly on our own results on the interaction of the neurotransmitters glutamate, dopamine and GABA in the basal ganglia during the normal process of aging. We review first the studies on the action of endogenous glutamate on the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and GABA in the neostriatum and nucleus accumbens during aging. It was found that there exists an age-related change in the interaction of glutamate, dopamine and GABA and that these effects of aging exhibit a dorsal-to-ventral pattern of effects with no changes in the dorsal parts (dorsal striatum) and changes in the most ventral parts (nucleus accumbens). Second we reviewed the data on the effects of different ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists on the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and GABA in the nucleus accumbens. The results obtained clearly show the different contribution of each glutamate receptor subtype in the age-related changes produced on the interaction of glutamate, dopamine and GABA in this area of the brain. Third the effects of an enriched environment on the action of AMPA and NMDA-receptor agonists in the nucleus accumbens of rats during aging are also evaluated. Finally, and since the nucleus accumbens has been suggested to play a role in emotion and motivation and also motor behaviour, we speculated on the possibility of a specific contribution for the different glutamatergic pathways terminating in the nucleus accumbens and their interaction with a decreased dopamine playing a relevant role in motor behaviour during aging.

  11. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE, AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR PRETREATMENT OF HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-01-12

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal, and sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results from the development of an improved titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and effective capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  12. [Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid by L-glutamate oxidase from L-glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Niu, Panqing; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Liming

    2014-08-01

    We produced α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) from L-glutamic acid, using enzymatic transformation approach with L-glutamate oxidase (LGOX). First, wild strain Streptomyces sp. FMME066 was mutated with NTG, a genetically stable mutant Streptomyces sp. FMME067 was obtained. Under the optimal nutrition conditions with fructose 10 g/L, peptone 7.5 g/L, KH2PO4 1 g/L and CaCl2 0.05 g/L, the maximum LGOX activity reached 0.14 U/mL. The LGOX was stable to pH and temperature, and Mn2+ had a stimulating effect. Finally, after 24 h enzymatic conversion under the optimal conditions, the maximum titer of α-KG reached 38.1 g/L from 47 g/L L-glutamic acid. Enzymatic transformation by LGOX is a potential approach for α-KG production.

  13. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  14. Rapid Microelectrode Measurements and the Origin and Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, E.R.; Hascup, K.N.; Stephens, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Huettl, P.; Gratton, A.; Gerhardt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a significant role in several mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, addiction and anxiety. Previous studies on PFC glutamate-mediated function have used techniques that raise questions on the neuronal vs. astrocytic origin of glutamate. The present studies used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to monitor second-by-second resting glutamate levels in the PFC of awake rats. Locally-applied drugs were employed in an attempt to discriminate between the neuronal or glial components of the resting glutamate signal. Local application of tetrodotoxin (TTX; sodium channel blocker), produced a significant (~40%) decline in resting glutamate levels. In addition significant reductions in extracellular glutamate were seen with locally-applied ω-conotoxin (MVIIC; ~50%; calcium channel blocker), and the mGluR⅔ agonist, LY379268 (~20%), and a significant increase with the mGluR⅔ antagonist LY341495 (~40%), effects all consistent with a large neuronal contribution to the resting glutamate levels. Local administration of D,L-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; glutamate transporter inhibitor) produced an ~120% increase in extracellular glutamate levels, supporting that excitatory amino acid transporters, which are largely located on glia, modulate clearance of extracellular glutamate. Interestingly, local application of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG; cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor), produced small, non-significant bi-phasic changes in extracellular glutamate versus vehicle control. Finally, pre-administration of TTX completely blocked the glutamate response to tail pinch stress. Taken together, these results support that PFC resting glutamate levels in rats as measured by the MEA technology are at least 40-50% derived from neurons. Furthermore, these data support that the impulse flow-dependent glutamate release from a physiologically-evoked event is entirely neuronally derived. PMID:20969570

  15. Zinc-positive boutons in the cerebral cortex of lizards show glutamate immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guijarro, F J; Soriano, E; Del Rio, J A; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1991-10-01

    Zinc-positive boutons, originating in the medial cortex of lizards, exhibit glutamate immunoreactivity. This finding supports the presumed homology between lizard zinc-positive boutons and the hippocampal mossy fibres of mammals, which are also glutamate-immunoreactive and zinc-positive. Zinc-positive boutons of lizards contain a chelatable pool of zinc located in the hippocampal mossy fibres of mammals. These synaptic systems also contain glutamate, which indicates a possible simultaneous action of zinc and glutamate during synaptic transmission.

  16. Glutamate secretion and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 expression during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Valiya Veettil, Mohanan; Dutta, Dipanjan; Bottero, Virginie; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Gjyshi, Olsi; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with endothelial Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and B-cell proliferative primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), common malignancies seen in immunocompromised HIV-1 infected patients. The progression of these cancers occurs by the proliferation of cells latently infected with KSHV, which is highly dependent on autocrine and paracrine factors secreted from the infected cells. Glutamate and glutamate receptors have emerged as key regulators of intracellular signaling pathways and cell proliferation. However, whether they play any role in the pathological changes associated with virus induced oncogenesis is not known. Here, we report the first systematic study of the role of glutamate and its metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) in KSHV infected cell proliferation. Our studies show increased glutamate secretion and glutaminase expression during de novo KSHV infection of endothelial cells as well as in KSHV latently infected endothelial and B-cells. Increased mGluR1 expression was detected in KSHV infected KS and PEL tissue sections. Increased c-Myc and glutaminase expression in the infected cells was mediated by KSHV latency associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1). In addition, mGluR1 expression regulating host RE-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) was retained in the cytoplasm of infected cells. KSHV latent protein Kaposin A was also involved in the over expression of mGluR1 by interacting with REST in the cytoplasm of infected cells and by regulating the phosphorylation of REST and interaction with β-TRCP for ubiquitination. Colocalization of Kaposin A with REST was also observed in KS and PEL tissue samples. KSHV infected cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by glutamate release inhibitor and mGluR1 antagonists. These studies demonstrated that elevated glutamate secretion and mGluR1 expression play a role in KSHV induced cell proliferation and

  17. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  18. Unveiling the secret lives of glutamate transporters: VGLUTs engage in multiple transport modes.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Alessio

    2014-12-17

    Accumulation of glutamate in synaptic vesicles is mediated by vesicular glutamate transporters called VGLUTs. In the current issue of Neuron, Preobraschenski et al. (2014) show that the VGLUTs, in addition to transporting glutamate, also provide the conductances necessary to maintain the appropriate voltage and pH inside these vesicles. PMID:25521371

  19. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  3. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  4. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis.

  5. Delineation of an in vivo inhibitor for Aspergillus glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Noor, Shahid; Varadarajalu, Lakshmi Prabha; Punekar, Narayan S

    2008-01-01

    NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) along with glutamine synthetase plays a pivotal role in ammonium assimilation. Specific inhibitors were valuable in defining the importance of glutamine synthetase in nitrogen metabolism. Selective in vivo inhibition of NADP-GDH has so far been an elusive desideratum. Isophthalate, a potent in vitro inhibitor of Aspergillus niger NADP-GDH [Noor S, Punekar NS. Allosteric NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase from aspergilli: purification, characterization and implications for metabolic regulation at the carbon-nitrogen interface. Microbiology 2005;151:1409-19], was evaluated for its efficacy in vivo. Dimethyl ester of isophthalate (DMIP), but not isophthalate, inhibited A. niger growth on agar as well as in liquid culture. This was ascribed to the inability of isophthalate to enter fungal mycelia. Subsequent to DMIP addition however, intracellular isophthalate could be demonstrated. Apart from NAD-GDH, no other enzyme including NAD-glutamate synthase was inhibited by isophthalate. A cross-over at NADP-GDH step of metabolism was observed as a direct consequence of isophthalate (formed in vivo from DMIP) inhibiting this enzyme. Addition of ammonium to DMIP-treated A. niger mycelia resulted in intensive vacuolation, retraction of cytoplasm and autolysis. Taken together, these results implicate glutamate dehydrogenase and NADP-GDH in particular, as a key target of in vivo isophthalate inhibition during ammonium assimilation. PMID:22578865

  6. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  7. Microbial production and chemical transformation of poly-γ-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (PGA), a novel polyamide material with industrial applications, possesses a nylon-like backbone, is structurally similar to polyacrylic acid, is biodegradable and is safe for human consumption. PGA is frequently found in the mucilage of natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food. To date, three different types of PGA, namely a homo polymer of D-glutamate (D-PGA), a homo polymer of L-glutamate (L-PGA), and a random copolymer consisting of D- and L-glutamate (DL-PGA), are known. This review will detail the occurrence and physiology of PGA. The proposed reaction mechanism of PGA synthesis including its localization and the structure of the involved enzyme, PGA synthetase, are described. The occurrence of multiple carboxyl residues in PGA likely plays a role in its relative unsuitability for the development of bio-nylon plastics and thus, establishment of an efficient PGA-reforming strategy is of great importance. Aside from the potential applications of PGA proposed to date, a new technique for chemical transformation of PGA is also discussed. Finally, some techniques for PGA and its derivatives in advanced material technology are presented.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: From the workbench to the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, F.; Bockaert, J.; Collingridge, G.L.; Conn, P.J.; Ferraguti, F.; Schoepp, D.D.; Wroblewski, J.T.; Pin, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were discovered in the mid 1980s and originally described as glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis. Almost 6500 articles have been published since then, and subtype-selective mGlu receptor ligands are now under clinical development for the treatment of a variety of disorders such as Fragile-X syndrome, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, generalized anxiety disorder, chronic pain, and gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Prof. Erminio Costa was linked to the early times of the mGlu receptor history, when a few research groups challenged the general belief that glutamate could only activate ionotropic receptors and all metabolic responses to glutamate were secondary to calcium entry. This review moves from those nostalgic times to the most recent advances in the physiology and pharmacology of mGlu receptors, and highlights the role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes in the pathophysiology of human disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Trends in Neuropharmacology: In Memory of Erminio Costa’. PMID:21036182

  9. Continuous glutamate production using an immobilized whole-cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Ryu, D.D.Y.

    1982-10-01

    For the purpose of saving the energy and raw materials required in a glutamate fermentation, an immobilized whole-cell system was prepared and its performance in a continuous reactor system was evaluated. Corynebacterium glutamicum (a mutant strain of ATCC 13058) whole cell was immobilized in k-carrageenan matrix and the gel structure was strengthened by treatment with a hardening agent. The effective diffusivities of carrageenan gel for glucose and oxygen were formed to decrease significantly with an increase in carrageenan concentration, while the gel strength showed an increasing trend. Based on the physical and chemical properties of carrageenan gel, the immobilized method was improved and the operation of the continuous reactor system was partially optimized. In an air-stirred fermentor, the continuous production of glutamate was carried out. The effect of the dilution rate of glutamate production and operation stability was investigated. The performance of the continuous wbole-cell reactor system was evaluated by measuring glutamate productivity for a period of 30 days; it was found to be far superior to the performance of convention batch reactor systems using free cells.

  10. Microbial production and chemical transformation of poly-γ-glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (PGA), a novel polyamide material with industrial applications, possesses a nylon-like backbone, is structurally similar to polyacrylic acid, is biodegradable and is safe for human consumption. PGA is frequently found in the mucilage of natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food. To date, three different types of PGA, namely a homo polymer of d-glutamate (D-PGA), a homo polymer of l-glutamate (L-PGA), and a random copolymer consisting of d- and l-glutamate (DL-PGA), are known. This review will detail the occurrence and physiology of PGA. The proposed reaction mechanism of PGA synthesis including its localization and the structure of the involved enzyme, PGA synthetase, are described. The occurrence of multiple carboxyl residues in PGA likely plays a role in its relative unsuitability for the development of bio-nylon plastics and thus, establishment of an efficient PGA-reforming strategy is of great importance. Aside from the potential applications of PGA proposed to date, a new technique for chemical transformation of PGA is also discussed. Finally, some techniques for PGA and its derivatives in advanced material technology are presented. PMID:23855427

  11. Paraventricular Stimulation with Glutamate Elicits Bradycardia and Pituitary Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Miyamoto, Michael; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), or the organic acid, acetate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), was microinjected (50 nl over 2 min) directly into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats while arterial blood pressure and heart rate and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin, and oxytocin were measured. Activation of PVN neurons with L-glutamate led to increases in plasma ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin and a profound bradycardia (-80 beats/min) with little change in arterial blood pressure. Microinjection of acetate had no effect on the above variables. The decrease in heart rate was shown to be dependent on the concentration of glutamate injected and the volume of injectate. The bradycardia was mediated through the autonomic nervous system because ganglionic blockade (pentolinium tartrate) eliminated the response; atropine and propranolol severely attenuated the bradycardia. The bradycardia was greatest when L-glutamate was microinjected into the caudal PVN. Injections into the rostral PVN or into nuclei surrounding the PVN led to small or nonsignificant decreases in heart rate. Focal electric stimulation (2-50 pA) of the PVN also led to decreases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that activation of PVN neurons leads to the release of ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin from the pituitary and a bradycardia that is mediated by the autonomic nervous system.

  12. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  13. Microbial production and chemical transformation of poly-γ-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (PGA), a novel polyamide material with industrial applications, possesses a nylon-like backbone, is structurally similar to polyacrylic acid, is biodegradable and is safe for human consumption. PGA is frequently found in the mucilage of natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food. To date, three different types of PGA, namely a homo polymer of D-glutamate (D-PGA), a homo polymer of L-glutamate (L-PGA), and a random copolymer consisting of D- and L-glutamate (DL-PGA), are known. This review will detail the occurrence and physiology of PGA. The proposed reaction mechanism of PGA synthesis including its localization and the structure of the involved enzyme, PGA synthetase, are described. The occurrence of multiple carboxyl residues in PGA likely plays a role in its relative unsuitability for the development of bio-nylon plastics and thus, establishment of an efficient PGA-reforming strategy is of great importance. Aside from the potential applications of PGA proposed to date, a new technique for chemical transformation of PGA is also discussed. Finally, some techniques for PGA and its derivatives in advanced material technology are presented. PMID:23855427

  14. Deeper Insights into the Allosteric Modulation of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Regan, Michael C; Furukawa, Hiro

    2016-09-21

    Two articles in this issue of Neuron (Yelshanskaya et al., 2016; Yi et al., 2016) explore the structural basis of allosteric inhibition in ionotropic glutamate receptors, providing key insights into how iGluRs function in the brain as well as how they might be pharmacologically modulated in neurological disorders and disease. PMID:27657445

  15. Blood and Brain Glutamate Levels in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Tamer H.; Abdelrahman, Hadeel M.; Fattah, Nelly R. Abdel; El-Masry, Nagda M.; Hashim, Haitham M.; El-Gerby, Khaled M.; Fattah, Nermin R. Abdel

    2013-01-01

    Despite of the great efforts that move forward to clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms in autism, the cause of this disorder, however, remains largely unknown. There is an increasing body of literature concerning neurochemical contributions to the pathophysiology of autism. We aimed to determine blood and brain levels of glutamate in children…

  16. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L. Jr.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  17. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  18. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in schizophrenia: a review.

    PubMed

    Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo; Gerretsen, Philip; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Kobylianskii, Jane; Chung, Jun Ku; Caravaggio, Fernando; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2014-10-01

    Findings from neuroimaging studies in patients with schizophrenia suggest widespread structural changes although the mechanisms through which these changes occur are currently unknown. Glutamatergic activity appears to be increased in the early phases of schizophrenia and may contribute to these structural alterations through an excitotoxic effect. The primary aim of this review was to describe the possible role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in explaining the presence of neuroanatomical changes within schizophrenia. A Medline(®) literature search was conducted, identifying English language studies on the topic of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in schizophrenia, using the terms "schizophreni" and "glutam" and (("MRS" or "MRI" or "magnetic resonance") or ("computed tomography" or "CT")). Studies concomitantly investigating glutamatergic activity and brain structure in patients with schizophrenia were included. Results are discussed in the context of findings from preclinical studies. Seven studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. These studies provide inconclusive support for the role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in the occurrence of structural changes within schizophrenia, with the caveat that there is a paucity of human studies investigating this topic. Preclinical data suggest that an excitotoxic effect may occur as a result of a paradoxical increase in glutamatergic activity following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction. Based on animal literature, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity may account for certain structural changes present in schizophrenia, but additional human studies are required to substantiate these findings. Future studies should adopt a longitudinal design and employ magnetic resonance imaging techniques to investigate whether an association between glutamatergic activity and structural changes exists in patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Glutamate, GABA, and glutamine are synchronously upregulated in the mouse lateral septum during the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic structural and functional remodeling occurs in the postpartum brain for the establishment of maternal care, which is essential for the growth and development of young offspring. Glutamate and GABA signaling are critically important in modulating multiple behavioral performances. Large scale signaling changes occur in the postpartum brain, but it is still not clear to what extent the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA change and whether the ratio of glutamate/GABA remains balanced. In this study, we examined the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle in the lateral septum (LS) of postpartum female mice. In postpartum females (relative to virgins), tissue levels of glutamate and GABA were elevated in LS and increased mRNA was found for the respective enzymes producing glutamate and GABA, glutaminase (Gls) and glutamate decarboxylase 1 and 2 (Gad1 and Gad2). The common precursor, glutamine, was elevated as was the enzyme that produces it, glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul). Additionally, glutamate, GABA, and glutamine were positively correlated and the glutamate/GABA ratio was almost identical in the postpartum and virgin females. Collectively, these findings indicate that glutamate and GABA signaling are increased and that the ratio of glutamate/GABA is well balanced in the maternal LS. The postpartum brain may provide a useful model system for understanding how glutamate and GABA are linked despite large signaling changes. Given that some mental health disorders, including depression and schizophrenia display dysregulated glutamate/GABA ratio, and there is increased vulnerability to mental disorders in mothers, it is possible that these postpartum disorders emerge when glutamate and GABA changes are not properly coordinated. PMID:25451092

  20. Glutamate, GABA, and glutamine are synchronously upregulated in the mouse lateral septum during the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-12-01

    Dramatic structural and functional remodeling occurs in the postpartum brain for the establishment of maternal care, which is essential for the growth and development of young offspring. Glutamate and GABA signaling are critically important in modulating multiple behavioral performances. Large scale signaling changes occur in the postpartum brain, but it is still not clear to what extent the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA change and whether the ratio of glutamate/GABA remains balanced. In this study, we examined the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle in the lateral septum (LS) of postpartum female mice. In postpartum females (relative to virgins), tissue levels of glutamate and GABA were elevated in LS and increased mRNA was found for the respective enzymes producing glutamate and GABA, glutaminase (Gls) and glutamate decarboxylase 1 and 2 (Gad1 and Gad2). The common precursor, glutamine, was elevated as was the enzyme that produces it, glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul). Additionally, glutamate, GABA, and glutamine were positively correlated and the glutamate/GABA ratio was almost identical in the postpartum and virgin females. Collectively, these findings indicate that glutamate and GABA signaling are increased and that the ratio of glutamate/GABA is well balanced in the maternal LS. The postpartum brain may provide a useful model system for understanding how glutamate and GABA are linked despite large signaling changes. Given that some mental health disorders, including depression and schizophrenia display dysregulated glutamate/GABA ratio, and there is increased vulnerability to mental disorders in mothers, it is possible that these postpartum disorders emerge when glutamate and GABA changes are not properly coordinated.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of higher amino acid Schiff bases, as monosodium salts and neutral forms. Investigation of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all Schiff bases, antibacterial and antifungal activities of neutral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan

    2014-09-01

    Schiff bases derived from 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde and 4-aminobutyric acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid and 6-aminohexanoic acid were synthesized both as monosodium salts (1a-3a) and neutral forms (1b-3b). The monosodium-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The neutral-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, 2D NMR (HMQC), mass, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding and related tautomeric equilibria in all the Schiff bases were studied by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra in solution. Additionally, the neutral-Schiff bases were screened against Staphylococcus aureus-EB18, S. aureus-ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli-ATCC 11230, Candida albicans-M3 and C. albicans-ATCC 16231.

  2. Calmodulin binding to glutamate decarboxylase is required for regulation of glutamate and GABA metabolism and normal development in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, G; Lev-Yadun, S; Fridmann, Y; Arazi, T; Katsnelson, H; Zik, M; Fromm, H

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of glutamate to CO2 and gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). GAD is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but only plant GAD has been shown to bind calmodulin (CaM). Here, we assess the role of the GAD CaM-binding domain in vivo. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a mutant petunia GAD lacking the CaM-binding domain (GADdeltaC plants) exhibit severe morphological abnormalities, such as short stems, in which cortex parenchyma cells fail to elongate, associated with extremely high GABA and low glutamate levels. The morphology of transgenic plants expressing the full-length GAD (GAD plants) is indistinguishable from that of wild-type (WT) plants. In WT and GAD plant extracts, GAD activity is inhibited by EGTA and by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, and is associated with a CaM-containing protein complex of approximately 500 kDa. In contrast, GADdeltaC plants lack normal GAD complexes, and GAD activity in their extracts is not affected by EGTA and trifluoperazine. We conclude that CaM binding to GAD is essential for the regulation of GABA and glutamate metabolism, and that regulation of GAD activity is necessary for normal plant development. This study is the first to demonstrate an in vivo function for CaM binding to a target protein in plants. Images PMID:8670800

  3. Calmodulin binding to glutamate decarboxylase is required for regulation of glutamate and GABA metabolism and normal development in plants.

    PubMed

    Baum, G; Lev-Yadun, S; Fridmann, Y; Arazi, T; Katsnelson, H; Zik, M; Fromm, H

    1996-06-17

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of glutamate to CO2 and gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). GAD is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but only plant GAD has been shown to bind calmodulin (CaM). Here, we assess the role of the GAD CaM-binding domain in vivo. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a mutant petunia GAD lacking the CaM-binding domain (GADdeltaC plants) exhibit severe morphological abnormalities, such as short stems, in which cortex parenchyma cells fail to elongate, associated with extremely high GABA and low glutamate levels. The morphology of transgenic plants expressing the full-length GAD (GAD plants) is indistinguishable from that of wild-type (WT) plants. In WT and GAD plant extracts, GAD activity is inhibited by EGTA and by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, and is associated with a CaM-containing protein complex of approximately 500 kDa. In contrast, GADdeltaC plants lack normal GAD complexes, and GAD activity in their extracts is not affected by EGTA and trifluoperazine. We conclude that CaM binding to GAD is essential for the regulation of GABA and glutamate metabolism, and that regulation of GAD activity is necessary for normal plant development. This study is the first to demonstrate an in vivo function for CaM binding to a target protein in plants.

  4. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  5. Construction of glutamate biosensor based on covalent immobilization of glutamate oxidase on polypyrrole nanoparticles/polyaniline modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Batra, Bhawna; Kumari, Seema; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-04-10

    A method is described for construction of a highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for detection of glutamate. The biosensor is based on covalent immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GluOx) onto polypyrrole nanoparticles and polyaniline composite film (PPyNPs/PANI) electrodeposited onto Au electrode. The enzyme electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The biosensor showed optimum response within 3s at pH 7.5 (0.1 M sodium phosphate) and 35 °C, when operated at 50 mV s⁻¹. It exhibited excellent sensitivity (detection limit as 0.1 nM), fast response time and wider linear range (from 0.02 to 400 μM). Analytical recovery of added glutamate (5 mM and 10 mM) was 95.56 and 97%, while within batch and between batch coefficients of variation were 3.2% and 3.35% respectively. The enzyme electrode was used 100 times over a period of 60 days, when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor measured glutamate level in food stuff, which correlated well with a standard colorimetric method (r=0.99). PMID:24629270

  6. The cystine/glutamate antiporter: when too much of a good thing goes bad.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity represents a major cellular component of ischemic brain injury. In this issue of the JCI, Soria and colleagues reveal that the cystine/glutamate exchanger is an important source of excitotoxic glutamate in response to ischemia induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation. As the exchanger is a primary determinant of both extracellular glutamate and intracellular glutathione, the findings from this study not only provide important insight into the mechanisms of brain ischemia but also demonstrate the complexity of the yin and yang of glutamate homeostasis and cellular redox balance.

  7. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  8. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  9. An examination of aspartate decarboxylase and glutamate decarboxylase activity in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Graham; Ding, Haizhen; Rocheleau, Tom; Mayhew, George; Reddy, Erin; Han, Qian; Christensen, Bruce M.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    A major pathway of beta-alanine synthesis in insects is through the alpha-decarboxylation of aspartate, but the enzyme involved in the decarboxylation of aspartate has not been clearly defined in mosquitoes and characterized in any insect species. In this study, we expressed two putative mosquito glutamate decarboxylase-like enzymes of mosquitoes and critically analyzed their substrate specificity and biochemical properties. Our results provide clear biochemical evidence establishing that one of them is an aspartate decarboxylase and the other is a glutamate decarboxylase. The mosquito aspartate decarboxylase functions exclusively on the production of beta-alanine with no activity with glutamate. Likewise the mosquito glutamate decarboxylase is highly specific to glutamate with essentially no activity with aspartate. Although insect aspartate decarboxylase shares high sequence identity with glutamate decarboxylase, we are able to closely predict aspartate decarboxylase from glutamate decarboxylase based on the difference of their active site residues. PMID:19842059

  10. Effect of insulin on the compartmentation of glutamate for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.B.; Mohan, C.; Bessman, S.P.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of insulin on the formation of CO/sub 2/ and incorporation of 1-/sup 14/C glutamine and U-/sup 14/C acetate into protein was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Insulin caused an 18% increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from U-/sup 14/C acetate in comparison to a 10% increase from 1-/sup 14/C glutamate. Insulin caused a greater increase in the incorporation of tracer acetate carbons into hepatocyte protein. Hydrolysis of labeled protein and subsequent determination of glutamate specific activity revealed that incorporation of acetate carbons into protein as glutamate was about 52% greater in the presence of insulin. These results demonstrate the existence of two compartments of glutamate for protein synthesis: (i) glutamate generated in the Krebs cycle through transamination of a-ketoglutarate; (ii) cytosolic glutamate. Insulin had a greater stimulatory effect on the incorporation of glutamate generated in the Krebs cycle.

  11. Metabolic pathways and activity-dependent modulation of glutamate concentration in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Silvia; Giove, Federico; Dinuzzo, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Glutamate is one of the most versatile molecules present in the human brain, involved in protein synthesis, energy production, ammonia detoxification, and transport of reducing equivalents. Aside from these critical metabolic roles, glutamate plays a major part in brain function, being not only the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter, but also the precursor for γ-aminobutyric acid, the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter. Regulation of glutamate levels is pivotal for normal brain function, as abnormal extracellular concentration of glutamate can lead to impaired neurotransmission, neurodegeneration and even neuronal death. Understanding how the neuron-astrocyte functional and metabolic interactions modulate glutamate concentration during different activation status and under physiological and pathological conditions is a challenging task, and can only be tentatively estimated from current literature. In this paper, we focus on describing the various metabolic pathways which potentially affect glutamate concentration in the brain, and emphasize which ones are likely to produce the variations in glutamate concentration observed during enhanced neuronal activity in human studies.

  12. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Faith LW; Featherstone, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the types of genes identified, rather

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in the control of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Witkin, Jeffrey M; Marek, Gerard J; Johnson, Bryan G; Schoepp, Darryle D

    2007-04-01

    Current treatments for depression are less than optimal in terms of onset of action, response and remission rates, and side-effect profiles. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter controlling synaptic excitability and plasticity in most brain circuits, including limbic pathways involved in depression. Thus, drugs that target glutamate neuronal transmission offer novel approaches to treat depression. Recently, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine has demonstrated clinical efficacy in a randomized clinical trial of depressed patients. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors function to regulate glutamate neuronal transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Accumulating evidence from biochemical and behavioral studies support the idea that the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors is linked to mood disorders and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. For example, mGlu receptor modulation can facilitate neuronal stem cell proliferation (neurogenesis) and the release of neurotransmitters that are associated with treatment response to depression in humans (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine). In particular, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3 and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MSG0039, MPEP) have been linked to the above pharmacology and have also shown in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy such as the forced-swim test. The in vivo actions of these agents can be antagonized by compounds that block AMPA receptors, suggesting that their actions are direct downstream consequences of the enhancement of glutamate neuronal transmission in brain regions involved in depression. These data provide new approaches to finding mechanistically distinct drugs for depression that may have advantages over current therapies for some patients

  14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Emanuela; Auta, James; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Pesold, Christine; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2001-01-01

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72–96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in γ2 and α1; increase in α5) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD67. In contrast, dl-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal. PMID:11248104

  15. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Izzo, E; Auta, J; Impagnatiello, F; Pesold, C; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    2001-03-13

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72-96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in gamma(2) and alpha(1); increase in alpha(5)) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD(67). In contrast, dl-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal.

  16. Sodium-Dependent Glutamate Uptake by an Alkaliphilic, Thermophilic Bacillus Strain, TA2.A1

    PubMed Central

    Peddie, Catherine J.; Cook, Gregory M.; Morgan, Hugh W.

    1999-01-01

    A strain of Bacillus designated TA2.A1, isolated from a thermal spring in Te Aroha, New Zealand, grew optimally at pH 9.2 and 70°C. Bacillus strain TA2.A1 utilized glutamate as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, and sodium chloride (>5 mM) was an obligate requirement for growth. Growth on glutamate was inhibited by monensin and amiloride, both inhibitors that collapse the sodium gradient (ΔpNa) across the cell membrane. N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide inhibited the growth of Bacillus strain TA2.A1, suggesting that an F1F0-ATPase (H type) was being used to generate cellular ATP needed for anabolic reactions. Vanadate, an inhibitor of V-type ATPases, did not affect the growth of Bacillus strain TA2.A1. Glutamate transport by Bacillus strain TA2.A1 could be driven by an artificial membrane potential (ΔΨ), but only when sodium was present. In the absence of sodium, the rate of ΔΨ-driven glutamate uptake was fourfold lower. No glutamate transport was observed in the presence of ΔpNa alone (i.e., no ΔΨ). Glutamate uptake was specifically inhibited by monensin, and the Km for sodium was 5.6 mM. The Hill plot had a slope of approximately 1, suggesting that sodium binding was noncooperative and that the glutamate transporter had a single binding site for sodium. Glutamate transport was not affected by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, suggesting that the transmembrane pH gradient was not required for glutamate transport. The rate of glutamate transport increased with increasing glutamate concentration; the Km for glutamate was 2.90 μM, and the Vmax was 0.7 nmol · min−1 mg of protein. Glutamate transport was specifically inhibited by glutamate analogues. PMID:10322019

  17. Vitamin C neuroprotection against dose-dependent glutamate-induced neurodegeneration in the postnatal brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity due to over-activation of glutamate receptors and associated energy depletion (phosphorylation and activation of AMPK) results in neuronal cell death in various neurological disorders. Restoration of energy balance during an excitotoxic insult is critical for neuronal survival. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an essential nutrient with well-known antioxidant potential, protects the brain from oxidative damage in various models of neurodegeneration. In this study, we reported the therapeutic efficacy of vitamin C in response to glutamate-induced excitation, resulting in energy depletion and apoptosis in the hippocampus of the developing rat brain. A single subcutaneous injection of glutamate at two different concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) in postnatal day 7 rat pups increased brain glutamate levels and increased the protein expression of neuronal apoptotic markers. Both doses of glutamate upregulated the ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, cytochrome-c release, caspase-3 activation and the expression of PARP-1. However, co-treatment of vitamin C (250 mg/kg) with glutamate decreased brain glutamate levels and reversed the changes induced by glutamate in the developing hippocampus. Interestingly, only a high dose of glutamate caused the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK and induced neuronal cell death, whereas a low dose of glutamate failed to mediate these effects. Vitamin C supplementation reduced the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of AMPK and attenuated neuronal cell death, as assessed morphologically by Fluoro Jade B in the hippocampal CA1 region of the developing brain. Taken together, our results indicated that glutamate in both concentrations is toxic to the immature rat brain, whereas vitamin C is pharmacologically effective against glutamate-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25701025

  18. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  19. Vitamin C neuroprotection against dose-dependent glutamate-induced neurodegeneration in the postnatal brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity due to over-activation of glutamate receptors and associated energy depletion (phosphorylation and activation of AMPK) results in neuronal cell death in various neurological disorders. Restoration of energy balance during an excitotoxic insult is critical for neuronal survival. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an essential nutrient with well-known antioxidant potential, protects the brain from oxidative damage in various models of neurodegeneration. In this study, we reported the therapeutic efficacy of vitamin C in response to glutamate-induced excitation, resulting in energy depletion and apoptosis in the hippocampus of the developing rat brain. A single subcutaneous injection of glutamate at two different concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) in postnatal day 7 rat pups increased brain glutamate levels and increased the protein expression of neuronal apoptotic markers. Both doses of glutamate upregulated the ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, cytochrome-c release, caspase-3 activation and the expression of PARP-1. However, co-treatment of vitamin C (250 mg/kg) with glutamate decreased brain glutamate levels and reversed the changes induced by glutamate in the developing hippocampus. Interestingly, only a high dose of glutamate caused the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK and induced neuronal cell death, whereas a low dose of glutamate failed to mediate these effects. Vitamin C supplementation reduced the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of AMPK and attenuated neuronal cell death, as assessed morphologically by Fluoro Jade B in the hippocampal CA1 region of the developing brain. Taken together, our results indicated that glutamate in both concentrations is toxic to the immature rat brain, whereas vitamin C is pharmacologically effective against glutamate-induced neurodegeneration.

  20. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A.; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  1. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  2. Alcohol consumption increases basal extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core of Sprague-Dawley rats without increasing spontaneous glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Pati, Dipanwita; Kelly, Kyle; Stennett, Bethany; Frazier, Charles J; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) mediates ethanol consumption. Previous studies using non-contingent and voluntary alcohol administration in inbred rodents have reported increased basal extracellular glutamate levels in the NAc. Here, we assessed basal glutamate levels in the NAc following intermittent alcohol consumption in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had access to ethanol for 7 weeks on alternating days. We found increased basal NAc glutamate at 24 h withdrawal from ethanol and thus sought to identify the source of this glutamate. To do so, we employed a combination of microdialysis, slice electrophysiology and western blotting. Reverse dialysis of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin did not affect glutamate levels in either group. Electrophysiological recordings in slices made after 24 h withdrawal revealed a decrease in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency relative to controls, with no change in sEPSC amplitude. No change in metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGlu2/3) function was detected as bath application of the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 decreased spontaneous and miniature EPSC frequency in slices from both control and ethanol-consuming rats. The increase in basal glutamate was not associated with changes in the surface expression of GLT-1, however, a decrease in slope of the no-net-flux dialysis function was observed following ethanol consumption, indicating a potential decrease in glutamate reuptake. Taken together, these findings indicate that the increase in basal extracellular glutamate occurring after chronic ethanol consumption is not mediated by an increase in action potential-dependent glutamate release or a failure of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors to regulate such release. PMID:27207718

  3. Theoretical analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase kinetics under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Popova, S V; Reich, J G

    1983-01-01

    A kinetic model of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction has been formulated for the reversible reaction including all seven reactants (substrates and cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H)). The model parameters have been evaluated from published initial-rate data. Analysis of the model at cofactor concentration near to that in the intact mitochondrion has shown that the competition for active sites between cofactors and substrates simultaneously present in mitochondria diminishes the steady-state rate of the reaction by a factor of 10 to 100 as compared to the maximal reaction rate. The model predicts near-equilibrium of the reaction substrates with NAD+/NADH cofactor pair and off-equilibrium with NADP+/NADPH. Substrate cycling with futile transfer of hydrogen from NADP+-system to NAD+-system has been found to account under in vivo conditions for no more than 2% of the maximal glutamate dehydrogenase activity in the mitochondria.

  4. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder. PMID:27296644

  5. Synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Franssen, Maurice C R; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2011-06-20

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the intermediate 3-cyanopropanoic amide was achieved from glutamic acid 5-methyl ester in an 86 mol% yield and from glutamine in a 56 mol % yield. 3-Cyanopropanoic acid can be converted into succinonitrile, with a selectivity close to 100% and a 62% conversion, by making use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed equilibrium reaction with acetonitrile. Thus, a new route to produce biobased 1,4-diaminobutane has been discovered. PMID:21557494

  6. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder.

  7. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  8. Glutamate modulators in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Established treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are of benefit in approximately 3 of every 4 patients, but refractory disease remains distressingly common, and many treatment responders continue to experience considerable morbidity. This motivates a search for new insights into pathophysiology that may inform novel treatment strategies. Much recent work has focused on the neurotransmitter glutamate. Several lines of neurochemical and genetic evidence suggests that glutamate dysregulation may contribute to OCD, although much remains unclear. The off-label use of a number of pharmacological agents approved for other indications has been investigated in refractory OCD. We summarize investigations of memantine, riluzole, ketamine, D-cycloserine, glycine, N-acetylserine, topiramate, and lamotrigine. Evidence exists for benefit from each of these in some patients; though none has been proven effective with sufficient clarity to be considered part of standard care, these agents are options in individuals whose symptoms are refractory to better-established therapeutic strategies. PMID:26236057

  9. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: beyond the regulation of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Storto, Marianna; Ngomba, Richard T; Iacovelli, Luisa; Arcella, Antonietta; Gradini, Roberto; Sale, Patrizio; Rampello, Liborio; De Vita, Teresa; Di Marco, Roberto; Melchiorri, Daniela; Bruno, Valeria

    2007-08-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are G-protein coupled receptors activated by glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the CNS. A growing body of evidence suggests that the function of mGlu receptors is not restricted to the regulation of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are expressed in a variety of peripheral cells, including inter alia hepatocytes, pancreatic cells, osteoblasts and immune cells. Within the immunological synapses, mGlu receptors expressed by T cells might contribute to the vast array of signals generated by the antigen-presenting cells. mGlu receptors are also found in embryonic and neural stem cells. This suggests their involvement in the pathophysiology of brain tumors, which likely originates from cancer stem cells similar to neural stem cells. Ligands of mGlu3 and mGlu4 receptors are potential candidates for the experimental treatment of malignant gliomas and medulloblastomas, respectively. PMID:17651904

  11. Role of astrocytic glutamate transporter in alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer R; Jia, Yun-Fang; Qiu, Yan-Yan; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is one of the most widespread neuropsychiatric conditions, having a significant health and socioeconomic impact. According to the 2014 World Health Organization global status report on alcohol and health, the harmful use of alcohol is responsible for 5.9% of all deaths worldwide. Additionally, 5.1% of the global burden of disease and injury is ascribed to alcohol (measured in disability adjusted life years, or disability adjusted life years). Although the neurobiological basis of AUD is highly complex, the corticostriatal circuit contributes significantly to the development of addictive behaviors. In-depth investigation into the changes of the neurotransmitters in this circuit, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyricacid, and glutamate, and their corresponding neuronal receptors in AUD and other addictions enable us to understand the molecular basis of AUD. However, these discoveries have also revealed a dearth of knowledge regarding contributions from non-neuronal sources. Astrocytes, though intimately involved in synaptic function, had until recently been noticeably overlooked in their potential role in AUD. One major function of the astrocyte is protecting neurons from excitotoxicity by removing glutamate from the synapse via excitatory amino acid transporter type 2. The importance of this key transporter in addiction, as well as ethanol withdrawal, has recently become evident, though its regulation is still under investigation. Historically, pharmacotherapy for AUD has been focused on altering the activity of neuronal glutamate receptors. However, recent clinical evidence has supported the animal-based findings, showing that regulating glutamate homeostasis contributes to successful management of recovery from AUD. PMID:27014596

  12. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives. PMID:27455572

  13. Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Limin; Guo, Minglei; Jin, Daozhong; Xue, Bing; Wang, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroadaptations of glutamatergic transmission in the limbic reward circuitry are linked to persistent drug addiction. Accumulating data have demonstrated roles of ionotropic glutamate receptors and group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in this event. Emerging evidence also identifies Gαi/o-coupled group III mGluRs (mGluR4/7/8 subtypes enriched in the limbic system) as direct substrates of drugs of abuse and active regulators of drug action. Auto- and heteroreceptors of mGluR4/7/8 reside predominantly on nerve terminals of glutamatergic corticostriatal and GABAergic striatopallidal pathways, respectively. These presynaptic receptors regulate basal and/or phasic release of respective transmitters to maintain basal ganglia homeostasis. In response to operant administration of common addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamine), alcohol and opiates, limbic group III mGluRs undergo drastic adaptations to contribute to the enduring remodeling of excitatory synapses and to usually suppress drug seeking behavior. As a result, a loss-of-function mutation (knockout) of individual group III receptor subtypes often promotes drug seeking. This review summarizes the data from recent studies on three group III receptor subtypes (mGluR4/7/8) expressed in the basal ganglia and analyzes their roles in the regulation of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the striatum and their participation in the addictive properties of three major classes of drugs (psychostimulants, alcohol, and opiates). PMID:24078068

  14. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  15. Dysfunction of Glutamate Receptors in Microglia May Cause Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutamate signalling is important in Alzheimer's disease and other pathologies. There has been a focus on changes in neuronal glutamate signalling, but microglia also express glutamate receptors (GluRs), which are known to modulate their responses to neuropathology. Microglia express both metabotropic and ionotropic GluRs. Among ionotropic GluRs, microglial AMPA (α-amino-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate)-type of GluRs (AMPA-Rs) are Ca2+ impermeable due to the expression of subunit GluA2. Upon activation of microglia, expression level of surface GluA2 subunits significantly increase, while expression of GluA1, A3 and A4 subunits on membrane surface significantly decrease. Owing to the GluA2 subunits-dominant composition, AMPA-Rs in activated microglia show little response to Glu. On the other hand, microglia lacking GluA2 show higher Ca(2+)-permeability, consequently inducing a significant increase in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, such as TNF-α. It is suggested that membrane translocation of GluA2-containing AMPA-Rs in activated microglia has functional importance. Thus, dysfunction or decreased expression of GluA2 reported in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may accelerate Glu neurotoxicity via excess release of proinflammatory cytokines from microglia, causing more neuronal death. PMID:26567741

  16. MicroRNA-223 is neuroprotective by targeting glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Maged M; Eacker, Stephen M; Wang, Xueqing; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2012-11-13

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Extracellular glutamate accumulation leading to overstimulation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors mediates neuronal injury in stroke and in neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that miR-223 controls the response to neuronal injury by regulating the functional expression of the glutamate receptor subunits GluR2 and NR2B in brain. Overexpression of miR-223 lowers the levels of GluR2 and NR2B by targeting 3'-UTR target sites (TSs) in GluR2 and NR2B, inhibits NMDA-induced calcium influx in hippocampal neurons, and protects the brain from neuronal cell death following transient global ischemia and excitotoxic injury. MiR-223 deficiency results in higher levels of NR2B and GluR2, enhanced NMDA-induced calcium influx, and increased miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in hippocampal neurons. In addition, the absence of MiR-223 leads to contextual, but not cued memory deficits and increased neuronal cell death following transient global ischemia and excitotoxicity. These data identify miR-223 as a major regulator of the expression of GluR2 and NR2B, and suggest a therapeutic role for miR-223 in stroke and other excitotoxic neuronal disorders.

  17. Targeting glutamate uptake to treat alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P.S.S.; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a serious public health concern that is characterized by the development of tolerance to alcohol's effects, increased consumption, loss of control over drinking and the development of physical dependence. This cycle is often times punctuated by periods of abstinence, craving and relapse. The development of tolerance and the expression of withdrawal effects, which manifest as dependence, have been to a great extent attributed to neuroadaptations within the mesocorticolimbic and extended amygdala systems. Alcohol affects various neurotransmitter systems in the brain including the adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, peptidergic, and serotonergic systems. Due to the myriad of neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems affected by alcohol, the efficacies of current pharmacotherapies targeting alcohol dependence are limited. Importantly, research findings of changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission induced by alcohol self- or experimenter-administration have resulted in a focus on therapies targeting glutamatergic receptors and normalization of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Glutamatergic receptors implicated in the effects of ethanol include the ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, Kainate, and NMDA) and some metabotropic glutamate receptors. Regarding glutamatergic homeostasis, ceftriaxone, MS-153, and GPI-1046, which upregulate glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) expression in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, reduce alcohol intake in genetic animal models of alcoholism. Given the hyperglutamatergic/hyperexcitable state of the central nervous system induced by chronic alcohol abuse and withdrawal, the evidence thus far indicates that a restoration of glutamatergic concentrations and activity within the mesocorticolimbic system and extended amygdala as well as multiple memory systems holds great promise for the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:25954150

  18. Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin cotyledons: characterization and isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Chou, K H; Splittstoesser, W E

    1972-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Pior. cultivar Dickinson Field) cotyledons was found in both soluble and particulate fractions with the bulk of the activity in the soluble fraction. Both enzymes used NAD(H) and NADP(H) but NAD(H) was favored. The enzymes were classified as glutamate-NAD oxidoreductase, deaminating (EC 1.4.1.3). Both enzymes were heat stable, had a pH optimum for reductive amination of 8.0, and were inhibited by high concentrations of NH(4) (+) or alpha-ketoglutarate. The soluble enzyme was more sensitive to NH(4) (+) inhibition and was activated by metal ions after ammonium sulfate fractionation while the solubilized particulate enzyme was not. Inhibition by ethylenediaminetetraacetate was restored by several divalent ions and inhibition by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was reversed by glutathione. Particulate glutamate dehydrogenase showed a greater activity with NADP. The molecular weights of the enzymes are 250,000. Separation of the enzymes by disc gel electrophoresis showed that during germination the soluble isoenzymes increased from 1 to 7 in number, while only one particulate isoenzyme was found at any time. This particulate isoenzyme was identical with one of the soluble isoenzymes. A number of methods indicated that the soluble isoenzymes were not simply removed from the particulate fraction and that true isoenzymes were found.

  19. Glutamate Receptor Homologs in Plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michelle Beth; Jelesko, John; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    The plant glutamate-like receptor homologs (GLRs) are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenetic analysis using iGluRs from metazoans, plants, and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial iGluRs, indicating the separation of plant, other eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed. PMID:23115559

  20. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2016-06-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD(+) versus NADP(+), but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia coli enzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP(+) cofactor from the parent E. coli domain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity. PMID:27303899

  1. An Optimized Glutamate Receptor Photoswitch with Sensitized Azobenzene Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Gascón-Moya, Marta; Pejoan, Arnau; Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Pittolo, Silvia; Cabré, Gisela; Hernando, Jordi; Alibés, Ramon; Gorostiza, Pau; Busqué, Félix

    2015-10-16

    A new azobenzene-based photoswitch, 2, has been designed to enable optical control of ionotropic glutamate receptors in neurons via sensitized two-photon excitation with NIR light. In order to develop an efficient and versatile synthetic route for this molecule, a modular strategy is described which relies on the use of a new linear fully protected glutamate derivative stable in basic media. The resulting compound undergoes one-photon trans-cis photoisomerization via two different mechanisms: direct excitation of its azoaromatic unit and irradiation of the pyrene sensitizer, a well-known two-photon sensitive chromophore. Moreover, 2 presents large thermal stability of its cis isomer, in contrast to other two-photon responsive switches relying on the intrinsic nonlinear optical properties of push-pull substituted azobenzenes. As a result, the molecular system developed herein is a very promising candidate for evoking large photoinduced biological responses during the multiphoton operation of neuronal glutamate receptors with NIR light, which require accumulation of the protein-bound cis state of the switch upon repeated illumination.

  2. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  3. Effect of carnitine on muscular glutamate uptake and intramuscular glutathione in malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Hack, V; Schuster, K; Tokus, M; Böhles, H; Hagmüller, E; Edler, L; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    2000-01-01

    Abnormally low intramuscular glutamate and glutathione (GSH) levels and/or a decreased muscular uptake of glutamate by the skeletal muscle tissue have previously been found in malignant diseases and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and may contribute to the development of cachexia. We tested the hypothesis that an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism may compromise the Na+-dependent glutamate transport. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was designed to study the effects of L-carnitine, i.e. an agent known to enhance mitochondrial integrity and function, on the glutamate transport and plasma glutamate level of cancer patients. The effect of carnitine on the intramuscular glutamate and GSH levels was examined in complementary experiments with tumour-bearing mice. In the mice, L-carnitine treatment ameliorated indeed the tumour-induced decrease in muscular glutamate and GSH levels and the increase in plasma glutamate levels. The carnitine-treated group in the randomized clinical study showed also a significant decrease in the plasma glutamate levels but only a moderate and statistically not significant increase in the relative glutamate uptake in the lower extremities. Further studies may be warranted to determine the effect of L-carnitine on the intramuscular GSH levels in cancer patients.

  4. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chendan; Ren, Jianbo; Guo, Xiangjie; Yun, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS). Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress. PMID:27783050

  5. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  6. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  7. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  8. Effect of carnitine on muscular glutamate uptake and intramuscular glutathione in malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Hack, V; Schuster, K; Tokus, M; Böhles, H; Hagmüller, E; Edler, L; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    2000-01-01

    Abnormally low intramuscular glutamate and glutathione (GSH) levels and/or a decreased muscular uptake of glutamate by the skeletal muscle tissue have previously been found in malignant diseases and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and may contribute to the development of cachexia. We tested the hypothesis that an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism may compromise the Na+-dependent glutamate transport. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was designed to study the effects of L -carnitine, i.e. an agent known to enhance mitochondrial integrity and function, on the glutamate transport and plasma glutamate level of cancer patients. The effect of carnitine on the intramuscular glutamate and GSH levels was examined in complementary experiments with tumour-bearing mice. In the mice, L -carnitine treatment ameliorated indeed the tumour-induced decrease in muscular glutamate and GSH levels and the increase in plasma glutamate levels. The carnitine-treated group in the randomized clinical study showed also a significant decrease in the plasma glutamate levels but only a moderate and statistically not significant increase in the relative glutamate uptake in the lower extremities. Further studies may be warranted to determine the effect of L -carnitine on the intramuscular GSH levels in cancer patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646895

  9. Delayed post-conditioning reduces post-ischemic glutamate level and improves protein synthesis in brain.

    PubMed

    Bonova, Petra; Burda, Jozef; Danielisova, Viera; Nemethova, Miroslava; Gottlieb, Miroslav

    2013-05-01

    In the clinic delayed post-conditioning would represent an attractive strategy for the survival of vulnerable neurons after an ischemic event. In this paper we studied the impact of ischemia and delayed post-conditioning on blood and brain tissue concentrations of glutamate and protein synthesis. We designed two groups of animals for analysis of brain tissues and blood after global ischemia and post-conditioning, and one for analysis of blood glutamate after transient focal ischemia. Our results showed elevated blood glutamate in two models of transient brain ischemia and decreases in blood glutamate to control in the first 20min of post-conditioning recirculation followed by a consecutive drop of about 20.5% on the first day. Similarly, we recorded reduced protein synthesis in hippocampus and cortex 2 and 3days after ischemia. However, increased glutamate was registered only in the hippocampus. Post-conditioning improves protein synthesis in CA1 and dentate gyrus and, surprisingly, leads to 50% reduction in glutamate in whole hippocampus and cortex. In conclusion, ischemia leads to meaningful elevation of blood and tissue glutamate. Post-conditioning activates mechanisms resulting in rapid elimination of glutamate from brain tissue and/or in the circulatory system that could otherwise impede brain-to-blood glutamate efflux mechanisms. Moreover, post-conditioning induces protein synthesis renewing in ischemia affected tissues that could also contribute to elimination of excitotoxicity. In addition, the potential of glutamate for monitoring the progress of ischemia and efficacy of therapy was shown.

  10. Glutamate-related gene expression changes with age in the mouse auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Waxmonsky, Nicole C; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in both the peripheral and central auditory systems. Changes of glutamate and glutamate-related genes with age may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related hearing loss-presbycusis. In this study, changes in glutamate-related mRNA gene expression in the CBA mouse inferior colliculus with age and hearing loss were examined and correlations were sought between these changes and functional hearing measures, such as the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Gene expression of 68 glutamate-related genes was investigated using both genechip microarray and real-time PCR (qPCR) molecular techniques for four different age/hearing loss CBA mouse subject groups. Two genes showed consistent differences between groups for both the genechip and qPCR. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme (Pycs) showed down-regulation with age and a high-affinity glutamate transporter (Slc1a3) showed up-regulation with age and hearing loss. Since Pycs plays a role in converting glutamate to proline, its deficiency in old age may lead to both glutamate increases and proline deficiencies in the auditory midbrain, playing a role in the subsequent inducement of glutamate toxicity and loss of proline neuroprotective effects. The up-regulation of Slc1a3 gene expression may reflect a cellular compensatory mechanism to protect against age-related glutamate or calcium excitoxicity.

  11. Protein kinase C -dependent regulation of synaptosomal glutamate uptake under conditions of hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Borisov, Arseniy; Sivko, Roman

    Glutamate is not only the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, but also a potent neurotoxin. Excessive concentration of ambient glutamate over activates glutamate receptors and causes neurotoxicity. Uptake of glutamate from the extracellular space into nerve cells was mediated by sodium-dependent glutamate transporters located in the plasma membrane. It was shown that the activity of glutamate transporters in rat brain nerve terminals was decreased after hypergravity (centrifugation of rats in special containers at 10 G for 1 hour). This decrease may result from the reduction in the number of glutamate transporters expressed in the plasma membrane of nerve terminals after hypergravity that was regulated by protein kinase C. The possibility of the involvement of protein kinase C in the regulation of the activity of glutamate transporters was assessed under conditions of hypergravity. The effect of protein kinase C inhibitor GF 109 203X on synaptosomal L-[14C]glutamate uptake was analysed. It was shown that the inhibitor decreased L-[14C]glutamate uptake by 15 % in control but did not influence it after hypergravity. In control, the initial velocity of L-[14C]glutamate uptake in the presence of the inhibitor decreased from 2.5 ± 0.2 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.17 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins, whereas after hypergravity this value lowered from 2.05 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.04 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins. Thus, protein kinase C -dependent alteration in the cell surface expression of glutamate transporters may be one of the causes of a decrease in the activity of glutamate transporters after hypergravity.

  12. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  13. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  14. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of egg white-chalcanthite and purple bamboo salts mixture on arthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Song, Hyun-kyung; Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Dong-Yoon; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of anti-osteoarthritis effects on egg white-chalcanthite (EC), purple bamboo salts (PBS), and a mixture of EC and PBS (EC+PBS). EC is a mixture of egg white and pulverized chalcanthite. PBS has been widely used as one of functional foods in Korea and shows unique features compared with common salt. Osteoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 4mg/kg bw) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Test substances were administered once daily for 6 weeks at doses of 10 mg EC, EC+100 mg PBS, EC+200 mg PBS before and after MIA injection. Each substance was assessed by blood chemistry parameters, and by serum cytokines including IL-1β and IL-6, and nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). Structural changes of articular cartilage were also evaluated by histopathological examination. As a result, body weight and blood chemistry parameter were not different in all experimental groups. EC+PBS mixture reduced the production of PGE2, NO, IL-1β, and IL-6. In histological grade of osteoarthritis, EC+PBS mixture had a tendency to ameliorate damage of articular cartilage induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, EC+PBS mixture was demonstrated to have a potential for anti-inflammatory effect against osteoarthritis induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27382377

  16. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  17. Platelets abrogate leukotriene B(4) generation by human blood neutrophils stimulated with monosodium urate monohydrate or f-Met-Leu-Phe in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Poubelle, Patrice E; Molière, Patrick; De Médicis, Rinaldo; Lussier, André; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Neutrophils are physiologically associated with platelets in whole blood. Inflammatory reactions can be modulated by the presence of platelets. To investigate the influence of platelets on neutrophil activity, we studied the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathway in normal human blood neutrophils stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) or monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in the presence of autologous platelets. Platelets inhibited by more than 90% the synthesis of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE in neutrophils activated with fMLP or MSUM. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid did not reverse the inhibitory effect of platelets on 5-LOX-generated metabolites in fMLP- or MSUM-activated neutrophils. Preincubation of neutrophils with adenosine deaminase reversed the inhibitory effect of platelets in fMLP-treated neutrophils, indicating that adenosine was responsible for the platelet inhibition of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE formation. In contrast, adenosine deaminase had no influence on the inhibitory effects of platelets in MSUM-stimulated cells. These results suggest that platelets can inhibit the synthesis of 5-LOX products (a). by acting mainly downstream to phospholipase A(2) in cells stimulated by fMLP or MSUM, (b). through adenosine when neutrophils are activated with fMLP, and (c). by an adenosine-independent mechanism in MSUM-activated neutrophils by an as-yet-unidentified mediator.

  18. Glutamate and tumor-associated epilepsy: glial cell dysfunction in the peritumoral environment

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Robel, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Seizures are a serious and debilitating co-morbidity of primary brain tumors that affect most patients, yet their etiology is poorly understood. In many CNS pathologies, including epilepsy and brain injury, high levels of extracellular glutamate have been implicated in seizure generation. It has been shown that gliomas release neurotoxic levels of glutamate through their high expression of system xc-. More recently it was shown that the surrounding peritumoral cortex is spontaneously hyperexcitable. In this review, we discuss how gliomas induce changes in the surrounding environment that may further contribute to elevated extracellular glutamate and tumor-associated seizures. Peritumoral astrocytes become reactive and lose their ability to remove glutamate, while microglia, in response to signals from glioma cells, may release glutamate. In addition, gliomas increase blood brain barrier permeability, allowing seizure-inducing serum components, including glutamate, into the peritumoral region. These factors, working together or alone, may influence the frequency and severity of tumor-associated epilepsy. PMID:23385090

  19. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Douglas J; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Dahl, Russell; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2011-08-17

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consist of the metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu(2)) and metabotropic glutamate 3 (mGlu(3)) receptor subtypes which modulate glutamate transmission by second messenger activation to negatively regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the perisynaptic extracellular region triggers mGlu(2) and mGlu(3) receptors to inhibit further release of glutamate. There is growing evidence that the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by small molecule modulators of Group II mGlu receptors has significant potential for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. This review provides an overview of recent progress on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of positive and negative allosteric modulators of the Group II mGlu receptors. PMID:22860167

  20. Recent Progress in the Synthesis and Characterization of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consist of the metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) and metabotropic glutamate 3 (mGlu3) receptor subtypes which modulate glutamate transmission by second messenger activation to negatively regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the perisynaptic extracellular region triggers mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors to inhibit further release of glutamate. There is growing evidence that the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by small molecule modulators of Group II mGlu receptors has significant potential for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. This review provides an overview of recent progress on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of positive and negative allosteric modulators of the Group II mGlu receptors. PMID:22860167

  1. Enzyme-based flow injection analysis system for glutamine and glutamate in mammalian cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Frauer, A; Schalkhammer, T; Pittner, F

    1999-03-01

    We present the setup of a flow injection analysis system designed for on-line monitoring of glutamate and glutamine. These amino acids represent a major energy source in mammalian cell culture. A cycling assay consisting of glutamate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase produces NADH proportional to the glutamate concentration in the sample. NADH is then measured spectrophotometrically. Glutamine is determined by conversion to glutamate which is fed into the cycling assay. The conversion of glutamine to glutamate is catalyzed by asparaginase. Asparaginase was used in place of glutaminase due to its relatively high reactivity with glutamine and a pH optimum similar to that of glutamate dehydrogenase. The enzymes were immobilized covalently to activated controlled pore glass beads and integrated into the flow injection analysis system. The application of the immobilized enzymes and the technical setup are presented in this paper.

  2. [The effect of cerebral glutamate enhanced level on the respiratory system of anesthetized rats].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, V G; Buĭ Tkhi, Kh; Aleksandrova, N P

    2012-07-01

    A cerebral level of glutamate is one of the determinants of the central mechanisms of respiratory control. It had been hypothesized that endogenous glutamate could have a modulating effect on the functioning of mechanisms for neural control of respiratory function. Acute experiments on spontaneuosly breathing, urethane-anesthetized rats had been performed to study the respiratory effects of cerebroventricular microinjection of glutamate. It has been shown that a higher level of cerebral glutamate increases breathing rate and electrical activity of the diaphragm, and strengthen the Hering-Breuer reflex. These effects had a clear character of the phase. The results confirm the hypothesis suggested and prove that the increase in cerebral levels of glutamate leads to the activation of glutamate receptors of various types.

  3. Magnesium Sulfate Protects Against the Bioenergetic Consequences of Chronic Glutamate Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Young, Christina A.; Bordt, Evan A.; Grigore, Alina M.; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular glutamate is elevated following brain ischemia or trauma and contributes to neuronal injury. We tested the hypothesis that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 3 mM) protects against metabolic failure caused by excitotoxic glutamate exposure. Rat cortical neuron preparations treated in medium already containing a physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1 mM) could be segregated based on their response to glutamate (100 µM). Type I preparations responded with a decrease or small transient increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Type II neurons responded with >50% stimulation in OCR, indicating a robust response to increased energy demand without immediate toxicity. Pre-treatment with MgSO4 improved the initial bioenergetic response to glutamate and ameliorated subsequent loss of spare respiratory capacity, measured following addition of the uncoupler FCCP, in Type I but not Type II neurons. Spare respiratory capacity in Type I neurons was also improved by incubation with MgSO4 or NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 in the absence of glutamate treatment. This finding indicates that the major difference between Type I and Type II preparations is the amount of endogenous glutamate receptor activity. Incubation of Type II neurons with 5 µM glutamate prior to excitotoxic (100 µM) glutamate exposure recapitulated a Type I phenotype. MgSO4 protected against an excitotoxic glutamate-induced drop in neuronal ATP both with and without prior 5 µM glutamate exposure. Results indicate that MgSO4 protects against chronic moderate glutamate receptor stimulation and preserves cellular ATP following treatment with excitotoxic glutamate. PMID:24236167

  4. Detection of glutamate release from neurons by genetically encoded surface-displayed FRET nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Looger, Loren L.; Micheva, Kristina D.; Reimer, Richard J.; Smith, Stephen J.; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2005-06-01

    Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. Once released, its rapid removal from the synaptic cleft is critical for preventing excitotoxicity and spillover to neighboring synapses. Despite consensus on the role of glutamate in normal and disease physiology, technical issues limit our understanding of its metabolism in intact cells. To monitor glutamate levels inside and at the surface of living cells, genetically encoded nanosensors were developed. The fluorescent indicator protein for glutamate (FLIPE) consists of the glutamate/aspartate binding protein ybeJ from Escherichia coli fused to two variants of the green fluorescent protein. Three sensors with lower affinities for glutamate were created by mutation of residues peristeric to the ybeJ binding pocket. In the presence of ligands, FLIPEs show a concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. When expressed on the surface of rat hippocampal neurons or PC12 cells, the sensors respond to extracellular glutamate with a reversible concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. Depolarization of neurons leads to a reduction in FRET efficiency corresponding to 300 nM glutamate at the cell surface. No change in FRET was observed when cells expressing sensors in the cytosol were superfused with up to 20 mM glutamate, consistent with a minimal contribution of glutamate uptake to cytosolic glutamate levels. The results demonstrate that FLIPE sensors can be used for real-time monitoring of glutamate metabolism in living cells, in tissues, or in intact organisms, providing tools for studying metabolism or for drug discovery. aspartate | hippocampal neuron | neurotransmitter | secretion | transport

  5. Astrocytic energetics during excitatory neurotransmission: What are contributions of glutamate oxidation and glycolysis?

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2013-10-01

    Astrocytic energetics of excitatory neurotransmission is controversial due to discrepant findings in different experimental systems in vitro and in vivo. The energy requirements of glutamate uptake are believed by some researchers to be satisfied by glycolysis coupled with shuttling of lactate to neurons for oxidation. However, astrocytes increase glycogenolysis and oxidative metabolism during sensory stimulation in vivo, indicating that other sources of energy are used by astrocytes during brain activation. Furthermore, glutamate uptake into cultured astrocytes stimulates glutamate oxidation and oxygen consumption, and glutamate maintains respiration as well as glucose. The neurotransmitter pool of glutamate is associated with the faster component of total glutamate turnover in vivo, and use of neurotransmitter glutamate to fuel its own uptake by oxidation-competent perisynaptic processes has two advantages, substrate is supplied concomitant with demand, and glutamate spares glucose for use by neurons and astrocytes. Some, but not all, perisynaptic processes of astrocytes in adult rodent brain contain mitochondria, and oxidation of only a small fraction of the neurotransmitter glutamate taken up into these structures would be sufficient to supply the ATP required for sodium extrusion and conversion of glutamate to glutamine. Glycolysis would, however, be required in perisynaptic processes lacking oxidative capacity. Three lines of evidence indicate that critical cornerstones of the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model are not established and normal brain does not need lactate as supplemental fuel: (i) rapid onset of hemodynamic responses to activation delivers oxygen and glucose in excess of demand, (ii) total glucose utilization greatly exceeds glucose oxidation in awake rodents during activation, indicating that the lactate generated is released, not locally oxidized, and (iii) glutamate-induced glycolysis is not a robust phenotype of all astrocyte cultures

  6. Coupling of glutamate and glucose uptake in cultured Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Suárez-Pozos, Edna; Najimi, Mustapha; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of sodium-dependent, glutamate uptake transporters mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing neuronal death. The sustained sodium influx associated to glutamate removal in glial cells, activates the sodium/potassium ATPase restoring the ionic balance, additionally, glutamate entrance activates glutamine synthetase, both events are energy demanding, therefore glia cells increase their ATP expenditure favouring glucose uptake, and triggering several signal transduction pathways linked to proper neuronal glutamate availability, via the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. To further characterize these complex transporters interactions, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity, plasma membrane localization and protein levels of glucose transporters was detected upon d-aspartate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of a protein kinase C-dependent signaling cascade. Furthermore, a glutamate-dependent glucose and glutamate transporters co-immunoprecipitation was detected. These results favour the notion that glial cells are involved in glutamatergic neuronal physiology. PMID:27184733

  7. Kinetic studies to determine the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase by nucleotide effectors.

    PubMed

    Cook, P F

    1982-01-01

    A combination of kinetic and isotope effect studies in the presence and absence of the effectors ADP and GTP was used to elucidate the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. ADP at low concentrations of glutamate competes with TPN for free enzyme. GTP exhibits a similar effect at high concentrations (100 microM and above). When ADP binds at its allosteric site, it increases the off rates of both alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH from their product complexes. This results in a decrease in V/K for both substrates, an increase in V, and an increase in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters so that they are all about 1.3. The rate of release of glutamate from E-TPNH-glutamate is also apparently enhanced since no substrate inhibition by glutamate is observed in the presence of ADP. The effect of GTP is in opposition to that of ADP in that GTP decreases the off rates for both TPN and glutamate from E-TPN-glutamate as well as the off rates for alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH. This results in an increase in the V/K's for both substrates, a decrease in V, and a decrease in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters to a value of 1. Substrate inhibition by glutamate is also eliminated by GTP probably by preventing any significant accumulation of E-TPNH to which glutamate binds as an inhibitor.

  8. Differential effects of diltiazem on glutamate potentials and excitatory junctional potentials at the crayfish neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, M; Shinozaki, H

    1980-01-01

    1. The effects of diltiazem on glutamate potentials and excitatory junctional potentials (e.j.p.s) were investigated in the crayfish neuromuscular junction. 2. When diltiazem (0.3 mM) was added to the perfusion fluid, the ionophoretic glutamate potential was reduced to about half, whereas the peak amplitude of successive e.j.p.s elicited by a train of pulses of 100/sec increased by about 2 times. 3. It was suggested that diltiazem was a non-competitive inhibitor of L-glutamate. The reduction of the response to applied glutamate was not due to the acceleration of desensitization of the glutamate receptor. The rate of recovery from desensitization was delayzed by diltiazem. 4. The increase in amplitude of e.j.p.s caused by diltiazem was due to the increase in membrane resistance. The quantum content and size of extracellular e.j.p.s were not affected by diltiazem. 5. It was substantiated using the micro-electrode technique that the glutamate sensitive area coincided with the neuromuscular junctional area. 6. The pharmacological difference between glutamate potentials and e.j.p.s revealed in the present study is difficult to explain on the glutamate transmitter hypothesis. One explanation worthy to be considered is that there are two pharmacologically different kinds of receptors sensitive to L-glutamate. PMID:7359406

  9. On the mechanism of enhanced ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium caused by glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Pisarenko, O I; Solomatina, E S; Ivanov, V E; Studneva, I M; Kapelko, V I; Smirnov, V N

    1985-01-01

    The effect of glutamic acid on the cardiac contractile function and sources of anaerobic ATP formation in hypoxic myocardium was studied in isovolumic rat hearts. The presence of glutamic acid (5 mM) in the perfusate significantly diminished an increment in diastolic pressure caused by 60 min hypoxia, and facilitated its complete recovery during 30 min reoxygenation. This effect was combined with the maintenance of a higher ATP level during hypoxia and reoxygenation. The total content of lactate in the heart-perfusate system rose exactly as during hypoxia without glutamic acid, while pyruvate content decreased due to increased alanine formation. Restoration of tissue content of glutamate and aspartate in the presence of exogenous glutamic acid was accompanied by a more than 2-fold increase in succinate formation, the end-product of the Krebs' cycle under anaerobic conditions. The products of glutamic acid transamination with oxaloacetic acid, aspartic and alpha-ketoglutaric acids (5mM each), induced the same functional and metabolic alterations as glutamic acid. Amino-oxyacetic acid, a tramsaminase inhibitor, eliminated the effects caused by glutamic acid. Moreover, the inhibition of transamination was accompanied by a decreased succinate and alanine synthesis as well as insignificantly increased lactate formation compared to hypoxia without additives. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of glutamic acid is due to the activation of anaerobic ATP formation in the mitochondria rather than stimulation of glycolysis.

  10. On the defensive action of glutamate against the cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of quartz dust.

    PubMed Central

    Morosova, K I; Aronova, G V; Katsnelson, B A; Velichkovski, B T; Genkin, A M; Elnichnykh, L N; Privalova, L I

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxic action of quartz (DQ12) particles on cultures of rat peritoneal macrophages, as estimated by the inhibition of the TTC-reductase activity, is considerably reduced by preincubation with glutamic acid and by adding sodium glutamate (15 mg/ml) to the drinking water of the rats donating the macrophages. This increase in macrophage resistance under the influence of glutamate is the most probable cause of the delay in the development of silicotic fibrosis shown in several experiments on rats intratracheally injected with quartz and then treated by prolonged administration of glutamate. This effect is probably connected with the influence of glutamate on the stability of the macrophage membranes, which can in its turn be explained by different mechanisms, including the influence on the synthesis and phosphorylation of adenosine nucleotides. Such an influence was shown in rats receiving glutamate by the change of the ATP/ADP ratio in macrophages, but not in erythrocytes. The resistance of rat erythrocytes to the haemolytic action of quartz is also not influenced by the action of glutamate neither in vitro nor in vivo. Such differences in the influences of glutamate on two types of cells, equally susceptible to quartz cytotoxicity but considerably differing in the character of energy metabolism, is an indirect proof of the role of the latter in the realisation of the anticytotoxic, and thereby antifibrogenic, effect of glutamate. PMID:6124270

  11. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  12. Resting Glutamate Levels and Rapid Glutamate Transients in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Flinders Sensitive Line Rat: A Genetic Rodent Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R; Stephens, Michelle L; Glaser, Paul EA; Yoshitake, Takashi; Mathé, Aleksander A; Gerhardt, Greg A; Kehr, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the numerous drugs targeting biogenic amines for major depressive disorder (depression), the search for novel therapeutics continues because of their poor response rates (∼30%) and slow onset of action (2–4 weeks). To better understand role of glutamate in depression, we used an enzyme-based microelectrode array (MEA) that was selective for glutamate measures with fast temporal (2 Hz) and high spatial (15 × 333 μm) resolution. These MEAs were chronically implanted into the prefrontal cortex of 3- to 6-month-old and 12- to 15-month-old Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, a validated genetic rodent model of depression. Although no changes in glutamate dynamics were observed between 3 and 6 months FRL and FSL rats, a significant increase in resting glutamate levels was observed in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with the 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats on days 3–5 post-implantation. Our MEA also recorded, for the first time, a unique phenomenon in all the four rat groups of fluctuations in resting glutamate, which we have termed glutamate transients. Although these events lasted only for seconds, they did occur throughout the testing paradigm. The average concentration of these glutamate-burst events was significantly increased in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats. These studies lay the foundation for future studies of both tonic and phasic glutamate signaling in rat models of depression to better understand the potential role of glutamate signaling in depression. PMID:21525860

  13. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  14. Glutamate and GABA imbalance following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Giza, Christopher C; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to multiple short- and long-term changes in neuronal circuits that ultimately conclude with an imbalance of cortical excitation and inhibition. Changes in neurotransmitter concentrations, receptor populations, and specific cell survival are important contributing factors. Many of these changes occur gradually, which may explain the vulnerability of the brain to multiple mild impacts, alterations in neuroplasticity, and delays in the presentation of posttraumatic epilepsy. In this review, we provide an overview of normal glutamate and GABA homeostasis and describe acute, subacute, and chronic changes that follow injury. We conclude by highlighting opportunities for therapeutic interventions in this paradigm. PMID:25796572

  15. Glutamate and GABA imbalance following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Réjean M.; Giza, Christopher C.; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to multiple short and long term changes in neuronal circuits that ultimately conclude with an imbalance of cortical excitation and inhibition. Changes in neurotransmitter concentrations, receptor populations and specific cell survival are important contributing factors. Many of these changes occur gradually, which may explain the vulnerability of the brain to multiple mild impacts, alterations in neuroplasticity, and delays in the presentation of post-traumatic epilepsy. In this review we provide an overview of normal glutamate and GABA homeostasis, and describe acute, subacute and chronic changes that follow injury. We conclude by highlighting opportunities for therapeutic interventions in this paradigm. PMID:25796572

  16. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and Interacting Proteins in Epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter and receptor systems are involved in different neurological and neuropsychological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, depression, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. Recent advances in studies of signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins of neurotransmitter receptor systems suggest that different receptor systems may share the common signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins which may be better therapeutic targets for development of drugs to effectively control brain diseases. In this paper, we reviewed metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and their related signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins in status epilepticus and temporal lobe epilepsy, and proposed some novel therapeutical drug targets for controlling epilepsy and epileptogenesis. PMID:27030135

  17. Glutamate Metabolism and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Santiago, Fabián J.; Noel, Richard J.; Porter, James T.; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can lead to neurocognitive impairment collectively known as HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Although combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) has significantly ameliorated HIV’s morbidity and mortality, persistent neuroinflammation and neurocognitive dysfunction continue. This review focuses on the current clinical and molecular evidence of the viral and host factors that influence glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity and neuropathogenesis as an important underlying mechanism during the course of HAND development. In addition, discusses potential pharmacological strategies targeting the glutamatergic system that may help prevent and improve neurological outcomes in HIV-1 infected subjects. PMID:24867611

  18. Genetic insights into migraine and glutamate: a protagonist driving the headache.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Smith, Robert A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2016-08-15

    Migraine is a complex polygenic disorder that continues to be a great source of morbidity in the developed world with a prevalence of 12% in the Caucasian population. Genetic and pharmacological studies have implicated the glutamate pathway in migraine pathophysiology. Glutamate profoundly impacts brain circuits that regulate core symptom domains in a range of neuropsychiatric conditions and thus remains a "hot" target for drug discovery. Glutamate has been implicated in cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon responsible for migraine with aura and in animal models carrying FHM mutations. Genotyping case-control studies have shown an association between glutamate receptor genes, namely, GRIA1 and GRIA3 with migraine with indirect supporting evidence from GWAS. New evidence localizes PRRT2 at glutamatergic synapses and shows it affects glutamate signalling and glutamate receptor activity via interactions with GRIA1. Glutamate-system defects have also been recently implicated in a novel FHM2 ATP1A2 disease-mutation mouse model. Adding to the growing evidence neurophysiological findings support a role for glutamate in cortical excitability. In addition to the existence of multiple genes to choreograph the functions of fast-signalling glutamatergic neurons, glutamate receptor diversity and regulation is further increased by the post-translational mechanisms of RNA editing and miRNAs. Ongoing genetic studies, GWAS and meta-analysis implicate neurogenic mechanisms in migraine pathology and the first genome-wide associated locus for migraine on chromosome X. Finally, in addition to glutamate modulating therapies, the kynurenine pathway has emerged as a candidate for involvement in migraine pathophysiology. In this review we discuss recent genetic evidence and glutamate modulating therapies that bear on the hypothesis that a glutamatergic mechanism may be involved in migraine susceptibility. PMID:27423601

  19. Peripherally restricted viral challenge elevates extracellular glutamate and enhances synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Holly C; Wang, Desheng; Petrisko, Tiffany J; Alhowail, Ahmad; Setti, Sharay E; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Konat, Gregory W; Reed, Miranda N

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral infections increase the propensity and severity of seizures in susceptible populations. We have previously shown that intraperitoneal injection of a viral mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC), elicits hypersusceptibility of mice to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. This study was undertaken to determine whether this seizure hypersusceptibility entails alterations in glutamate signaling. Female C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with PIC, and after 24 h, glutamate homeostasis in the hippocampus was monitored using the enzyme-based microelectrode arrays. PIC challenge robustly increased the level of resting extracellular glutamate. While pre-synaptic potassium-evoked glutamate release was not affected, glutamate uptake was profoundly impaired and non-vesicular glutamate release was augmented, indicating functional alterations of astrocytes. Electrophysiological examination of hippocampal slices from PIC-challenged mice revealed a several fold increase in the basal synaptic transmission as compared to control slices. PIC challenge also increased the probability of pre-synaptic glutamate release as seen from a reduction of paired-pulse facilitation and synaptic plasticity as seen from an enhancement of long-term potentiation. Altogether, our results implicate a dysregulation of astrocytic glutamate metabolism and an alteration of excitatory synaptic transmission as the underlying mechanism for the development of hippocampal hyperexcitability, and consequently seizure hypersusceptibility following peripheral PIC challenge. Peripheral infections/inflammations enhance seizure susceptibility. Here, we explored the effect of peritoneal inflammation induced by a viral mimic on glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the mouse hippocampus. We found that peritoneal inflammation elevated extracellular glutamate concentration and enhanced the probability of pre-synaptic glutamate release resulting in hyperexcitability of

  20. Researching glutamate – induced cytotoxicity in different cell lines: a comparative/collective analysis/study

    PubMed Central

    Kritis, Aristeidis A.; Stamoula, Eleni G.; Paniskaki, Krystallenia A.; Vavilis, Theofanis D.

    2015-01-01

    Although glutamate is one of the most important excitatory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system, its excessive extracellular concentration leads to uncontrolled continuous depolarization of neurons, a toxic process called, excitotoxicity. In excitotoxicity glutamate triggers the rise of intracellular Ca2+ levels, followed by up regulation of nNOS, dysfunction of mitochondria, ROS production, ER stress, and release of lysosomal enzymes. Excessive calcium concentration is the key mediator of glutamate toxicity through over activation of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In addition, glutamate accumulation can also inhibit cystine (CySS) uptake by reversing the action of the CySS/glutamate antiporter. Reversal of the antiporter action reinforces the aforementioned events by depleting neurons of cysteine and eventually glutathione’s reducing potential. Various cell lines have been employed in the pursuit to understand the mechanism(s) by which excitotoxicity affects the cells leading them ultimately to their demise. In some cell lines glutamate toxicity is exerted mainly through over activation of NMDA, AMPA, or kainate receptors whereas in other cell lines lacking such receptors, the toxicity is due to glutamate induced oxidative stress. However, in the greatest majority of the cell lines ionotropic glutamate receptors are present, co-existing to CySS/glutamate antiporters and metabotropic glutamate receptors, supporting the assumption that excitotoxicity effect in these cells is accumulative. Different cell lines differ in their responses when exposed to glutamate. In this review article the responses of PC12, SH-SY5Y, HT-22, NT-2, OLCs, C6, primary rat cortical neurons, RGC-5, and SCN2.2 cell systems are systematically collected and analyzed. PMID:25852482

  1. Glutamate cycling may drive organic anion transport on the basal membrane of human placental syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Lofthouse, Emma M; Brooks, Suzanne; Cleal, Jane K; Hanson, Mark A; Poore, Kirsten R; O'Kelly, Ita M; Lewis, Rohan M

    2015-10-15

    The organic anion transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) and organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1) are expressed in the basal membrane of the placental syncytiotrophoblast. These transporters mediate exchange whereby uptake of one organic anion is coupled to efflux of a counter-ion. In placenta, these exchangers mediate placental uptake of substrates for oestrogen synthesis as well as clearing waste products and xenobiotics from the fetal circulation. However, the identity of the counter-ion driving this transport in the placenta, and in other tissues, is unclear. While glutamate is not a known OAT4 or OATP2B1 substrate, we propose that its high intracellular concentration has the potential to drive accumulation of substrates from the fetal circulation. In the isolated perfused placenta, glutamate exchange was observed between the placenta and the fetal circulation. This exchange could not be explained by known glutamate exchangers. However, glutamate efflux was trans-stimulated by an OAT4 and OATP2B1 substrate (bromosulphothalein). Exchange of glutamate for bromosulphothalein was only observed when glutamate reuptake was inhibited (by addition of aspartate). To determine if OAT4 and/or OATP2B1 mediate glutamate exchange, uptake and efflux of glutamate were investigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our data demonstrate that in Xenopus oocytes expressing either OAT4 or OATP2B1 efflux of intracellular [(14)C]glutamate could be stimulated by conditions including extracellular glutamate (OAT4), estrone-sulphate and bromosulphothalein (both OAT4 and OATP2B1) or pravastatin (OATP2B1). Cycling of glutamate across the placenta involving efflux via OAT4 and OATP2B1 and subsequent reuptake will drive placental uptake of organic anions from the fetal circulation.

  2. Effect of arsenite, arsenate, and the herbicide monosodium methyl arsonate (MSMA) on hepatic metallothionein expression and lipid peroxidation in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, D; Wolford, L; Chelius, M; Steevens, J; Chan, K M

    1997-10-01

    Arsenic exerts its toxicity by the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates which caused lipid peroxidation and cellular damage. Metallothioneins (MTs) have been shown to be induced by oxidative stress and act as scavengers of reactive oxygen intermediates. Thus, hepatic MT was examined in channel catfish treated with the herbicide monosodium methyl arsonate (MSMA) and compared to equal doses of trivalent and pentavalent arsenic. Fish were exposed to 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L of each compound for 1 week by static renewal. Hepatic MT was measured by the cadmium/hemoglobin (Cd/Hb) saturation assay, ELISA using antibodies raised against the first 10 amino acids of piscine MT, and Northern blot analysis using a cDNA encoding winter flounder hepatic MT. Cd/Hb and ELISA measurements of low molecular weight fractions from the hepatic cytosolic component of fish exposed to MSMA revealed a dose dependent increase in MT. MTs and MT mRNA of fish receiving the 1.0 mg/L dose were significantly induced vs control. Responses to arsenate exposure were more variable, but showed a trend toward a dose-dependent induction of MT and MT mRNA. MT mRNA and protein also showed a dose-dependent increase with arsenite exposure with no significant differences with untreated animals. Hepatic lipid peroxidation (as determined by TBARS) and glutathione was unaltered by any of the arsenical treatments. Thus, the lack of correlation between oxidative stress and MT expression suggest MT may not be a reliable indicator of oxidative stress. In addition, the induction of hepatic MT by various forms of As does not appear to be mediated through an oxidative stress mechanism in the liver.

  3. Deer bone extract suppresses articular cartilage damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate in osteoarthritic rats: an in vivo micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Yooheon; Ahn, Chang Won; Park, Soo Hyun; Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 μm, HDB: 80.7 μm vs. NC: 48.0 μm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 μm, HDB: 81.2 μm vs. NC: 112.0 μm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model.

  4. Monosodium urate crystal-induced pro-interleukin-1β production is post-transcriptionally regulated via the p38 signaling pathway in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeon-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β is a key mediator of sterile inflammation in response to endogenous particulates, a type of damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs) molecule derived from damaged cells. Despite the well-known role of sterile particulates such as monosodium urate (MSU) crystals as inflammasome inducers in monocytes/macrophages, little is known regarding how pro-IL-1β synthesis is induced under sterile inflammatory conditions. We provide evidence that MSU crystals post-transcriptionally induce the rapid production of pro-IL-1β in human primary monocytes. Metabolic labeling and pull-down assays for newly-synthesized proteins clearly showed that MSU crystals rapidly, within 30 min, induce the synthesis of pro-IL-1β as well as global proteins. Notably, MSU crystal-induced pro-IL-1β synthesis is selectively dependent on the p38 MAPK pathway, whereas global protein synthesis is mediated via the mTOR, ERK1/2, and p38 pathways. Furthermore, inhibition of Mnk1, a substrate of p38, blocked MSU crystal-induced pro-IL-1β synthesis downstream of eIF4E phosphorylation. In addition, the p38 MAPK pathway leading to phosphorylation of MK2 was also critical for stabilization of pro-IL-1β mRNA following MSU stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that post-transcriptional regulation via p38 MAPK plays a central role in the rapid synthesis of pro-IL-1β in response to MSU crystals, which is an essential step for IL-1β production in human monocytes. PMID:27694988

  5. Arsenic and lead residues in carrots from foliar applications of monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA): A comparison between mineral and organic soils, or from soil residues.

    PubMed

    Zandstra, B H; De Kryger, T A

    2007-01-01

    Carrot roots may absorb arsenic residues when grown in soil that has been treated previously with arsenical pesticides. Arsenic residues in crops also may result from the inappropriate application of post-emergence arsenical herbicides. To compare potential sources of arsenic residues, carrots were planted in mineral or organic soil and treated post-emergence with the herbicide monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) at 0, 0.56, 1.12, 2.24, 4.48, or 8.96 kg ha(-1). Arsenic concentration in all plant parts declined between 30 days before harvest and harvest. Arsenic concentration in peeled carrot roots ranged from less than the limit of detection (LOD) for untreated carrots to 0.963 mg kg(-1) (fresh weight) at harvest for carrots treated with 8.96 kg ha(-1) MSMA. In another study, carrots were grown in a greenhouse in soil collected from an old orchard site that had been sprayed with lead arsenate for many years. The old orchard site soil had an arsenic level of 110 mg kg(-1), and similar non-orchard soil had an arsenic level of 1.97 mg kg(-1). All carrot plant segments from plants grown in old orchard soil had higher arsenic concentrations than those from non-orchard soil. Peeled carrot roots from non-orchard soil contained 0.034 mg kg(-1) arsenic, while the peeled roots from old orchard soil had 0.135 mg kg(-1). Old orchard soil had a lead level of 496 mg kg(-1), compared with 6.52 mg kg(-1) for non-orchard soil. Peeled carrot roots from old orchard soil contained 0.885 mg kg(-1) lead, and peeled roots from non-orchard soil contained 0.147 mg kg(-1) lead. PMID:17164215

  6. Deer bone extract suppresses articular cartilage damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate in osteoarthritic rats: an in vivo micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Yooheon; Ahn, Chang Won; Park, Soo Hyun; Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 μm, HDB: 80.7 μm vs. NC: 48.0 μm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 μm, HDB: 81.2 μm vs. NC: 112.0 μm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model. PMID:24797662

  7. Three-dimensional models of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, M J; Wo, Z G; Oswald, R E

    1996-01-01

    Structural models have been produced for three types of non-NMDA inotropic glutamate receptors: an AMPA receptor, GluR1, a kainate receptor, GluR6; and a low-molecular-weight kainate receptor from goldfish, GFKAR alpha. Modeling was restricted to the domains of the proteins that bind the neurotransmitter glutamate and that form the ion channel. Model building combined homology modeling, distance geometry, molecular mechanics, interactive modeling, and known constraints. The models indicate new potential interactions in the extracellular domain between protein and agonists, and suggest that the transition from the "closed" to the "open" state involves the movement of a conserved positive residue away from, and two conserved negative residues into, the extracellular entrance to the pore upon binding. As a first approximation, the ion channel domain was modeled with a structure comprising a central antiparallel beta-barrel that partially crosses the membrane, and against which alpha-helices from each subunit are packed; a third alpha-helix packs against these two helices in each subunit. Much, but not all, of the available data were consistent with this structure. Modifying the beta-barrel to a loop-like topology produced a model consistent with available data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785317

  8. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Dependent Cortical Plasticity in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kohei; Li, Shermaine; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Many cortical areas play crucial roles in higher order brain functions such as pain and emotion-processing, decision-making, and cognition. Among them, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular cortex (IC) are two key areas. Glutamate mediates major excitatory transmission during long-term plasticity in both physiological and pathological conditions. Specifically related to nociceptive or pain behaviors, metabotropic glutamate subtype receptors (mGluRs) have been involved in different types of synaptic modulation and plasticity from periphery to the spinal cord. However, less is known about their functional roles in plasticity related to pain and its related behaviors within cortical regions. In this review, we first summarized previous studies of synaptic plasticity in both the ACC and IC, and discussed how mGluRs may be involved in both cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD)-especially in LTD. The activation of mGluRs contributes to the induction of LTD in both ACC and IC areas. The loss of LTD caused by peripheral amputation or nerve injury can be rescued by priming ACC or IC with activations of mGluR1 receptors. We also discussed the potential functional roles of mGluRs for pain-related behaviors. We propose that targeting mGluRs in the cortical areas including the ACC and IC may provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic pain, phantom pain or anxiety. PMID:27296638

  9. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Giselle; Sibille, Jérémie; Zapata, Jonathan; Rouach, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis. PMID:26346563

  10. Glutamate dehydrogenase: structure, allosteric regulation, and role in insulin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine and inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds blocked the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  11. The structure and allosteric regulation of mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2012-03-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine, while the most important inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Recently, spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds were found to block the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  12. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media.

  13. Targeting of metabotropic glutamate receptors for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2011-01-01

    The glutamatergic system is involved in a wide range of physiological processes in the brain, and its dysfunction plays an important role in the etiology and pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Among the glutamate receptors, metabotropic receptors (mGlu receptors) have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for the development of novel interventions for psychiatric disorders. Among them, group II mGlu receptors, such as mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors, are of particular interest because of their unique distribution and the regulatory roles they have in neurotransmission. Recently, potent agonists for mGlu2/3 receptor have been synthesized, and their pharmacological roles have been intensively investigated in animal models. The efficacy for the treatment of schizophrenia has also been proven in a clinical trial. Recently, much attention has been paid to mGlu2 receptor potentiators, which potentiate the glutamate response without affecting the actual activity of the mGlu2 receptor. In addition, mGlu1 receptor antagonists have recently been proposed as an attractive approach to developing novel antipsychotics in animal models. This review describes the potential of both mGlu2/3 receptor agonists/potentiators and mGlu1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:21355835

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: their therapeutic potential in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Lesage, Anne; Lavreysen, Hilde; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Steckler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are linked to changes in synaptic excitatory processes with a key role for glutamate, that is, the most abundant excitatory amino-acid. Molecular cloning of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors has led to the identification of eight mGlu receptors, which, in contrast to ligand-gated ion channels (responsible for fast excitatory transmission), modulate and fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are G protein-coupled and constitute a new group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of Groups I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain function and dysfunction including anxiety. Although investigation of the role of the Group III (mGlu4, 6, 7, and 8) receptors is less advanced, the generation of genetically manipulated animals and recent advances in the identification of subtype-selective compounds have revealed some first insights into the therapeutic potential of this group of receptors. PMID:21309118

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: their therapeutic potential in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Lesage, Anne; Lavreysen, Hilde; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Steckler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are linked to changes in synaptic excitatory processes with a key role for glutamate, that is, the most abundant excitatory amino-acid. Molecular cloning of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors has led to the identification of eight mGlu receptors, which, in contrast to ligand-gated ion channels (responsible for fast excitatory transmission), modulate and fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are G protein-coupled and constitute a new group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of Groups I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain function and dysfunction including anxiety. Although investigation of the role of the Group III (mGlu4, 6, 7, and 8) receptors is less advanced, the generation of genetically manipulated animals and recent advances in the identification of subtype-selective compounds have revealed some first insights into the therapeutic potential of this group of receptors.

  16. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  17. Memantine: targeting glutamate excitotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José L; Lladó, Albert; Rami, Lorena

    2005-01-01

    The management of dementia has changed since the development of new antidementia drugs. The benefits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) with selective cholinergic transmission treatments are mainly symptomatic, without clear evidence of neuroprotection. The hypothesis that glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity is involved in the pathogenesis of AD is finding increasingly more acceptance in the scientific community. Glutamate receptors are overactive, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential for the treatment of AD and other neurological disorders. Memantine is a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist that is considered a neuroprotective drug. Memantine's capacity has been demonstrated in preclinical studies, and it is considered a useful symptomatic treatment for AD. Memantine has been shown to benefit cognition, function, and global outcome in patients with moderate to severe AD, and it is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of moderate to severe AD. Recently, memantine has also demonstrated efficacy in the initial stages of AD, although FDA authorization is pending. This review highlights the important pharmacological and clinical aspects of memantine, as well as some basic mechanisms mediating glutamatergic neurodegeneration.

  18. Yokukansan, a kampo medicine, protects PC12 cells from glutamate-induced death by augmenting gene expression of cystine/glutamate antiporter system Xc-.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitomi; Kawakami, Zenji; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Kase, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the kampo medicine yokukansan on gene expression of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system Xc-, which protects against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity, were examined in Pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). Yokukansan inhibited glutamate-induced PC12 cell death. Similar cytoprotective effects were found in Uncaria hook. Experiments to clarify the active compounds revealed that geissoschizine methyl ether, hirsuteine, hirsutine, and procyanidin B1 in Uncaria hook, had cytoprotective effects. These components enhanced gene expressions of system Xc- subunits xCT and 4F2hc, and also ameliorated the glutamate-induced decrease in glutathione levels. These results suggest that the cytoprotective effect of yokukansan may be attributed to geissoschizine methyl ether, hirsuteine, hirsutine, and procyanidin B1 in Uncaria hook.

  19. Ethanol-Associated Changes in Glutamate Reward Neurocircuitry: A Minireview of Clinical and Preclinical Genetic Findings.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Hauser, Sheketha R; McClintick, Jeanette; Rahman, Shafiqur; Edenberg, Howard J; Szumlinski, Karen K; McBride, William J

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we have reviewed the role of glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, in a number of neurochemical, -physiological, and -behavioral processes mediating the development of alcohol dependence. The findings discussed include results from both preclinical as well as neuroimaging and postmortem clinical studies. Expression levels for a number of glutamate-associated genes and/or proteins are modulated by alcohol abuse and dependence. These changes in expression include metabotropic receptors and ionotropic receptor subunits as well as different glutamate transporters. Moreover, these changes in gene expression parallel the pharmacologic manipulation of these same receptors and transporters. Some of these gene expression changes may have predated alcohol abuse and dependence because a number of glutamate-associated polymorphisms are related to a genetic predisposition to develop alcohol dependence. Other glutamate-associated polymorphisms are linked to age at the onset of alcohol-dependence and initial level of response/sensitivity to alcohol. Finally, findings of innate and/or ethanol-induced glutamate-associated gene expression differences/changes observed in a genetic animal model of alcoholism, the P rat, are summarized. Overall, the existing literature indicates that changes in glutamate receptors, transporters, enzymes, and scaffolding proteins are crucial for the development of alcohol dependence and there is a substantial genetic component to these effects. This indicates that continued research into the genetic underpinnings of these glutamate-associated effects will provide important novel molecular targets for treating alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:26809998

  20. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes. PMID:26099947

  1. Characterization of the venom from the spider, Araneus gemma: search for a glutamate antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Early, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Venom from three spiders, Argiope aurantia, Neoscona arabesca, and Araneus gemma have been shown to inhibit the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to both GBP and synaptic membranes. The venom from Araneus gemma was shown to be the most potent of the three venoms in inhibiting the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to GBP. Therefore, Araneus gemma venom was selected for further characterization. Venom from Araneus gemma appeared to contain two factors which inhibit the binding of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate to GBP and at least one factor that inhibits L-glutamate-stimulated /sup 35/SCN flux. Factor I is thought to be L-glutamic acid, based on: (1) its similar mobility to glutamic acid in thin-layer chromatography and amino acid analysis, (2) the presence of fingerprint molecular ion peaks for glutamate in the mass spectrum for the methanol:water (17:1) extract and for the fraction from the HPLC-purification of the crude venom, and (3) its L-glutamate-like interaction with the sodium-dependent uptake system. Factor II appears to be a polypeptide, possibly 21 amino acids in length, and does not appear to contain any free amino groups or tryptophan. While the venom does not appear to contain any indoleamines, three catecholamines (epinephrine, epinine, dopamine) and one catecholamine metabolite (DOPAC) were detected.

  2. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes.

  3. Glutamate and post-traumatic stress disorder: toward a psychobiology of dissociation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R A; Bremner, J D; Moghaddam, B; Southwick, S M; Charney, D S; Krystal, J H

    1999-10-01

    Dissociative cognitive and perceptual alterations commonly occur at the time of traumatization and as an enduring feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After stress exposure, dissociative symptoms are a predictor of the development of PTSD. Recent preclinical data suggest that stress stimulates the cortico-limbic release of glutamate. The glutamate that is released during stress in animal models influences behavior, induces a variety of changes in neural plasticity that may have long-lasting effects on brain function and behavior, and contributes to neural toxicity. Antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor also stimulates transient cortico-limbic glutamate release in animals. Further, some of the effects of NMDA antagonists in animals are blocked by drugs that attenuate glutamate release. Clinical studies suggest that NMDA antagonists may transiently stimulate glutamate release and produce symptoms resembling dissociative states in humans. A recent study suggests that a drug that reduces glutamate release also attenuates the perceptual effects of the NMDA antagonist, ketamine, in humans. Because of the possible contributions of hyperglutamatergic states to the acute and long-lasting consequences of traumatic stress exposure, the therapeutic and neuroprotective potential of drugs that attenuate glutamate release should be explored in traumatized individuals with dissociative symptoms.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  5. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.500 Condensed, extracted glutamic acid... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid...

  6. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.500 Condensed, extracted glutamic acid... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid...

  7. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.500 Condensed, extracted glutamic acid... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid...

  8. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.500 Condensed, extracted glutamic acid... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid...

  9. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.500 Condensed, extracted glutamic acid... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid...

  10. Levetiracetam inhibits oligomeric Aβ-induced glutamate release from human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Piña-Crespo, Juan C; Zhang, Xiaofei; McKercher, Scott R; Lipton, Stuart A

    2016-06-15

    A recently identified mechanism for oligomeric Aβ-induced glutamate release from astrocytes involves intracellular Ca elevation, potentially by Ca-dependent vesicular release. Evidence suggests that levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra), an antiepileptic drug, can improve cognitive performance in both humans with mild cognitive impairment and animal models of Alzheimer disease. Because LEV acts by modulating neurotransmitter release from neurons by interaction with synaptic vesicles, we tested the effect of LEV on Aβ-induced astrocytic release of glutamate. We used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based glutamate sensor (termed SuperGluSnFR), whose structure is based on the ligand-binding site of glutamate receptors, to monitor glutamate release from primary cultures of human astrocytes exposed to oligomeric amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ42). We found that LEV (10 µM) inhibited oligomeric Aβ-induced astrocytic glutamate release. In addition, we show that this Aβ-induced glutamate release from astrocytes is sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin, an inhibitor of the vesicle release machinery. Taken together, our evidence suggests that LEV inhibits Aβ-induced vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes and thus may underlie, at least in part, the ability of LEV to reduce hyperexcitability in Alzheimer disease. PMID:27183239

  11. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  12. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  13. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  14. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors modulate glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes and gliosomes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre Dos; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, where its toxic build-up leads to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic cell death that underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, efforts have been made to understand the regulation of glutamate transporters, which are responsible for the clearance of extracellular glutamate. We now report that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) R) control the uptake of D-aspartate in primary cultured astrocytes as well as in an ex vivo preparation enriched in glial plasmalemmal vesicles (gliosomes) from adult rats, whereas A(1) R and A(3) R were devoid of effects. Thus, the acute exposure to the A(2A) R agonist, CGS 21680, inhibited glutamate uptake, an effect prevented by the A(2A) R antagonist, SCH 58261, and abbrogated in cultured astrocytes from A(2A) R knockout mice. Furthermore, the prolonged activation of A(2A) R lead to a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent reduction of GLT-I and GLAST mRNA and protein levels, which leads to a sustained decrease of glutamate uptake. This dual mechanism of inhibition of glutamate transporters by astrocytic A(2A) R provides a novel candidate mechanism to understand the ability of A(2) (A) R to control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, two conditions tightly associated with the control of extracellular glutamate levels by glutamate transporters.

  16. Ethanol-Associated Changes in Glutamate Reward Neurocircuitry: A Minireview of Clinical and Preclinical Genetic Findings.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Hauser, Sheketha R; McClintick, Jeanette; Rahman, Shafiqur; Edenberg, Howard J; Szumlinski, Karen K; McBride, William J

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we have reviewed the role of glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, in a number of neurochemical, -physiological, and -behavioral processes mediating the development of alcohol dependence. The findings discussed include results from both preclinical as well as neuroimaging and postmortem clinical studies. Expression levels for a number of glutamate-associated genes and/or proteins are modulated by alcohol abuse and dependence. These changes in expression include metabotropic receptors and ionotropic receptor subunits as well as different glutamate transporters. Moreover, these changes in gene expression parallel the pharmacologic manipulation of these same receptors and transporters. Some of these gene expression changes may have predated alcohol abuse and dependence because a number of glutamate-associated polymorphisms are related to a genetic predisposition to develop alcohol dependence. Other glutamate-associated polymorphisms are linked to age at the onset of alcohol-dependence and initial level of response/sensitivity to alcohol. Finally, findings of innate and/or ethanol-induced glutamate-associated gene expression differences/changes observed in a genetic animal model of alcoholism, the P rat, are summarized. Overall, the existing literature indicates that changes in glutamate receptors, transporters, enzymes, and scaffolding proteins are crucial for the development of alcohol dependence and there is a substantial genetic component to these effects. This indicates that continued research into the genetic underpinnings of these glutamate-associated effects will provide important novel molecular targets for treating alcohol abuse and dependence.

  17. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  18. Biochemical and immunological changes on oral glutamate feeding in male albino rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Bansal, Anju; Thomas, Pauline; Sairam, M.; Sharma, S. K.; Mongia, S. S.; Singh, R.; Selvamurthy, W.

    High altitude stress leads to lipid peroxidation and free radical formation which results in cell membrane damage in organs and tissues, and associated mountain diseases. This paper discusses the changes in biochemical parameters and antibody response on feeding glutamate to male albino Sprague Dawley rats under hypoxic stress. Exposure of rats to simulated hypoxia at 7576 m, for 6 h daily for 5 consecutive days, in an animal decompression chamber at 32+/-2° C resulted in an increase in plasma malondialdehyde level with a concomitant decrease in blood glutathione (reduced) level. Supplementation of glutamate orally at an optimal dose (27 mg/kg body weight) in male albino rats under hypoxia enhanced glutathione level and decreased malondialdehyde concentration significantly. Glutamate feeding improved total plasma protein and glucose levels under hypoxia. The activities of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and the urea level remained elevated on glutamate supplementation under hypoxia. Glutamate supplementation increased the humoral response against sheep red blood cells (antibody titre). These results indicate a possible utility of glutamate in the amelioration of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress.

  19. Neuroprotection by glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase in ischemic stroke: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Sobrino, Tomás; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Argibay, Bárbara; Agulla, Jesús; Pérez-Mato, María; Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Brea, David; Castillo, José

    2011-06-01

    As ischemic stroke is associated with an excessive release of glutamate into the neuronal extracellular space, a decrease in blood glutamate levels could provide a mechanism to remove it from the brain tissue, by increasing the brain-blood gradient. In this regard, the ability of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) to metabolize glutamate in blood could represent a potential neuroprotective tool for ischemic stroke. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of GOT in an animal model of cerebral ischemia by means of a middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO) following the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) group guidelines. In this animal model, oxaloacetate-mediated GOT activation inhibited the increase of blood and cerebral glutamate after MCAO. This effect is reflected in a reduction of infarct size, smaller edema volume, and lower sensorimotor deficits with respect to controls. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed that the increase of glutamate levels in the brain parenchyma after MCAO is inhibited after oxaloacetate-mediated GOT activation. These findings show the capacity of the GOT to remove glutamate from the brain by means of blood glutamate degradation, and suggest the applicability of this enzyme as an efficient and novel neuroprotective tool against ischemic stroke.

  20. Conditional deletion of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 reveals that astrocytic GLT-1 protects against fatal epilepsy while neuronal GLT-1 contributes significantly to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Petr, Geraldine T; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A; Fischer, Kathryn D; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake. PMID:25834045