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Sample records for monoterpenes alpha-pinene beta-pinene

  1. Theoretical study of the gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene (C10H16).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T L; Peeters, J; Vereecken, L

    2009-07-21

    The O3-initiated oxidation of beta-pinene, a monoterpene emitted in forested areas, was theoretically characterized using DFT, CBS-QB3 and CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations combined with statistical kinetic RRKM/master equation analysis and transition state theory. The first-principles based rate coefficient of the initial 03 attack on the exocyclic double bond shows a slight positive temperature dependence, k(tot)T = 1.27 x 10(-22) x T2.64 x exp(-714 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) and is in close agreement with experiment. The resulting primary ozonides are found to give rise to two distinct, non-interconvertible conformers of the predominant Criegee intermediate (CI-1 and CI-2), with subsequent chemistries that are shown to be very different; this crucial aspect of beta-pinene ozonolysis was not taken into account in earlier studies. One of the conformers CI-2--carrying nearly half the total reaction flux--cannot undergo the usual "hydroperoxide channel", thus rationalizing why the OH yield from beta-pinene is barely half of that from alpha-pinene. The predicted first-generation product distribution for atmospheric conditions is consistent with the available experimental data on the overall products. Our final results predict 5% of nopinone formation, 28% OH radicals with 2-oxo-alkyl radical coproducts, 37% of stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI), 17% lactones, 10% CO2 formed after an intersystem crossing, and 3% of a newly proposed biradical formed from prompt ring opening in the CI. In atmospheric conditions, additional OH production is expected from the stabilized CI-1 conformer via the thermal unimolecular "hydroperoxide channel", whereas the stabilized CI-2 can react with H2O and its dimer, to produce additional nopinone. The expected subsequent chemistries of the large coproduct radicals formed from reactions of the two CI are also addressed in extenso.

  2. Monoterpene emission from ponderosa pine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerdau, Manual; Dilts, Stephen B.; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the variability in monoterpene emissions from ponderosa pine beyond that which can be explained by temperature alone. Specifically, we examine the roles that photosynthesis and needle monoterpene concentrations play in controlling emissions. We measure monoterpene concentrations and emissions, photosynthesis, temperature, and light availability in the late spring and late summer in a ponderosa pine forest in central Oregon. We use a combination of measurements from cuvettes and Teflon bag enclosures to show that photosynthesis is not correlated with emissions in the short term. We also show that needle monoterpene concentrations are highly correlated with emissions for two compounds, alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, but that Delta-carene concentrations are not correlated with emissions. We suggest that direct effects of light and photosynthesis do not need to be included in emission algorithms. Our results indicate that the role of needle concentration bears further investigation; our results for alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are explainable by a Raoult's law relationship, but we cannot yet explain the cause of our results with Delta-carene.

  3. Monoterpene oxidation in an oxidative flow reactor: SOA yields and the relationship between bulk gas-phase properties and organic aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    We use an oxidative flow reactor (OFR) to determine the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields of five monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, sabinene, and terpinolene) at a range of OH exposures. These OH exposures correspond to aging timescales of a few hours to seven days. We further determine how SOA yields of beta-pinene and alpha-pinene vary as a function of seed particle type (organic vs. inorganic) and seed particle mass concentration. We hypothesize that the monoterpene structure largely accounts for the observed variance in SOA yields for the different monoterpenes. We also use high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry to calculate the bulk gas-phase properties (O:C and H:C) of the monoterpene oxidation systems as a function of oxidant concentrations. Bulk gas-phase properties can be compared to the SOA yields to assess the capability of the precursor gas-phase species to inform the SOA yields of each monoterpene oxidation system. We find that the extent of oxygenated precursor gas-phase species corresponds to SOA yield.

  4. Evaluation of sensory irritation of delta3-carene and turpentine, and acceptable levels of monoterpenes in occupational and indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Kasanen, J P; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P; Liesivuori, J; Kosma, V M; Alarie, Y

    1999-05-28

    The standard mouse bioassay was used for obtaining the RD50 (i.e., the concentration that causes a 50% decrease in respiratory frequency) and for estimating the irritation properties of d-delta3-carene (i.e., (+)-delta3-carene) and commercial turpentine. The chemicals studied possess mainly sensory irritation properties similar to the previously studied monoterpenes, pinenes. The irritation potency of d-delta3-carene (RD50 = 1345 ppm) was almost equal to that of d-pinenes. Thus, d-delta3-carene was about four times more potent as a sensory irritant than I-beta-pinene, whereas the difference with I-alpha-pinene was more marked; as a sensory irritant, I-alpha-pinene is almost inactive. Based on sensory irritation potency and physicochemical and structural properties of pinenes and delta3-carene, the potency of a closely related monoterpene, limonene, is discussed. For commercial turpentine, a mixture of monoterpenes (mainly d-delta3-carene, I-beta-pinene, alpha-pinenes, and limonenes), the RD50 (1173 ppm) was the same order of magnitude as those of d-pinenes and d-delta3-carene. Apparently, d-monoterpenes are responsible for the sensory irritation caused by turpentine. In the wood industry and in the indoor air of nonindustrial environments, monoterpenes are thought to be one of the causative agents for irritation symptoms. The occupational exposure limit (OEL) of turpentine (100 ppm in Finland and the United States) is also used for individual monoterpenes, excluding limonene. Using results from this and our previous study, proposed OELs and recommended indoor levels (RILs) for selected monoterpenes and turpentine were determined based on their RD50 values. According to our studies, the present OEL of turpentine (100 ppm; 560 mg/m3) in Finland and in the United States seems to be suitable only for I-pinenes. For d-monoterpenes and turpentine, an OEL about three times lower is suggested. Our results show that recommended indoor levels (RILs) for monoterpenes are high

  5. Influence of light and temperature on monoterpene emission rates from slash pine.

    PubMed

    Tingey, D T; Manning, M; Grothaus, L C; Burns, W F

    1980-05-01

    There is a growing awareness of vegetation's role as a source of potentially reactive hydrocarbons that may serve as photochemical oxidant precursors. This study assessed the influence of light and temperature, independently, on monoterpene emissions from slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.). Plants were preconditioned in a growth chamber, then transferred to an environmentally controlled gas exchange chamber. Samples of the chamber atmosphere were collected; the monoterpenes were concentrated cryogenically and measured by gas chromatography. Five monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, myrcene, limonene, and beta-phellandrene) were present in the vapor phase surrounding the plants in sufficient quantity for reliable measurement. Light did not directly influence monoterpene emission rates since the emissions were similar in both the dark and at various light intensities. Monoterpene emission rates increased exponentially with temperature (i. e. emissions depend on temperature in a log-linear manner). The summed emissions of the five monoterpenes ranged from 3 to 21 micrograms C per gram dry weight per hour as temperature was increased from 20 to 46 C. Initially, emission rates from heat-stressed needles were similar to healthy needles, but rates decreased 11% per day. Daily carbon loss through monoterpene emissions accounted for approximately 0.4% of the carbon fixed during photosynthesis.

  6. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  7. Impact of ozone on monoterpene emissions and evidence for an isoprene-like antioxidant action of monoterpenes emitted by Quercus ilex leaves.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Francesco; Pinelli, Paola; Manes, Fausto; Kollist, Hannes

    2004-04-01

    Quercus ilex (L.) leaves emit monoterpenes, particularly alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and sabinene. Apart from the monoterpene pools that are stored in specialized structures and have a clear defensive or attractive role, the function of monoterpenes in Q. ilex leaves is unknown. We tested whether monoterpenes have an antioxidant role, as has previously been found for isoprene in isoprene-emitting leaves. We exposed Q. ilex leaves to either mild and repeated ozone exposure (Experiment I) or to a single acute ozone exposure (Experiment II) at temperatures ranging between 20 and 32 degrees C. Both ozone treatments rapidly stimulated monoterpene synthesis, but had no effect on photosynthesis and caused no visible damage to leaves maintained at 25, 30 or 32 degrees C. Ozone inhibited both photosynthesis and monoterpene synthesis in leaves maintained at 20 degrees C. To characterize the relationship between monoterpenes and ozone-induced damage, we fed detached leaves fosmidomycin, a selective inhibitor of isoprene synthesis. Fosmidomycin caused rapid and complete inhibition of monoterpene emissions in leaves maintained at 30 degrees C, confirming that monoterpenes are synthesized by the same biochemical pathway as isoprene. However, over the experimental period, fosmidomycin did not affect concentrations of compounds that are formed from chloroplastic isoprenoids and that might have conferred antioxidant protection, either directly (carotenoids) or indirectly (chlorophylls, xanthophylls). In leaves whose monoterpene synthesis had been inhibited by fosmidomycin, ozone rapidly and significantly inhibited photosynthesis and increased the production of hydrogen peroxide and malonyldialdehyde. We conclude that monoterpenes produced by Q. ilex leaves share the same biosynthetic pathway and function as isoprene. Furthermore, all volatile isoprenoids may have similar antioxidant properties and may be stimulated by the same stress-inducing conditions.

  8. Dermal exposure to monoterpenes during wood work.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Kare; Wiklund, Leif

    2004-06-01

    The dermal exposure to the suspected allergenic monoterpenes [small alpha]-pinene, [small beta]-pinene and [capital Delta](3)-carene was assessed with a patch sampling technique. The patch used was made of activated charcoal sandwiched between two layers of cotton cloth. Patches were fastened at 12 different spots on a sampling overall and at the front of a cap to estimate the potential exposure of the body. Fastening two patches on a cotton glove, one patch representing the dorsal side and one patch representing the palm of the hand respectively, assessed the exposure on the hands. Sampling was carried out during collecting of pine and spruce boards in sawmills and during sawing of pine wood pieces in joinery shops respectively. The potential dermal exposure of the total body was 29.0-1 890 mg h(-1) with a geometric mean (GM) of 238 mg h(-1) during sawing. During collecting the GM was estimated to 100 mg h(-1) with a range of 12.2-959 mg h(-1). The hands had a mean exposure of 9.24 mg h(-1) during sawing and 3.25 mg h(-1) during collecting respectively. The good correlation between the mass of contamination on the individual body parts and the potential body exposure indicates that sampling can be performed on one body part to give a good estimation of the potential body exposure. Monoterpenes were detected at patches fastened underneath the protective clothing indicating a contamination of the skin of the worker. The patch used may overestimate the dermal exposure.

  9. Poly-beta-pinene, a Novel Nonconjugated Conductive Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Mrinal; Vippa, Prakash; Rajagopalan, Harish

    2004-03-01

    Electrical conductivity in a novel nonconjugated conductive polymer, poly-beta-pinene, has been measured as a function of iodine doping. The conductivity increases about ten orders of magnitude to a maximum value ˜ 0.01 S/cm. The molar concentration of iodine corresponding to saturation is ˜ 0.8. The optical absorption measurements after light doping have shown two peaks: one at 4.1 eV and the other at 3.1 eV. The first peak is due to the radical cation and the second due the charge-transfer between the double bond and the dopant. As observed in other nonconjugated conductive polymers, the second peak becomes broader and undergoes a red-shift upon higher doping [1,2]. The FTIR spectroscopic studies have shown that the C=C stretching vibration at 1610 cm-1 and the =C-H bending vibration band at 728 cm-1 decrease upon doping as observed in other nonconjugated conductive polymers. Preliminary measurements have shown large quadratic electro-optic effects in this material. 1. M. Thakur, J. Macromol. Sci.-PAC,2001,A38(12),1337. 2. M. Thakur, S. Khatavkar and E.J. Parish, J. Macromol. Sci.-PAC,2003,A40(12),1397.

  10. Effect of cineole, alpha-pinene, and camphor on survivability of skin flaps

    PubMed

    İnce, Bilsev; Dadacı, Mehmet; Kılınç, İbrahim; Oltulu, Pembe; Yarar, Serhat; Uyar, Mehmet

    2018-06-14

    Background/aim: The aim of this study was to determine the specific component of Rosmarinus officinalis (RO) responsible for increased flap survival and how RO displays its efficacy. Materials and methods: Rectangular random-pattern flaps were elevated from the back of each rat. Group I was the control group. In group II 0.1 mL of cineole, in group III 0.1 mL of alpha-pinene, in group IV 0.1 mL of camphor, in group V 0.1 mL each of alpha-pinene and cineole, in group VI 0.1 mL each of alpha-pinene and camphor, in group VII 0.1 mL each of cineole and camphor, and in group VIII, 0.1 mL each of alpha-pinene, cineole, and camphor was orally administered once a day before surgery. The luminal area of the largest blood vessel in the proximal flap was measured. Interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and vascular endothelial growth factor values were measured. Results: The mean percentage of the viable surface area was significantly greater in groups VIII, III, and V. The mean percentage of vessel diameter was significantly greater in groups V, VIII, and VII. Conclusion: We suggest that alpha-pinene and cineole were the components of RO that were responsible for increased flap survival. The most effective of feature of RO was the antiinflammatory effects.

  11. Herbivory and climate interact serially to control monoterpene emissions from pinyon pine forests.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Amy M; Daly, Ryan W; Helmig, Detlev; Stoy, Paul C; Monson, Russell K

    2014-06-01

    The emission of volatile monoterpenes from coniferous trees impacts the oxidative state of the troposphere and multi-trophic signaling between plants and animals. Previous laboratory studies have revealed that climate anomalies and herbivory alter the rate of tree monoterpene emissions. However, no studies to date have been conducted to test these relations in situ. We conducted a two-year field experiment at two semiarid sites dominated by pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) during outbreaks of a specialist herbivore, the southwestern tiger moth (Lophocampa ingens: Arctiidae). We discovered that during the early spring, when herbivory rates were highest, monoterpene emission rates were approximately two to six times higher from undamaged needles on damaged trees, with this increase in emissions due to alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and camphene at both sites. During mid-summer, emission rates did not differ between previously damaged and undamaged trees at the site on the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains, but rather tracked changes in the temperature and precipitation regime characteristic of the region. As the mid-summer drought progressed at the Eastern Slope site, emission rates were low, but differences between previously damaged and undamaged trees were not statistically significant. Despite no difference in emissions, mid-summer tissue monoterpene concentrations were significantly lower in previously damaged trees at both sites. With the onset of monsoon rains during late summer, emission rates from previously damaged trees increased to levels higher than those of undamaged trees despite the lack of herbivory. We conclude that (1) herbivory systemically increases the flux of terpenes to the atmosphere during the spring, (2) drought overrides the effect of past herbivory as the primary control over emissions during the mid-summer, and (3) a release from drought and the onset of late-summer rains is correlated with a secondary increase in emissions, particularly from

  12. Influence of environmental factors and air composition on the emission of {alpha}-pinene from Quercus ilex leaves

    SciT

    Loreto, F.; Tricoli, D.; Ciccioli, P.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the emission of {alpha}-pinene from Quercus ilex leaves. Only the abaxial side of the hypostomatous Q. ilex leaf emits {alpha}-pinene. Light induced photosynthesis and {alpha}-pinene emission. However, the response of photosynthesis to dark-to-light transitions was faster than that of {alpha}-pinene, suggesting that ATP controls the emission. The emission was higher at 30 than at 20{degrees}C, whereas photosynthesis did not change. Therefore, the relationship between photosynthesis and {alpha}-pinene emission does not always hold. When CO{sub 2} was removed from the air, transpiration was stimulated and transpiration was reduced, but {alpha}-pinene emission was unaffected. Therefore, the emission depends on themore » availability of photosynthetic carbon, is not saturated at ambient CO{sub 2}, and is not dependent on stomatal opening. The pattern of {alpha}-pinene emission from Q. ilex is different from that of plants having specialized structures for storage and emission of terpenes. We suggest that {alpha}-pinene emitted by Q. ilex leaves is synthesized in the chloroplasts and shares the same biochemical pathway with isoprene emitted by isoprene-emitting oak species. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.« less

  13. ESTIMATES OF ALPHA-PINENE EMISSIONS FROM A LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST USING AN ATMOSPHERIC DIFFUSION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The body of information presented in this paper is directed to atmospheric chemists and modelers who are concerned with assessing the impact of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. A field study was conducted to determine the emission rate of alpha-pinene from a loblolly pine forest u...

  14. Removal of alpha-pinene from gases using biofilters containing fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Groenestijn, J. W.; Liu, J. X.

    Biofiltration is cost-effective for the treatment of gases containing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (<3 g m -3) . However, conventional biofilters, based on compost and bacterial activity, face problems with the elimination of hydrophobic compounds. Besides that, biofilter operational stability is often hampered by acidification and drying out of the filter bed. To overcome these problems, biofilters with fungi on inert packing material have been developed. Fungi are more resistant to acid and dry conditions than bacteria, and it is hypothesised that the aerial mycelia of fungi, which are in direct contact with the gas, can take up hydrophobic compounds faster than flat aqueous bacterial biofilm surfaces. Alpha-pinene was chosen as a model compound. It is an odorous compound emitted by the wood processing industry. In 2 l biofilter columns four different packing materials were tested: perlite, expanded clay granules, polyurethane foam cubes and compost. The filters were inoculated with forest soil and ventilated with gas containing alpha-pinene. Start up took 1-2 months and removal efficiencies of more than 90% were observed, but mostly ranged from 50% to 90% due to overloading. In the filters containing perlite, clay, polyurethane and compost volumetric removal capacities of, respectively, 24, 33, 38 and 24 g alpha- pinene m -3 filter bed h -1 were attained and the gas pressure drops in the 60 cm high filter beds measured at a superficial gas velocity of 35 m h -1 were 70, 550, 180 and 250 Pa. The results indicate that it is possible to develop biofilters based on the action of fungi with higher elimination capacities for alpha-pinene as reported in literature for bacterial biofilters. The use of polyurethane foam cubes is preferred because of the low gas pressure drop in combination with a high volumetric elimination capacity.

  15. Removal characteristics and kinetic analysis of an aerobic vapor-phase bioreactor for hydrophobic alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yifeng; Li, Shanshan; Cheng, Zhuowei; Zhu, Runye; Chen, Jianmeng

    2012-01-01

    Biofiltration is considered an effective method to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential use of a bacterial biofilter packed with wood chips and peat for the removal of hydrophobic alpha-pinene. When inoculated with two pure degraders and adapted activated sludge, a removal efficiency (RE) of more than 95% was achieved after a startup period of 11 days. The maximum elimination capacity (EC) of 50 g/(m3 x hr) with RE of 94% was obtained at empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 102 sec. When higher alpha-pinene concentrations and shorter EBRTs were applied, the REs and ECs decreased significantly due to mass-transfer and biological reaction limitations. As deduced from the experimental results, approximately 74% of alpha-pinene were completely mineralized by the consortiums and the biomass yield was 0.60 g biomass/g alpha-pinene. Sequence analysis of the selected bands excised from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the inoculated pure cultures could be present during the whole operation, and others were closely related to bacteria being able to degrade hydrocarbons. The kinetic results demonstrated that the whole biofiltration for alpha-pinene was diffusion-limit controlled owing to its hydrophobic characteristics. These findings indicated that this bacterial biofiltration is a promising technology for the remediation of hydrophobic industrial waste gases containing alpha-pinene.

  16. Gastroprotective effect of alpha-pinene and its correlation with antiulcerogenic activity of essential oils obtained from Hyptis species

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marcelo de Almeida; Magalhães, Rafael Matos; Torres, Danielle Mesquita; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Mota, Francisca Sheila Xavier; Oliveira Coelho, Emanuela Maria Araújo; Moreira, Henrique Pires; Lima, Glauber Cruz; Araújo, Pamella Cristina da Costa; Cardoso, José Henrique Leal; de Souza, Andrelina Noronha Coelho; Diniz, Lúcio Ricardo Leite

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-pinene (α-pinene) is a monoterpene commonly found in essential oils with gastroprotective activity obtained from diverse medicinal plants, including Hyptis species. The genus Hyptis (lamiaceae) consists of almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. In the north and northeastern Brazil, some Hyptis species are used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal disturbances. Objective: The present study has investigated the gastoprotective effect of purified α-pinene in experimental gastric ulcer induced by ethanol and indomethacin in mice. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcers were induced in male Swiss mice (20-30 g) by oral administration of absolute ethanol or indomethacin 45 min after oral pretreatment with vehicle, standard control drugs or α-pinene (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg). One hour after the ulcerative challenges, the stomach were removed, and gastric lesions areas measured. The effects of α-pinene on the gastric juice acidity were determined by pylorus ligation model. The gastrointestinal motility and mucus depletion were determined by measuring the gastric levels of phenol red and alcian blue, respectively. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of gastric mucosa of the experimental groups were used for histology analysis. Results: α-pinene pretreatment inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions, reduced volume and acidity of the gastric juice and increased gastric wall mucus (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we showed an interesting correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species (P Pearson = 0.98). Conclusion: Our data showed that the α-pinene exhibited significant antiulcerogenic activity and a great correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species was also observed. PMID:25709221

  17. MODELING THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL. 1. APPLICATION OF THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES TO MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED IN THE ALPHA-PINENE/, BETA-PINENE/, SABINENE/, DELTA3-CARENE/, AND CYCLOHEXENE/OZONE SYSTEMS. (R826371C003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Mechanistic and kinetic insights into the thermally induced rearrangement of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Stolle, Achim; Ondruschka, Bernd; Findeisen, Matthias

    2008-11-07

    The thermal rearrangement of alpha-pinene (1) is interesting from mechanistic as well as kinetic point of view. Carrier gas pyrolyses with 1 and its acyclic isomers ocimene (2) and alloocimene (3) were performed to investigate the thermal network of these hydrocarbons. Kinetic analysis of the major reaction steps allows for a deeper insight in the reaction mechanism. Thus it was possible to explain the racemization of 1, the formation of racemic limonene (4), and the absence of the primary pyrolysis product 2 in the reaction mixture resulting from thermal rearrangement of 1. Results supported the conclusion that the reactions starting with 1 involve biradical transition states.

  19. Chirality transition in the epoxidation of (-)-alpha-pinene and successive hydrolysis studied by Raman optical activity and DFT.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shi; Li, Guanna; Liu, Peng; Wang, Changhao; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2010-03-28

    Characterization of the chirality evolution involved in chemical and biochemical reaction processes is extremely important to the understanding of the chiral catalysis mechanism. In this work, the chiral transition from the epoxidation of (-)-alpha-pinene to alpha-pinene oxide and successive hydrolysis to (-)-pinanediol has been studied as an archetype of the asymmetric catalysis by Raman optical activity (ROA) and the DFT calculation. Minor changes of the absolute configuration of the chiral products from (-)-alpha-pinene to (-)-pinanediol lead to the dramatic variation in ROA spectra indicating that the chirality is delocalized in the whole molecule rather than only concentrated on the chiral centers. The oxygen atom of alpha-pinene oxide contributes strong ROA signals while the two hydroxyl groups of (-)-pinanediol give no apparent contribution to the chirality in terms of ROA signals. Isolation of the two symmetric anisotropic invariants shows that the predominant contribution to the ROA signals stems from the electric dipole-magnetic dipole invariant, and the bond polarizability model is indeed found to be a good approximation for molecules composed of entirely axially-symmetric bonds in alpha-pinene oxide and (-)-pinanediol. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ROA to sensitively monitor the variation of the chirality transition during the chiral reactions either in the chemical or biological system.

  20. Acidity-controlled selective oxidation of alpha-pinene, isolated from Indonesian pine's turpentine oils (pinus merkusii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masruri; Farid Rahman, Mohamad; Nurkam Ramadhan, Bagus

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-pinene was isolated in high purity from turpentine oil harvested from Pinus merkusii plantation. The recent investigation on selective oxidation of alpha-pinene using potassium permanganate was undertaken under acidic conditions. The result taught the selective oxidation of alpha-pinene in acidic using potassium permanganate lead to the formation of 2-(3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutyl)acetaldehyde or pinon aldehyde. The study method applied reaction in various different buffer conditions i.e. pH 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively, and each reaction product was monitored using TLC every hour. Product determination was undertaken on spectrometry basis such as infrared, ultra violet-visible, gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  1. The essential oil of turpentine and its major volatile fraction (alpha- and beta-pinenes): a review.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Beatrice; Prost, Josiane; Prost, Michel

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary review of the major biological features concerning the essential oil of turpentine, its origin and use in traditional and modern medicine. More precisely, the safety of this volatile fraction to human health, and the medical, biological and environmental effects of the two major compounds of this fraction (alpha- and beta-pinenes) have been discussed.

  2. Two Photon Absorption in a Novel Nano-optical Material Based on the Nonconjugated Conductive Polymer, Poly(beta-pinene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Jitto; Thakur, Mrinal

    2006-03-01

    As recently reported, the electrical conductivity of the nonconjugated polymer, poly(beta-pinene) increases by more than ten orders of magnitude upon doping with iodine [1]. The FTIR, optical absorption and EPR measurements have shown that radical cations are formed upon doping and charge-transfer involving the isolated double-bond in poly(beta-pinene). In this report, exceptionally large two-photon absorption in iodine-doped poly(beta-pinene) will be discussed. The linear absorption spectrum of medium-doped poly(beta-pinene) have peaks at about 4 eV and 3.1 eV. The first peak is due to the radical cation and the second due to the charge-transfer between the double bond and the dopant. The two-photon absorption of the medium-doped polymer has been measured at 730-860 nm using open-aperture z-scan with 150 femtosecond pulses from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A two-photon peak at about 1.5 eV with a magnitude of more than 1 cm/MW has been observed. The large magnitude of the two-photon absorption coefficient which is proportional to the imaginary part of the third order susceptibility has been attributed to the special structure of the radical cation and the confinement within a sub-nanometer dimension. [1] Vippa, Rajagopalan and Thakur, J. Poly. Sci. Part B: Poly. Phys., 43, 3695 (2005).

  3. Variation in monoterpene content among geographic sources of eastern white pine

    A.R. Gilmore; J.J. Jokela

    1977-01-01

    Variations of monoterpenes in cortical oleoresins and foliar samples were determined for seed from 16 provenances of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.). The experiment was analyzed using the "raw" and the arcsine "transformed" data. Alpha-pinene, camphene, and β-pinene varied between seed sources when "raw" data were analyzed...

  4. Two-stage gas-phase bioreactor for the combined removal of hydrogen sulphide, methanol and alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Jin, Yaomin; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Biological treatment systems have emerged as cost-effective and eco-friendly techniques for treating waste gases from process industries at moderately high gas flow rates and low pollutant concentrations. In this study, we have assessed the performance of a two-stage bioreactor, namely a biotrickling filter packed with pall rings (BTF, 1st stage) and a perlite + pall ring mixed biofilter (BF, 2nd stage) operated in series, for handling a complex mixture of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH) and alpha-pinene (C10H16). It has been reported that the presence of H2S can reduce the biofiltration efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when both are present in the gas mixture. Hydrogen sulphide and methanol were removed in the first stage BTF, previously inoculated with H2S-adapted populations and a culture containing Candida boidinii, an acid-tolerant yeast, whereas, in the second stage, alpha-pinene was removed predominantly by the fungus Ophiostoma stenoceras. Experiments were conducted in five different phases, corresponding to inlet loading rates varying between 2.1 and 93.5 g m(-3) h(-1) for H2S, 55.3 and 1260.2 g m(-3) h(-1) for methanol, and 2.8 and 161.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for alpha-pinene. Empty bed residence times were varied between 83.4 and 10 s in the first stage and 146.4 and 17.6 s in the second stage. The BTF, working at a pH as low as 2.7 as a result of H2S degradation, removed most of the H2S and methanol but only very little alpha-pinene. On the other hand, the BF, at a pH around 6.0, removed the rest of the H2S, the non-degraded methanol and most of the alpha-pinene vapours. Attempts were originally made to remove the three pollutants in a single acidophilic bioreactor, but the Ophiostoma strain was hardly active at pH <4. The maximum elimination capacities (ECs) reached by the two-stage bioreactor for individual pollutants were 894.4 g m(-3) h(-1) for methanol, 45.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for H2S and 138.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for alpha-pinene. The

  5. A critical role for autoxidation in the alpha-pinene + OH aerosol system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of monoterpenes results in efficient formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and is included as an SOA source in most chemical transport models. However, current model parameterizations lack a mechanistic dependence of monoterpene SOA on NOx and oxidant identity (e...

  6. Inhibition of methane consumption in forest soils by monoterpenes

    SciT

    Amaral, J.A.; Knowles, R.

    1998-04-01

    Selected monoterpenes were tested for their ability to inhibit atmospheric methane consumption by three forest soils from different vegetation types and by the cultured methanotrophic strain, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Subsurface soil from coniferous (Pinus banksiana), deciduous (Populus tremuloides), and mixed hardwood (Tsuga canadensis and Prunus pensylvanica) stands was used under field-moist and slurry conditions. Most of the hydrocarbon monoterpenes tested significantly inhibited methane consumption by soils at environmentally relevant levels, with ({minus})-{alpha}-pinene being the most effective. With the exception of {beta}-myrcene, monoterpenes also strongly inhibited methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Carbon dioxide production was stimulated in all of themore » soils by the monoterpenes tested. In one case, methane production was stimulated by ({minus})-{alpha}-pinene in an intact, aerobic core. Oxide and alcohol monoterpenoids stimulated methane production. Thus, monoterpenes appear to be potentially important regulators of methane consumption and carbon metabolism in forest soils.« less

  7. Modeling of combined effects of citral, linalool and beta-pinene used against Saccharomyces cerevisiae in citrus-based beverages subjected to a mild heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Belletti, Nicoletta; Kamdem, Sylvain Sado; Tabanelli, Giulia; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Gardini, Fausto

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of three terpenes (citral, linalool and beta-pinene), in combination with a mild heat treatment (55 degrees C, 15 min). The study has been carried out on an orange based soft drink inoculated using a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results, expressed as growth/no-growth data, were analyzed with the logistic regression. A model comprising only of significant individual parameters (p < or = 0.05) and describing the relationships between terpene concentrations and the probability of having stable beverages was obtained. When citral and beta-pinene were combined, the citral concentration required to achieve a 50% probability of having stable bottles (P=0.5) dropped from 100.9 microL/L in the absence of beta-pinene to 49.3 microL/L in the presence of 20 microL/L of beta-pinene. The mixture of citral and linalool was less effective, in fact, the same probability (P=0.5) was obtained combining 60 microL/L of linalool with 35.1 microL/L of citral. The addition of 20 microL/L of linalool and beta-pinene reinforced citral bioactivity and the concentration of citral needed to reach P=0.5 fell from 100.9 microL/L in the presence of citral alone to 42.0 microL/L. The presence of both linalool and beta-pinene at a concentration of 40 or 60 microL/L in the absence of citral led to a lower spoilage probability (P=0.58 and P=0.93, respectively). It can be concluded that the antimicrobial potential of the three terpenes alone can be strengthened combining appropriate concentrations of each of them. This study confirmed also the potentiating effect of a mild temperature treatment on the antimicrobial efficacy of the molecules. Neither the thermal treatment alone nor the presence of the terpenes at their maximum concentrations (without thermal treatment) were able to guarantee the microbial stability of the beverages. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Photooxidation of Alpha-Pinene at High Relative Humidity in the Presence of Increasing Concentrations of NOx

    SciT

    Yu, Yong; Ezell, Michael J.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2008-06-01

    The photooxidation of ~1 ppm alpha-pinene in the presence of increasing concentrations of NO2 was studied in a Teflon chamber at relative humidities from 70 - 88% and temperatures from 296 - 304 K. The loss of alpha-pinene and formation of gas phase products were followed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Gas phase reaction products measured by PTR-MS and their yields include formaldehyde (5 + 1%), formic acid (2.5 + 1.4%), methanol (0.6 + 0.3%), acetaldehyde (3.9 + 1.7%), acetic acid (10 + 2%), acetone (11.5 + 3.1%), pinonaldehyde (22 + 6%), and pinene oxide (0.9 + 0.1%).more » There was evidence of organic nitrates in the gas phase and small peaks were tentatively assigned to norpinonaldehyde, 4-oxopinonaldehyde, propanedial, 2,3-dioxobutanal and 3,5,6-trioxoheptanal or 3-hydroxymethyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanone. The formation and growth of new particles were followed using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and their chemical composition was probed using single particle mass spectrometry (SPLAT II). SPLAT II analysis also provided measurements of the vacuum aerodynamic diameters of the newly formed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles and, in combination with the electrical mobility diameter, a particle density of 1.21 + 0.02 g cm-3 was calculated, 20% larger than often assumed in calculating SOA yields. SPLAT II showed that the suspended SOA consisted of a complex mixture of organic nitrates and organics, possibly including pinonic acid, pinic acid and trans-sobrerol. Three-wavelength light scattering measurements made using an integrating nephelometer were consistent with particles having a refractive index characteristic of organic compounds, but the data could not be well matched at all three wavelengths with a single refractive index. The effect of addition of cyclohexane or NO on particle formation showed that ozonolysis was the major mechanism of SOA formation in this system. However, unlike simple ozonolysis

  9. Ozone and OH-induced oxidation of monoterpenes: Changes in the thermal properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watne, Ågot K.; Westerlund, Jonathan; Hallquist, Åsa M.; Brune, William H.; Hallquist, Mattias

    2017-12-01

    The behaviour of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere is highly dependent on their thermal properties. Here we investigate the volatility of SOA formed from alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and limonene upon ozone- and OH-induced oxidation, and the effect of OH-induced ageing on the initially produced SOA. For all three terpenes, the ozone-induced SOA was less volatile than the OH-induced SOA. The thermal properties of the SOA were described using three parameters extracted from the volatility measurements: the temperature at which 50 per cent of the volume has evaporated (TVFR0.5), which is used as a general volatility indicator; a slope factor (SVFR), which describes the volatility distribution; and TVFR0.1, which measures the volatility of the least volatile particle fraction. Limonene-derived SOA generally had higher TVFR0.5 values and shallower slopes than SOA derived from alpha- and beta-pinene. This was especially true for the ozone-induced SOA, partially because the ozonolysis of limonene has a strong tendency to cause SOA formation and to produce extremely low volatility VOCs (ELVOCs). Ageing by OH exposure did not reduce TVFR0.5 for any of the studied terpenes but did increase the breadth of the volatility distribution by increasing the aerosols heterogeneity and contents of substances with different vapour pressures, also leading to increases in TVFR0.1. This stands in contrast to previously reported results from smog chamber experiments, in which TVFR0.5 always increased with ageing. These results demonstrate that there are two opposing processes that influence the evolution of SOAs thermal properties as they age, and that results from both flow reactors and static chambers are needed to fully understand the temporal evolution of atmospheric SOA thermal properties.

  10. Studies on the Effect of Sub-zero Temperatures on the Formation of Extremely Low Volatility Dimer Esters in Secondary Organic Aerosol from Alpha-Pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Normann Jensen, Louise; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is considered a major source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Recently, extremely low volatility organic compounds, or ELVOC, formed from the oxidation of VOCs have been shown to play a crucial role in new particle formation (Ehn et al., 2014). In addition, higher molecular weight dimer esters originating from the oxidation of the biogenic VOC alpha-pinene have been observed in both laboratory-generated and ambient SOA (Kristensen et al., 2013). The low volatility of the dimer esters along with an observed rapid formation makes these high molecular weight compounds likely candidates involved in new particle formation from the oxidation of alpha-pinene. Furthermore, laboratory experiments show that the dimer esters only form in the presence of ozone, thus may be used as tracers for the ozone-initiated oxidation of alpha-pinene, and are therefore indicative of enhanced anthropogenic activities. In this work, we present the results of a series of oxidation experiments performed in the newly constructed cold-room smog chamber at Aarhus University. This unique and state-of-the-art Teflon chamber allows for atmospheric simulations of the oxidation VOCs and subsequent SOA formation at temperatures down to -16 °C. In this study, ozonolysis and photochemical oxidations of alpha-pinene are performed at temperatures ranging from +20 to -16 °C. Chemical characterization of the formed SOA is performed using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results show significant differences in the chemical composition related to the experiment temperature. In particularly, the concentration of the high molecular weight dimer esters showed to be highly affected by temperature. Interestingly, preliminary results show higher formation of dimer esters related to increased SOA formation rate, thus indicating that these particle-phase ELVOCs may be linked with new particle

  11. Evidence of the photosynthetic origin of monoterpenes emitted by quercus ilex L. leaves by {sup 13}C labeling

    SciT

    Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.; Cecinato, A.

    1996-04-01

    The carbon of the four main monoterpenes emitted by Quercus ilex L. leaves was completely labeled with {sup 13}C after a 20-min feeding with 99% {sup 13}CO{sub 2}. This labeling time course is comparable with the labeling time course of isoprene, the terpenoid emitted by other Quercus species and synthesized in leaf chloroplasts. It is also comparable with that of phosphoglyceric acid. Our experiment therefore provides evidence that monoterpenes emitted by Q. ilex are formed photosynthesis intermediates and may share the same synthetic pathway with isoprene. By analyzing the rate and the distribution of labeling in the different fragments, wemore » looked for evidence of differential carbon labeling in the {alpha}-pinene emitted. However, the labeling pattern was quite uniform in the different fragments, suggesting that the carbon skeleton of the emitted monoterpenes comes from a unique carbon source. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

  12. Laboratory studies of monoterpene secondary organic aerosol formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; D'Ambro, E.; Zhao, Y.; Lee, B. H.; Pye, H. O. T.; Schobesberger, S.; Shilling, J.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    We have conducted a series of chamber experiments to study the molecular composition and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from monoterpenes under a range of photochemical and dark conditions. We connect variations in the SOA mass yield to molecular composition and volatility, and use a detailed Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) based chemical box model with dynamic gas-particle partitioning to examine the importance of various peroxy radical reaction mechanisms in setting the SOA yield and properties. We compare the volatility distribution predicted by the model to that inferred from isothermal room-temperature evaporation experiments using the FIGAERO-CIMS where SOA particles collected on a filter are allowed to evaporate under humidified pure nitrogen flow stream for up to 24 hours. We show that the combination of results requires prompt formation of low volatility SOA from predominantly gas-phase mechanisms, with important differences between monoterpenes (alpha-Pinene and delta-3-Carene) followed by slower non-radical particle phase chemistry that modulates both the chemical and physical properties of the SOA. Implications for the regional evolution of atmospheric monoterpene SOA are also discussed.

  13. The role of genetic and chemical variation of Pinus sylvestris seedlings in influencing slug herbivory.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Iason, Glenn R; Thoss, Vera

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the genetic and chemical basis of resistance of Pinus sylvestris seedlings to herbivory by a generalist mollusc, Arion ater. Using feeding trials with captive animals, we examined selective herbivory by A. ater of young P. sylvestris seedlings of different genotypes and correlated preferences with seedling monoterpene levels. We also investigated the feeding responses of A. ater to artificial diets laced with two monoterpenes, Delta(3)-carene and alpha-pinene. Logistic regression indicated that two factors were the best predictors of whether seedlings in the trial would be consumed. Individual slug variation (replicates) was the most significant factor in the model; however, alpha-pinene concentration (also representing beta-pinene, Delta(3)-carene and total monoterpenes due to multicollinearity) of needles was also a significant factor. While A. ater did not select seedlings on the basis of family, seedlings not eaten were significantly higher in levels of alpha-pinene compared to seedlings that were consumed. We also demonstrated significant genetic variation in alpha-pinene concentration of seedlings between different families of P. sylvestris. Nitrogen and three morphological seedling characteristics (stem length, needle length and stem diameter) also showed significant genetic variation between P. sylvestris families. Artificial diets laced with high (5 mg g(-1) dry matter) quantities of either Delta(3)-carene or alpha-pinene, were eaten significantly less than control diets with no added monoterpenes, supporting the results of the seedling feeding trial. This study demonstrates that A. ater selectively feed on P. sylvestris seedlings and that this selection is based, in part, on the monoterpene concentration of seedlings. These results, coupled with significant genetic variation in alpha-pinene concentration of seedlings and evidence that slug herbivory is detrimental to P. sylvestris fitness, are discussed as possible evidence for A

  14. Identification of organic nitrates in the NO3 radical initiated oxidation of alpha-pinene by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Véronique; Bruns, Emily A; Ezell, Michael J; Johnson, Stanley N; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    The gas-phase reactions of nitrate radicals (NO3) with biogenic organic compounds are a major sink for these organics during night-time. These reactions form secondary organic aerosols, including organic nitrates that can undergo long-range transport, releasing NOx downwind. We report here studies of the reaction of NO3 with alpha-pinene at 1 atm in dry synthetic air (relative humidity approximately 3%) and at 298 K using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) to identify gaseous and particulate products. The emphasis is on the identification of individual organic nitrates in the particle phase that were obtained by passing the product mixture through a denuder to remove gas-phase reactants and products prior to entering the source region of the mass spectrometer. Filter extracts were also analyzed by GC-MS and by APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-ToF-MS) with methanol as the proton source. In addition to pinonaldehyde and pinonic acid, five organic nitrates were identified in the particles as well as in the gas phase: 3-oxopinane-2-nitrate, 2-hydroxypinane-3-nitrate, pinonaldehyde-PAN, norpinonaldehyde-PAN, and (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-3-nitrooxycyclobutyl)acetaldehyde. Furthermore, there was an additional first-generation organic nitrate product tentatively identified as a carbonyl hydroxynitrate with a molecular mass of 229. These studies suggest that a variety of organic nitrates would partition between the gas phase and particles in the atmosphere, and serve as a reservoir for NOx.

  15. Composition of the essential oils from Peucedanum cervaria and P. alsaticum growing wild in the urban area of Vienna (Austria).

    PubMed

    Chizzola, Remigius

    2012-11-01

    The composition of the essential oil from the different above ground plant parts of Peucedanum cervaria and P. alsaticum (Apiaceae) collected in the urban area of Vienna has been studied. P. cervaria fruits and inflorescences had 1.5 and 1.8% essential oil, respectively. All the oils of P. cervaria were dominated by monoterpenes, with the main components being beta-pinene (7-58%), alpha-pinene (7-22%), sabinene (up to 22%), and beta-phellandrene with limonene (6-21%). P. alsaticum fruits afforded 0.3-0.4% essential oil. These oils were made up mainly by alpha-pinene (11-40%), sabinene (16-34%) and beta-phellandrene (12-31%). Stems and leaves produced only very small amounts of essential oil (< 0.05%). Besides monoterpenes, these oils contained also E-nerolidol (5-22%), spathulenol (up to 18%), dodecanal (up to 7.5%) and caryophyllene oxide (up to 7%).

  16. Short term inhalation exposure to turpentine: toxicokinetics and acute effects in men.

    PubMed Central

    Filipsson, A F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study describes the toxicokinetics, pulmonary function, and subjective ratings of discomfort in volunteers experimentally exposed to turpentine vapour (a mixture of monoterpenes). The results were compared with similar exposure to single monoterpenes to look in the toxicokinetics and acute effects for signs of interactions between the monoterpenes. METHODS: Eight male volunteers were exposed to 450 mg/m3 turpentine by inhalation (2 h, 50 W) in an exposure chamber. RESULTS: The mean relative uptakes of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and 3-carene were 62%, 66%, and 68% respectively, of the amount supplied. Between 2% and 5% of the net uptake was excreted unchanged in the expired air after the end of exposure. The mean blood clearance 21 hours after exposure (CL21h) of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and 3-carene, were 0.8, 0.5, and 0.4 l.kg-1.h-1, respectively. The mean half lives (t1/2) of the last phase of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and 3-carene averaged 32, 25, and 42 hours, respectively. The t1/2s agreed with previously calculated half lives from single exposures. The total blood clearance CL21h of 3-carene found in this turpentine study was lower, and CL4h of 3-carene was significantly lower than the values obtained from similar exposure to pure 3-carene. The subjects attending both exposure to turpentine and to pure alpha-pinene at 450 mg/m3 had lower CL4h during the exposure to turpentine, when they experienced more discomfort of the throat or the airways (F = 5.7, P = 0.048) than during exposure to control concentrations. After experimental exposure to turpentine an increase in airway resistance was found that differed significantly from results of exposure to 3-carene at 10 mg/m3 (P = 0.021) or 450 mg/m3 (P = 0.047). CONCLUSIONS: Toxicokinetics and acute effects show small, if any, interactions between alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and 3-carene. The subjects experienced discomfort in the throat and airways during exposure to turpentine and airway

  17. Terpene exposure and respiratory effects among workers in Swedish joinery shops.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K A; Levin, J O; Sandström, T; Lindström-Espeling, K; Lindén, G; Stjernberg, N L

    1997-04-01

    Exposure to monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and delta 3-carene) in joinery shops was studied in Sweden during the processing of Scot's pine, and the acute respiratory effects among the employees were evaluated. A cross-sectional study of 38 workers was carried out in 4 joinery shops. The investigation included personal air sampling of monoterpenes, biological monitoring of metabolites of alpha-pinene in the workers' urine, interviews following a standardized questionnaire, and dynamic spirometry. The personal exposure to monoterpenes in the joinery shops was 10-214 mg/m3. The correlation (correlation coefficient = 0.69) between exposure to alpha-pinene and verbenols (metabolites from alpha-pinene) in urine was relatively good. No acute effects on forced vital capacity or forced expiratory volume during 1 s were detected. The workers had significantly reduced preshift lung function values when compared with the values of a local reference group, even when smokers and ex-smokers were excluded. Personal exposure to the monoterpenes alpha-pinene, and delta 3-carene in joinery shops may exceed the present Swedish occupational exposure limit of 150 mg/m3 during the winter season when workroom air is commonly recirculated. The determination of metabolites of alpha-pinene (verbenols) in urine can be used as an index of exposure to fumes released during wood-treating processes. The results from the lung function tests indicate chronic rather than acute reactions in the airways. The fact that there were no major changes in lung function over a workshift indicates chronic reaction in the airways.

  18. Assessment of sensitization potential of monoterpenes using the rat popliteal lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Karen; Delgado, Isabella F; Santos, Laísa M F; Paumgartten, Francisco J R

    2007-08-01

    The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) has been proposed as a screening test for detecting chemicals with potential of inducing allergic and auto-immune-like reactions in humans. In the present study, we used the rat PLNA to evaluate the immuno-sensitizing potential of 10 monoterpenes found in the essential oils of a variety of aromatic, edible and medicinal plants. The primary or direct PLNA was performed with the monoterpenes, and chlorpromazine (CPZ) and barbital were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Female, 7-8 week-old Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously (50 microL) with the test substance (0.5, 2.5 or 5mg) into the right hind footpad while the contralateral footpad was injected with the vehicle (DMSO) alone. Weight (WI) and cellularity (CI) indices for draining PLNs were determined 7 days after treatment. PLNA was positive (WI >or= 2 and CI >or= 5) for CPZ, citral, alpha-terpinene, beta-myrcene and (-)-alpha-pinene, and negative for barbital, DMSO, (-)-menthol, 1,8-cineole, (+/-) citronellal, (+)-limonene, (+/-) camphor and terpineol. A secondary PLNA, a T-cell priming test, was carried out with the four substances that had been positive in the primary assay. Six weeks after being locally primed with 5 mg/paw, rats were sc injected into the same footpad with a dose (0.5 mg/paw) of the substance that had been previously found to be insufficient to cause a positive response. WI and CI were then calculated 4 and 7 days after the second injection. CPZ was also positive in the secondary assay thereby confirming that it is a sensitizing agent. Citral, alpha-terpinene, beta-myrcene and (-)-alpha-pinene, however, were negative in the secondary assay. In summary, citral, alpha-terpinene, beta-myrcene and (-)-alpha-pinene induced a clear immuno-stimulatory response due to their irritant properties but no monoterpene proved to be a sensitizing agent in the PLNA.

  19. Monoterpene engineering in a woody plant Eucalyptus camaldulensis using a limonene synthase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Sasaki, Kanako; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aimed at monoterpene production has become an intensive research topic in recent years, although most studies have been limited to herbal plants including model plants such as Arabidopsis. The genus Eucalyptus includes commercially important woody plants in terms of essential oil production and the pulp industry. This study attempted to modify the production of monoterpenes, which are major components of Eucalyptus essential oil, by introducing two expression constructs containing Perilla frutescens limonene synthase (PFLS) cDNA, whose gene products were designed to be localized in either the plastid or cytosol, into Eucalyptus camaldulensis. The expression of the plastid-type and cytosol-type PFLS cDNA in transgenic E. camaldulensis was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector analyses of leaf extracts revealed that the plastidic and cytosolic expression of PFLS yielded 2.6- and 4.5-times more limonene than that accumulated in wild-type E. camaldulensis, respectively, while the ectopic expression of PFLS had only a small effect on the emission of limonene from the leaves of E. camaldulensis. Surprisingly, the high level of PFLS in Eucalyptus was accompanied by a synergistic increase in the production of 1,8-cineole and alpha-pinene, two major components of Eucalyptus monoterpenes. This genetic engineering of monoterpenes demonstrated a new potential for molecular breeding in woody plants.

  20. Cloning and Characterization of the Gene Encoding Alpha-Pinene Oxide Lyase Enzyme (Prα-POL) from Pseudomonas rhodesiae CIP 107491 and Production of the Recombinant Protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dubessay, Pascal; Larroche, Christian; Fontanille, Pierre

    2017-12-28

    The alpha-pinene oxide lyase (Prα-POL) from Pseudomonas rhodesiae CIP107491 belongs to catabolic alpha-pinene degradation pathway. In this study, the gene encoding Prα-POL has been identified using mapping approach combined to inverse PCR (iPCR) strategy. The Prα-POL gene included a 609-bp open reading frame encoding 202 amino acids and giving rise to a 23.7 kDa protein, with a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 5.23. The amino acids sequence analysis showed homologies with those of proteins with unknown function from GammaProteobacteria group. Identification of a conserved domain in amino acid in positions 18 to 190 permitted to classify Prα-POL among the nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF2) protein superfamily. Heterologous expression of Prα-POL, both under its native form and with a histidin tag, was successfully performed in Escherichia coli, and enzymatic kinetics were analyzed. Bioconversion assay using recombinant E. coli strain allowed to reach a rate of isonovalal production per gramme of biomass about 40-fold higher than the rate obtained with P. rhodesiae.

  1. Characterization of the interaction between two food aroma components, alpha-pinene and ethyl butyrate, and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) packaging films as a function of environmental humidity.

    PubMed

    López-Carballo, Gracia; Cava, David; Lagarón, Jose M; Catalá, Ramón; Gavara, Rafael

    2005-09-07

    The ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOHs) are well-known high oxygen barrier materials that are being used successfully in the design of packaging structures for oxygen-sensitive food or pharmaceutical products. Recently, there has been increasing interest in using EVOH materials to provide a high barrier to organic compounds as a means to reduce food aroma scalping. However, the barrier function of this family of materials diminishes significantly in humid environments, and it is supposed that so does the organic vapor barrier. In this work, a new sorption-based method to characterize the interaction between food aroma and polymer films for packaging as a function of relative humidity is presented and is used to determine the barrier to ethyl butyrate and alpha-pinene of EVOH at 23 degrees C. The results show that although EVOH is an excellent barrier to food aroma when dry, a property that even improves at low relative humidity (RH), the solubility and diffusivity of the compounds tested increase dramatically with humidity at medium to high water activities. However, even in the worst case (100% RH), EVOH outperforms low-density polyethylene (LDPE) as a barrier to organic vapors at least 500,000-fold.

  2. Invasive bark beetle-associated microbes degrade a host defensive monoterpene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Le-Tian; Lu, Min; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Conifers respond to herbivore attack with defensive chemicals, which are toxic to both insects and their associated microorganisms. Microorganisms associated with insects have been widely reported to metabolize toxic chemicals, which may help both microorganisms and host insects overcome host conifer defense. Dendroctonus valens LeConte, an introduced exotic pest from North America to China, has killed millions of healthy pines. Alpha-pinene is the most abundant defensive monoterpene in Chinese Pinus tabuliformis. Although microorganisms associated with D. valens have already been investigated, little is known about their bioactivities when encountering host defensive monoterpenes. In this study, we evaluated the influences of different concentrations of α-pinene to D. valens and the three most frequently isolated yeasts and bacteria of D. valens, and further assayed microorganisms' capabilities to degrade α-pinene. Results showed that the gallery lengths and body weight changes of bark beetles were significantly affected by 6 mg/mL and 12 mg/mL of α-pinene applied in media compared to controls. The tolerance of experimental microorganisms to α-pinene varied depending on the microbial species. Two out of three yeast strains and all three bacterial strains degraded 20%-50% of α-pinene compared to controls in 24 h in vitro. The microorganisms capable of α-pinene degradation in vitro and their tolerance to high levels of α-pinene suggested that D. valens-associated microorganisms may help both microorganisms and the bark beetle overcome host α-pinene defense. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of Santiria trimera bark.

    PubMed

    Martins, A P; Salgueiro, L R; Gonçalves, M J; Proença da Cunha, A; Vila, R; Cañigueral, S

    2003-01-01

    The composition and the antimicrobial activity of the bark oil of Santiria trimera (Oliv.) Aubrév., a plant widely used by the traditional healers in S. Tomé and Príncipe, especially for wound healing, are reported for the first time. The analysis of the essential oil was carried out by GC and GC-MS. The oil contains a high content of monoterpenes, alpha-pinene (66.6 %) being the major constituent, followed by beta-pinene (20.0 %). The essential oil was active against both bacteria and fungi strains, except Staphylococcus epidermidis and Aspergillus niger. It exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Proteus vulgaris and Cryptococcus neoformans with MICs values of 1.11 microl/ml and lower than 0.71 microl/ml, respectively.

  4. Monoterpene glycosides from Paeonia veitchii.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Tan, Mao-Ling; Yuan, Hai-Mei; Chen, Jiang; Fu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    The EtOH extract of the roots of Paeonia veitchii afforded two new monoterpene glycosides paeonidanin I (1) and paeonidanin J (2), and a new dimeric monoterpene glycoside paeonidanin K (3). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic means and hydrolysis products.

  5. How rainfall, relative humidity and temperature influence volatile emissions from apple trees in situ.

    PubMed

    Vallat, Armelle; Gu, Hainan; Dorn, Silvia

    2005-07-01

    Headspace volatiles from apple-bearing twigs were collected in the field with a Radiello sampler during three different diurnal periods over the complete fruit growing season. Analyses by thermal desorption-GC-MS identified a total of 62 compounds in changing quantities, including the terpenoids alpha-pinene, camphene, beta-pinene, limonene, beta-caryophyllene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, the aldehydes (E)-2-hexenal, benzaldehyde and nonanal, and the alcohol (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol. The variations in emission of these plant odours were statistically related to temperature, humidity and rainfall in the field. Remarkably, rainfall had a significant positive influence on changes in volatile release during all three diurnal periods, and further factors of significance were temperature and relative humidity around noon, relative humidity in the late afternoon, and temperature and relative humidity during the night. Rainfall was associated consistently with an increase in the late afternoon in terpene and aldehyde volatiles with a known repellent effect on the codling moth, one of the key pests of apple fruit. During the summer of 2003, a season characterized by below-average rainfall, some postulated effects of drought on trees were tested by establishing correlations with rainfall. Emissions of the wood terpenes alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and limonene were negatively correlated with rainfall. Another monoterpene, camphene, was only detected in this summer but not in the previous years, and its emissions were negatively correlated with rainfall, further supporting the theory that drought can result in higher formation of secondary metabolites. Finally, the two green leaf volatiles (E)-2-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol were negatively correlated with rainfall, coinciding well with the expectation that water deficit stress increases activity of lipoxygenase. To our knowledge, this work represents the first empirical study concerning the influence of abiotic factors on volatile

  6. Chemotypes of Pistacia atlantica leaf essential oils from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Gourine, Nadhir; Bombarda, Isabelle; Yousfi, Mohamed; Gaydou, Emile M

    2010-01-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of Pistacia atlantica Desf. leaves collected from different regions of Algeria were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The essential oil was rich in monoterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. The major components were alpha-pinene (0.0-67%), delta-3-carene (0.0-56%), spathulenol (0.5-22%), camphene (0.0-21%), terpinen-4-ol (0.0-16%) and beta-pinene (0.0-13%). Among the various components identified, twenty were used for statistical analyses. The result of principal component analysis (PCA) showed the occurrence of three chemotypes: a delta-3-carene chemotype (16.4-56.2%), a terpinen-4-ol chemotype (10.8-16.0%) and an alpha-pinene/camphene chemotype (10.9-66.6%/3.8-20.9%). It was found that the essential oil from female plants (delta-3-carene chemotype) could be easily differentiated from the two other chemotypes corresponding to male trees.

  7. Conifer-Derived Monoterpenes and Forest Walking

    PubMed Central

    Sumitomo, Kazuhiro; Akutsu, Hiroaki; Fukuyama, Syusei; Minoshima, Akiho; Kukita, Shin; Yamamura, Yuji; Sato, Yoshiaki; Hayasaka, Taiki; Osanai, Shinobu; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Conifer and broadleaf trees emit volatile organic compounds in the summer. The major components of these emissions are volatile monoterpenes. Using solid phase microextraction fiber as the adsorbant, monoterpenes were successfully detected and identified in forest air samples. Gas chromatography/mass chromatogram of monoterpenes in the atmosphere of a conifer forest and that of serum from subjects who were walking in a forest were found to be similar each other. The amounts of α-pinene in the subjects became several folds higher after forest walking. The results indicate that monoterpenes in the atmosphere of conifer forests are transferred to and accumulate in subjects by inhalation while they are exposed to this type of environment. PMID:26819913

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from the gum of Turkish pistachio (Pistacia vera L.).

    PubMed

    Alma, Mehmet Hakki; Nitz, Siegfried; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Digrak, Metin; Efe, Fatih Tuncay; Yilmaz, Necmettin

    2004-06-16

    The essential oil from the gum of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae)) grown in Turkey was obtained by the hydro-distillation method, and its chemical composition was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Moreover, the antimicrobial activities of the oil against the growth of 13 bacteria and 3 pathogenic yeasts were evaluated using the agar-disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The results showed that the essential oil contained about 89.67% monoterpenes, 8.1% oxygenated monoterpenes and 1.2% diterpenes. alpha-Pinene (75.6%), beta-pinene (9.5%), trans-verbenol (3.0%), camphene (1.4%), trans-pinocarveol (about 1.20%), and limonene (1.0%) were the major components. The antimicrobial results showed that the oil inhibited nine bacteria and all the yeasts studied, and the activities were considerably dependent upon concentration and its bioactive compounds such as carvacrol, camphene, and limonene. Moreover, the essential oil of the gum was found to be more effective yeastcide than Nystatin, synthetic yeastcide. Furthermore, the antibacterial activities of the oil were lower than those of standard antibiotics, ampicillin sodium, and streptomycine sulfate under the conditions studied.

  9. SOA Formation Potential of Emissions from Soil and Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Vanderschelden, G. S.; Wen, M.; Cobos, D. R.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources exceed all anthropogenic sources combined. VOCs participate in oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere and impact the concentrations of ozone and particulate material. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is particularly complex and is frequently underestimated using state-of-the-art modeling techniques. We present findings that suggest emissions of important SOA precursors from soil and leaf litter are higher than current inventories would suggest, particularly under conditions typical of Fall and Spring. Soil and leaf litter samples were collected at Big Meadow Creek from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The dominant tree species in this area of the forest are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch. Samples were transported to the laboratory and housed within a 0.9 cubic meter Teflon dynamic chamber where VOC emissions were continuously monitored with a GC-FID-MS and PTR-MS. Aerosol was generated from soil and leaf litter emissions by pumping the emissions into a 7 cubic meter Teflon aerosol growth chamber where they were oxidized with ozone in the absence of light. The evolution of particle microphysical and chemical characteristics was monitored over the following eight hours. Particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured with a SMPS and HR-ToF-AMS respectively. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates up to 283 micrograms carbon per meter squared per hour. The dominant monoterpenes emitted were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and delta-3-carene in descending order. The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and alpha-pinene. Measured soil/litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest that during fall and spring when tree emissions are lower, monoterpene emissions within forests may be

  10. Generation and Functional Evaluation of Designer Monoterpene Synthases.

    PubMed

    Srividya, N; Lange, I; Lange, B M

    2016-01-01

    Monoterpene synthases are highly versatile enzymes that catalyze the first committed step in the pathways toward terpenoids, the structurally most diverse class of plant natural products. Recent advancements in our understanding of the reaction mechanism have enabled engineering approaches to develop mutant monoterpene synthases that produce specific monoterpenes. In this chapter, we are describing protocols to introduce targeted mutations, express mutant enzyme catalysts in heterologous hosts, and assess their catalytic properties. Mutant monoterpene synthases have the potential to contribute significantly to synthetic biology efforts aimed at producing larger amounts of commercially attractive monoterpenes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-01

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissions of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.

  12. Significance of wood terpenoids in the resistance of Scots pine provenances against the old house borer, Hylotrupes bajulus, and brown-rot fungus, Coniophora puteana.

    PubMed

    Nerg, A M; Heijari, J; Noldt, U; Viitanen, H; Vuorinen, M; Kainulainen, P; Holopainen, J K

    2004-01-01

    We tested how terpenoid (i.e., monoterpenes and resin acids) composition and concentration in wood affects resistance against wood-borers and decaying fungi. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood from nine provenances having variable terpenoid profiles was studied against the old house borer, Hylotrupes bajulus, and the decay fungus, Coniophora puteana. Provenances represented a 1200-km N-S transect from Estonia to northern Finland, but they were all cultivated for 7 years in the same nursery field, in central Finland. Mean relative growth rate (MRGR) of small H. hajulus larvae positively correlated with the total monoterpene concentration of wood, and feeding was associated with high proportion of levopimaric+palustric acid in wood. Provenance did not affect the MRGR of small or big larvae, but big larvae consumed more wood and produced more frass on the northern Ylitornio trees than on the southern Rakvere and Ruokolahti trees. Low beta-pinene and total monoterpene concentration and low beta: alpha-pinene ratio in wood were all associated with a high number of eggs. The most northern Muonio provenance was the most favored as an oviposition site, differing significantly from Saaremaa, Tenhola, and Suomussalmi. Wood from Saaremaa, Tenhola, Ruokolahti, and Suomussalmi provenance was most resistant against decay fungus, differing significantly from that of Kinnula provenance. However, decay resistance was not clearly associated with the concentrations of wood terpenoids. These results suggest that monoterpene composition of wood affects resistance against wood-boring Cerambycid beetles, but resistance against wood-decaying fungi is not as clearly associated with wood terpenoids.

  13. Chemical composition of essential oils from needles and twigs of balkan pine (Pinus peuce grisebach) grown in Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Koukos, P K; Papadopoulou, K I; Patiaka, D T; Papagiannopoulos, A D

    2000-04-01

    The composition of essential oils from twigs and needles of Balkan pine (Pinus peuce Gris.) grown in northern Greece was investigated. The compounds were identified by using GC-MS analysis. The twig oil was rich in alpha-pinene (7.38%), beta-pinene (12.46%), beta-phellandrene (26.93%), beta-caryophyllene (4.48%), and citronellol (12.48%), and the needle oil was rich in alpha-pinene (23.07%), camphene (5.52%), beta-pinene (22.00%), beta-phellandrene (6.78%), bornyl acetate (9.76%), beta-caryophyllene (3.05%), and citronellol (13.42%). The mean oil yield was 2.85% for twigs and 0. 57% for needles.

  14. Synergism of turpentine and ethanol as attractants for certain pine-infesting beetles (Coleoptera)

    SciT

    Phillips, T.W.; Wilkening, A.J.; Atkinson, T.H.

    1988-06-01

    Responses of seven species of pine-infesting beetles to traps baited with either turpentine, ethanol, turpentine and ethanol released from separate dispensers, or a 1:1 solution of turpentine and ethanol released from one dispenser were assessed in three field experiments. The weevil species, Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and the cerambycid pine sawyer, Monochamus carolinenis (Olivier), were attracted to turpentine and were unaffected by the addition of ethanol. The ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, responded to ethanol alone but was not attracted to turpentine, nor did the presence of turpentine significantly affects its response to ethanol. The remaining four species) hylobius pales, M.more » titillator, Dendroctonus terebrans and x. pubescens) displayed responses to turpentine that were enhanced by the addition of ethanol, but in different ways according to the method of deployment. Reasons for increased responses by some species to a solution of turpentine and ethanol over the two released separately are not clear; they may lie in different dosages of evaporation rates of volatiles in the field. Laboratory analyses of trapped headspace volatiles from dispensers containing only turpentine and those containing a solution of turpentine and ethanol revealed no differences in the amounts of four principal monoterpene hydrocarbons (..cap alpha..-pinene, camphene, ..beta..-pinene, and limonene) released over time.« less

  15. LC-MS-MS-TOF analysis of oxygenated organic compounds in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roempp, A.; Moortgat, G.

    2003-04-01

    Ambient aerosol samples were taken at different sites across Europe. The fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz filters at flow rates of 160 L/min and 500 L/min. These samples were analyzed for organic acids (C>4) by an HPLC system coupled to a hybrid mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer consists of a quadrupole mass analyzer, a quadrupole collision cell and a time-of-flight mass analyzer (TOF). Analytes were identified by standards when available or MS-MS experiments and exact mass measurements utilizing the high mass resolution of the TOF instrument. Monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, sabinene, limonene, 3-carene) were ozonolyzed in the laboratory and compared with field samples. Besides the commonly measured organic acids (pinic, pinonic and norpinic acid) sabinic, caric and caronic acid were identified for the first time in ambient aerosol. In addition, nearly all samples showed significant concentrations of newly identified keto dicarboxylic acids (C9 - C12). Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the formation mechanisms of these compounds. By comparing laboratory measurements of wood combustion and field samples from the Eastern Mediterranean region, nitrocatechol was identified as a possible tracer for biomass burning. The data obtained is used to determine the role of biogenic sources in secondary organic aerosol formation.

  16. Antioxidant, antiproliferative and antimicrobial activities of the volatile oil from the wild pepper Piper capense used in Cameroon as a culinary spice.

    PubMed

    Woguem, Verlaine; Maggi, Filippo; Fogang, Hervet P D; Tapondjoua, Léon A; Womeni, Hilaire M; Luana, Quassinti; Bramuccic, Massimo; Vitali, Luca A; Petrelli, Dezemona; Lupidi, Giulio; Papa, Fabrizio; Vittori, Sauro; Barboni, Luciano

    2013-12-01

    Wild pepper (Piper capense L.f., Piperaceae) is a spice traditionally used in western Cameroon to make soups called 'Nkui' and 'Nah poh'. In the present work, the essential oil hydrodistilled from fruits was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS, and for in vitro biological activities, namely cytotoxic, antioxidant and antimicrobial, by MTT, DPPH, ABTS and agar disc diffusion methods. The oil composition was dominated by monoterpene hydrocarbons (56.5%) responsible for the pepper odor, such as (beta-pinene (33.2%), sabinene (10.0%) and alpha-pinene (8.9%). The oil induced a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on human tumor cells MDA-MB 231 (breast adenocarcinoma), A375 (malignant melanoma) and HCT116 (colon carcinoma), showing IC50 values of 26.3, 76.0 and 22.7 microg/ml, respectively. The oil showed total antioxidant activity with a Trolox equivalent antioxidant concentration (TEAC) value of 140 micromol/g. The essential oil of P. capense proved to be an effective scavenger of the ABTS+ radical, with an activity only about 30 times lower than that of Trolox. Moderate activity was observed against the Gram-positive species Staphylococcos aureus and Enterococcusfaecalis, and the yeast Candida albicans. The notable inhibition of some human tumor cells is worthy of further investigation to discover the possible mechanisms of action responsible for the observed cytotoxic effect of this essential oil.

  17. Isolation and characterization of allelopathic volatiles from mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Barney, Jacob N; Hay, Anthony G; Weston, Leslie A

    2005-02-01

    Several volatile allelochemicals were identified and characterized from fresh leaf tissue of three distinct populations of the invasive perennial weed, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris). A unique bioassay was used to demonstrate the release of volatile allelochemicals from leaf tissues. Leaf volatiles were trapped and analyzed via gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Some of the components identified were terpenes, including camphor, eucalyptol, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene. Those commercially available were tested individually to determine their phytotoxicity. Concentrations of detectable volatiles differed in both absolute and relative proportions among the mugwort populations. The three mugwort populations consisted of a taller, highly branched population (ITH-1); a shorter, lesser-branched population (ITH-2) (both grown from rhizome fragments from managed landscapes); and a population grown from seed with lobed leaves (VT). Considerable interspecific variation existed in leaf morphology and leaf surface chemistry. Bioassays revealed that none of the individual monoterpenes could account for the observed phytotoxicity imparted by total leaf volatiles, suggesting a synergistic effect or activity of a component not tested. Despite inability to detect a single dominant phytotoxic compound, decreases in total terpene concentration with increase in leaf age correlated with decreases in phytotoxicity. The presence of bioactive terpenoids in leaf surface chemistry of younger mugwort tissue suggests a potential role for terpenoids in mugwort establishment and proliferation in introduced habitats.

  18. Evaluation of allergenicity of constituents of myoga using the murine local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Wei, Q J; Wei, C N; Harada, K; Minamoto, K; Okamoto, Y; Otsuka, M; Ueda, A

    2010-01-01

    Myoga (Zingiber Myoga Roscoe) is a perennial plant with a pungent smell from its flower buds. It is native to East Asia and has been reported to cause allergic contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study is to assess the allergenicity of myoga related to its major chemical components, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, limonene oxide and beta-phellandrene, which are supposed to be the causative agents of contact dermatitis among myoga cultivators. We performed a toxicity study of the volatile constituents of myoga using the local lymph node assay (LLNA), in which limonene, limonene oxide and beta-phellandrene had positive responses and the EC3 was 35.8%, 8.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. EC3 for both alpha-pinene and beta-pinene was over 100%. Both chemicals failed to induce positive responses in the LLNA. While the maximization rating of limonene, limonene oxide and phellandrene were evaluated as moderate, extreme, and extreme respectively, alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were evaluated as weak in the previously reported GPMT. The usage of LLNA was also confirmed by comparing with previously reported GPMT results to detect the allergenicity of myoga constituents. The actual risk of humans developing an allergy to myoga constituents depends on many factors. The concentration of the compounds, the frequency and duration of exposure and the condition of the skin are supposed to be important factors.

  19. Larvicidal effect of Eucalyptus grandis essential oil and turpentine and their major components on Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Gonzalez Audino, Paola; Seccacini, Emilia; Licastro, Susana; Zerba, Eduardo; Masuh, Hector

    2007-09-01

    In the search for new alternatives for the control of Aedes aegypti the larvicidal activity of Eucalyptus grandis essential oil and pine resin essential oil (turpentine) and their major components (alpha- and beta-pinene and 1,8-cineole) was determined. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of E. grandis essential oil revealed that its major components are alpha-pinene and 1,8-cineole. Similar analysis of turpentine obtained by distillation of the resin pitch of conifers showed that alpha- and beta-pinene are the only major components. Third and early 4th instars of the CIPEIN-susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti were exposed to acetonic solutions of E. grandis essential oil, turpentine, and their major components for 24 h. Turpentine, with an LC50 of 14.7 ppm, was more active than the essential oil of E. grandis (LC50: 32.4 ppm). Larvicidal activity of the essential oil components showed that alpha- and beta-pinene present low LC50 values (15.4 and 12.1 ppm, respectively), whereas pure 1,8-cineole showed an LC50 of 57.2 ppm. These results suggest that alpha-pinene in E. grandis and alpha- and beta-pinene in turpentine serve as the principal larvicidal components of both oils. Results obtained on larvicidal effects of essential oil of Eucalyptus grandis and turpentine could be considered a contribution to the search for new biodegradable larvicides of natural origin.

  20. Factors Affecting the Emission of Monoterpenes from Red Pine (Pinus densiflora)

    PubMed Central

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Ambe, Yoshinari

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of monoterpene emission from Pinus densiflora was studied using an environmentally controlled gas cabinet. It was found that monoterpene emission rate increases exponentially with temperature and is also influenced by light. These observations were explained reasonably by a mechanism whereby monoterpene emission rate depends on the monoterpene amount in the leaf oil and its saturated vapor pressure. PMID:16663724

  1. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    DOE PAGES

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; ...

    2015-03-06

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissionsmore » of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.« less

  2. PLANT VOLATILES. Biosynthesis of monoterpene scent compounds in roses.

    PubMed

    Magnard, Jean-Louis; Roccia, Aymeric; Caissard, Jean-Claude; Vergne, Philippe; Sun, Pulu; Hecquet, Romain; Dubois, Annick; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Jullien, Frédéric; Nicolè, Florence; Raymond, Olivier; Huguet, Stéphanie; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Meyer, Sophie; Claudel, Patricia; Jeauffre, Julien; Rohmer, Michel; Foucher, Fabrice; Hugueney, Philippe; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Baudino, Sylvie

    2015-07-03

    The scent of roses (Rosa x hybrida) is composed of hundreds of volatile molecules. Monoterpenes represent up to 70% percent of the scent content in some cultivars, such as the Papa Meilland rose. Monoterpene biosynthesis in plants relies on plastid-localized terpene synthases. Combining transcriptomic and genetic approaches, we show that the Nudix hydrolase RhNUDX1, localized in the cytoplasm, is part of a pathway for the biosynthesis of free monoterpene alcohols that contribute to fragrance in roses. The RhNUDX1 protein shows geranyl diphosphate diphosphohydrolase activity in vitro and supports geraniol biosynthesis in planta. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Oxidation of monoterpenes in Protium heptaphyllum oleoresins.

    PubMed

    Albino, Rayane C; Oliveira, Prissila C; Prosdocimi, Francisco; da Silva, Osman F; Bizzo, Humberto R; Gama, Paola E; Sakuragui, Cássia M; Furtado, Carolina; de Oliveira, Danilo R

    2017-04-01

    Protium heptaphyllum (Burseraceae) oleoresins are rich in volatile monoterpenes, exhibiting a chemical composition that can be strongly altered with time. The present work aimed to discuss the temporal change of the volatile composition of these oleoresins, and search for related supporting evidence. Samples of P. heptaphyllum oleoresin were collected separately for fresh (n = 10) and aged (n = 8) oleoresins, with the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Fresh oleoresins were characterized by a high content of terpinolene (28.2-69.7%), whereas aged ones contained large amounts of p-cymene (18.7-43.0%) and p-cymen-8-ol (8.2-31.8%). Multivariate analyses were performed based on the yield and major essential oil components to clearly demonstrate the existence of two subsets (fresh and aged oleoresins). In addition, an analysis of the partial genome sequencing of the species was carried out, producing the largest amount of data for the genus Protium. Subsequently, were searched for nucleotide sequences responsible for the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenes. Two hypotheses were formulated to understand the oxidation process during aging of the oleoresins: (i) a natural chemical oxidation of terpenes and (ii) an oxidation catalyzed by enzymes produced by microorganisms associated with the plant. The results suggested that terpinolene was most likely oxidized to p-cymene, which, in turn, was oxidized into p-cymen-8-ol during natural aging of the exudate due to abiotic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of storage on the essential oil composition of Piper nigrum L. fruits of different ripening states.

    PubMed

    Orav, Anne; Stulova, Irina; Kailas, Tiiu; Müürisepp, Mati

    2004-05-05

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the essential oil from black, green, and white pepper was determined by using a simultaneous distillation and extraction micromethod for oil isolation and gas chromatography (GC)/flame ionization detection (FID) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS) analysis techniques. The most abundant compounds in pepper oils were (E)-beta-caryophyllene (1.4-70.4%), limonene (2.9-38.4%), beta-pinene (0.7-25.6%), Delta-3-carene (1.7-19.0%), sabinene (0-12.2%), alpha-pinene (0.3-10.4%), eugenol (0.1-41.0%), terpinen-4-ol (0-13.2%), hedycaryol (0-9.1%), beta-eudesmol (0-9.7%), and caryophyllene oxide (0.1-7.2%). Green pepper corn obtained by a sublimation drying method gave more oil (12.1 mg/g) and a much higher content of monoterpenes (84.2%) in the oil than air-dried green pepper corn (0.8 mg/g and 26.8%, respectively). The oil from ground black pepper contained more monoterpenes and less sesquiterprnes and oxygenated terpenoids as compared to green and white pepper oils. After 1 year of storage of pepper samples in a glass vessel at room temperature, the amount of the oils isolated decreased, the content of terpenes decreased, and the amount of oxygenated terpenoids increased. Differently from other pepper samples, 1 year storage of green pepper corn raised the oil amount more than twice of both drying methods.

  5. Antitumor Activity of Monoterpenes Found in Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Marianna Vieira; Xavier, Aline Lira; Lima, Tamires Cardoso; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex genetic disease that is a major public health problem worldwide, accounting for about 7 million deaths each year. Many anticancer drugs currently used clinically have been isolated from plant species or are based on such substances. Accumulating data has revealed anticancer activity in plant-derived monoterpenes. In this review the antitumor activity of 37 monoterpenes found in essential oils is discussed. Chemical structures, experimental models, and mechanisms of action for bioactive substances are presented. PMID:25401162

  6. Monoterpene emissions from an understory species, Pteridium aquilinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, Monica B.; Greenberg, James P.; Wessman, Carol A.; Guenther, Alex B.

    2012-07-01

    Monoterpene emissions from the dominant understory species Pteridium aquilinum (Bracken fern) in a mixed temperate forest were measured in the field during the summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. The results showed that Bracken fern emitted monoterpenes at different rates depending if the plants were located in the understory or in open areas. Understory plants emitted monoterpene levels ranging from 0.002 to 13 μgC gdw-1 h-1. Open area plants emitted monoterpene levels ranging from 0.005 to 2.21 μgC gdw-1 h-1. During the summer of 2008 greenhouse studies were performed to complement the field studies. Only 3% of the greenhouse Bracken fern plants emitted substantial amounts of monoterpenes. The average emission, 0.15 μgC gdw-1 h-1 ± 0.9 μgC gdw-1 h-1, was much lower than that observed in the field. The factors controlling monoterpene emissions are not clear, but this study provides evidence of the potential importance of understory vegetation to ecosystem total hydrocarbon emissions and emphasizes the need for longer-term field studies.

  7. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lemeng; Jongedijk, Esmer; Bouwmeester, Harro; Van Der Krol, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana indicated local GDP availability for each compartment but resulted in different product levels. A GDP synthase from Picea abies (PaGDPS1) was shown to boost GDP production. PaGDPS1 was also targeted to plastids, cytosol or mitochondria and PaGDPS1 and GES were coexpressed in all possible combinations. Geraniol and geraniol-derived products were analyzed by GC-MS and LC-MS, respectively. GES product levels were highest for plastid-targeted GES, followed by mitochondrial- and then cytosolic-targeted GES. For each compartment local boosting of GDP biosynthesis increased GES product levels. GDP exchange between compartments is not equal: while no GDP is exchanged from the cytosol to the plastids, 100% of GDP in mitochondria can be exchanged to plastids, while only 7% of GDP from plastids is available for mitochondria. This suggests a direct exchange mechanism for GDP between plastids and mitochondria. Cytosolic PaGDPS1 competes with plastidial GES activity, suggesting an effective drain of isopentenyl diphosphate from the plastids to the cytosol. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Cytotoxic halogenated monoterpenes from Plocamium cartilagineum.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Omar M M; Goeger, Douglas E; Valeriote, Frederick A; Gerwick, William H

    2017-02-01

    As a result of our efforts to identify bioactive agents from marine algae, we have isolated and identified one new halogenated monoterpene 1 [(-)-(5E,7Z)-348-trichloro-7-dichloromethyl-3-methyl-157-octatriene] in addition to three known compounds (2, 3 and 4) from the red alga Plocamium cartilagineum collected by hand from the eastern coast of South Africa. Compound 1 was found to be active as a cytotoxic agent in human lung cancer (NCI-H460) and mouse neuro-2a cell lines (IC 50 4 μg/mL). Two of these compounds (3 and 4) were found to have cytotoxic activity in other cell line assays, especially against human leukaemia and human colon cancers (IC 50 1.3 μg/mL). None of these metabolites were active as sodium channel blockers or activators. All structures were determined by spectroscopic methods (UV, IR, LRMS, HRMS, 1D NMR and 2D NMR). 1D and 2D NOE experiments were carried out on these compounds to confirm the geometry of the double bonds.

  9. Monoterpenes Support Systemic Acquired Resistance within and between Plants.

    PubMed

    Riedlmeier, Marlies; Ghirardo, Andrea; Wenig, Marion; Knappe, Claudia; Koch, Kerstin; Georgii, Elisabeth; Dey, Sanjukta; Parker, Jane E; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Vlot, A Corina

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the role of volatile organic compounds in systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a salicylic acid (SA)-associated, broad-spectrum immune response in systemic, healthy tissues of locally infected plants. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analyses of SAR-related emissions of wild-type and non-SAR-signal-producing mutant plants associated SAR with monoterpene emissions. Headspace exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to a mixture of the bicyclic monoterpenes α-pinene and β-pinene induced defense, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and expression of SA- and SAR-related genes, including the SAR regulatory AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 ( AZI1 ) gene and three of its paralogs. Pinene-induced resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signaling and on AZI1 Arabidopsis geranylgeranyl reductase1 mutants with reduced monoterpene biosynthesis were SAR-defective but mounted normal local resistance and methyl salicylate-induced defense responses, suggesting that monoterpenes act in parallel with SA The volatile emissions from SAR signal-emitting plants induced defense in neighboring plants, and this was associated with the presence of α-pinene, β-pinene, and camphene in the emissions of the "sender" plants. Our data suggest that monoterpenes, particularly pinenes, promote SAR, acting through ROS and AZI1 , and likely function as infochemicals in plant-to-plant signaling, thus allowing defense signal propagation between neighboring plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Monoterpenes Support Systemic Acquired Resistance within and between Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Knappe, Claudia; Koch, Kerstin; Dey, Sanjukta; Parker, Jane E.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the role of volatile organic compounds in systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a salicylic acid (SA)-associated, broad-spectrum immune response in systemic, healthy tissues of locally infected plants. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analyses of SAR-related emissions of wild-type and non-SAR-signal-producing mutant plants associated SAR with monoterpene emissions. Headspace exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to a mixture of the bicyclic monoterpenes α-pinene and β-pinene induced defense, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and expression of SA- and SAR-related genes, including the SAR regulatory AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 (AZI1) gene and three of its paralogs. Pinene-induced resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signaling and on AZI1. Arabidopsis geranylgeranyl reductase1 mutants with reduced monoterpene biosynthesis were SAR-defective but mounted normal local resistance and methyl salicylate-induced defense responses, suggesting that monoterpenes act in parallel with SA. The volatile emissions from SAR signal-emitting plants induced defense in neighboring plants, and this was associated with the presence of α-pinene, β-pinene, and camphene in the emissions of the “sender” plants. Our data suggest that monoterpenes, particularly pinenes, promote SAR, acting through ROS and AZI1, and likely function as infochemicals in plant-to-plant signaling, thus allowing defense signal propagation between neighboring plants. PMID:28536145

  11. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  12. Emission and Accumulation of Monoterpene and the Key Terpene Synthase (TPS) Associated with Monoterpene Biosynthesis in Osmanthus fragrans Lour

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiangling; Liu, Cai; Zheng, Riru; Cai, Xuan; Luo, Jing; Zou, Jingjing; Wang, Caiyun

    2016-01-01

    Osmanthus fragrans is an ornamental and economically important plant known for its magnificent aroma, and the most important aroma-active compounds in flowers are monoterpenes, mainly β-ocimene, linalool and linalool derivatives. To understand the molecular mechanism of monoterpene production, we analyzed the emission and accumulation patterns of these compounds and the transcript levels of the genes involved in their biosynthesis in two O. fragrans cultivars during flowering stages. The results showed that both emission and accumulation of monoterpenes varied with flower development and glycosylation had an important impact on floral linalool emission during this process. Gene expression demonstrated that the transcript levels of terpene synthase (TPS) genes probably played a key role in monoterpene production, compared to the genes in the MEP pathway. Phylogenetic analysis showed that OfTPS1 and OfTPS2 belonged to a TPS-g subfamily, and OfTPS3 and OfTPS4 clustered into a TPS-b subfamily. Their transient and stable expression in tobacco leaves suggested that OfTPS1 and OfTPS2 exclusively produced β-linalool, and trans-β-ocimene was the sole product from OfTPS3, while OfTPS4, a predictive sesquiterpene synthase, produced α-farnesene. These results indicate that OfTPS1, OfTPS2, and OfTPS3 could account for the major floral monoterpenes, linalool and trans-β-ocimene, produced in O. fragrans flowers. PMID:26793212

  13. Emission and Accumulation of Monoterpene and the Key Terpene Synthase (TPS) Associated with Monoterpene Biosynthesis in Osmanthus fragrans Lour.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangling; Liu, Cai; Zheng, Riru; Cai, Xuan; Luo, Jing; Zou, Jingjing; Wang, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    Osmanthus fragrans is an ornamental and economically important plant known for its magnificent aroma, and the most important aroma-active compounds in flowers are monoterpenes, mainly β-ocimene, linalool and linalool derivatives. To understand the molecular mechanism of monoterpene production, we analyzed the emission and accumulation patterns of these compounds and the transcript levels of the genes involved in their biosynthesis in two O. fragrans cultivars during flowering stages. The results showed that both emission and accumulation of monoterpenes varied with flower development and glycosylation had an important impact on floral linalool emission during this process. Gene expression demonstrated that the transcript levels of terpene synthase (TPS) genes probably played a key role in monoterpene production, compared to the genes in the MEP pathway. Phylogenetic analysis showed that OfTPS1 and OfTPS2 belonged to a TPS-g subfamily, and OfTPS3 and OfTPS4 clustered into a TPS-b subfamily. Their transient and stable expression in tobacco leaves suggested that OfTPS1 and OfTPS2 exclusively produced β-linalool, and trans-β-ocimene was the sole product from OfTPS3, while OfTPS4, a predictive sesquiterpene synthase, produced α-farnesene. These results indicate that OfTPS1, OfTPS2, and OfTPS3 could account for the major floral monoterpenes, linalool and trans-β-ocimene, produced in O. fragrans flowers.

  14. Dynamics of Monoterpene Formation in Spike Lavender Plants.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Arrillaga, Isabel; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2017-12-19

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways was analyzed in spike lavender ( Lavandula latifolia Med) on the basis of 13 CO₂-labelling experiments using wildtype and transgenic plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first and key enzyme of the MVA pathway. The plants were labelled in the presence of 13 CO₂ in a gas chamber for controlled pulse and chase periods of time. GC/MS and NMR analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor, the major monoterpenes present in their essential oil, indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the MEP pathway. Surprisingly, overexpression of HMGR did not have significant impact upon the crosstalk between the MVA and MEP pathways indicating that the MEP route is the preferred pathway for the synthesis of C5 monoterpene precursors in spike lavender.

  15. New zwitterionic monoterpene indole alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Xinyu; Si, Xiali; Liang, Hong; Tu, Pengfei; Zhang, Qingying

    2018-01-31

    Four new zwitterionic monoterpene indole alkaloids, rhynchophyllioniums A-D (1-4), together with eight known alkaloids (5-12), were isolated from the hook-bearing stems of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic data analysis of MS, 1D and 2D NMR, and ECD, and the zwitterionic forms and absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were unambiguously confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All the isolates, including the monoterpene indole alkaloids with free C-22 carboxyl group and those with C-22 carboxyl methyl ester, were proved to be naturally coexisting in the herb by LC-MS analysis. This is the first report of monoterpene indole alkaloids that exist in the form of zwitterion. Additionally, the cytotoxic activities of all isolates against A549, HepG2, and MCF-7 cell lines are reported. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential contribution of exposed resin to ecosystem emissions of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Allyson S. D.; Harley, Peter; Monson, Russell K.

    2013-10-01

    Conifers, especially pines, produce and store under pressure monoterpene-laden resin in canals located throughout the plant. When the plants are damaged and resin canals punctured, the resin is exuded and the monoterpenes are released into the atmosphere, a process that has been shown to influence ecosystem-level monoterpene emissions. Less attention has been paid to the small amounts of resin that are exuded from branches, expanding needles, developing pollen cones, and terminal buds in the absence of any damage. The goal of this study was to provide the first estimate of the potential of this naturally-exposed resin to influence emissions of monoterpenes from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) ecosystems. When resin is first exuded as small spherical beads from undamaged tissues it emits monoterpenes to the atmosphere at a rate that is four orders of magnitude greater than needle tissue with an equivalent exposed surface area and the emissions from exuded beads decline exponentially as the resin dries. We made measurements of resin beads on the branches of ponderosa pine trees in the middle of the growing season and found, on average, 0.15 cm2 of exposed resin bead surface area and 1250 cm2 of total needle surface area per branch tip. If the resin emerged over the course of 10 days, resin emissions would make up 10% of the ecosystem emissions each day. Since we only accounted for exposed resin at a single point in time, this is probably an underestimate of how much total resin is exuded from undamaged pine tissues over the course of a growing season. Our observations, however, reveal the importance of this previously unrecognized source of monoterpenes emitted from pine forests and its potential to influence regional atmospheric chemistry dynamics.

  17. Cloning and Characterizing Genes Involved in Monoterpene Induced Mammary Tumor Regression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    Monoterpene -induced/repressed genes were identified in regressing rat mammary carcinomas treated with dietary limonene using a newly developed method...termed subtractive display. The subtractive display screen identified 42 monoterpene -induced genes comprising 9 known genes and 33 unidentified genes...as well as 58 monoterpene -repressed genes comprising 1 known gene and 57 unidentified genes. Several of the identified differentially expressed

  18. Evaluation of extracts and oils of mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) repellent plants from Sweden and Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, Thomas G T; Pålsson, Katinka; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2006-01-01

    In laboratory tests, ethyl acetate extracts of Hyptis suaveolens Poit. from Guinea-Bissau and Rhododendon tomentosum (Stokes) H. Harmaja (formerly Ledum palustre L.) and Myrica gale L. significantly reduced probing activity of Aedes aegypti (L.). In the field in southern Sweden, extracts of leaves of R. tomentosum, M. gale, and Achillea millefolium L. significantly reduced biting by Aedes mosquitoes. Volatile compounds from M. gale, R. tomentosum, A. millefolium, and H. suaveolens were collected by solid phase microextraction (SPME). Alternatively, compounds in the plants were subjected to extraction by organic solvents of different polarities or by steam distillation and collection by SPME. Compounds collected were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Leaves of H. suaveolens contained mainly beta-caryophyllene, bergamotene, and terpinolene. The volatile fraction of an ethyl acetate extract of H. suaveolens was collected by SPME and included beta-caryophyllene, (-) -sabinene, beta-pinene, limonene, alpha-pinene, and bergamotene. The main volatiles detected were alpha-pinene, alpha-phellandrene, myrcene, and limonene from M. gale leaves or inflorescences; pcymene, sabinene, and terpinyl acetate from leaves of R. tomentosum; and (-)-germacrene D, beta-pinene, sabinene, and alpha-pinene from A. millefolium leaves or inflorescences. The selected plant species contained numerous volatiles known to have insecticidal, acaricidal, "pesticidal," and/ or insect repellent properties.

  19. Geographic variation in shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) - cortical monoterpenes

    R.C. Schmidtling; J.H. Myszewski; C.E. McDaniel

    2005-01-01

    Cortical monoterpenes were assayed in bud tissue from 16 Southwide Southern Pine Seed Source Study (SSPSS) sources and from 6 seed orchard sources fiom across the natural range of the species, to examine geogaphic variation in shortleaf pine. Spruce pine and pond pine were also sampled. The results show geographic differences in all of the major terpenes. There was no...

  20. The Biosynthetic Origin of Irregular Monoterpenes in Lavandula

    PubMed Central

    Demissie, Zerihun A.; Erland, Lauren A. E.; Rheault, Mark R.; Mahmoud, Soheil S.

    2013-01-01

    Lavender essential oils are constituted predominantly of regular monoterpenes, for example linalool, 1,8-cineole, and camphor. However, they also contain irregular monoterpenes including lavandulol and lavandulyl acetate. Although the majority of genes responsible for the production of regular monoterpenes in lavenders are now known, enzymes (including lavandulyl diphosphate synthase (LPPS)) catalyzing the biosynthesis of irregular monoterpenes in these plants have not been described. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel cis-prenyl diphosphate synthase cDNA, termed Lavandula x intermedia lavandulyl diphosphate synthase (LiLPPS), through a homology-based cloning strategy. The LiLPPS ORF, encoding for a 305-amino acid long protein, was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. The approximately 34.5-kDa bacterially produced protein specifically catalyzed the head-to-middle condensation of two dimethylallyl diphosphate units to LPP in vitro with apparent Km and kcat values of 208 ± 12 μm and 0.1 s−1, respectively. LiLPPS is a homodimeric enzyme with a sigmoidal saturation curve and Hill coefficient of 2.7, suggesting a positive co-operative interaction among its catalytic sites. LiLPPS could be used to modulate the production of lavandulol and its derivatives in plants through metabolic engineering. PMID:23306202

  1. Low temperature fluidized wood chip drying with monoterpene analysis

    Bridget N. Bero; Alarick Reiboldt; Ward Davis; Natalie Bedard; Evan Russell

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the drying of ponderosa pine wood chips at low (20°C and 50°C) temperatures using a bench-scale batch pulsed fluidizer to evaluate both volatile pine oils (monoterpenes) and moisture losses during drying.

  2. Variations in the monoterpene composition of ponderosa pine wood oleoresin

    Richard H. Smith

    1964-01-01

    A wide range in quantitative composition of the wood oleoresin monoterpenes was found among 64 ponderosa pines in the central Sierra Nevada by gas chromatographic analysis. An inverse relationship was found in the amount of β-pinene and Δ3-carene. Practically no difference in composition could be associated with (a) type of...

  3. Predictors of monoterpene exposure in the Danish furniture industry.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Katja; Jacobsen, Gitte; Sigsgaard, Torben; Schaumburg, Inger; Erlandsen, Mogens; Schlunssen, Vivi

    2012-04-01

    Individuals who work with pine in the furniture industry may be exposed to monoterpenes, the most abundant of which are α-pinene, β-pinene, and Δ(3)-carene. Monoterpenes are suspected to cause dermatitis and to harm the respiratory system. An understanding of the predictors of monoterpene exposure is therefore important in preventing these adverse effects. These predictors may include general characteristics of the work environment and specific work operations. We sought to assess the extent to which workers are exposed to monoterpenes and to identify possible predictors of monoterpene exposure in the pine furniture industry in Denmark. Passive measurements of the levels of selected monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, and Δ(3)-carene) were performed on 161 subjects from 17 pine furniture factories in Viborg County, Denmark; one sample was acquired from each worker. Additionally, wood dust samples were collected from 145 workers. Data on potential predictors of exposure were acquired over the course of the day on which the exposure measurements were recorded and could be assigned to one of four hierarchic ordered levels: worker, machine, department, and factory. In addition to univariate analyses, a mixed model was used to account for imbalances within the data and random variation with each of the hierarchically ordered levels. The geometric mean (GM) monoterpene content observed over the 161 measurements was 7.8 mg m(-3) [geometric standard deviation (GSD): 2.4]; the GM wood dust level over 145 measurements was 0.58 mg m(-3) (GSD: 1.49). None of the measured samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit for terpenes in Denmark (25 ppm, 150 mg m(-3)). In the univariate analyses, half of the predictors tested were found to be significant; the multivariate model indicated that only three of the potential predictors were significant. These were the recirculation of air in rooms used for the processing of wood (a factory level predictor), the presence of a

  4. Is the gas-particle partitioning in alpha-pinene secondary organic aerosol reversible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieshop, Andrew P.; Donahue, Neil M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2007-07-01

    This paper discusses the reversibility of gas-particle partitioning in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from α-pinene ozonolysis in a smog chamber. Previously, phase partitioning has been studied quantitatively via SOA production experiments and qualitatively by perturbing temperature and observing particle evaporation. In this work, two methods were used to isothermally dilute the SOA: an external dilution sampler and an in-chamber technique. Dilution caused some evaporation of SOA, but repartitioning took place on a time scale of tens of minutes to hours-consistent with an uptake coefficient on the order of 0.001-0.01. However, given sufficient time, α-pinene SOA repartitions reversibly based on comparisons with data from conventional SOA yield experiments. Further, aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data indicate that the composition of SOA varies with partitioning. These results suggest that oligomerization observed in high-concentration laboratory experiments may be a reversible process and underscore the complexity of the kinetics of formation and evaporation of SOA.

  5. Flowery odor formation revealed by differential expression of monoterpene biosynthetic genes and monoterpene accumulation in rose (Rosa rugosa Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Liguo; Chen, Chen; Li, Tinglin; Wang, Meng; Tao, Jun; Zhao, Daqiu; Sheng, Lixia

    2014-02-01

    Rosa rugosa is an important ornamental and economical plant. In this paper, four genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), alcohol acyltransferase (AAT) and linalool synthase (LIS) involved in the monoterpene biosynthesis pathways were isolated from R. rugosa 'Tangzi', and the expression patterns of these genes in different flower development stages and different parts of floral organs were determined by real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis was carried out into the relationship between expression of four monoterpene synthesis genes and accumulation of main volatile monoterpenes and their acetic acid ester derivatives. The results showed that the genes RrDXS, RrDXR and RrLIS showed consistent expressions during the development process for R. rugosa flower from budding to withering stage, the overall expression levels of gene RrDXS and RrLIS were obviously lower as compared with those of gene RrDXR and RrAAT. Although the gene RrDXS, RrDXR, RrAAT and RrLIS were expressed in all parts of R. rugosa floral organs, the expression levels varied significantly. The variations in the constituent and content of volatile monoterpenes including citronellol, geraniol, nerol, linalool, citronellyl acetate, geranyl acetate and neryl acetate at different development stages and parts of floral organs were significantly different. On this basis, we concluded that the gene RrDXR and RrAAT might play a key role in the biosynthesis of volatile monoterpenes in R. rugosa flowers, and the two genes are important candidate genes for the regulation of secondary metabolism for rose aromatic components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from forested areas in Turkey: determination of specific emission rates for thirty-one tree species.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Yagmur Meltem; Yaman, Baris; Koca, Husnu; Dasdemir, Okan; Kara, Melik; Altiok, Hasan; Dumanoglu, Yetkin; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Tolunay, Doganay; Odabasi, Mustafa; Elbir, Tolga

    2014-08-15

    Normalized biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission rates for thirty one tree species that cover the 98% of national forested areas in Turkey were determined. Field samplings were performed at fourteen different forested areas in Turkey using a specific dynamic enclosure system. The selected branches of tree species were enclosed in a chamber consisted of a transparent Nalofan bag. The air-flows were sampled from both inlet and outlet of the chamber by Tenax-filled sorbent tubes during photosynthesis of trees under the presence of sunlight. Several environmental parameters (temperature, humidity, photosynthetically active radiation-PAR, and CO2) were continuously monitored inside and outside the enclosure chamber during the samplings. Collected samples were analyzed using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system equipped with a thermal desorber (TD). Sixty five BVOCs classified in five major groups (isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, and other oxygenated compounds) were analyzed. Emission rates were determined by normalization to standard conditions (1000 μmol/m(2)s PAR and 30 °C temperature for isoprene and 30 °C temperature for the remaining compounds). In agreement with the literature, isoprene was mostly emitted by broad-leaved trees while coniferous species mainly emitted monoterpenes. Several tree species such as Sweet Chestnut, Silver Lime, and European Alder had higher monoterpene emissions although they are broad-leaved species. High isoprene emissions were also observed for a few coniferous species such as Nordmann Fir and Oriental Spruce. The highest normalized total BVOC emission rate of 27.1 μg/gh was observed for Oriental Plane while South European Flowering Ash was the weakest BVOC emitter with a total normalized emission rate of 0.031 μg/gh. Monoterpene emissions of broad-leaved species mainly consisted of sabinene, limonene and trans-beta-ocimene, while alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and beta

  7. Monoterpene emissions from a Ponderosa Pine forest. Does age matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, M. B.; Guenther, A. B.; Wessman, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the emissions rate of biogenic volatile organic carbon (BVOC) from plants is a challenge. Biological variability makes it difficult to assess accurately those emissions rates. It is known that photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), temperature, nutrients as well as the biology of the plant affect emissions. However, less is known about the variability of the emissions with respect to the life cycle of the plants. This study is focusing on the difference of monoterpene emission rates from mature Ponderosa Pine trees and saplings in the field. Preliminary calculations show that there is a significant difference between total monoterpene emissions in mature trees (0.24±0.04 μgC/gdwh) and saplings (0.37±0.02 μgC/gdwh).

  8. Cyclic monoterpene mediated modulations of Arabidopsis thaliana phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kriegs, Bettina; Jansen, Marcus; Hahn, Katrin; Peisker, Helga; Šamajová, Olga; Beck, Martina; Braun, Silvia; Ulbrich, Andreas; Baluška, František

    2010-01-01

    Monoterpenes at high atmospheric concentrations are strong growth inhibitors in allelopathic interactions. Effects depend on dose, molecular structure of the monoterpene and on the species of the receiver plant. Stomata are among the first targets affected by camphor and menthol. Previously, it could be demonstrated that the compounds induce swelling of the protoplasts, prevent stomatal closure and enhance transpiration. In this study, we show that the block of stomatal closure is accompanied by changes to the cytoskeleton, which has a direct role in stomatal movements. Although MPK3 (MAP3 kinase) and ABF4 gene expressions are induced within six hours, stomatal closure is prevented. In contrast to ABF4, ABF2 (both transcription factors) is not induced. MPK3 and ABF4 both encode for proteins involved in the process of stomatal closure. The expression of PEPCase, an enzyme important for stomatal opening, is downregulated. The leaves develop stress symptoms, mirrored by transient changes in the expression profile of additional genes: lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2), CER5, CER6 (both important for wax production) and RD29B (an ABA inducible stress protein). Non-invasive methods showed a fast response of the plant to camphor fumigations both in a rapid decrease of the quantum yield and in the relative growth rate. Repeated exposures to the monoterpenes resulted finally in growth reduction and a stress related change in the phenotype. It is proposed that high concentrations or repeated exposure to monoterpenes led to irreversible damages, whereas low concentrations or short-term fumigations may have the potential to strengthen the plant fitness. PMID:20484979

  9. Xylem monoterpenes of pines: distribution, variation, genetics, function

    Richard Smith

    2000-01-01

    The monoterpenes of about 16,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) speciesand hybrids—largely from the western United States—were analyzed in this long-term study of the resistance of pines to attack by bark beetles (Coleoptera:Scolytidae), with special emphasis on resistance to the western pine beetle(Dendroctonus brevicomis). The samples were analyzed by gas liquid...

  10. Dynamics of Monoterpene Formation in Spike Lavender Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways was analyzed in spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) on the basis of 13CO2-labelling experiments using wildtype and transgenic plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first and key enzyme of the MVA pathway. The plants were labelled in the presence of 13CO2 in a gas chamber for controlled pulse and chase periods of time. GC/MS and NMR analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor, the major monoterpenes present in their essential oil, indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the MEP pathway. Surprisingly, overexpression of HMGR did not have significant impact upon the crosstalk between the MVA and MEP pathways indicating that the MEP route is the preferred pathway for the synthesis of C5 monoterpene precursors in spike lavender. PMID:29257083

  11. Monoterpenes as Perspective to Chronic Pain Management: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Daniele Nascimento; Pina, Lícia Tairiny Santos; Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; da Rocha Santos, Wagner Barbosa; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Guimarães, Adriana Gibara

    2017-07-11

    Individuals with chronic diseases have persistent pain as the main symptom, which can often reduce their life quality and functional capacity. The suffering of patients results from the interaction of aversive perception of pain with physical disability, social and family isolation, financial worries and fear of mutilation and death. As an individual and subjective phenomenon that involves many complex aspects, chronic pain should be evaluated and treated in its various components. Several drugs are currently used, but besides the high cost, they have side effects that are harmful to patients. Therefore, there is the need to search for new options for pain relief. Natural products as monoterpenes have been the target of many researchers. This systematic review aimed to briefly summarize the knowledge of the analgesic potential of monoterpenes facing chronic pain. After a search in PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus and Cochrane, 27 articles were selected, which described the analgesic potential of 16 monoterpenes for relief of chronic pain. After analyzing the data, it can be suggested that these compounds are strong candidates for the treatment of painful states. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Gas-phase chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P. K.; Chatha, J. P. S.; Vohra, K. G.

    1983-08-01

    Chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes such as linallol, geraniol, d-limonene and α-pinene have been studied in the gas phase at low pressures. Methylglyoxal phosphorescence has been observed in the first two reactions. Emissions from HCHO( 1A 2) and glyoxal ( 3A u) are observed in the reaction of ozone with d-limonene and formation of excited glyoxal is found to be first order in ozone. The reaction of ozone with β-pinene gives rise to emission from a α-dicarbonyl compound and this is found to be first order in ozone. The mechanisms for the formation of excited species are proposed.

  13. Isolation of Monoterpene Dihydrochalcones from Piper montealegreanum Yuncker (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Alves, Harley da Silva; Rocha, Wilma Raianny Vieira da; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Chaves, Maria Célia de Oliveira

    2017-06-09

    Four new compounds were isolated from the branches of Piper montealegreanum Yuncker, a shrub found in the Amazon rainforest, including two new dihydrochalcones named claricine ( 1 ) and maisine ( 2 ), a cinnamic acid derivative 3 and a phenylalkanoid 4 , along with a porphyrin identified as the known compound phaeophytin a ( 5 ). The structures were established using spectroscopic experiments, including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS experiments, performed on the two monoterpene dihydrochalcones and their monoacetyl derivatives. The structural diversity of these substances is very important for the Piper genus chemotaxonomy.

  14. Workplace concentrations and exposure assessment of monoterpenes in rosemary- and lavender-growing greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Tani, Akira; Nozoe, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Monoterpenes can positively or negatively affect human health depending on their concentrations. To assess the atmospheric risk for greenhouse workers, monoterpene concentrations and personal exposure in herb-growing greenhouses were measured. Monoterpene concentrations in a commercial greenhouse, where rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia L.) were grown in pots, were measured every 4 hours on 11 days spread across a year. In a small experimental greenhouse, typical horticultural tasks were conducted to determine the factors increasing monoterpene concentrations. Concentrations of α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, limonene and cineole in the farmer's greenhouse were higher in winter than in summer because of longer ventilation periods of the greenhouse in summer. Further, the concentrations of these compounds were high (but <2 parts per billion in volume [ppbv]) when horticultural tasks were conducted inside the greenhouse. In a small experimental greenhouse, moving pots and cutting shoots increased ambient monoterpene concentrations to 10 ppbv. Spraying water also increased monoterpene concentrations but to a lesser extent. When performing tasks, greenhouse workers were exposed to monoterpene concentrations 2-3 times higher than the concentration in the ambient greenhouse air. Our measurement results reveal that monoterpene emissions are stimulated by horticultural tasks, even by spraying water. Our calculation result suggests that if ventilation is limited, the concentrations can reach levels high enough to cause sensory irritation in greenhouse workers. Greenhouse workers should be cautious when performing tasks for hours in tightly closed herb-growing greenhouses.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Three New Monoterpene Synthases from Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Ju-Xin; Li, Jian-Xu; Fang, Xin; Wang, Ling-Jian; Hu, Wen-Li; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Yang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Artemisia annua, an annual herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, produces a wealth of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, including the well-known sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin, an active ingredient in the treatment for malaria. Here we report three new monoterpene synthases of A. annua. From a glandular trichome cDNA library, monoterpene synthases of AaTPS2, AaTPS5, and AaTPS6, were isolated and characterized. The recombinant proteins of AaTPS5 and AaTPS6 produced multiple products with camphene and 1,8-cineole as major products, respectively, and AaTPS2 produced a single product, β-myrcene. Although both Mg2+ and Mn2+ were able to support their catalytic activities, altered product spectrum was observed in the presence of Mn2+ for AaTPS2 and AaTPS5. Analysis of extracts of aerial tissues and root of A. annua with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry detected more than 20 monoterpenes, of which the three enzymes constituted more than 1/3 of the total. Mechanical wounding induced the expression of all three monoterpene synthase genes, and transcript levels of AaTPS5 and AaTPS6 were also elevated after treatments with phytohormones of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, and gibberellin, suggesting a role of these monoterpene synthases in plant–environment interactions. The three new monoterpene synthases reported here further our understanding of molecular basis of monoterpene biosynthesis and regulation in plant. PMID:27242840

  16. Cytosolic monoterpene biosynthesis is supported by plastid-generated geranyl diphosphate substrate in transgenic tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Gutensohn, Michael; Orlova, Irina; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Sitrit, Yaron; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Pichersky, Eran; Dudareva, Natalia

    2013-08-01

    Geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the precursor of most monoterpenes, is synthesized in plastids from dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate by GPP synthases (GPPSs). In heterodimeric GPPSs, a non-catalytic small subunit (GPPS-SSU) interacts with a catalytic large subunit, such as geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, and determines its product specificity. Here, snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) GPPS-SSU was over-expressed in tomato fruits under the control of the fruit ripening-specific polygalacturonase promoter to divert the metabolic flux from carotenoid formation towards GPP and monoterpene biosynthesis. Transgenic tomato fruits produced monoterpenes, including geraniol, geranial, neral, citronellol and citronellal, while exhibiting reduced carotenoid content. Co-expression of the Ocimum basilicum geraniol synthase (GES) gene with snapdragon GPPS-SSU led to a more than threefold increase in monoterpene formation in tomato fruits relative to the parental GES line, indicating that the produced GPP can be used by plastidic monoterpene synthases. Co-expression of snapdragon GPPS-SSU with the O. basilicum α-zingiberene synthase (ZIS) gene encoding a cytosolic terpene synthase that has been shown to possess both sesqui- and monoterpene synthase activities resulted in increased levels of ZIS-derived monoterpene products compared to fruits expressing ZIS alone. These results suggest that re-direction of the metabolic flux towards GPP in plastids also increases the cytosolic pool of GPP available for monoterpene synthesis in this compartment via GPP export from plastids. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Spruce budworm feeding and oviposition are stimulated by monoterpenes in white spruce epicuticular waxes.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Darragh; Despland, Emma; Chen, Fei; Forgione, Pat; Bauce, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Monoterpenes, source of the distinctive odor of conifers, are generally considered plant defensive compounds. However, they are also known to act as long-range insect attractants, as they are volatile and permeate forest airspaces. Moreover, they are lipid soluble and can be absorbed into plant epicuticular waxes. We test their role in short-range host plant choice by both adult females and larvae of a folivorous forest pest (Choristoneura fumiferana). We conducted laboratory assays testing the responses of Eastern spruce budworm to an artificial monoterpene mix (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, myrcene) and to white spruce (Picea glauca) epicuticular waxes in closed arenas. Ovipositing females preferred filter paper discs treated with P. glauca waxes to controls, and preferred the waxes + monoterpenes treatment to waxes alone. However, females showed no preference between the monoterpene-treated disc and the control when presented without waxes. Feeding larvae prefered wax discs to control discs. They also consumed discs treated with realistic monoterpene concentrations and wax preferentially over wax-only discs, but showed no preference between extremely high monoterpene concentrations and wax-only controls. In an insect-free assay, P. glauca epicuticular wax decreased monoterpene volatilization. These results suggest that P. glauca waxes and realistic concentrations of monoterpenes are stimulatory to both egg-laying females and feeding larvae, and that their effects are synergistic. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Lipoxygenase-inhibiting phenolic glycosides and monoterpene glycosides from Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liang; Hu, Lin-Feng; Guo, Yi-Dong; Song, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The EtOH extract of the roots of Paeonia lactiflora afforded a new phenolic glycoside paenoside A (1) and a new monoterpene glycoside paeonin D (2), and five known monoterpene glycosides. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic means and hydrolysis products. All compounds displayed inhibitory potential against enzyme lipoxygenase.

  19. MONOTERPENE LEVELS IN NEEDLES OF DOUGLAS-FIR EXPOSED TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Levels of monoterpenes in current year needles of douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings were measured at the conclusion of four years of exposure to ambient or elevated CO2 (+ 179 mmol.mol-1), and ambient or elevated temperature (+ 3.5 C). Eleven monoterpen...

  20. Local and regional variation in the monoterpenes of ponderosa pine wood oleoresin

    R.H. Smith; R.L. Peloquin; P.C. Passof

    1969-01-01

    A gas chromatographic analysis of the mono-terpenes of 927 ponderosa pines, representing to some degree a major portion of the species' range, showed considerable local and regional diversity in composition. Five major monoterpenes— α-pinene, β-pinene, 3-carene, myrcene, and limonene—were analyzed. There is some evidence to support the...

  1. Host-tree monoterpenes and biosynthesis of aggregation pheromones in the bark beetle ips paraconfusus

    In the 1970-80s, vapors of the common conifer tree monoterpenes, myrcene and a-pinene, were shown to serve as precursors of ipsenol, ipsdienol and cis-verbenol, aggregation pheromone components of Ips paraconfusus. A paradigm developed that Ips bark beetles utilize pre-formed monoterpene precursors ...

  2. Do multiple herbivores maintain chemical diversity of Scots pine monoterpenes?

    PubMed Central

    Iason, Glenn R.; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.; Brewer, Mark J.; Summers, Ron W.; Moore, Ben D.

    2011-01-01

    A central issue in our understanding of the evolution of the diversity of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) is whether or not compounds are functional, conferring an advantage to the plant, or non-functional. We examine the hypothesis that the diversity of monoterpene PSMs within a plant species (Scots pine Pinus sylvestris) may be explained by different compounds acting as defences against high-impact herbivores operating at different life stages. We also hypothesize that pairwise coevolution, with uncorrelated interactions, is more likely to result in greater PSM diversity, than diffuse coevolution. We tested whether up to 13 different monoterpenes in Scots pine were inhibitory to herbivory by slugs (Arion ater), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), each of which attack trees at a different life stage. Plants containing more α-pinene were avoided by both slugs and capercaillie, which may act as reinforcing selective agents for this dominant defensive compound. Herbivory by red deer and capercaillie were, respectively, weakly negatively associated with δ3-carene, and strongly negatively correlated with the minor compound β-ocimene. Three of the four herbivores are probably contributory selective agents on some of the terpenes, and thus maintain some, but by no means all, of the phytochemical diversity in the species. The correlated defensive function of α-pinene against slugs and capercaillie is consistent with diffuse coevolutionary processes. PMID:21444308

  3. Is forest management a significant source of monoterpenes into the boreal atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanala, S.; Hakola, H.; Hellén, H.; Vestenius, M.; Levula, J.; Rinne, J.

    2011-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including terpenoids are emitted into the atmosphere from various natural sources. Damaging the plant tissue is known to strongly increase their monoterpene release. We measured the terpenoid emissions caused by timber felling, i.e. those from stumps and logging residue. The emissions from stumps were studied using enclosures and those from the whole felling area using an ecosystem scale micrometeorological method, disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA). The compounds analyzed were isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Strong emissions of monoterpenes were measured from both the stumps and from the whole felling area. The emission rate fell down rapidly within few months after the logging. In addition to fresh logging residue, the results suggest also other strong monoterpene sources to be present at the felling area. Those could include pre-existing litter, increased microbial activity and remaining undergrowth. To evaluate the possible importance of monoterpenes emitted from cut Scots pine forests in Finland annually, we conducted a rough upscaling. The resulting monoterpene release was about 15 kilotonnes per year which is more than 10 % of the monoterpene release from intact forests in Finland.

  4. Is forest management a significant source of monoterpenes into the boreal atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanala, S.; Hakola, H.; Hellén, H.; Vestenius, M.; Levula, J.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including terpenoids are emitted into the atmosphere from various natural sources. Damaging the plant tissue is known to strongly increase their monoterpene release. We measured the terpenoid emissions caused by timber felling, i.e. those from stumps and logging residue. The emissions from stumps were studied using enclosures and those from the whole felling area using an ecosystem-scale micrometeorological method, disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA). The compounds analyzed were isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Strong emissions of monoterpenes were measured from both the stumps and from the whole felling area. The emission rate decreased rapidly within a few months after the logging. In addition to fresh logging residue, the results suggest also other strong monoterpene sources may be present in the felling area. These could include pre-existing litter, increased microbial activity and remaining undergrowth. In order to evaluate the possible importance of monoterpenes emitted annually from cut Scots pine forests in Finland, we conducted a rough upscaling calculation. The resulting monoterpene release was approximated to be on the order of 15 kilotonnes per year, which corresponds to about one tenth of the monoterpene release from intact forests in Finland.

  5. Influence of Light and Temperature on Monoterpene Emission Rates from Slash Pine

    PubMed Central

    Tingey, David T.; Manning, Marybeth; Grothaus, Louis C.; Burns, Walter F.

    1980-01-01

    There is a growing awareness of vegetation's role as a source of potentially reactive hydrocarbons that may serve as photochemical oxidant precursors. This study assessed the influence of light and temperature, independently, on monoterpene emissions from slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.). Plants were preconditioned in a growth chamber, then transferred to an environmentally controlled gas exchange chamber. Samples of the chamber atmosphere were collected; the monoterpenes were concentrated cryogenically and measured by gas chromatography. Five monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, limonene, and β-phellandrene) were present in the vapor phase surrounding the plants in sufficient quantity for reliable measurement. Light did not directly influence monoterpene emission rates since the emissions were similar in both the dark and at various light intensities. Monoterpene emission rates increased exponentially with temperature (i. e. emissions depend on temperature in a log-linear manner). The summed emissions of the five monoterpenes ranged from 3 to 21 micrograms C per gram dry weight per hour as temperature was increased from 20 to 46 C. Initially, emission rates from heat-stressed needles were similar to healthy needles, but rates decreased 11% per day. Daily carbon loss through monoterpene emissions accounted for approximately 0.4% of the carbon fixed during photosynthesis. PMID:16661285

  6. Changes in monoterpene mixing ratios during summer storms in rural New Hampshire (USA)

    Haase, K.B.; Jordan, C.; Mentis, E.; Cottrell, L.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.; Sive, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Monoterpenes are an important class of biogenic hydrocarbons that influence ambient air quality and are a principle source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Emitted from vegetation, monoterpenes are a product of photosynthesis and act as a response to a variety of environmental factors. Most parameterizations of monoterpene emissions are based on clear weather models that do not take into account episodic conditions that can drastically change production and release rates into the atmosphere. Here, the ongoing monoterpene dataset from the rural Thompson Farm measurement site in Durham, New Hampshire is examined in the context of a set of known severe storm events. While some storm systems had a negligible influence on ambient monoterpene mixing ratios, the average storm event increased mixing ratios by 0.59 ?? 0.21 ppbv, a factor of 93 % above pre-storm levels. In some events, mixing ratios reached the 10's of ppbv range and persisted overnight. These mixing ratios correspond to increases in the monoterpene emission rate, ranging from 120 to 1240 g km-2 h -1 compared to an estimated clear weather rate of 116 to 193 g km-2 h-1. Considering the regularity of storm events over most forested areas, this could be an important factor to consider when modeling global monoterpene emissions and their resulting influence on the formation of organic aerosols. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  7. Changes in monoterpene mixing ratios during summer storms in rural New Hampshire (USA)

    Haase, Karl B.; Jordan, C.; Mentis, E.; Cottrell, L.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.; Sive, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Monoterpenes are an important class of biogenic hydrocarbons that influence ambient air quality and are a principle source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Emitted from vegetation, monoterpenes are a product of photosynthesis and act as a response to a variety of environmental factors. Most parameterizations of monoterpene emissions are based on clear weather models that do not take into account episodic conditions that can drastically change production and release rates into the atmosphere. Here, the monoterpene dataset from the rural Thompson Farm measurement site in Durham, New Hampshire is examined in the context of a set of known severe storm events. While some storm systems had a negligible influence on ambient monoterpene mixing ratios, the average storm event increased mixing ratios by 0.59 ?? 0.21 ppbv, a factor of 93% above pre-storm levels. In some events, mixing ratios reached the 10's of ppbv range and persisted overnight. These mixing ratios correspond to increases in the monoterpene emission rate, ranging from 120 to 1240 g km-2 h -1 compared to an estimated clear weather rate of 116 to 193 g km-2 h-1. Considering the regularity of storm events over most forested areas, this could be an important factor to consider when modeling global monoterpene emissions and their resulting influence on the formation of organic aerosols.

  8. Monoterpene derivatives from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora and their anti-proliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Ze-Ming; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan-Bo; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Yao-Lan; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-10-01

    An unusual nor-monoterpene with only nine carbons, nor-paeonilactone (1), two new monoterpenes, paeonisuffrone C (2), paeonilactone D (9), and a new monoterpene glucoside, paeonin D (3), along with ten known compounds were isolated from the dried roots of Paeonia lactiflora. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR, and computational data. Compounds 4-14 were evaluated for their anti-proliferative activities against BT 483 human breast cancer cells and OVCA 429 human ovarian cancer cells by MTT assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeted Isolation of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids from Palicourea sessilis.

    PubMed

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz C; Cretton, Sylvian; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Genta-Jouve, Grégory; Passos, Carolina S; Salton, Juliana; Bertelli, Pablo; Pupier, Marion; Jeannerat, Damien; Heyden, Yvan Vander; Gasper, André L; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Christen, Philippe; Henriques, Amélia T

    2017-11-22

    Phytochemical investigation of the alkaloid extract of Palicourea sessilis by LC-HRMS/MS using molecular networking and an in silico MS/MS fragmentation approach suggested the presence of several new monoterpene indole alkaloids. These compounds were isolated by semipreparative HPLC, and their structures confirmed by means of HRMS, NMR, and ECD measurements as 4-N-methyllyaloside (3), 4-N-methyl-3,4-dehydrostrictosidine (4), 4β-hydroxyisodolichantoside (6), and 4α-hydroxyisodolichantoside (7), as well as the known alkaloids alline (1), N-methyltryptamine (2), isodolichantoside (5), and 5-oxodolichantoside (8). In addition, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the compounds was evaluated up to 50 μM.

  10. Antinociceptive and anticonvulsant effects of the monoterpene linalool oxide.

    PubMed

    Souto-Maior, Flávia Negromonte; Fonsêca, Diogo Vilar da; Salgado, Paula Regina Rodrigues; Monte, Lucas de Oliveira; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega

    2017-12-01

    Linalool oxide (OXL) (a monoterpene) is found in the essential oils of certain aromatic plants, or it is derived from linalool. The motivation for this work is the lack of psychopharmacological studies on this substance. To evaluate OXL's acute toxicity, along with its anticonvulsant and antinociceptive activities in male Swiss mice. OXL (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg, i.p.) was investigated for acute toxicity and in the Rota-rod test. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated by the acetic acid-induced writhing test, and by formalin testing. Anticonvulsant effects were demonstrated by testing for pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures and by Maximum Electroshock headset (MES) test. OXL was administered to the animals intraperitoneally 30 min before for pharmacological tests. OXL showed an LD 50 of ∼721 (681-765) mg/kg. In the Rota-rod test, it was observed that OXL caused no damage to the animal's motor coordination. OXL significantly reduced (p < .001) the number of writhings. OXL also significantly decreased (p < .05, p < .01 or p < .001) paw-licking time in the two phases of the formalin test. OXL significantly reduced (p < .01 or p < .001) the duration of tonic seizures in the MES test, and at the dose 150 mg/kg, significantly increased (p < .01) the latency to first seizure in the PTZ test. The tested doses of OXL were safe, with no motor impairment, and show clear antinociceptive and anticonvulsant potential. Future investigations with this monoterpene may lead to the development of a new molecule with even higher potency and selectivity.

  11. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060 mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49 mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The unusual canangafruticosides A-E: five monoterpene glucosides, two monoterpenes and a monoterpene glucoside diester of the aryldihydronaphthalene lignan dicarboxylic acid from leaves of Cananga odorata var. fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Jiro; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki; Lhieochaiphant, Duangporn; Lhieochaiphant, Sorasak

    2010-09-01

    From the leaves of Cananga odorata var. fruticosa, five unusual monoterpene glucosides, named canangafruticosides A-E (1-5), along with two unusual non-glucosidic monoterpenes (6, 7) were isolated. An aryldihydronaphthalene-type lignan dicarboxylate (8) was also isolated, with two moles of canangafruticoside A (1) on its ester moiety. This lignan also showed strong blue fluorescence emission under basic conditions. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods, with their absolute configurations determined by application of the modified Mosher's method to a compound chemically derived from canangafruticoside E. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) repellency field tests of essential oils from plants traditionally used in Laos.

    PubMed

    Vongsombath, Chanda; Pålsson, Katinka; Björk, Lars; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Jaenson, Thomas G T

    2012-11-01

    Essential oils of Hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae), Croton roxburghii (Euphorbiaceae), and Litsea cubeba (Lauraceae) were tested in the field near Vientiane city, Lao PDR, on humans for repellent activity against mosquitoes. Landing mosquitoes were collected and later identified. The most abundant mosquitoes captured belonged to the genera Armigeres, Culex, and Aedes. All the plant oils tested at concentrations of 1.7 microg/cm(2), 3.3 microg/cm(2), and 6.3 microg/cm(2) were significantly more mosquito repellent than the negative control. Croton oil was significantly repellent against mosquitoes of the three genera at the highest (6.3 microg/cm(2)) concentration tested. Litsea oil was significantly repellent against Armigeres at all (1.7 microg/cm(2), 3.3 microg/cm(2), and 6.3 microg/cm(2)) concentrations tested. Hyptis oil was significantly repellent against Armigeres at 3.3 microg/cm(2) and 6.3 microg/cm(2) and against Culex at 1.7 microg/cm(2) and 6.3 microg/cm(2). The oils were analyzed for chemical content of volatiles, mainly terpenes. Main constituents were beta-pinene, sabinene, and 1,8-cineol from oils of the green parts of H. suaveolens; alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and alpha-phellandrene from fresh bark of C. roxburghii; and alpha-pinene, beta-phellandrene, sabinene, and 1,8-cineol from fresh fruits of L. cubeba.

  14. Essential oil composition and antibacterial activity of Tanacetum argenteum (Lam.) Willd. ssp. argenteum and T. densum (Lab.) Schultz Bip. ssp. amani heywood from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Polatoğlu, Kaan; Demirci, Fatih; Demirci, Betül; Gören, Nezhun; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can

    2010-01-01

    Water-distilled essential oils from aerial parts of Tanacetum argenteum ssp. argenteum and T. densum ssp. amani from Turkey were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The essential oil of T. argenteum ssp. argenteum was characterized with alpha-pinene 36.7%, beta-pinene 27.5% and 1,8-cineole 9.8%. T. densum ssp. amani was characterized with beta-pinene 27.2%, 1,8-cineole 13.1%, alpha-pinene 9.7% and p-cymene 8.9%. Antibacterial activity of the oils were evaluated for five Gram-positive and five Gram-negative bacteria by using a broth microdilution assay. The highest inhibitory activity was observed against Bacillus cereus for T. argenteum ssp. argenteum oil (125 microg/mL) when compared with positive control chloramphenicol it showed the same inhibition potency. However, the same oil showed lower inhibitory activity against B. subtilis when compared. The oil of T. densum ssp. amani did not show significant activity against the tested microorganisms. DPPH radical scavenging activity of the T. argenteum ssp. argenteum oil was investigated for 15 and 10 mg/mL concentrations. However, the oil did not show significant activity when compared to positive control alpha-tocopherol. Both oils showed toxicity to Vibrio fischeri in the TLC-bioluminescence assay.

  15. Allelopathic effects of volatile monoterpenoids produced by Salvia leucophylla: Inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in the root apical meristem of Brassica campestris seedlings.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Nami; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriko; Saito, Chieko; Sakai, Atsushi

    2005-05-01

    Salvia leucophylla, a shrub observed in coastal south California, produces several volatile monoterpenoids (camphor, 1,8-cineole, beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and camphene) that potentially act as allelochemicals. The effects of these were examined using Brassica campestris as the test plant. Camphor, 1,8-cineole, and beta-pinene inhibited germination of B. campestris seeds at high concentrations, whereas alpha-pinene and camphene did not. Root growth was inhibited by all five monoterpenoids in a dose-dependent manner, but hypocotyl growth was largely unaffected. The monoterpenoids did not alter the sizes of matured cells in either hypocotyls or roots, indicating that cell expansion is relatively insensitive to these compounds. They did not decrease the mitotic index in the shoot apical region, but specifically lowered mitotic index in the root apical meristem. Moreover, morphological and biochemical analyses on the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine into DNA demonstrated that the monoterpenoids inhibit both cell-nuclear and organelle DNA synthesis in the root apical meristem. These results suggest that the monoterpenoids produced by S. leucophylla could interfere with the growth of other plants in its vicinity through inhibition of cell proliferation in the root apical meristem.

  16. Seasonal monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Pinus taeda and Pinus virginiana

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal volatile organic compound emission data from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) were collected using branch enclosure techniques in Central North Carolina, USA. Pinus taeda monoterpene emission rates were at least ten times higher than oxyge...

  17. A REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS OF MONOTERPENE SPECIATION FROM FORESTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The monoterpene composition (emission and tissue internal concentration) of major forest tree species in the United States is discussed. Of the 14 most commonly occurring compounds ( -pinene, -pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, camphene, myrcene, -terpinenen, -phellandrene, sabin...

  18. Monoterpenes as inhibitors of digestive enzymes and counter-adaptations in a specialist avian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Pitman, Elizabeth; Robb, Brecken C; Connelly, John W; Dearing, M Denise; Forbey, Jennifer Sorensen

    2015-05-01

    Many plants produce plant secondary metabolites (PSM) that inhibit digestive enzymes of herbivores, thus limiting nutrient availability. In response, some specialist herbivores have evolved digestive enzymes that are resistant to inhibition. Monoterpenes, a class of PSMs, have not been investigated with respect to the interference of specific digestive enzymes, nor have such interactions been studied in avian herbivores. We investigated this interaction in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Phasianidae: Centrocercus urophasianus), which specializes on monoterpene-rich sagebrush species (Artemisia spp.). We first measured the monoterpene concentrations in gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. Next, we compared the ability of seven individual monoterpenes present in sagebrush to inhibit a protein-digesting enzyme, aminopeptidase-N. We also measured the inhibitory effects of PSM extracts from two sagebrush species. Inhibition of aminopeptidase-N in sage-grouse was compared to inhibition in chickens (Gallus gallus). We predicted that sage-grouse enzymes would retain higher activity when incubated with isolated monoterpenes or sagebrush extracts than chicken enzymes. We detected unchanged monoterpenes in the gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. We found that three isolated oxygenated monoterpenes (borneol, camphor, and 1,8-cineole) inhibited digestive enzymes of both bird species. Camphor and 1,8-cineole inhibited enzymes from chickens more than from sage-grouse. Extracts from both species of sagebrush had similar inhibition of chicken enzymes, but did not inhibit sage-grouse enzymes. These results suggest that specific monoterpenes may limit the protein digestibility of plant material by avian herbivores. Further, this work presents additional evidence that adaptations of digestive enzymes to plant defensive compounds may be a trait of specialist herbivores.

  19. Airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpene emissions from southeastern U.S. forests.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haofei; Guenther, Alex; Gu, Dasa; Warneke, Carsten; Geron, Chris; Goldstein, Allen; Graus, Martin; Karl, Thomas; Kaser, Lisa; Misztal, Pawel; Yuan, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Isoprene and monoterpene emission rates are essential inputs for atmospheric chemistry models that simulate atmospheric oxidant and particle distributions. Process studies of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling these emissions are advancing our understanding and the accuracy of model predictions but efforts to quantify regional emissions have been limited by a lack of constraints on regional distributions of ecosystem emission capacities. We used an airborne wavelet-based eddy covariance measurement technique to characterize isoprene and monoterpene fluxes with high spatial resolution during the 2013 SAS (Southeast Atmosphere Study) in the southeastern United States. The fluxes measured by direct eddy covariance were comparable to emissions independently estimated using an indirect inverse modeling approach. Isoprene emission factors based on the aircraft wavelet flux estimates for high isoprene chemotypes (e.g., oaks) were similar to the MEGAN2.1 biogenic emission model estimates for landscapes dominated by oaks. Aircraft flux measurement estimates for landscapes with fewer isoprene emitting trees (e.g., pine plantations), were about a factor of two lower than MEGAN2.1 model estimates. The tendency for high isoprene emitters in these landscapes to occur in the shaded understory, where light dependent isoprene emissions are diminished, may explain the lower than expected emissions. This result demonstrates the importance of accurately representing the vertical profile of isoprene emitting biomass in biogenic emission models. Airborne measurement-based emission factors for high monoterpene chemotypes agreed with MEGAN2.1 in landscapes dominated by pine (high monoterpene chemotype) trees but were more than a factor of three higher than model estimates for landscapes dominated by oak (relatively low monoterpene emitting) trees. This results suggests that unaccounted processes, such as floral emissions or light dependent monoterpene emissions, or

  20. Airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpene emissions from southeastern U.S. forests

    SciT

    Yu, Haofei; Guenther, Alex; Gu, Dasa

    Isoprene and monoterpene emission rates are essential inputs for atmospheric chemistry models that simulate atmospheric oxidant and particle distributions. Process studies of the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling these emissions are advancing our understanding and the accuracy of model predictions but efforts to quantify regional emissions have been limited by a lack of constraints on regional distributions of ecosystem emission capacities. We used an airborne wavelet-based eddy covariance measurement technique to characterize isoprene and monoterpene fluxes with high spatial resolution during the 2013 SAS (Southeast Atmosphere Study) in the southeastern United States. The fluxes measured by direct eddy covariance weremore » comparable to emissions independently estimated using an indirect inverse modeling approach. Isoprene emission factors based on the aircraft wavelet flux estimates for high isoprene chemotypes (e.g., oaks) were similar to the MEGAN2.1 biogenic emission model estimates for landscapes dominated by oaks. Aircraft flux measurement estimates for landscapes with fewer isoprene emitting trees (e.g., pine plantations), were about a factor of two lower than MEGAN2.1 model estimates. The tendency for high isoprene emitters in these landscapes to occur in the shaded understory, where light dependent isoprene emissions are diminished, may explain the lower than expected emissions. This result demonstrates the importance of accurately representing the vertical profile of isoprene emitting biomass in biogenic emission models. Airborne measurement-based emission factors for high monoterpene chemotypes agreed with MEGAN2.1 in landscapes dominated by pine (high monoterpene chemotype) trees but were more than a factor of three higher than model estimates for landscapes dominated by oak (relatively low monoterpene emitting) trees. This results suggests that unaccounted processes, such as floral emissions or light dependent monoterpene

  1. Quantitative and enantioselective analysis of monoterpenes from plant chambers and in ambient air using SPME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Custer, T.; Song, W.; Pech, F.; Kesselmeier, J.; Williams, J.

    2010-08-01

    A solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system has been developed for quantifying enantiomeric and nonenantiomeric monoterpenes in plant chamber studies and ambient air. Performance of this system was checked using a capillary diffusion system to produce monoterpene standards. The adsorption efficiency, competitive adsorption and chromatographic peak resolution of monoterpene enantiomer pairs were compared for three SPME fibre coatings: 75 μm Carboxen-PDMS (CAR-PDMS), 50/30 μm, divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS) and 65 μm divinylbenzene-polydimethyl-siloxane (DVB-PDMS). Key parameters such as the linearity and reproducibility of the SPME system have been investigated in this work. The best compromise between the enantiomeric separation of monoterpenes and competitive adsorption of the isoprenoids on the solid SPME fibre coating was found for DVB-PDMS fibres. The optimum conditions using DVB-PDMS fibres were applied to measure the exchange rates of monoterpenes in the emission of Quercus ilex using a laboratory whole plant enclosure under light and dark conditions, as well as in ambient air. With 592 and 223 ng m-2 s-1, respectively, β-myrcene and limonene were the predominant monoterpenes in the emission of Q. ilex. These values were closely comparable to those obtained using a zNose and cartridge GC-FID systems.

  2. Monoterpene 'thermometer' of tropical forest-atmosphere response to climate warming.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Kolby J; Jardine, Angela B; Holm, Jennifer A; Lombardozzi, Danica L; Negron-Juarez, Robinson I; Martin, Scot T; Beller, Harry R; Gimenez, Bruno O; Higuchi, Niro; Chambers, Jeffrey Q

    2017-03-01

    Tropical forests absorb large amounts of atmospheric CO 2 through photosynthesis but elevated temperatures suppress this absorption and promote monoterpene emissions. Using 13 CO 2 labeling, here we show that monoterpene emissions from tropical leaves derive from recent photosynthesis and demonstrate distinct temperature optima for five groups (Groups 1-5), potentially corresponding to different enzymatic temperature-dependent reaction mechanisms within β-ocimene synthases. As diurnal and seasonal leaf temperatures increased during the Amazonian 2015 El Niño event, leaf and landscape monoterpene emissions showed strong linear enrichments of β-ocimenes (+4.4% °C -1 ) at the expense of other monoterpene isomers. The observed inverse temperature response of α-pinene (-0.8% °C -1 ), typically assumed to be the dominant monoterpene with moderate reactivity, was not accurately simulated by current global emission models. Given that β-ocimenes are highly reactive with respect to both atmospheric and biological oxidants, the results suggest that highly reactive β-ocimenes may play important roles in the thermotolerance of photosynthesis by functioning as effective antioxidants within plants and as efficient atmospheric precursors of secondary organic aerosols. Thus, monoterpene composition may represent a new sensitive 'thermometer' of leaf oxidative stress and atmospheric reactivity, and therefore a new tool in future studies of warming impacts on tropical biosphere-atmosphere carbon-cycle feedbacks. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cyclic and Linear Monoterpenes in Phospholipid Membranes: Phase Behavior, Bilayer Structure, and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pham, Quoc Dat; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2015-10-13

    Monoterpenes are abundant in essential oils extracted from plants. These relatively small and hydrophobic molecules have shown important biological functions, including antimicrobial activity and membrane penetration enhancement. The interaction between the monoterpenes and lipid bilayers is considered important to the understanding of the biological functions of monoterpenes. In this study, we investigated the effect of cyclic and linear monoterpenes on the structure and dynamics of lipids in model membranes. We have studied the ternary system 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-monoterpene-water as a model with a focus on dehydrated conditions. By combining complementary techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, bilayer structure, phase transitions, and lipid molecular dynamics were investigated at different water contents. Monoterpenes cause pronounced melting point depression and phase segregation in lipid bilayers, and the extent of these effects depends on the hydration conditions. The addition of a small amount of thymol to the fluid bilayer (volume fraction of 0.03 in the bilayer) leads to an increased order in the acyl chain close to the bilayer interface. The findings are discussed in relation to biological systems and lipid formulations.

  4. A systematic review of the wound-healing effects of monoterpenes and iridoid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Rosana S S; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L C; Araújo, Adriano A S; Almeida, Jackson R G S; Santos, Márcio R V; Barreto, André S; DeSantana, Josimari M; Siqueira-Lima, Pollyana S; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2014-01-13

    The search for more effective and lower cost therapeutic approaches for wound healing remains a challenge for modern medicine. In the search for new therapeutic options, plants and their metabolites are a great source of novel biomolecules. Among their constituents, the monoterpenes represent 90% of essential oils, and have a variety of structures with several activities such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and wound healing. Based on that, and also due to the lack of reviews concerning the wound-healing activity of monoterpenes, we performed this systematic review-which provides an overview of their characteristics and mechanisms of action. In this search, the terms "terpenes", "monoterpenes", "wound healing" and "wound closure techniques" were used to retrieve articles published in LILACS, PUBMED and EMBASE until May 2013. Seven papers were found concerning the potential wound healing effect of five compouds (three monoterpenes and two iridoid derivatives) in preclinical studies. Among the products used for wound care, the films were the most studied pharmaceutical form. Monoterpenes are a class of compounds of great diversity of biological activities and therapeutic potential. The data reviewed here suggest that monoterpenes, although poorly studied in this context, are promising compounds for the treatment of chronic wound conditions.

  5. Monoterpene ‘thermometer’ of tropical forest-atmosphere response to climate warming

    SciT

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Jardine, Angela B.; Holm, Jennifer A.

    Tropical forests absorb large amounts of atmospheric CO 2 through photosynthesis but elevated temperatures suppress this absorption and promote monoterpene emissions. Using 13CO 2 labeling, in this paper we show that monoterpene emissions from tropical leaves derive from recent photosynthesis and demonstrate distinct temperature optima for five groups (Groups 1–5), potentially corresponding to different enzymatic temperature-dependent reaction mechanisms within β-ocimene synthases. As diurnal and seasonal leaf temperatures increased during the Amazonian 2015 El Niño event, leaf and landscape monoterpene emissions showed strong linear enrichments of β-ocimenes (+4.4% °C -1) at the expense of other monoterpene isomers. The observed inverse temperaturemore » response of α-pinene (-0.8% °C -1), typically assumed to be the dominant monoterpene with moderate reactivity, was not accurately simulated by current global emission models. Given that β-ocimenes are highly reactive with respect to both atmospheric and biological oxidants, the results suggest that highly reactive β-ocimenes may play important roles in the thermotolerance of photosynthesis by functioning as effective antioxidants within plants and as efficient atmospheric precursors of secondary organic aerosols. Monoterpene composition may represent a new sensitive ‘thermometer’ of leaf oxidative stress and atmospheric reactivity, and therefore a new tool in future studies of warming impacts on tropical biosphere-atmosphere carbon-cycle feedbacks.« less

  6. Monoterpene ‘thermometer’ of tropical forest-atmosphere response to climate warming

    DOE PAGES

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Jardine, Angela B.; Holm, Jennifer A.; ...

    2016-12-11

    Tropical forests absorb large amounts of atmospheric CO 2 through photosynthesis but elevated temperatures suppress this absorption and promote monoterpene emissions. Using 13CO 2 labeling, in this paper we show that monoterpene emissions from tropical leaves derive from recent photosynthesis and demonstrate distinct temperature optima for five groups (Groups 1–5), potentially corresponding to different enzymatic temperature-dependent reaction mechanisms within β-ocimene synthases. As diurnal and seasonal leaf temperatures increased during the Amazonian 2015 El Niño event, leaf and landscape monoterpene emissions showed strong linear enrichments of β-ocimenes (+4.4% °C -1) at the expense of other monoterpene isomers. The observed inverse temperaturemore » response of α-pinene (-0.8% °C -1), typically assumed to be the dominant monoterpene with moderate reactivity, was not accurately simulated by current global emission models. Given that β-ocimenes are highly reactive with respect to both atmospheric and biological oxidants, the results suggest that highly reactive β-ocimenes may play important roles in the thermotolerance of photosynthesis by functioning as effective antioxidants within plants and as efficient atmospheric precursors of secondary organic aerosols. Monoterpene composition may represent a new sensitive ‘thermometer’ of leaf oxidative stress and atmospheric reactivity, and therefore a new tool in future studies of warming impacts on tropical biosphere-atmosphere carbon-cycle feedbacks.« less

  7. Tree water relations can trigger monoterpene emissions from Scots pine stems during spring recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, A.; Chan, T.; Aalto, J.; Korhonen, J. F.; Kolari, P.; Hölttä, T.; Nikinmaa, E.; Bäck, J.

    2015-09-01

    Tree canopies are known to emit large amounts of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) such as monoterpenes into the surrounding air. High VOC emission rates from boreal forests have been observed during the transition from winter to summer activity. The most important sources of these are considered to be the green foliage, understory vegetation and soil organisms, but emissions from the living stand woody compartments have so far not been quantified. We analyzed whether the non-foliar components could partially explain the springtime high emission rates. We measured the monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stem and shoots during the dehardening phase of trees in field conditions in two consecutive springs. We observed a large, transient monoterpene burst from the stem, while the shoot monoterpene emissions remained low. The burst lasted about 12 h. Simultaneously, an unusual nighttime sap flow and a non-systematic diurnal pattern of tree diameter were detected. Hence, we suggest that the monoterpene burst was a consequence of the recovery of the stem from wintertime, and likely related to the refilling of embolized tracheids and/or phenological changes in the living cells of the stem. This indicates that the dominant processes and environmental drivers triggering the monoterpene emissions are different between the stem and the foliage.

  8. Quantitative and enantioselective analysis of monoterpenes from plant chambers and in ambient air using SPME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Custer, T.; Song, W.; Pech, F.; Kesselmeier, J.; Williams, J.

    2010-11-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system has been developed for quantifying enantiomeric and nonenantiomeric monoterpenes in plant chamber studies and ambient air. Performance of this system was checked using a capillary diffusion system to produce monoterpene standards. The adsorption efficiency, competitive adsorption and chromatographic peak resolution of monoterpene enantiomer pairs were compared for three SPME fibre coatings: 75 μm Carboxen-PDMS (CAR-PDMS), 50/30 μm divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS) and 65 μm divinylbenzene-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-PDMS). Key parameters such as the linearity and reproducibility of the SPME system have been investigated in this work. The best compromise between the enantiomeric separation of monoterpenes and competitive adsorption of the isoprenoids on the solid SPME fibre coating was found for DVB-PDMS fibres. The optimum conditions using DVB-PDMS fibres were applied to measure the exchange rates of monoterpenes in the emission of Quercus ilex using a laboratory whole plant enclosure under light and dark conditions, as well as in ambient air. With 592 and 223 ng m-2 s-1 respectively, β-myrcene and limonene were the predominant monoterpenes in the emission of Q. ilex. These values were closely comparable to those obtained using a zNose and cartridge GC-FID systems.

  9. Effects of soil water content and elevated CO2 concentration on the monoterpene emission rate of Cryptomeria japonica.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Amagai, Takashi; Tani, Akira

    2018-09-01

    Monoterpenes emitted from plants contribute to the formation of secondary pollution and affect the climate system. Monoterpene emission rates may be affected by environmental changes such as increasing CO 2 concentration caused by fossil fuel burning and drought stress induced by climate change. We measured monoterpene emissions from Cryptomeria japonica clone saplings grown under different CO 2 concentrations (control: ambient CO 2 level, elevated CO 2 : 1000μmolmol -1 ). The saplings were planted in the ground and we did not artificially control the SWC. The relationship between the monoterpene emissions and naturally varying SWC was investigated. The dominant monoterpene was α-pinene, followed by sabinene. The monoterpene emission rates were exponentially correlated with temperature for all measurements and normalized (35°C) for each measurement day. The daily normalized monoterpene emission rates (E s0.10 ) were positively and linearly correlated with SWC under both control and elevated CO 2 conditions (control: r 2 =0.55, elevated CO 2 : r 2 =0.89). The slope of the regression line of E s0.10 against SWC was significantly higher under elevated CO 2 than under control conditions (ANCOVA: P<0.01), indicating that the effect of CO 2 concentration on monoterpene emission rates differed by soil water status. The monoterpene emission rates estimated by considering temperature and SWC (Improved G93 algorithm) better agreed with the measured monoterpene emission rates, when compared with the emission rates estimated by considering temperature alone (G93 algorithm). Our results demonstrated that the combined effects of SWC and CO 2 concentration are important for controlling the monoterpene emissions from C. japonica clone saplings. If these relationships can be applied to the other coniferous tree species, our results may be useful to improve accuracy of monoterpene emission estimates from the coniferous forests as affected by climate change in the present and

  10. A new bioactive monoterpene-flavonoid from Satureja khuzistanica.

    PubMed

    Malmir, Maryam; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Silva, Olga

    2015-09-01

    A new monoterpene-flavonoid, saturejin (3'-(2,5-dihydroxy-p-cymene) 5,7,4'-trihydroxy flavone) (4), together with twelve known flavonoids consist of two flavanonols (aromadendrin (8) and taxifolin (12)), two flavanones (naringenin (3) and 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy flavanone (9)) and eight flavones (xanthomicrol (1), acacetin (2), cirsimaritin (5), 7-methoxy luteolin (6), apigenin (7), cirsilineol (10), diosmetin (11) and 6-hydroxyluteolin 7,3'-dimethyl ether (13)), were isolated from an ethyl acetate extract and identified for the first time in the dried aerial parts of Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad, an endemic medicinal plant traditionally used as dental anesthetic, oral antiseptic and anti-inflammatory among the nomadic inhabitants of southwestern Iran. The structures of these compounds were determined using the usual spectroscopic methods including 2D-NMR and MS analyses. Saturejin showed a significant β-glucosidase inhibitory activity at concentration of 10 μg as well as positive antioxidant activity at the amount of 1 μg. These results could be correlated with the in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-diabetic properties reported from this medicinal plant. Similar activities were also described for some of the other isolated compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antifungal Monoterpene Derivatives from the Plant Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis foedan.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhang, Bing-Yang; Yang, Xiao-Long

    2016-10-01

    A new monoterpene lactone, (1R,4R,5R,8S)-8-hydroxy-4,8-dimethyl-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-3-one (1), along with one related known compound, (2R)-2-[(1R)-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]propanoic acid (2), were isolated from the liquid culture of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis foedan obtained from the branch of Bruguiera sexangula. The structure and absolute configuration of 1 were determined on the basis of extensive analysis of NMR spectra combined with computational methods via calculation of the optical rotation (OR) and 13 C-NMR. Both compounds exhibited strong antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora nicotianae with MIC values of 3.1 and 6.3 μg/ml, respectively, which are comparable to those of the known antifungal drug ketoconazole. Compound 2 also showed modest antifungal activity against Candida albicans with a MIC value of 50 μg/ml. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  12. Suppression of new particle formation from monoterpene oxidation by NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, J.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Andres, S.; Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Müsgen, P.; Rohrer, F.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2013-10-01

    The impact of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) on new particle formation (NPF) and on photochemical ozone production from real plant volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions was studied in a laboratory set up. At high NOx conditions (BVOC/NOx < 7, NOx > 23 ppb) no new particles were formed. Instead photochemical ozone formation was observed resulting in higher hydroxyl radical (OH) and lower nitrogen monoxide (NO) concentrations. As soon as [NO] was reduced to below 1 ppb by OH reactions, NPF was observed. Adding high amounts of NOx caused NPF orders of magnitude slower than in analogous experiments at low NOx conditions (NOx ~ 300 ppt), although OH concentrations were higher. Varying NO2 photolysis enabled showing that NO was responsible for suppression of NPF suggesting that peroxy radicals are involved in NPF. The rates of NPF and photochemical ozone production were related by power law dependence with an exponent of approximately -2. This exponent indicated that the overall peroxy radical concentration must have been the same whenever NPF appeared. Thus permutation reactions of first generation peroxy radicals cannot be the rate limiting step in NPF from monoterpene oxidation. It was concluded that permutation reactions of higher generation peroxy radical like molecules limit the rate of new particle formation. In contrast to the strong effects on the particle numbers, the formation of particle mass was less sensitive to NOx concentrations, if at all. Only at very high NOx concentrations yields were reduced by about an order of magnitude.

  13. Suppression of new particle formation from monoterpene oxidation by NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, J.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Andres, S.; Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Müsgen, P.; Rohrer, F.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2014-03-01

    The impact of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) on new particle formation (NPF) and on photochemical ozone production from real plant volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions was studied in a laboratory setup. At high NOx conditions ([BVOC] / [NOx] < 7, [NOx] > 23 ppb) new particle formation was suppressed. Instead, photochemical ozone formation was observed resulting in higher hydroxyl radical (OH) and lower nitrogen monoxide (NO) concentrations. When [NO] was reduced back to levels below 1 ppb by OH reactions, NPF was observed. Adding high amounts of NOx caused NPF to be slowed by orders of magnitude compared to analogous experiments at low NOx conditions ([NOx] ~300 ppt), although OH concentrations were higher. Varying NO2 photolysis enabled showing that NO was responsible for suppression of NPF. This suggests that peroxy radicals are involved in NPF. The rates of NPF and photochemical ozone production were related by power law dependence with an exponent approaching -2. This exponent indicated that the overall peroxy radical concentration must have been similar when NPF occurred. Thus, permutation reactions of first-generation peroxy radicals cannot be the rate limiting step in NPF from monoterpene oxidation. It was concluded that permutation reactions of higher generation peroxy-radical-like intermediates limit the rate of new particle formation. In contrast to the strong effects on the particle numbers, the formation of particle mass was substantially less sensitive to NOx concentrations. If at all, yields were reduced by about an order of magnitude only at very high NOx concentrations.

  14. Monoterpenes released from fruit, plant, and vegetable systems.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad Asif; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Ahn, Jeong Hyeon

    2014-09-29

    To quantify the emission rate of monoterpenes (MTs) from diverse natural sources, the sorbent tube (ST)-thermal desorption (TD) method was employed to conduct the collection and subsequent detection of MTs by gas chromatography. The calibration of MTs, when made by both mass spectrometric (MS) and flame ionization detector (FID), consistently exhibited high coefficient of determination values (R2 > 0.99). This approach was employed to measure their emission rate from different fruit/plant/vegetable (F/P/V) samples with the aid of an impinger-based dynamic headspace sampling system. The results obtained from 10 samples (consisting of carrot, pine needle (P. sylvestris), tangerine, tangerine peel, strawberry, sepals of strawberry, plum, apple, apple peel, and orange juice) marked α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, R-limonene, γ-terpinene, and p-cymene as the most common MTs. R-limonene was the major species emitted from citrus fruits and beverages with its abundance exceeding 90%. In contrast, α-pinene was the most abundant MT (37%) for carrot, while it was myrcene (31%) for pine needle. The overall results for F/P/V samples confirmed α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, and γ-terpinene as common MTs. Nonetheless, the types and magnitude of MTs released from fruits were distinguished from those of vegetables and plants.

  15. The monoterpene limonene in orange peels attracts pests and microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ana; Andrés, Victoria San; Cervera, Magdalena; Redondo, Ana; Alquézar, Berta; Shimada, Takehiko; Gadea, José; Rodrigo, María; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Palou, Lluís; López, María M.; Castañera, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2011-01-01

    Plant volatiles include terpenoids, which are generally involved in plant defense, repelling pests and pathogens and attracting insects for herbivore control, pollination and seed dispersal. Orange fruits accumulate the monoterpene limonene at high levels in the oil glands of their fruit peels. When limonene production was downregulated in orange fruits by the transgenic expression of a limonene synthase (CitMTSE1) in the antisense configuration, these fruits were resistant to the fungus Penicillium digitatum (Pers.) Sacc. and the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and were less attractive to the medfly pest Ceratitis capitata. These responses were reversed when the antisense transgenic orange fruits were treated with limonene. To gain more insight into the role of the limonene concentration in fruit responses to pests and pathogens, we attempted to overexpress CitMTSE1 in the sense configuration in transgenic orange fruits. Only slight increases in the amount of limonene were found in sense transgenic fruits, maybe due to the detrimental effect that excessive limonene accumulation would have on plant development. Collectively, these results suggest that when limonene reaches peak levels as the fruit develops, it becomes a signal for pest and pathogen attraction, which facilitate access to the fruit for pulp consumers and seed dispersers. PMID:22212123

  16. Structure elucidation and absolute stereochemistry of isomeric monoterpene chromane esters.

    PubMed

    Batista, João M; Batista, Andrea N L; Mota, Jonas S; Cass, Quezia B; Kato, Massuo J; Bolzani, Vanderlan S; Freedman, Teresa B; López, Silvia N; Furlan, Maysa; Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-04-15

    Six novel monoterpene chromane esters were isolated from the aerial parts of Peperomia obtusifolia (Piperaceae) using chiral chromatography. This is the first time that chiral chromane esters of this kind, ones with a tethered chiral terpene, have been isolated in nature. Due to their structural features, it is not currently possible to assess directly their absolute stereochemistry using any of the standard classical approaches, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR, optical rotation, or electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Herein we report the absolute configuration of these molecules, involving four chiral centers, using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP/6-31G*) calculations. This work further reinforces the capability of VCD to determine unambiguously the absolute configuration of structurally complex molecules in solution, without crystallization or derivatization, and demonstrates the sensitivity of VCD to specify the absolute configuration for just one among a number of chiral centers. We also demonstrate the sufficiency of using the so-called inexpensive basis set 6-31G* compared to the triple-ζ basis set TZVP for absolute configuration analysis of larger molecules using VCD. Overall, this work extends our knowledge of secondary metabolites in plants and provides a straightforward way to determine the absolute configuration of complex natural products involving a chiral parent moiety combined with a chiral terpene adduct.

  17. Global isoprene and monoterpene emissions under changing climate, vegetation, CO2 and land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantson, Stijn; Knorr, Wolfgang; Schurgers, Guy; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Arneth, Almut

    2017-04-01

    Plants emit large quantities of isoprene and monoterpenes, the main components of global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. BVOCs have an important impact on the atmospheric composition of methane, and of short-lived radiative forcing agents (e.g. ozone, aerosols etc.). It is therefore necessary to know how isoprene and monoterpene emissions have changed over the past and how future changes in climate, land-use and other factors will impact them. Here we present emission estimates of isoprene and monoterpenes over the period 1901-2 100 based on the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, including the effects of all known important drivers. We find that both isoprene and monoterpene emissions at the beginning of the 20th century were higher than at present. While anthropogenic land-use change largely drives the global decreasing trend for isoprene over the 20th century, changes in natural vegetation composition caused a decreasing trend for monoterpene emissions. Future global isoprene and monoterpene emissions depend strongly on the climate and land-use scenarios considered. Over the 21st century, global isoprene emissions are simulated to either remain stable (RCP 4.5), or decrease further (RCP 8.5), with important differences depending on the underlying land-use scenario. Future monoterpene emissions are expected to continue their present decreasing trend for all scenarios, possibly stabilizing from 2050 onwards (RCP 4.5). These results demonstrate the importance to take both natural vegetation dynamics and anthropogenic changes in land-use into account when estimating past and future BVOC emissions. They also indicate that a future global increase in BVOC emissions is improbable.

  18. Composition and enantiomeric analysis of the essential oil of the fruits and the leaves of Pistacia vera from Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsokou, Anastasia; Georgopoulou, Katerina; Melliou, Eleni; Magiatis, Prokopios; Tsitsa, Eugenia

    2007-06-30

    The essential oils of the fruits and the leaves of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Fresh unripe pistachio fruits were richer in essential oil (0.5%, w/w) than the leaves (0.1%, w/w). Twenty one compounds were identified in the essential oil of the fruits and the major components were (+)-alpha-pinene (54.6%) and terpinolene (31.2%). The enantiomeric ratio of the major constituents of the essential oil of the fruits was determined using chiral GC/MS and it was found that the (+)/(-)-alpha-pinene ratio was 99.5:0.5, (+)/(-)-limonene 80:20, (+)/(-)-beta-pinene 96:4, and (+)/(-)-alpha-terpineol 0:100. Thirty three compounds were identified in the essential oil of the leaves and the major components were found to be alpha-pinene (30.0%), terpinolene (17.6%) and bornyl acetate (11.3%).

  19. The oxygen-independent metabolism of cyclic monoterpenes in Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The facultatively anaerobic betaproteobacterium Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen utilizes acyclic, monocyclic and bicyclic monoterpenes as sole carbon source under oxic as well as anoxic conditions. A biotransformation pathway of the acyclic β-myrcene required linalool dehydratase-isomerase as initial enzyme acting on the hydrocarbon. An in-frame deletion mutant did not use myrcene, but was able to grow on monocyclic monoterpenes. The genome sequence and a comparative proteome analysis together with a random transposon mutagenesis were conducted to identify genes involved in the monocyclic monoterpene metabolism. Metabolites accumulating in cultures of transposon and in-frame deletion mutants disclosed the degradation pathway. Results Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen oxidizes the monocyclic monoterpene limonene at the primary methyl group forming perillyl alcohol. The genome of 3.95 Mb contained a 70 kb genome island coding for over 50 proteins involved in the monoterpene metabolism. This island showed higher homology to genes of another monoterpene-mineralizing betaproteobacterium, Thauera terpenica 58EuT, than to genomes of the family Alcaligenaceae, which harbors the genus Castellaniella. A collection of 72 transposon mutants unable to grow on limonene contained 17 inactivated genes, with 46 mutants located in the two genes ctmAB (cyclic terpene metabolism). CtmA and ctmB were annotated as FAD-dependent oxidoreductases and clustered together with ctmE, a 2Fe-2S ferredoxin gene, and ctmF, coding for a NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Transposon mutants of ctmA, B or E did not grow aerobically or anaerobically on limonene, but on perillyl alcohol. The next steps in the pathway are catalyzed by the geraniol dehydrogenase GeoA and the geranial dehydrogenase GeoB, yielding perillic acid. Two transposon mutants had inactivated genes of the monoterpene ring cleavage (mrc) pathway. 2-Methylcitrate synthase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase were also essential

  20. Differences in Monoterpene Biosynthesis and Accumulation in Pistacia palaestina Leaves and Aphid-Induced Galls.

    PubMed

    Rand, Karin; Bar, Einat; Ari, Matan Ben; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Dudareva, Natalia; Inbar, Moshe; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2017-02-01

    Certain insect species can induce gall formation on numerous plants species. Although the mechanism of gall development is largely unknown, it is clear that insects manipulate their hosts' anatomy, physiology, and chemistry for their own benefit. It is well known that insect-induced galls often contain vast amounts of plant defensive compounds as compared to non-colonized tissues, but it is not clear if defensive compounds can be produced in situ in the galled tissues. To answer this question, we analyzed terpene accumulation patterns and possible independent biosynthetic potential of galls induced by the aphid Baizongia pistaciae L. on the terminal buds of Pistacia palaestina Boiss. We compared monoterpene levels and monoterpene synthase enzyme activity in galls and healthy leaves from individual trees growing in a natural setting. At all developmental stages, monoterpene content and monoterpene synthase activity were consistently (up to 10 fold on a fresh weight basis) higher in galls than in intact non-colonized leaves. A remarkable tree to tree variation in the products produced in vitro from the substrate geranyl diphosphate by soluble protein extracts derived from individual trees was observed. Furthermore, galls and leaves from the same trees displayed enhanced and often distinct biosynthetic capabilities. Our results clearly indicate that galls possess independent metabolic capacities to produce and accumulate monoterpenes as compared to leaves. Our study indicates that galling aphids manipulate the enzymatic machinery of their host plant, intensifying their own defenses against natural enemies.

  1. Drought and soil amendment effects on monoterpene emission in rosemary plants.

    PubMed

    Nogués, I; Muzzini, V; Loreto, F; Bustamante, M A

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work was to study the changes during 15days in the monoterpene emission rates of the Mediterranean shrub rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), in response to increasing drought stress and fertilisation using two different composts derived from livestock anaerobic digestates (cattle and pig slurry). Drought stress considerably reduced photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance and isoprenoid emissions and also induced a change in blend composition. In the drought stressed rosemary plants, a positive relationship of non-oxygenated monoterpene emissions and a negative relationship of oxygenated monoterpene with photosynthesis were observed, indicating a different control mechanism over the emissions of the two types of isoprenoids. The emission of non-oxygenated monoterpenes seemed to depend more on photosynthesis and "de novo" synthesis, whereas emission of oxygenate monoterpenes was more dependent on volatilisation from storage, mainly driven by cumulative temperatures. In the short term, the addition of composted organic materials to the soil did not induce a significant effect on isoprenoid emission rates in the rosemary plants. However, the effect of the interaction between fertilisation and seasonality on isoprenoid emission rates was influenced by the amendment origin. Also, we emphasized changes in potential isoprenoid emission factors throughout the experiment, probably indicating changes in the leaf developmental stage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Basin-scale observations of isoprene and monoterpenes in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, L.; Hackenberg, S.; Andrews, S.; Minaeian, J.; Chance, R.; Arnold, S.; Spracklen, D. V.; Walker, H.; Brewin, R. J.; Tarran, G.; Tilstone, G.; Small, A.; Bouman, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    We report surface ocean concentrations, atmospheric mixing ratios and calculated sea-to-air fluxes of isoprene and six monoterpenes (α- and β-pinene, myrcene, Δ 3-carene, ocimene, and limonene) spanning approximately 130 degrees of latitude (80 °N- 50 °S) in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. Oceanic isoprene concentrations showed covariance with a number of concurrently monitored biological parameters, and these relationships were dependent on sea surface temperatures. Parameterisations of isoprene seawater concentrations based on linear regression analyses of these relationships perform well for Arctic and Atlantic data. Levels of all monoterpenes were generally low, with oceanic concentrations ranging from below the detection limit of <1 pmol L-1 to 5 pmol L-1 . In air, monoterpene mixing ratios varied from below the detection limit ( 1 pptv) to 5 pptv, after careful filtering for ship-related contamination. Unlike in previous studies, no clear trends or relationships of the monoterpenes with biological data were found. Limonene showed generally the highest levels in water (up to 84 pmol L-1 in the Atlantic Ocean) and air; however this was attributed mostly to shipborne contamination. We calculate global sea-air fluxes of isoprene and monoterpenes based on this data and compare to previous estimates.

  3. Allelopathic Monoterpenes Interfere with Arabidopsis thaliana Cuticular Waxes and Enhance Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Kussmann, Petra; Knop, Mona; Kriegs, Bettina; Gresens, Frank; Eichert, Thomas; Ulbrich, Andreas; Marx, Friedhelm; Fabricius, Heinz; Goldbach, Heiner; Noga, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to the allelopathic monoterpenes camphor (100 mg/10 L) and menthol (50 mg/10 L) for 24 h enhanced transpiration of Arabidopsis thaliana fully developed rosette leaves similar to de-waxing. As ascertained by ESEM analyses the leaf surfaces were spotted with platelet like structures which seem to be partly mixed with the lipophilic epicuticular layers. The structures are supposed to contain the condensed monoterpenes, which could be identified by GC. Long term exposure (more than 48 h) to 100 mg/50 mg killed the plants by desiccation, a 24 h exposure caused necrotic spots that became visible one to two days after the treatment. Examinations of the stomatal apertures indicated that monoterpenes induced stomatal opening followed by extreme swelling and a final break down of the protoplasts. Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to volatiles of Mentha piperita, Lavandula latifolia and Artemisia camphorata resulted in a dramatic increase of the stomata aperture but swelling of the protoplasts was less exhibited. In contrast to de-waxing, expression of the fatty acid condensing enzyme encoding CER6 gene and de novo synthesis of CER6 protein was not induced after 24 h of exposure to the monoterpenes. The aim of the study was to demonstrate that the lipophilic layers of the leaf surface and the stomata are primary targets of monoterpene allelopathic attack. Enhanced transpiration results from a combination of affected lipophilic wax layers and a disturbed stomata function. PMID:19516993

  4. Repellence produced by monoterpenes on Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) decreases after continuous exposure to these compounds.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Alejandra; Sfara, Valeria; Alzogaray, Raúl Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Botanical monoterpenes are secondary metabolites present in essential oils produced by plants. Some of them are insect repellents. The bloodsucking bug Rhodnius prolixus Ståhl (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) is one of the main vectors of Chagas disease in the north of South America and some countries in Central America. In this study, we studied the repellence produced by two monoterpenes, menthyl acetate and geraniol, on fifth instar nymphs of R. prolixus. In the absence of other stimuli, both menthyl acetate and geraniol produced a repellent effect from 740 μg/cm(2) and 74 μg/cm(2), respectively. Pre-exposure to each monoterpene reduced the repellent activity produced by the same substance. Additionally, pre-exposure to one monoterpene decreased the behavioral response of the nymphs to the other one. The repellent effect of both monoterpenes also decreased when nymphs' antennae were previously treated with the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-cysteine. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  5. Repellence Produced by Monoterpenes on Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Decreases After Continuous Exposure to These Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Alejandra; Sfara, Valeria; Alzogaray, Raúl Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Botanical monoterpenes are secondary metabolites present in essential oils produced by plants. Some of them are insect repellents. The bloodsucking bug Rhodnius prolixus Ståhl (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) is one of the main vectors of Chagas disease in the north of South America and some countries in Central America. In this study, we studied the repellence produced by two monoterpenes, menthyl acetate and geraniol, on fifth instar nymphs of R. prolixus . In the absence of other stimuli, both menthyl acetate and geraniol produced a repellent effect from 740 μg/cm 2 and 74 μg/cm 2 , respectively. Pre-exposure to each monoterpene reduced the repellent activity produced by the same substance. Additionally, pre-exposure to one monoterpene decreased the behavioral response of the nymphs to the other one. The repellent effect of both monoterpenes also decreased when nymphs’ antennae were previously treated with the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-cysteine. PMID:25525113

  6. Treatment of gaseous alpha-pinene by a combined system containing photo oxidation and aerobic biotrickling filtration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo-Wei; Zhang, Li-Li; Chen, Jian-Meng; Yu, Jian-Ming; Gao, Zeng-Liang; Jiang, Yi-Feng

    2011-09-15

    Biofiltration of hydrophobic and/or recalcitrant volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited. In the present study, a combined ultraviolet-biotrickling filter (UV-BTF) was developed to improve the removal of these compounds, and a single BTF as the control was operated under the same conditions. The experimental results showed that the UV-BTF provided higher removal efficiencies than the single BTF at an inlet concentration range of 600-1500 mg m(-3) under shorter residence times. The maximum elimination capacities (ECs) obtained were 94.2 mg m(-3)h(-1) and 44 mg m(-3)h(-1) in the combined UV-BTF and single BTF, respectively. The mass ratio of carbon dioxide produced to α-pinene removed in the UV-BTF was approximately 2.74, which was much higher than that of the single BTF (1.99). Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis indicated that there was more complicated microbial community in the UV-BTF than that in the single BTF. In addition, we investigated the effect of starvation or stagnation on re-acclimation and removal performance from an engineering standpoint. The results showed that the combined UV-BTF could deal with fluctuating conditions or periods without any flow (air or liquid) supply much better than the single BTF. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Monoterpene derivatives with anti-allergic activity from red peony root, the root of Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Shu; Ge, Yue-Wei; He, Yu-Min; Kazuma, Kohei; Wang, Zhengtao; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2016-01-01

    The methanolic extract and its subfractions from red peony root, the dried roots of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas showed potent antiallergic effects, as inhibition of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated degranulation in rat basophil leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of 16 monoterpene derivatives, including 3 new compounds, paeoniflorol (1), 4'-hydroxypaeoniflorigenone (2) and 4-epi-albiflorin (3), together with 13 known ones (4-16). The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidences. Among the isolated monoterpene derivatives, nine compounds showed potent anti-allergic effects and compound 1 was the most effective. A primary structure-activity relationship of monoterpene derivatives was discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased and Altered Fragrance of Tobacco Plants after Metabolic Engineering Using Three Monoterpene Synthases from Lemon

    PubMed Central

    Lücker, Joost; Schwab, Wilfried; van Hautum, Bianca; Blaas, Jan; van der Plas, Linus H. W.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Verhoeven, Harrie A.

    2004-01-01

    Wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants emit low levels of terpenoids, particularly from the flowers. By genetic modification of tobacco cv Petit Havana SR1 using three different monoterpene synthases from lemon (Citrus limon L. Burm. f.) and the subsequent combination of these three into one plant by crossings, we show that it is possible to increase the amount and alter the composition of the blend of monoterpenoids produced in tobacco plants. The transgenic tobacco plant line with the three introduced monoterpene synthases is emitting β-pinene, limonene, and γ-terpinene and a number of side products of the introduced monoterpene synthases, from its leaves and flowers, in addition to the terpenoids emitted by wild-type plants. The results show that there is a sufficiently high level of substrate accessible for the introduced enzymes. PMID:14718674

  9. An overview of the pharmacological properties and potential applications of natural monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Kozioł, Agata; Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Librowski, Tadeusz; Sałat, Kinga; Gaweł, Magdalena; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Monoterpenes, the major components of essential oils, belong to the group of isoprenoids containing ten carbon atoms. Being widely distributed in the plant kingdom they are extensively used in cuisine and human health care products. Studies have shown that both natural monoterpenes and their synthetic derivatives are endowed with various pharmacological properties including antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, anticancer, antiarrhythmic, anti-aggregating, local anesthetic, antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, antihistaminic and anti-spasmodic activities. Monoterpenes act also as regulators of growth, heat, transpiration, tumor inhibitors, inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, insect repellants, feline and canine attractants and antidiabetics. These interesting activities which might be potentially used not only in pharmaceutical, but also food and cosmetic industries are discussed below.

  10. Toxicity of Monoterpene Structure, Diversity and Concentration to Mountain Pine Beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae: Beetle Traits Matter More.

    PubMed

    Reid, Mary L; Sekhon, Jagdeep K; LaFramboise, Lanielle M

    2017-04-01

    A high diversity of plant defenses may be a response to herbivore diversity or may be collectively more toxic than single compounds, either of which may be important for understanding insect-plant associations. Monoterpenes in conifers are particularly diverse. We tested the fumigant toxicity of four monoterpenes, alone and in combination, to mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae, in the context of the beetles' individual body traits. Chemical structures of tested monoterpene hydrocarbons had modest effects on beetle survival, mass loss, water content and fat content, with (R)-(+)-limonene tending to be more toxic than (-)-α-pinene, (-)-β-pinene, and (+)-3-carene. Monoterpene diversity (all qualitative combinations of one to four monoterpenes) did not affect toxicity. Concentration (0 to 1200 ppm) of individual monoterpenes was a strong determinant of toxicity. Beetle body size and body condition index strongly and positively affected survival during monoterpene treatments. Larger beetles in better condition lost proportionally less mass during exposure, where proportion mass loss negatively affected survivorship. Toxicity was much more associated with water loss than with fat loss, suggesting that a main cost of detoxification is excretion, a process that has received little attention. These results provide insight into the determinants of beetle success in historic and novel hosts that differ in monoterpene composition and concentration. We also suggest that water availability will affect beetle success directly through their ability to tolerate detoxification as well as indirectly through host responses to drought.

  11. Impact of drought stress on specialised metabolism: Biosynthesis and the expression of monoterpene synthases in sage (Salvia officinalis).

    PubMed

    Radwan, Alzahraa; Kleinwächter, Maik; Selmar, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    In previous experiments, we demonstrated that the amount of monoterpenes in sage is increased massively by drought stress. Our current study is aimed to elucidate whether this increase is due, at least in part, to elevated activity of the monoterpene synthases responsible for the biosynthesis of essential oils in sage. Accordingly, the transcription rates of the monoterpene synthases were analyzed. Salvia officinalis plants were cultivated under moderate drought stress. The concentrations of monoterpenes as well as the expression of the monoterpene synthases were analyzed. The amount of monoterpenes massively increased in response to drought stress; it doubled after just two days of drought stress. The observed changes in monoterpene content mostly match with the patterns of monoterpene synthase expressions. The expression of bornyl diphosphate synthase was strongly up-regulated; its maximum level was reached after two days. Sabinene synthase increased gradually and reached a maximum after two weeks. In contrast, the transcript level of cineole synthase continuously declined. This study revealed that the stress related increase of biosynthesis is not only due to a "passive" shift caused by the stress related over-reduced status, but also is due - at least in part-to an "active" up-regulation of the enzymes involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Co-expression of peppermint geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit enhances monoterpene production in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Lin; Wong, Woon-Seng; Jang, In-Cheol; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2017-02-01

    Monoterpenes are important for plant survival and useful to humans. In addition to their function in plant defense, monoterpenes are also used as flavors, fragrances and medicines. Several metabolic engineering strategies have been explored to produce monoterpene in tobacco but only trace amounts of monoterpenes have been detected. We investigated the effects of Solanum lycopersicum 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (SlDXS), Arabidopsis thaliana geranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (AtGPS) and Mentha × piperita geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit (MpGPS.SSU) on production of monoterpene and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) diversities, and plant morphology by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and overexpression in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. We showed that MpGPS.SSU could enhance the production of various monoterpenes such as (-)-limonene, (-)-linalool, (-)-α-pinene/β-pinene or myrcene, in transgenic tobacco by elevating geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPS) activity. In addition, overexpression of MpGPS.SSU in tobacco caused early flowering phenotype and increased shoot branching by elevating contents of GA 3 and cytokinins due to upregulated transcript levels of several plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway genes, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases 3 (GGPPS3) and GGPPS4. Our method would allow the identification of new monoterpene synthase genes using transient expression in N. benthamiana and the improvement of monoterpene production in transgenic tobacco plants. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Effects of monoterpenes on mortality, growth, fecundity, and ovarian development of Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    El-Minshawy, Abdelaziz M; Abdelgaleil, Samir A M; Gadelhak, Gadelhak G; Al-Eryan, Mohamed A; Rabab, Rafiaa A

    2018-06-01

    The peach fruit fly (PFF), Bactrocera zonata, is a serious insect pest infesting fruits and vegetables. The insecticidal activity of three monoterpenes, namely, (R)-camphor, (R)-carvone, and (1R,2S,5R)-menthol, was evaluated on the second-instar larvae of B. zonata. In addition, the latent effects of monoterpenes on pupation, adult emergence, deformation, oviposition, adult longevity, and ovarian development were also examined. The three tested monoterpenes showed pronounced insecticidal activity against B. zonata larvae with (R)-carvone being the most potent toxicant. When the second-instar larvae of B. zonata were treated with monoterpenes at concentrations of 20, 50, and 70 mg/kg for 72 h, significant reduction in pupation and adult emergence was observed. The three monoterpenes caused complete suppression of adult emergence at 100 mg/kg. Moreover, monoterpenes induced complete inhibition of egg deposition at all tested concentrations. Some adult deformations were also noticed at 20, 50, and 70 mg/kg. However, (R)-carvone was more effective than (1R,2S,5R)-menthol and (R)-camphor on the examined biological parameters. On the other hand, histological examination of the ovaries of emerged females from larvae that fed on diet treated with (R)-carvone, (1R,2S,5R)-menthol, and (R)-camphor at 20 and 50 mg/L indicated that both concentrations caused retardation in the development of ovarioles. It is clear that all the egg chambers are empty; the germarium region is constricted at base due to the failure of oocyte formation. Many vacant spaces were present between ovarioles.

  14. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl as a screening tool for recombinant monoterpene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Behrendorff, James Byh; Vickers, Claudia E; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Nielsen, Lars K

    2013-08-23

    Monoterpenes are a class of natural C10 compounds with a range of potential applications including use as fuel additives, fragrances, and chemical feedstocks. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes in heterologous systems is yet to reach commercially-viable levels, and therefore is the subject of strain engineering and fermentation optimization studies. Detection of monoterpenes typically relies on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; this represents a significant analytical bottleneck which limits the potential to analyse combinatorial sets of conditions. To address this, we developed a high-throughput method for pre-screening monoterpene biosynthesis. An optimised DPPH assay was developed for detecting monoterpenes from two-phase microbial cultures using dodecane as the extraction solvent. The assay was useful for reproducible qualitative ranking of monoterpene concentrations, and detected standard preparations of myrcene and γ-terpinene dissolved in dodecane at concentrations as low as 10 and 15 μM, respectively, and limonene as low as 200 μM. The assay could not be used quantitatively due to technical difficulties in capturing the initial reaction rate in a multi-well plate and the presence of minor DPPH-reactive contaminants. Initially, limonene biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tested using two different limonene synthase enzymes and three medium compositions. The assay indicated that limonene biosynthesis was enhanced in a supplemented YP medium and that the Citrus limon limonene synthase (CLLS) was more effective than the Mentha spicata limonene synthase (MSLS). GC-MS analysis revealed that the DPPH assay had correctly identified the best limonene synthase (CLLS) and culture medium (supplemented YP medium). Because only traces of limonene were detected in SD medium, we subsequently identified medium components that improved limonene production and developed a defined medium based on these findings. The best limonene titres obtained were 1.48 ± 0.22 mg

  15. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl as a screening tool for recombinant monoterpene biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Monoterpenes are a class of natural C10 compounds with a range of potential applications including use as fuel additives, fragrances, and chemical feedstocks. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes in heterologous systems is yet to reach commercially-viable levels, and therefore is the subject of strain engineering and fermentation optimization studies. Detection of monoterpenes typically relies on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; this represents a significant analytical bottleneck which limits the potential to analyse combinatorial sets of conditions. To address this, we developed a high-throughput method for pre-screening monoterpene biosynthesis. Results An optimised DPPH assay was developed for detecting monoterpenes from two-phase microbial cultures using dodecane as the extraction solvent. The assay was useful for reproducible qualitative ranking of monoterpene concentrations, and detected standard preparations of myrcene and γ-terpinene dissolved in dodecane at concentrations as low as 10 and 15 μM, respectively, and limonene as low as 200 μM. The assay could not be used quantitatively due to technical difficulties in capturing the initial reaction rate in a multi-well plate and the presence of minor DPPH-reactive contaminants. Initially, limonene biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tested using two different limonene synthase enzymes and three medium compositions. The assay indicated that limonene biosynthesis was enhanced in a supplemented YP medium and that the Citrus limon limonene synthase (CLLS) was more effective than the Mentha spicata limonene synthase (MSLS). GC-MS analysis revealed that the DPPH assay had correctly identified the best limonene synthase (CLLS) and culture medium (supplemented YP medium). Because only traces of limonene were detected in SD medium, we subsequently identified medium components that improved limonene production and developed a defined medium based on these findings. The best limonene titres obtained

  16. Monoterpene persistence in the sapwood and heartwood of longleaf pine stumps: assessment of differences in composition and stability under field conditions

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Philip M. Sheridan; Jolie M. Mahfouz

    2009-01-01

    Monoterpenes in exudates, phloem and sapwood have received considerable attention relative to the active defenses of pine trees. However, little is known about the composition and function of the heartwood monoterpenes. To address this deficiency, monoterpene contents and relative compositions were determined for sapwood and heartwood samples from longleaf pine (Pinus...

  17. The role of ecophysiology in determining monoterpene concentrations and emissions from pinyon pine under drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, A. M.; Adams, H. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Stoy, P.; Monson, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    While much research has focused on the primary metabolic mechanisms underlying pinyon pine's sensitivity to severe and abrupt drought conditions, there remains a gap in our knowledge concerning how the resulting shift in carbon allocation toward plant secondary compounds, particularly monoterpenes, affects both atmospheric process and ecological species interactions. Because of the large global emission rate of monoterpenes and their effect on atmospheric chemistry, identifying the primary controls over and sensitivities to environmental change is critical for global emission models. Furthermore, monoterpenes are also known to impact insect behavior and act as defense compounds against herbivores, contributing to fluctuations in the population densities of herbivores either directly through toxicity, or indirectly by influencing an insect's susceptibility to parasitism. While pinyon mortality events are thought to be exacerbated by their susceptibility to herbivores resulting from weakened secondary chemical defenses, the impact of current and predicted drought on the chemical defense status of pinyons and the potential consequences for atmospheric composition and ecological interactions remains unknown. We performed a manipulative field study to untangle the effects of drought on plant carbon assimilation, growth, and defense throughout the year. Transplanting pinyons from their natural habitat into a desert environment, we were able to increase mean annual temperature by ~4 degrees C. Throughout the growing season, we measured pinyon physiology and monoterpene composition and emissions under different water (well-watered, ambient, or drought-stresed) and temperature (natural pinyon habitat or desert transplants) regimes. We hypothesized that increased drought would increase tissue concentrations in accordance with the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH). Furthermore, we predicted that higher temperatures and lower water availability together would influence

  18. Untangling the primary drivers of pinyon monoterpene production and emissions under predicted drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, A. M.; Adams, H. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Monson, R. K.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and insect herbivory have important consequences for plant function, atmospheric composition, and the functioning of ecosystems and ecological communities. Within the last decade, pinyon-juniper woodlands throughout the southwestern U.S. have suffered large-scale mortality, especially of pinyon pine, due to drought and associated insect outbreaks. While much research has focused on the primary metabolic mechanisms underlying pinyon's sensitivity to drought, there remains a gap in our knowledge concerning how the resulting shift in carbon allocation toward plant secondary compounds, particularly monoterpenes, affects atmospheric process and ecological interactions. Monoterpenes are the principal constituents of pinyon resin. Because of their large global emission rates and effect on atmospheric chemistry, particularly ozone creation, identifying controls over emissions and sensitivities to environmental change is critical for global emission models. Furthermore, monoterpenes are known to impact insect behavior and act as defense compounds against herbivores, contributing to insect population fluctuations either directly through toxicity, or indirectly by influencing parasitism susceptibility. Pinyon mortality events are thought to be exacerbated by their susceptibility to herbivores resulting from weakened secondary chemical defenses, but the impact of current and predicted drought on the chemical defense status of pinyons and subsequent atmospheric and ecological consequences remain unknown. A field study was developed to examine the impact of seasonality and climate, particularly drought, on pinyon pine physiology and chemistry in the context of tiger moth (Lophocampa ingens) herbivory in pinyon-juniper woodlands. We demonstrate the importance of geography and seasonality, particularly mid-summer drought and late summer monsoons, in driving physiology and monoterpene concentrations and emissions. Emission rates significantly decreased throughout the summer

  19. Field Bioassays of Synthetic Pheromones and Host Monoterpenes for Conophthorus coniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Peter de Groot; Gary L. DeBarr; Goran Birgersson

    1998-01-01

    Four major monoterpenes, (±)-a-pinene,1 (S)-(-)-ß-pinene,(R)-(+)-limonene, and myrcene are found in the cones of eastern white pines, Pinus strobus L. Mixtures ofthese, as well as. a-pinene or ß-pinene alone. increased catches of male white pine cone...

  20. Xylem monoterpenes of some hard pines of Western North America: three studies

    Richard H. Smith

    1982-01-01

    Monoterpene composition was studied in a number of hard pine species and results were compared with earlier work. (1) Intratree measurements showed strong constancy of composition in both single-stemmed and forked trees of ponderosa, Jeffrey, Coulter, and Jeffrey x ponderosa pines. In grafts of these and other pines, the scion influenced the root stock, but not the...

  1. Monoterpene composition of pine species and hybrids...some preliminary findings

    Richard H. Smith

    1967-01-01

    Xylem resin samples, obtained from 72 freshly cut pine stumps at the Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, Calif., were analyzed for monoterpenes by gasliquid chromatography. Very little or no qualitative or quantitative variation could be attributed to annual ring, time of securing sample, and period of storage of sample up to 1 year. The 34 hybrids sampled...

  2. Inhibition of the NorA multi-drug transporter by oxygenated monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, Mayara Ladeira; Ferreira, Josie Haydée Lima; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto; Kaatz, Glenn W; Barreto, Humberto Medeiros; de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intrinsic antimicrobial activity of three monoterpenes nerol, dimethyl octanol and estragole, against bacteria and yeast strains, as well as, investigate if these compounds are able to inhibit the NorA efflux pump related to fluoroquinolone resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the monoterpenes against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans strains were determined by micro-dilution assay. MICs of the norfloxacin against a S. aureus strain overexpressing the NorA protein were determined in the absence or in the presence of the monoterpenes at subinhibitory concentrations, aiming to verify the ability of this compounds act as efflux pump inhibitors. The monoterpenes were inactive against S. aureus however the nerol was active against E. coli and C. albicans. The addition of the compounds to growth media at sub-inhibitory concentrations enhanced the activity of norfloxacin against S. aureus SA1199-B. This result shows that bioactives tested, especially the nerol, are able to inhibit NorA efflux pump indicating a potential use as adjuvants of norfloxacin for therapy of infections caused by multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two new monoterpene glucosides from Xanthium strumarium subsp. sibiricum with their anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Xing, Xudong; Yan, Meiling; Guo, Xinyue; Yang, Lin; Yang, Liu

    2018-06-01

    Two new monoterpene glucosides: xanmonoter A (1) and xanmonoter B (2) were isolated from Xanthium strumarium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, MS and CD analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity with IC 50 values of 17.4, 22.1 μM, respectively.

  4. The Use of Monoterpenes as Kairomones by Ips latidens (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    D.R. Miller; J.H. Borden

    1990-01-01

    The responses of Ips lutidens (LeConte) to multiple-funnel traps baited with various monoterpenes were determined in stands of lodgepole pine in British Columbia. ß-Phellandrene was attractive to I. lutidens in the absence of the pheromone ipsenol ß-Phellandrene increased the attraction of I. lutidens to...

  5. Analysis of trends in isoprene and monoterpenes in a remote forest and an anthropogenic influenced forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, S.; Sheesley, R. J.; Winfield, Z.; Yoon, S.; Erickson, M.; Flynn, J. H., III; Alvarez, S. L.; Wallace, H. W., IV; Griffin, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Houston Mobile Air Quality Laboratory (MAQL) was deployed to the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) in July 2016 as part of the PROPHET-AMOS study and then was deployed to Jones Forest located north of Houston, TX from August 12 through September 23, 2016. Both sites are heavily forested, but UMBS is remote with no anthropogenic influence while Jones Forest sees frequent pollution transport from Houston. UMBS experienced periods of high isoprene:monoterpenes and periods of equivalent isoprene:monoterpenes, while Jones Forest had a consistently high isoprene:monoterpenes. This provided for a test bed to look at the interactions within two forested environments as well as the influence of anthropogenic sources. The MAQL was outfitted to measure O3 (2B Technology), NOy and SO2 (Thermo Scientific), NO/NOx (Air Quality Design), CO (Los Gatos), and select biogenic volatile organic carbon (BVOC) with their oxidation products (Ionicon PTR-MS). The instruments sampled from MAQL's 6 m tower at both sites. The UMBS site was below canopy and the Jones Forest site was in an open field surrounded by forest. The trends in isoprene and monoterpenes were explored in relation to time-of-day, temperature, and precipitation for both locations. In addition, the production of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein under these different conditions of meteorology, trace gas composition and BVOC composition was explored.

  6. Alpha-Terpineol, a natural monoterpene: A review of its biological properties

    Terpineols are monocyclic monoterpene tertiary alcohols and they are naturally present in plant species. There are five common isomers of terpineols, alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and terpinen-4-ol, of which alpha-terpineol and its isomer terpinen-4-ol are the most common terpineols found in nature....

  7. A novel fast gas chromatography method for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in ambient air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C9-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a 14.5 min analysis time. Moreover, in-situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an 11.7 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to 19.7 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). These analysis times potentially allow for a twofold to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in-situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC (OBVOC) linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest

  8. De novo production of six key grape aroma monoterpenes by a geraniol synthase-engineered S. cerevisiae wine strain.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Ester; Rico, Juan; Gil, José Vicente; Orejas, Margarita

    2015-09-16

    Monoterpenes are important contributors to grape and wine aroma. Moreover, certain monoterpenes have been shown to display health benefits with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer or hypotensive properties amongst others. The aim of this study was to construct self-aromatizing wine yeasts to overproduce de novo these plant metabolites in wines. Expression of the Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) geraniol synthase (GES) gene in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain substantially changed the terpene profile of wine produced from a non-aromatic grape variety. Under microvinification conditions, and without compromising other fermentative traits, the recombinant yeast excreted geraniol de novo at an amount (~750 μg/L) well exceeding (>10-fold) its threshold for olfactory perception and also exceeding the quantities present in wines obtained from highly aromatic Muscat grapes. Interestingly, geraniol was further metabolized by yeast enzymes to additional monoterpenes and esters: citronellol, linalool, nerol, citronellyl acetate and geranyl acetate, resulting in a total monoterpene concentration (~1,558 μg/L) 230-fold greater than that of the control. We also found that monoterpene profiles of wines derived from mixed fermentations were found to be determined by the composition of the initial yeast inocula suggesting the feasibility of producing 'à la carte' wines having predetermined monoterpene contents. Geraniol synthase-engineered yeasts demonstrate potential in the development of monoterpene enhanced wines.

  9. Stomatal uptake and stomatal deposition of ozone in isoprene and monoterpene emitting plants.

    PubMed

    Fares, S; Loreto, F; Kleist, E; Wildt, J

    2008-01-01

    Volatile isoprenoids were reported to protect plants against ozone. To understand whether this could be the result of a direct scavenging of ozone by these molecules, the stomatal and non-stomatal uptake of ozone was estimated in plants emitting isoprene or monoterpenes. Ozone uptake by holm oak (Quercus ilex, a monoterpene emitter) and black poplar (Populus nigra, an isoprene emitter) was studied in whole plant enclosures (continuously stirred tank reactors, CSTR). The ozone uptake by plants was estimated measuring ozone concentration at the inlet and outlet of the reactors, after correcting for the uptake of the enclosure materials. Destruction of ozone at the cuticle or at the plant stems was found to be negligible compared to the ozone uptake through the stomata. For both plant species, a relationship between stomatal conductance and ozone uptake was found. For the poplar, the measured ozone losses were explained by the uptake of ozone through the stomata only, and ozone destruction by gas phase reactions with isoprene was negligible. For the oak, gas phase reactions of ozone with the monoterpenes emitted by the plants contributed significantly to ozone destruction. This was confirmed by two different experiments showing a) that in cases of high stomatal conductance but under low CO(2) concentration, a reduction of monoterpene emission was still associated with reduced O(3) uptake; and b) that ozone losses due to the gas phase reactions only can be measured when using the exhaust from a plant chamber to determine the gas phase reactivity in an empty reaction chamber. Monoterpenes can therefore relevantly scavenge ozone at leaf level contributing to protection against ozone.

  10. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  11. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2013-10-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the Earth's atmosphere where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror images forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR. The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  12. Behavioral and toxicological responses of Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) to 10 monoterpene alcohols.

    PubMed

    Moretti, A N; Zerba, E N; Alzogaray, Raúl A

    2013-09-01

    The effect on locomotor activity, the repellency, and the knock-down produced by 10 monoterpene alcohols were evaluated on first-instar nymphs of Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma infestans, vectors of Chagas disease. A video tracking technique was used to evaluate locomotor activity and repellency by exposure to papers impregnated with monoterpenes. Eugenol on R. prolixus and (S)-cis-verbenol on T. infestans did not modify the locomotor activity. The remaining monoterpenes produced hyperactivity on both species, although the concentration required was at least a 1,000 times higher than that of deltamethrin (positive control). Carvacrol, eugenol, and geraniol resulted as repellent as N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (positive control) for both species. A similar result was observed for almost every monoterpene on T. infestans. Knock-down effect was evaluated by exposing the nymphs in closed recipients. The order of increasing toxicity on R. prolixus was (KT50 values in min): geraniol (213.7) < alpha-terpineol (164.5) < linalool (124.2) < carvacrol (111.6) < eugenol (89.8) < thymol (78.9), and on T. infestans: alpha-terpineol (289.8) < eugenol (221.3) < carvacrol (164.2) < linalool (154.9) < thymol (96.7). All monoterpenes were less toxic than the positive control, dichlorvos (3.6 min for R. prolixus and 3.9 min for T. infestans). After 7 h of exposure, (-)-carveol, citronellol, and menthol (on both species) and geraniol (on T. infestans) produced < 50% of knock-down. After these results, it is worthwhile to explore more deeply the potential of these compounds as tools for controlling Chagas disease vectors.

  13. The Capacity for Thermal Protection of Photosynthetic Electron Transport Varies for Different Monoterpenes in Quercus ilex1

    PubMed Central

    Copolovici, Lucian O.; Filella, Iolanda; Llusià, Joan; Niinemets, Ülo; Peñuelas, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Heat stress resistance of foliar photosynthetic apparatus was investigated in the Mediterranean monoterpene-emitting evergreen sclerophyll species Quercus ilex. Leaf feeding with fosmidomycin, which is a specific inhibitor of the chloroplastic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, essentially stopped monoterpene emission and resulted in the decrease of the optimum temperature of photosynthetic electron transport from approximately 38°C to approximately 30°C. The heat stress resistance was partly restored by fumigation with 4 to 5 nmol mol−1 air concentrations of monoterpene α-pinene but not with fumigations with monoterpene alcohol α-terpineol. Analyses of monoterpene physicochemical characteristics demonstrated that α-pinene was primarily distributed to leaf gas and lipid phases, while α-terpineol was primarily distributed to leaf aqueous phase. Thus, for a common monoterpene uptake rate, α-terpineol is less efficient in stabilizing membrane liquid-crystalline structure and as an antioxidant in plant membranes. Furthermore, α-terpineol uptake rate (U) strongly decreased with increasing temperature, while the uptake rates of α-pinene increased with increasing temperature, providing a further explanation of the lower efficiency of thermal protection by α-terpineol. The temperature-dependent decrease of α-terpineol uptake was both due to decreases in stomatal conductance, gw, and increased volatility of α-terpineol at higher temperature that decreased the monoterpene diffusion gradient between the ambient air (FA) and leaf (FI; U = gw[FA − FI]). Model analyses suggested that α-pinene reacted within the leaf at higher temperatures, possibly within the lipid phase, thereby avoiding the decrease in diffusion gradient, FA − FI. Thus, these data contribute to the hypothesis of the antioxidative protection of leaf membranes during heat stress by monoterpenes. These data further suggest that fumigation with the relatively low atmospheric concentrations of

  14. Turbulent transport and chemistry of isoprene and monoterpenes within and above tropical forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Stoy, P. C.; Trowbridge, A.; Wei, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Amazon rainforest and other rainforests emit large quantities of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), including isoprene and monoterpenes, which react with and produce atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical. Some of the resulting reaction products condense to form secondary organic aerosols, which due to the typically clean tropical air can make up a large portion of the total atmospheric aerosols and may thus impact cloud development and regional climate. To better understand the role of tropical forests on cloud development and climate, it is necessary to quantify not only BVOC emissions, but also turbulent transport and the resulting atmospheric chemistry within both the forest canopy and atmospheric boundary-layer. To date, most research has ignored within-canopy chemical processes that are typically not resolved in regional models that treat the forest as a lower boundary condition. We use canopy-resolving Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to study the role of turbulence and chemistry in the isoprene lifetime under conditions observed during a 2014 field campaign in central Amazonia. The LES includes a simple chemical mechanism for the oxidation of isoprene and aggregated monoterpenes (34 reactions), which we use to quantify the impact of within-canopy and boundary-layer processes on the transport and air chemistry of isoprene, monoterpenes, and primary reaction products on their export at the top of the boundary layer. LES results show air parcel residence times in the dense Amazon rainforest, which govern the time available for in-canopy reactions, to range from a few seconds near the canopy top to 30 minutes near the ground. Such residence times are comparable to chemical lifetimes of many reactive species and the convective eddy turnover timescale. Additionally, monoterpene oxidation with ambient ozone levels can increase within-canopy hydroxyl radical concentrations from 5 x 104 to 3 x 105 radicals cm-3, thus greatly increasing

  15. Monoterpenes in the glandular trichomes of tomato are synthesized from a neryl diphosphate precursor rather than geranyl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Schilmiller, Anthony L; Schauvinhold, Ines; Larson, Matthew; Xu, Richard; Charbonneau, Amanda L; Schmidt, Adam; Wilkerson, Curtis; Last, Robert L; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-06-30

    We identified a cis-prenyltransferase gene, neryl diphosphate synthase 1 (NDPS1), that is expressed in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar M82 type VI glandular trichomes and encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of neryl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. mRNA for a terpene synthase gene, phellandrene synthase 1 (PHS1), was also identified in these glands. It encodes an enzyme that uses neryl diphosphate to produce beta-phellandrene as the major product as well as a variety of other monoterpenes. The profile of monoterpenes produced by PHS1 is identical with the monoterpenes found in type VI glands. PHS1 and NDPS1 map to chromosome 8, and the presence of a segment of chromosome 8 derived from Solanum pennellii LA0716 causes conversion from the M82 gland monoterpene pattern to that characteristic of LA0716 plants. The data indicate that, contrary to the textbook view of geranyl diphosphate as the "universal" substrate of monoterpene synthases, in tomato glands neryl diphosphate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of monoterpenes.

  16. Pheromone Production by an Invasive Bark Beetle Varies with Monoterpene Composition of its Naïve Host.

    PubMed

    Taft, Spencer; Najar, Ahmed; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-06-01

    The secondary chemistry of host plants can have cascading impacts on the establishment of new insect herbivore populations, their long-term population dynamics, and their invasion potential in novel habitats. Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) has recently expanded its range into forests of jack pine, Pinus banksiana Lamb., in western Canada. We investigated whether variations in jack pine monoterpenes affect beetle pheromone production, as the primary components of the beetle's aggregation pheromone, (-)-trans-verbenol and anti-aggregation pheromone (-)-verbenone, are biosynthesized from the host monoterpene α-pinene. Jack pine bolts were collected from five Canadian provinces east of the beetle's current range, live D. ponderosae were introduced into them, and their monoterpene compositions were characterized. Production of (-)-trans-verbenol and (-)-verbenone emitted by beetles was measured to determine whether pheromone production varies with monoterpene composition of jack pines. Depending on particular ratios of major monoterpenes in host phloem, jack pine could be classified into three monoterpenoid groups characterized by high amounts of (+)-α-pinene, 3-carene, or a more moderate blend of monoterpenes, and beetle pheromone production varied among these groups. Specifically, beetles reared in trees characterized by high (+)-α-pinene produced the most (-)-trans-verbenol and (-)-verbenone, while beetles in trees characterized by high 3-carene produced the least. Our results indicate that pheromone production by D. ponderosae will remain a significant aspect and important predictor of its survival and persistence in the boreal forest.

  17. Monoterpenes in the glandular trichomes of tomato are synthesized from a neryl diphosphate precursor rather than geranyl diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Schauvinhold, Ines; Larson, Matthew; Xu, Richard; Charbonneau, Amanda L.; Schmidt, Adam; Wilkerson, Curtis; Last, Robert L.; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-01-01

    We identified a cis-prenyltransferase gene, neryl diphosphate synthase 1 (NDPS1), that is expressed in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar M82 type VI glandular trichomes and encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of neryl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. mRNA for a terpene synthase gene, phellandrene synthase 1 (PHS1), was also identified in these glands. It encodes an enzyme that uses neryl diphosphate to produce β-phellandrene as the major product as well as a variety of other monoterpenes. The profile of monoterpenes produced by PHS1 is identical with the monoterpenes found in type VI glands. PHS1 and NDPS1 map to chromosome 8, and the presence of a segment of chromosome 8 derived from Solanum pennellii LA0716 causes conversion from the M82 gland monoterpene pattern to that characteristic of LA0716 plants. The data indicate that, contrary to the textbook view of geranyl diphosphate as the “universal” substrate of monoterpene synthases, in tomato glands neryl diphosphate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of monoterpenes. PMID:19487664

  18. Successful Colonization of Lodgepole Pine Trees by Mountain Pine Beetle Increased Monoterpene Production and Exhausted Carbohydrate Reserves.

    PubMed

    Roth, Marla; Hussain, Altaf; Cale, Jonathan A; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2018-02-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests have experienced severe mortality from mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western North America for the last several years. Although the mechanisms by which beetles kill host trees are unclear, they are likely linked to pine defense monoterpenes that are synthesized from carbohydrate reserves. However, how carbohydrates and monoterpenes interact in response to MPB colonization is unknown. Understanding this relationship could help to elucidate how pines succumb to bark beetle attack. We compared concentrations of individual and total monoterpenes and carbohydrates in the phloem of healthy pine trees with those naturally colonized by MPB. Trees attacked by MPB had nearly 300% more monoterpenes and 40% less carbohydrates. Total monoterpene concentrations were most strongly associated with the concentration of sugars in the phloem. These results suggest that bark beetle colonization likely depletes carbohydrate reserves by increasing the production of carbon-rich monoterpenes, and other carbon-based secondary compounds. Bark beetle attacks also reduce water transport causing the disruption of carbon transport between tree foliage and roots, which restricts carbon assimilation. Reduction in carbohydrate reserves likely contributes to tree mortality.

  19. Characterization of a monoterpene synthase from Paeonia lactiflora producing α-pinene as its single product.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaohui; Guo, Juan; Ma, Ying; Jin, Baolong; Zhan, Zhilai; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Luqi

    2016-07-01

    To identify a terpene synthase that catalyzes the conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) to α-pinene and is involved in the biosynthesis of paeoniflorin. Two new terpene synthase genes were isolated from the transcriptome data of Peaonia lactiflora. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence characterization revealed that one gene, named PlPIN, encoded a monoterpene synthase that might be involved in the biosynthesis of paeoniflorin. In vitro enzyme assay showed that, in contrast to most monoterpene synthases, PlPIN encoded an α-pinene synthase which converted GPP into α-pinene as a single product. This newly identified α-pinene synthase could be used for improving paeoniflorin accumulation by metabolic engineering or for producing α-pinene via synthetic biology.

  20. Selective removal of monoterpenes from bergamot oil by inclusion in deoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Giancarlo; Fogagnolo, Marco; Maietti, Silvia; Rossetti, Stefano

    2010-05-12

    A new approach for removing monoterpenes (MTs) from bergamot oil by selective inclusion in deoxycholic acid (DCA) is proposed. The inclusion process is very efficient, the included fraction being composed mainly of limonene (71.7%) and gamma-terpinene (19.8%). On the other hand, the deterpenated bergamot oil fraction showed for the linalool and linalyl acetate derivatives significant increases from 16.6 and 21.4% to 18.3 and 42.2%, respectively. The major advantages of this methodology are its simplicity, the mild conditions employed, and the quantitative recovery of both host (DCA) and guest (monoterpenes) compounds. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffractometry (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analysis were used to investigate and characterize the inclusion compounds.

  1. Secondary organic aerosols over oceans via oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes from Arctic to Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qi-Hou; Xie, Zhou-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ming; Kang, Hui; He, Quan-Fu; Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Isoprene and monoterpenes are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in continents. However, their contributions to aerosols over oceans are still inconclusive. Here we analyzed SOA tracers from isoprene and monoterpenes in aerosol samples collected over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. Combined with literature reports elsewhere, we found that the dominant tracers are the oxidation products of isoprene. The concentrations of tracers varied considerably. The mean average values were approximately one order of magnitude higher in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. High values were generally observed in coastal regions. This phenomenon was ascribed to the outflow influence from continental sources. High levels of isoprene could emit from oceans and consequently have a significant impact on marine SOA as inferred from isoprene SOA during phytoplankton blooms, which may abruptly increase up to 95 ng/m3 in the boundary layer over remote oceans. PMID:23880782

  2. Above Canopy Emissions of Isoprene and Monoterpenes from a Southeast Asian Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Johnson, C.; Cai, Z.; Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Bai, J.; Li, Q.

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of isoprene were measured using the eddy covariance technique and an ozone chemiluminescence isoprene sensor above a secondary tropical forest/rubber tree plantation located in the Xishuangbanna region of southern China during the wet and dry seasons. Fluxes of monoterpenes were inferred from ambient boundary layer concentrations (wet season) and from relaxed eddy accumulation measurements (dry season). Isoprene emissions were comparable to what has been observed from other tropical forests in Africa and South America. In this forest, monoterpene emissions were much higher during the wet season due to the senescence of the rubber trees during the dry season. These flux measurements represent the first ecosystem level flux measurements reported from Southeast Asian tropical forests.

  3. A synthetic biochemistry platform for cell free production of monoterpenes from glucose

    SciT

    Korman, Tyler P.; Opgenorth, Paul H.; Bowie, James U.

    Cell-free systems designed to perform complex chemical conversions of biomass to biofuels or commodity chemicals are emerging as promising alternatives to the metabolic engineering of living cells. We design a system comprises 27 enzymes for the conversion of glucose into monoterpenes that generates both NAD(P)H and ATP in a modified glucose breakdown module and utilizes both cofactors for building terpenes. Different monoterpenes are produced in our system by changing the terpene synthase enzyme. The system is stable for the production of limonene, pinene and sabinene, and can operate continuously for at least 5 days from a single addition of glucose.more » We also obtain conversion yields 495% and titres 415 g l -1. The titres are an order of magnitude over cellular toxicity limits and thus difficult to achieve using cell-based systems. Overall, these results highlight the potential of synthetic biochemistry approaches for producing bio-based chemicals.« less

  4. A synthetic biochemistry platform for cell free production of monoterpenes from glucose

    DOE PAGES

    Korman, Tyler P.; Opgenorth, Paul H.; Bowie, James U.

    2017-05-24

    Cell-free systems designed to perform complex chemical conversions of biomass to biofuels or commodity chemicals are emerging as promising alternatives to the metabolic engineering of living cells. We design a system comprises 27 enzymes for the conversion of glucose into monoterpenes that generates both NAD(P)H and ATP in a modified glucose breakdown module and utilizes both cofactors for building terpenes. Different monoterpenes are produced in our system by changing the terpene synthase enzyme. The system is stable for the production of limonene, pinene and sabinene, and can operate continuously for at least 5 days from a single addition of glucose.more » We also obtain conversion yields 495% and titres 415 g l -1. The titres are an order of magnitude over cellular toxicity limits and thus difficult to achieve using cell-based systems. Overall, these results highlight the potential of synthetic biochemistry approaches for producing bio-based chemicals.« less

  5. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Phosphatidylcholine Analogues Containing Monoterpene Acids as Potent Antiproliferative Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Niezgoda, Natalia; Gładkowski, Witold; Czarnecka, Marta; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of novel phosphatidylcholines with geranic and citronellic acids in sn-1 and sn-2 positions is described. The structured phospholipids were obtained in high yields (59–87%) and evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against several cancer cell lines of different origin: MV4-11, A-549, MCF-7, LOVO, LOVO/DX, HepG2 and also towards non-cancer cell line BALB/3T3 (normal mice fibroblasts). The phosphatidylcholines modified with monoterpene acid showed a significantly higher antiproliferative activity than free monoterpene acids. The highest activity was observed for the terpene-phospholipids containing the isoprenoid acids in sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid in sn-2. PMID:27310666

  6. Monoterpenes are the largest source of summertime organic aerosol in the southeastern United States

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haofei; Yee, Lindsay D.; Lee, Ben H.; ...

    2018-02-12

    The chemical complexity of atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) has caused substantial uncertainties in understanding its origins and environmental impacts. Here, we provide constraints on OA origins through compositional characterization with molecular-level details. Our results suggest that secondary OA (SOA) from monoterpene oxidation accounts for approximately half of summertime fine OA in Centreville, AL, a forested area in the southeastern United States influenced by anthropogenic pollution. We find that different chemical processes involving nitrogen oxides, during days and nights, play a central role in determining the mass of monoterpene SOA produced. These findings elucidate the strong anthropogenic–biogenic interaction affecting ambient aerosolmore » in the southeastern United States and point out the importance of reducing anthropogenic emissions, especially under a changing climate, where biogenic emissions will likely keep increasing.« less

  7. Monoterpenes are the largest source of summertime organic aerosol in the southeastern United States

    SciT

    Zhang, Haofei; Yee, Lindsay D.; Lee, Ben H.

    The chemical complexity of atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) has caused substantial uncertainties in understanding its origins and environmental impacts. Here, we provide constraints on OA origins through compositional characterization with molecular-level details. Our results suggest that secondary OA (SOA) from monoterpene oxidation accounts for approximately half of summertime fine OA in Centreville, AL, a forested area in the southeastern United States influenced by anthropogenic pollution. We find that different chemical processes involving nitrogen oxides, during days and nights, play a central role in determining the mass of monoterpene SOA produced. These findings elucidate the strong anthropogenic–biogenic interaction affecting ambient aerosolmore » in the southeastern United States and point out the importance of reducing anthropogenic emissions, especially under a changing climate, where biogenic emissions will likely keep increasing.« less

  8. Secondary organic aerosols over oceans via oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes from Arctic to Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Hou; Xie, Zhou-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ming; Kang, Hui; He, Quan-Fu; Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Isoprene and monoterpenes are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in continents. However, their contributions to aerosols over oceans are still inconclusive. Here we analyzed SOA tracers from isoprene and monoterpenes in aerosol samples collected over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. Combined with literature reports elsewhere, we found that the dominant tracers are the oxidation products of isoprene. The concentrations of tracers varied considerably. The mean average values were approximately one order of magnitude higher in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. High values were generally observed in coastal regions. This phenomenon was ascribed to the outflow influence from continental sources. High levels of isoprene could emit from oceans and consequently have a significant impact on marine SOA as inferred from isoprene SOA during phytoplankton blooms, which may abruptly increase up to 95 ng/m³ in the boundary layer over remote oceans.

  9. Improving monoterpene geraniol production through geranyl diphosphate synthesis regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Bao, Xiaoming; Li, Chen; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Monoterpenes have wide applications in the food, cosmetics, and medicine industries and have recently received increased attention as advanced biofuels. However, compared with sesquiterpenes, monoterpene production is still lagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, geraniol, a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol, was synthesized in S. cerevisiae. We evaluated three geraniol synthases in S. cerevisiae, and the geraniol synthase Valeriana officinalis (tVoGES), which lacked a plastid-targeting peptide, yielded the highest geraniol production. To improve geraniol production, synthesis of the precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was regulated by comparing three specific GPP synthase genes derived from different plants and the endogenous farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene variants ERG20 (G) (ERG20 (K197G) ) and ERG20 (WW) (ERG20 (F96W-N127W) ), and controlling endogenous ERG20 expression, coupled with increasing the expression of the mevalonate pathway by co-overexpressing IDI1, tHMG1, and UPC2-1. The results showed that overexpressing ERG20 (WW) and strengthening the mevalonate pathway significantly improved geraniol production, while expressing heterologous GPP synthase genes or down-regulating endogenous ERG20 expression did not show positive effect. In addition, we constructed an Erg20p(F96W-N127W)-tVoGES fusion protein, and geraniol production reached 66.2 mg/L after optimizing the amino acid linker and the order of the proteins. The best strain yielded 293 mg/L geraniol in a fed-batch cultivation, a sevenfold improvement over the highest titer previously reported in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. Finally, we showed that the toxicity of geraniol limited its production. The platform developed here can be readily used to synthesize other monoterpenes.

  10. Conifer Monoterpene Chemistry during an Outbreak Enhances Consumption and Immune Response of an Eruptive Folivore.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Amy M; Bowers, M Deane; Monson, Russell K

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of plant defense compounds during herbivory can impact herbivore resource allocation patterns and thereby herbivore survival, growth, and immune response against endoparasitoid infection. Few studies have investigated folivore responses to changes in plant chemistry that occur under outbreak conditions in mature conifer systems. Using data from an earlier observational field study, we carried out laboratory bioassays to test how variation in monoterpenes in piñon pine trees (Pinus edulis, Pinaceae) during an outbreak affects growth, consumption, and immune response of a specialist herbivore, the Southwestern tiger moth (Lophocampa ingens, Arctiidae). Larvae were fed on artificial diets containing four monoterpenes at concentrations that mimicked those observed in undamaged and herbivore-damaged trees in situ during an outbreak. Damaged trees contained 30% lower total monoterpene concentrations, likely reflecting volatile losses as observed in a previous field study Trowbridge et al. (Ecology 95:1591-1603, Trowbridge et al. 2014). Herbivores reared on diets mimicking terpene concentrations in the needles of damaged trees exhibited an approximately 60% increase in consumption relative to larvae reared on diets characteristic of trees without herbivore damage. Higher consumption was accompanied by a 40% increase in immune response with no change in growth rate. These observations suggest preferential resource allocation towards immunity and/or a strong genetic component that determines growth under these conditions. These outcomes, which favor the herbivore, point to: (i) a potential positive feedback mechanism that may increase L. ingens's chance of escaping parasitism during the early phases of an outbreak; and (ii) the important role of monoterpenes in mediating conifer-folivore interactions specifically for P. edulis, which has suffered large-scale drought-induced mortality events exacerbated by the presence of insects.

  11. Seasonal influence on gene expression of monoterpene synthases in Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Grausgruber-Gröger, Sabine; Schmiderer, Corinna; Steinborn, Ralf; Novak, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Garden sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is one of the most important medicinal and aromatic plants and possesses antioxidant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, astringent, antihidrotic and specific sensorial properties. The essential oil of the plant, formed mainly in very young leaves, is in part responsible for these activities. It is mainly composed of the monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, α- and β-thujone and camphor synthesized by the 1,8-cineole synthase, the (+)-sabinene synthase and the (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, respectively, and is produced and stored in epidermal glands. In this study, the seasonal influence on the formation of the main monoterpenes in young, still expanding leaves of field-grown sage plants was studied in two cultivars at the level of mRNA expression, analyzed by qRT-PCR, and at the level of end-products, analyzed by gas chromatography. All monoterpene synthases and monoterpenes were significantly influenced by cultivar and season. 1,8-Cineole synthase and its end product 1,8-cineole remained constant until August and then decreased slightly. The thujones increased steadily during the vegetative period. The transcript level of their corresponding terpene synthase, however, showed its maximum in the middle of the vegetative period and declined afterwards. Camphor remained constant until August and then declined, exactly correlated with the mRNA level of the corresponding terpene synthase. In summary, terpene synthase mRNA expression and respective end product levels were concordant in the case of 1,8-cineole (r=0.51 and 0.67 for the two cultivars, respectively; p<0.05) and camphor (r=0.75 and 0.82; p<0.05) indicating basically transcriptional control, but discordant for α-/β-thujone (r=-0.05 and 0.42; p=0.87 and 0.13, respectively). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Susceptibility to Verticillium longisporum is linked to monoterpene production by TPS23/27 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Jonas; Bejai, Sarosh; Mozūraitis, Raimondas; Dixelius, Christina

    2015-02-01

    The fungus Verticillium longisporum is a soil-borne plant pathogen of increasing economic importance, and information on plant responses to it is limited. To identify the genes and components involved in the early stages of infection, transcripts in roots of V. longisporum-challenged Arabidopsis Col-0 and the susceptible NON-RACE SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1 (ndr1-1) mutant were compared using ATH1 gene chips. The analysis revealed altered transcript levels of several terpene biosynthesis genes, including the monoterpene synthase TPS23/27. When transgenic 35S:TPS23/27 and TPS23/27-amiRNA plants were monitored the over-expresser line showed enhanced fungal colonization whereas the silenced genotype was indistinguishable from Col-0. Transcript analysis of terpene biosynthesis genes suggested that only the TPS23/27 pathway is affected in the two transgenic genotypes. To confirm changes in monoterpene production, emitted volatiles were determined using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Levels of all identified TPS23/27 monoterpene products were significantly altered in the transgenic plants. A stimulatory effect on conidial germination and hyphal growth of V. longisporum was also seen in co-cultivation with 35S:TPS23/27 plants and upon exposure to 1,8-cineole, the main product of TPS23/27. Methyl jasmonate treatments of myc2-1 and myc2-2 mutants and analysis of TPS23/27:uidA in the myc2-2 background suggested a dependence on jasmonic acid mediated by the transcription factor MYC2. Taken together, our results show that TPS23/27-produced monoterpenes stimulate germination and subsequent invasion of V. longisporum in Arabidopsis roots. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  14. A monoterpene glucoside and three megastigmane glycosides from Juniperus communis var. depressa.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Iida, Naoki; Inatomi, Yuka; Murata, Hiroko; Inada, Akira; Murata, Jin; Lang, Frank A; Iinuma, Munekazu; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2005-07-01

    A new monoterpene glucoside (1) and three new natural megastigmane glycosides (2-4) were isolated along with a known megastigmane glucoside (5) from twigs with leaves of Juniperus communis var. depressa (Cupressaceae) collected in Oregon, U.S.A., and their structures were determined on the basis of spectral and chemical evidence. In addition, the antibacterial activities of the isolated components against Helicobacter pylori were also investigated.

  15. Remote sensing estimation of isoprene and monoterpene emissions generated by natural vegetation in Monterrey, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gastelum, Sandra L; Mejía-Velázquez, G M; Lozano-García, D Fabián

    2016-06-01

    In addition to oxygen, hydrocarbons are the most reactive chemical compounds produced by plants into the atmosphere. These compounds are part of the family of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and are discharged in a great variety of forms. Among the VOCs produced by natural sources such as vegetation, the most studied until today are the isoprene and monoterpene. These substances can play an important role in the chemical balance of the atmosphere of a region. In this project, we develop a methodology to estimate the natural (vegetation) emission of isoprene and monoterpenes and applied it to the Monterrey Metropolitan Area, Mexico and its surrounding areas. Landsat-TM data was used to identify the dominant vegetation communities and field work to determine the foliage biomass density of key species. The studied communities were submontane scrub, oak, and pine forests and a combination of both. We carried out the estimation of emissions for isoprene and monoterpenes compounds in the different plant communities, with two different criteria: (1) taking into account the average foliage biomass density obtained from the various sample point in each vegetation community, and (2) using the foliage biomass density obtained for each transect, associated to an individual spectral class within a particular vegetation type. With this information, we obtained emission maps for each case. The results show that the main producers of isoprene are the communities that include species of the genus Quercus, located mainly on the Sierra Madre Oriental and Sierra de Picachos, with average isoprene emissions of 314.6 ton/day and 207.3 ton/day for the two methods utilized. The higher estimates of monoterpenes were found in the submontane scrub areas distributed along the valley of the metropolitan zone, with an estimated average emissions of 47.1 ton/day and 181.4 tons for the two methods respectively.

  16. Monoterpene and herbivore-induced emissions from cabbage plants grown at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Terhi; Reddy, G. V. P.; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The warming of the lower atmosphere due to elevating CO 2 concentration may increase volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from plants. Also, direct effects of elevated CO 2 on plant secondary metabolism are expected to lead to increased VOC emissions due to allocation of excess carbon on secondary metabolites, of which many are volatile. We investigated how growing at doubled ambient CO 2 concentration affects emissions from cabbage plants ( Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata) damaged by either the leaf-chewing larvae of crucifer specialist diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella L.) or generalist Egyptian cotton leafworm ( Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval)). The emission from cabbage cv. Lennox grown in both CO 2 concentrations, consisted mainly of monoterpenes (sabinene, limonene, α-thujene, 1,8-cineole, β-pinene, myrcene, α-pinene and γ-terpinene). ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, sesquiterpene ( E, E)- α-farnesene and homoterpene ( E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) were emitted mainly from herbivore-damaged plants. Plants grown at 720 μmol mol -1 of CO 2 had significantly lower total monoterpene emissions per shoot dry weight than plants grown at 360 μmol mol -1 of CO 2, while damage by both herbivores significantly increased the total monoterpene emissions compared to intact plants. ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, ( E, E)- α-farnesene and DMNT emissions per shoot dry weight were not affected by the growth at elevated CO 2. The emission of DMNT was significantly enhanced from plants damaged by the specialist P. xylostella compared to the plants damaged by the generalist S. littoralis. The relative proportions of total monoterpenes and total herbivore-induced compounds of total VOCs did not change due to the growth at elevated CO 2, while insect damage increased significantly the proportion of induced compounds. The results suggest that VOC emissions that are induced by the leaf-chewing herbivores will not be influenced by elevated CO 2 concentration.

  17. Reversal of efflux mediated antifungal resistance underlies synergistic activity of two monoterpenes with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2013-01-23

    Thymol (THY) and carvacrol (CARV), the principal chemical components of thyme oil have long been known for their wide use in medicine due to antimicrobial and disinfectant properties. This study, however, draws attention to a possible synergistic antifungal effect of these monoterpenes with azole antimycotic-fluconazole. Resistance to azoles in Candida albicans involves over-expression of efflux-pump genes MDR1, CDR1, CDR2 or mutations and over-expression of target gene ERG11. The inhibition of drug efflux pumps is considered a feasible strategy to overcome clinical antifungal resistance. To put forward this approach, we investigated the combination effects of these monoterpenes and FLC against 38 clinically obtained FLC-sensitive, and eleven FLC-resistant Candida isolates. Synergism was observed with combinations of THY-FLC and CARV-FLC evaluated by checkerboard microdilution method and nature of the interactions was calculated by FICI. In addition, antifungal activity was assessed using agar-diffusion and time-kill curves. The drug efflux activity was determined using two dyes, Rhodamine6G (R6G) and fluorescent Hoechst 33342. No significant differences were observed in dye uptakes between FLC-susceptible and resistant isolates, incubated in glucose free buffer. However, a significantly higher efflux was recorded in FLC-resistant isolates when glucose was added. Both monoterpenes inhibited efflux by 70-90%, showing their high potency to block drug transporter pumps. Significant differences, in the expression levels of CDR1 and MDR1, induced by monoterpenes revealed reversal of FLC-resistance. The selectively fungicidal characteristics and ability to restore FLC susceptibility in resistant isolates signify a promising candidature of THY and CARV as antifungal agents in combinational treatments for candidiasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cloning and Characterizing Genes Involved in Monoterpene Induced Mammary Tumor Regression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    causes morphologic differentiation within 4 hours as characterized by neurite outgrowths (12). Monoterpenes inhibit enzymes in the mevalonate-lipid...metabolism pathway, including a selective inhibition of isoprenylation of 21-26 kDa small G proteins (13-15) and inhibition of ubiquinone ( CoQ ) and...Letters 269(2), 305-10 18 FOOTNOTES 1 The abbreviations used are: DMBA, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; NMU, N-methyl-N- nitrosourea; CoQ , ubiquinone

  19. Onset of photosynthesis in spring speeds up monoterpene synthesis and leads to emission bursts

    PubMed Central

    Porcar‐Castell, A.; Atherton, J.; Kolari, P.; Pohja, T.; Hari, P.; Nikinmaa, E.; PetÄJÄ, T.; Bäck, J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by boreal evergreen trees have strong seasonality, with low emission rates during photosynthetically inactive winter and increasing rates towards summer. Yet, the regulation of this seasonality remains unclear. We measured in situ monoterpene emissions from Scots pine shoots during several spring periods and analysed their dynamics in connection with the spring recovery of photosynthesis. We found high emission peaks caused by enhanced monoterpene synthesis consistently during every spring period (monoterpene emission bursts, MEB). The timing of the MEBs varied relatively little between the spring periods. The timing of the MEBs showed good agreement with the photosynthetic spring recovery, which was studied with simultaneous measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence, CO 2 exchange and a simple, temperature history‐based proxy for state of photosynthetic acclimation, S. We conclude that the MEBs were related to the early stages of photosynthetic recovery, when the efficiency of photosynthetic carbon reactions is still low whereas the light harvesting machinery actively absorbs light energy. This suggests that the MEBs may serve a protective functional role for the foliage during this critical transitory state and that these high emission peaks may contribute to atmospheric chemistry in the boreal forest in springtime. PMID:25850935

  20. The Effect of Resin and Monoterpenes on Spore Germination and Growth in Fusarium circinatum.

    PubMed

    Slinski, S L; Zakharov, F; Gordon, T R

    2015-01-01

    Resin obtained from Pinus radiata and five monoterpene components of resin (limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, and myrcene) were tested to determine their effects on mycelial growth and germination and survival of spores of Fusarium circinatum, the cause of pitch canker in pine, and F. temperatum, which is interfertile with F. circinatum but not pathogenic to pine. Averaged across all treatments, F. temperatum sustained the greatest reduction in radial growth (16.9±0.02% of control). The greatest reduction in dry weight also occurred in F. temperatum (11.7±0.01% of control), and all isolates of F. circinatum were significantly less affected (P<0.05). Spore germination rates in a saturated atmosphere of monoterpenes were relatively high for all tested isolates but, when placed in direct contact with resin, spore survival was significantly greater for F. circinatum than for F. temperatum. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that greater tolerance of resin is one factor distinguishing F. circinatum from the nonpathogenic F. temperatum. However, differential tolerance of monoterpene components of resin is not sufficient to explain the observed variation in virulence to pine in F. circinatum.

  1. Direct suppression of a rice bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) by monoterpene (S)-limonene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woong; Chung, Moon-Soo; Kang, Mihyung; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Sungbeom

    2016-05-01

    Rice bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is a severe disease of rice plants. Upon pathogen infection, rice biosynthesizes phytoalexins, including diterpenoids such as momilactones, phytocassanes, and oryzalexins. However, information on headspace volatiles in response to Xoo infection is limited. We have examined headspace volatile terpenes, induced by the infection of Xoo, and investigated their biological roles in the rice plant. Monoterpenes α-thujene, α-pinene, sabinene, myrcene, α-terpene, and (S)-limonene and sesquiterpenes cyclosativene, α-copaene, and β-elemene were detected from 1-week-old Xoo-infected rice seedlings, by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All monoterpenes were constitutively released from rice seedlings before Xoo infection. However, (S)-limonene emission was further elicited after exposure of the seedlings to Xoo in coincidence with upregulation of limonene synthase gene (OsTPS20) transcripts. Only the stereospecific (S)-limonene [and not (R)-limonene or other monoterpenes] severely inhibited Xoo growth, as confirmed by disc diffusion and liquid culture assays. Rice seedlings showed suppressed pathogenic symptoms suggestive of resistance to Xoo infection after foliar treatment with (S)-limonene. Collectively, our findings suggest that (S)-limonene is a volatile phytoanticipin, which plays a significant role in suppressing Xoo growth in rice seedlings.

  2. Onset of photosynthesis in spring speeds up monoterpene synthesis and leads to emission bursts.

    PubMed

    Aalto, J; Porcar-Castell, A; Atherton, J; Kolari, P; Pohja, T; Hari, P; Nikinmaa, E; Petäjä, T; Bäck, J

    2015-11-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by boreal evergreen trees have strong seasonality, with low emission rates during photosynthetically inactive winter and increasing rates towards summer. Yet, the regulation of this seasonality remains unclear. We measured in situ monoterpene emissions from Scots pine shoots during several spring periods and analysed their dynamics in connection with the spring recovery of photosynthesis. We found high emission peaks caused by enhanced monoterpene synthesis consistently during every spring period (monoterpene emission bursts, MEB). The timing of the MEBs varied relatively little between the spring periods. The timing of the MEBs showed good agreement with the photosynthetic spring recovery, which was studied with simultaneous measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence, CO2 exchange and a simple, temperature history-based proxy for state of photosynthetic acclimation, S. We conclude that the MEBs were related to the early stages of photosynthetic recovery, when the efficiency of photosynthetic carbon reactions is still low whereas the light harvesting machinery actively absorbs light energy. This suggests that the MEBs may serve a protective functional role for the foliage during this critical transitory state and that these high emission peaks may contribute to atmospheric chemistry in the boreal forest in springtime. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. α,β-Unsaturated monoterpene acid glucose esters: structural diversity, bioactivities and functional roles.

    PubMed

    Goodger, Jason Q D; Woodrow, Ian E

    2011-12-01

    The glycosylation of lipophilic small molecules produces many important plant secondary metabolites. The majority of these are O-glycosides with relatively fewer occurring as glucose esters of aromatic or aliphatic acids. In particular, monoterpene acid glucose esters have much lower structural diversity and distribution compared to monoterpene glycosides. Nevertheless, there have been over 20 monoterpene acid glucose esters described from trees in the genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) in recent years, all based on oleuropeic acid, menthiafolic acid or both. Here we review all of the glucose esters containing these monoterpenoids identified in plants to date. Many of the compounds contain phenolic aglycones and all contain at least one α,β-unsaturated carbonyl, affording a number of important potential therapeutic reactivities such as anti-tumor promotion, carcinogenesis suppression, and anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Additional properties such as cytotoxicity, bitterness, and repellency are suggestive of a role in plant defence, but we also discuss their localization to the exterior of foliar secretory cavity lumina, and suggest they may also protect secretory cells from toxic terpenes housed within these structures. Finally we discuss how the use of a recently developed protocol to isolate secretory cavities in a functional state could be used in conjunction with systems biology approaches to help characterize their biosynthesis and roles in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The contribution of wine-derived monoterpene glycosides to retronasal odour during tasting.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mango; Black, Cory A; Barker, Alice; Pearson, Wes; Hayasaka, Yoji; Francis, I Leigh

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the sensory significance of monoterpene glycosides during tasting, by retronasal perception of odorant aglycones released in-mouth. Monoterpene glycosides were isolated from Gewürztraminer and Riesling juices and wines, chemically characterised and studied using sensory time-intensity methodology, together with a synthesised monoterpene glucoside. When assessed in model wine at five times wine-like concentration, Gewürztraminer glycosides and geranyl glucoside gave significant fruity flavour, although at wine-like concentrations, or in the presence of wine volatiles, the effect was not significant. Gewürztraminer glycosides, geranyl glucoside and guaiacyl glucoside were investigated using a sensory panel (n=39), revealing large inter-individual variability, with 77% of panellists responding to at least one glycoside. The study showed for the first time that grape-derived glycosides can contribute perceptible fruity flavour, providing a means of enhancing flavour in wines, and confirms the results of previous studies that the effect is highly variable across individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Monoterpene emissions from Pinus halepensis forests in a semi-arid region (Israel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, R.; Karl, T.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Greenberg, J.; Guenther, A. B.; Llusia, J.; Penuelas, J.; Kim, S.; Dicken, U.; Rotenberg, E.; Rohatyn, S.; Preisler, Y.; Yakir, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have key environmental and biological roles, and can affect atmospheric chemisty, secondary aerosol formation, and as a consequence also climate. At the same time, global changes in climate arising from human activities can modify the VOC emissions of vegetation in the coming years. Monoterpene emission fluxes were measured during April 2013 at two forests in the semi-arid climate of Israel. Both forests were dominated by the same pine species, Pinus halepensis, but differed in the amount of annual average precipitation received (280 and 800 mm at Yatir and Birya, respectively). Measurements performed included leaf-level sampling as well as canopy-level flux calculations. Leaf level monoterpene emissions were sampled from leaf cuvettes with adsorbent cartridges and later analyzed by GC-MS. Canopy scale fluxes were calculated with the Disjunct Eddy Covariance technique by means of a Quadrupole PTRMS. We report the differences observed between the two forests in terms of photosynthetic activity and monoterpene emissions, aiming to see the effect of the different precipitation regimes at each location.

  6. [Analysis of variation of monoterpene glycosides and polyhydroxy compounds in paeoniae radix alba during preliminary processing].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Pei; Yan, Hui; Qian, Da-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2014-05-01

    To investigate variation of monoterpene glycosides and polyhydroxy compounds in Paeoniae Radix Alba dried by different processing methods. The crude drugs were processed sequentially as washed, removed the head, tail, fine roots and dried. The samples were divided into eight groups by whether peeled and decocted or not. Each group was dried by 35, 45, 60, 80,100, 120 degrees C, sun-dried and shade-dried. HPLC-PDA method was adopted to determine the content of monoterpene glycosides compounds (paeoniflorin alibiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin and benzoylpaeoniflorin), polyhydroxy compounds (catechin and gallic acid) and benzoic acid. Chromatographic conditions: Phecad C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm). A principal component analysis (PCA) method was used subsequently to get data processed. The retained content of seven constituents decreased in those peeled crude drug, and after cooked, monoterpene glycosides and polyhydroxy compounds increased while the benzoic acid decreased. It was believed that rele- vant enzymes were inactivated while being cooked so that drying temperature showed little influence on the biotransformation. Contents of effective ingredients in Paeoniae Radix Alba are influenced by drying processing. The preferable method shows to be that crude drug should be cooked before being peeled and dried. As a matter of processing convtence, it is suggested to be peeled and sliced before being dried.

  7. Observations of ambient monoterpenes at a costal site in the East Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzitzikalaki, Evaggelia; Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Kanakidou, Maria; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Observations of ambient monoterpenes at a costal site in the East Mediterranean Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) affect the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere since they react with hydroxyl radicals, nitrate radicals and ozone, and participate in ozone formation in the presence of sufficient amounts of nitrogen oxides. Moreover, BVOC oxidation products contribute to new particle formation and growth processes. While isoprene is emitted in the largest amount among BVOCs into the atmosphere, monoterpenes are also important for atmospheric chemistry. Tree species are responsible of the most BVOC emissions to the atmosphere but little is known about the contribution of shrub and long-range transport to the ambient BVOC concentrations. In the Mediterranean region monoterpene measurements are scarce and are limited in temporal and ecosystem coverage (forested areas). The present study presents long- term measurements of monoterpenes at a remote coastal site without tree vegetation under typical phrygana vegetation of Crete island in Greece. Measurements took place (35° 20' N, 25° 40' E, 250m a.s.l) on the north east side of the island of Crete at the Finokalia monitoring station of the University of Crete (http://finokalia.chemistry.uoc.gr). Two intensive campaigns took place, one during spring (13/03-08/04/2014) and one during summer(19/06 - 04/08/2014). During each campaign diurnal cycles were measured collecting 9 samples per day(every two hours). In addition, one diurnal cycle per week has been measured since 13/10/2014. Off-line sampling took place in adsorption tubes, using stainless steel cartridges filled with Tenax TA for one hour at 200 ml/min flow rate. Samples were stored at 40C and analyzed within two days. The samples were after desorption by a Thermal Desorber were analyzed by a GC-FID system. The most abundant monoterpenes were found to be Δ3-carene and limonene.Highest concentrations were observed during autumn when a clear diurnal cycle

  8. Secondary organic aerosol formation from hydroxyl radical oxidation and ozonolysis of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. F.; Kaminski, M.; Schlag, P.; Fuchs, H.; Acir, I.-H.; Bohn, B.; Häseler, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wang, M. J.; Wegener, R.; Wildt, J.; Wahner, A.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation by hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozonolysis are the two major pathways of daytime biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) oxidation and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In this study, we investigated the particle formation of several common monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene) by OH-dominated oxidation, which has seldom been investigated. OH oxidation experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction) chamber in Jülich, Germany, at low NOx (0.01 ~ 1 ppbV) and low ozone (O3) concentration (< 20 ppbV). OH concentration and total OH reactivity (kOH) were measured directly, and through this the overall reaction rate of total organics with OH in each reaction system was quantified. Multi-generation reaction process, particle growth, new particle formation (NPF), particle yield and chemical composition were analyzed and compared with that of monoterpene ozonolysis. Multi-generation products were found to be important in OH-dominated SOA formation. The relative role of functionalization and fragmentation in the reaction process of OH oxidation was analyzed by examining the particle mass and the particle size as a function of OH dose. We developed a novel method which quantitatively links particle growth to the reaction rate of OH with total organics in a reaction system. This method was also used to analyze the evolution of functionalization and fragmentation of organics in the particle formation by OH oxidation. It shows that functionalization of organics was dominant in the beginning of the reaction (within two lifetimes of the monoterpene) and fragmentation started to play an important role after that. We compared particle formation from OH oxidation with that from pure ozonolysis. In individual experiments, growth rates of the particle size did not necessarily correlate with the reaction rate of monoterpene with OH and O3. Comparing the size growth rates at the similar reaction rates

  9. The Ratio and Concentration of Two Monoterpenes Mediate Fecundity of the Pinewood Nematode and Growth of Its Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Hongtao; Zhao, Lilin; Lu, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Sun, Jianghua

    2012-01-01

    The pinewood nematode (PWN) Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, vectored primarily by the sawyer beetle, Monochamus alternatus, is an important invasive pest and causal agent of pine wilt disease of Chinese Masson pine, Pinus massoniana. Previous work demonstrated that the ratios and concentrations of α-pinene∶β-pinene differed between healthy trees and those trees containing blue-stain fungus (and M. alternatus pupae). However, the potential influence of the altered monoterpene ratios and concentrations on PWN and associated fungi remained unknown. Our current results show that low concentrations of the monoterpenes within petri dishes reduced PWN propagation, whereas the highest concentration of the monoterpenes increased PWN propagation. The propagation rate of PWN treated with the monoterpene ratio representative of blue-stain infected pine (α-pinene∶β-pinene = 1∶0.8, 137.6 mg/ml) was significantly higher than that (α-pinene∶β-pinene = 1∶0.1, 137.6 mg/ml) representative of healthy pines or those damaged by M. alternatus feeding, but without blue stain. Furthermore, inhibition of mycelial growth of associated fungi increased with the concentration of the monoterpenes α-pinene and β-pinene. Additionally, higher levels of β-pinene (α-pinene∶β-pinene = 1∶0.8) resulted in greater inhibition of the growth of the associated fungi Sporothrix sp.2 and Ophiostoma ips strains, but had no significant effects on the growth of Sporothrix sp.1, which is the best food resource for PWN. These results suggest that host monoterpenes generally reduce the reproduction of PWN. However, PWN utilizes high monoterpene concentrations and native blue-stain fungus Sporothrix sp.1 to improve its own propagation and overcome host resistance, which may provide clues to understanding the ecological mechanisms of PWN's successful invasion. PMID:22363713

  10. Differential effects of plant ontogeny and damage type on phloem and foliage monoterpenes in jack pine (Pinus banksiana).

    PubMed

    Erbilgin, Nadir; Colgan, L Jessie

    2012-08-01

    Coniferous trees have both constitutive and inducible defences that deter or kill herbivores and pathogens. We investigated constitutive and induced monoterpene responses of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) to a number of damage types: a fungal associate of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins), Grosmannia clavigera (Robinson-Jeffrey & R.W. Davidson); two phytohormones, methyl jasmonate (MJ) and methyl salicylate (MS); simulated herbivory; and mechanical wounding. We only included the fungal, MJ and mechanical wounding treatments in the field experiments while all treatments were part of the greenhouse studies. We focused on both constitutive and induced responses between juvenile and mature jack pine trees and differences in defences between phloem and needles. We found that phytohormone applications and fungal inoculation resulted in the greatest increase in monoterpenes in both juvenile and mature trees. Additionally, damage types differentially affected the proportions of individual monoterpenes: MJ-treated mature trees had higher myrcene and β-pinene than fungal-inoculated mature trees, while needles of juveniles inoculated with the fungus contained higher limonene than MJ- or MS-treated juveniles. Although the constitutive monoterpenes were higher in the phloem of juveniles than mature jack pine trees, the phloem of mature trees had a much higher magnitude of induction. Further, induced monoterpene concentrations in juveniles were higher in phloem than in needles. There was no difference in monoterpene concentration between phytohormone applications and G. clavigera inoculation in mature trees, while in juvenile trees MJ was different from both G. clavigera and simulated herbivory in needle monoterpenes, but there was no difference between phytohormone applications and simulated herbivory in the phloem.

  11. Alleviating monoterpene toxicity using a two-phase extractive fermentation for the bioproduction of jet fuel mixtures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Timothy C R; Turner, Christopher D; Krömer, Jens O; Nielsen, Lars K

    2012-10-01

    Monoterpenes are a diverse class of compounds with applications as flavors and fragrances, pharmaceuticals and more recently, jet fuels. Engineering biosynthetic pathways for monoterpene production in microbial hosts has received increasing attention. However, monoterpenes are highly toxic to many microorganisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a widely used industrial biocatalyst. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for S. cerevisiae was determined for five monoterpenes: β-pinene, limonene, myrcene, γ-terpinene, and terpinolene (1.52, 0.44, 2.12, 0.70, 0.53 mM, respectively). Given the low MIC for all compounds tested, a liquid two-phase solvent extraction system to alleviate toxicity during fermentation was evaluated. Ten solvents were tested for biocompatibility, monoterpene distribution, phase separation, and price. The solvents dioctyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, isopropyl myristate, and farnesene showed greater than 100-fold increase in the MIC compared to the monoterpenes in a solvent-free system. In particular, the MIC for limonene in dibutyl phthalate showed a 702-fold (308 mM, 42.1 g L(-1) of limonene) improvement while cell viability was maintained above 90%, demonstrating that extractive fermentation is a suitable tool for the reduction of monoterpene toxicity. Finally, we estimated that a limonane to farnesane ratio of 1:9 has physicochemical properties similar to traditional Jet-A aviation fuel. Since farnesene is currently produced in S. cerevisiae, its use as a co-product and extractant for microbial terpene-based jet fuel production in a two-phase system offers an attractive bioprocessing option. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of juniper berry essential oil (Juniperus communis L., Cupressaceae).

    PubMed

    Pepeljnjak, Stjepan; Kosalec, Ivan; Kalodera, Zdenka; Blazević, Nikola

    2005-12-01

    Juniper essential oil (Juniperi aetheroleum) was obtained from the juniper berry, and the GC/MS analysis showed that the main compounds in the oil were alpha-pinene (29.17%) and beta-pinene (17.84%), sabinene (13.55%), limonene (5.52%), and mircene (0.33%). Juniper essential oil was evaluated for the antimicrobial activity against sixteen bacterial species, seven yeast-like fungi, three yeast and four dermatophyte strains. Juniper essential oil showed similar bactericidal activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species, with MIC values between 8 and 70% (V/V), as well as a strong fungicidal activity against yeasts, yeast-like fungi and dermatophytes, with MIC values below 10% (V/V). The strongest fungicidal activity was recorded against Candida spp. (MIC from 0.78 to 2%, V/V) and dermatophytes (from 0.39 to 2%, V/V).

  13. Short Communication: Evaluation of the chemical composition of essential oil of Thuja occidentalis leaves grown in Peshawar, Pakistan by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Muhammad Nasimullah; Siddique, Muhammad; Rahman, Inayat-Ur; Kanwal, Farina

    2016-11-01

    Essential oil extracted from the fresh leaves of Thuja occidentalis were evaluated for its chemical composition employing GC-MS. Total of twenty nine components were identified and determined quantitatively using the area normalization procedure. Alpha-pinene and (+)-4-carene were found in high amount with a percentage concentration of 54.78 and 11.28 respectively. Other compounds which yielded appreciable amounts are: alpha-cedrol (6.87%), terpinolene (5.88%), p-menth-1-en-8-ol acetate (5.21%), beta-myrcene (4.04%), beta-pinene (2.26%), germacrene D (1.72%), sabinene (1.65%) and D-Limonene (1.62%).

  14. Characterization of the key aroma compounds in dried fruits of the West African peppertree Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich (Annonaceae) using aroma extract dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Tairu, A O; Hofmann, T; Schieberle, P

    1999-08-01

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis on an extract of the dried fruits of the West African peppertree Xylopia aethiopica obtained by extraction with diethyl ether followed by sublimation in vacuo revealed 28 odor-active compounds in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range of 4-8192, all of which could be identified. The highest FD factor was found for linalol (floral), followed by (E)-beta-ocimene (flowery), alpha-farnesene (sweet, flowery), beta-pinene (terpeny), alpha-pinene (pine needle-like), myrtenol (flowery), and beta-phellandrene (terpeny). Vanillin (vanilla-like) and 3-ethylphenol (smoky, phenolic) showing somewhat lower FD factors (FD = 128) were detected for the first time as constituents of the dried fruit.

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry study of the essential oils of Schinus longifolia (Lindl.) speg., Schinus fasciculata (Griseb.) I. M. Johnst., and Schinus areira L.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ana P; Frontera, María A; Tomas, María A; Mulet, María C

    2005-01-01

    The essential oil composition from the aerial parts of three Anacardiaceae growing in Bahía Blanca, Argentina was studied by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The essential oils of S. longifolia and S. fasciculata have been studied for the first time. The major constituents were alpha-pinene (46.5%), beta-pinene (15.1%) and alpha-phellandrene (10.1%) for S. longifolia and limonene (10.9%), beta-phellandrene (6.16%) and alpha-phellandrene (5.6%) for S. fasciculata. The major components of the essential oil of S. areira were limonene (28.6%), alpha-phellandrene (10.1%), sabinene (9.2%) and camphene (9.2%) differing from the literature data. The essential oils from S. areira and S. longifolia exhibited a high biotoxicity in a brine shrimp assay with Artemia persimilis.

  16. Impact of heat stress on the emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, phenolic BVOC and green leaf volatiles from several tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Andres, S.; Bohne, A.; Folkers, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce exposed to heat stress were measured in a laboratory setup. In general, heat stress decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Decreasing emission strength with heat stress was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions being constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, heat stress induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. It also amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers probably due to heat-induced damage of these resin ducts. The increased release of monoterpenes could be strong and long lasting. But, despite of such strong monoterpene emission pulses, the net effect of heat stress on BVOC emissions from conifers can be an overall decrease. In particular during insect attack on conifers the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat stress induced decrease of these de novo emissions was larger than the increased release caused by damage of resin ducts. We project that global change induced heat waves may cause increased BVOC emissions only in cases where the respective areas are predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Otherwise the overall effect of heat stress will be a decrease in BVOC emissions.

  17. Airborne Monoterpenes Emitted from a Cupressus lusitanica Cell Culture Induce a Signaling Cascade that Produces β-Thujaplicin.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koki; Kambe, Ryo; De Alwis, Ransika; Yagi, Tatsuya; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    A cell culture of Cupressus lusitanica was used to investigate the reaction of a plant to certain airborne chemicals. Compared with laboratory and field methods using intact plants or tissues, a cell culture is advantageous because it is not affected by environmental factors, and the experiments are easier to reproduce. When exposed to an elicitor, our cell line produces 10 monoterpenes and β-thujaplicin, which is a strong phytoalexin. These monoterpenes are emitted into the vapor phase and are expected to play a role in airborne signaling. In the present study, the cells were exposed to monoterpene vapors, and the volatiles present in the culture flasks were monitored. When the culture cells were exposed to low doses of sabinene, we detected γ-terpinene and p-cymene. After exposure to γ-terpinene, we found p-cymene and terpinolene, whereas p-cymene exposure resulted in terpinolene emission. By contrast, the other seven monoterpenes we investigated did not induce any emissions of other monoterpenes. These results strongly suggest that in C. lusitanica a signaling cascade exists that starts with the emission of sabinene and moves to γ-terpinene, p-cymene, and finally to terpinolene, which accelerates the production of the phytoalexin β-thujaplicin.

  18. Observations of speciated monoterpenes above a Southeastern United States Forest and comparison with a 0-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcavey, K. M.; Groff, C. J.; Harkins, A. D.; Bertman, S. B.; Starn, T.; Seeley, J. S.; Shepson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions of monoterpenes play a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and tropospheric ozone, as well as impacting the fate of nitrogen through production of organic nitrates. Monoterpene emissions can interact with anthropgenic emissions (e.g. sulfate aerosol) to produce a variety of SOA components, such as organosulfates. Concentrations of several monoterpenes, including some combination of α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, limonene, terpinolene, γ-terpinene, myrcene, and ρ-cymene (depending on chromatographic resolution) were quantified in a forested site in rural Alabama using an automated solid sorbent sampler/2D-GC, as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Monoterpene concentrations were relatively large in this mixed coniferous/deciduous forest, with individual terpenes maximizing at concentrations as high as 1 ppb or more, making them important OH sinks, as well as organic nitrate precursors. α-pinene was the dominant terpene measured. Diurnal patterns show a clear increase in observed monoterpene concentrations occurring in the later evening hours. In this presentation we will compare the observed terpene distribution with that from a simple landcover survey and emissions model, and discuss the relative role of isoprene and the terpenes as OH sinks, and precursors to organic nitrates, which are themselves potentially important SOA components.

  19. Characterization of two monoterpene synthases involved in floral scent formation in Hedychium coronarium.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuechong; Yu, Rangcai; Fan, Yanping

    2014-10-01

    Hedychium coronarium, a perennial herb belonging to the family Zingiberaceae, is cultivated as a garden plant or cut flower as well as for medicine and aromatic oil. Its flowers emit a fresh and inviting scent, which is mainly because of monoterpenes present in the profile of the floral volatiles. However, fragrance produced as a result of monoterpenes has not been well studied. In the present study, two novel terpene synthase (TPS) genes (HcTPS7 and HcTPS8) were isolated to study the biosynthesis of monoterpenes in H. coronarium. In vitro characterization showed that the recombinant HcTPS7 was capable of generating sabinene as its main product, in addition to nine sub-products from geranyl diphosphate (GPP). Recombinant HcTPS8 almost specifically catalyzed the formation of linalool from GPP, while it converted farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to α-bergamotene, cis-α-bisabolene, β-farnesene and other ten sesquiterpenes. Subcellular localization experiments revealed that HcTPS7 and HcTPS8 were located in plastids. Real-time PCR analyses showed that HcTPS7 and HcTPS8 genes were highly expressed in petals and sepals, but were almost undetectable in vegetative organs. The changes of their expression levels in petals were positively correlated with the emission patterns of sabinene and linalool, respectively, during flower development. The results indicated that HcTPS7 and HcTPS8 were involved in the biosynthesis of sabinene and linalool in H. coronarium flowers. Results on these two TPSs first characterized from H. coronarium provide new insights into molecular mechanisms of terpene biosynthesis in this species and also lay the basis for biotechnological modification of floral scent profile in Hedychium.

  20. Enhanced Oxidation of Isoprene and Monoterpenes in High and Low NOx Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarek, T. W.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Taha, Y. M.; Osthoff, H. D.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the troposphere, the photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is primarily initiated by their reactions with the hydroxyl radical (OH) which yields peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2). Concentrations of OH and the rates of VOC oxidation depend on the efficiency of peroxy radical recycling to OH. Radical recycling mainly occurs through reaction of HO2 with NO to produce NO2 and, ultimately, ozone (O3). Hence, the rate of VOC oxidation is dependent on NOx (=NO+NO2) concentration. The Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) campaign was conducted from March 17 to April 29, 2015 with the main goal of identifying and quantifying industrial sources of pollutants throughout the United States, in particular those associated with the production of oil and natural gas. In this work, a case study of biogenic VOC oxidation within and outside a power plant plume in the Haynesville basin near the border of Texas and Louisiana is presented. Isoprene, monoterpenes and their oxides were measured by H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry (H3O+ CIMS) in high time resolution (1 s). Further, an improved Whole Air Sampler (iWAS) was used to collect samples for post-flight analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) and yielded speciated quantification of biogenic VOCs. The monoterpene oxide to monoterpene ratio follows the spatial extent of the plume as judged by another tracer (NOx), tracking the enhancement of oxidation rates by NOx. The observations are rationalized with the aid of box modeling using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM).

  1. De novo post-illumination monoterpene burst in Quercus ilex (holm oak).

    PubMed

    Srikanta Dani, K G; Marino, Giovanni; Taiti, Cosimo; Mancuso, Stefano; Atwell, Brian J; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro

    2017-02-01

    Explicit proof for de novo origin of a rare post-illumination monoterpene burst and its consistency under low O 2 , shows interaction of photorespiration, photosynthesis, and isoprenoid biosynthesis during light-dark transitions. Quercus ilex L (holm oak) constitutively emits foliar monoterpenes in an isoprene-like fashion via the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway located in chloroplasts. Isoprene-emitting plants are known to exhibit post-illumination isoprene burst, a transient emission of isoprene in darkness. An analogous post-illumination monoterpene burst (PiMB) had remained elusive and is reported here for the first time in Q. ilex. Using 13 CO 2 labelling, we show that PiMB is made from freshly fixed carbon. PiMB is rare at ambient (20%) O 2 , absent at high (50%) O 2 , and becomes consistent in leaves exposed to low (2%) O 2 . PiMB is stronger and occurs earlier at higher temperatures. We also show that primary and secondary post-illumination CO 2 bursts (PiCO 2 B) are sensitive to O 2 in Q. ilex. The primary photorespiratory PiCO 2 B is absent under both ambient and low O 2 , but is induced under high (>50%) O 2 , while the secondary PiCO 2 B (of unknown origin) is absent under ambient, but present at low and high O 2 . We propose that post-illumination recycling of photorespired CO 2 competes with the MEP pathway for photosynthetic carbon and energy, making PiMB rare under ambient O 2 and absent at high O 2 . PiMB becomes consistent when photorespiration is suppressed in Q. ilex.

  2. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases and the origin of terpene skeletal diversity in plants.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Jörg; Köllner, Tobias G; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The multitude of terpene carbon skeletons in plants is formed by enzymes known as terpene synthases. This review covers the monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthases presenting an up-to-date list of enzymes reported and evidence for their ability to form multiple products. The reaction mechanisms of these enzyme classes are described, and information on how terpene synthase proteins mediate catalysis is summarized. Correlations between specific amino acid motifs and terpene synthase function are described, including an analysis of the relationships between active site sequence and cyclization type and a discussion of whether specific protein features might facilitate multiple product formation.

  3. Callistrilones A and B, Triketone-Phloroglucinol-Monoterpene Hybrids with a New Skeleton from Callistemon rigidus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Yu-Ting; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2016-01-04

    The first triketone-phloroglucinol-monoterpene hybrids, callistrilones A and B (1 and 2), along with a postulated biosynthetic intermediate (3) were isolated from the leaves of Callistemon rigidus. Compounds 1 and 2 featured a new carbon skeleton with an unprecedented [1]benzofuro[2,3-a]xanthene or [1]benzofuro[3,2-b]xanthene pentacyclic ring system composed of three kinds of building blocks. Their structures and absolute configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, X-ray diffraction, and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculations. A plausible biogenetic pathway for the new compounds is also proposed. Compound 1 exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria including multiresistant strains.

  4. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty for purity of a monoterpenic acid by small-scale coulometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, L. C.; de Carvalho, E. M.; Tappin, M. R. R.; Borges, P. P.

    2018-03-01

    Purity of the perylic acid (HPe) which is a monoterpenic acid from natural product (NP) with anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties was analyzed by small-scale coulometry (SSC), due to the low availability of HPe on the pharmaceutic market and its high cost. This work aims to present the evaluation of the measurements uncertainty from the purity of HPe by using SSC. Coulometric mean of purity obtained from 5 replicates resulted in 94.23% ± 0.88% (k = 2.06, for an approximately 95% confidence level). These studies aim in the future to develop the production of certified reference materials from NPs.

  5. Pondering the monoterpene composition of Pinus serotina Michx.: can limonene be used as a chemotaxonomic marker for the identification of old turpentine stumps?

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Jolie M. Mahfouz; Philip M. Sheridan

    2010-01-01

    Wood samples from old turpentine stumps in Virginia were analyzed by GC-MS to determine if the monoterpene compositions could be used for species identification. Given that limonene is reported to be the predominant monoterpene for pond pine (Pinus serotina Michx.), low relative proportions of limonene in these samples appeared to suggest that these...

  6. Modeling biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation from monoterpene reactions with NO3: A case study of the SOAS campaign using CMAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Momei; Hu, Yongtao; Wang, Xuesong; Vasilakos, Petros; Boyd, Christopher M.; Xu, Lu; Song, Yu; Ng, Nga Lee; Nenes, Athanasios; Russell, Armistead G.

    2018-07-01

    Monoterpenes react with nitrate radicals (NO3), contributing substantially to nighttime organic aerosol (OA) production. In this study, the role of reactions of monoterpenes + NO3 in forming biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) was examined using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, with extended emission profiles of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), species-specific representations of BSOA production from individual monoterpenes and updated aerosol yields for monoterpene + NO3. The model results were compared to detailed measurements from the Southern Oxidants and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at Centreville, Alabama. With the more detailed model, monoterpene-derived BSOA increased by ∼1 μg m-3 at night, accounting for one-third of observed less-oxidized oxygenated OA (LO-OOA), more closely agreeing with observations (lower error, stronger correlation). Implementation of a multigenerational oxidation approach resulted in the model capturing elevated OA episodes. With the aging model, aged semi-volatile organic compounds (ASVOCs) contributed over 60% of the monoterpene-derived BSOA, followed by SOA formation via nitrate radical chemistry, making up to 34% of that formed at night. Among individual monoterpenes, β-pinene and limonene contributed most to the monoterpene-derived BSOA from nighttime reactions.

  7. Influence of gibberellin and daminozide on the expression of terpene synthases and on monoterpenes in common sage (Salvia officinalis).

    PubMed

    Schmiderer, Corinna; Grausgruber-Gröger, Sabine; Grassi, Paolo; Steinborn, Ralf; Novak, Johannes

    2010-07-01

    Common sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is one of the most important medicinal and aromatic plants, with antioxidant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, astringent, antihidrotic and specific sensorial properties. The essential oil of the plant, composed mainly of the monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, alpha-thujone, beta-thujone and camphor, is responsible for some of these effects. Gibberellins regulate diverse physiological processes in plants, such as seed germination, shoot elongation and cell division. In this study, we analyzed the effect of exogenously applied plant growth regulators, namely gibberellic acid (GA(3)) and daminozide, on leaf morphology and essential oil formation of two leaf stages during the period of leaf expansion. Essential oil content increased with increasing levels of gibberellins and decreased when gibberellin biosynthesis was blocked with daminozide. With increasing levels of gibberellins, 1,8-cineole and camphor contents increased. Daminozide blocked the accumulation of alpha- and beta-thujone. GA(3) at the highest level applied also led to a significant decrease of alpha- and beta-thujone. Monoterpene synthases are a class of enzymes responsible for the first step in monoterpene biosynthesis, competing for the same substrate geranylpyrophosphate. The levels of gene expression of the three most important monoterpene synthases in sage were investigated, 1,8-cineole synthase leading directly to 1,8-cineole, (+)-sabinene synthase responsible for the first step in the formation of alpha- and beta-thujone, and (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, the first step in camphor biosynthesis. The foliar application of GA(3) increased, while daminozide significantly decreased gene expression of the monoterpene synthases. The amounts of two of the end products, 1,8-cineole and camphor, were directly correlated with the levels of gene expression of the respective monoterpene synthases, indicating transcriptional control, while the formation of alpha- and beta

  8. Chemical analysis of particulate and gaseous products from the monoterpene oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber during the EUCAARI campaign 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnt, A.; Iinuma, Y.; Herrmann, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Fisseha, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes leads to multifunctional products with lower vapour pressure. These products condense and coagulate to existing particles leading to particle formation and growth. In order to obtain better insights into the mechanisms and the importance of sources to organic aerosol, a mixture of monoterpenes was oxidised in the SAPHIR outdoor chamber during the EUCAARI campaign in 2008. The mixture was made of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, 3-carene and ocimene, representing a typical monoterpene emission from a boreal forest. In addition, two sesquiterpenes (α-farnesene and caryophyllene) were reacted together with the monoterpene mixture in some experiments. The VOC (volatile organic compound) mixture was reacted under tropospheric oxidation and light conditions in a prolonged time scale over two days. In the present study, a special emphasis is put on the detection of carbonyl compounds from the off-line analysis of collected filter and denuder samples from the campaign in 2008. The oxidation products which contain carbonyl groups are important first stable intermediates during the monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation. They react further with atmospheric oxidants to form lower volatile acidic compounds, contributing to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Commonly used methods for the analysis of carbonyl compounds involve derivatisation steps prior to separation and subsequent UV or MS detection. In the present study, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was used to derivatise the extracted filter and denuder samples. The DNPH converts aldehyde- and keto-groups to stable hydrazones, which can be purified afterwards using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The derivatised samples were analysed with HPLC/ESI-TOFMS which allowed us to determine the exact chemical formula of unknown products. In addition to known carbonyl compounds from monoterpene oxidation such as pinonaldehyde and nopinon, previously unreported molecular masses

  9. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in tomato fruits via introduction of the non-canonical substrate neryl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gutensohn, Michael; Nguyen, Thuong T H; McMahon, Richard D; Kaplan, Ian; Pichersky, Eran; Dudareva, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Recently it was shown that monoterpenes in tomato trichomes (Solanum lycopersicum) are synthesized by phellandrene synthase 1 (PHS1) from the non-canonical substrate neryl diphosphate (NPP), the cis-isomer of geranyl diphosphate (GPP). As PHS1 accepts both NPP and GPP substrates forming different monoterpenes, it was overexpressed in tomato fruits to test if NPP is also available in a tissue highly active in carotenoid production. However, transgenic fruits overexpressing PHS1 produced only small amounts of GPP-derived PHS1 monoterpene products, indicating the absence of endogenous NPP. Therefore, NPP formation was achieved by diverting the metabolic flux from carotenoids via expression of tomato neryl diphosphate synthase 1 (NDPS1). NDPS1 transgenic fruits produced NPP-derived monoterpenes, including nerol, neral and geranial, while displaying reduced lycopene content. NDPS1 co-expression with PHS1 resulted in a monoterpene blend, including β-phellandrene, similar to that produced from NPP by PHS1 in vitro and in trichomes. Unexpectedly, PHS1×NDPS1 fruits showed recovery of lycopene levels compared to NDPS1 fruits, suggesting that redirection of metabolic flux is only partially responsible for the reduction in carotenoids. In vitro assays demonstrated that NPP serves as an inhibitor of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, thus its consumption by PHS1 leads to recovery of lycopene levels. Monoterpenes produced in PHS1×NDPS1 fruits contributed to direct plant defense negatively affecting feeding behavior of the herbivore Helicoverpa zea and displaying antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea. These results show that NPP-derived terpenoids can be produced in plant tissues; however, NPP has to be consumed to avoid negative impacts on plant metabolism. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction of Senescence and Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Tomato in Response to Monoterpene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Kumar, Anil; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2013-01-01

    Monoterpenes, which are among the major components of plant essential oils, are known for their ecological roles as well for pharmaceutical properties. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/senescence in various cancer cells and plants; however, the genes involved in the process and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of tomato plants with geraniol results in induction of senescence due to a substantial alteration in transcriptome. We have identified several geraniol-responsive protein encoding genes in tomato using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach. These genes comprise of various components of signal transduction, cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene signalling, apoptosis and DNA damage response. Upregulation of NADPH oxidase and antioxidant genes, and increase in ROS level after geraniol treatment point towards the involvement of ROS in geraniol-mediated senescence. The delayed onset of seedling death and induced expression of geraniol-responsive genes in geraniol-treated ethylene receptor mutant (Nr) suggest that geraniol-mediated senescence involves both ethylene dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, expression analysis during tomato ripening revealed that geraniol-responsive genes are also associated with the natural organ senescence process. PMID:24098759

  11. Sorption of the monoterpenes α-pinene and limonene to carbonaceous geosorbents including biochar.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Endo, Satoshi; Arp, Hans Peter H; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The sorption of two monoterpenes, α pinene and limonene to the carbonaceous geosorbents graphite, bituminous coal, lignite coke, biochar and Pahokee peat was quantified. Polyethylene (PE) passive samplers were calibrated for the first time for these compounds by determining the PE-water partitioning coefficients and used as a tool to determine sorption to the carbonaceous geosorbents. Log KPE-water values were 3.49±0.58 for α pinene and 4.08±0.27 for limonene. The sorption of limonene to all materials was stronger than that for α pinene (differences of 0.2-1.3 log units between distribution coefficients for the monoterpenes). Placing Kd values in increasing order for α pinene gave biochar≈Pahokee peat≈bituminous coal≈lignite coke

  12. BOREAS TGB-8 Monoterpene Concentration Data over the SSA-OBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Lerdau, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-8 team collected data to investigate the controls over NMHC fluxes from boreal forest tree species. This data set contains measurements of monoterpene concentrations in collected foliar gas emissions and foliar samples. The data were collected at the OJP and OBS tower flux sites in the SSA and were the locus for the monoterpene emission measurements. These areas contained mature stands of jack pine and black spruce and were the focal sites in the BOREAS program for studies of biosphere/atmosphere exchange from these two habitat types. The OBS site is situated in a black spruce/sphagnum bog with the largest trees 155 years old and 10-15 m tall. The OJP site is in a jack pine forest, 80 to 120 years old, which lies on a sandy bench of glacial outwash with the largest tree standing 15 m tall. Temporally, the data cover the period of 24-May-1994 to 19-Sep-1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  13. Alternative control of Aedes aegypti resistant to pyrethroids: lethal and sublethal effects of monoterpene bioinsecticides.

    PubMed

    Silva, Indira Ma; Martins, Gustavo F; Melo, Carlisson R; Santana, Alisson S; Faro, Ruan Rn; Blank, Arie F; Alves, Péricles B; Picanço, Marcelo C; Cristaldo, Paulo F; Araújo, Ana Paula A; Bacci, Leandro

    2018-04-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is intensively controlled because it is a vector of viruses that cause numerous diseases, especially in tropical regions. As a consequence of the indiscriminate use of insecticides, populations from different regions have become resistant to pyrethroids. Here, we analyzed the lethal and sublethal effects of essential oil of Aristolochia trilobata and its major compounds on A. aegypti from susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant populations. Our results showed that the toxicity of the different compounds and behavioral changes in response to them are dependent on the stage of the insect life cycle. The monoterpene ρ-cymene caused high mortality in both larvae and adult females of A. aegypti, including those from the pyrethroid-resistant population. The monoterpenes limonene and linalool caused a sublethal effect in the larvae, triggering changes in the swimming pattern. This study highlights the potential of the essential oil of A. trilobata and its major compounds ρ-cymene and limonene for the control of A. aegypti and reveals the importance of analyzing sublethal effects on the population dynamics of the A. aegypti mosquito. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Essential Oil Yield Pattern and Antibacterial and Insecticidal Activities of Trachyspermum ammi and Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Soni, Rajgovind; Sharma, Gaurav; Jasuja, Nakuleshwar Dut

    2016-01-01

    Two Indian spices, Trachyspermum ammi and Myristica fragrans, were studied for their essential oil (EO) yielding pattern, insecticidal activity, antibacterial activity, and composition. The essential oils (EOs) of T. ammi (1.94 ± 30 mL/100 gm) and M. fragrans (5.93 ± 90 mL/100 gm) were extracted using hydrodistillation method. In Gas Chromatography analysis, the beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, alpha-p-menth-1-en-4-ol, Limonene, and elemicin were found as major constituents of T. ammi essential oil whereas M. fragrans essential oil mostly contains Gamma-Terpinolene, p-Cymene, Thymol, and beta-pinene. The insecticidal activities of EO were demonstrated using LC50 values against Plodia interpunctella and EO of T. ammi was found comparatively more effective than EO of M. fragrans. Further, individual EO and combination of essential oil were examined for antibacterial activity against three Gram (-) bacterial strains (E. coli-MTCC 443, P. vulgaris-MTCC 1771, and K. pneumoniae-MTCC number 7028) and three Gram (+) bacterial strains (S. aureus-MTCC 3381, B. subtilis-MTCC 10619, and B. megaterium-MTCC 2412) by well agar diffusion method. The essential oil in combination (CEO) exhibited higher antibacterial activity as compared with individual essential oils.

  15. Ex vivo skin absorption of terpenes from Vicks VapoRub ointment.

    PubMed

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sopala, Monika

    2008-08-01

    The pharmaceutical market offers a wide range of inhalant drug products applied on the skin that contain essential oils and/or their isolated compounds, i.e. terpenes. Because there are few data concerning the skin penetration of terpenes, especially from complex carriers, the goal of this study was to determine the ex vivo skin absorption kinetics of chosen terpenes, namely eucalyptol, menthol, camphor, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene, from the product Vicks VapoRub. Human cadaver skin was placed in a flow-through diffusion chamber and the product was applied for 15, 30, and 60 min. After the application time the skin was separated into layers using a tape-stripping technique: three fractions of stratum corneum and epidermis with dermis, and terpenes amounts in the samples were determined by gas-chromatography. The investigated terpenes showed different absorption characteristics related to their physicochemical properties and did not permeate through the skin into the acceptor fluid. Eucalyptol had the largest total accumulation in the stratum corneum and in the epidermis with dermis, while alpha-pinene penetrated into the skin in the smallest amount. The short time in which saturation of the stratum corneum with the terpenes occurred and the high accumulation of most of the investigated terpenes in the skin layers proved that these compounds easily penetrate and permeate the stratum corneum and that in vivo they may easily penetrate into the blood circulation.

  16. Bark beetles, pityogenes bidentatus, orienting to aggregation pheromone avoid conifer monoterpene odors when flying but not when walking

    Previous studies have provided evidence that monoterpene odors from healthy host Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and non-host Norway spruce (Picea abies) significantly reduce the attraction of flying bark beetles, Pityogenes bidentatus, to their aggregation pheromone components (grandisol and cis-ver...

  17. Dose-Dependent and Species-Specific Responses of Pine Bark Beetles (Coeoptera: Scolytidae) to Monoterpenes in Association with Phermones

    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden

    2000-01-01

    Monoterpenes affected the attraction of three sympatric species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to pheromone-baited multiple-funnel traps in stands of lodgepole pine. Catches of Ips pini(Say) in traps baited with its pheromone, ipsdienol, were directly related to the release rates of 3-carene, ß-pphellandrene, and ß-pinene. Catches of

  18. A novel Fast Gas Chromatography based technique for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C10-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a ~ 14 min analysis time. Moreover, in situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an ~ 11 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to ~ 19 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). This corresponds to a two- to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest ~ 30 km west of central Tokyo, Japan, the

  19. Monoterpene emissions from needles of hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × Larix kaempferi) grown under elevated carbon dioxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Tani, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We measured monoterpene emissions from needles of hybrid larch F1 (Larix gmelinii var. japonica × Larix kaempferi) to evaluate the response of monoterpene emission rates and their composition to elevated CO2 (600 μmol mol-1) and O3 (60 nmol mol-1) conditions. The dominant monoterpenes were α-pinene and β-pinene. The emission rate of total monoterpenes significantly decreased under elevated CO2 conditions (P < 0.05). The ratio of carbon emission in the form of monoterpenes to photosynthetically fixed carbon also significantly decreased under elevated CO2 conditions. By contrast, elevated O3 did not significantly affect the emission rate of total monoterpenes. The ratios of α-pinene/β-pinene, limonene/β-pinene, and myrcene/β-pinene were all significantly decreased by O3 exposure (P < 0.05). High reactivity of α-pinene, limonene, and myrcene when combining with O3 may be able to mitigate oxidative damage inside the larch needles. No significant combined effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on individual or total monoterpene emissions were detected.

  20. Fate and transport of monoterpenes through soils. Part II: calculation of the effect of soil temperature, water saturation and organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    van Roon, André; Parsons, John R; Krap, Lenny; Govers, Harrie A J

    2005-09-01

    This theoretical study was performed to investigate the influence of soil temperature, soil water content and soil organic carbon fraction on the mobility of monoterpenes (C10HnOn') applied as pesticides to a top soil layer. This mobility was expressed as the amount volatilized and leached from the contaminated soil layer after a certain amount of time. For this, (slightly modified) published analytical solutions to a one dimensional, homogeneous medium, diffusion/advection/biodegradation mass balance equation were used. The required input-parameters were determined in a preceding study. Because the monoterpenes studied differ widely in the values for their physico-chemical properties, the relative importance of the various determinants also differed widely. Increasing soil water saturation reduced monoterpene vaporization and leaching losses although a modest increase was usually observed at high soil water contents. Organic matter served as the major retention domain, reducing volatilization and leaching losses. Increasing temperature resulted in higher volatilization and leaching losses. Monoterpene mobility was influenced by vertical water flow. Volatilization losses could be reduced by adding a clean soil layer on top of the contaminated soil. Detailed insight into the specific behaviour of different monoterpenes was obtained by discussing intermediate calculation results; the transport retardation factors and effective soil diffusion coefficients. One insight was that the air-water interface compartment is probably not an important partitioning domain for monoterpenes in most circumstances. The results further indicated that biodegradation is an important process for monoterpenes in soil.

  1. Monoterpene separation by coupling proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry with fastGC.

    PubMed

    Materić, Dušan; Lanza, Matteo; Sulzer, Philipp; Herbig, Jens; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a well-established technique for real-time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Although it is extremely sensitive (with sensitivities of up to 4500 cps/ppbv, limits of detection <1 pptv and the response times of approximately 100 ms), the selectivity of PTR-MS is still somewhat limited, as isomers cannot be separated. Recently, selectivity-enhancing measures, such as manipulation of drift tube parameters (reduced electric field strength) and using primary ions other than H3O(+), such as NO(+) and O2 (+), have been introduced. However, monoterpenes, which belong to the most important plant VOCs, still cannot be distinguished so more traditional technologies, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), have to be utilised. GC-MS is very time consuming (up to 1 h) and cannot be used for real-time analysis. Here, we introduce a sensitive, near-to-real-time method for plant monoterpene research-PTR-MS coupled with fastGC. We successfully separated and identified six of the most abundant monoterpenes in plant studies (α- and β-pinenes, limonene, 3-carene, camphene and myrcene) in less than 80 s, using both standards and conifer branch enclosures (Norway spruce, Scots pine and black pine). Five monoterpenes usually present in Norway spruce samples with a high abundance were separated even when the compound concentrations were diluted to 20 ppbv. Thus, fastGC-PTR-ToF-MS was shown to be an adequate one-instrument solution for plant monoterpene research.

  2. Temperature Dependency of the Correlation between Secondary Organic Aerosol and Monoterpenes Concentrations at a Boreal Forest Site in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhang, W.; Rinne, J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate feedbacks represent the large uncertainty in the climate projection partly due to the difficulties to quantify the feedback mechanisms in the biosphere-atmosphere interaction. Recently, a negative climate feedback mechanism whereby higher temperatures and CO2-levels boost continental biomass production, leading to increased biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, tending to cause cooling, has been attached much attention. To quantify the relationship between biogenic organic compounds (BVOCs) and SOA, a five-year data set (2008, 2010-2011,2013-2014) for SOA and monoterpenes concentrations (the dominant fraction of BVOCs) measured at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland, is analyzed. Our results show that there is a moderate linear correlation between SOA and monoterpenes concentration with the correlation coefficient (R) as 0.66. To rule out the influence of anthropogenic aerosols, the dataset is further filtered by selecting the data at the wind direction of cleaner air mass, leading to an improved R as 0.68. As temperature is a critical factor for vegetation growth, BVOC emissions, and condensation rate, the correlation between SOA and monoterpenes concentration at different temperature windows are studied. The result shows a higher R and slope of linear regression as temperature increases. To identify the dominant oxidant responsible for the BVOC-SOA conversion, the correlations between SOA concentration and the monoterpenes oxidation rates by O3 and OH are compared, suggesting more SOA is contributed by O3 oxidation process. Finally, the possible processes and factors such as the atmospheric boundary layer depth, limiting factor in the monoterpenes oxidation process, as well as temperature sensitivity in the condensation process contributing to the temperature dependence of correlation between BVOA and SOA are investigated.

  3. Comparable Monoterpene emission from pine forests across 500 mm precipitation gradient in the semi-arid transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Roger; Karl, Thomas; Turnipseed, Andrew; Greenberg, Jim; Guenther, Alex; Llusia, Joan; Penuelas, Josep; Dicken, Uri; Rotenberg, Eyal; Rohatyn, Shani; Preisler, Yakir; Yakir, Dan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have key environmental and biological roles, and can affect atmospheric chemistry, secondary aerosol formation, and as a consequence also climate. At the same time, global changes in climate arising from human activities can modify the VOC emissions of vegetation in the coming years. Monoterpene emission fluxes were measured during April 2013 at two forests in the semi-arid climate of Israel. Both forests were dominated by Pinus halepensis trees of similar age, but differed in the amount of annual average precipitation received (~276 and ~760 mm at the Yatir and Birya sites, respectively). Measurements performed included leaf-level sampling and gas exchange, as well as canopy-level flux calculations. Leaf level monoterpene emissions were sampled from leaf cuvettes with adsorbent cartridges and later analyzed by GC-MS. Canopy scale fluxes were calculated with the Disjunct Eddy Covariance technique by means of a Quadrupole PTRMS and eddy-covariance system. We report the differences observed between the two forests in terms of photosynthetic activity and monoterpene emissions, aiming to see the effect of the different climatic regimes at each location. Significantly higher emission rates of monoterpenes were observed in the wetter site during mid-day, in both the leaf scale and canopy scale measurements. Remarkably, however, normalized to 30C and corrected for tree density differences between the sites indicated comparable emission rates for both sites, with higher emission rated in the evening hours in the dry site at the edge of the Negev Desert. Modeling the monoterpene emission rates using MEGAN v2.1 indicated better agreement with observations in the wetter site then in the dry site, especially with respect to fluxes during the evening hours.

  4. Fluxes of isoprene and monoterpenes emitted by Tapajos National Forest, eastern central Amazonian rainforest, Santarem-PA, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Batalha, S. S. A.; Park, J. H.; Seco, R.; Tota, J.; Santana, R. A. S. D.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.; Smith, J. N.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical cycles. It is known that tropical forests are the biggest source of the dominant BVOCs (i.e. isoprene and monoterpenes) emitted to the atmosphere. Nevertheless, Amazonian rainforest, the world's largest tropical rainforest, has been poorly explored for isoprene and monoterpene emissions. Recently (June and July 2014), we deployed a PTR-TOF-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometer) to quantify isoprene and monoterpene emissions using the eddy covariance flux method at the FLONA Tapajos (Floresta Nacional do Tapajos; Tapajos National Forest) in the eastern central Amazon rainforest, Santarem-PA, Brazil. The sample inlet and a 3D-sonic anemometer were located above the forest canopy (~65m), and the air was sampled through a long Teflon tube (100m) with high flow rate (40L/min) to the PTR-TOF-MS. From preliminary results for the first 3 days, concentrations and fluxes of m/z 69 (isoprene; C5H8-H+) and m/z 137 (total monoterpenes; C10H16-H+) showed a clear circadian cycle (high during daytime and low at nighttime), suggesting the emissions of these compounds are light and temperature dependent. Our study provides the first PTR-TOF-MS flux observations of isoprene and total monoterpenes at the Flona Tapajos. Moreover, since there are variations on the emissions, when comparing different environments of the huge Amazon basin, these results from eastern central Amazonia will contribute to improving regional and global BVOC emission model estimates.

  5. Oxidative stress and production of bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids: biotechnological implications.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hélio Nitta; Rau, Mariana Ritter; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2014-02-01

    Monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) encompass plant natural products with important pharmacological relevance. They include the anti-tumoral MIAs found in Catharanthus roseus and Camptotheca acuminata. The often low yields of bioactive alkaloids in plants has prompted research to identify the factors regulating MIA production. Oxidative stress is a general response associated with biotic and abiotic stresses leading to several secondary responses, including elicitation of MIA production. These changes in secondary metabolism may take place directly or via second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). H2O2 is the main ROS that participates in MIA biosynthesis. This review analyzes the links between oxidative stress, elicitation of bioactive MIA production and their potential roles in antioxidant defense, as well as exploring the implications to developing biotechnological strategies relevant for alkaloid supply.

  6. Impact of aromatics and monoterpenes on simulated tropospheric ozone and total OH reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, William C.; Safieddine, Sarah A.; Heald, Colette L.

    2017-11-01

    The accurate representation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in models is an important step towards the goal of understanding and predicting many changes in atmospheric constituents relevant to climate change and human health. While isoprene is the most abundant non-methane VOC, many other compounds play a large role in governing pollutant formation and the overall oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. We quantify the impacts of aromatics and monoterpenes, two classes of VOC not included in the standard gas-phase chemistry of the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, on atmospheric composition. We find that including these compounds increases mean total summer OH reactivity by an average of 11% over the United States, Europe, and Asia. This increased reactivity results in higher simulated levels of O3, raising maximum daily 8-h average O3 in the summer by up to 14 ppb at some NOx-saturated locations.

  7. Release of wine monoterpenes from natural precursors by glycosidases from Oenococcus oeni

    PubMed Central

    Michlmayr, Herbert; Nauer, Stefan; Brandes, Walter; Schümann, Christina; Kulbe, Klaus D.; del Hierro, Andrés M.; Eder, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that wine-related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially Oenococcus oeni, possess glycosidase activities that positively contribute to wine aroma through the hydrolysis of grape-derived aroma precursors. In our recent studies, we have identified and characterised several LAB glycosidases with potential in these terms. Here, we report that both a glucosidase and an arabinosidase from O. oeni can release high amounts of monoterpenes from natural substrates under optimal conditions, indicating that these intracellular enzymes might play a significant role in the hydrolysis of aroma precursors during malolactic fermentation. The enzymes from O. oeni exhibited broad substrate specificities (release of both primary/tertiary terpene alcohols) and were even active in grape juice. Further, a sensory panel clearly preferred enzyme-treated Riesling wines over the controls and affirmed that the glycosidases from O. oeni could improve the typical Riesling aroma.

  8. Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Monoterpenes in Scots Pine and Norway Spruce Tissues Affect Pine Weevil Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Lina; Nordlander, Göran; Björklund, Niklas; Nordenhem, Henrik; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2016-12-01

    In large parts of Europe, insecticide-free measures for protecting conifer plants are desired to suppress damage by the pine weevil Hylobius abietis (L.). Treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a chemical elicitor already used in crop production, may enhance expression of chemical defenses in seedlings in conifer regenerations. However, in a previous experiment, MeJA treatment resulted in substantially better field protection for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) than for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Hypothesizing that the variations may be at least due partly to volatiles released by MeJA-treated seedlings and their effects on pine weevil orientation, we examined tissue extracts of seedlings (from the same batches as previously used) by two-dimensional GC-MS. We found that the MeJA treatment increased contents of the monoterpene (-)-β-pinene in phloem (the weevil's main target tissue) of both tree species, however, the (-)-β-pinene/(-)-α-pinene ratio increased more in the phloem of P. sylvestris. We also tested the attractiveness of individual monoterpenes found in conifer tissues (needles and phloem) for pine weevils using an arena with traps baited with single-substance dispensers and pine twigs. Trap catches were reduced when the pine material was combined with a dispenser releasing (-)-β-pinene, (+)-3-carene, (-)-bornyl acetate or 1,8-cineole. However, (-)-α-pinene did not have this effect. Thus, the greater field protection of MeJA-treated P. sylvestris seedlings may be due to the selective induction of increases in contents of the deterrent (-)-β-pinene, in contrast to strong increases in both non-deterrent (-)-α-pinene and the deterrent (-)-β-pinene in P. abies seedlings.

  9. Unexpected Irregular Monoterpene "Yomogi Alcohol" in the Volatiles of the Lathyrus L. species (Leguminosae) of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Polatoğlu, Kaan; Arsal, Seniha; Demirci, Betül; Can Başer, Kemal Hüsnü

    2016-01-01

    Lathyrus species including L. ochrus and L. sativus are known for their food, feed and horticultural uses. Despite their widespread uses and cultivation, there is limited information on their chemistry. Previously, only the essential oil composition of L. rotundifolius, L. vernus and volatiles of L. odoratus have been reported. In the present research, volatiles of seven Lathyrus L. species, namely, L. aphaca, L. ochrus, L. cicera, L. sativus, L. gorgonei, L. saxatilis and L. blepharicarpos var. cyprius were analyzed by SPME GC-MS for the first time. Plant materials were collected from five different locations in Cyprus (February-March 2012). The main components of L. aphaca volatiles from four locations were yomogi alcohol 26.1-16.5%, camphor 21.6-10.1%, tetradecane 14.3-0%; L. cicera from five locations were yomogi alcohol 20.3-3.0%, camphor 18.7-2.0%; L. gorgonei from two locations were yomogi alcohol 24.5-13.1%, camphor 17.1-9.0% and L. sativus was yomogi alcohol 11.4%, camphor 9.0%. Yomogi alcohol was not present as the major compound in L. ochrus (2-methyl butanoic acid 7.2%), L. saxatilis (hexanal 7.7%) and L. blepharicarpos var. cyprius ((Z)-3-hexenal 8.6%) volatiles. The volatiles of the Lathyrus species were also compared with each other quantitative and qualitatively using AHC analysis to find out differences among the species. The irregular monoterpene yomogi alcohol is reported from the Lathyrus and the Leguminosae family for the first time. The existence of yomogi alcohol in Lathyrus volatiles points out that the irregular monoterpenes are not restricted solely to Asteraceae family.

  10. Temperature-dependent rate coefficients for the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with the atmospheric biogenics isoprene, alpha-pinene and delta-3-carene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Terry J.; Dulitz, Katrin; Groß, Christoph B. M.; Crowley, John N.

    2017-12-01

    Pulsed laser methods for OH generation and detection were used to study atmospheric degradation reactions for three important biogenic gases: OH + isoprene (Reaction R1), OH +α-pinene (Reaction R2) and OH + Δ-3-carene (Reaction R3). Gas-phase rate coefficients were characterized by non-Arrhenius kinetics for all three reactions. For (R1), k1 (241-356 K) = (1.93±0.08) × 10-11exp{(466±12)/T} cm3 molecule-1 s-1 was determined, with a room temperature value of k1 (297 K) = (9.3±0.4) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of bath-gas pressure (5-200 Torr) and composition (M = N2 or air). Accuracy and precision were enhanced by online optical monitoring of isoprene, with absolute concentrations obtained via an absorption cross section, σisoprene = (1.28±0.06) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at λ = 184.95 nm, determined in this work. These results indicate that significant discrepancies between previous absolute and relative-rate determinations of k1 result in part from σ values used to derive the isoprene concentration in high-precision absolute determinations.

    Similar methods were used to determine rate coefficients (in 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) for (R2)-(R3): k2 (238-357 K) = (1.83±0.04) × exp{(330±6)/T} and k3 (235-357 K) = (2.48±0.14) × exp{(357±17)/T}. This is the first temperature-dependent dataset for (R3) and enables the calculation of reliable atmospheric lifetimes with respect to OH removal for e.g. boreal forest springtime conditions. Room temperature values of k2 (296 K) = (5.4±0.2) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and k3 (297 K) = (8.1±0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 were independent of bath-gas pressure (7-200 Torr, N2 or air) and in good agreement with previously reported values. In the course of this work, 184.95 nm absorption cross sections were determined: σ = (1.54±0.08) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 for α-pinene and (2.40±0.12) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 for Δ-3-carene.

  11. MODELING AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ALPHA-PINENE + NOX IN THE PRESENCE OF NATURAL SUNLIGHT USING GAS PHASE KINETICS AND GAS-PARTICLE PARTITIONING THEORY. (R826771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic mechanism was used to link and model the gas-phase reactions and
    aerosol accumulation resulting from src="/ncer/pubs/images/alpha.gif">-pinene reactions in the presence of sunlight,
    ozone (O3), and oxides of nitrogen
    (NO

  12. The effect of sub-zero temperature on the formation and composition of secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, K; Jensen, L N; Glasius, M; Bilde, M

    2017-10-18

    This study presents a newly constructed temperature controlled cold-room smog chamber at Aarhus University, Denmark. The chamber is herein utilized to study the effect of sub-zero temperature on the formation and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene. The chemical composition of α-pinene SOA formed from dark ozonolysis of α-pinene at 293 K and 258 K was investigated using High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS) and Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI-qToF-MS). For comparison, an OH-initiated oxidation experiment was performed at 293 K. In ozonolysis experiments it was found that oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratios were higher in the particles formed at 293 K compared to 258 K. A total of 16 different organic acids and 30 dimers esters were quantified in the collected particles composing up to 34% of the total α-pinene SOA mass with increased mass fraction of carboxylic acids in particles from α-pinene ozonolysis at 258 K compared to 293 K. In contrast, dimer esters showed suppressed formation at the sub-zero reaction temperature, thus contributing 3% to SOA mass at 258 K while contributing 9% at 293 K. SOA formed in the OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene at 293 K resulted in low concentrations of dimer esters supporting Criegee intermediates as a possible pathway to dimer ester formation. Vapour pressure estimates of the identified carboxylic acids and dimer esters are presented and show how otherwise semi-volatile carboxylic acids at sufficiently low temperatures may classify as low or even extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOC), thus may add to an enhanced particle formation observed at the sub-zero temperature through gas-to-particle conversion. The change in chemical composition of the SOA particles with temperature is ascribed to a combination of effects: the decreased vapour pressures and hence increased condensation of carboxylic acids from the gas phase to the particle phase along with suppressed formation of the high molecular weight dimer esters and different gas and particle phase chemistry results in particles of different chemical composition as a consequence of low reaction temperatures.

  13. Ca²⁺ signal contributing to the synthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia'.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zenghui; Li, Tianjiao; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Kai; He, Xiangfeng; Leng, Pingsheng

    2015-06-01

    The floral scent is an important part of plant volatile compounds, and is influenced by environmental factors. The emission of monoterpenes of Lilium 'siberia' is regulated by light intensity, but the mechanism is large unknown. In this study, the expression of Li-mTPS, a monoterpene synthase gene in the tepals of Lilium 'siberia', and net Ca(2+) flux were investigated after exposure to different levels of light intensity (0, 100, 300, 600, 1000, and 1500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Moreover the effect of LaCl3 and ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on the Li-mTPS expression, monoterpene emission, and net Ca(2+) flux were examined at 600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that along with the enhancement of light intensity, the expression level of Li-mTPS increased gradually, and the net Ca(2+) influx was also enhanced showing a similar pattern. It was found that LaCl3 and EGTA effectively inhibited the increase in expression of Li-mTPS and the net Ca(2+) influx induced by light treatment. Moreover, the release amounts of monoterpenes decreased significantly after treatment with LaCl3 and EGTA. So it can be concluded that Ca(2+) signal contributed to the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia' tepals. The increased light intensity firstly triggered the Ca(2+) influx to cytoplasm, and then the gene expression of monoterpene synthases downstream was activated to regulate the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes. But in the signaling pathway other mechanisms were thought to be involved in the emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity, which need to be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of water stress and fungal inoculation on monoterpene emission from an historical and a new pine host of the mountain pine beetle.

    PubMed

    Lusebrink, Inka; Evenden, Maya L; Blanchet, F Guillaume; Cooke, Janice E K; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2011-09-01

    The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) has killed millions of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) trees in Western Canada, and recent range expansion has resulted in attack of jack pine (Pinus banksiana) in Alberta. Establishment of MPB in the Boreal forest will require use of jack pine under a suite of environmental conditions different from those it typically encounters in its native range. Lodgepole and jack pine seedlings were grown under controlled environment conditions and subjected to either water deficit or well watered conditions and inoculated with Grosmannia clavigera, a MPB fungal associate. Soil water content, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored over the duration of the six-week study. Monoterpene content of bark and needle tissue was measured at the end of the experiment. β-Phellandrene, the major monoterpene in lodgepole pine, was almost completely lacking in the volatile emission profile of jack pine. The major compound in jack pine was α-pinene. The emission of both compounds was positively correlated with stomatal conductance. 3-Carene was emitted at a high concentration from jack pine seedlings, which is in contrast to monoterpene profiles of jack pine from more southern and eastern parts of its range. Fungal inoculation caused a significant increase in total monoterpene emission in water deficit lodgepole pine seedlings right after its application. By 4 weeks into the experiment, water deficit seedlings of both species released significantly lower levels of total monoterpenes than well watered seedlings. Needle tissue contained lower total monoterpene content than bark. Generally, monoterpene tissue content increased over time independent from any treatment. The results suggest that monoterpenes that play a role in pine-MPB interactions differ between lodgepole and jack pine, and also that they are affected by water availability.

  15. Monoterpenes: Novel insights into their biological effects and roles on glucose uptake and lipid metabolism in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Tan, X C; Chua, K H; Ravishankar Ram, M; Kuppusamy, U R

    2016-04-01

    Various strategies have been adopted to combat complications caused by Type 2 diabetes mellitus and controlled diet is one of them. Monoterpenes, major constituents of essential oils, are synthesized and widely used as artificial food flavors. A series of twelve monoterpenes were assessed in the present study. Monoterpenes, exhibited low 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity even at high concentrations. Some monoterpenes inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and stimulated glucose uptake and lipolysis. Monoterpenes such as (R)-(+)-limonene stimulated both glucose uptake (17.4%) and lipolysis (17.7%); the mRNA expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) was upregulated but glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) was unaffected, and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) was suppressed. Taken together, the selected monoterpenes may not confer strong protection against free radicals but nevertheless, their positive influence on lipid and glucose metabolism may have potential in the control of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Irreversible impacts of heat on the emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, phenolic BVOC and green leaf volatiles from several tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Andres, S.; Bohne, A.; Folkers, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change will induce extended heat waves to parts of the vegetation more frequently. High temperatures may act as stress (thermal stress) on plants changing emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). As BVOCs impact the atmospheric oxidation cycle and aerosol formation, it is important to explore possible alterations of BVOC emissions under high temperature conditions. Applying heat to European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce in a laboratory setup either caused the well-known exponential increases of BVOC emissions or induced irreversible changes of BVOC emissions. Considering only irreversible changes of BVOC emissions as stress impacts, we found that high temperatures decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. This behaviour was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions were constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, application of thermal stress to conifers amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers and induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. In particular during insect attack on conifers, the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs, which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat-induced decrease of de novo emissions was larger than the increased monoterpene release caused by damage of resin ducts. For insect-infested conifers the net effect of thermal stress on BVOC emissions could be an overall decrease. Global change-induced heat waves may put hard thermal stress on plants. If so, we project that BVOC emissions increase is more than predicted by models only in areas predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs. Otherwise overall effects of high temperature stress will be lower increases of BVOC emissions than predicted by algorithms that do not consider stress impacts.

  17. Soil microorganisms alleviate the allelochemical effects of a thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated grass species.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Bodil K

    2011-01-01

    Plant allelochemicals released into the soil can significantly impact the performance of associated plant species thereby affecting their competitive ability. Soil microbes can potentially affect the interaction between plant and plant chemicals by degrading the allelochemicals. However, most often plant-plant chemical interactions are studied using filter paper bioassays examining the pair-wise interaction between a plant and a plant chemical, not taking into account the potential role of soil microorganisms. To explore if the allelopathic effects on a grass by the common thyme monoterpene "carvacrol" are affected by soil microorganisms. Seedlings of the grass Agrostis capillaris originating from 3 different thyme sites were raised in the greenhouse. Seedlings were grown under four different soil treatments in a 2*2 fully factorial experiment. The monoterpene carvacrol was either added to standard greenhouse soil or left out, and soil was either sterilized (no soil microorganisms) or not (soil microorganisms present in soil). The presence of carvacrol in the soil strongly increased mortality of Agrostis plants, and this increase was highest on sterile soil. Plant biomass was reduced on soil amended with carvacrol, but only when the soil was also sterilized. Plants originating from sites where thyme produces essential oils containing mostly carvacrol had higher survival on soil treated with that monoterpene than plants originating from a site where thyme produced different types of terpenes, suggesting an adaptive response to the locally occurring terpene. The study shows that presence of soil microorganisms can alleviate the negative effect of a common thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated plant species, emphasizing the role of soil microbes in modulating plant-plant chemical interactions.

  18. Soil Microorganisms Alleviate the Allelochemical Effects of a Thyme Monoterpene on the Performance of an Associated Grass Species

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Bodil K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant allelochemicals released into the soil can significantly impact the performance of associated plant species thereby affecting their competitive ability. Soil microbes can potentially affect the interaction between plant and plant chemicals by degrading the allelochemicals. However, most often plant-plant chemical interactions are studied using filter paper bioassays examining the pair-wise interaction between a plant and a plant chemical, not taking into account the potential role of soil microorganisms. Methodology/Principal findings To explore if the allelopathic effects on a grass by the common thyme monoterpene “carvacrol” are affected by soil microorganisms. Seedlings of the grass Agrostis capillaris originating from 3 different thyme sites were raised in the greenhouse. Seedlings were grown under four different soil treatments in a 2*2 fully factorial experiment. The monoterpene carvacrol was either added to standard greenhouse soil or left out, and soil was either sterilized (no soil microorganisms) or not (soil microorganisms present in soil). The presence of carvacrol in the soil strongly increased mortality of Agrostis plants, and this increase was highest on sterile soil. Plant biomass was reduced on soil amended with carvacrol, but only when the soil was also sterilized. Plants originating from sites where thyme produces essential oils containing mostly carvacrol had higher survival on soil treated with that monoterpene than plants originating from a site where thyme produced different types of terpenes, suggesting an adaptive response to the locally occurring terpene. Conclusions/Significance The study shows that presence of soil microorganisms can alleviate the negative effect of a common thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated plant species, emphasizing the role of soil microbes in modulating plant-plant chemical interactions. PMID:22125596

  19. Chiral ligands derived from monoterpenes: application in the synthesis of optically pure secondary alcohols via asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    El Alami, Mohammed Samir Ibn; El Amrani, Mohamed Amin; Agbossou-Niedercorn, Francine; Suisse, Isabelle; Mortreux, André

    2015-01-19

    The preparation of optically pure secondary alcohols in the presence of catalysts based on chiral ligands derived from monoterpenes, such as pinenes, limonenes and carenes, is reviewed. A wide variety of these ligands has been synthesized and used in several catalytic reactions, including hydrogen transfer, C-C bond formation via addition of organozinc compounds to aldehydes, hydrosilylation, and oxazaborolidine reduction, leading to high activities and enantioselectivities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Quercus coccifera exhibit interacting responses to light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudt, M.; Lhoutellier, L.

    2011-09-01

    Light and temperature are known to be the most important environmental factors controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants, but little is known about their interdependencies especially for BVOCs other than isoprene. We studied light responses at different temperatures and temperature responses at different light levels of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence on Quercus coccifera, an evergreen oak widespread in Mediterranean shrublands. More than 50 BVOCs were detected in the emissions from Q. coccifera leaves most of them being isoprenoids plus a few green leaf volatiles (GLVs). Under standard conditions non-oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-hc) accounted for about 90% of the total BVOC release (mean ± SD: 738 ± 378 ng m-2 projected leaf area s-1 or 13.1 ± 6.9 μg g-1 leaf dry weight h-1) and oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-ox) and sesquiterpenes (SQTs) accounted for the rest in about equal proportions. Except GLVs, emissions of all BVOCs responded positively to light and temperature. The light responses of MT and SQT emissions resembled that of CO2-assimilation and were little influenced by the assay temperature: at high assay temperature, MT-hc emissions saturated at lower light levels than at standard assay temperature and tended even to decrease in the highest light range. The emission responses to temperature showed mostly Arrhenius-type response curves, whose shapes in the high temperature range were clearly affected by the assay light level and were markedly different between isoprenoid classes: at non-saturating light, all isoprenoids showed a similar temperature optimum (~43 °C), but, at higher temperatures, MT-hc emissions decreased faster than MT-ox and SQT emissions. At saturating light, MT-hc emissions peaked around 37 °C and rapidly dropped at higher temperatures, whereas MT-ox and SQT emissions strongly increased between 40 and 50 °C accompanied by a burst of GLVs. In all experiments

  1. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Quercus coccifera exhibit interacting responses to light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudt, M.; Lhoutellier, L.

    2011-06-01

    Light and temperature are known to be the most important environmental factors controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants, but little is known about their interdependencies especially for BVOCs other than isoprene. We studied light responses at different temperatures and temperature responses at different light levels of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence on Quercus coccifera, an evergreen oak widespread in Mediterranean shrublands. More than 50 BVOCs were detected in the emissions from Q. coccifera leaves most of them being isoprenoids plus a few green leaf volatiles (GLVs). Under standard conditions non-oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-hc) accounted for about 90 % of the total BVOC release (mean ± SD: 738 ± 378 ng m-2 projected leaf area s-1 or 13.1 ± 6.9 μg g-1 leaf dry weight h-1) and oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-ox) and sesquiterpenes (SQTs) accounted for the rest in about equal proportions. Except GLVs, emissions of all BVOCs responded positively to light and temperature. The light responses of MT and SQT emissions resembled that of CO2-assimilation and were little influenced by the assay temperature: at high assay temperature, MT-hc emissions saturated at lower light levels than at standard assay temperature and tended even to decrease in the highest light range. The emission responses to temperature showed mostly Arrhenius-type response curves, whose shapes in the high temperature range were clearly affected by the assay light level and were markedly different between isoprenoid classes: at non-saturating light, all isoprenoids showed a similar temperature optimum (~43 °C), but, at higher temperatures, MT-hc emissions decreased faster than MT-ox and SQT emissions. At saturating light, MT-hc emissions peaked already around 37 °C and rapidly dropped at higher temperatures, whereas MT-ox and SQT emissions strongly increased between 40 and 50 °C accompanied by a burst of GLVs. In all experiments

  2. Beta-cyclodextrin enhanced gastroprotective effect of (-)-linalool, a monoterpene present in rosewood essential oil, in gastric lesion models.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Francilene Vieira; de Barros Fernandes, Hélio; Oliveira, Irisdalva Sousa; Viana, Ana Flávia Seraine Custódio; da Costa, Douglas Soares; Lopes, Miriam Teresa Paz; de Lira, Kamila Lopes; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; de Sousa, Adriano Antunes; de Cássia Meneses Oliveira, Rita

    2016-11-01

    (-)-Linalool is a monoterpene constituent of many essential oils. This particular monoterpene has both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity. Moreover, this compound has been shown to be antinociceptive. However, the poor chemical stability and short half-life prevents the clinical application of (-)-linalool and many other essential oils. Important to the topic of this study, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) has been used to increase the solubility, stability, and pharmacological effects of numerous lipophilic compounds in vivo. In this study, the gastroprotective activities of (-)-linalool (LIN) and linalool incorporated into inclusion complex containing β-cyclodextrin (LIN-βCD) were evaluated using models of acute and chronic gastric ulcers in rodents. LIN and LIN-βCD showed strong gastroprotective activity (p < 0.001). The LIN-βCD complex revealed that the gastroprotective effect was significantly improved compared with LIN uncomplexed, suggesting that this improvement is related to increased solubility and stability. Taking together the potentiation of the antioxidant profile of this monoterpene, our results suggest that β-CD may represent an important tool for improved gastroprotective activity of (-)-linalool and other water-insoluble compounds.

  3. Release of lipoxygenase products and monoterpenes by tomato plants as an indicator of Botrytis cinerea-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R M C; Miebach, M; Kleist, E; van Henten, E J; Wildt, J

    2009-11-01

    Changes in emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from tomato induced by the fungus Botrytis cinerea were studied in plants inoculated by spraying with suspensions containing B. cinerea spores. VOC emissions were analysed using on-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, with a time resolution of about 1 h, for up to 2 days after spraying. Four phases were delimited according to the starting point and the applied day/night rhythm of the experiments. These phases were used to demonstrate changes in VOC flux caused by B. cinerea infestation. Tomato plants inoculated with B. cinerea emitted a different number and amount of VOCs after inoculation compared to control plants that had been sprayed with a suspension without B. cinerea spores. The changes in emissions were dependent on time after inoculation as well as on the severity of infection. The predominant VOCs emitted after inoculation were volatile products from the lipoxygenase pathway (LOX products). The increased emission of LOX products proved to be a strong indicator of a stress response, indicating that VOC emissions can be used to detect plant stress at an early stage. Besides emission of LOX products, there were also increases in monoterpene emissions. However, neither increased emission of LOX products nor of monoterpenes is specific for B. cinerea attack. The emission of LOX products is also induced by other stresses, and increased emission of monoterpenes seems to be the result of mechanical damage induced by secondary stress impacts on leaves.

  4. Synthesis of 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes in Nicotiana section Alatae: gene isolation, expression, functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Brosemann, Anne; Teske, Laura; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2012-08-01

    The scent bouquets of flowers of Nicotiana species, particularly those of section Alatae, are rich in monoterpenes, including 1,8-cineole, limonene, β-myrcene, α- and β-pinene, sabinene, and α-terpineol. New terpene synthase genes were isolated from flowers of Nicotiana bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis. The recombinant enzymes synthesize simultaneously the characteristic 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes with 1,8-cineole as the dominant volatile product. Interestingly, amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree construction clustered the newly isolated cineole synthases (CIN) of section Alatae together with the catalytically similar CIN of N. suaveolens of section Suaveolentes, thus suggesting a common ancestor. These CIN genes of N. bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis are distinct from the terpineol synthases (TERs) of the taxonomically related N. alata and N. langsdorfii (both Alatae), thus indicating gene diversification of monoterpene synthases in section Alatae. Furthermore, the presence of CINs in species of the American section Alatae supports the hypothesis that one parent of the Australian section Suaveolentes was a member of the present section Alatae. Amino acid sequences of the Nicotiana CINs and TERs were compared to identify relevant amino acids of the cyclization reaction from α-terpineol to 1,8-cineole.

  5. High-resolution MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides in the root of Paeonia lactiflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) at 10 μm pixel size was performed to unravel the spatio-chemical distribution of major secondary metabolites in the root of Paeonia lactiflora. The spatial distributions of two major classes of bioactive components, gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides, were investigated and visualized at the cellular level in tissue sections of P. lactiflora roots. Accordingly, other primary and secondary metabolites were imaged, including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids and monoterpenes, indicating the capability of untargeted localization of metabolites by using high-resolution MSI platform. The employed AP-SMALDI MSI system provides significant technological advancement in the visualization of individual molecular species at the cellular level. In contrast to previous histochemical studies of tannins using unspecific staining reagents, individual gallotannin species were accurately localized and unequivocally discriminated from other phenolic components in the root tissues. High-quality ion images were obtained, providing significant clues for understanding the biosynthetic pathway of gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides and possibly helping to decipher the role of tannins in xylem cells differentiation and in the defence mechanisms of plants, as well as to investigate the interrelationship between tannins and lignins.

  6. High-resolution MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides in the root of Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2016-10-31

    High-resolution atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) at 10 μm pixel size was performed to unravel the spatio-chemical distribution of major secondary metabolites in the root of Paeonia lactiflora. The spatial distributions of two major classes of bioactive components, gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides, were investigated and visualized at the cellular level in tissue sections of P. lactiflora roots. Accordingly, other primary and secondary metabolites were imaged, including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids and monoterpenes, indicating the capability of untargeted localization of metabolites by using high-resolution MSI platform. The employed AP-SMALDI MSI system provides significant technological advancement in the visualization of individual molecular species at the cellular level. In contrast to previous histochemical studies of tannins using unspecific staining reagents, individual gallotannin species were accurately localized and unequivocally discriminated from other phenolic components in the root tissues. High-quality ion images were obtained, providing significant clues for understanding the biosynthetic pathway of gallotannins and monoterpene glucosides and possibly helping to decipher the role of tannins in xylem cells differentiation and in the defence mechanisms of plants, as well as to investigate the interrelationship between tannins and lignins.

  7. Assessment of the repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil and major monoterpenes on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Lima, A da Silva; Carvalho, J F de; Peixoto, M G; Blank, A F; Borges, L M F; Costa Junior, L M

    2016-03-01

    The control of Rhipicephalus microplus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) is achieved using synthetic acaricides. However, resistant tick populations are widespread around the world. Plant essential oils can act as repellents, keeping ticks away from hosts and decreasing the selection pressure on synthetic acaricides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro repellent effect of Lippia alba essential oil on R. microplus larvae. Leaves from two L. alba genotypes maintained under the same agronomic and environmental conditions were collected. Essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major monoterpenes detected in the chemical analysis were commercially acquired and tested. For the repellency test, a glass rod was vertically fixed to measure active climbing of approximately 30 R. microplus larvae aged 14-21 days in response to essential oils and monoterpenes. Repellency was evaluated at 1 h, 3 h and 5 h after treatment. Variation in repellent action was detected between the genotypes. The major monoterpenes identified in the essential oils (limonene and carvone) showed low repellent effects in comparison with intact essential oils. Thus, the present results showed that L. alba essential oil contains bioactive compounds with great repellent activity against ticks that varies according to the plant genotype. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  8. Effects of sunlight exclusion on the profiles of monoterpene biosynthesis and accumulation in grape exocarp and mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erpeng; Chai, Fengmei; Zhang, Haohao; Li, Shaohua; Liang, Zhenchang; Fan, Peige

    2017-12-15

    Terpenes are important aroma compounds in table Muscat grape and wine, and their content in the berry can be affected by sunlight. The effects of sunlight exclusion on monoterpene profiles and relevant gene expression profiles in the exocarp and mesocarp of table Muscat grape 'Jingxiangyu' at different development stages were thoroughly surveyed by bagging pre-veraison clusters in special opaque boxes. The responses of monoterpenes to sunlight treatments varied in three types, representatively linalool, ocimene and geraniol. Linalool was the most sensitive compound to sunlight, whose biosynthesis was severely inhibited by sunlight exclusion and then was elevated by re-exposure. Ocimene and glycosylated geraniol showed a certain suppressive and stimulative responses to sunlight exclusion respectively. Further transcription analysis revealed that VvPNLinNer1, VvCSbOci, VvGT7 and VvGT14 genes were mainly responsible for monoterpene accumulation and sensitivity to sunlight. VvDXS2 and VvDXR genes were partially related to the differential accumulation of total terpenes under different sunlight treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evident elevation of atmospheric monoterpenes due to degradation-induced species changes in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Mu, Yujing; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-15

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from plants have substantial effects on atmospheric chemistry/physics and feedbacks on ecosystem function. The on-going climate change and anthropogenic disturbance have been confirmed to cause the evident degradation of grassland with shift of plant community, and hence BVOCs emissions were suspected to be altered due to the different BOVCs emission potentials of different species. In this study, we investigated BVOCs concentration above ground surface during growing season in a degraded semi-arid grassland (41°2' N-45°6' N, 113°5'-117°8') in Inner Mongolia. The observed monoterpenes' concentrations varied from 0.10 to 215.78 μg m(-3) (34.88 ± 9.73 μg m(-3) in average) across 41 sites. Compared to non-degraded grassland, concentrations of monoterpenes were about 180 times higher at the sites dominated by subshrub--Artemisia frigida, a preponderant species under drought stress and over-grazing. The biomass of A. frigida explained 51.39% of the variation of monoterpenes' concentrations. α-pinene, β-pinene and γ-terpinene dominated in the 10 determined monoterpenes, accounting for 37.72 ± 2.98%, 14.65 ± 2.55% and 10.50 ± 2.37% of the total monoterpenes concentration, respectively. Low isoprene concentrations (≤ 3.25 μg m(-3)) were found and sedge biomass contributed about 51.76% to their spatial variation. α-pinene and isoprene emissions at noon were as high as 515.53 ± 88.34 μg m(-2)h(-1) and 7606.19 ± 1073.94 μg m(-2) h(-1) in A. frigida- and sedge-dominated areas where their biomass were 236.90 g m(-2) and 72.37 g m(-2), respectively. Our results suggested that the expansion of A. frigida and sedge caused by over-grazing and climatic stresses may increase local ambient BVOCs concentration in grassland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Flowers: Optimisation of Oxygenated Monoterpenes, Coumarin and Herniarin Content.

    PubMed

    Jerković, Igor; Molnar, Maja; Vidović, Senka; Vladić, Jelena; Jokić, Stela

    2017-11-01

    Lavandula angustifolia is good source of oxygenated monoterpenes containing coumarins as well, which are all soluble in supercritical CO 2 (SC-CO 2 ). The study objective is to investigate SC-CO 2 extraction parameters on: the total yield; GC-MS profile of the extracts; relative content of oxygenated monoterpenes; the amount of coumarin and herniarin; and to determine optimal SC-CO 2 extraction conditions by response surface methodology (RSM). SC-CO 2 extraction was performed under different pressure, temperature and CO 2 flow rate determined by Box-Behnken design (BBD). The sample mass and the extraction time were kept constant. The chemical profiles and relative content of oxygenated monoterpenes (as coumarin equivalents, CE) were determined by GC-MS. Coumarin and herniarin concentrations were dosed by HPLC. SC-CO 2 extracts contained linalool (57.4-217.9 mg CE/100 g), camphor (10.6-154.4 mg CE/100 g), borneol (6.2-99.9 mg CE/100 g), 1,8-cineole (5.0-70.4 mg CE/100 g), linalyl acetate (86.1-267.9 mg CE/100 g), coumarin (0.95-18.16 mg/100 g), and herniarin (0.95-13.63 mg/100 g). The interaction between the pressure and CO 2 flow rate as well as between the temperature and CO 2 flow rate showed statistically significant influence on the extraction yield. Applying BBD, the optimum extraction conditions for higher monoterpenes and lower coumarin content were at 10 MPa, 41°C and CO 2 flow rate 2.3 kg/h, and at 30 MPa, 50°C and CO 2 flow rate 3 kg/h for higher monoterpenes and coumarin content. SC-CO 2 extraction is a viable technique for obtaining lavender extracts with desirable flavour components. The second-order model based on BBD predicts the results for SC-CO 2 extraction quite satisfactorily. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Enhancing monoterpene alcohols in sweet potato shochu using the diglycoside-specific β-primeverosidase.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Han, Jinshun; Fukuda, Hisashi; Mikami, Shigeaki

    2018-02-01

    Monoterpene alcohols (MTAs) are characteristic flavour-imparting compounds in sweet potato shochu (Japanese distilled spirit) that are liberated following hydrolysis by specific enzymes during fermentation. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of an exogenously added diglycoside-specific β-glycosidase (β-primeverosidase) on aroma formation during shochu brewing using various sweet potato species to address whether MTAs are predominantly present as diglycosidic precursors in raw materials. The results showed that the amount of MTAs produced from enzyme-treated mash was dramatically increased by 2- to 9-fold compared with untreated controls, and the increase varied with sweet potato species. In addition, levels of methyl salicylate, 1-octene-3-ol and ethyl benzoate were also elevated by enzyme treatment. These results indicate that a large amount of MTAs and other volatile aroma compounds are stored in the form of disaccharide β-glycosides such as β-primeverosides in sweet potato. This enzyme may therefore be useful for controlling aroma formation during shochu manufacturing, and may ultimately contribute to diversifying shochu quality. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategies for engineering plant natural products: the iridoid-derived monoterpene indole alkaloids of Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    The manipulation of pathways to make unnatural variants of natural compounds, a process often termed combinatorial biosynthesis, has been robustly successful in prokaryotic systems. The development of approaches to generate new-to-nature compounds from plant-based pathways is, in comparison, much less advanced. Success will depend on the specific chemistry of the pathway, as well as on the suitability of the plant system for transformation and genetic manipulation. As plant pathways are elucidated, and can be heterologously expressed in hosts that are more amenable to genetic manipulation, biosynthetic production of new-to-nature compounds from plant pathways will become more widespread. In this chapter, some of the key strategies that have been developed for metabolic engineering of plant pathways, namely directed biosynthesis, mutasynthesis, and pathway incorporation of engineered enzymes are highlighted. The iridoid-derived monoterpene indole alkaloids from C. roseus, which are the focus of this chapter, provide an excellent system for developing these strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of β-Secretase Activity by Monoterpenes, Sesquiterpenes, and C13 Norisoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Marumoto, Shinsuke; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2017-08-01

    Inhibition of β-secretase (BACE1) is currently regarded as the leading treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we aimed to screen the in vitro inhibitory activity of 80 types of aroma compounds (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and C 13 norisoprenoids), including plant-based types, at a 200-μM concentration against a recombinant human BACE1. The results showed that the most potent inhibitor of BACE1 was geranyl acetone followed by (+)-camphor, (-)-fenchone, (+)-fenchone, and (-)-camphor with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values of 51.9 ± 3.9, 95.9 ± 11.0, 106.3 ± 14.9, 117.0 ± 18.6, and 134.1 ± 16.4 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the mechanism of inhibition of BACE1 by geranyl acetone was analyzed using Dixon kinetics plus Cornish-Bowden plots, which revealed mixed-type mode. Therefore aroma compounds may be used as potential lead molecules for designing anti-BACE1 agents.

  14. Monoterpenes from Larval Frass of Two Cerambycids as Chemical Cues for a Parasitoid, Dastarcus helophoroides

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jian-Rong; Lu, Xi-Ping; Jiang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Anopiophora glabripennis (Motsch.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a destructive woodborer, attacking many species of deciduous hardwood trees. Apriona swainsoni (Hope) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a woodborer of Sophora japonica L. (Angiospermae: Fabaceae). Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is an important natural enemy of both Cerambycid species in China. Kairomones for two populations of D. helophoroides that parasitize A. glabripennis and A. swainsoni respectively were studied. Based on identification and quantification of volatiles from larval frass produced by A. glabripennis and A. swainsoni, monoterpenes were selected to test their kairomonal activity to both populations of D. helophoroides adults using a Y-tube olfactometer. The results indicated that (S)-(-)-limonene served as a kairomone for the population of D. helophoroides parasitized A. glabripennis. α-pinene, (IR)-(+)-αpinene and (+)-β-pinene were attractive to the population of D. helophoroides parasitized A. swainsoni. The results provide information about the co-evolution of D. helophoroides, its host, and host-food trees. PMID:23906184

  15. Active monoterpene ketones isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis with fumigant and contact action against Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Park, Jun-Hwan; Chung, Namhyun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2014-08-01

    The acaricidal activities of an active material derived from Rosmarinus officinalis oil and its relative monoterpene ketones were determined using fumigant and contact toxicity bioassays against Tyrophagus putrescentiae and were compared with that of a commercial acaricide (benzyl benzoate). The active component of R. officinalis oil, isolated by silica gel column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, was identified as camphor, based on various spectroscopic analyses. In the fumigant toxicity bioassay, camphor (2.25 μg/cm(3)) was 5.58 times more active than benzyl benzoate (12.56 μg/cm(3)) against T. putrescentiae, followed by (+)-camphor (3.89 μg/cm(3)) and (-)-camphor (5.61 μg/cm(3)). In the contact toxicity bioassay, camphor (1.34 μg/cm(2)) was 6.74 times more toxic than benzyl benzoate (9.03 μg/cm(2)) against T. putrescentiae, followed by (+)-camphor (2.23 μg/cm(2)) and (-)-camphor (2.94 μg/cm(2)). These results indicate that camphor and its derivatives are very useful as potential control agents against stored food mites regardless of the application method.

  16. Membrane-assisted extraction of monoterpenes: from in silico solvent screening towards biotechnological process application

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on the process development of membrane-assisted solvent extraction of hydrophobic compounds such as monoterpenes. Beginning with the choice of suitable solvents, quantum chemical calculations with the simulation tool COSMO-RS were carried out to predict the partition coefficient (logP) of (S)-(+)-carvone and terpinen-4-ol in various solvent–water systems and validated afterwards with experimental data. COSMO-RS results show good prediction accuracy for non-polar solvents such as n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-heptane even in the presence of salts and glycerol in an aqueous medium. Based on the high logP value, n-heptane was chosen for the extraction of (S)-(+)-carvone in a lab-scale hollow-fibre membrane contactor. Two operation modes are investigated where experimental and theoretical mass transfer values, based on their related partition coefficients, were compared. In addition, the process is evaluated in terms of extraction efficiency and overall product recovery, and its biotechnological application potential is discussed. Our work demonstrates that the combination of in silico prediction by COSMO-RS with membrane-assisted extraction is a promising approach for the recovery of hydrophobic compounds from aqueous solutions. PMID:29765654

  17. Geraniol and Geranial Dehydrogenases Induced in Anaerobic Monoterpene Degradation by Castellaniella defragrans

    PubMed Central

    Lüddeke, Frauke; Wülfing, Annika; Timke, Markus; Germer, Frauke; Weber, Johanna; Dikfidan, Aytac; Rahnfeld, Tobias; Linder, Dietmar; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2012-01-01

    Castellaniella defragrans is a Betaproteobacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of monoterpenes with denitrification. Geraniol dehydrogenase (GeDH) activity was induced during growth with limonene in comparison to growth with acetate. The N-terminal sequence of the purified enzyme directed the cloning of the corresponding open reading frame (ORF), the first bacterial gene for a GeDH (geoA, for geraniol oxidation pathway). The C. defragrans geraniol dehydrogenase is a homodimeric enzyme that affiliates with the zinc-containing benzyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the superfamily of medium-chain-length dehydrogenases/reductases (MDR). The purified enzyme most efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of perillyl alcohol (kcat/Km = 2.02 × 106 M−1 s−1), followed by geraniol (kcat/Km = 1.57 × 106 M−1 s−1). Apparent Km values of <10 μM are consistent with an in vivo toxicity of geraniol above 5 μM. In the genetic vicinity of geoA is a putative aldehyde dehydrogenase that was named geoB and identified as a highly abundant protein during growth with phellandrene. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing geoB demonstrated in vitro a geranial dehydrogenase (GaDH) activity. GaDH activity was independent of coenzyme A. The irreversible formation of geranic acid allows for a metabolic flux from β-myrcene via linalool, geraniol, and geranial to geranic acid. PMID:22286981

  18. Geraniol and geranial dehydrogenases induced in anaerobic monoterpene degradation by Castellaniella defragrans.

    PubMed

    Lüddeke, Frauke; Wülfing, Annika; Timke, Markus; Germer, Frauke; Weber, Johanna; Dikfidan, Aytac; Rahnfeld, Tobias; Linder, Dietmar; Meyerdierks, Anke; Harder, Jens

    2012-04-01

    Castellaniella defragrans is a Betaproteobacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of monoterpenes with denitrification. Geraniol dehydrogenase (GeDH) activity was induced during growth with limonene in comparison to growth with acetate. The N-terminal sequence of the purified enzyme directed the cloning of the corresponding open reading frame (ORF), the first bacterial gene for a GeDH (geoA, for geraniol oxidation pathway). The C. defragrans geraniol dehydrogenase is a homodimeric enzyme that affiliates with the zinc-containing benzyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the superfamily of medium-chain-length dehydrogenases/reductases (MDR). The purified enzyme most efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of perillyl alcohol (k(cat)/K(m) = 2.02 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), followed by geraniol (k(cat)/K(m) = 1.57 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). Apparent K(m) values of <10 μM are consistent with an in vivo toxicity of geraniol above 5 μM. In the genetic vicinity of geoA is a putative aldehyde dehydrogenase that was named geoB and identified as a highly abundant protein during growth with phellandrene. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing geoB demonstrated in vitro a geranial dehydrogenase (GaDH) activity. GaDH activity was independent of coenzyme A. The irreversible formation of geranic acid allows for a metabolic flux from β-myrcene via linalool, geraniol, and geranial to geranic acid.

  19. Update on Monoterpenes as Antimicrobial Agents: A Particular Focus on p-Cymene

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Anna; Arciola, Carla Renata; Barbieri, Ramona; Silva, Ana Sanches; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Tsetegho Sokeng, Arold Jorel; Izadi, Morteza; Jafari, Nematollah Jonaidi; Suntar, Ipek; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    p-Cymene [1-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-benzene] is a monoterpene found in over 100 plant species used for medicine and food purposes. It shows a range of biological activity including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, anxiolytic, anticancer and antimicrobial effects. This last property has been widely investigated due to the urgent need for new substances with antimicrobial properties, to be used to treat communicable diseases whose diffusion in developed countries has been facilitated by globalization and the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. This review summarizes available scientific data, as reported by the most recent studies describing the antimicrobial activity of p-cymene either alone, or as the main component of plant extracts, as well as addressing the mechanisms of action of cymenes as antimicrobial agents. While p-cymene is one of the major constituents of extracts and essential oils used in traditional medicines as antimicrobial agents, but considering the limited data on its in vivo efficacy and safety, further studies are required to reach a definitive recommendation on the use and beneficial effects of p-cymene in human healthcare and in biomedical applications as a promising candidate to functionalize biomaterials and nanomaterials. PMID:28809799

  20. Borneol, a Bicyclic Monoterpene Alcohol, Reduces Nociceptive Behavior and Inflammatory Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Silva, Juliane Cabral; Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes de Lima; Júnior, Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Barreto, Rosana de Souza Siqueira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Junior, Lucindo José Quintans

    2013-01-01

    Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene, has been evaluated for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were studied by measuring nociception by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate, and grip strength tests, while inflammation was prompted by carrageenan-induced peritonitis. The rotarod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Borneol produced a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of the nociceptive behavior at the early and late phases of paw licking and reduced the writhing reflex in mice (formalin and writhing tests, resp.). When the hot plate test was conducted, borneol (in higher dose) produced an inhibition (P < 0.05) of the nociceptive behavior. Such results were unlikely to be provoked by motor abnormality. Additionally, borneol-treated mice reduced the carrageenan-induced leukocytes migration to the peritoneal cavity. Together, our results suggest that borneol possess significant central and peripheral antinociceptive activity; it has also anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, borneol did not impair motor coordination. PMID:23710149

  1. Isoprene and monoterpene emissions in south-east Australia: comparison of a multi-layer canopy model with MEGAN and with atmospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerson, Kathryn M.; Cope, Martin E.; Galbally, Ian E.; Lee, Sunhee; Nelson, Peter F.

    2018-05-01

    One of the key challenges in atmospheric chemistry is to reduce the uncertainty of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission estimates from vegetation to the atmosphere. In Australia, eucalypt trees are a primary source of biogenic emissions, but their contribution to Australian air sheds is poorly quantified. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has performed poorly against Australian isoprene and monoterpene observations. Finding reasons for the MEGAN discrepancies and strengthening our understanding of biogenic emissions in this region is our focus. We compare MEGAN to the locally produced Australian Biogenic Canopy and Grass Emissions Model (ABCGEM), to identify the uncertainties associated with the emission estimates and the data requirements necessary to improve isoprene and monoterpene emissions estimates for the application of MEGAN in Australia. Previously unpublished, ABCGEM is applied as an online biogenic emissions inventory to model BVOCs in the air shed overlaying Sydney, Australia. The two models use the same meteorological inputs and chemical mechanism, but independent inputs of leaf area index (LAI), plant functional type (PFT) and emission factors. We find that LAI, a proxy for leaf biomass, has a small role in spatial, temporal and inter-model biogenic emission variability, particularly in urban areas for ABCGEM. After removing LAI as the source of the differences, we found large differences in the emission activity function for monoterpenes. In MEGAN monoterpenes are partially light dependent, reducing their dependence on temperature. In ABCGEM monoterpenes are not light dependent, meaning they continue to be emitted at high rates during hot summer days, and at night. When the light dependence of monoterpenes is switched off in MEGAN, night-time emissions increase by 90-100 % improving the comparison with observations, suggesting the possibility that monoterpenes emitted from Australian vegetation may not be

  2. Structurally Related Monoterpenes p-Cymene, Carvacrol and Thymol Isolated from Essential Oil from Leaves of Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) Protect Mice against Elastase-Induced Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Games, Ellen; Guerreiro, Marina; Santana, Fernanda R; Pinheiro, Nathalia M; de Oliveira, Emerson A; Lopes, Fernanda D T Q S; Olivo, Clarice R; Tibério, Iolanda F L C; Martins, Mílton A; Lago, João Henrique G; Prado, Carla M

    2016-10-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by irreversible airflow obstruction and inflammation. Natural products, such as monoterpenes, displayed anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities and can be used as a source of new compounds to COPD treatment. Our aim was to evaluate, in an elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice, the effects of and underlying mechanisms of three related natural monoterpenes ( p -cymene, carvacrol and thymol) isolated from essential oil from leaves Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae). Mices received porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and were treated with p -cymene, carvacrol, thymol or vehicle 30 min later and again on 7th, 14th and 28th days. Lung inflammatory profile and histological sections were evaluated. In the elastase-instilled animals, the tested monoterpenes reduced alveolar enlargement, macrophages and the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-17 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and collagen fibers, MMP-9 and p-65-NF-κB-positive cells in lung parenchyma ( p < 0.05). All treatments attenuated levels of 8-iso-PGF2α but only thymol was able to reduced exhaled nitric oxide ( p < 0.05). Monoterpenes p -cymene, carvacrol and thymol reduced lung emphysema and inflammation in mice. No significant differences among the three monoterpenes treatments were found, suggesting that the presence of hydroxyl group in the molecular structure of thymol and carvacrol do not play a central role in the anti-inflammatory effects.

  3. Genetic variation for sensitivity to a thyme monoterpene in associated plant species.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Catrine Grønberg; Ehlers, Bodil Kirstine

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that plant allelochemicals can have profound effects on the performance of associated species, such that plants with a history of co-existence with "chemical neighbour" plants perform better in their presence compared to naïve plants. This has cast new light on the complexity of plant-plant interactions and plant communities and has led to debates on whether plant communities are more co-evolved than traditionally thought. In order to determine whether plants may indeed evolve in response to other plants' allelochemicals it is crucial to determine the presence of genetic variation for performance under the influence of specific allelochemicals and show that natural selection indeed operates on this variation. We studied the effect of the monoterpene carvacrol-a dominant compound in the essential oil of Thymus pulegioides-on three associated plant species originating from sites where thyme is either present or absent. We found the presence of genetic variation in both naïve and experienced populations for performance under the influence of the allelochemical but the response varied among naïve and experienced plant. Plants from experienced populations performed better than naïve plants on carvacrol soil and contained significantly more seed families with an adaptive response to carvacrol than naïve populations. This suggests that the presence of T. pulegioides can act as a selective agent on associated species, by favouring genotypes which perform best in the presence of its allelochemicals. The response to the thyme allelochemical varied from negative to neutral to positive among the species. The different responses within a species suggest that plant-plant interactions can evolve; this has implications for community dynamics and stability.

  4. β-Citronellol, an alcoholic monoterpene with inhibitory properties on the contractility of rat trachea

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, T.B.; Ribeiro-Filho, H.V.; Lucetti, L.T.; Magalhães, P.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    β-Citronellol is an alcoholic monoterpene found in essential oils such Cymbopogon citratus (a plant with antihypertensive properties). β-Citronellol can act against pathogenic microorganisms that affect airways and, in virtue of the popular use of β-citronellol-enriched essential oils in aromatherapy, we assessed its pharmacologic effects on the contractility of rat trachea. Contractions of isolated tracheal rings were recorded isometrically through a force transducer connected to a data-acquisition device. β-Citronellol relaxed sustained contractions induced by acetylcholine or high extracellular potassium, but half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for K+-elicited stimuli were smaller than those for cholinergic contractions. It also inhibited contractions induced by electrical field stimulation or sodium orthovanadate with pharmacologic potency equivalent to that seen against acetylcholine-induced contractions. When contractions were evoked by selective recruitment of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium, β-citronellol preferentially inhibited contractions that involved voltage-operated (but not receptor-operated) pathways. β-Citronellol (but not verapamil) inhibited contractions induced by restoration of external Ca2+ levels after depleting internal Ca2+ stores with the concomitant presence of thapsigargin and recurrent challenge with acetylcholine. Treatment of tracheal rings with L-NAME, indomethacin or tetraethylammonium did not change the relaxing effects of β-citronellol. Inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) or transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptors with selective antagonists caused no change in the effects of β-citronellol. In conclusion, β-citronellol exerted inhibitory effects on rat tracheal rings, with predominant effects on contractions that recruit Ca2+ inflow towards the cytosol by voltage-gated pathways, whereas it appears less active against contractions elicited by receptor

  5. Development of Transcriptomic Resources for Interrogating the Biosynthesis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Medicinal Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Childs, Kevin L.; Fedewa, Greg; Hamilton, John P.; Liscombe, David K.; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Nims, Ezekiel; Runguphan, Weerawat; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Varbanova-Herde, Marina; DellaPenna, Dean; McKnight, Thomas D.; O’Connor, Sarah; Buell, C. Robin

    2012-01-01

    The natural diversity of plant metabolism has long been a source for human medicines. One group of plant-derived compounds, the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), includes well-documented therapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer (vinblastine, vincristine, camptothecin), hypertension (reserpine, ajmalicine), malaria (quinine), and as analgesics (7-hydroxymitragynine). Our understanding of the biochemical pathways that synthesize these commercially relevant compounds is incomplete due in part to a lack of molecular, genetic, and genomic resources for the identification of the genes involved in these specialized metabolic pathways. To address these limitations, we generated large-scale transcriptome sequence and expression profiles for three species of Asterids that produce medicinally important MIAs: Camptotheca acuminata, Catharanthus roseus, and Rauvolfia serpentina. Using next generation sequencing technology, we sampled the transcriptomes of these species across a diverse set of developmental tissues, and in the case of C. roseus, in cultured cells and roots following elicitor treatment. Through an iterative assembly process, we generated robust transcriptome assemblies for all three species with a substantial number of the assembled transcripts being full or near-full length. The majority of transcripts had a related sequence in either UniRef100, the Arabidopsis thaliana predicted proteome, or the Pfam protein domain database; however, we also identified transcripts that lacked similarity with entries in either database and thereby lack a known function. Representation of known genes within the MIA biosynthetic pathway was robust. As a diverse set of tissues and treatments were surveyed, expression abundances of transcripts in the three species could be estimated to reveal transcripts associated with development and response to elicitor treatment. Together, these transcriptomes and expression abundance matrices provide a rich resource for

  6. Passive Adsorption of Volatile Monoterpene in Pest Control: Aided by Proximity and Disrupted by Ozone.

    PubMed

    Mofikoya, Adedayo O; Kim, Tae Ho; Abd El-Raheem, Ahmed M; Blande, James D; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2017-11-08

    Plant volatiles mediate a range of interactions across and within trophic levels, including plant-plant interactions. Volatiles emitted by a plant may trigger physiological responses in neighboring plants or adhere to their surfaces, which, in turn, may affect the responses of the neighboring plant to herbivory. These volatiles are subject to chemical reactions during transport in air currents, especially in a polluted atmosphere. We conducted a field experiment to test for the adsorption of dispenser-released myrcene on the surfaces of cabbage plants and the effects of distance from the dispenser and elevated ozone levels (1.4× ambient) on the process. We also tested the effects of the same treatments on oviposition on cabbage plants by naturally occurring Plutella xylostella. Under low ambient ozone conditions of central Finland, there was evidence for the adsorption and re-release of myrcene by cabbage plants growing at a distance of 50 cm from myrcene dispensers. This effect was absent at elevated ozone levels. The number of eggs deposited by P. xylostella was generally lower in plots under elevated ozone compared to ambient control plots. Our results indicate that passive adsorption and re-release of a volatile monoterpene can occur in nature; however, this process is dependent upon the distance between emitter source and receiver plants as well as the concentration of atmospheric pollutants in the air. We conclude that, in the development of field-scale use of plant volatiles in modern pest control, the effects of distances and air pollution should be considered.

  7. Antihypertensive effect of auraptene, a monoterpene coumarin from the genus Citrus, upon chronic administration

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Arasteh, Ebrahim; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Auraptene, a monoterpene coumarin from Citrus species, exhibits cardioprotective effects. In this study, the effects of auraptene administration were investigated on blood pressure of normotensive and desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) salt induced hypertensive rats. Materials and Methods: Five weeks administration of auraptene (2, 4, 8 and 16 mg/kg/day) and nifedipine (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg/day) in different groups of normotensive and hypertensive rats (at the end of 3 weeks treatment by DOCA salt) was carried out and their effects on mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP) and mean heart rate (MHR) were evaluated using tail cuff method. Results: Our results indicated that chronic administration of auraptene (2, 4, 8 and 16 mg/kg/day) significantly reduced the MSBP in DOCA salt treated rats in a dose and time dependent manner. The percent of decreases in MSBP levels by the highest dose of auraptene (16 mg/kg) at the end of 4 th to 8 th weeks, were 7.00%, 10.78%, 16.07%, 21.28% and 27.54% respectively (P<0.001). Moreover the antihypertensive effect of auraptene was less than nifedipine (ED50 value of nifedipine = 0.7 mg/kg at 8th week and ED50 value of auraptene = 5.64 mg/kg at 8 week). Conclusion: Auraptene considerably reduced MSBP in hypertensive rats, but not in normotensive (normal saline treated) rats. The results of MHR measurement showed that the increase in MHR was not significant in comparison with DOCA treated rats. PMID:25810889

  8. Monoterpene phenolic compound thymol promotes browning of 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Heon; Kim, Sang Woo; Yu, Rina; Yun, Jong Won

    2017-10-01

    Appearance of brown-like adipocytes within white adipose tissue depots (browning) is associated with improved metabolic phenotypes, and thus a wide variety of dietary agents that contribute to browning of white adipocytes are being studied. The aim of this study was to assess the browning effect of thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenolic compound, in 3T3-L1 white adipocytes. Thymol-induced fat browning was investigated by determining expression levels of brown fat-specific genes and proteins by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis, respectively. Moreover, the molecular mechanism underlying the fat-browning effect of thymol was investigated by determining expression levels of key players responsible for browning in the presence of kinase inhibitors. Thymol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced expression of a core set of brown fat-specific markers as well as increased protein levels of PPARγ, PPARδ, pAMPK, pACC, HSL, PLIN, CPT1, ACO, PGC-1α, and UCP1, suggesting its possible role in browning of white adipocytes, augmentation of lipolysis, fat oxidation, and thermogenesis, and reduction of lipogenesis. Increased expression of UCP1 and other brown fat-specific markers by thymol was tightly coordinated with activation of β3-AR as well as AMPK, PKA, and p38 MAPK. Our findings suggest that 3T3-L1 is a potential cell model for screening browning agents. Thymol plays multiple modulatory roles in the form of inducing the brown-like phenotype as well as enhancing lipid metabolism. Thus, thymol may be explored as a potentially promising food additive for prevention of obesity.

  9. Bornyl-diphosphate synthase from Lavandula angustifolia: A major monoterpene synthase involved in essential oil quality.

    PubMed

    Despinasse, Yolande; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Antonczak, Serge; Moja, Sandrine; Bony, Aurélie; Nicolè, Florence; Baudino, Sylvie; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Jullien, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Lavender essential oils (EOs) of higher quality are produced by a few Lavandula angustifolia cultivars and mainly used in the perfume industry. Undesirable compounds such as camphor and borneol are also synthesized by lavender leading to a depreciated EO. Here, we report the cloning of bornyl diphosphate synthase of lavender (LaBPPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the production of bornyl diphosphate (BPP) and then by-products such as borneol or camphor, from an EST library. Compared to the BPPS of Salvia officinalis, the functional characterization of LaBPPS showed several differences in amino acid sequence, and the distribution of catalyzed products. Molecular modeling of the enzyme's active site suggests that the carbocation intermediates are more stable in LaBPPS than in SoBPPS leading probably to a lower efficiency of LaBPPS to convert GPP into BPP. Quantitative RT-PCR performed from leaves and flowers at different development stages of L. angustifolia samples show a clear correlation between transcript level of LaBPPS and accumulation of borneol/camphor, suggesting that LaBPPS is mainly responsible of in vivo biosynthesis of borneol/camphor in fine lavender. A phylogenetic analysis of terpene synthases (TPS) pointed out the basal position of LaBPPS in the TPSb clade, suggesting that LaBPPS could be an ancestor of others lavender TPSb. Finally, borneol could be one of the first monoterpenes to be synthesized in the Lavandula subgenus. Knowledge gained from these experiments will facilitate future studies to improve the lavender oils through metabolic engineering or plant breeding. Accession numbers: LaBPPS: KM015221. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol from sesquiterpene and monoterpene emissions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sakulyanontvittaya, Tanarit; Guenther, Alex; Helmig, Detlev; Milford, Jana; Wiedinmyer, Christine

    2008-12-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation are believed to be a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which in turn comprises a large fraction of fine particulate matter in many areas. Sesquiterpenes are a class of biogenic VOC with high chemical reactivity and SOA yields. Sesquiterpenes have only recently been quantified in emissions from a wide variety of plants. In this study, a new sesquiterpene emission inventory is used to provide input to the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. CMAQ is used to estimate the contribution of sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes to SOA concentrations over the contiguous United States. The gas-particle partitioning module of CMAQ was modified to include condensable products of sesquiterpene oxidation and to update values of the enthalpy of vaporization. The resulting model predicts July monthly average surface concentrations of total SOA in the eastern U.S. ranging from about 0.2-0.8 microg m(-3). This is roughly double the amount of SOA produced in this region when sesquiterpenes are not included. Even with sesquiterpenes included, however, the model significantly underpredicts surface concentrations of particle-phase organic matter compared to observed values. Treating all SOA as capable of undergoing polymerization increases predicted monthly average surface concentrations in July to 0.4-1.2 microg m(-3), in closer agreement with observations. Using the original enthalpy of vaporization value in CMAQ in place of the values estimated from the recent literature results in predicted SOA concentrations of about 0.3-1.3 microg m(-3).

  11. The atmospheric impacts of monoterpene ozonolysis on global stabilised Criegee intermediate budgets and SO2 oxidation: experiment, theory and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, Mike J.; Rickard, Andrew R.; Sherwen, Tomás; Evans, Mathew J.; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J.

    2018-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction of alkenes with ozone is known to produce stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs). These biradical/zwitterionic species have the potential to act as atmospheric oxidants for trace pollutants such as SO2, enhancing the formation of sulfate aerosol with impacts on air quality and health, radiative transfer and climate. However, the importance of this chemistry is uncertain as a consequence of limited understanding of the abundance and atmospheric fate of SCIs. In this work we apply experimental, theoretical and numerical modelling methods to quantify the atmospheric impacts, abundance and fate of the structurally diverse SCIs derived from the ozonolysis of monoterpenes, the second most abundant group of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere. We have investigated the removal of SO2 by SCIs formed from the ozonolysis of three atmospherically important monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene) in the presence of varying amounts of water vapour in large-scale simulation chamber experiments that are representative of boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on water vapour concentration, but this dependence is not linear across the range of [H2O] explored. At low [H2O] a strong dependence of SO2 removal on [H2O] is observed, while at higher [H2O] this dependence becomes much weaker. This is interpreted as being caused by the production of a variety of structurally (and hence chemically) different SCIs in each of the systems studied, which displayed different rates of reaction with water and of unimolecular rearrangement or decomposition. The determined rate constants, k(SCI+H2O), for those SCIs that react primarily with H2O range from 4 to 310 × 10-15 cm3 s-1. For those SCIs that predominantly react unimolecularly, determined rates range from 130 to 240 s-1. These values are in line with previous results for the (analogous) stereo-specific SCI system of syn-/anti-CH3CHOO. The experimental results are

  12. A qualitative comparison of secondary organic aerosol yields and composition from ozonolysis of monoterpenes at varying concentrations of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. C.; Farmer, D. K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, and limonene was investigated using a dark flow-through reaction chamber. SOA mass yields were calculated for each monoterpene from ozonolysis with varying NO2 concentrations. Kinetics modeling of the first-generation gas-phase chemistry suggests that differences in observed aerosol yields for different NO2 concentrations are consistent with NO3 formation and subsequent competition between O3 and NO3 to oxidize each monoterpene. α-Pinene was the only monoterpene studied that showed a systematic decrease in both aerosol number concentration and mass concentration with increasing [NO2]. β-Pinene and Δ3-carene produced fewer particles at higher [NO2], but both retained moderate mass yields. Limonene exhibited both higher number concentrations and greater mass concentrations at higher [NO2]. SOA from each experiment was collected and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS, enabling comparisons between product distributions for each system. In general, the systems influenced by NO3 oxidation contained more high molecular weight products (MW > 400 amu), suggesting the importance of oligomerization mechanisms in NO3-initiated SOA formation. α-Pinene, which showed anomalously low aerosol mass yields in the presence of NO2, showed no increase in these oligomer peaks, suggesting that lack of oligomer formation is a likely cause of α-pinene's near 0 % yields with NO3. Through direct comparisons of mixed-oxidant systems, this work suggests that NO3 is likely to dominate nighttime oxidation pathways in most regions with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Therefore, accurately constraining SOA yields from NO3 oxidation, which vary substantially with the volatile organic compound precursor, is essential in predicting nighttime aerosol production.

  13. Limonene dehydrogenase hydroxylates the allylic methyl group of cyclic monoterpenes in the anaerobic terpene degradation by Castellaniella defragrans.

    PubMed

    Puentes-Cala, Edinson; Liebeke, Manuel; Markert, Stephanie; Harder, Jens

    2018-05-01

    The enzymatic functionalization of hydrocarbons is a central step in the global carbon cycle initiating the mineralization of methane, isoprene and monoterpenes, the most abundant biologically produced hydrocarbons. Also, terpene-modifying enzymes have found many applications in the energy-economic biotechnological production of fine chemicals. Here we describe a limonene dehydrogenase that was purified from the facultatively anaerobic betaproteobacterium Castellaniella defragrans 65Phen grown on monoterpenes under denitrifying conditions in the absence of molecular oxygen. The purified limonene:ferrocenium oxidoreductase activity hydroxylated the methyl group of limonene (1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl)-cyclohex-1-ene) yielding perillyl alcohol ([4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-1-en-1-yl]methanol). The enzyme had a dithiothreitol:perillyl alcohol oxidoreductase activity yielding limonene. Mass spectrometry and molecular size determinations revealed a heterodimeric enzyme comprising CtmA and CtmB. Recently the two proteins had been identified by transposon mutagenesis and proteomics as part of the cyclic terpene metabolism ( ctm ) in Castellaniella defragrans and were annotated as FAD-dependent oxidoreductases of the protein domain family phytoene dehydrogenases and related proteins (COG1233). CtmAB is the first heterodimeric enzyme in this protein superfamily. Flavins in the purified CtmAB are oxidized by ferrocenium and are reduced by limonene. Heterologous expression of CtmA, CtmB and CtmAB in E. coli demonstrated that limonene dehydrogenase activity required both subunits carrying each a flavin cofactor. Native CtmAB oxidized a wide range of monocyclic monoterpenes containing the allylic methyl group motif (1-methyl-cyclohex-1-ene). In conclusion, we have identified CtmAB as a hydroxylating limonene dehydrogenase and the first heteromer in a family of FAD-dependent dehydrogenases acting on allylic methylene or methyl CH-bonds. We suggest a placement in EC 1

  14. A comparison of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and composition from ozonolysis of monoterpenes at varying concentrations of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. C.; Farmer, D. K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, and limonene was investigated using a dark flow-through reaction chamber. SOA mass yields were calculated for each monoterpene from ozonolysis with varying NO2 concentrations. Kinetics modeling of the first generation gas-phase chemistry suggests that differences in observed aerosol yields for different NO2 concentrations are consistent with NO3 formation and subsequent competition between O3 and NO3 to oxidize each monoterpene. α-pinene was the only monoterpene studied that showed a systematic decrease in both aerosol number concentration and mass concentration with increasing [NO2]. β-pinene and Δ3-carene produced fewer particles at higher [NO2], but both retained moderate mass yields. Limonene exhibited both higher number concentrations and greater mass concentrations at higher [NO2]. SOA from each experiment was collected and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS, enabling comparisons between product distributions for each system. In general, the systems influenced by NO3 oxidation contained more high molecular weight products (MW >400 amu), suggesting the importance of oligomerization mechanisms in NO3-initiated SOA formation. α-pinene, which showed anomalously low aerosol mass yields in the presence of NO2, showed no increase in these oligomer peaks, suggesting that lack of oligomer formation is a likely cause of α-pinene's near 0% yields with NO3. Through direct comparisons of mixed-oxidant systems, this work suggests that NO3 is likely to dominate nighttime oxidation pathways in most regions with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Therefore, accurately constraining SOA yields from NO3 oxidation, which vary substantially with the VOC precursor, is essential in predicting nighttime aerosol production.

  15. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in relation to wood dust and monoterpene exposure in the wood pellet industry

    PubMed Central

    Löfstedt, Håkan; Hagström, Katja; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Holmström, Mats; Rask-Andersen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Wood pellets are used as a source of renewable energy for heating purposes. Common exposures are wood dust and monoterpenes, which are known to be hazardous for the airways. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of occupational exposure on respiratory health in wood pellet workers. Materials and methods Thirty-nine men working with wood pellet production at six plants were investigated with a questionnaire, medical examination, allergy screening, spirometry, and nasal peak expiratory flow (nasal PEF). Exposure to wood dust and monoterpenes was measured. Results The wood pellet workers reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms, dry cough, and asthma medication compared to controls from the general population. There were no differences in nasal PEF between work and leisure time. A lower lung function than expected (vital capacity [VC], 95%; forced vital capacity in 1 second [FEV1], 96% of predicted) was noted, but no changes were noted during shifts. There was no correlation between lung function and years working in pellet production. Personal measurements of wood dust at work showed high concentrations (0.16–19 mg/m3), and exposure peaks when performing certain work tasks. Levels of monoterpenes were low (0.64–28 mg/m3). There was no association between exposure and acute lung function effects. Conclusions In this study of wood pellet workers, high levels of wood dust were observed, and that may have influenced the airways negatively as the study group reported upper airway symptoms and dry cough more frequently than expected. The wood pellet workers had both a lower VC and FEV1 than expected. No cross-shift changes were found. PMID:28276782

  16. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in relation to wood dust and monoterpene exposure in the wood pellet industry.

    PubMed

    Löfstedt, Håkan; Hagström, Katja; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Holmström, Mats; Rask-Andersen, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Wood pellets are used as a source of renewable energy for heating purposes. Common exposures are wood dust and monoterpenes, which are known to be hazardous for the airways. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of occupational exposure on respiratory health in wood pellet workers. Thirty-nine men working with wood pellet production at six plants were investigated with a questionnaire, medical examination, allergy screening, spirometry, and nasal peak expiratory flow (nasal PEF). Exposure to wood dust and monoterpenes was measured. The wood pellet workers reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms, dry cough, and asthma medication compared to controls from the general population. There were no differences in nasal PEF between work and leisure time. A lower lung function than expected (vital capacity [VC], 95%; forced vital capacity in 1 second [FEV 1 ], 96% of predicted) was noted, but no changes were noted during shifts. There was no correlation between lung function and years working in pellet production. Personal measurements of wood dust at work showed high concentrations (0.16-19 mg/m 3 ), and exposure peaks when performing certain work tasks. Levels of monoterpenes were low (0.64-28 mg/m 3 ). There was no association between exposure and acute lung function effects. In this study of wood pellet workers, high levels of wood dust were observed, and that may have influenced the airways negatively as the study group reported upper airway symptoms and dry cough more frequently than expected. The wood pellet workers had both a lower VC and FEV 1 than expected. No cross-shift changes were found.

  17. RNA-Seq in the discovery of a sparsely expressed scent-determining monoterpene synthase in lavender (Lavandula).

    PubMed

    Adal, Ayelign M; Sarker, Lukman S; Malli, Radesh P N; Liang, Ping; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2018-06-09

    Using RNA-Seq, we cloned and characterized a unique monoterpene synthase responsible for the formation of a scent-determining S-linalool constituent of lavender oils from Lavandula × intermedia. Several species of Lavandula produce essential oils (EOs) consisting mainly of monoterpenes including linalool, one of the most abundant and scent-determining oil constituents. Although R-linalool dominates the EOs of lavenders, varying amounts (depending on the species) of the S-linalool enantiomer can also be found in these plants. Despite its relatively low abundance, S-linalool contributes a sweet, pleasant scent and is an important constituent of lavender EOs. While several terpene synthase genes including R-linalool synthase have been cloned from lavenders many important terpene synthases including S-linalool synthase have not been described from these plants. In this study, we employed RNA-Seq and other complementary sequencing data to clone and functionally characterize the sparsely expressed S-linalool synthase cDNA (LiS-LINS) from Lavandula × intermedia. Recombinant LiS-LINS catalyzed the conversion of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to S-linalool as the sole product. Intriguingly, LiS-LINS exhibited very low (~ 30%) sequence similarity to other Lavandula terpene synthases, including R-linalool synthase. However, the predicted 3D structure of this protein, including the composition and arrangement of amino acids at the active site, is highly homologous to known terpene synthase proteins. LiS-LINS transcripts were detected in flowers, but were much less abundant than those corresponding to LiR-LINS, paralleling enantiomeric composition of linalool in L. × intermedia oils. These data indicate that production of S-linalool is at least partially controlled at the level of transcription from LiS-LINS. The cloned LiS-LINS cDNA may be used to enhance oil composition in lavenders and other plants through metabolic engineering.

  18. Pd(OAc)2/Ph3P-catalyzed dimerization of isoprene and synthesis of monoterpenic heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Dominik; Weger, Maximilian; Gini, Andrea; Mancheño, Olga García

    2017-01-01

    The palladium-catalyzed dimerization of isoprene is a practical approach of synthesizing monoterpenes. Though several highly selective methods have been reported, most of them still required pressure or costly ligands for attaining the active system and desired selectivity. Herein, we present a simple and economical procedure towards the tail-to-tail dimer using readily available Pd(OAc) 2 and inexpensive triphenylphosphine as ligand. Furthermore, simple screw cap vials are employed, allowing carrying out the reaction at low pressure. In addition, the potential of the dimer as a chemical platform for the preparation of heterocyclic terpenes by subsequent (hetero)-Diels-Alder or [4 + 1]-cycloadditions with nitrenes is also depicted.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) after intravenous dosing of antiseptic XueBiJing injection in human subjects and rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Lin, Jia-zhen; Li, Li; Yang, Jun-ling; Jia, Wei-wei; Huang, Yu-hong; Du, Fei-fei; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Mei-juan; Li, Yan-fen; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Na-ting; Olaleye, Olajide E; Sun, Yan; Li, Jian; Sun, Chang-hai; Zhang, Gui-ping; Li, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) are believed to be pharmacologically important for the antiseptic herbal injection XueBiJing. This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides. Systemic exposure to Chishao monoterpene glycosides was assessed in human subjects receiving an intravenous infusion and multiple infusions of XueBiJing injection, followed by assessment of the pharmacokinetics of the major circulating compounds. Supportive rat studies were also performed. Membrane permeability and plasma-protein binding were assessed in vitro. A total of 18 monoterpene glycosides were detected in XueBiJing injection (content levels, 0.001-2.47 mmol/L), and paeoniflorin accounted for 85.5% of the total dose of monoterpene glycosides detected. In human subjects, unchanged paeoniflorin exhibited considerable levels of systemic exposure with elimination half-lives of 1.2-1.3 h; no significant metabolite was detected. Oxypaeoniflorin and albiflorin exhibited low exposure levels, and the remaining minor monoterpene glycosides were negligible or undetected. Glomerular-filtration-based renal excretion was the major elimination pathway of paeoniflorin, which was poorly bound to plasma protein. In rats, the systemic exposure level of paeoniflorin increased proportionally as the dose was increased. Rat lung, heart, and liver exposure levels of paeoniflorin were lower than the plasma level, with the exception of the kidney level, which was 4.3-fold greater than the plasma level; brain penetration was limited by the poor membrane permeability. Due to its significant systemic exposure and appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, as well as previously reported antiseptic properties, paeoniflorin is a promising XueBiJing constituent of therapeutic importance.

  20. Monoamine oxidase inhibition by monoterpene indole alkaloids and fractions obtained from Psychotria suterella and Psychotria laciniata.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Soldi, Tatiane Cristina; Torres Abib, Renata; Anders Apel, Miriam; Simões-Pires, Cláudia; Marcourt, Laurence; Gottfried, Carmem; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha

    2013-06-01

    Alkaloid fractions of Psychotria suterella (SAE) and Psychotria laciniata (LAE) as well as two monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) isolated from these fractions were evaluated against monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and -B) obtained from rat brain mitochondria. SAE and LAE were analysed by HPLC-PDA and UHPLC/HR-TOF-MS leading to the identification of the compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4, whose identity was confirmed by NMR analyses. Furthermore, SAE and LAE were submitted to the enzymatic assays, showing a strong activity against MAO-A, characterized by IC(50) values of 1.37 ± 1.05 and 2.02 ± 1.08 μg/mL, respectively. Both extracts were also able to inhibit MAO-B, but in higher concentrations. In a next step, SAE and LAE were fractionated by RP-MPLC affording three and four major fractions, respectively. The RP-MPLC fractions were subsequently tested against MAO-A and -B. The RP-MPLC fractions SAE-F3 and LAE-F4 displayed a strong inhibition against MAO-A with IC(50) values of 0.57 ± 1.12 and 1.05 ± 1.15 μg/mL, respectively. The MIAs 1 and 2 also inhibited MAO-A (IC(50) of 50.04 ± 1.09 and 132.5 ± 1.33 μg/mL, respectively) and -B (IC(50) of 306.6 ± 1.40 and 162.8 ± 1.26 μg/mL, respectively), but in higher concentrations when compared with the fractions. This is the first work describing the effects of MIAs found in neotropical species of Psychotria on MAO activity. The results suggest that species belonging to this genus could consist of an interesting source in the search for new MAO inhibitors.

  1. Microwave Spectroscopy of Monoterpenes of Atmospheric Interest: α-PINENE, β-PINENE, and Nopinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Neeman, Elias; Huet, T. R.

    2014-06-01

    Several monoterpenes and terpenoids are biogenic volatile organic compounds which are emitted in the atmosphere, and react with OH, O_3, NO_x, etc. to give rise to several oxydation and degradation products. Spectroscopic information on these atmospheric species are still very scarse. Meanwhile we have demonstrated that combining quantum calculations to microwave spectroscopy led to the unambiguous characterization of the most stable conformers for perillaldehyde, limonene and carvone. This information can be used to subsequently model accurately the vibrational signature for atmospheric purposes. We have recorded the pure rotational spectra of α-pinene and β-pinene (C10H_{16}), and of nopinone (C9H_{14O}), using the MB-FTMW spectrometer of Lille, in the 2-20 GHz range at temperatures varying between 340 and 380 K. For these three bicyclic molecules only one conformer can be observed, and the rotational structure was observed up to J, K_a = 8, 3 ; 8, 4 ; 8, 5, respectively. All the spectra were modeled with a semi-rigid rotor Hamiltonian and fitted to obtain a rms value better than 5 kHz using a-, b- and c- type transitions. All the experimental results were supported by several quantum calculations performed at different levels of theory (DFT and ab initio). In particular no experimental evidence of internal rotation motion was found (methyl groups), in good agreement with the calculated barriers. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. J.-R. Aviles Moreno, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez and T. R. Huet, Chem. Phys. Lett. 473 (2009) 17 J.-R. Aviles Moreno, T. R. Huet, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez, Struct. Chem. 24 (2013) 1163 T. R. Huet, J.-R. Aviles Moreno, O. Pirali, M. Tudorie, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez, JQSRT. 113 (2012) 1261

  2. Novel pathway of SO2 oxidation in the atmosphere: reactions with monoterpene ozonolysis intermediates and secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianhuai; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2018-04-01

    Ozonolysis of monoterpenes is an important source of atmospheric biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). While enhanced BSOA formation has been associated with sulfate-rich conditions, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, the interactions between SO2 and reactive intermediates from monoterpene ozonolysis were investigated under different humidity conditions (10 % vs. 50 %). Chamber experiments were conducted with ozonolysis of α-pinene or limonene in the presence of SO2. Limonene SOA formation was enhanced in the presence of SO2, while no significant changes in SOA yields were observed during α-pinene ozonolysis. Under dry conditions, SO2 primarily reacted with stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) produced from ozonolysis, but at 50 % RH heterogeneous uptake of SO2 onto organic aerosol was found to be the dominant sink of SO2, likely owing to reactions between SO2 and organic peroxides. This SO2 loss mechanism to organic peroxides in SOA has not previously been identified in experimental chamber studies. Organosulfates were detected and identified using an electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-IMS-TOF) when SO2 was present in the experiments. Our results demonstrate the synergistic effects between BSOA formation and SO2 oxidation through sCI chemistry and SO2 uptake onto organic aerosol and illustrate the importance of considering the chemistry of organic and sulfur-containing compounds holistically to properly account for their reactive sinks.

  3. Secondary organic aerosol production from pinanediol, a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Penglin; Zhao, Yunliang; Chuang, Wayne K.; Robinson, Allen L.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from pinanediol (PD), a precursor chosen as a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes. Observations at the CLOUD facility at CERN have shown that oxidation of organic compounds such as PD can be an important contributor to new-particle formation. Here we focus on SOA mass yields and chemical composition from PD photo-oxidation in the CMU smog chamber. To determine the SOA mass yields from this semi-volatile precursor, we had to address partitioning of both the PD and its oxidation products to the chamber walls. After correcting for these losses, we found OA loading dependent SOA mass yields from PD oxidation that ranged between 0.1 and 0.9 for SOA concentrations between 0.02 and 20 µg m-3, these mass yields are 2-3 times larger than typical of much more volatile monoterpenes. The average carbon oxidation state measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer was around -0.7. We modeled the chamber data using a dynamical two-dimensional volatility basis set and found that a significant fraction of the SOA comprises low-volatility organic compounds that could drive new-particle formation and growth, which is consistent with the CLOUD observations.

  4. In vitro inhibition of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus by the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum (basil) and monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Kubiça, Thaís F; Alves, Sydney H; Weiblen, Rudi; Lovato, Luciane T

    2014-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is suggested as a model for antiviral studies of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The antiviral activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum and the monoterpenes camphor, thymol and 1,8-cineole against BVDV was investigated. The cytotoxicities of the compounds were measured by the MTT (3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) test, and the antiviral activities were tested by the plaque reduction assay. The oil or compounds were added to the assay in three different time points: a) pre-treatment of the virus (virucidal assay); b) pre-treatment of the cells; or c) post-treatment of the cells (after virus inoculation). The percentage of plaques inhibition for each compound was determined based on the number of plaques in the viral control. The results were expressed by CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration), IC50 (inhibitory concentration for 50% of plaques) and SI (selectivity index = CC50/IC50). Camphor (CC50 = 4420.12 μg mL(-1)) and 1,8-cineole (CC50 = 2996.10 μg mL(-1)) showed the lowest cytotoxicities and the best antiviral activities (camphor SI = 13.88 and 1,8-cineol SI = 9.05) in the virucidal assay. The higher activities achieved by the monoterpenes in the virucidal assay suggest that these compounds act directly on the viral particle.

  5. In vitro inhibition of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus by the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum (basil) and monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    Kubiça, Thaís F.; Alves, Sydney H.; Weiblen, Rudi; Lovato, Luciane T.

    2014-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is suggested as a model for antiviral studies of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The antiviral activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum and the monoterpenes camphor, thymol and 1,8-cineole against BVDV was investigated. The cytotoxicities of the compounds were measured by the MTT (3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) test, and the antiviral activities were tested by the plaque reduction assay. The oil or compounds were added to the assay in three different time points: a) pre-treatment of the virus (virucidal assay); b) pre-treatment of the cells; or c) post-treatment of the cells (after virus inoculation). The percentage of plaques inhibition for each compound was determined based on the number of plaques in the viral control. The results were expressed by CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration), IC50 (inhibitory concentration for 50% of plaques) and SI (selectivity index = CC50/IC50). Camphor (CC50 = 4420.12 μg mL−1) and 1,8-cineole (CC50 = 2996.10 μg mL−1) showed the lowest cytotoxicities and the best antiviral activities (camphor SI = 13.88 and 1,8-cineol SI = 9.05) in the virucidal assay. The higher activities achieved by the monoterpenes in the virucidal assay suggest that these compounds act directly on the viral particle. PMID:24948933

  6. Formulation of sage essential oil (Salvia officinalis, L.) monoterpenes into chitosan hydrogels and permeation study with GC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Kodadová, Alexandra; Vitková, Zuzana; Herdová, Petra; Ťažký, Anton; Oremusová, Jarmila; Grančai, Daniel; Mikuš, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the formulation of natural drugs into hydrogels. For the first time, compounds from the sage essential oil were formulated into chitosan hydrogels. A sample preparation procedure for hydrophobic volatile analytes present in a hydrophilic water matrix along with an analytical method based on the gas chromatography coupled with the mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and applied for the evaluation of the identity and quantity of essential oil components in the hydrogels and saline samples. The experimental results revealed that the chitosan hydrogels are suitable for the formulation of sage essential oil. The monoterpene release can be effectively controlled by both chitosan and caffeine concentration in the hydrogels. Permeation experiment, based on a hydrogel with the optimized composition [3.5% (w/w) sage essential oil, 2.0% (w/w) caffeine, 2.5% (w/w) chitosan and 0.1% (w/w) Tween-80] in donor compartment, saline solution in acceptor compartment, and semi-permeable cellophane membrane, demonstrated the useful permeation selectivity. Here, (according to lipophilicity) an enhanced permeation of the bicyclic monoterpenes with antiflogistic and antiseptic properties (eucalyptol, camphor and borneol) and, at the same time, suppressed permeation of toxic thujone (not exceeding its permitted applicable concentration) was observed. These properties highlight the pharmaceutical importance of the developed chitosan hydrogel formulating sage essential oil in the dermal applications.

  7. The biosynthetic origin of irregular monoterpenes in Lavandula: isolation and biochemical characterization of a novel cis-prenyl diphosphate synthase gene, lavandulyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Zerihun A; Erland, Lauren A E; Rheault, Mark R; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2013-03-01

    Lavender essential oils are constituted predominantly of regular monoterpenes, for example linalool, 1,8-cineole, and camphor. However, they also contain irregular monoterpenes including lavandulol and lavandulyl acetate. Although the majority of genes responsible for the production of regular monoterpenes in lavenders are now known, enzymes (including lavandulyl diphosphate synthase (LPPS)) catalyzing the biosynthesis of irregular monoterpenes in these plants have not been described. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel cis-prenyl diphosphate synthase cDNA, termed Lavandula x intermedia lavandulyl diphosphate synthase (LiLPPS), through a homology-based cloning strategy. The LiLPPS ORF, encoding for a 305-amino acid long protein, was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. The approximately 34.5-kDa bacterially produced protein specifically catalyzed the head-to-middle condensation of two dimethylallyl diphosphate units to LPP in vitro with apparent Km and kcat values of 208 ± 12 μm and 0.1 s(-1), respectively. LiLPPS is a homodimeric enzyme with a sigmoidal saturation curve and Hill coefficient of 2.7, suggesting a positive co-operative interaction among its catalytic sites. LiLPPS could be used to modulate the production of lavandulol and its derivatives in plants through metabolic engineering.

  8. Monoterpene concentration in Douglas-fir in relation to geographic location and resistance to attack by the Douglas-fir beetle

    J.W. Hanover; M.M. Furniss

    1966-01-01

    The concentration of monoterpenes in Pinus monticola Dougl. has been shown to be genetically controlled (Hanover, in preparation). Genetic control of terpene concentration has been implied, also, from analyses of parents or interspecies hybrids in other species (Bannister et al. 1959; Williams and Bannister 1962; Smith 1964, and Forde 1964). Evidence...

  9. WET AND DRY SEASON ECOSYSTEM LEVEL FLUXES OF ISOPRENE AND MONOTERPENES FROM A SOUTHEAST ASIAN SECONDARY FOREST AND RUBBER TREE PLANTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Canopy scale fluxes of isoprene and monoterpenes were investigated in both wet and dry seasons above a rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)/secondary tropical forest in the Yunnan province of southwestern China. Drought conditions were unusually high during the dry season experiment....

  10. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated douglas-fir ( pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca'). Forest Service research paper

    SciT

    Muzika, R.M.; Engle, J.; Parks, C.

    1993-02-01

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees characterized as either resistant' or susceptible' to western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more foliage monoterpenes and broke bud 7 to 10 days earlier than susceptible trees.

  11. Monoterpene concentrations in fresh, senescent, and decaying foliage of singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frem.: Pinaceae) from the western Great Basin.

    PubMed

    Wilt, F M; Miller, G C; Everett, R L; Hackett, M

    1993-02-01

    Senescent foliage from pines is potentially a large contributor to the total monoterpene content of the litter layer, and the availability of these compounds as phytotoxins may result from release of these compounds into the vapor phase. In order to determine the fate of several monoterpene hydrocarbons in the natural environment, we examined their concentrations in fresh, senescent, and decaying needles from 32 single-leaf pinyon pine (Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frem.: Pinaceae) trees growing at two different locations. Total monoterpene content was highest in the fresh needles (mean=5.6 ± 2.2 mg/g extracted air dry weight), but also remained relatively high in senescent needles (mean=3.6 ±1.8 mg/g extracted air dry weight), either still attached to the tree or forming the freshest layer of understory litter. Decaying needles within a dark decomposing layer of litter material 5-20 cm from the surface were found to contain much lower amounts of total monoterpenes (average: =0.12 ±0.06 mg/g extracted air dry weight). Further investigation of the fate of these compounds in the pinyon understory is required to determine if these hydrocarbons are indeed exerting phytotoxic characteristics.

  12. Variations in foliar monoterpenes across the range of jack pine reveal three widespread chemotypes: implications to host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle.

    PubMed

    Taft, Spencer; Najar, Ahmed; Godbout, Julie; Bousquet, Jean; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    The secondary compounds of pines (Pinus) can strongly affect the physiology, ecology and behaviors of the bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) that feed on sub-cortical tissues of hosts. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) has a wide natural distribution range in North America (Canada and USA) and thus variations in its secondary compounds, particularly monoterpenes, could affect the host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which has recently expanded its range into the novel jack pine boreal forest. We investigated monoterpene composition of 601 jack pine trees from natural and provenance forest stands representing 63 populations from Alberta to the Atlantic coast. Throughout its range, jack pine exhibited three chemotypes characterized by high proportions of α-pinene, β-pinene, or limonene. The frequency with which the α-pinene and β-pinene chemotypes occurred at individual sites was correlated to climatic variables, such as continentality and mean annual precipitation, as were the individual α-pinene and β-pinene concentrations. However, other monoterpenes were generally not correlated to climatic variables or geographic distribution. Finally, while the enantiomeric ratios of β-pinene and limonene remained constant across jack pine's distribution, (-):(+)-α-pinene exhibited two separate trends, thereby delineating two α-pinene phenotypes, both of which occurred across jack pine's range. These significant variations in jack pine monoterpene composition may have cascading effects on the continued eastward spread and success of D. ponderosae in the Canadian boreal forest.

  13. Isolation and expression of cytochrome P450 genes in the antennae and gut of pine beetle Dendroctonus rhizophagus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) following exposure to host monoterpenes

    Claudia Cano-Ramirez; Maria Fernanda Lopez; Ana K. Cesar-Ayala; Veronica Pineda-Martinez; Brian T. Sullivan; Gerardo and Zuniga

    2013-01-01

    Bark beetles oxidize the defensive monoterpenes of their host trees both to detoxify them and convert them into components of their pheromone system. This oxidation is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes and occurs in different tissues of the insect, including the gut (i.e., the site where the beetle's pheromones are produced and accumulated) and the antennae (i....

  14. Monoterpene chemical speciation in a tropical rainforest:variation with season, height, and time of dayat the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Yáñez-Serrano, Ana; Nölscher, Anke Christine; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Gomes Alves, Eliane; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Bonn, Boris; Wolff, Stefan; Sa, Marta; Yamasoe, Marcia; Williams, Jonathan; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Speciated monoterpene measurements in rainforest air are scarce, but they are essential for understanding the contribution of these compounds to the overall reactivity of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions towards the main atmospheric oxidants, such as hydroxyl radicals (OH), ozone (O3) and nitrate radicals (NO3). In this study, we present the chemical speciation of gas-phase monoterpenes measured in the tropical rainforest at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO, Amazonas, Brazil). Samples of VOCs were collected by two automated sampling systems positioned on a tower at 12 and 24 m height and analysed using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. The samples were collected in October 2015, representing the dry season, and compared with previous wet and dry season studies at the site. In addition, vertical profile measurements (at 12 and 24 m) of total monoterpene mixing ratios were made using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. The results showed a distinctly different chemical speciation between day and night. For instance, α-pinene was more abundant during the day, whereas limonene was more abundant at night. Reactivity calculations showed that higher abundance does not generally imply higher reactivity. Furthermore, inter- and intra-annual results demonstrate similar chemodiversity during the dry seasons analysed. Simulations with a canopy exchange modelling system show simulated monoterpene mixing ratios that compare relatively well with the observed mixing ratios but also indicate the necessity of more experiments to enhance our understanding of in-canopy sinks of these compounds.

  15. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  16. Effects of Acute Ozone Exposure and Methyl Jasmonate Treatment on White Pine Monoterpene and Sesquiterpene Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Wagner, D.; Allwine, E.; Harley, P. C.; Vanreken, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are produced by plants and include monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are one of the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions, and impact both ozone concentration and secondary organic aerosol formation. Under unstressed conditions, the release of BVOCs to the atmosphere is primarily controlled by the vapor pressure of the relevant compounds within the plant tissue, which is in turn dependent on temperature as well as complex biochemical production processes. However, various natural and anthropogenic stressors can alter both the quantity and composition of the BVOCs emitted by plants. Many potential stressors are expected to become stronger as climate change effects escalate. The impacts of most stressors on BVOC emissions have not been well characterized, particularly in a field setting where changes in BVOC emissions could have influential feedbacks with climate. This study investigated the effects of two stressors on monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission rates at a field site in northern Michigan: acute ozone exposure and treatment with methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. The study included six repetitions of the same experiment, each time using a new set of sub-canopy eastern white pine specimens. For each experiment, dynamic branch enclosures were simultaneously used on three specimens for sample collection: one ozone treatment tree, one methyl jasmonate treatment tree, and one control tree. Sampling lines were placed in each enclosure and VOCs were collected onto cartridges packed with Tenax GR adsorbent. Samples were collected several times per day for at least two days before treatment and for five days after treatment. Cartridges were analyzed via thermodesorption with an Agilent GC/MS/FID. This analysis allowed the identification and quantification of several monoterpene and sesquiterpene species in the samples

  17. Challenges in modelling isoprene and monoterpene emission dynamics of Arctic plants: a case study from a subarctic tundra heath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Schurgers, Guy; Valolahti, Hanna; Faubert, Patrick; Tiiva, Päivi; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic is warming at twice the global average speed, and the warming-induced increases in biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions from Arctic plants are expected to be drastic. The current global models' estimations of minimal BVOC emissions from the Arctic are based on very few observations and have been challenged increasingly by field data. This study applied a dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS, as a platform to investigate short-term and long-term BVOC emission responses to Arctic climate warming. Field observations in a subarctic tundra heath with long-term (13-year) warming treatments were extensively used for parameterizing and evaluating BVOC-related processes (photosynthesis, emission responses to temperature and vegetation composition). We propose an adjusted temperature (T) response curve for Arctic plants with much stronger T sensitivity than the commonly used algorithms for large-scale modelling. The simulated emission responses to 2 °C warming between the adjusted and original T response curves were evaluated against the observed warming responses (WRs) at short-term scales. Moreover, the model responses to warming by 4 and 8 °C were also investigated as a sensitivity test. The model showed reasonable agreement to the observed vegetation CO2 fluxes in the main growing season as well as day-to-day variability of isoprene and monoterpene emissions. The observed relatively high WRs were better captured by the adjusted T response curve than by the common one. During 1999-2012, the modelled annual mean isoprene and monoterpene emissions were 20 and 8 mg C m-2 yr-1, with an increase by 55 and 57 % for 2 °C summertime warming, respectively. Warming by 4 and 8 °C for the same period further elevated isoprene emission for all years, but the impacts on monoterpene emissions levelled off during the last few years. At hour-day scale, the WRs seem to be strongly impacted by canopy air T, while at the day-year scale, the WRs are a combined

  18. Knockdown and larvicidal activity of six monoterpenes against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) and their structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Zerba, Eduardo; Masuh, Hector

    2013-12-01

    The relationships between physicochemical parameters of majority components of Eucalyptus essential oils and their insecticide effect were evaluated on Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). The octanol-water partition coefficients of the monoterpenes were estimated by the atom/fragment contribution method and the vapor pressures were determined by our laboratory in previous studies. The larvicidal activity (LC50 (ppm)) and knockdown effect (KT50 (min)) of each component was determined. The results show that the toxicity of EOs main components of Eucalyptus on adults and larvae of A. aegypti is strongly related to their physicochemical properties (vapor pressure and Log P). However, the interaction of both variables (vapor pressure * Log P) explains the toxicological phenomenon more precisely. The regression models were expressed as follows: KT 50(min) =  - 10.9 + 3.7 * Log P + 1.9 * 1/Pvapor (R(2) = 0.80; F = 42.5) and LC 50(ppm) =  - 94.3 + 438.6 *  1/Log P + 2.8 *  1/Pvapor (F = 57.8; R(2) = 0.85). The six evaluated components present different functional groups. Therefore, it was considered to evaluate the monoterpenes as a group and separated in two groups: oxygenated monoterpenes (α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, and 1,8-cineole) and terpene hydrocarbons (γ-terpinene, p-cymene, and α-pinene). The results show the regression models for each group as follows: (A) oxygenated terpenes: KT 50(min) = - 515.3 + 1613.2 * 1/Log P + 5, 2 * 1/Pvapor (F = 3176.7 R(2) = 0.99) and LC 50(ppm)  =  - 1679.4 + 5402.1 * 1/Log P + 12.7 *  1/Pvapor (F = 282.9; R(2) = 0.99). (B) Hydrocarbons terpenes: KT 50(min) = 18.2 - 58.3 * 1/Log P + 2.7 * 1/Pvapor (F = 171.7;  R(2) = 0.97) and LC 50(ppm) = - 21.1 + 174.9 * 1/Log P - 14.3 * 1/Pvapor (F = 410.0; R(2) = 0.99). The association between

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of monoterpene-based 2-amino carboxylic acids on macrocyclic glycopeptide-based phases.

    PubMed

    Sipos, László; Ilisz, István; Pataj, Zoltán; Szakonyi, Zsolt; Fülöp, Ferenc; Armstrong, Daniel W; Péter, Antal

    2010-10-29

    The enantiomers of five monoterpene-based 2-amino carboxylic acids were directly separated on chiral stationary phases containing macrocyclic glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin (Astec Chirobiotic T and T2) and teicoplanin aglycone (Chirobiotic TAG) as chiral selectors. The effects of pH, the mobile phase composition, the structure of the analyte and temperature on the separations were investigated. Experiments were performed at constant mobile phase compositions in the temperature range 10-40°C to study the effects of temperature and thermodynamic parameters on separations. Apparent thermodynamic parameters and T(iso) values were calculated from plots of ln k or ln α versus 1/T. Some mechanistic aspects of the chiral recognition process are discussed with respect to the structures of the analytes. It was found that the enantioseparations were in most cases enthalpy driven. The sequence of elution of the enantiomers was determined in all cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Emissions of Monoterpenes and DMS from Corn and their Influence on Nighttime Chemical Processing of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Brown, S. S.; Williams, E. J.; Eller, A. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Lerner, B. M.; Fall, R.; Warneke, C.

    2012-12-01

    In the United States large amounts of corn are grown for the use as animal feed, for the food industry and for the production of fuel ethanol. In 2012 the acreage of corn planted was 390,000 km2 covering over 4.2% of the US land surface. The BioCORN 2011 field experiment took place in summer 2011 to look at ecosystem fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a cornfield in Colorado during the period of rapid biomass increase and the development of flowers and ears. Eddy covariance, soil and leaf cuvette measurements using various instruments including PTR-MS, NI-PT-CIMS and GC-MS were used to determine fluxes of VOCs, CO2 and NOx. Corn plants emit significant amounts of VOCs with methanol being the largest emission and smaller emissions of other VOCs such acetone, acetaldehyde, monoterpene and dimethylsulfide (DMS). During the day VOCs mainly react with hydroxyl radicals and during the night with nitrate radicals (NO3), where emissions from corn may act as a sink for reactive nitrogen. DMS, mainly emitted from oceans and to a lesser extent from terrestrial vegetation, had a diurnal cycle: mixing ratios high during the night, but fluxes high during the day. DMS was found to dominate the reactivity of NO3 followed by monoterpenes and the heterogeneous loss of N2O5, which has implications for the nighttime chemistry. Other results of BioCORN 2011 on VOC emissions from corn and their impact on atmospheric chemistry will be presented and discussed.

  1. Comparative analysis of essential oils of six Anthemis taxa from Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Milica; Lakusić, Dmitar; Kovacević, Nada; Tzakou, Olga; Couladis, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The essential-oil composition of six Anthemis taxa from several populations in Serbia and Montenegro, Anthemis triumfetti (L.) DC., A. tinctoria L., A. austriaca Jacq., A. ruthenica Bieb., A. cotula L., and A. cretica ssp. carpatica (Willd.) Grierson were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The main constituents have been identified as follows: camphor (13.8-15.4%), alpha-pinene (5.2-9.3%), beta-pinene (4.9-7.8%), and (E)-caryophyllene (7.3-9.8%) in three populations, and cis-chrysanthenol (27.0%) and 1,8-cineole (8.4%) in one population of A. triumfetti; 1,8-cineole (9.0-25.8%) in the oils of five populations, and borneol (16.0%) and spatulenol (16.0%) in the oil of one population of A. tinctoria; cis-chrysanthenyl acetate (17.5-22.0%), beta-pinene (8.6-13.2%), and 1,8-cineole (7.2-10.4%) in the oils of A. austriaca; germacrene D (8.3-11.3%) and terpinen-4-ol (6.3-7.3%) in A. ruthenica oils; beta-cedrene (10.3-19.0%), (E)-beta-farnesene (7.8-13.5%), and germacrene D (5.2-9.1%) in the oils of A. cotula; cis-thujone (39.0%), trans-thujone (13.5%), and yomogi alcohol (7.1%) in the oil of A. cretica ssp. carpatica. The essential oil of A. austriaca was studied for the first time. A cluster analysis based on the relative percentages of all components of the essential oils was used to determine the distances between taxa and populations.

  2. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions from Abies alba in a French forest.

    PubMed

    Moukhtar, S; Couret, C; Rouil, L; Simon, V

    2006-02-01

    Air quality studies need to be based on accurate and reliable data, particularly in the field of the emissions. Biogenic emissions from forests, crops, and grasslands are now considered as major compounds in photochemical processes. Unfortunately, depending on the type of vegetation, these emissions are not so often reliably defined. As an example, although the silver fir (Abies alba) is a very widespread conifer tree in the French and European areas, its standard emission rate is not available in the literature. This study investigates the isoprene and monoterpenes emission from A. alba in France measured during the fieldwork organised in the Fossé Rhénan, from May to June 2003. A dynamic cuvette method was used. Limonene was the predominant monoterpene emitted, followed by camphene, alpha-pinene and eucalyptol. No isoprene emission was detected. The four monoterpenes measured showed different behaviours according to micrometeorological conditions. In fact, emissions of limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene were temperature-dependant while eucalyptol emissions were temperature and light dependant. Biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions were modeled using information gathered during the field study. Emissions of the three monoterpenes previously quoted were achieved using the monoterpenes algorithm developed by Tingey et al. (1980) [Tingey D, Manning M, Grothaus L, Burns W. Influence of light and temperature on monoterpene emission rates from slash pine. Plant Physiol 1980;65: 797-801.] and the isoprene algorithm [Guenther, A., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1991. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: observations with eucalyptus and emission rate algorithm development. J Geophys Res 26A: 10799-10808.]; [Guenther, A., Zimmerman, P., Harley, P., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: model evaluation and sensitivity analysis. J Geophys Res 98D: 12609-12617.]) was used for the eucalyptol emission. With these

  3. Structural investigation of the β-cyclodextrin complexes with chiral bicyclic monoterpenes - Influence of the functionality group on the host-guest stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceborska, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    The crystal structures of the complexes of β-cyclodextrin with (+)- and (-)-camphors are presented. The comparison of the obtained crystal structures with available data for other complexes of β-cyclodextrin with chiral bicyclic monoterpenes (hydrocarbon (+)-fenchene and alcohols: (-)-isopinocampheol, and (+)-, and (-)-borneols) obtained from Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) shows the trend of alcohols to form dimeric complexes of 2:3 stoichiometry, while hydrocarbons and ketones prefer to form 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes.

  4. Monoterpene isolated from the essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi is cytotoxic to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Faride; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Banar, Maryam; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Taherikalani, Morovat; Leeuwen, Willem B van; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an herbal extract containing monoterpene exhibited activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from clinical infection samples. The essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague ex Turrill (Apiaceae) fruit was extracted by hydrodistillation. Fruit residues were treated with hydrochloric acid and re-hydrodistilled to obtain volatile compounds. Compounds in the distilled oil were identified using gas-chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The antibiotic susceptibility of all bacterial isolates was analyzed using both the disc diffusion method and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The sensitivity of antibiotic-resistant isolates to essential oil was also determined by using the disc diffusion method and MIC determination. Of 26 clinical isolates, 92% were multidrug-resistant (MDR). Aromatic monoterpenes (thymol, paracymene, and gamma-terpinene) were the major (90%) components of the oil. Growth of S. aureus strains was successfully inhibited by the oil, with an inhibitory zone diameter (IZD) between 30-60mm and MIC <0.02μL/mL. The oil had no antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa; rather, it prevented pigment production in these isolates. This study revealed that the essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi, which contains monoterpene, has good antibacterial potency. Monoterpenes could thus be incorporated into antimicrobial ointment formulas in order to treat highly drug-resistant S. aureus infections. Our findings also underscore the utility of research on natural products in order to combat bacterial multidrug resistance.

  5. Ice core records of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers from Aurora Peak in Alaska since 1660s: Implication for climate change variability in the North Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Ambarish; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Ono, Kaori; Seki, Osamu; Fu, Pingqing; Matoba, Sumio; Shiraiwa, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    Monoterpene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers are reported for the first time in an Alaskan ice core to better understand the biological source strength before and after the industrial revolution in the Northern Hemisphere. We found significantly high concentrations of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers (e.g., pinic, pinonic, and 2-methylglyceric acids, 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol) in the ice core, which show historical trends with good correlation to each other since 1660s. They show positive correlations with sugar compounds (e.g., mannitol, fructose, glucose, inositol and sucrose), and anti-correlations with α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) and fatty acids (e.g., C18:1) in the same ice core. These results suggest similar sources and transport pathways for monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers. In addition, we found that concentrations of C5-alkene triols (e.g., 3-methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene, cis-2-methyl 1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene and trans-2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene) in the ice core have increased after the Great Pacific Climate Shift (late 1970s). They show positive correlations with α-dicarbonyls and fatty acids (e.g., C18:1) in the ice core, suggesting that enhanced oceanic emissions of biogenic organic compounds through the marine boundary layer are recorded in the ice core from Alaska. Photochemical oxidation process for these monoterpene- and isoprene-/sesquiterpene-SOA tracers are suggested to be linked with the periodicity of multi-decadal climate oscillations and retreat of sea ice in the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. The atu and liu clusters are involved in the catabolic pathways for acyclic monoterpenes and leucine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, J A; Zavala, A N; Díaz-Pérez, C; Cervantes, C; Díaz-Pérez, A L; Campos-García, J

    2006-03-01

    Evidence suggests that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 gnyRDBHAL cluster, which is involved in acyclic isoprenoid degradation (A. L. Díaz-Pérez, N. A. Zavala-Hernández, C. Cervantes, and J. Campos-García, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70:5102-5110, 2004), corresponds to the liuRABCDE cluster (B. Hoschle, V. Gnau, and D. Jendrossek, Microbiology 151:3649-3656, 2005). A liu (leucine and isovalerate utilization) homolog cluster was found in the PAO1 genome and is related to the catabolism of acyclic monoterpenes of the citronellol family (AMTC); it was named the atu cluster (acyclic terpene utilization), consisting of the atuCDEF genes and lacking the hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (CoA) lyase (HMG-CoA lyase) homolog. Mutagenesis of the atu and liu clusters showed that both are involved in AMTC and leucine catabolism by encoding the enzymes related to the geranyl-CoA and the 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA pathways, respectively. Intermediary metabolites of the acyclic monoterpene pathway, citronellic and geranic acids, were accumulated, and leucine degradation rates were affected in both atuF and liuD mutants. The alpha subunit of geranyl-CoA carboxylase and the alpha subunit of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (alpha-MCCase), encoded by the atuF and liuD genes, respectively, were both induced by citronellol, whereas only the alpha-MCCase subunit was induced by leucine. Both citronellol and leucine also induced a LacZ transcriptional fusion at the liuB gene. The liuE gene encodes a probable hydroxy-acyl-CoA lyase (probably HMG-CoA lyase), an enzyme with bifunctional activity that is essential for both AMTC and leucine degradation. P. aeruginosa PAO1 products encoded by the liuABCD cluster showed a higher sequence similarity (77.2 to 79.5%) with the probable products of liu clusters from several Pseudomonas species than with the atuCDEF cluster from PAO1 (41.5%). Phylogenetic studies suggest that the atu cluster from P. aeruginosa could be the result of horizontal transfer

  7. Enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes of Juniperus communis L. and Juniperus oxycedrus needles and berries determined by HS-SPME and enantioselective GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Foudil-Cherif, Yazid; Yassaa, Noureddine

    2012-12-01

    For the first time, enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes in the headspace of Juniperus communis L. and Juniperus oxycedrus needles and berries has been determined using HS-SPME combined with enantioselective GC/MS. The essential oils from needles and berries of both Juniperus species obtained by hydrodistillation were also performed. HS-SPME has shown good potential to reproduce the same results as the commonly used hydrodistillation extraction technique. While needles and berries of J. communis showed high contents of sabinene, α-pinene and β-myrcene with 19-30%, 12-24% and 9-20%, respectively, J. oxycedrus was strongly dominated by α-pinene with 85-92% in both needles and berries. Large variations in chiral distribution of monoterpenes within the same plant species and between the two junipers were observed. Interestingly, similar enantiomeric preferences of monoterpenes were obtained between needles and berries of the two junipers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative Intensity Studies of Three Gas-Phase Monoterpenes in the Infrared: α-PINENE, β-PINENE and D-Limonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2013-06-01

    Monoterpenes are a class of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) whose general formula is C_{10}H_{16}. Like other VOCs, monoterpenes play an important role in the atmosphere as they are produced by vegetation in large quantities, and have recently been discovered in biomass burning plumes. Absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities are reported in the 600 - 6500 cm^{-1} region for three monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene and d-limonene. The pressure broadened (1 atmosphere N_2) spectra were recorded in a 19.96 cm path length cell with 0.112 cm^{-1} resolution at two temperatures and a minimum of six different partial pressures using a Bruker 66V FTIR. These data are part of the PNNL Spectral Database, which contains quantitative spectra of over 600 molecules. Potential atmospheric applications will be discussed Timothy J. Johnson, Luisa T. M. Profeta, Robert L. Sams, David W. T. Griffith, Robert L. Yokelson Vibrational Spectroscopy {53}(1);97-102 (2010).

  9. Aroma compound analysis of Piper nigrum and Piper guineense essential oils from Cameroon using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography, solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Jirovetz, Leopold; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Ngassoum, Martin Benoit; Geissler, Margit

    2002-11-08

    The investigation of aroma compounds of the essential oils of dried fruits of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and black and white "Ashanti pepper" (Piper guineense) from Cameroon by means of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was carried out for the first time to identify the odorous target components responsible for the characteristic odor of these valuable spices and food flavoring products. By means of GC-flame ionization detection (FID) and GC-MS (using different polar columns) the main compounds (concentration >3.0%, calculated as area of GC-FID analysis using a non-polar fused-silica open tubular RSL-200 column) of the SPME headspace samples of P. nigrum (black) and P. guineense (black and white) were found to be: P. nigrum (black)--germacrene D (11.01%), limonene (10.26%), beta-pinene (10.02%), alpha-phellandrene (8.56%), beta-caryophyllene (7.29%), alpha-pinene (6.40%) and cis-beta-ocimene (3.19%); P. guineense (black)--beta-caryophyllene (57.59%), beta-elemene (5.10%), bicyclogermacrene (5.05%) and alpha-humulene (4.86%); and P. guineense (white)--beta-caryophyllene (51.75%), cis-beta-ocimene (6.61%), limonene (5.88%), beta-pinene (4.56%), linalool (3.97%) and alpha-humulene (3.29%). The most intense odor impressions of the essential oils of the various dried pepper fruits were given byprofessional perfumers as follows: P nigrum (black)--fine, pleasant black pepper note; P. guineense (black)--black pepper top-note; and P. guineense (white)--pleasant white pepper note. These analytical results for the SPME headspace samples of three different pepper species from Cameroon are in accordance with the olfactoric data of the corresponding essential oils. A GC-sniffing technique was used to correlate the single odor impression of the identified SPME headspace volatiles of the three investigated pepper samples with the following results: themain compounds such as beta-caryophyllene, germacrene D, limonene, beta-pinene, alpha-phellandrene and alpha-humulene, as well as

  10. Monoterpene glycoside ESK246 from Pittosporum targets LAT3 amino acid transport and prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Grkovic, Tanja; Font, Josep; Bonham, Sarah; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Bailey, Charles G; Moran, Anne M; Ryan, Renae M; Rasko, John E J; Jormakka, Mika; Quinn, Ronald J; Holst, Jeff

    2014-06-20

    The L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) family consists of four members (LAT1-4) that mediate uptake of neutral amino acids including leucine. Leucine is not only important as a building block for proteins, but plays a critical role in mTORC1 signaling leading to protein translation. As such, LAT family members are commonly upregulated in cancer in order to fuel increased protein translation and cell growth. To identify potential LAT-specific inhibitors, we established a function-based high-throughput screen using a prefractionated natural product library. We identified and purified two novel monoterpene glycosides, ESK242 and ESK246, sourced from a Queensland collection of the plant Pittosporum venulosum. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing individual LAT family members, we demonstrated that ESK246 preferentially inhibits leucine transport via LAT3, while ESK242 inhibits both LAT1 and LAT3. We further show in LNCaP prostate cancer cells that ESK246 is a potent (IC50 = 8.12 μM) inhibitor of leucine uptake, leading to reduced mTORC1 signaling, cell cycle protein expression and cell proliferation. Our study suggests that ESK246 is a LAT3 inhibitor that can be used to study LAT3 function and upon which new antiprostate cancer therapies may be based.

  11. Monoterpene Glycoside ESK246 from Pittosporum Targets LAT3 Amino Acid Transport and Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The l-type amino acid transporter (LAT) family consists of four members (LAT1–4) that mediate uptake of neutral amino acids including leucine. Leucine is not only important as a building block for proteins, but plays a critical role in mTORC1 signaling leading to protein translation. As such, LAT family members are commonly upregulated in cancer in order to fuel increased protein translation and cell growth. To identify potential LAT-specific inhibitors, we established a function-based high-throughput screen using a prefractionated natural product library. We identified and purified two novel monoterpene glycosides, ESK242 and ESK246, sourced from a Queensland collection of the plant Pittosporum venulosum. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing individual LAT family members, we demonstrated that ESK246 preferentially inhibits leucine transport via LAT3, while ESK242 inhibits both LAT1 and LAT3. We further show in LNCaP prostate cancer cells that ESK246 is a potent (IC50 = 8.12 μM) inhibitor of leucine uptake, leading to reduced mTORC1 signaling, cell cycle protein expression and cell proliferation. Our study suggests that ESK246 is a LAT3 inhibitor that can be used to study LAT3 function and upon which new antiprostate cancer therapies may be based. PMID:24762008

  12. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis Flowers[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G.; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J.C.; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (−)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined. PMID:24285789

  13. Deciphering the route to cyclic monoterpenes in Chrysomelina leaf beetles: source of new biocatalysts for industrial application?

    PubMed

    Burse, Antje; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-09-26

    The drastic growth of the population on our planet requires the efficient and sustainable use of our natural resources. Enzymes are indispensable tools for a wide range of industries producing food, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, or biofuels. Because insects constitute one of the most species-rich classes of organisms colonizing almost every ecological niche on earth, they have developed extraordinary metabolic abilities to survive in various and sometimes extreme habitats. Despite this metabolic diversity, insect enzymes have only recently generated interest in industrial applications because only a few metabolic pathways have been sufficiently characterized. Here, we address the biosynthetic route to iridoids (cyclic monoterpenes), a group of secondary metabolites used by some members of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina as defensive compounds against their enemies. The ability to produce iridoids de novo has also convergently evolved in plants. From plant sources, numerous pharmacologically relevant structures have already been described. In addition, in plants, iridoids serve as building blocks for monoterpenoid indole alkaloids with broad therapeutic applications. As the commercial synthesis of iridoid-based drugs often relies on a semisynthetic approach involving biocatalysts, the discovery of enzymes from the insect iridoid route can account for a valuable resource and economic alternative to the previously used enzymes from the metabolism of plants. Hence, this review illustrates the recent discoveries made on the steps of the iridoid pathway in Chrysomelina leaf beetles. The findings are also placed in the context of the studied counterparts in plants and are further discussed regarding their use in technological approaches.

  14. The in vitro and in vivo antiviral properties of combined monoterpene alcohols against West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pliego Zamora, Adriana; Edmonds, Judith H; Reynolds, Maxwell J; Khromykh, Alexander A; Ralph, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that can cause neuroinvasive disease in humans and animals for which no therapies are currently available. We studied an established combination of monoterpene alcohols (CMA) derived from Melaleuca alternifolia, against WNV infection. The in vitro results show that CMA exhibits virucidal activity, as well as reduces the viral titres and percentage of infected cells. The antiviral mechanism of action of CMA was studied. We found that CMA did not alter the intracellular pH, neither induced apoptosis, but did induce cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase although that was not the antiviral mechanism. Furthermore, we tested CMA in vivo using IRF 3(-)(/)(-)/7(-/-)mice and it was found that CMA treatment significantly delayed morbidity due to WNV infection, reduced the loss of body weight and reduced the viral titres in brain. These findings suggest that CMA could be a therapeutic agent against WNV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elution-extrusion counter-current chromatography for the separation of two pairs of isomeric monoterpenes from Paeoniae Alba Radix.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chu; Zhang, Shidi; Tong, Shengqiang; Li, Xingnuo; Li, Qingyong; Yan, Jizhong

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a simple and efficient protocol for the rapid separation of two pairs of isomeric monoterpenes from Paeoniae Alba Radix was developed by combining macroporous resin and elution-extrusion counter-current chromatography. The crude extract was firstly subjected to a D101 macroporous resin column eluted with water and a series of different concentrations of ethanol. Then, effluents of 30 and 95% ethanol were collected as sample 1 and sample 2 for further counter-current chromatography purification. Finally, a pair of isomers, 96 mg of compound 1 and 48 mg of compound 2 with purities of 91.1 and 96.2%, respectively, was isolated from 200 mg of sample 1. The other pair of isomers, 14 mg of compound 3 and 8 mg of compound 4 with purities of 93.6 and 88.9%, respectively, was isolated from 48 mg of sample 2. Their purities were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and their chemical structures were identified by mass spectrometry and (1) H NMR spectroscopy. Compared to a normal counter-current chromatography separation, the separation time and solvent consumption of elution-extrusion counter-current chromatography were reduced while the resolutions were still good. The established protocol is promising for the separation of natural products with great disparity of content in herbal medicines. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Spectroscopic profiling and computational study of the binding of tschimgine: A natural monoterpene derivative, with calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh, Masoumeh Ashrafi; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Shaghaghi, Masoomeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2018-03-01

    DNA is a major target for a number of anticancer substances. Interaction studies between small molecules and DNA are essential for rational drug designing to influence main biological processes and also introducing new probes for the assay of DNA. Tschimgine (TMG) is a monoterpene derivative with anticancer properties. In the present study we tried to elucidate the interaction of TMG with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) using different spectroscopic methods. UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies as well as molecular docking study revealed formation of complex between TMG and CT-DNA. Binding constant (Kb) between TMG and DNA was 2.27 × 104 M- 1, that is comparable to groove binding agents. The fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of TMG by CT-DNA is static quenching. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH < 0 and ΔS < 0) at different temperatures indicated that van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds were involved in the binding process of TMG with CT-DNA. Competitive binding assay with methylene blue (MB) and Hoechst 33258 using fluorescence spectroscopy displayed that TMG possibly binds to the minor groove of CT-DNA. These observations were further confirmed by CD spectral analysis, viscosity measurements and molecular docking.

  17. Spectroscopic profiling and computational study of the binding of tschimgine: A natural monoterpene derivative, with calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Khajeh, Masoumeh Ashrafi; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Shaghaghi, Masoomeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2018-03-05

    DNA is a major target for a number of anticancer substances. Interaction studies between small molecules and DNA are essential for rational drug designing to influence main biological processes and also introducing new probes for the assay of DNA. Tschimgine (TMG) is a monoterpene derivative with anticancer properties. In the present study we tried to elucidate the interaction of TMG with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) using different spectroscopic methods. UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies as well as molecular docking study revealed formation of complex between TMG and CT-DNA. Binding constant (K b ) between TMG and DNA was 2.27×10 4 M -1 , that is comparable to groove binding agents. The fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of TMG by CT-DNA is static quenching. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH<0 and ΔS<0) at different temperatures indicated that van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds were involved in the binding process of TMG with CT-DNA. Competitive binding assay with methylene blue (MB) and Hoechst 33258 using fluorescence spectroscopy displayed that TMG possibly binds to the minor groove of CT-DNA. These observations were further confirmed by CD spectral analysis, viscosity measurements and molecular docking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical composition of the essential oils of Juniperus from ripe and unripe berries and leaves and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Alberto; Barra, Andrea; Russo, Maria T; Coroneo, Valentina; Dessi, Sandro; Cabras, Paolo

    2003-05-07

    The composition of the essential oil from ripe and unripe berries and leaves of Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus phoenicea ssp. turbinata and Juniperus communis ssp. communis was analyzed by GC-MS, and microbiological assays were carried out. Samples were collected in different localities (Sardinia, Italy) and hydro distilled. The yields ranged between 2.54% +/- 0.21 (v\\w dried weight) and 0.04% +/- 0.00. A total of 36 components were identified. The major compounds in the essential oils were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta-3-carene, sabinene, myrcene, beta-phellandrene, limonene, and D-germacrene. Both qualitative and quantitative differences between species and between different parts of the plant were observed. The essential oils and their major compounds were tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined. The results obtained led to a nonsignificant inhibitory effect, although all the essential oils from Juniperus phoenicea ssp. turbinata and the essential oil from leaves of Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus exhibited rather good or weak activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus.

  19. Full-scale chamber investigation and simulation of air freshener emissions in the presence of ozone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Mason, Mark; Krebs, Kenneth; Sparks, Leslie

    2004-05-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from one electrical plug-in type of pine-scented air freshener and their reactions with O3 were investigated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency indoor air research large chamber facility. Ozone was generated from a device marketed as an ozone generator air cleaner. Ozone and oxides of nitrogen concentrations and chamber conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and air exchange rate were controlled and/or monitored. VOC emissions and some of the reaction products were identified and quantified. Source emission models were developed to predict the time/concentration profiles of the major VOCs (limonene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, camphene, benzyl propionate, benzyl alcohol, bornyl acetate, isobornyl acetate, and benzaldehyde) emitted bythe air freshener. Gas-phase reactions of VOCs from the air freshener with O3 were simulated by a photochemical kinetics simulation system using VOC reaction mechanisms and rate constants adopted from the literature. The concentration-time predictions were in good agreement with the data for O3 and VOCs emitted from the air freshener and with some of the primary reaction products. Systematic differences between the predictions and the experimental results were found for some species. Poor understanding of secondary reactions and heterogeneous chemistry in the chamber is the likely cause of these differences. The method has the potential to provide data to predict the impact of O3/VOC interactions on indoor air quality.

  20. [Comparison of chemical components of essential oils in needles of Pinus massoniana Lamb and Pinus elliottottii Engelm from Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Shen, Changmao; Duan, Wengui; Cen, Bo; Tan, Jianhui

    2006-11-01

    Essential oils were extracted by steam distillation from the needles of Pinus massoniana Lamb and Pinus elliottottii Engelm grown in Guangxi. Various factors such as pine needle dosage and extraction time which may influence the oil yield were investigated. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: pine needle dosage 700 g, extraction time 5 h. The essential oil yields from the needles of Pinus massoniana Lamb and Pinus elliottottii Engelm were 0.45% and 0.19%, respectively. Moreover, the chemical compositions of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sixty four components in the essential oil from needle of Pinus massoniana Lamb were separated and twenty of them (98.59%) were identified while seventy three components in the essential oil from needle of Pinus elliottottii Engelm were separated and twenty nine of them (94.23%) were identified. Generally, the compositions of the essential oils from needles of the two varieties were similar but the contents of some compounds differed greatly. Especially, the content of alpha-pinene in the essential oils from Pinus massoniana Lamb needles was 2.6 times as that from Pinus elliottottii Engelm needles, but the content of beta-pinene was less than the latter. Mono- and sesquiterpenes were the main composition of the essential oils from Pinus massoniana Lamb and Pinus elliottottii Engelm needles.

  1. The effect of selected monoterpenoids on the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum NC4.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J Y; Kim, J H; Yun, K W

    2004-06-01

    We tested the activity of 11 main compounds identified from Pinus plants on the growth of Dictyostelium discoideum NC4. Four concentrations (1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.001 microg/microl) of each compound were tested using a disk volatilization technique following germination of D. discoideum NC4 spores. Photographs of D. discoideum NC4 fruiting bodies were taken 2 days after treatment. Fenchone (at 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 microg/microl) and camphene (at 0.01 microg/microl) stimulated growth of D. discoideum NC4. (1S)-(-)-verbenone, (1S)-(-)-alpha-pinene, (+)-beta-pinene, myrcene, (-)-menthone, (-)-bornyl acetate, (S)-(+)-carvone, (-)-camphene, and (R)-(+)-limonene inhibit its growth. All of the compounds at 1 microg/microl had a strong inhibitory effect on cell growth of D. discoideum NC4. Microscopic observation of the fruiting bodies matched the results of growth rate analysis. Most of the inhibitory effects were represented by changes in the shapes of the fruiting bodies. These changes include short sorophores, smaller sized sori, and sori without spores. Our results suggest that inhibition of growth is the most common effect of monoterpenoids on D. discoideum NC4. Nevertheless, some of them, like fenchone and camphene, seem to enhance its growth.

  2. Paraquat-induced lightwood in two European conifers - Scotch pine and Norway spruce

    SciT

    Wroblewska, H.; Conner, A.H.; Rowe, J.W.

    1978-04-01

    Paraquat treatment induced oleoresin-soaked lightwood in Scotch pine; borehole and ax-frill treatment methods were equally effective. Paraquat treatment of Norway spruce induced limited lightwood formation accompanied by heavy external oleoresin exudation. Thus paraquat treatment of Scotch pine and possibly Norway spruce could be commercially advantageous for increasing naval stores production from these species. Analysis of tall oil precursors (nonvolatile ether extractives) for resin acids, fatty acids, and nonsaponifiables showed that the increase from paraquat treatment was mainly from an increased resin acid content. The chemical composition of the resin acids from the lightwood and control wood areas was similar andmore » consisted of the usual pimaric and abietic type resin acids found in conifers. The fatty acids were predominately unsaturated C/sub 18/ isomers. Turpentine of both species consisted mainly of ..cap alpha..-pinene, ..beta..-pinene, and 3-carene. The composition of the turpentine from the Scotch pine lightwood did not differ from that of the control wood. However, turpentine from the Norway spruce lightwood had an increased 3-carene content compared to that from the control.« less

  3. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oil from cones of Pinus koraiensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Ho; Yang, Hye-Young; Lee, Hong-Sub; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2008-03-01

    The essential oil from the cones of Pinus koraiensis was prepared after removing the seeds, and its chemical composition analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hydrodistillation of the P. koraiensis cones yielded 1.07% (v/w) of essential oil, which was almost three times the amount of essential oil extracted from the needles of the same plant. Moreover, the antimicrobial activities of the oil against the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi were evaluated using the agar disc diffusion method and broth microdilution method. Eighty-seven components, comprising about 96.8% of the total oil, were identified. The most abundant oil components were limonene (27.90%), alpha-pinene (23.89%), beta-pinene (12.02%), 3-carene (4.95%), beta-myrcene (4.53%), isolongifolene (3.35%), (-)-bornyl acetate (2.02%), caryophyllene (1.71%), and camphene (1.54%). The essential oil was confirmed to have significant antimicrobial activities, especially against pathogenic fungal strains such as Candida glabrata YFCC 062 and Cryptococcus neoformans B 42419. Therefore, the present results indicate that the essential oil from the cones of Pinus koraiensis can be used in various ways as a nontoxic and environmentally friendly disinfectant.

  4. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    SciT

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine ( Pinus aristata), blue spruce ( Picea pungens), western redcedar ( Thuja plicata), grand fir ( Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measuredmore » continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  5. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    SciT

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine ( Pinus aristata), blue spruce ( Picea pungens), western redcedar ( Thuja plicata), grand fir ( Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species weremore » measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. Here, the compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  6. Chemical composition of Schinus molle essential oil and its cytotoxic activity on tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Cecilia; Quesada, Silvia; Brenes, Oscar; Aguilar, Gilda; Cicció, José F

    2008-01-01

    The leaf essential oil hydrodistilled from Schinus molle grown in Costa Rica was characterised in terms of its chemical composition, antioxidant activity, ability to induce cytotoxicity and the mechanism of cell death involved in the process. As a result, 42 constituents, accounting for 97.2% of the total oil, were identified. The major constituents of the oil were beta-pinene and alpha-pinene. The antioxidant activity showed an IC(50) of 36.3 microg mL(-1). The essential oil was cytotoxic in several cell lines, showing that it is more effective on breast carcinoma and leukemic cell lines. The LD(50) for cytotoxicity at 48 h in K562 corresponded to 78.7 microg mL(-1), which was very similar to the LD(50) obtained when apoptosis was measured. The essential oil did not induce significant necrosis up to 200 microg mL(-1), which together with the former results indicate that apoptosis is the main mechanism of toxicity induced by S. molle essential oil in this cell line. In conclusion, the essential oil tested was weak antioxidant and induced cytotoxicity in different cell types by a mechanism related to apoptosis. It would be interesting to elucidate the role that different components of the oil play in the effect observed here, since some of them could have potential anti-tumoural effects, either alone or in combination.

  7. Identification of Volatile Flavor Components by Headspace Analysis: A Quick and Easy Experiment for Introducing GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjonaas, Richard; Soller, Jean L.; McCoy, Leslee A.

    1997-09-01

    By placing a piece of chewing gum (Wrigley's) or a crushed piece of hard candy (LifeSavers or Runts) into a vial, followed by GC/MS analysis of a five microliter sample of the headspace, students are able to identify several of the volatile flavoring components which are present. The experiment has been used successfully with sophomore organic chemistry students, and with visiting groups of talented high school students over a three year period. Identification is simplified by handing out a list of the structural formulas of some likely candidates. Some of the components that these students easily identity include ethyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, limonene, and cinnamaldehyde. Some of the more difficult to identify components include menthol, menthone, carvone, cineole, myrcene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, para-cymene, and gama-terpinene. Most of the major headspace components give signals whose size is comparable to that of the carbon dioxide which is present in each injection. Even with split injection, the background noise is trivial compared to the signals from the major components. The experiments were carried out with a commercially available tabletop GC/MS (Varian 3400 with Saturn MS).

  8. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil and the gum of Pistacia lentiscus Var. chia.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudaki, Christina; Krsek, Martin; Rodger, Alison

    2005-10-05

    The essential oil and gum of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, commonly known as the mastic tree, are natural antimicrobial agents that have found extensive uses in medicine in recent years. In this work, the chemical composition of mastic oil and gum was studied by GC-MS, and the majority of their components was identified. alpha-Pinene, beta-myrcene, beta-pinene, limonene, and beta-caryophyllene were found to be the major components. The antibacterial activity of 12 components of mastic oil and the oil itself was evaluated using the disk diffusion method. Furthermore, attempts were made to separate the essential oil into different fractions in order to have a better picture of the components responsible for its antibacterial activity. Several trace components that appear to contribute significantly to the antibacterial activity of mastic oil have been identified: verbenone, alpha-terpineol, and linalool. The sensitivity to these compounds was different for different bacteria tested (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis), which suggests that the antibacterial efficacy of mastic oil is due to a number of its components working synergistically. The establishment of a correlation between the antibacterial activity of mastic oil and its components was the main purpose of this research. Mastic gum was also examined, but it proved to be more difficult to handle compared to the essential oil.

  9. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine ( Pinus aristata), blue spruce ( Picea pungens), western redcedar ( Thuja plicata), grand fir ( Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measuredmore » continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  10. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine ( Pinus aristata), blue spruce ( Picea pungens), western redcedar ( Thuja plicata), grand fir ( Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species weremore » measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. Here, the compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  11. Heteromeric and homomeric geranyl diphosphate synthases from Catharanthus roseus and their role in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Avanish; Smita, Shachi S; Singh, Anup Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2013-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is the sole source of two most important monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) anti-cancer agents: vinblastine and vincristine. MIAs possess a terpene and an indole moiety derived from terpenoid and shikimate pathways, respectively. Geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the entry point to the formation of terpene moiety, is a product of the condensation of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) by GPP synthase (GPPS). Here, we report three genes encoding proteins with sequence similarity to large subunit (CrGPPS.LSU) and small subunit (CrGPPS.SSU) of heteromeric GPPSs, and a homomeric GPPSs. CrGPPS.LSU is a bifunctional enzyme producing both GPP and geranyl geranyl diphosphate (GGPP), CrGPPS.SSU is inactive, whereas CrGPPS is a homomeric enzyme forming GPP. Co-expression of both subunits in Escherichia coli resulted in heteromeric enzyme with enhanced activity producing only GPP. While CrGPPS.LSU and CrGPPS showed higher expression in older and younger leaves, respectively, CrGPPS.SSU showed an increasing trend and decreased gradually. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment of leaves significantly induced the expression of only CrGPPS.SSU. GFP localization indicated that CrGPPS.SSU is plastidial whereas CrGPPS is mitochondrial. Transient overexpression of AmGPPS.SSU in C. roseus leaves resulted in increased vindoline, immediate monomeric precursor of vinblastine and vincristine. Although C. roseus has both heteromeric and homomeric GPPS enzymes, our results implicate the involvement of only heteromeric GPPS with CrGPPS.SSU regulating the GPP flux for MIA biosynthesis.

  12. Geraniol, a natural monoterpene, ameliorates hyperglycemia by attenuating the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Babukumar, Sukumar; Vinothkumar, Veerasamy; Sankaranarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Srinivasan, Subramani

    2017-12-01

    Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene alcohol is found in medicinal plants, is used traditionally for several medical purposes including diabetes. The present study evaluates the antihyperglycemic potential of geraniol on key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in experimental rats, by a single intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of STZ [40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)]. Different doses of geraniol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w.) and glyclazide (5 mg/kg b.w.) were administrated orally to diabetic rats for 45 days. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ), hepatic glucose metabolic enzymes and glycogen were examined. The LD 50 value of geraniol is 3600 mg/kg b.w. at oral administration in rats. Administration of geraniol in a dose-dependent manner (100, 200, 400 mg/kg b.w.) and glyclazide (5 mg/kg b.w.) for 45 days significantly improved the levels of insulin, Hb and decreased plasma glucose, HbA 1C in diabetic-treated rats. Geraniol at its effective dose (200 mg/kg b.w.) ameliorated the altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes near normal effects compared with two other doses (100 and 400 mg/kg b.w.). Geraniol treatment to diabetic rats improved hepatic glycogen content suggesting its anti-hyperglycemic potential. Geraniol supplement was found to preserve the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and pancreatic β-cells in diabetic rats. The present findings suggest that geraniol can potentially ameliorate key enzymes of glucose metabolism in experimental diabetes even though clinical studies used to evaluate this possibility are warranted.

  13. Antifungal activity of geraniol and citronellol, two monoterpenes alcohols, against Trichophyton rubrum involves inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fillipe de Oliveira; Mendes, Juliana Moura; Lima, Igara Oliveira; Mota, Kelly Samara de Lira; Oliveira, Wylly Araújo de; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common fungus causing chronic dermatophytosis in humans. Antifungal activity of promising agents is of great interest. Geraniol and citronellol are monoterpenes with antimicrobial properties. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects and possible mechanism of antifungal activity of geraniol and citronellol against strains of T. rubrum. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each drug against 14 strains was determined by broth microdilution. The effects of the drugs on dry mycelial weight, conidial germination, infectivity on human nail fragments, and morphogenesis of T. rubrum were analyzed. The effects on the cell wall (test with sorbitol) and cell membrane (release of intracellular material and ergosterol biosynthesis) were investigated. MIC values of geraniol ranged between 16 and 256 µg/mL while citronellol showed MIC values from 8 to 1024 µg/mL. The drugs (MIC and 2 × MIC) inhibited the mycelial growth, conidia germination, and fungal growth on nail fragments. The drugs (half of MIC) induced the formation of wide, short, and crooked hyphae in T. rubrum morphology. With sorbitol, geraniol MIC was increased by 64-fold and citronellol by 32-fold. The drugs caused leakage of intracellular material and inhibited ergosterol biosynthesis. The results suggest that the drugs damage cell wall and cell membrane of T. rubrum through a mechanism that seems to involve the inhibition of the ergosterol biosynthesis. This study confirms that geraniol and citronellol can be regarded as potential drugs for controlling T. rubrum growth, with great potential against agents of dermatophytosis.

  14. Identification, characterization and distribution of monoterpene indole alkaloids in Rauwolfia species by Orbitrap Velos Pro mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-01-25

    Monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are medicinally important class of compounds abundant in the roots of Rauwolfia species (Apocynaceae). MIAs such as yohimbine (aphrodisiac agent) and reserpine (antihypertensive, tranquilizer) are the official drugs included in Model List of Essential Drugs of World Health Organization (WHO). Therefore, we have attempt to identify and characterize the MIAs in the crude extracts of six Rauwolfia species using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with Orbitrap Velos Pro hybrid mass spectrometer. The identity of the MIAs were construed using the high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS) spectra of standard compounds 'yohimbine' and 'reserpine' in higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) modes. The diagnostic fragment ions found in HCD mode was highly affected by variation of normalized collision energy (NCE) and gave few product ions ('C-F') while CID produced intense and more diagnostic product ions ('A-F'). Consequently, CID-MS/MS mode provided significantly more structural information about basic skeleton and therefore the recommended mode for analysis of MIAs. Furthermore, six diagnostic fragmentation pathways were established by multi-stage mass analysis (MS(n) (n=5)) analysis which gave information regarding the substitution. Fragment ions 'A-F' revealed the number and position of substituents on indole and terpene moieties. The proposed diagnostic fragmentation pathways have been successfully applied for identification and characterization of MIAs in crude root extracts of six Rauwolfia species. Ten bioactive reserpine class of MIAs were tentatively identified and characterized on the basis of chromatographic and mass spectrometric features as well as HRMS/MS an MS(n) (n=4) analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. Results We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. Conclusion In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine. PMID:23679205

  16. Novel polymeric micelles for insect pest control: encapsulation of essential oil monoterpenes inside a triblock copolymer shell for head lice control.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Guzmán, Eduardo; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G

    2017-01-01

    Essential oil components (EOCs) are molecules with interesting application in pest control, these have been evaluated against different insect pest from more than 100 years, but their practical use is rather limited. Thus, the enhancement of their bioavailability and manageability due to their dispersion in water can open new perspective for the preparation of formulations for the control of insect pest. In this work, we studied the encapsulation of different monoterpenes in a poloxamer shell in order to prepare aqueous formulations that can be used for the development of platforms used in pest control. Micellar systems containing a 5 wt% of poloxamer 407 and 1.25 wt% of the different monoterpenes were prepared. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) experiments were carried out to characterize the dispersion of the EOCs in water. The pediculicidal activity of these micellar systems was tested on head lice using an ex vivo immersion test. The poloxamers allowed the dispersion of EOCs in water due to their encapsulation inside the hydrophobic core of the copolymer micelles. From this study, we concluded that it is possible to make stable micellar systems containing water (>90 wt%), 1.25 wt% of different monoterpenes and a highly safe polymer (5wt% Poloxamer 407). These formulations were effective against head lice with mortality ranging from 30 to 60%, being the most effective emulsions those containing linalool, 1,8-cineole, α -terpineol, thymol, eugenol, geraniol and nonyl alcohol which lead to mortalities above 50%. Since these systems showed good pediculicidal activity and high physicochemical stability, they could be a new route for the green fabrication of biocompatible and biosustainable insecticide formulations.

  17. Novel polymeric micelles for insect pest control: encapsulation of essential oil monoterpenes inside a triblock copolymer shell for head lice control

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Essential oil components (EOCs) are molecules with interesting application in pest control, these have been evaluated against different insect pest from more than 100 years, but their practical use is rather limited. Thus, the enhancement of their bioavailability and manageability due to their dispersion in water can open new perspective for the preparation of formulations for the control of insect pest. In this work, we studied the encapsulation of different monoterpenes in a poloxamer shell in order to prepare aqueous formulations that can be used for the development of platforms used in pest control. Methods Micellar systems containing a 5 wt% of poloxamer 407 and 1.25 wt% of the different monoterpenes were prepared. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) experiments were carried out to characterize the dispersion of the EOCs in water. The pediculicidal activity of these micellar systems was tested on head lice using an ex vivo immersion test. Results The poloxamers allowed the dispersion of EOCs in water due to their encapsulation inside the hydrophobic core of the copolymer micelles. From this study, we concluded that it is possible to make stable micellar systems containing water (>90 wt%), 1.25 wt% of different monoterpenes and a highly safe polymer (5wt% Poloxamer 407). These formulations were effective against head lice with mortality ranging from 30 to 60%, being the most effective emulsions those containing linalool, 1,8-cineole, α-terpineol, thymol, eugenol, geraniol and nonyl alcohol which lead to mortalities above 50%. Discussion Since these systems showed good pediculicidal activity and high physicochemical stability, they could be a new route for the green fabrication of biocompatible and biosustainable insecticide formulations. PMID:28439460

  18. Natural Variation in Monoterpene Synthesis in Kiwifruit: Transcriptional Regulation of Terpene Synthases by NAC and ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-Like Transcription Factors1

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Chen, Xiuyin; Wang, Mindy Y.; Matich, Adam J.; Perez, Ramon Lopez; Allan, Andrew C.; Green, Sol A.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2015-01-01

    Two kiwifruit (Actinidia) species with contrasting terpene profiles were compared to understand the regulation of fruit monoterpene production. High rates of terpinolene production in ripe Actinidia arguta fruit were correlated with increasing gene and protein expression of A. arguta terpene synthase1 (AaTPS1) and correlated with an increase in transcript levels of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway enzyme 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS). Actinidia chinensis terpene synthase1 (AcTPS1) was identified as part of an array of eight tandemly duplicated genes, and AcTPS1 expression and terpene production were observed only at low levels in developing fruit. Transient overexpression of DXS in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves elevated monoterpene synthesis by AaTPS1 more than 100-fold, indicating that DXS is likely to be the key step in regulating 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate substrate flux in kiwifruit. Comparative promoter analysis identified potential NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor) and ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like transcription factor (TF) binding sites in the AaTPS1 promoter, and cloned members of both TF classes were able to activate the AaTPS1 promoter in transient assays. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AaNAC2, AaNAC3, and AaNAC4 bind a 28-bp fragment of the proximal NAC binding site in the AaTPS1 promoter but not the A. chinensis AcTPS1 promoter, where the NAC binding site was mutated. Activation could be restored by reintroducing multiple repeats of the 12-bp NAC core-binding motif. The absence of NAC transcriptional activation in ripe A. chinensis fruit can account for the low accumulation of AcTPS1 transcript, protein, and monoterpene volatiles in this species. These results indicate the importance of NAC TFs in controlling monoterpene production and other traits in ripening fruits. PMID:25649633

  19. Characterization of a Root-Specific Arabidopsis Terpene Synthase Responsible for the Formation of the Volatile Monoterpene 1,8-Cineole1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Petri, Jana; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Bohlmann, Jörg; Pichersky, Eran; Tholl, Dorothea

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis is emerging as a model system to study the biochemistry, biological functions, and evolution of plant terpene secondary metabolism. It was previously shown that the Arabidopsis genome contains over 30 genes potentially encoding terpene synthases (TPSs). Here we report the characterization of a monoterpene synthase encoded by two identical, closely linked genes, At3g25820 and At3g25830. Transcripts of these genes were detected almost exclusively in roots. An At3g25820/At3g25830 cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein thus produced was shown to catalyze the formation of 10 volatile monoterpenes from geranyl diphosphate, with 1,8-cineole predominating. This protein was therefore designated AtTPS-Cin. The purified recombinant AtTPS-Cin displayed similar biochemical properties to other known monoterpene synthases, except for a relatively low Km value for geranyl diphosphate of 0.2 μm. At3g25820/At3g25830 promoter activity, measured with a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, was primarily found in the epidermis, cortex, and stele of mature primary and lateral roots, but not in the root meristem or the elongation zone. Although the products of AtTPS-Cin were not detected by direct extraction of plant tissue, the recent report of 1,8-cineole as an Arabidopsis root volatile (Steeghs M, Bais HP, de Gouw J, Goldan P, Kuster W, Northway M, Fall R, Vivanco JM [2004] Plant Physiol 135: 47–58) suggests that the enzyme products may be released into the rhizosphere rather than accumulated. Among Arabidopsis TPSs, AtTPS-Cin is most similar to the TPS encoded by At3g25810, a closely linked gene previously shown to be exclusively expressed in flowers. At3g25810 TPS catalyzes the formation of a set of monoterpenes that is very similar to those produced by AtTPS-Cin, but its major products are myrcene and (E)-β-ocimene, and it does not form 1,8-cineole. These data demonstrate that divergence of organ expression pattern and product specificity are

  20. Natural variation in monoterpene synthesis in kiwifruit: transcriptional regulation of terpene synthases by NAC and ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Chen, Xiuyin; Wang, Mindy Y; Matich, Adam J; Perez, Ramon Lopez; Allan, Andrew C; Green, Sol A; Atkinson, Ross G

    2015-04-01

    Two kiwifruit (Actinidia) species with contrasting terpene profiles were compared to understand the regulation of fruit monoterpene production. High rates of terpinolene production in ripe Actinidia arguta fruit were correlated with increasing gene and protein expression of A. arguta terpene synthase1 (AaTPS1) and correlated with an increase in transcript levels of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway enzyme 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS). Actinidia chinensis terpene synthase1 (AcTPS1) was identified as part of an array of eight tandemly duplicated genes, and AcTPS1 expression and terpene production were observed only at low levels in developing fruit. Transient overexpression of DXS in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves elevated monoterpene synthesis by AaTPS1 more than 100-fold, indicating that DXS is likely to be the key step in regulating 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate substrate flux in kiwifruit. Comparative promoter analysis identified potential NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor) and ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like transcription factor (TF) binding sites in the AaTPS1 promoter, and cloned members of both TF classes were able to activate the AaTPS1 promoter in transient assays. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AaNAC2, AaNAC3, and AaNAC4 bind a 28-bp fragment of the proximal NAC binding site in the AaTPS1 promoter but not the A. chinensis AcTPS1 promoter, where the NAC binding site was mutated. Activation could be restored by reintroducing multiple repeats of the 12-bp NAC core-binding motif. The absence of NAC transcriptional activation in ripe A. chinensis fruit can account for the low accumulation of AcTPS1 transcript, protein, and monoterpene volatiles in this species. These results indicate the importance of NAC TFs in controlling monoterpene production and other traits in ripening fruits. © 2015 American

  1. Assessment of the in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of extracts and indole monoterpene alkaloid from the roots of Galianthe thalictroides (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L M; Garcez, W S; Mantovani, M S; Figueiredo, P O; Fernandes, C A; Garcez, F R; Guterres, Z R

    2013-09-01

    Roots of Galianthe thalictroides K. Schum. (Rubiaceae) are used in folk medicine in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for treating and preventing cancer. To gain information about the genotoxicity of extracts (aqueous and EtOH), the CHCl₃ phase resulting from partition of the EtOH extract and the indole monoterpene alkaloid 1 obtained from this plant. The genotoxicity of 1 and extracts was evaluated in vivo through the Drosophila melanogaster wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test - SMART, while in vitro cytotoxic (MTT) and Comet assays were performed only with alkaloid 1. The results obtained with the SMART test indicated that the aqueous extract had no genotoxic activity. The EtOH extract was not genotoxic to ST descendants but genotoxic to HB ones. The CHCl₃ phase was genotoxic and cytotoxic. Alkaloid 1 showed significant mutational events with SMART, in the cytotoxicity assay (MTT), it showed a high cytotoxicity for human hepatoma cells (HepG2), whereas for the Comet assay, not showing genotoxic activity. The ethanol extract was shown to be genotoxic to HB descendants in the SMART assay, while the results obtained in this test for the monoterpene indole alkaloid 1 isolated from this extract. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. VOC Reactivity and the Ozone Climate Penalty: Modeled Impacts of Updated Aromatic and Monoterpene Chemistry on the Ozone-temperature Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, W. C.; Heald, C. L.; Safieddine, S.

    2016-12-01

    Rising temperatures associated with global warming can increase concentrations of tropospheric ozone (O3) in many regions worldwide, a correlation often described as the "ozone climate penalty". This effect is driven by a variety of underlying chemical, physical, and biological mechanisms, including temperature-dependent reaction rates, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from trees and other plant life, and correlations with other meteorological variables. While many of the most important O3-producing VOCs, such as isoprene, are represented in typical chemical transport models such as GEOS-Chem, others - including aromatics from fires and human activity and monoterpenes from natural sources - are not always included in gas-phase chemistry. Here we examine the impact of increased VOC reactivity on the ozone climate penalty due to a more comprehensive treatment of aromatics and monoterpenes in the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, finding regional impacts not only on daily O3 levels themselves, but also on the O3/temperature relationship. While many uncertainties related to the emissions and chemistry of these species remain, the impact of their inclusion on both current simulations and future projections indicates their importance towards the overall goal of more accurately modeled surface O3.

  3. Ultraviolet-B and photosynthetically active radiation interactively affect yield and pattern of monoterpenes in leaves of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.).

    PubMed

    Behn, Helen; Albert, Andreas; Marx, Friedhelm; Noga, Georg; Ulbrich, Andreas

    2010-06-23

    Solar radiation is a key environmental signal in regulation of plant secondary metabolism. Since metabolic responses to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure are known to depend on the ratio of spectral ranges (e.g., UV-B/PAR), we examined effects of different UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) levels and ratios on yield and pattern of monoterpenoid essential oil of peppermint. Experiments were performed in exposure chambers, technically equipped for realistic simulation of natural climate and radiation. The experimental design comprised four irradiation regimes created by the combination of two PAR levels including or excluding UV-B radiation. During flowering, the highest essential oil yield was achieved at high PAR (1150 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and approximate ambient UV-B radiation (0.6 W m(-2)). Regarding the monoterpene pattern, low PAR (550 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and the absence of UV-B radiation led to reduced menthol and increased menthone contents and thereby to a substantial decrease in oil quality. Essential oil yield could not be correlated with density or diameter of peltate glandular trichomes, the epidermal structures specialized on biosynthesis, and the accumulation of monoterpenes. The present results lead to the conclusion that production of high quality oils (fulfilling the requirements of the Pharmacopoeia Europaea) requires high levels of natural sunlight. In protected cultivation, the use of UV-B transmitting covering materials is therefore highly recommended.

  4. The monoterpene terpinolene from the oil of Pinus mugo L. in concert with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene effectively prevents oxidation of LDL.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, J; Hippeli, S; Spitzenberger, R; Elstner, E F

    2005-06-01

    Antioxidants from several nutrients, e.g. vitamin E, beta-carotene, or flavonoids, inhibit the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins. This protective effect could possibly retard atherogenesis and in consequence avoid coronary heart diseases. Some studies have shown a positive effect of those antioxidants on cardiovascular disease. Another class of naturally occurring antioxidants are terpenoids, which are found in essential oils. The essential oil of Pinus mugo and the contained monoterpene terpinolene effectively prevent low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-oxidation. In order to test the mechanism by which terpinolene protects LDL from oxidation, LDL from human blood plasma enriched in terpinolene was isolated. In this preparation not only the lipid part of LDL is protected against copper-induced oxidation--as proven by following the formation of conjugated dienes, but also the oxidation of the protein part is inhibited, since loss of tryptophan fluorescence is strongly delayed. This inhibition is due to a retarded oxidation of intrinsic carotenoids of LDL, and not, as in the case of some flavonoids, attributable to a protection of intrinsic alpha-tocopherol. These results are in agreement with our previous results, which showed the same effects for a monoterpene from lemon oil, i.e. gamma-terpinene.

  5. The phytochemical and genetic survey of common and dwarf juniper (Juniperus communis and Juniperus nana) identifies chemical races and close taxonomic identity of the species.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Natalia; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Asztemborska, Monika

    2006-07-01

    Juniperus communis L. (= J. communis var. communis) and Juniperus nana Willd. (= J. communis var. SAXATILIS) are subspecies of juniper. J. communis grows widely in both hemispheres, primarily in lower elevations while J. nana is mainly observed in high mountains. Although they can be distinguished by morphological features, it is not known whether they are genetically and phytochemically distinct entities. We aimed to check whether it is possible to distinguish these two plants (i) by pharmaceutically important chemical traits and (ii) on the basis of intraspecifically highly polymorphic fragment of chloroplast DNA. We used GC with achiral as well as with enantioselective stationary phase columns to identify the main monoterpenes of the essential oil. Sequence analysis of the TRNL (UAA)- TRNF (GAA) intergenic spacer of the chloroplast genome was used as a genetic marker of taxonomic identity between these two subspecies. The chromatographic analysis showed the existence of three chemical races - the alpha-pinene type, the sabinene type and one with intermediate contents of these terpenes among both J. communis and J. nana. Surprisingly, sequence analysis of TRNL (UAA)- TRNF (GAA) revealed 100 % similarity between the common and the dwarf juniper. Thus, the monoterpene pattern is related to geographical origin, and not to the species identity. We suggest that the three chemical races identified in the present study should be considered as separate sources of pharmaceutical raw material. Our results demonstrate that the contents of alpha-pinene and sabinene may be applied as a quick diagnostic test for preliminary evaluation of plant material.

  6. Jasmonate induction of the monoterpene linalool confers resistance to rice bacterial blight and its biosynthesis is regulated by JAZ protein in rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shiduku; Hosokawa-Shinonaga, Yumi; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Yamada, Shoko; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is involved in the regulation of host immunity in plants. Recently, we demonstrated that JA signalling has an important role in resistance to rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) in rice. Here, we report that many volatile compounds accumulate in response to exogenous application of JA, including the monoterpene linalool. Expression of linalool synthase was up-regulated by JA. Vapour treatment with linalool induced resistance to Xoo, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing linalool synthase were more resistance to Xoo, presumably due to the up-regulation of defence-related genes in the absence of any treatment. JA-induced accumulation of linalool was regulated by OsJAZ8, a rice jasmonate ZIM-domain protein involving the JA signalling pathway at the transcriptional level, suggesting that linalool plays an important role in JA-induced resistance to Xoo in rice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Parameterized isoprene and monoterpene emissions from the boreal forest floor: Implementation into a 1D chemistry-transport model and investigation of the influence on atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogensen, Ditte; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana; Kieloaho, Antti-Jussi; Gierens, Rosa; Smolander, Sampo; Kulmala, Markku; Boy, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from the biosphere and can work as precursor gases for aerosol particles that can affect the climate (e.g. Makkonen et al., ACP, 2012). VOC emissions from needles and leaves have gained the most attention, however other parts of the ecosystem also have the ability to emit a vast amount of VOCs. This, often neglected, source can be important e.g. at periods where leaves are absent. Both sources and drivers related to forest floor emission of VOCs are currently limited. It is thought that the sources are mainly due to degradation of organic matter (Isidorov and Jdanova, Chemosphere, 2002), living roots (Asensio et al., Soil Biol. Biochem., 2008) and ground vegetation. The drivers are biotic (e.g. microbes) and abiotic (e.g. temperature and moisture). However, the relative importance of the sources and the drivers individually are currently poorly understood. Further, the relative importance of these factors is highly dependent on the tree species occupying the area of interest. The emission of isoprene and monoterpenes where measured from the boreal forest floor at the SMEAR II station in Southern Finland (Hari and Kulmala, Boreal Env. Res., 2005) during the snow-free period in 2010-2012. We used a dynamic method with 3 automated chambers analyzed by Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (Aaltonen et al., Plant Soil, 2013). Using this data, we have developed empirical parameterizations for the emission of isoprene and monoterpenes from the forest floor. These parameterizations depends on abiotic factors, however, since the parameterizations are based on field measurements, biotic features are captured. Further, we have used the 1D chemistry-transport model SOSAA (Boy et al., ACP, 2011) to test the seasonal relative importance of inclusion of these parameterizations of the forest floor compared to the canopy crown emissions, on the atmospheric reactivity throughout the canopy.

  8. Engineering d-limonene synthase down-regulation in orange fruit induces resistance against the fungus Phyllosticta citricarpa through enhanced accumulation of monoterpene alcohols and activation of defence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Kava, Vanessa; Latorre-García, Lorena; da Silva, Geraldo J; G Pereira, Rosana; Glienke, Chirlei; Ferreira-Maba, Lisandra S; Vicent, Antonio; Shimada, Takehiko; Peña, Leandro

    2018-03-24

    Terpene volatiles play an important role in the interactions between specialized pathogens and fruits. Citrus black spot (CBS), caused by the fungus Phyllosticta citricarpa, is associated with crop losses in different citrus-growing areas worldwide. The pathogen may infect the fruit for 20-24 weeks after petal fall, but the typical hard spot symptoms appear when the fruit have almost reached maturity, caused by fungal colonization and the induction of cell lysis around essential oil cavities. d-Limonene represents approximately 95% of the total oil gland content in mature orange fruit. Herein, we investigated whether orange fruit with reduced d-limonene content in peel oil glands via an antisense (AS) approach may affect fruit interaction with P. citricarpa relative to empty vector (EV) controls. AS fruit showed enhanced resistance to the fungus relative to EV fruit. Because of the reduced d-limonene content, an over-accumulation of linalool and other monoterpene alcohols was found in AS relative to EV fruit. A global gene expression analysis at 2 h and 8 days after inoculation with P. citricarpa revealed the activation of defence responses in AS fruit via the up-regulation of different pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes, probably as a result of enhanced constitutive accumulation of linalool and other alcohols. When assayed in vitro and in vivo, monoterpene alcohols at the concentrations present in AS fruit showed strong antifungal activity. We show here that terpene engineering in fruit peels could be a promising method for the development of new strategies to obtain resistance to fruit diseases. © 2018 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Housefly (Musca domestica L.) control potential of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf. (Poales: Poaceae) essential oil and monoterpenes (citral and 1,8-cineole).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Malik, Anushree; Satya, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    In spite of being a major vector for several domestic, medical, and veterinary pests, the control aspect of the common housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) is often neglected. In the present study, the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus and its major components were evaluated for control of housefly. The chemical composition analysis of C. citratus oil by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed citral (47 %) and 1,8-cineole (7.5 %) as principal components. The analysis of oil vapor by solid phase microextraction (SPME/GC-MS) showed increase in citral (74.9 %) and 1,8-cineole (8.6 %) content. Assay of oil against housefly larvae and pupae through contact toxicity assay showed lethal concentration (LC)(50) value of 0.41 μl/cm(2) and of percentage inhibition rate (PIR) of 77.3 %, respectively. Fumigation assay was comparatively more effective with LC(50) of 48.6 μl/L against housefly larvae, and a PIR value of 100 % against housefly pupae. The monoterpenes, citral, and 1,8-cineole, when assessed for their insecticidal activity against housefly larvae, showed LC(50) of 0.002 and 0.01 μl/cm(2) (contact toxicity assay) and LC(50) of 3.3 and 2.4 μl/L (fumigation assay). For pupicidal assay, both citral and 1,8-cineole had a PIR value of 100 %. High efficacy of citral and 1,8-cineole against housefly, established them to be an active insecticidal agent of C. citratus oil. The study demonstrates potentiality of C. citratus oil as an excellent insecticide for housefly control, and the results open up the opportunity of oil/monoterpenes being developed into an eco-friendly, economical, and acceptable product.

  10. The essential oil of bergamot enhances the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus of rat: implication of monoterpene hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Luigi A; Rombolà, Laura; Pelle, Cinzia; Corasaniti, Maria T; Zappettini, Simona; Paudice, Paolo; Bonanno, Giambattista; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2007-04-01

    The effects of bergamot essential oil (BEO) on the release of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampus have been studied by in vivo microdialysis and by in vitro superfusion of isolated nerve terminals. Intraperitoneal administration of BEO (100microl/kg) significantly elevated the extracellular concentration of aspartate, glycine and taurine in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. A dose-relation study generated a bell-shaped curve. When perfused into the hippocampus via the dialysis probe (20microl/20min), BEO produced a significant increase of extracellular aspartate, glycine, taurine as well as of GABA and glutamate. The augmentation of all amino acids was Ca(2+)-independent. Focally injected 1:1 diluted BEO preferentially caused extracellular increase of glutamate. Interestingly, this release appeared to be strictly Ca(2+)-dependent. BEO concentration-dependently enhanced the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from superfused hippocampal synaptosomes. Similar results were obtained by monitoring the BEO-evoked release of endogenous glutamate. At relatively high concentrations, the BEO-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate release was almost entirely prevented by the glutamate transporter blocker dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) and was Ca(2+)-independent. At relatively low concentrations the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was only in part ( approximately 50%) DL-TBOA-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent; the remaining portion of release was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). Interestingly, the monoterpene hydrocarbon-free fraction of the essential oil appeared to be inactive while the bergapten-free fraction superimposed the releasing effect of BEO supporting the deduction that psoralens may not be implicated. To conclude, BEO contains into its volatile fraction still unidentified monoterpene hydrocarbons able to stimulate glutamate release by transporter reversal and/or by exocytosis, depending on the dose administered.

  11. Plasticity and evolution of (+)-3-carene synthase and (-)-sabinene synthase functions of a sitka spruce monoterpene synthase gene family associated with weevil resistance.

    PubMed

    Roach, Christopher R; Hall, Dawn E; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2014-08-22

    The monoterpene (+)-3-carene is associated with resistance of Sitka spruce against white pine weevil, a major North American forest insect pest of pine and spruce. High and low levels of (+)-3-carene in, respectively, resistant and susceptible Sitka spruce genotypes are due to variation of (+)-3-carene synthase gene copy number, transcript and protein expression levels, enzyme product profiles, and enzyme catalytic efficiency. A family of multiproduct (+)-3-carene synthase-like genes of Sitka spruce include the three (+)-3-carene synthases, PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and the (-)-sabinene synthase PsTPS-sab. Of these, PsTPS-3car2 is responsible for the relatively higher levels of (+)-3-carene in weevil-resistant trees. Here, we identified features of the PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and PsTPS-sab proteins that determine different product profiles. A series of domain swap and site-directed mutations, supported by structural comparisons, identified the amino acid in position 596 as critical for product profiles dominated by (+)-3-carene in PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, and PsTPS-3car3, or (-)-sabinene in PsTPS-sab. A leucine in this position promotes formation of (+)-3-carene, whereas phenylalanine promotes (-)-sabinene. Homology modeling predicts that position 596 directs product profiles through differential stabilization of the reaction intermediate. Kinetic analysis revealed position 596 also plays a role in catalytic efficiency. Mutations of position 596 with different side chain properties resulted in a series of enzymes with different product profiles, further highlighting the inherent plasticity and potential for evolution of alternative product profiles of these monoterpene synthases of conifer defense against insects. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. OH radical-initiated oxidation of (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimene in the presence of NOx: the role of light-dependent monoterpenes in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol formation in the above-canopy forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H., Jr.; Jayarathne, T.; Morales, A. C.; Shepson, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) oxidation represents a significant pathway in the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). BVOC oxidation products, including organic nitrates (ON), impact both the SOA burden and the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere by sequestering NOx. A recent field study in the mixed deciduous/coniferous forest of northern Michigan showed that concentrations of multifunctional monoterpene-derived hydroxy nitrates (MTN) and SOA can be greater in the above-canopy environment during daytime, but the source of MTN is unclear as model simulations cannot replicate the higher concentrations above canopy. Light-dependent monoterpenes, including the polyolefinic species, trans-ocimene, may be one such contributor to the higher measured ON and SOA above canopy as this compound has been predicted to be an important source of monoterpene-derived ON during daytime in this environment. However, there are currently no measurements of the ON (and SOA yields) from trans-ocimene oxidation by OH in the presence of NOx, the dominant pathway for daytime ON production. Here we conduct photochemical reaction chamber studies of the OH radical-initiated oxidation of authentic (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimene isomers in the presence of NOx to examine the total (gas and particle) ON, hydroxy nitrate, and SOA yields. The effects of variable chamber relative humidity and seed particle acidity on the ON and SOA yields are examined to better understand the role of hydrolysis on SOA formation and the lifetime of ocimene-derived ON in the particles. This work underscores the importance of light-dependent monoterpenes on mediating the oxidative capacity of the near canopy forest environment and has important implications for understanding NOx cycling and the formation of SOA in forests, which are not currently included in atmospheric models.

  13. Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol cause oxidative damage in Escherichia coli without the involvement of tricarboxylic acid cycle and Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-10-17

    Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol are common constituents of many essential oils (EOs) that have been extensively studied as antimicrobial agents but whose mechanisms of microbial inactivation have not been totally elucidated. A recent study described a mechanism of Escherichia coli death for (+)-limonene, a hydrocarbon monoterpene also frequently present in EOs, similar to the common mechanism proposed for bactericidal antibiotics. This mechanism involves the formation of Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical, a reactive oxygen species (ROS), via tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which would ultimately inactivate cells. Our objective was to determine whether E. coli MG1655 inactivation by citral and carvacrol follows a similar mechanism of cell death. Challenging experiments with 300μL/L citral and 100μL/L carvacrol inactivated at least 2.5log10cycles of exponentially growing cells in 3h under aerobic conditions. The presence of thiourea (an ROS scavenger) reduced cell inactivation in 2log10cycles, demonstrating the role of ROS in cell death. Decreased resistance of a ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) indicated that citral and carvacrol caused oxidative damage to DNA. Although the mechanism of E. coli inactivation by carvacrol and citral was similarly mediated by ROS, their formation did not follow the same pathways described for (+)-limonene and bactericidal drugs because neither Fenton reaction nor NADH production via the TCA cycle was involved in cell death. Moreover, further experiments demonstrated antimicrobial activity of citral and carvacrol in anaerobic environments without the involvement of ROS. As a consequence, cell death by carvacrol and citral in anaerobiosis follows a different mechanism than that observed under aerobic conditions. These results demonstrated a different mechanism of inactivation by citral and carvacrol with regard to (+)-limonene and bactericidal antibiotics, indicating the

  14. The Influence of Monoterpene and Isoprene Nitrates on the Chemistry and Phase State of Secondary Organic Aerosol in a Low-NOx Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H., Jr.; Shepson, P. B.; Desrochers, S. J.; Harvey, R. M.; Wallace, W.; Bui, A.; Griffin, R. J.; Kavassalis, S.; Shi, Q.; Murphy, J. G.; Cook, R.; Connor, M.; Ault, A. P.; Pratt, K.; Alwe, H. D.; Millet, D. B.; Bertman, S. B.; Stevens, P. S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Boor, B.; Petrucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    Particle phase state plays a key role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) growth, reactive uptake of gas-phase radicals, and condensed phase reactions, influencing atmospheric composition and clouds. While biogenic SOA derived from isoprene and monoterpene oxidation can exhibit glassy or highly viscous semisolid phase states depending on relative humidity, the lifetimes of important SOA precursors including organic nitrates (ON) can depend on the liquid water content (LWC) and particle acidity. Reactions such as acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of particulate ON (pON) are especially sensitive to changes in aerosol LWC. However, the role of particle phase state on the chemistry of pON, and the chemical transformations of pON on the phase of SOA are poorly understood. During the summer of 2016, as part of the PROPHET - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer (AMOS) field study in a northern Michigan mixed deciduous/coniferous forest, we investigated the production of isoprene (IN) and monoterpene nitrates (MTN) at the ground and canopy levels and their role in particle formation, growth, and phase using a combination of high-resolution chemical ionization and aerosol mass spectrometry techniques, size distribution measurements, and particle bounce factors (BF) using two electrical low pressure impactors operating in parallel. Preliminary derived BF suggest the particles may be in a liquid-like state similar to those measured in other high-humidity and isoprene-rich regions such as the Amazon and Southeastern US. However, maxima in BF are observed during periods of high pON, NO, and IN during the day and high NO2 and MTN at night. Some periods were marked with low pON followed by an increase in particulate organic sulfate (pOS), and decrease in BF. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of pON from IN- and MTN-derived SOA may be driving the transition of pON to pOS, leading to a change in the phase state of SOA. Preliminary results

  15. Ice core records of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers from Aurora Peak in Alaska since 1660s: Implication for climate variability in the North Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, A.; Kawamura, K.; Seki, O.; Ono, K.; Matoba, S.; Shiraiwa, T.

    2015-12-01

    180 m long ice core (ca. 343 years old) was drilled in the saddle of the Aurora Peak of Alaska, which is located southeast of Fairbanks (63.52°N; 146.54°W, elevation: 2,825 m). Samples were directly transported to the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University and have been analyzed for monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers using gas chromatograph (GC; HP 6890) and mass spectrometry system (GC/MS; Agilent). Ice core collected from mountain glacier has not been explored for SOA yet. We found significantly high concentrations of these tracers (e.g., pinic, pinonic, and 2-methylglyceric acids, 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylrythritol), which show historical trends with good correlation with each other since 1665-2008. They show positive correlations with sugar compounds (e.g., mannitol, glucose, fructose, inositol, and sucrose), and anti-correlations with diacids (e.g., C9), w-oxocarboxylic (wC4-wC9), a-dicarbonyls and low molecular weight fatty acids (LFAs) (e.g., C18:1). LFAs show strong correlations with MSA- and nss-SO42- in the same ice core. These results suggest source regions of SOA tracers and ice core chemistry of Alaska. Concentrations of C5-alkene triols (e.g., 3-methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene, cis-2-methyl 1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene and trans-2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene) have increased in the ice core after the Great Pacific Climate Shift (late 1970's). They show positive correlations with a-dicarbonyls and LFAs (e.g., C18:1) in the ice core, suggesting that enhanced oceanic emissions of biogenic organic compounds through the surface microlayer are recorded in the ice core. Photochemical oxidation processes for these monoterpene- and isoprene-/sesquiterpene-SOA tracers are suggested to be linked with the periodicity of multi-decadal climate oscillations (e.g., North Pacific Index) and we can look at a whole range of environmental parameters in parallel with the robust reconstructed temperature changes in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Spearmint R2R3-MYB transcription factor MsMYB negatively regulates monoterpene production and suppresses the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit (MsGPPS.LSU).

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaishnavi Amarr; Wang, Qian; Dhar, Niha; Kumar, Nadimuthu; Venkatesh, Prasanna Nori; Rajan, Chakravarthy; Panicker, Deepa; Sridhar, Vishweshwaran; Mao, Hui-Zhu; Sarojam, Rajani

    2017-09-01

    Many aromatic plants, such as spearmint, produce valuable essential oils in specialized structures called peltate glandular trichomes (PGTs). Understanding the regulatory mechanisms behind the production of these important secondary metabolites will help design new approaches to engineer them. Here, we identified a PGT-specific R2R3-MYB gene, MsMYB, from comparative RNA-Seq data of spearmint and functionally characterized it. Analysis of MsMYB-RNAi transgenic lines showed increased levels of monoterpenes, and MsMYB-overexpressing lines exhibited decreased levels of monoterpenes. These results suggest that MsMYB is a novel negative regulator of monoterpene biosynthesis. Ectopic expression of MsMYB, in sweet basil and tobacco, perturbed sesquiterpene- and diterpene-derived metabolite production. In addition, we found that MsMYB binds to cis-elements of MsGPPS.LSU and suppresses its expression. Phylogenetic analysis placed MsMYB in subgroup 7 of R2R3-MYBs whose members govern phenylpropanoid pathway and are regulated by miR858. Analysis of transgenic lines showed that MsMYB is more specific to terpene biosynthesis as it did not affect metabolites derived from phenylpropanoid pathway. Further, our results indicate that MsMYB is probably not regulated by miR858, like other members of subgroup 7. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Analysis of enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in plant emissions using portable dynamic air sampling/solid-phase microextraction (PDAS-SPME) and chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Williams, Jonathan

    A portable dynamic air sampler (PDAS) using a porous polymer solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre has been validated for the determination of biogenic enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in air. These compounds were adsorbed in the field, and then thermally desorbed at 250 °C in a gas chromatograph injector port connected via a β-cyclodextrin capillary separating column to a mass spectrometer. The optimized method has been applied for investigating the emissions of enantiomeric monoterpenes from Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) and Lavandula lanata (Lavender) which were selected as representative of coniferous trees and aromatic plants, respectively. The enantiomers of α-pinene, sabinene, camphene, δ-3-carene, β-pinene, limonene, β-phellandrene, 4-carene and camphor were successfully determined in the emissions from the three plants. While Douglas-fir showed a strong predominance toward (-)-enantiomers, Rosemary and Lavender demonstrated a large variation in enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes. The simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of dynamic sampling with porous polymer coated SPME fibres coupled to chiral capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) makes this method potentially useful for in-field investigations of atmosphere-biosphere interactions and studies of optically explicit atmospheric chemistry.

  18. Distillation time alters essential oil yield, composition, and antioxidant activity of male Juniperus scopulorum trees.

    PubMed

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina A; Schlegel, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 15 distillation times (DT), ranging from 1.25 to 960 min, on oil yield, essential oil profiles, and antioxidant capacity of male J. scopulorum trees. Essential oil yields were 0.07% at 1.25 min DT and reached a maximum of 1.48% at 840 min DT. The concentrations of alpha-thujene (1.76-2.75%), alpha-pinene (2.9-8.7%), sabinene (45-74.7%), myrcene (2.4-3.4%), and para-cymene (0.8-3.1%) were highest at the shortest DT (1.5 to 5 min) and decreased with increasing DT. Cis-sabinene hydrate (0.5-0.97%) and linalool plus trans-sabinene (0.56-1.6%) reached maximum levels at 40 min DT. Maximum concentrations of limonene (2.3-2.8%) and pregeijerene-B (0.06-1.4%) were obtained at 360-480 min DT, and 4-terpinenol (0.7-5.7%) at 480 min DT. Alpha-terpinene (0.16-2.9%), gamma-terpinene (0.3-4.9%) and terpinolene (0.3-1.4%) reached maximum at 720 min DT. The concentrations of delta-cadinene (0.06-1.65%), elemol (0-6.0%), and 8-alpha-acetoxyelemol (0-4.4%) reached maximum at 840 min DT. The yield of the essential oil constituents increased with increasing DT. Only linalool/transsabinene hydrate reached a maximum yield at 360 min DT. Maximum yields of the following constituents were obtained at 720 min DT: alpha-thujene, alpha-pinene, camphene, sabinene, myrcene, alpha-terpinene, para-cimene, limonene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, and 4-terpinenol. At 840 min DT, cis-sabinene hydrate, prejeijerene-B, gamma muurolene, delta-cadinene, reached maximum. At 960 min DT, maximum yields of beta-pinene, elemol, alphaeudesmol/betaeudesmol, 8-alpha-acetoxyelemol were reached. These changes were adequately modeled by either the Michaelis-Menten or the Power (Convex) nonlinear regression models. Oils from the 480 min DT showed higher antioxidant activity compared to samples collected at 40, 160, or 960 min DT. These results show the potential for obtaining essential oils with various compositions and antioxidant capacity from male J

  19. Observations of Diurnal to Weekly Variations of Monoterpene-Dominated Fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds from Mediterranean Forests: Implications for Regional Modeling

    SciT

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Jiang, Xiaoyan

    2013-10-01

    The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests and dune vegetation. In this work, basal emission factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a proton transfer reaction–time-of-flight–mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parametrize the modelmore » of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (community land model, CLM v4.0) of the community earth system model (CESM v1.0). Finally, results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parametrization.« less

  20. Rice terpene synthase 24 (OsTPS24) encodes a jasmonate-responsive monoterpene synthase that produces an antibacterial γ-terpinene against rice pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, Kayo; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Tanaka, Keiichiro; Uji, Yuya; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops worldwide and is widely used as a model plant for molecular studies of monocotyledonous species. The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) is involved in rice-pathogen interactions. In addition, volatile compounds, including terpenes, whose production is induced by JA, are known to be involved in the rice defense system. In this study, we analyzed the JA-induced terpene synthase OsTPS24 in rice. We found that OsTPS24 was localized in chloroplasts and produced a monoterpene, γ-terpinene. The amount of γ-terpinene increased after JA treatment. γ-Terpinene had significant antibacterial activity against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo); however, it did not show significant antifungal activity against Magnaporthe oryzae. The antibacterial activity of the γ-terpinene against Xoo was caused by damage to bacterial cell membranes. These results suggest that γ-terpinene plays an important role in JA-induced resistance against Xoo, and that it functions as an antibacterial compound in rice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Encapsulation of carvacrol, a monoterpene present in the essential oil of oregano, with β-cyclodextrin, improves the pharmacological response on cancer pain experimental protocols.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Adriana Gibara; Oliveira, Marlange Almeida; Alves, Rafael dos Santos; Menezes, Paula dos Passos; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza; Bezerra, Daniel Pereira; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José

    2015-02-05

    Cancer pain is a major public health problem worldwide due to the strong impact on the quality of life of patients and side effects of the existing therapeutic options. Monoterpenes, as carvacrol (CARV), have been extensively studied about their therapeutic properties, especially their importance in the control of painful conditions and inflammation, which can be improved through the use of inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). We evaluated the effect of encapsulation of CARV in β-CD (CARV/β-CD) on the nociception induced by tumor cells (Sarcoma 180) in rodents. Inclusion complexes were prepared in two different procedures and characterized through thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. CARV/β-CD complex was administered (50 mg/kg, p.o.) in mice with tumor on the hind paw and was able to reduce the hyperalgesia (von Frey) during 24 h, unlike the free CARV (100 mg/kg, p.o.), which promoted effects until 9 h. Administration on alternate days of complex of CARV/β-CD (12.5-50 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced hyperalgesia, as well as spontaneous and palpation-induced nociception. However, pure CARV (50 mg/kg) did not cause significant changes in nociceptive responses. Together, these results produced evidence that the encapsulation of carvacrol in β-cyclodextrin can be useful for the development of new options for pain management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcriptome profiling of the Australian arid-land plant Eremophila serrulata (A.DC.) Druce (Scrophulariaceae) for the identification of monoterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Kracht, Octavia Natascha; Ammann, Ann-Christin; Stockmann, Julia; Wibberg, Daniel; Kalinowski, Jörn; Piotrowski, Markus; Kerr, Russell; Brück, Thomas; Kourist, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Plant terpenoids are a large and highly diverse class of metabolites with an important role in the immune defense. They find wide industrial application as active pharmaceutical ingredients, aroma and fragrance compounds. Several Eremophila sp. derived terpenoids have been documented. To elucidate the terpenoid metabolism, the transcriptome of juvenile and mature Eremophila serrulata (A.DC.) Druce (Scrophulariaceae) leaves was sequenced and a transcript library was generated. We report on the first transcriptomic dataset of an Eremophila plant. IlluminaMiSeq sequencing (2 × 300 bp) revealed 7,093,266 paired reads, which could be assembled to 34,505 isogroups. To enable detection of terpene biosynthetic genes, leaves were separately treated with methyl jasmonate, a well-documented inducer of plant secondary metabolites. In total, 21 putative terpene synthase genes were detected in the transcriptome data. Two terpene synthase isoenzymatic genes, termed ES01 and ES02, were successfully expressed in E. coli. The resulting proteins catalyzed the conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate, the universal substrate of monoterpene synthases to myrcene and Z-(b)-ocimene, respectively. The transcriptomic data and the discovery of the first terpene synthases from Eremophila serrulata are the initial step for the understanding of the terpene metabolism in this medicinally important plant genus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pinus halepensis, Pinus pinaster, Pinus pinea and Pinus sylvestris Essential Oils Chemotypes and Monoterpene Hydrocarbon Enantiomers, before and after Inoculation with the Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana M; Mendes, Marta D; Lima, Ana S; Barbosa, Pedro M; Ascensão, Lia; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G; Mota, Manuel M; Figueiredo, A Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, a serious threat to global forest populations of conifers, especially Pinus spp. A time-course study of the essential oils (EOs) of 2-year-old Pinus halepensis, Pinus pinaster, Pinus pinea and Pinus sylvestris following inoculation with the PWN was performed. The constitutive and nematode inoculation induced EOs components were analyzed at both the wounding or inoculation areas and at the whole plant level. The enantiomeric ratio of optically active main EOs components was also evaluated. External symptoms of infection were observed only in P. pinaster and P. sylvestris 21 and 15 days after inoculation, respectively. The EO composition analysis of uninoculated and unwounded plants revealed the occurrence of chemotypes for P. pinaster, P. halepensis and P. sylvestris, whereas P. pinea showed a homogenous EO composition. When whole plants were evaluated for EO and monoterpene hydrocarbon enantiomeric chemical composition, no relevant qualitative and quantitative differences were found. Instead, EO analysis of inoculated and uninoculated wounded areas revealed an increase of sesquiterpenes and diterpenic compounds, especially in P. pinea and P. halepensis, comparatively to healthy whole plants EOs. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  4. Precursor feeding studies and molecular characterization of geraniol synthase establish the limiting role of geraniol in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus leaves.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishna; Kumar, Sarma Rajeev; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shanker, Karuna; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-10-01

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are generally derived from strictosidine, which is formed by condensation of the terpene moiety secologanin and the indole moiety tryptamine. There are conflicting reports on the limitation of either terpene or indole moiety in the production of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus cell cultures. Formation of geraniol by geraniol synthase (GES) is the first step in secologanin biosynthesis. In this study, feeding of C. roseus leaves with geraniol, but not tryptophan (precursor for tryptamine), increased the accumulation of the MIAs catharanthine and vindoline, indicating the limitation of geraniol in MIA biosynthesis. This was further validated by molecular and in planta characterization of C. roseus GES (CrGES). CrGES transcripts exhibited leaf and shoot specific expression and were induced by methyl jasmonate. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CrGES significantly reduced the MIA content, which was restored to near-WT levels upon geraniol feeding. Moreover, over-expression of CrGES in C. roseus leaves increased MIA content. Further, CrGES exhibited correlation with MIA levels in leaves of different C. roseus cultivars and has significantly lower expression relative to other pathway genes. These results demonstrated that the transcriptional regulation of CrGES and thus, the in planta geraniol availability plays crucial role in MIA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhodotorula bloemfonteinensis sp. nov., Rhodotorula eucalyptica sp. nov., Rhodotorula orientis sp. nov. and Rhodotorula pini sp. nov., yeasts isolated from monoterpene-rich environments.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Smit, Martha S; Albertyn, Jacobus

    2011-09-01

    Recent rDNA sequencing of 25 isolates from a previous study, during which limonene-utilizing yeasts were isolated from monoterpene-rich environments by using 1,4-disubstituted cyclohexanes as sole carbon sources, led to the identification of four hitherto unknown Rhodotorula species. Analyses of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 region as well as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domain indicated that two isolates (CBS 8499(T) and CBS 10736) were identical and were closely related to Rhodotorula cycloclastica, a previously described limonene-utilizing yeast. These novel isolates differed from known yeast species and could be distinguished from R. cycloclastica by standard physiological tests. The other three isolates represent three novel Rhodotorula species, closely related to Sporobolomyces magnisporus. These three species could also be distinguished from other Rhodotorula species by standard physiological tests. Based on these results, we suggest that the new isolates represent novel species, for which the names Rhodotorula eucalyptica sp. nov. (type strain CBS 8499(T)  = NRRL Y-48408(T)), Rhodotorula pini sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10735(T)  = NRRL Y-48410(T)), Rhodotorula bloemfonteinensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 8598(T)  = NRRL Y-48407(T)) and Rhodotorula orientis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 8594(T)  = NRRL Y-48719(T)) are proposed. R. eucalyptica and R. pini can also utilize limonene.

  6. Observations of diurnal to weekly variations of monoterpene-dominated fluxes of volatile organic compounds from mediterranean forests: implications for regional modeling.

    PubMed

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Guenther, Alex; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests and dune vegetation. In this work, basal emission factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a proton transfer reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parametrize the model of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (community land model, CLM v4.0) of the community earth system model (CESM v1.0). Results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parametrization.

  7. Benzene, alkylated benzenes, chlorinated hydrocarbons and monoterpenes in snow/ice at Jungfraujoch (46.6 degrees N, 8.0 degrees E) during CLACE 4 and 5.

    PubMed

    Fries, Elke; Sieg, Karsten; Püttmann, Wilhelm; Jaeschke, Wolfgang; Winterhalter, Richard; Williams, Jonathan; Moortgat, Geert K

    2008-03-01

    Benzene, alkylated benzenes, chlorinated hydrocarbons and monoterpenes were measured in snow/ice collected directly in-cloud at Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl) in February and March 2005 and 2006 during the CLoud and Aerosol Characterization Experiments CLACE 4 and CLACE 5. Melted snow/ice samples were analyzed by headspace-solid-phase-dynamic-extraction (HS-SPDE) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Generally, there was a tendency in the results that higher concentrations were found after longer precipitation-free periods, suggesting that higher concentrations in snow/ice may be caused by the washout effect of precipitation. High concentration variations in snow/ice samples taken at the same time at the same place highlight the heterogeneous nature of snow/ice. Air concentrations calculated by scavenging ratios and measured snow/ice values markedly exceed the typically reported concentrations of benzene and alkylbenzenes in air (Li Y, Campana M, Reimann S, Schaub KS, Staehlin J, Peter T. Hydrocarbon concentrations at the alpine mountain sites Jungfraujoch and Arosa. Atmos Environ 2005;39:1113-27). This argues for an efficient snow/ice scavenging of those compounds from the atmosphere during precipitation formation.

  8. Composition and antimicrobial activities of Lippia multiflora Moldenke, Mentha x piperita L. and Ocimum basilicum L. essential oils and their major monoterpene alcohols alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Bassolé, Imaël Henri Nestor; Lamien-Meda, Aline; Bayala, Balé; Tirogo, Souleymane; Franz, Chlodwig; Novak, Johannes; Nebié, Roger Charles; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama

    2010-11-03

    Essential oils from leaves of Lippia multiflora, Mentha x piperita and Ocimum basilicum from Burkina Faso were analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Major components were p-cymene, thymol, b-caryophyllene, carvacrol and carvone for L. multiflora, menthol and iso-menthone for M. x piperita and, linalool and eugenol for O. basilicum. The essential oils and their major monoterpene alcohols were tested against nine bacterial strains using the disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The essential oils with high phenolic contents were the most effective antimicrobials. The checkerboard method was used to quantify the efficacy of paired combinations of essential oils and their major components. The best synergetic effects among essential oils and major components were obtained with combinations involving O. basilicum essential oil and eugenol, respectively. As phenolic components are characterized by a strong spicy aroma, this study suggests that the selection of certain combinations of EOs could help to reduce the amount of essential oils and consequently reduce any adverse sensory impact in food.

  9. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis. PMID:26734034

  10. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  11. Composition of the essential oil of leaves, galls, and ripe and unripe fruits of Jordanian Pistacia palaestina Boiss.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Bader, Ammar; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Katbeh-Bader, Ahmad; Morelli, Ivano

    2004-02-11

    Pistacia palaestina Boiss. (Pistacia terebinthus L. var. palaestina (Boiss.) Engl.) is a medicinal and foodstuff plant. The ripe fruits are used largely in the Middle East as a component of the so-called Zaatar, a mix of aromatic and food plants. Results of GC and GC-MS analyses of the essential oils of leaves, galls produced by Baizongia pistaciae (L.), and ripe and unripe fruits of Pistacia palaestinaBoiss. collected in Jordan are reported. Both qualitative and quantitative differences between different parts of the plant were observed. The oil was rich in monoterpenes, and the main constituents were alpha-pinene (63.1%) and myrcene (13.3%) in the leaves and alpha-pinene (49.4%), sabinene (22.8%), and limonene (8.1%) in the galls. (E)-Ocimene (33.8-41.3%), sabinene (20.3-24.1%), and (Z)-ocimene (3.8-13.0%) were the main ones in both unripe and ripe fruits. Sesquiterpenes have been detected in small quantities in leaves and fruits and in trace amounts in galls.

  12. Citral, A Monoterpene Protect Against High Glucose Induced Oxidative Injury in HepG2 Cell In Vitro-An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, Sri Devi; Natarajan, Ashok Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a major metabolic disorder associated with hyperglycaemia is one of the leading cause of death in many developed countries. However, use of natural phytochemicals have been proved to have a protective effect against oxidative damage. To investigate the effect of citral, a monoterpene on high glucose induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (Hep G2) cell line. Cells were treated with 50 mM concentration of glucose for 24 hours incubation following citral (30 μM) was added to confluent HepG2 cells. Cell viability, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, antioxidants and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) signaling were assessed in citral and/or high glucose induced HepG2 cells. Cells treated with glucose (50 mM), resulted in increased cytotoxicity, ROS generation, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and depletion of enzymatic and non enzymatic antioxidants. In contrast, treatment with citral (30 μM) significantly decreased cell cytotoxicity, ROS generation, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and increased antioxidants enzymes in high glucose induced HepG2 cells. In addition, the present study highlighted that high glucose treated cells showed increased expression of Extracellular Signal Regulated Protein Kinase-1 (ERK-1), c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and p38 in HepG2 cells. On the other hand treatment with citral significantly suppressed the expression of ERK-1, JNK and p38 in high glucose induced HepG2 cells. Citral protects against high glucose induced oxidative stress through inhibiting ROS activated MAPK signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

  13. Mitigation of acrylamide-induced behavioral deficits, oxidative impairments and neurotoxicity by oral supplements of geraniol (a monoterpene) in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathya N; Muralidhara

    2014-11-05

    In the recent past, several phytoconstituents are being explored for their potential neuromodulatory effects in neurological diseases. Repeated exposure of acrylamide (ACR) leads to varying degree of neuronal damage in experimental animals and humans. In view of this, the present study investigated the efficacy of geraniol (GE, a natural monoterpene) to mitigate acrylamide (ACR)-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity in a rat model and compared its efficacy to that of curcumin (CU, a spice active principle with multiple biological activities). ACR administration (50mg/kg bw, i.p. 3times/week) for 4weeks to growing rats caused typical symptoms of neuropathy. ACR rats provided with daily oral supplements of phytoconstituents (GE: 100mg/kg bw/d; CU: 50mg/kg bw/d, 4weeks) exhibited marked improvement in behavioral tests. Both phytoconstituents markedly attenuated ACR-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by the diminished levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and nitric oxide and restored the reduced glutathione levels in sciatic nerve (SN) and brain regions (cortex - Ct, cerebellum - Cb). Further, both phytoconstituents effectively diminished ACR-induced elevation in cytosolic calcium levels in SN and Cb. Furthermore, diminution in the levels of oxidative markers in the mitochondria was associated with elevation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. While ACR mediated elevation in the acetylcholinesterase activity was reduced by both actives, the depletion in dopamine levels was restored only by CU in brain regions. Taken together our findings for the first time demonstrate that the neuromodulatory propensity of GE is indeed comparable to that of CU and may be exploited as a therapeutic adjuvant in the management of varied human neuropathy conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a sampling method for the simultaneous monitoring of straight-chain alkanes, straight-chain saturated carbonyl compounds and monoterpenes in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Detournay, Anaïs; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Gaudion, Vincent; Leonardis, Thierry; Fronval, Isabelle; Kaluzny, Pascal; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2011-04-01

    Studies have shown that biogenic compounds, long chain secondary compounds and long lifetime anthropogenic compounds are involved in the formation of organic aerosols in both polluted areas and remote places. This work aims at developing an active sampling method to monitor these compounds (i.e. 6 straight-chain saturated aldehydes from C6 to C11; 8 straight-chain alkanes from C9 to C16; 6 monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, limonene, α-terpinene, & γ-terpinene; and 5 aromatic compounds: toluene, ethylbenzene, meta-, para- and ortho-xylenes) in remote areas. Samples are collected onto multi-bed sorbent cartridges at 200 mL min(-1) flow rate, using the automatic sampler SyPAC (TERA-Environnement, Crolles, France). No breakthrough was observed for sampling volumes up to 120 L (standard mixture at ambient temperature, with a relative humidity of 75%). As ozone has been shown to alter the samples (losses of 90% of aldehydes and up to 95% of terpenes were observed), the addition of a conditioned manganese dioxide (MnO(2)) scrubber to the system has been validated (full recovery of the affected compounds for a standard mixture at 50% relative humidity--RH). Samples are first thermodesorbed and then analysed by GC/FID/MS. This method allows suitable detection limits (from 2 ppt for camphene to 13 ppt for octanal--36 L sampled), and reproducibility (from 1% for toluene to 22% for heptanal). It has been successfully used to determine the diurnal variation of the target compounds (six 3 h samples a day) during winter and summer measurement campaigns at a remote site in the south of France.

  15. A phycocyanin·phellandrene synthase fusion enhances recombinant protein expression and β-phellandrene (monoterpene) hydrocarbons production in Synechocystis (cyanobacteria).

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Melis, Anastasios

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria can be exploited as photosynthetic platforms for heterologous generation of terpene hydrocarbons with industrial applications. Transformation of Synechocystis and heterologous expression of the β-phellandrene synthase (PHLS) gene alone is necessary and sufficient to confer to Synechocystis the ability to divert intermediate terpenoid metabolites and to generate the monoterpene β-phellandrene during photosynthesis. However, terpene synthases, including the PHLS, have a slow Kcat (low Vmax) necessitating high levels of enzyme concentration to enable meaningful rates and yield of product formation. Here, a novel approach was applied to increase the PHLS protein expression alleviating limitations in the rate and yield of β-phellandrene product generation. Different PHLS fusion constructs were generated with the Synechocystis endogenous cpcB sequence, encoding for the abundant in cyanobacteria phycocyanin β-subunit, expressed under the native cpc operon promoter. In one of these constructs, the CpcB·PHLS fusion protein accumulated to levels approaching 20% of the total cellular protein, i.e., substantially higher than expressing the PHLS protein alone under the same endogenous cpc promoter. The CpcB·PHLS fusion protein retained the activity of the PHLS enzyme and catalyzed β-phellandrene synthesis, yielding an average of 3.2 mg product g(-1) dry cell weight (dcw) versus the 0.03 mg g(-1)dcw measured with low-expressing constructs, i.e., a 100-fold yield improvement. In conclusion, the terpene synthase fusion-protein approach is promising, as, in this case, it substantially increased the amount of the PHLS in cyanobacteria, and commensurately improved rates and yield of β-phellandrene hydrocarbons production in these photosynthetic microorganisms. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural characterization of monoterpene indole alkaloids in ethanolic extracts of Rauwolfia species by liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Srivastava, Mukesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-12-01

    Rauwolfia species (Apocynaceae) are medicinal plants well known worldwide due to its potent bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) such as reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine. Reserpine, ajmalicine and ajmaline are powerful antihypertensive, tranquilizing agents used in hypertension. Yohimbine is an aphrodisiac used in dietary supplements. As there is no report on the comparative and comprehensive phytochemical investigation of the roots of Rauwolfia species, we have developed an efficient and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for ethanolic root extract of Rauwolfia species to elucidate the fragmentation pathways for dereplication of bioactive MIAs using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS) in positive ion mode. We identified and established diagnostic fragment ions and fragmentation pathways using reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine. The MS/MS spectra of reserpine, ajmalicine, and ajmaline showed C -ring-cleavage whereas E -ring cleavage was observed in serpentine via Retro Diels Alder (RDA). A total of 47 bioactive MIAs were identified and characterized on the basis of their molecular formula, exact mass measurements and MS/MS analysis. Reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine were unambiguously identified by comparison with their authentic standards and other 42 MIAs were tentatively identified and characterized from the roots of Rauwolfia hookeri, Rauwolfia micrantha, Rauwolfia serpentina, Rauwolfia verticillata, Rauwolfia tetraphylla and Rauwolfia vomitoria . Application of LC-MS followed by principal component analysis (PCA) has been successfully used to discriminate among six Rauwolfia species.

  17. Effects of an Enriched Extract of Paeoniflorin, a Monoterpene Glycoside used in Chinese Herbal Medicine, on Cholesterol Metabolism in a Hyperlipidemic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huiming; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Su, Jie; Wu, Yajun; Zhu, Yanchen; Wang, Yin; Fang, Hui; Pang, Minxia; Li, Bo; Chen, Suhong; Lv, Guiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Background Paeoniflorin is a monoterpene glycoside extracted from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora and is used in Chinese herbal medicine to treat hyperlipidemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an enriched extract of paeoniflorin on cholesterol levels, hemodynamics, and oxidative stress in a hyperlipidemic rat model. Material/Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed high-cholesterol diets and treated with three different doses of paeoniflorin for 12 weeks. The effects of paeoniflorin treatment were assessed on cholesterol levels, cholesterol metabolism, red blood cell vascular flow using hemorheology, antioxidant enzymes, and expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR). Rat liver histology and immunohistochemical analysis were performed to evaluate the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2), cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-α. Protein expression HMG-CoAR, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), PPAR-α and CYP7A1 was measured by Western blotting. Antioxidant activity in rat liver was determined by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Results Serum and hepatic cholesterol, hepatic steatosis and the products of cholesterol metabolism were reduced by paeoniflorin treatment, which also reduced the activity of HMG-CoAR and upregulated the expression of LDLR, PPAR-α, and CYP7A1 expression, increased SOD, decreased MDA, and upregulated Nrf2 expression. Conclusions The findings of this study in a rat model of hyperlipidemia have shown that paeoniflorin regulates hepatic cholesterol synthesis and metabolism and may also protect the liver from oxidative stress. PMID:28706181

  18. Activity of essential oils and individual components against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay; Kartal, Murat; Kan, Yüksel; Sener, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    We have tested acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities of nineteen essential oils obtained from cultivated plants, namely one from Anethum graveolens L. (organic fertilizer), two from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. collected at fully-mature and flowering stages (organic fertilizer), two from Melissa officinalis L. (cultivated using organic and chemical fertilizers), two from Mentha piperita L. and M. spicata L. (organic fertilizer), two from Lavandula officinalis Chaix ex Villars (cultivated using organic and chemical fertilizers), two from Ocimum basilicum L. (green and purple-leaf varieties cultivated using only organic fertilizer), four from Origanum onites L., O. vulgare L., O. munitiflorum Hausskn., and O. majorana L. (cultivated using organic fertilizer), two from Salvia sclarea L. (organic and chemical fertilizers), one from S. officinalis L. (organic fertilizer), and one from Satureja cuneifolia Ten. (organic fertilizer) by a spectrophotometric method of Ellman using ELISA microplate-reader at 1 mg/ml concentration. In addition, a number of single components widely encountered in most of the essential oils [gamma-terpinene, 4-allyl anisole, (-)-carvone, dihydrocarvone, (-)-phencone, cuminyl alcohol, cumol, 4-isopropyl benzaldehyde, trans-anethole, camphene, iso-borneol, (-)-borneol, L-bornyl acetate, 2-decanol, 2-heptanol, methyl-heptanol, farnesol, nerol, iso-pulegol, 1,8-cineole, citral, citronellal, citronellol, geraniol, linalool, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, piperitone, iso-menthone, menthofurane, linalyl oxide, linalyl ester, geranyl ester, carvacrol, thymol, menthol, vanilline, and eugenol] was also screened for the same activity in the same manner. Almost all of the essential oils showed a very high inhibitory activity (over 80%) against both enzymes, whereas the single components were not as active as the essential oils.

  19. Anti-inflammation activity of fruit essential oil from Cinnamomum insularimontanum Hayata.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Tsong; Chen, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ting-Yu; Tung, Judia Chen; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the fruit essential oil of Cinnamomum insularimontanum was prepared by using water distillation. Followed by GC-MS analysis, the composition of fruit essential oil was characterized. The main constituents of essential oil were alpha-pinene (9.45%), camphene (1.70%), beta-pinene (4.30%), limonene (1.76%), citronellal (24.64%), citronellol (16.78%), and citral (35.89%). According to the results obtained from nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity assay, crude essential oil and its dominant compound (citral) presented the significant NO production inhibitory activity, IC(50) of crude essential oil and citral were 18.68 and 13.18microg/mL, respectively. Moreover, based on the results obtained from the protein expression assay, the expression of IKK, iNOS, and nuclear NF-kappaB was decreased and IkappaBalpha was increased in dose-dependent manners, it proved that the anti-inflammatory mechanism of citral was blocked via the NF-kappaB pathway, but it could not efficiently suppress the activity on COX-2. In addition, citral exhibited a potent anti-inflammatory activity in the assay of croton oil-induced mice ear edema, when the dosage was 0.1 and 0.3mg per ear, the inflammation would reduce to 22% and 83%, respectively. The results presented that the fruit essential oil of C. insularimontanum and/or citral may have a great potential to develop the anti-inflammatory medicine in the future.

  20. Biogenic nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions estimated from tethered balloon observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. J.; Lenschow, D. H.; Zimmerman, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for estimating surface fluxes of trace gases, the mixed-layer gradient technique, is used to calculate isoprene and terpene emissions from forests. The technique is applied to tethered balloon measurements made over the Amazon forest and a pine-oak forest in Alabama at altitudes up to 300 m. The observations were made during the dry season Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2A) and the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment 1990 experiment (ROSE I). Results from large eddy simulations of scalar transport in the clear convective boundary layer are used to infer fluxes from the balloon profiles. Profiles from the Amazon give a mean daytime emission of 3630 +/- 1400 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, where the uncertainty represents the standard deviation of the mean of eight flux estimates. Twenty profiles from Alabama give emissions of 4470 +/- 3300 micrograms isoprene sq m/h, 1740 +/- 1060 micrograms alpha-pinene sq m/h, and 790 +/- 560 micrograms beta-pinene sq m/h, respectively. These results are in agreement with emissions derived from chemical budgets. The emissions may be overestimated because of uncertainty about how to incorporate the effects of the canopy on the mixed-layer gradients. The large variability in these emission estimates is probably due to the relatively short sampling times of the balloon profiles, though spatially heterogeneous emissions may also play a role. Fluxes derived using this technique are representative of an upwind footprint of several kilometers and are independent of hydrocarbon oxidation rate and mean advection.

  1. A day trip to a forest park increases human natural killer activity and the expression of anti-cancer proteins in male subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Hirata, Y; Li, Y J; Hirata, K; Shimizu, T; Suzuki, H; Katsumata, M; Wakayama, Y; Kawada, T; Ohira, T; Matsui, N; Kagawa, T

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that 2-night/3-day trips to forest parks enhanced human NK activity, the number of NK cells, and intracellular anti-cancer proteins in lymphocytes, and that this increased NK activity lasted for more than 7 days after the trip in both male and female subjects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a day trip to a forest park on human NK activity in male subjects. Twelve healthy male subjects, aged 35-53 years, were selected after giving informed consent. The subjects experienced a day trip to a forest park in the suburbs of Tokyo. They walked for two hours in the morning and afternoon, respectively, in the forest park on Sunday. Blood and urine were sampled in the morning of the following day and 7 days after the trip, and the NK activity, numbers of NK and T cells, and granulysin, perforin, and granzyme A/B-expressing lymphocytes, the concentration of cortisol in blood samples, and the concentration of adrenaline in urine were measured. Similar measurements were made before the trip on a weekend day as the control. Phytoncide concentrations in the forest were measured. The day trip to the forest park significantly increased NK activity and the numbers of CD16(+) and CD56(+) NK cells, perforin, granulysin, and granzyme A/B-expressing NK cells and significantly decreased CD4(+) T cells, the concentrations of cortisol in the blood and adrenaline in urine. The increased NK activity lasted for 7 days after the trip. Phytoncides, such as isoprene, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene, were detected in the forest air. These findings indicate that the day trip to the forest park also increased the NK activity, number of NK cells, and levels of intracellular anti-cancer proteins, and that this effect lasted for at least 7 days after the trip. Phytoncides released from trees and decreased stress hormone levels may partially contribute to the increased NK activity.

  2. Chemical composition and anticancer and antioxidant activities of Schinus molle L. and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries essential oils.

    PubMed

    Bendaoud, Houcine; Romdhane, Mehrez; Souchard, Jean Pierre; Cazaux, Sylvie; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2010-08-01

    Essential oils were obtained by steam distillation from berries of Schinus molle L. and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi originating from southern of Tunisia and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Among 57 and 62 compounds (%[mg/100 g dry matter]) identified in these oils, the main were alpha-phellandrene (46.52%[1256.15] and 34.38%[859.60]), beta-phellandrene (20.81%[561.74] and 10.61%[265.15]), alpha-terpineol (8.38%[226.26] and 5.60%[140.03]), alpha-pinene (4.34%[117.29] and 6.49%[162.25]), beta-pinene (4.96%[133.81] and 3.09%[77.30]) and p-cymene (2.49%[67.28] and 7.34%[183.40]), respectively. A marked quantity of gamma-cadinene (18.04%[451.05]) was also identified in the S. terebinthifolius essential oil whereas only traces (0.07%[1.81]) were detected in the essential oil of S. molle. The in vitro antioxidant and antiradical scavenging properties of the investigated essential oils were evaluated by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. Essential oil of S. terebinthifolius expressed stronger antioxidant activity in the ABTS assay, with an IC(50) of 24 +/- 0.8 mg/L, compared to S. molle (IC(50)= 257 +/- 10.3 mg/L). Essential oils were also evaluated for their anticancer activities against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). S. terebinthifolius essential oil was more effective against tested cell lines (IC(50)= 47 +/- 9 mg/L) than that from S. molle (IC(50)= 54 +/- 10 mg/L). Suggestions on relationships between chemical composition and biological activities are outlined.

  3. Variability of the needle essential oils of Pinus heldreichii from different populations in Montenegro and Serbia.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Biljana; Ristić, Mihailo; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2007-05-01

    The essential-oil compositions of Pinus heldreichii Christ. from Montenegro and Serbia are reported at the population level. Whitebark pine is a sub-endemic high-mountain Balkan pine relict of an anthropogenically reduced area, with large morphological diversity and insufficiently clear taxonomic position. In the pine-needle terpene profile from three populations from Montenegro, and one from Serbia, 101 compounds were detected, 72 of which could be identified (Table 3). The dominant constituents are limonene (26.3%), alpha-pinene (17.5%), germacrene D (13.5%), and beta-caryophyllene (10.4%), comprising ca. 67.7% of the essential oil. Medium-to-high contents (0.5-10%) of the following 16 additional components were found: beta-pinene, beta-myrcene, alpha-humulene, delta-cadinene, alpha-muurolene, (E)-hex-2-enal, beta-gurjunene, gamma-muurolene, isopimarol, camphene, gamma-cadinene, aromadendrene, beta-bisabolene, trans-beta-farnesene, alpha-cadinene, and (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol. The similarity of the populations and the within-population variability was visualized by principle-component analysis (PCA) of eleven selected terpenes in 97 tree samples. Cluster and genetic analyses suggest closest connection between the two spatially most-distant populations I (Montenegro) and IV (Serbia). Based on the profile of the main sesquiterpene components, the studied populations from Montenegro and Serbia are more similar to the populations from Greece and the Central Balkan peninsula (Bosnia and Serbia-Kosovo) than to those on the furthest eastern margin of their natural range (Bulgaria).

  4. Variability of the needle essential oils of Pinus peuce from different populations in Montenegro and Serbia.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Biljana; Ristić, Mihailo; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2008-07-01

    The essential-oil composition of Pinus peuce Griseb. is reported at the population level. Macedonian pine is endemic high-mountain Balkan pine relict of an anthropogenically reduced area, with large morphological diversity and insufficiently clear taxonomic position. In the pine-needle terpene profile of two populations from Montenegro and one from Serbia, 78 compounds were detected, 56 of which are identified (Table 3). The dominant constituents were alpha-pinene (36.5%) and germacrene D (11.4%). The following 20 additional components were found to be present in medium-to-high amounts (0.5-10%): camphene (8.5%), bornyl acetate (6.8%), beta-pinene (6.8%), beta-caryophyllene (5.2%), beta-phellandrene (4.7%), terpinen-4-ol acetate (1.6%), (E)-hex-2-enal (1.5%), alpha-muurolene (1.2%), beta-gurjunene (1.1%), beta-myrcene (1.0%), alpha-terpinyl acetate (0.9%), alpha-phellandrene (0.8%), delta-cadinene (0.8%), alpha-humulene (0.8%), sabinene (0.7%), aromadendrene (0.6%), alpha-thujene (0.6%), gamma-muurolene (0.6%), gamma-cadinene (0.6%), alpha-terpinolene (0.5%), and one unknown component (0.5%). The similarity of the populations and the within-population variability were visualized by principle-component analysis (PCA) and genetic analysis of selected terpenes in 90 tree samples. Our study suggests a closer connection between populations II and III compared to population I. Based on the profile of the main terpene components, the studied populations are more similar to populations from Kosovo and Greece than to the population from Mt. Mokra (Montenegro) and the population in France.

  5. Dose- and tissue-specific interaction of monoterpenes with the gibberellin-mediated release of potato tuber bud dormancy, sprout growth and induction of α-amylases and β-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Sonja; Podzimska, Dagmara; Voegele, Antje; Imbeck, Madeleine; Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) are involved in bud dormancy release in several species. We show here that GA-treatment released bud dormancy, initiated bud sprouting and promoted sprout growth of excised potato tuber bud discs ('eyes'). Monoterpenes from peppermint oil (PMO) and S-(+)-carvone (CAR) interact with the GA-mediated bud dormancy release in a hormesis-type response: low monoterpene concentrations enhance dormancy release and the initiation of bud sprouting, whereas high concentrations inhibit it. PMO and CAR did, however, not affect sprout growth rate after its onset. We further show that GA-induced dormancy release is associated with tissue-specific regulation of α- and β-amylases. Molecular phylogenetic analysis shows that potato α-amylases cluster into two distinct groups: α-AMY1 and α-AMY2. GA-treatment induced transcript accumulation of members of both α-amylase groups, as well as α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprout and 'sub-eye' tissues. In sprouts, CAR interacts with the GA-mediated accumulation of α-amylase transcripts in an α-AMY2-specific and dose-dependent manner. Low CAR concentrations enhance the accumulation of α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts, but do not affect the α-AMY1-type transcripts. Low CAR concentrations also enhance the accumulation of α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprouts, but not in 'sub-eye' tissues. In contrast, high CAR concentrations have no appreciable effect in sprouts on the enzyme activities and the α-amylase transcript abundances of either group. The dose-dependent effects on the enzyme activities and the α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts in sprouts are specific for CAR but not for PMO. Different monoterpenes therefore may have specific targets for their interaction with hormone signalling pathways.

  6. Organic nitrate chemistry and its implications for nitrogen budgets in an isoprene- and monoterpene-rich atmosphere: constraints from aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations in the Southeast US

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Travis, K. R.; Kim, P. S.; Marais, E. A.; Miller, C. Chan; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Mao, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; Teng, A. P.; Nguyen, T. B.; St. Clair, J. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Romer, P.; Nault, B. A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Shepson, P. B.; Xiong, F.; Blake, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Misztal, P. K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.

    2018-01-01

    Formation of organic nitrates (RONO2) during oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs: isoprene, monoterpenes) is a significant loss pathway for atmospheric nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx), but the chemistry of RONO2 formation and degradation remains uncertain. Here we implement a new BVOC oxidation mechanism (including updated isoprene chemistry, new monoterpene chemistry, and particle uptake of RONO2) in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with ∼25 × 25 km2 resolution over North America. We evaluate the model using aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations of NOx, BVOCs, and RONO2 from the Southeast US in summer 2013. The updated simulation successfully reproduces the concentrations of individual gas- and particle-phase RONO2 species measured during the campaigns. Gas-phase isoprene nitrates account for 25-50% of observed RONO2 in surface air, and we find that another 10% is contributed by gas-phase monoterpene nitrates. Observations in the free troposphere show an important contribution from long-lived nitrates derived from anthropogenic VOCs. During both campaigns, at least 10% of observed boundary layer RONO2 were in the particle phase. We find that aerosol uptake followed by hydrolysis to HNO3 accounts for 60% of simulated gas-phase RONO2 loss in the boundary layer. Other losses are 20% by photolysis to recycle NOx and 15% by dry deposition. RONO2 production accounts for 20% of the net regional NOx sink in the Southeast US in summer, limited by the spatial segregation between BVOC and NOx emissions. This segregation implies that RONO2 production will remain a minor sink for NOx in the Southeast US in the future even as NOx emissions continue to decline. PMID:29681921

  7. Composition and antioxidant activity of the essential oils of Xylopia aethiopica (Dun) A. Rich. (Annonaceae) leaves, stem bark, root bark, and fresh and dried fruits, growing in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Karioti, Anastasia; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Mensah, Merlin L K; Fleischer, Theophilus C; Skaltsa, Helen

    2004-12-29

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the leaves, the barks of the stem and the root, as well as from the fresh and dried fruits of Xylopia aethiopica, growing in Ghana, was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. Kovats indices, mass spectra, and standard compounds were used to identify a total of 93 individual compounds. The monoterpene hydrocarbons formed the main portion in all studied samples. beta-Pinene was predominant in all cases, while trans-m-mentha-1(7),8-diene was the main compound in the essential oils of the leaves and the barks of roots and stems. Their potential antioxidant activity was also investigated and found to be significant in scavenging superoxide anion radical.

  8. Metabolism of monoterpenes: early steps in the metabolism of d-neomenthyl-. beta. -D-glucoside in peppermint (Mentha piperita) rhizomes

    SciT

    Croteau, R.; Sood, V.K.; Renstroem, B.

    1984-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H) menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaves of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to methyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside which is then transported to the rhizome. Analysis of the disposition of l-(G)/sup 3/H)menthone applied to midstem leaves of intact flowering plants allowed the kinetics of synthesis and transport of the monoterpenyl glucoside to be determined, and gave strong indication that the glucoside was subsequently metabolized in the rhizome. Studiesmore » with d-(G-/sup 3/H)neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside as substrate, using excised rhizomes or rhizome segments, confirmed the hydrolysis of the glucoside as an early step in metabolism at this site, and revealed that the terpenoid moiety was further converted to a series of ether-soluble, methanol-soluble, and water-soluble products. The conversion of menthone to the lactone, and of the lactone to more polar products, were confirmed in vivo using l-(G-/sup 3/H)menthone and l-(G-/sup 3/H)-3,4-menthone lactone as substrates. Additional oxidation products were formed in vivo via the desaturation of labeled neomenthol and/or menthone, but none of these transformations appeared to lead to ring opening of the p-menthane skeleton. Each step in the main reaction sequence, from hydrolysis of neomenthyl glucoside to lactonization of menthone, was demonstrated in cell-free extracts from the rhizomes of flowering mint plants. The lactomization step is of particular significance in providing a means of cleaving the p-methane ring to afford an acyclic carbon skeleton that can be further degraded by modifications of the well-known ..beta..-oxidation sequence. 41 references, 3 figures, 1 table.« less

  9. Characterizing oxidative flow reactor SOA production and OH radical exposure from laboratory experiments of complex mixtures (engine exhaust) and simple precursors (monoterpenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Link, M. L.; Friedman, B.; Ortega, J. V.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Park, G.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Lee, T.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent commercialization of the Oxidative Flow Reactor (OFR, occasionally described in the literature as a "Potential Aerosol Mass") has created the opportunity for many researchers to explore the mechanisms behind OH-driven aerosol formation on a wide range of oxidative timescales (hours to weeks) in both laboratory and field measurements. These experiments have been conducted in both laboratory and field settings, including simple (i.e. single component) and complex (multi-component) precursors. Standard practices for performing OFR experiments, and interpreting data from the measurements, are still being developed. Measurement of gas and particle phase chemistry, from oxidation products generated in the OFR, through laboratory studies on single precursors and the measurement of SOA from vehicle emissions on short atmospheric timescales represent two very different experiments in which careful experimental design is essential for exploring reaction mechanisms and SOA yields. Two parameters essential in experimental design are (1) the role of seed aerosol in controlling gas-particle partitioning and SOA yields, and (2) the accurate determination of OH exposure during any one experiment. We investigated the role of seed aerosol surface area in controlling the observed SOA yields and gas/particle composition from the OH-initiated oxidation of four monoterpenes using an aerosol chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer and scanning mobility particle sizer. While the OH exposure during laboratory experiments is simple to constrain, complex mixtures such as diesel exhaust have high estimated OH reactivity values, and thus require careful consideration. We developed methods for constraining OH radical exposure in the OFR during vehicle exhaust oxidation experiments. We observe changes in O/C ratios and highly functionalized species over the temperature gradient employed in the aerosol-CIMS measurement. We relate this observed, speciated chemistry to the

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Bioactive Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Ethanolic Extract of Seven Rauvolfia Species using UHPLC with Hybrid Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Srivastava, Mukesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Ojha, Sanjeev; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-09-01

    Rauvolfia serpentina is an endangered plant species due to its over-exploitation. It has highly commercial and economic importance due to the presence of bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) such as ajmaline, yohimbine, ajmalicine, serpentine and reserpine. To develop a validated, rapid, sensitive and selective ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQLIT -MS/MS) method in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode for simultaneous determination of bioactive MIAs in ethanolic extract of seven Rauvolfia species and herbal formulations. The separation of MIAs was achieved on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH™ C18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm × 50 mm) using a gradient mobile phase (0.1% aqueous formic acid and acetonitrile) at flow rate 0.3 μL/min in 7 min. The validated method showed good linearity (r(2)  ≥ 0.9999), limit of detection (LOD) (0.06-0.15 ng/mL), limit of quantitation (LOQ) (0.18-0.44 ng/mL), precisions [intraday: relative standard deviation (RSD) ≤ 2.24%, interday: RSD ≤ 2.74%], stability (RSD ≤ 1.53%) and overall recovery (RSD ≤ 2.23%). The validated method was applied to quantitate MIAs. Root of Rauvolfia vomitoria showed a high content of ajmaline (48.43 mg/g), serpentine (87.77 mg/g) whereas high quantities of yohimbine (100.21 mg/g) and ajmalicine (120.51 mg/g) were detected in R. tetraphylla. High content of reserpine was detected in R. micrantha (35.18 mg/g) and R. serpentina (32.38 mg/g). The encouraging results of this study may lead to easy selection of suitable Rauvolfia species according to the abundance of MIAs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Efficacy of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil and its monoterpene aldehyde constituents against fungi isolated from some edible legume seeds and aflatoxin B1 production.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ravindra; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Priyanka; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2009-10-31

    The present study deals with evaluation of antifungal properties of Lippia alba essential oil (EO) and two of its monoterpene aldehyde constituents against legume-contaminating fungi. Seventeen different fungal species were isolated from 11 varieties of legumes, and aflatoxigenic isolates of Aspergillus flavus were identified. Hydrodistillation method was used to extract the EO from fresh leaves. The GC and GC-MS analysis of EO revealed the monoterpene aldehydes viz. geranial (22.2%) and neral (14.2%) as the major components. The antifungal activity of EO, geranial and neral was evaluated by contact assay on Czapek's-dox agar. The EO (0.25-1 microL/mL) and its two constituents (1 microL/mL) showed remarkable antifungal effects against all the fungal isolates (growth inhibition range 32.1-100%). Their minimal inhibitory (MIC) and fungicidal (MFC) concentrations for A. flavus were lower than those of the systemic fungicide Bavistin. Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) production by three isolates of A. flavus was strongly inhibited even at the lower fungistatic concentration of EO and its constituents. There was no adverse effect of treatments on seed germination, and rather, there was enhanced seedling growth in the EO-treated seeds. It is concluded that L. alba EO and two of its constituents could be safely used as effective preservative for food legumes against fungal infections and mycotoxins.

  12. Combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR of the supercritical fluid extract of Abies alba twigs.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Two samples (leaves and twigs) of Abies alba Miller from Corsica were extracted using supercritical CO2 and their chemical compositions were compared with those of the essential oils obtained from the same batch of plant material. In total 45 components were identified using combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR. It was observed that the contents of monoterpenes (mainly represented by limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene) were significantly lower in the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) than in the essential oil (EO). Conversely, the proportions of sesquiterpenes were much higher in CO2 extracts than in essential oils (around 30% vs 4%). Cis-abienol, a diterpene alcohol, was identified only in SFE, and the proportions of this constituent (7.5% and 17.3%) were determined using quantitative 13C NMR since it was under estimated using the standard conditions of GC.

  13. Chemical variability of the needle oil of Juniperus communis ssp. alpina from Corsica.

    PubMed

    Ottavioli, Josephine; Gonny, Marcelle; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2009-12-01

    The composition of 109 samples of essential oil isolated from the needles of Juniperus communis ssp. alpina growing wild in Corsica was investigated by GC (in combination with retention indices), GC/MS, and 13C-NMR. Forty-four compounds accounting for 86.7-96.7% of the oil were identified. The oils consisted mainly of monoterpene hydrocarbons, in particular, limonene (9.2-53.9%), beta-phellandrene (3.7-25.2%), alpha-pinene (1.4-33.7%), and sabinene (0.1-33.6%). The 109 oil compositions were submitted to k-means partitioning and principal component analysis, which allowed the distinction of two groups within the oil samples. The composition of the major group (92% of the samples) was dominated by limonene and beta-phellandrene, while the second group contained mainly sabinene beside limonene and beta-phellandrene.

  14. Chemical characterization and biological activity of essential oils from Daucus carota L. subsp. carota growing wild on the Mediterranean coast and on the Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Maxia, Andrea; Marongiu, Bruno; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Tuveri, Enrica; Gonçalves, Maria J; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Ligia

    2009-01-01

    The essential oils and supercritical CO(2) extracts of wild Daucus carota L. subsp. carota growing spontaneously in Sardinia and in Portugal were investigated. The main components in the Sardinian essential oil of flowering and mature umbels with seeds are beta-bisabolene (17.6-51.0%) and 11-alpha-(H)-himachal-4-en-1-beta-ol (9.0-21.6%); instead, the oils from Portuguese samples are predominantly composed of geranyl acetate (5.2-65.0%) and alpha-pinene (3.5-37.9%). Supercritical extracts contain lower amounts of monoterpenes and higher amounts of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons. Antifungal activities of the Sardinian oils were the highest, particularly for dermatophytes and Cryptococcus neoformans, with MIC values of 0.16-0.64 microL mL(-1).

  15. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils of Pinus patula.

    PubMed

    Amri, Ismail; Lamia, Hamrouni; Gargouri, Samia; Hanana, Mohsen; Mahfoudhia, Mariem; Fezzani, Tarek; Ezzeddine, Ferjani; Jamoussi, Bassem

    2011-10-01

    Essential oils isolated from needles of Pinus patula by hydrodistillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty-eight compounds were identified, representing 98.3% of the total oil. The oil was rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons (62.4%), particularly alpha-pinene (35.2%) and beta-phellandrene (19.5%). The in vitro antifungal assay showed that P. patula oil significantly inhibited the growth of 9 plant pathogenic fungi. The oil, when tested on Sinapis arvensis, Lolium rigidum, Phalaris canariensis and Trifolium campestre, completely inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of all species. Our preliminary results showed that P. patula essential oil could be valorized for the control of weeds and fungal plant diseases.

  16. Comparison of pistachio hull essential oils from different Tunisian localities.

    PubMed

    Chahed, Thouraya; Dhifi, Wissal; Hamrouni, Ibtissem; Msaada, Kamel; Bellila, Amor; Kchouk, Mohamed E; Marzouk, Brahim

    2007-03-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) fruit is well known for its oleaginous and edible seed. Less information is available about the hull constituted by the epicarp and the mesocarp. This part of the fruit contains an essential oil that can be valorized. Tunisia is one of the countries cultivating pistachio trees. This work presents essential oil composition of pistachio hulls (Mateur variety) from different geographical localities: Grombalia (North-East), Kairouan (Middle) and Sfax (Middle-East). Yields were more important in Sfax samples (0.53% on a dry weight basis). Alpha-terpinolene was the major compound for Grombalia fruits (35.7%), whereas Kairouan and Sfax samples where characterized by alpha-pinene (42.5 and 43.8% respectively). For all samples, monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated (more than 79.8% of the essential oil).

  17. Essential oil composition of two myrtus communis L. varieties grown in North Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Aidi Wannes, Wissem; Mhamdi, Baya; Marzouk, Brahim

    2007-06-01

    Two Myrtus communis varieties (var. italica and baetica) were studied in order to investigate their essential oil yield and composition. Essential oil yield varied in leaves, fruits and stems. So, in leaves, it was 0.5% for italica and 0.3% for baetica and was higher than in fruits and stems with respectively 0.1% and 0.04% for italica and 0.07% and 0.03% for baetica. The essential oil analysis performed by GC and GC/MS showed a composition characterized by a high percentage of monoterpene hydrocarbons in leaves, largely due to alpha-pinene with 51.3% for italica and 27.7% for baetica; 1,8-cineole, the alone compound of ether class, was predominant in fruits and stems with respectively 31.6% and 34.7% for italica and 19.8% and 25.8% for baetica.

  18. Floral scent compounds of Amazonian Annonaceae species pollinated by small beetles and thrips.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, A; Webber, A C; Gottsberger, G

    2000-11-01

    Chemical analysis (GC-MS) yielded a total of 58 volatile compounds in the floral scents of six species of Annonaceae distributed in four genera (Xylopia, Anaxagorea, Duguetia, and Rollinia), Xylopia aromatica is pollinated principally by Thysanoptera and secondarily by small beetles (Nitidulidae and Staphylinidae), whereas the five other species were pollinated by Nitidulidae and Staphylinidae only. Although the six Annonaceae species attract a similar array of pollinator groups, the major constituents of their floral scents are of different biochemical origin. The fragrances of flowers of Anaxagorea brevipes and Anaxagorea dolichocarpa were dominated by esters of aliphatic acids (ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate), which were not detected in the other species. Monoterpenes (limonene, p-cymene, alpha-pinene) were the main scent compounds of Duguetia asterotricha, and naphthalene prevailed in the scent of Rollinia insignis flowers. The odors of X. aromatica and Xylopia benthamii flowers were dominated by high amounts of benzenoids (methylbenzoate, 2-phenylethyl alcohol).

  19. Organic Nitrate Chemistry and Its Implications for Nitrogen Budgets in an Isoprene- and Monoterpene-Rich Atmosphere: Constraints From Aircraft (SEAC4RS) and Ground-Based (SOAS) Observations in the Southeast US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jenny; Jacob, D. J.; Travis, K. R.; Kim, P. S.; Marais, E. A.; Miller, C. Chan; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Formation of organic nitrates (RONO2) during oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs: isoprene, monoterpenes) is a significant loss pathway for atmospheric nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx), but the chemistry of RONO2 formation and degradation remains uncertain. Here we implement a new BVOC oxidation mechanism (including updated isoprene chemistry, new monoterpene chemistry, and particle uptake of RONO2) in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with approximately 25 times 25 km(exp 2) resolution over North America. We evaluate the model using aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations of NOx, BVOCs, and RONO2 from the Southeast US in summer 2013. The updated simulation successfully reproduces the concentrations of individual gas- and particle-phase RONO2 species measured during the campaigns. Gas-phase isoprene nitrates account for 2550 of observed RONO2 in surface air, and we find that another 10 is contributed by gas-phase monoterpene nitrates. Observations in the free troposphere show an important contribution from long-lived nitrates derived from anthropogenic VOCs. During both campaigns, at least 10 of observed boundary layer RONO2 were in the particle phase. We find that aerosol uptake followed by hydrolysis to HNO3 accounts for 60 of simulated gas-phase RONO2 loss in the boundary layer. Other losses are 20 by photolysis to recycle NOx and 15 by dry deposition. RONO2 production accounts for 20 of the net regional NOx sink in the Southeast US in summer, limited by the spatial segregation between BVOC and NOx emissions. This segregation implies that RONO2 production will remain a minor sink for NOx in the Southeast US in the future even as NOx emissions continue to decline. XXXX We have used airborne and ground-based observations from two summer 2013 campaigns in the Southeast US (SEAC4RS, SOAS) to better understand the chemistry and impacts of alkyl and multi-functional organic nitrates (RONO2). We used the observations, along

  20. A UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides and four alkaloids in rat plasma: application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan and single herb extract.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yu; Wu, Yun; Wang, Fenrong; Ma, Wen; Bian, Qiaoxia; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and reliable ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides (paeoniflorin, alibiflorin and oxypaeoniflorin) and four alkaloids (tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine), the main active ingredients of Radix Paeoniae Rubra extract (RPE) and Corydalis yanhusuo extract (CYE) in Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), and to compare the pharmacokinetics of these active ingredients in normal and arthritic rats orally administrated with HLXLD or RPE/CYE alone. The analytes and internal standard (IS) (geniposide) were separated on a XBridge C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) using gradient elution with the mobile phase consisting of methanol and 0.01% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min. The detection of the analytes was performed on Acquity UPLC-MS/MS system with an electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode via polarity switching between negative (for monoterpene glycosides) and positive (for alkaloids) ionization mode. The lower limits of quantification were 2.5, 1, 0.5, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02 and 0.01 ng/ml for paeoniflorin, alibiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy of analytes were well within acceptance criteria (15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 83.1%. The validated method has been successfully applied to determination of the analytes. Results showed that there were remarkable differences in pharmacokinetic properties of the analytes between herbal formula and single herb group, normal and arthritic group. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Quantification of Terpenes by 1DGC-MS and 2DGC-TOF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, R. M.; Perlinger, J. A.; Doskey, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic emissions are the primary source of volatile organic compounds in the global troposphere. Deciduous and coniferous forests are the principal emitters of a complex mixture of isoprene (C5H8), monoterpenes (C10H16), and sesquiterpenes (C15H24). Sesquiterpenes are readily oxidized in the atmosphere producing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) with 100% yields. The SOA are hydrophilic and scatter light, and thus, increase albedo and lead to a cooling effect. In addition, both monoterpene and sesquiterpene generated SOA are effective cloud condensation nuclei leading to an increase in the particle number concentration and to the formation of clouds that also increase albedo. To quantify the complex mixture of terpenes and their oxidation products requires development of on-line extraction and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic techniques. One objective of this work was to compare one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (1DGC-MS) and two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (2DGC-TOFMS) for quantifying eight monoterpenes (alpha- and beta-pinene, limonene, 3-carene, linalool, terpinolene, myrcene and ocimene) and eight sesquiterpenes (beta-caryophyllene, humulene, alpha-cedrene, cis-nerolidol, trans-nerolidol, cedrol, camphene and farnesene) in air samples collected in Northern Michigan. Future research involves coupling thermal desorption and supercritical fluid extraction devices to a GC×2GC for routine quantification of the complex mixture of terpenes and their oxidation products in rural and urban air.

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of three terpene synthases from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia).

    PubMed

    Landmann, Christian; Fink, Barbara; Festner, Maria; Dregus, Márta; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Schwab, Wilfried

    2007-09-15

    The essential oil of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is mainly composed of mono- and sesquiterpenes. Using a homology-based PCR strategy, two monoterpene synthases (LaLIMS and LaLINS) and one sesquiterpene synthase (LaBERS) were cloned from lavender leaves and flowers. LaLIMS catalyzed the formation of (R)-(+)-limonene, terpinolene, (1R,5S)-(+)-camphene, (1R,5R)-(+)-alpha-pinene, beta-myrcene and traces of alpha-phellandrene. The proportions of these products changed significantly when Mn(2+) was supplied as the cofactor instead of Mg(2+). The second enzyme LaLINS produced exclusively (R)-(-)-linalool, the main component of lavender essential oil. LaBERS transformed farnesyl diphosphate and represents the first reported trans-alpha-bergamotene synthase. It accepted geranyl diphosphate with higher affinity than farnesyl diphosphate and also produced monoterpenes, albeit at low rates. LaBERS is probably derived from a parental monoterpene synthase by the loss of the plastidial signal peptide and by broadening its substrate acceptance spectrum. The identification and description of the first terpene synthases from L. angustifolia forms the basis for the biotechnological modification of essential oil composition in lavender.

  3. Constraining the Volatility Distributions and Possible Diffusion Limitations of Secondary Organic Aerosols Using Laboratory Dilution Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Q.; Robinson, E. S.; Mahfouz, N.; Sullivan, R. C.; Donahue, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate the mass of fine particles in the atmosphere. Their formation involves both oxidation of volatile organics from various sources that produce products with uncertain volatilities, and diffusion of these products into the condensed phase. Therefore, constraining volatility distribution and diffusion timescales of the constituents in SOA are important in predicting size, concentration and composition of SOA, as well as how these properties of SOA evolve in the atmosphere. In this work, we demonstrate how carefully designed laboratory isothermal dilution experiments in smog chambers can shed light into the volatility distribution and any diffusion barriers of common types of SOA over time scales relevant to atmospheric transport and diurnal cycling. We choose SOA made from mono-terpenes (alpha-pinene and limonene) and toluene to represent biogenic and anthropogenic SOA. We look into how moisture content can alter any evaporation behaviors of SOA by varying relative humidity during SOA generation and during dilution process. This provides insight into whether diffusion in the condensed phase is rate limiting in reaching gas/particle equilibrium of semi-volatile organic compounds. Our preliminary results show that SOA from alpha-pinene evaporates continuously over several hours of experiments, and there is no substantial discernible differences over wide ranges of the chamber humidity. SOA from toluene oxidation shows slower evaporation. We fit these experimental data using absorptive partitioning theory and a particle dynamic model to obtain volatility distributions and to predict particle size evolution. This in the end will help us to improve representation of SOA in large scale chemical transport models.

  4. Intraplantar injection of bergamot essential oil into the mouse hindpaw: effects on capsaicin-induced nociceptive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Tsukasa; Kuwahata, Hikari; Katsuyama, Soh; Komatsu, Takaaki; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of aromatherapy oils, there have not been many studies exploring the biological activities of bergamot (Citrus bergamia, Risso) essential oil (BEO). Recently, we have investigated the effects of BEO injected into the plantar surface of the hindpaw in the capsaicin test in mice. The intraplantar injection of capsaicin produced an intense and short-lived licking/biting response toward the injected hindpaw. The capsaicin-induced nociceptive response was reduced significantly by intraplantar injection of BEO. The essential oils of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea), Thyme ct. linalool (linalool chemotype of Thymus vulgaris), Lavender Reydovan (Lavandula hybrida reydovan), and True Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), had similar antinociceptive effects on the capsaicin-induced nociceptive response, while Orange Sweet (Citrus sinensis) essential oil was without effect. In contrast to a small number of pharmacological studies of BEO, there is ample evidence regarding isolated components of BEO which are also found in other essential oils. The most abundant compounds found in the volatile fraction are the monoterpene hydrocarbons, such as limonene, gamma-terpinene, beta-pinene, and oxygenated derivatives, linalool and linalyl acetate. Of these monoterpenes, the pharmacological activities of linalool have been examined. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in mice, linalool produces antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects in different animal models in addition to anti-inflammatory properties. Linalool also possesses anticonvulsant activity in experimental models of epilepsy. We address the importance of linalool or linalyl acetate in BEO-or the other essential oil-induced antinociception.

  5. Mertensene, a Halogenated Monoterpene, Induces G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase Dependent Apoptosis of Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT29 Cell Line through the Modulation of ERK-1/-2, AKT and NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tarhouni-Jabberi, Safa; Zakraoui, Ons; Ioannou, Efstathia; Riahi-Chebbi, Ichrak; Haoues, Meriam; Roussis, Vassilios; Kharrat, Riadh; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-07-20

    Conventional treatment of advanced colorectal cancer is associated with tumor resistance and toxicity towards normal tissues. Therefore, development of effective anticancer therapeutic alternatives is still urgently required. Nowadays, marine secondary metabolites have been extensively investigated due to the fact that they frequently exhibit anti-tumor properties. However, little attention has been given to terpenoids isolated from seaweeds. In this study, we isolated the halogenated monoterpene mertensene from the red alga Pterocladiella capillacea (S.G. Gmelin) Santelices and Hommersand and we highlight its inhibitory effect on the viability of two human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines HT29 and LS174. Interestingly, exposure of HT29 cells to different concentrations of mertensene correlated with the activation of MAPK ERK-1/-2, Akt and NF-κB pathways. Moreover, mertensene-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylated forms of the anti-tumor transcription factor p53 , retinoblastoma protein (Rb), cdc2 and chkp2. Indeed, a reduction of the cellular level of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2 and CDK4 was observed in mertensene-treated cells. We also demonstrated that mertensene triggers a caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT29 cancer cells characterized by the activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Besides, the level of death receptor-associated protein TRADD increased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of mertensene as a drug candidate for the treatment of colon cancer.

  6. Distillation time modifies essential oil yield, composition, and antioxidant capacity of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill).

    PubMed

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Horgan, Thomas; Astatkie, Tess; Schlegel, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill) is an essential oil crop grown worldwide for production of essential oil, as medicinal or as culinary herb. The essential oil is extracted via steam distillation either from the whole aboveground biomass (herb) or from fennel fruits (seed). The hypothesis of this study was that distillation time (DT) can modify fennel oil yield, composition, and antioxidant capacity of the oil. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of eight DT (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 min) on fennel herb essential oil. Fennel essential oil yield (content) reached a maximum of 0.68% at 160 min DT. The concentration of trans-anethole (32.6-59.4% range in the oil) was low at 1.25 min DT, and increased with an increase of the DT. Alpha-phelandrene (0.9-10.5% range) was the lowest at 1.25 min DT and higher at 10, 80, and 160 min DT. Alpha-pinene (7.1-12.4% range) and beta-pinene (0.95-1.64% range) were higher in the shortest DT and the lowest at 80 min DT. Myrcene (0.93-1.95% range), delta-3-carene (2.1-3.7% range), cis-ocimene (0-0.23% range), and gamma-terpinene (0.22-2.67% range) were the lowest at 1.25 min DT and the highest at 160 min DT. In contrast, the concentrations of paracymene (0.68-5.97% range), fenchone (9.8-22.7% range), camphor (0.21-0.51% range), and cis-anethole (0.14-4.66% range) were highest at shorter DT (1.25-5 min DT) and the lowest at the longer DT (80-160 min DT). Fennel oils from the 20 and 160 min DT had higher antioxidant capacity than the fennel oil obtained at 1.25 min DT. DT can be used to obtain fennel essential oil with differential composition. DT must be reported when reporting essential oil content and composition of fennel essential oil. The results from this study may be used to compare reports in which different DT to extract essential oil from fennel biomass were used.

  7. Visiting a forest, but not a city, increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Suzuki, H; Li, Y J; Wakayama, Y; Kawada, T; Park, B J; Ohira, T; Matsui, N; Kagawa, T; Miyazaki, Y; Krensky, A M

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that a forest bathing trip enhanced human NK activity, number of NK cells, and intracellular anti-cancer proteins in lymphocytes. In the present study, we investigated how long the increased NK activity lasts and compared the effect of a forest bathing trip on NK activity with a trip to places in a city without forests. Twelve healthy male subjects, age 35-56 years, were selected with informed consent. The subjects experienced a three-day/two-night trip to forest fields and to a city, in which activity levels during both trips were matched. On day 1, subjects walked for two hours in the afternoon in a forest field; and on day 2, they walked for two hours in the morning and afternoon, respectively, in two different forest fields; and on day 3, the subjects finished the trip and returned to Tokyo after drawing blood samples and completing the questionnaire. Blood and urine were sampled on the second and third days during the trips, and on days 7 and 30 after the trip, and NK activity, numbers of NK and T cells, and granulysin, perforin, and granzymes A/B-expressing lymphocytes in the blood samples, and the concentration of adrenaline in urine were measured. Similar measurements were made before the trips on a normal working day as the control. Phytoncide concentrations in forest and city air were measured. The forest bathing trip significantly increased NK activity and the numbers of NK, perforin, granulysin, and granzyme A/B-expressing cells and significantly decreased the concentration of adrenaline in urine. The increased NK activity lasted for more than 7 days after the trip. In contrast, a city tourist visit did not increase NK activity, numbers of NK cells, nor the expression of selected intracellular anti-cancer proteins, and did not decrease the concentration of adrenaline in urine. Phytoncides, such as alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were detected in forest air, but almost not in city air. These findings indicate that a forest bathing

  8. A forest bathing trip increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins in female subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Shimizu, T; Li, Y J; Wakayama, Y; Kawada, T; Ohira, T; Takayama, N; Kagawa, T; Miyazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that forest bathing trips enhanced human NK activity, number of NK cells, and intracellular anti-cancer proteins in lymphocytes, and that the increased NK activity lasted for more than 7 days after the trip in male subjects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of forest bathing trip on human NK activity in female subjects. Thirteen healthy nurses, age 25-43 years, professional career 4-18 years, were selected with informed consent. The subjects experienced a three-day/two-night trip to forest fields. On day 1, the subjects walked for two hours in the afternoon in a forest field; on day 2, they walked for two hours each in the morning and afternoon in two different forest fields; and on day 3, the subjects finished the trip and returned to Tokyo after drawing blood and completing a questionnaire. Blood and urine were sampled on the second and third days during the trip, and on days 7 and 30 after the trip. NK activity, numbers of NK and T cells, and granulysin, perforin, and granzymes A/B-expressing lymphocytes in the blood samples, the concentrations of estradiol and progesterone in serum, and the concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline in urine were measured. Similar control measurements were made before the trip on a normal working day. The concentrations of phytoncides in the forests were measured. The forest bathing trip significantly increased NK activity and the numbers of NK, perforin, granulysin, and granzymes A/B-expressing cells and significantly decreased the percentage of T cells, and the concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline in urine. The increased NK activity lasted for more than 7 days after the trip. Phytoncides, such as alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were detected in forest air. These findings indicate that a forest bathing trip also increased NK activity, number of NK cells, and levels of intracellular anti-cancer proteins in female subjects, and that this effect lasted at least 7 days after the

  9. Essential oils from Schinus species of northwest Argentina: Composition and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Sampietro, Diego A; Belizana, Maria Melina E; Baptista, Zareath P Terán; Vattuone, Marta A; Catalán, Cesar A N

    2014-07-01

    The composition of the essential oils from leaves (Sal) and fruits of S. areira (Saf), and fruits of S. fasciculatus (Sff) and S. gracilipes (Sgf) were analyzed by GC/MS. The major compounds identified were sabinene (26.0 +/- 0.5%), bicyclogermacrene (14.5 +/- 0.4%), and E-citral (6.7+/- 0.2%) in Sal oil, limonene (27.7 +/- 0.7%), sabinene (16.0+/- 0.5%), beta-phellandrene (14.6 +/- 0.8%) and bicyclogermacrene (8.1 +/- 0.2%) in Saf oil, sabinene (22.7 +/- 0.6%), alpha-phellandrene (18.7 +/- 0.3%), beta-phellandrene (15.7 +/- 0.4%), and bicyclogermacrene (8.1 +/- 0.2%) in Sff oil and beta-pinene (25.4 +/- 0.8%), alpha-pinene (24.7 +/- 0.7%), and sabinene (13.6 +/- 0.4%) in Sgf oil.The antifungal activity of the four oils was evaluated on strains of Fusarium verticillioides and F. graminearum, and the results compared with the effect of epoxyconazole, pyraclostrobin and thyme oil. The Sff oil had the highest antifungal activity among the Schinus oils tested, with MIC100 (F. graminearum) = 6 per thousand and MIC100 (F. verticillioides) = 12 per thousand. A principal component analysis suggests that 9 constituents (alpha-thujene, alpha-terpinene, p-cymene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, 1-terpineol, alpha-calacorene, alpha-phellandrene, and terpinen-4-ol) explain the higher antifungal effect of Sff. The MIC100s of Schinus oils were on average 30-60 and 8.5-17 fold lower than those obtained for thyme oil on F. verticillioides and F. graminearum, respectively. In the case of commercial fungicides, their MIC100s were three orders of magnitude lower than those of Schinus oils. The last ones showed an additive interaction when assayed in mixtures with the commecial fungicides and thyme oil. The results suggest that the doses of fungicides required for control of the Fusarium species can be reduced when they are assayed in mixtures with the Schinus oils.

  10. Impact of elevated CO2 and O3 concentrations on biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Li, Dewen; Chen, Ying; Shi, Yi; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Xin

    2009-04-01

    In natural environment with ambient air, ginkgo trees emitted volatile organic compounds 0.18 microg g(-1) h(-1) in July, and 0.92 microg g(-1) h(-1) in September. Isoprene and limonene were the most abundant detected compounds. In September, alpha-pinene accounted for 22.5% of the total. Elevated CO(2) concentration in OTCs increased isoprene emission significantly in July (p<0.05) and September (p<0.05), while the total monoterpenes emission was enhanced in July and decreased in September by elevated CO(2). Exposed to elevated O(3) increased the isoprene and monoterpenes emissions in July and September, and the total volatile organic compounds emission rates were 0.48 microg g(-1) h(-1) (in July) and 2.24 microg g(-1) h(-1) (in September), respectively. The combination of elevated CO(2) and O(3) did not have any effect on biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions, except increases of isoprene and Delta3-carene in September.

  11. Leaf enclosure measurement for determining marijuana volatile organic compound emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ashworth, K.; Harley, P. C.; Ortega, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    In 2014, Colorado became the first US state to legalize the industrial-scale cultivation of marijuana plants. There are now more than 700 marijuana cultivation facilities (MCFs) in operation in the greater Denver area. High concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), predominantly monoterpenes (C10H16) such as alpha-pinene, myrcene, and limonene have been observed in the grow rooms of MCFs, suggesting MCFs have the potential to release a significant amount of reactive VOCs into the atmosphere. Further, many MCFs are located in the urban core, where other urban emission sources are concentrated, resulting in interactions which can lead to the formation of ozone, impacting air quality. The little research done on marijuana has focused on indoor air quality and occupational exposure, or identification of the compounds associated with the characteristic smells of marijuana plants. We know of no previous studies that have identified or quantified the monoterpene emission rates from marijuana. Here, we collected air samples from leaf enclosures from different marijuana clones at different growth stages onto sorbent cartridges. These samples were analyzed using GC-MS/-FID to identify and quantify the VOCs emitted by growing marijuana plants. These results were then used to estimate basal emission rates at standard conditions (T=30 C, PPFD = 1000 umol/m2/s) using standard algorithms. We discuss the potential impact on air quality from these VOCs emitted into the atmosphere using air quality models.

  12. Docking, characterization and investigation of β-cyclodextrin complexed with citronellal, a monoterpene present in the essential oil of Cymbopogon species, as an anti-hyperalgesic agent in chronic muscle pain model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Priscila L; Brito, Renan G; Oliveira, Marlange A; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Guimarães, Adriana G; Santos, Márcio R V; Menezes, Paula P; Serafini, Mairim R; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Araújo, Adriano A S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-08-15

    Citronellal (CT) is a monoterpene with antinociceptive acute effect. β-Cyclodextrin (βCD) has enhanced the analgesic effect of various substances. To evaluate the effect of CT both complexed in β-cyclodextrin (CT-βCD) and non-complexed, in a chronic muscle pain model (CMP) in mice. The complex containing CT in βCD was obtained and characterized in the laboratory. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of CT and CT-βCD was evaluated in a pre-clinical in vivo study in a murine CMP. The complex was characterized through differential scanning calorimetry, derivative thermogravimetry, moisture determination, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Male Swiss mice were pre-treated with CT (50mg/kg, po), CT-βCD (50mg/kg, po), vehicle (isotonic saline, po) or standard drug (tramadol4 mg/kg, ip). 60 min after the treatment and then each 1h, the mechanic hyperalgesia was evaluated to obtain the time effect. In addition, the muscle strength using grip strength meter and hyperalgesia were also performed daily, for 7 days. We assessed by immunofluorescence for Fos protein on brains and spinal cords of mice. The involvement of the CT with the glutamatergic system was studied with molecular docking. All characterization methods showed the CT-βCD complexation. CT-induced anti-hyperalgesic effect lasted until 6h (p <0.001) while CT-βCD lasted until 8h (p <0.001vs vehicle and p <0.001vs CT from the 6th h). CT-βCD reduced mechanical hyperalgesia on all days of treatment (p <0.05), without changing muscle strength. Periaqueductal gray (p <0.01) and rostroventromedular area (p <0.05) showed significant increase in the Fos protein expression while in the spinal cord, there was a reduction (p <0.001). CT showed favorable energy binding (-5.6 and -6.1) to GluR2-S1S2J protein based in the docking score function. We can suggest that βCD improved the anti-hyperalgesic effect of CT, and that effect seems to involve the descending pain-inhibitory mechanisms, with a possible

  13. Comparing the variation of needle and wood terpenoids in Scots pine provenances.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A M; Tarhanen, S; Vuorinen, M; Kainulaine, P

    2002-01-01

    We determined variation in both the concentration and composition of terpenoids in needles and wood within nine Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) provenances. Seedlings of different provenances representing a 1200-km N-S transect from Estonia to northern Finland were cultivated in Suonenjoki nursery field, central Finland, for seven years. Growth of seedlings and the number of vertical resin ducts in wood were also determined. alpha-Pinene and 3-carene were the major monoterpenes both in the needles and wood. The total monoterpene concentration was about five times higher in the needles than in the wood. A strong positive correlation was found between proportional quantities of several terpenes of the needles and wood, particularly for 3-carene, sabinene, and terpinolene. The needles contained both labdane-type and tricyclic resin acids, whereas the wood contained only tricyclic ones. The wood had a four times higher tricyclic resin acid concentration than the needles. The highest total monoterpene concentration in the needles and in the wood occurred in the most northern Muonio provenance and in the most southern Saaremaa provenance plants, respectively. The amount of high 3-carene genotype trees decreased among the northern provenances. The wood of the most northern Muonio provenance showed the lowest total resin acid concentration, but provenance did not affect total tricyclic resin acids in the needles. Korpilahti provenance trees from central Finland had the best growth in height. In addition, Korpilahti and Ruokolahti provenance trees showed largest radial growth of stem and smallest number of vertical resin ducts. The results suggest that especially the proportional quantity of 3-carene in the needles could be used in estimating the amount of this compound in the wood and vice versa.

  14. New synthetic routes toward enantiopure nitrogen donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sala, Xavier; Rodríguez, Anna M; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Parella, Teodor; von Zelewsky, Alexander; Llobet, Antoni; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi

    2006-12-08

    New polypyridylic chiral ligands, having either C3 or lower symmetry, have been prepared via a de novo construction of the pyridine nucleus by means of Kröhnke methodology in the key step. The chiral moieties of these ligands originate from the monoterpen chiral pool, namely (-)-alpha-pinene ((-)-14, (-)-15) and (-)-myrtenal ((-)-9, (-)-10). Extension of the above-mentioned asymmetric synthesis procedure to the preparation of enantiopure derivatives of some commonly used polypyridylic ligands has been achieved through a new aldehyde building block ((-)-16). As an example, the synthesis of a chiral derivative of N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) ligand, (-)-19, has been performed to illustrate the viability of the method. The coordinative ability of the ligands has been tested through the synthesis and characterization of complexes [Mn((-)-19)Br2], (-)-20, and [RuCl((-)-10)(bpy)](BF4), (-)-21. Some preliminary results related to the enantioselective catalytic epoxidation of styrene with the ruthenium complex are also presented.

  15. Quantitative variation and biosynthesis of hindgut volatiles associated with the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, at different attack phases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z-H; Sun, J-H

    2010-06-01

    The red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte, is a destructive invasive forest pest in China. For such tree-killing species, how to initiate a volatile-mediated mass attack is of great importance during the course of establishment. To understand the hindgut volatile production mechanism underlying mass attack initiated by RTB, coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C-labelled precursors were applied to explore the quantitative variation and biosynthesis of volatiles associated with RTB at different attack phases. Five previously described volatiles, trans-verbenol, myrtenol, cis-verbenol, myrtenal and verbenone, were identified and quantified from extracts of female and male hindguts, with the first two compounds as the major components and the latter three as minor constituents. In newly emerged females and males, only minute amounts of these compounds were detected. The quantity of volatiles from female adults significantly increased after they fed on bolts. Male adults also yielded larger quantities of volatiles after they joined females in galleries, which suggested that RTB males could accelerate the mass colonization on host trees. We also confirmed that RTB produced the five volatiles through oxidizing the major host monoterpene, alpha-pinene, but not synthesized de novo since products were labeled without 13C. The implication of this study in understanding the successful invasion of RTB is discussed.

  16. Traps and attractants for wood-boring insects in ponderosa pine stands in the Black Hills, South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Costello, Sheryl L; Negrón, José F; Jacobi, William R

    2008-04-01

    Recent large-scale wildfires have increased populations of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Because little is known about possible impacts of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills, land managers are interested in developing monitoring techniques such as flight trapping with semiochemical baits. Two trap designs and four semiochemical attractants were tested in a recently burned ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., forest in the Black Hills. Modified panel and funnel traps were tested in combination with the attractants, which included a woodborer standard (ethanol and alpha-pinene), standard plus 3-carene, standard plus ipsenol, and standard plus ipsdienol. We found that funnel traps were equally efficient or more efficient in capturing wood-boring insects than modified panel traps. Trap catches of cerambycids increased when we added the Ips spp. pheromone components (ipsenol or ipsdienol) or the host monoterpene (3-carene) to the woodborer standard. During the summers of 2003 and 2004, 18 cerambycid, 14 buprestid, and five siricid species were collected. One species of cerambycid, Monochamus clamator (LeConte), composed 49 and 40% of the 2003 and 2004 trap catches, respectively. Two other cerambycids, Acanthocinus obliquus (LeConte) and Acmaeops proteus (Kirby), also were frequently collected. Flight trap data indicated that some species were present throughout the summer, whereas others were caught only at the beginning or end of the summer.

  17. Repellent activity of essential oils: a review.

    PubMed

    Nerio, Luz Stella; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Stashenko, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the use of synthetic chemicals to control insects and arthropods raises several concerns related to environment and human health. An alternative is to use natural products that possess good efficacy and are environmentally friendly. Among those chemicals, essential oils from plants belonging to several species have been extensively tested to assess their repellent properties as a valuable natural resource. The essential oils whose repellent activities have been demonstrated, as well as the importance of the synergistic effects among their components are the main focus of this review. Essential oils are volatile mixtures of hydrocarbons with a diversity of functional groups, and their repellent activity has been linked to the presence of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. However, in some cases, these chemicals can work synergistically, improving their effectiveness. In addition, the use of other natural products in the mixture, such as vanillin, could increase the protection time, potentiating the repellent effect of some essential oils. Among the plant families with promising essential oils used as repellents, Cymbopogon spp., Ocimum spp. and Eucalyptus spp. are the most cited. Individual compounds present in these mixtures with high repellent activity include alpha-pinene, limonene, citronellol, citronellal, camphor and thymol. Finally, although from an economical point of view synthetic chemicals are still more frequently used as repellents than essential oils, these natural products have the potential to provide efficient, and safer repellents for humans and the environment.

  18. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-07

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  19. Studies of Physicochemical Processes in Atmospheric Particles and Acid Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Spyros N.

    condensable products. Aerosol carbon yield from the beta -pinene photooxidation is as high as 8% and depends strongly on the initial HC/NO_{x} ratio. Monoterpene photooxidation can be a significant source of secondary aerosol in rural environments and in urban areas with extended natural vegetation. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  20. Secretory cavities and volatiles of Myrrhinium atropurpureum Schott var. atropurpureum (Myrtaceae): an endemic species collected in the restingas of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Victório, Cristiane Pimentel; Moreira, Claudio B; Souza, Marcelo da Costa; Sato, Alice; Arruda, Rosani do Carmo de Oliveira

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the leaf anatomy and the composition of volatiles in Myrrhinium atropurpureum var. atropurpureum endemic to Rio de Janeiro restingas. Particularly, leaf secretory structures were described using light microscopy, and histochemical tests were performed from fresh leaves to localize the secondary metabolites. To observe secretory cavities, fixed leaf samples were free-hand sectioned. To evaluate lipophilic compounds and terpenoids the following reagents were employed: Sudans III and IV, Red oil O and Nile blue. Leaf volatiles were characterized by gas chromatography after hydrodistillation (HD) or simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE). Leaf analysis showed several cavities in mesophyll that are the main sites of lipophilic and terpenoid production. Monoterpenes, which represented more than 80% of the major volatiles, were characterized mainly by alpha- and beta-pinene and 1,8-cineole. In order to provide tools for M. atropurpureum identification, the following distinguishing characteristics were revealed by the following data: 1) adaxial face clear and densely punctuated by the presence of round or ellipsoidal secretory cavities randomly distributed in the mesophyll; 2) the presence of cells overlying the upper neck cells of secretory cavities; 3) the presence of numerous paracytic stomata distributed on the abaxial leaf surface, but absent in vein regions and leaf margin; and 4) non-glandular trichomes on both leaf surfaces. Our study of the compounds produced by the secretory cavities of M. atropurpureum led us to conclude that volatile terpenoid class are the main secretory compounds and that they consist of a high concentration of monoterpenes, which may indicate the phytotherapeutic importance of this plant.

  1. Biogenic VOC Emissions from Tropical Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Vanni Gatti, L.; Baker, B.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic VOC have an important role in determining the chemical composition of atmosphere. As a result, these compounds are important for visibility, biogeochemical cycling, climate and radiative forcing, and the health of the biosphere. Tropical landscapes are estimated to release about 80% of total global biogenic VOC emissions but have been investigated to lesser extent than temperate regions. Tropical VOC emissions are particularly important due to the strong vertical transport and the rapid landuse change that is occurring there. This presentation will provide an overview of field measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from tropical landscapes in Amazonia (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia, LBA) Central (EXPRESSO) and Southern (SAFARI 2000) Africa, Asia and Central America. Flux measurement methods include leaf-scale (enclosure measurements), canopy-scale (above canopy tower measurements), landscape-scale (tethered balloon), and regional-scale (aircraft measurements) observations. Typical midday isoprene emission rates for different landscapes vary by more than a factor of 20 with the lowest emissions observed from degraded forests. Emissions of alpha-pinene vary by a similar amount with the highest emissions associated with landscapes dominated by light dependent monoterpene emitting plants. Isoprene emissions tend to be higher for neotropical forests (Amazon and Costa Rica) in comparison to Africa and Asian tropical forests but considerable differences are observed within regions. Strong seasonal variations were observed in both the Congo and the Amazon rainforests with peak emissions during the dry seasons. Substantial emissions of light dependent monoterpenes, methanol and acetone are characteristic of at least some tropical landscapes.

  2. In vitro biological activity and essential oil composition of four indigenous South African Helichrysum species.

    PubMed

    Lourens, A C U; Reddy, D; Başer, K H C; Viljoen, A M; Van Vuuren, S F

    2004-12-01

    Helichrysum species are used widely to treat various medical conditions. In this study, the anti-microbial, anti-oxidant (DPPH assay) and anti-inflammatory activity (5-lipoxygenase assay) of Helichrysum dasyanthum, Helichrysum felinum, Helichrysum excisum and Helichrysum petiolare were investigated. The essential oil compositions of these species were determined. The acetone and methanol extracts as well as the essential oils exhibited activity against Gram-positive bacteria, while both the methanol and acetone extracts of all four species were active in the anti-oxidant assay. The essential oils, on the other hand, displayed activity in the 5-lipoxygenase assay, which was used as an indication of anti-inflammatory activity. Two extracts exhibited promising activity in the anti-microbial assay, the acetone extract of Helichrysum dasyanthum with a MIC value of 15.63 microg/ml and the methanol extract of Helichrysum excisum with a MIC value of 62.5 microg/ml. The acetone extract of Helichrysum dasyanthum was the most active free radical scavenger in the DPPH assay (IC(50) of 9.53 microg/ml) while values for the anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oils ranged between 25 and 32 microg/ml. The essential oil compositions of three species (Helichrysum dasyanthum, Helichrysum excisum and Helichrysum petiolare) were dominated by the presence of monoterpenes such as alpha-pinene, 1,8-cineole and p-cymene. In the oil of Helichrysum felinum, monoterpenes were largely absent. Its profile consisted of a variety of sesquiterpenes in low concentrations with beta-caryophyllene dominating.

  3. The predicted impact of VOCs from Marijuana cultivation operations on ozone concentrations in great Denver, CO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ashworth, K.

    2016-12-01

    Colorado is the first the marijuana legal states in the United States since 2014. As a result, thousands of legal Marijuana cultivation operations are at great Denver area now. Those Marijuana cultivation operations could be the potential to release a lot of biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpene(C10H16), alpha-pinene, and D-limonene. Those alkene species could rapidly increase the peroxy radicals and chemical reactions in the atmosphere, especially in the urban area which belong to VOC-limited ozone regime. These emissions will increase the ozone in Denver city, where is ozone non-attainment area. Some previous research explained the marijuana smoke and indoor air quality (Martyny, Serrano, Schaeffer, & Van Dyke, 2013) and the smell of marijuana chemical compounds(Rice & Koziel, 2015). However, there have been no studies discuss on identifying and assessing emission rate from marijuana and how those species impact on atmospheric chemistry and ozone concentration, and the marijuana emissions have been not considered in the national emission inventory, either. This research will use air quality model to identify the possibility of ozone impact by marijuana cultivation emission. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions, CAMx, are applied for this research to identify the impact of ozone concentration. This model is government regulatory model based on the Three-State Air Quality Modeling Study (3SAQS), which developed by UNC-Chapel Hill and ENVIRON in 2012. This model is used for evaluation and regulate the ozone impact in ozone non-attainment area, Denver city. The details of the 3SAQS model setup and protocol can be found in the 3SAQS report(UNC-IE, 2013). For the marijuana emission study scenarios, we assumed the monoterpene (C10H16) is the only emission species in air quality model and identify the ozone change in the model by the different quantity of emission rate from marijuana cultivation operations.

  4. Study of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds at the French Guiana Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corain Lopes, P.; Guenther, A. B.; Turnipseed, A.; Burban, B.; Bonal, D.; Serca, D.; Emmons, L. K.; Bustillos, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    deposited and the majority of them were released in the atmosphere. Isoprene was by far the biogenic volatile organic compound with the highest concentration and flux followed by alpha-pinene (Figure 2). The lowest concentration and flux rate for all the studied compounds was observed during the months of March and late July and beginning of August indicating a lower production of those BVOCs by vegetation during those periods. Previous limited studies in Amazonia and the Congo suggested a higher concentration and flux rate of isoprene and alpha pinene should be expected during the dry season with lower emissions during the wet season, which is in general agreement with what was observed at this tropical forest site in French Guiana. The only exception was observed in June which corresponds to a wet season period in which the concentration of isoprene and alpha-pinene increased more than it was expected for this time of the year. The observations will be compared to output from the global chemistry transport model CAM-chem, which includes the MEGAN biogenic emissions model.

  5. Tunisian Salvia officinalis L. and Schinus molle L. essential oils: their chemical compositions and their preservative effects against Salmonella inoculated in minced beef meat.

    PubMed

    Hayouni, El Akrem; Chraief, Imed; Abedrabba, Manaf; Bouix, Marielle; Leveau, Jean-Yves; Mohammed, Hammami; Hamdi, Moktar

    2008-07-31

    The essential oils (EOs) extracted from the aerial parts of cultivated Salvia officinalis L. and the berries of Schinus molle L. were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 68 and 67 constituents were identified, respectively. The major constituents were 1,8-cineole (33.27%), beta-thujone (18.40%), alpha-thujone (13.45%), borneol (7.39%) in S. officinalis oil and alpha-phellandrene (35.86%), beta-phellandrene (29.3%), beta-pinene (15.68%), p-cymene (5.43%) and alpha-pinene (5.22%) in S. molle oil. In its second part, the present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of both studied EOs. For this purpose, paper disc-diffusion method and broth microdilution test were used. The disc-diffusion method showed significant zone of lysis against all the pathogens studied (gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, yeast). These activities remained stable after six months, and decreased approximately by 20% after one year of storage of the EOs at 4 to 7 degrees C. On comparing the efficiency of both EOs, S. officinalis EO exhibited higher antibacterial activity against the majority of strains and especially against Candida albicans (two fold more active according to the inhibition zones values). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were reported between 4.5 mg/ml and 72 mg/ml on nutrient broth. The particular chemotype of each EO may be involved in its specific antimicrobial behaviour. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of these EOs were evaluated against two foodborne pathogens belonging to Salmonella genus, experimentally inoculated (10(3) CFU/g) in minced beef meat, which was mixed with different concentrations of the EO and stored at 4 to 7 degrees C for 15 days. Although the antibacterial activities of both EOs in minced beef meat were clearly evident, their addition had notable effects on the flavour and taste of the meat at concentrations more than 2% for S. molle and 1.5% for S. officinalis. One solution to

  6. [Analysis of the chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave].

    PubMed

    Shong, E; Lui, R

    1997-10-01

    The chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave were analyzed by GC-MS-DS. 27 constituents were identified, alpha-pinene (70.65%) and caryophyllene (10.38%) of them are main components.

  7. Insecticidal properties of essential plant oils against the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Abdallah F; Taoubi, K; el-Haj, Samih; Bessiere, J M; Rammal, Salma

    2002-05-01

    The insecticidal activities of essential oil extracts from leaves and flowers of aromatic plants against fourth-instar larvae of the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus Forskal were determined. Extracts of Myrtus communis L were found to be the most toxic, followed by those of Origanum syriacum L, Mentha microcorphylla Koch, Pistacia lentiscus L and Lavandula stoechas L with LC50 values of 16, 36, 39, 70 and 89 mg litre-1, respectively. Over 20 major components were identified in extracts from each plant species. Eight pure components (1,8-cineole, menthone, linalool, terpineol, carvacrol, thymol, (1S)-(-)-alpha-pinene and (1R)-(+)-alpha-pinene) were tested against the larvae. Thymol, carvacrol, (1R)-(+)-alpha-pinene and (1S)-(-)-alpha-pinene were the most toxic (LC50 = 36-49 mg litre-1), while menthone, 1,8-cineole, linalool and terpineol (LC50 = 156-194 mg litre-1) were less toxic.

  8. ESTIMATES OF ISOPRENE AND MONOTERPENE EMISSION RATES IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A range of plant species, including crops, shrubs, herbs, and trees, was surveyed to determine the magnitude of isoprene emissions. In studies to determine if plants emitted isoprene, greenhouse-grown plants were encapsulated in impermeable plastic bags and kept in a growth chamb...

  9. Functional characterization of nine Norway Spruce TPS genes and evolution of gymnosperm terpene synthases of the TPS-d subfamily.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diane M; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (-)-limonene synthase, (-)-alpha/beta-pinene synthase, and (-)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-alpha-farnesene synthase, and E-alpha-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed.

  10. Isolation of cDNAs and functional characterisation of two multi-product terpene synthase enzymes from sandalwood, Santalum album L.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher G; Keeling, Christopher I; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Barbour, Elizabeth L; Plummer, Julie A; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2008-09-01

    Sandalwood, Santalum album (Santalaceae) is a small hemi-parasitic tropical tree of great economic value. Sandalwood timber contains resins and essential oils, particularly the santalols, santalenes and dozens of other minor sesquiterpenoids. These sesquiterpenoids provide the unique sandalwood fragrance. The research described in this paper set out to identify genes involved in essential oil biosynthesis, particularly terpene synthases (TPS) in S. album, with the long-term aim of better understanding heartwood oil production. Degenerate TPS primers amplified two genomic TPS fragments from S. album, one of which enabled the isolation of two TPS cDNAs, SamonoTPS1 (1731bp) and SasesquiTPS1 (1680bp). Both translated protein sequences shared highest similarity with known TPS from grapevine (Vitis vinifera). Heterologous expression in Escherichia coli produced catalytically active proteins. SamonoTPS1 was identified as a monoterpene synthase which produced a mixture of (+)-alpha-terpineol and (-)-limonene, along with small quantities of linalool, myrcene, (-)-alpha-pinene, (+)-sabinene and geraniol when assayed with geranyl diphosphate. Sesquiterpene synthase SasesquiTPS1 produced the monocyclic sesquiterpene alcohol germacrene D-4-ol and helminthogermacrene, when incubated with farnesyl diphosphate. Also present were alpha-bulnesene, gamma-muurolene, alpha- and beta-selinenes, as well as several other minor bicyclic compounds. Although these sesquiterpenes are present in only minute quantities in the distilled sandalwood oil, the genes and their encoded enzymes described here represent the first TPS isolated and characterised from a member of the Santalaceae plant family and they may enable the future discovery of additional TPS genes in sandalwood.

  11. Southern pine beetle: Olfactory receptor and behavior discrimination of enantiomers of the attractant pheromone frontalin

    SciT

    Payne, T.L.; Berisford, C.W.; Blum, M.S.

    1982-05-01

    In a laboratory and field bioassays, the response of Dendroctonus frontalis was significantly greater to the mixture of (1S,55R)-(-)-frontalin and alpha-pinene than to (1R,5S)-(+)-frontalin and alpha-pinene. Electrophysiologrical studies revealed that antennal olfactory receptor cells were significantly more responsive to (1S,5R)-(-)-frontalin than to 1R,5S)-(+) -frontalin. Both enanitiomers stimulated the same olfactory cells which suggests that each cell possesses at least two types of enanitomer-specific acceptors.

  12. The Five Senses of Christmas Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Derek A.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the organic chemistry of five compounds that are directly associated with the Christmas season. These substances and related materials are presented within the framework of the five senses: silver fulminate (sound), alpha-pinene (sight), sodium acetate (touch), tryptophan (taste), and gingerol (smell). Connections with the…

  13. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF LIQUID AEROSOLS CONTAINING DISSOLVED ORGANICS AND ELECTROLYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many tropospheric aerosols contain large fractions of soluble organic material, believed to derive from the oxidation of precursors such alpha-pinene. The chemical composition of aerosol organic matter is complex and not yet fully understood.

    The key properties of solu...

  14. Molecular transformations accompanying the aging of laboratory secondary organic aerosol

    The aging of fresh secondary organic aerosol, generated by alpha-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor, was studied by passing it through a second reaction chamber where hydroxyl radicals were generated. Two types of experiments were performed: plug injection experiments where the particle mass a...

  15. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  16. Measurement of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in serum, plasma, and rumen fluid from sheep

    Studies involving the consumption, metabolism, and elimination of terpenes by small ruminants consuming terpene-laden shrubs as well as those exploring the potential for natural products as rumen modifiers could benefit from a procedure that measures terpenes in both blood and rumen fluid and that i...

  17. Monoterpenes with antibacterial activities from a Cameroonian medicinal plant Canthium Multiflorum (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Kouam, Simeon Fogue; Ngouonpe, Alain Wembe; Bullach, Anke; Lamshöft, Marc; Kuigoua, Guy Merlin; Spiteller, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Investigation of the crude extract obtained from the aerial parts of Canthium multiflorum led to the isolation of a new iridoid (1) together with twelve known compounds. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by interpretation of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data, accurate mass measurements and comparison with analytical data of previously known analogues. Most of the isolated compounds have been reported for the first time from C. multiflorium. The antimicrobial activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated on five different bacterial strains using agar diffusion technique. The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus (DSM 799), and the Gram-negative bacteria Actinobacter calco-aceticus (DSM 30006), Serratia plymuthica (DSM 4540), Pseudomonas stutzeri (DSM 4166) and Escherichia coli (DSM 1116) were employed for this purpose. The new iridoid, named 6-oxo-genipin (1), demonstrated significant inhibitory activity against all microbial strains tested, especially the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the compounds 3, 4 and 9 exhibited antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum strain K1 and weak cytotoxicity against L6 cell lines. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Configurational assignments of conformationally restricted bis-monoterpene hydroquinones: utility in exploration of endangered plants.

    PubMed

    Oh, Joonseok; Bowling, John J; Zou, Yike; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Doerksen, Robert J; Ferreira, Daneel; Leininger, Theodor D; Hamann, Mark T

    2013-08-01

    Endangered plant species are an important resource for new chemistry. Lindera melissifolia is native to the Southeastern U.S. and scarcely populates the edges of lakes and ponds. Quantum mechanics (QM) used in combination with NMR/ECD is a powerful tool for the assignment of absolute configuration in lieu of X-ray crystallography. The EtOAc extract of L. melissifolia was subject to chromatographic analysis by VLC and HPLC. Spin-spin coupling constant (SSCC) were calculated using DFT at the MPW1PW91/6-31G(d,p) level for all staggered rotamers. ECD calculations employed Amber* force fields followed by PM6 semi-empirical optimizations. Hetero- and homo-nuclear coupling constants were extracted from 1D (1)H, E.COSY and HETLOC experiments. Two meroterpenoids, melissifolianes A (1) and B (2) were purified and their 2-D structures elucidated using NMR and HRESIMS. The relative configuration of 1 was established using the combination of NOE-based distance restraints and the comparisons of experimental and calculated SSCCs. The comparison of calculated and experimental ECD assigned the absolute configuration of 1. The relative configuration of a racemic mixture, melissifoliane B (2) was established utilizing J-based analysis combined with QM and NMR techniques.Conclusion Our study of the Lindera melissifolia metabolome exemplifies how new chemistry remains undiscovered among the numerous endangered plant species and demonstrates how analysis by ECD and NMR combined with various QM calculations is a sensible approach to support the stereochemical assignment of molecules with conformationally restricted conformations. QM-NMR/ECD combined approaches are of utility for unambiguous assignment of 3-D structures, especially with limited plant material and when a molecule is conformationally restricted. Conservation of an endangered plant species can be supported through identification of its new chemistry and utilization of that chemistry for commercial purposes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Metabolic engineering of plant monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and diterpenes--current status and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Lange, B Markus; Ahkami, Amirhossein

    2013-02-01

    Terpenoids (a.k.a. isoprenoids) represent the most diverse class of natural products found in plants, with tens of thousands of reported structures. Plant-derived terpenoids have a multitude of pharmaceutical and industrial applications, but the natural resources for their extraction are often limited and, in many cases, synthetic routes are not commercially viable. Some of the most valuable terpenoids are not accumulated in model plants or crops, and genetic resources for breeding of terpenoid natural product traits are thus poorly developed. At present, metabolic engineering, either in the native producer or a heterologous host, is the only realistic alternative to improve yield and accessibility. In this review article, we will evaluate the state of the art of modulating the biosynthetic pathways for the production of mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes in plants. © 2012 The Authors Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Hypotensive and vasorelaxant effects of citronellol, a monoterpene alcohol, in rats.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Joana F A; Moreira, Italo J A; Ribeiro, Thaís P; Medeiros, Isac A; Antoniolli, Angelo R; De Sousa, Damião P; Santos, Márcio R V

    2010-04-01

    Citronellol is an essential oil constituent from the medicinal plants Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon winterianus and Lippia alba which are thought to possess antihypertensive properties. Citronellol-induced cardiovascular effects were evaluated in this study. In rats, citronellol (1-20 mg/kg, i.v.) induced hypotension, which was not affected by pre-treatment with atropine, hexamethonium, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or indomethacin, and tachycardia, which was only attenuated by pre-treatment with atropine and hexamethonium. These responses were less than those obtained for nifedipine, a reference drug. In intact rings of rat mesenteric artery pre-contracted with 10 microM phenylephrine, citronellol induced relaxations (pD(2) = 0.71 +/- 0.11; E(max) = 102 +/- 5%; n = 6) that were not affected by endothelium removal, after tetraethylamonium in rings without endothelium pre-contracted with KCl 80 mM. Citronellol strongly antagonized (maximal inhibition = 97 +/- 4%; n = 6) the contractions induced by CaCl(2) (10(-6) to 3 x 10(-3 )M) and did not induce additional effects on the maximal response of nifedipine (10 microM). Finally, citronellol inhibited the contractions induced by 10 microM phenylephrine or 20 mM caffeine. The present results suggest that citronellol lowers blood pressure by a direct effect on the vascular smooth muscle leading to vasodilation.

  1. Monoterpene SOA - Contribution of first-generation oxidation products to formation and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzel, Anke; Rodigast, Maria; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of the consecutive reactions of first-generation terpene oxidation products provides insight into the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). To this end, OH radical reactions with α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were examined along with the OH-oxidation of nopinone as a β-pinene oxidation product and pinonaldehyde and myrtenal as α-pinene oxidation products. The SOA yield of β-pinene (0.50) was much higher than that of α-pinene (0.35) and the limonene/OH system (0.30). This is opposite to the ozonolysis SOA yields described in the literat