Science.gov

Sample records for mooring turnaround cruise

  1. 75 FR 82243 - Security Zones; Moored Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Moored Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego... a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is moored at any berth within the San Diego port area inside the sea buoys bounding the Port of San Diego. This temporary final rule is necessary to...

  2. Subduction experiment. Cruise report, R/V oceanus, cruise number 250 legs 1 and 2. Subduction 2 mooring deployment and recovery cruise, 25 January-26 February 1992. Technical report, 25 January-26 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, R.P.; Brink, N.J.; Regier, L.; McPhee, N.

    1993-03-01

    Subduction is the mechanism by which water masses formed in the mixed layer and near the surface of the ocean find their way into the upper thermocline. The subduction process and its underlying mechanisms were studied through a combination of Eulerian and Langrangian measurements of velocity, measurements of tracer distributions and hydrographic properties and modeling. An array of five surface moorings carrying meteorological and oceanographic instrumentation were deployed for a period of two years beginning in June 1991 as part of an Office of Naval Research (ONR) funded Subduction experiment. Three eight month deployments were planned. The initial deployment of five surface moorings took place during the third leg of R/V Oceanus cruise number 240. The moorings were deployed at 18 deg N 34 deg W, 18 deg N 22 deg W, 25.5 deg N 29 deg W, 33 deg N 22 deg W and 33 deg N 34 deg W. A Vector Averaging Wind Recorder (VAWR) and an Improved Meteorological Recorder (IMET) collected wind speed and wind direction, sea surface temperature, air temperature, short wave radiation, barometric pressure and relative humidity. The IMET also measured precipitation. The moorings were heavily instrumented below the surface with Vector Measuring Current Meters (VMCM) and single point temperature recorders. Expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data were collected and meteorological observations were made while transitting between mooring locations. This report describes the work that took place during R/V Oceanus cruise 250 which was the second scheduled Subduction mooring cruise. During this cruise the first setting of the moorings were recovered and redeployed for a second eight month period.

  3. The Turnaround Fallacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andy

    2010-01-01

    For as long as there have been struggling schools in America's cities, there have been efforts to turn them around. But overall, school turnaround efforts have consistently fallen far short of hopes and expectations. Quite simply, turnarounds are not a scalable strategy for fixing America's troubled urban school systems. Fortunately, findings from…

  4. Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

  5. Human Capital in Turnaround Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    Finding, keeping and supporting great educators presents the single biggest challenge to successful school turnarounds. Without teachers and administrators who bring the needed combination of skills and passion, nothing else will achieve the desired effect. The turnaround model supported by the U.S. Department of Education School Improvement Grant…

  6. Making Sense of School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, in a sector flooded with $3.5 billion in School Improvement Grant funds and the resulting improvement plans, there's great faith that "turnaround" strategies are a promising way to tackle stubborn problems with persistently low-performing schools. Unlike traditional reform efforts, with their emphasis on incremental improvement, turnarounds…

  7. OTEC mooring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, D.R.; Wendt, R.L.; Johnson, B.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes existing technology for mooring components which may be suitable for OTEC use. Due to the platform size, depth of water, and length of design life required for an operational OTEC plant, only large and high capacity mooring components were investigated. The report contains engineering, test, and manufacturer's data on wire rope, synthetic rope (nylon, polyester and Kevlar), anchors, deck fittings and machinery, and design concepts for tension leg platform mooring systems. A significant portion of the effort was directed to the assessment of synthetic rope technology and its application to moorings.

  8. Turnaround Schools and the Leadership They Require

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Strauss, Tiiu

    2008-01-01

    "Turnaround Schools and the Leadership They Require" was commissioned by the Canadian Education Association (CEA) in 2006. The research, conducted by Kenneth Leithwood and Tiiu Strauss, was a two-year study of Ontario schools identified as in need of "turnaround" meaning that a significant improvement in school achievement was required. The study…

  9. Ode to Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2011-01-01

    Best known for his monumental abstract sculptures of reclining figures, Henry Moore's forms are generally pierced or have a hollow space within them. Some say that these "organic undulating forms" are reminiscent of the landscape of his home in Yorkshire, England. Moore was a giant in the world of sculpture and his large cast bronzes and marble…

  10. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  11. 33 CFR 105.290 - Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals. 105.290 Section 105.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional requirements—cruise ship terminals. At all MARSEC Levels, in coordination with a vessel moored...

  12. 33 CFR 105.290 - Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals. 105.290 Section 105.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional requirements—cruise ship terminals. At all MARSEC Levels, in coordination with a vessel moored...

  13. 33 CFR 105.290 - Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals. 105.290 Section 105.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional requirements—cruise ship terminals. At all MARSEC Levels, in coordination with a vessel moored...

  14. 33 CFR 105.290 - Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals. 105.290 Section 105.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional requirements—cruise ship terminals. At all MARSEC Levels, in coordination with a vessel moored...

  15. 33 CFR 105.290 - Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional requirements-cruise ship terminals. 105.290 Section 105.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional requirements—cruise ship terminals. At all MARSEC Levels, in coordination with a vessel moored...

  16. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  17. Emergency Department Overcrowding and Ambulance Turnaround Time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Eui Jung; Cho, Jin Seong; Cha, Won Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe overcrowding in regional emergency departments in Seoul, Korea and evaluate the effect of crowdedness on ambulance turnaround time. Methods This study was conducted between January 2010 and December 2010. Patients who were transported by 119-responding ambulances to 28 emergency centers within Seoul were eligible for enrollment. Overcrowding was defined as the average occupancy rate, which was equal to the average number of patients staying in an emergency department (ED) for 4 hours divided by the number of beds in the ED. After selecting groups for final analysis, multi-level regression modeling (MLM) was performed with random-effects for EDs, to evaluate associations between occupancy rate and turnaround time. Results Between January 2010 and December 2010, 163,659 patients transported to 28 EDs were enrolled. The median occupancy rate was 0.42 (range: 0.10-1.94; interquartile range (IQR): 0.20-0.76). Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have older patients, those with normal mentality, and non-trauma patients. Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have longer turnaround intervals and traveling distances. The MLM analysis showed that an increase of 1% in occupancy rate was associated with 0.02-minute decrease in turnaround interval (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.03). In subgroup analyses limited to EDs with occupancy rates over 100%, we also observed a 0.03 minute decrease in turnaround interval per 1% increase in occupancy rate (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we found wide variation in emergency department crowding in a metropolitan Korean city. Our data indicate that ED overcrowding is negatively associated with turnaround interval with very small practical significance. PMID:26115183

  18. Assessing School Turnaround: Evidence from Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Player, Daniel; Katz, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers have struggled to find successful approaches to address concentrated, persistent low school achievement. While NCLB and the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program have devoted significant time and attention to turnaround, very little empirical evidence substantiates whether and how these efforts work. This study employs a comparative…

  19. School Turnaround: Cristo Rey Boston High School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielman, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The mandates of the federal No Child Left Behind Law, including the threat of closing a school for underperformance, have led to multiple public school turnaround attempts. Because turnaround is a relatively new area of focus in education, there is limited research on what does and does not work, and even the definition of turnaround is a work in…

  20. Turnaround Time Modeling for Conceptual Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, Michael; Staton, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have brought about a paradigm shift within NASA and the Space Launch Community regarding the performance of conceptual design. Reliability, maintainability, supportability, and operability are no longer effects of design; they have moved to the forefront and are affecting design. A primary focus of this shift has been a planned decrease in vehicle turnaround time. Potentials for instituting this decrease include attacking the issues of removing, refurbishing, and replacing the engines after each flight. less, it is important to understand the operational affects of an engine on turnaround time, ground support personnel and equipment. One tool for visualizing this relationship involves the creation of a Discrete Event Simulation (DES). A DES model can be used to run a series of trade studies to determine if the engine is meeting its requirements, and, if not, what can be altered to bring it into compliance. Using DES, it is possible to look at the ways in which labor requirements, parallel maintenance versus serial maintenance, and maintenance scheduling affect the overall turnaround time. A detailed DES model of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) has been developed. Trades may be performed using the SSME Processing Model to see where maintenance bottlenecks occur, what the benefits (if any) are of increasing the numbers of personnel, or the number and location of facilities, in addition to trades previously mentioned, all with the goal of optimizing the operational turnaround time and minimizing operational cost. The SSME Processing Model was developed in such a way that it can easily be used as a foundation for developing DES models of other operational or developmental reusable engines. Performing a DES on a developmental engine during the conceptual phase makes it easier to affect the design and make changes to bring about a decrease in turnaround time and costs.

  1. Charlotte Moore Sitterly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    2010-07-01

    Charlotte Moore Sitterly was a scientist in an era when it was rare for a woman to have the opportunity to devote her life to forefront science. Following her graduation from Swarthmore College in 1920, she accepted a position at Princeton University as an assistant to Henry Norris Russell. In 1925 she started a study of the solar spectrum. She could then not know that she would devote much of her scientific career to gathering basic atomic data that are invaluable to the scientific community, even today. In 1931 she obtained a Ph.D. degree at the University of California, Berkeley, and returned to Princeton as a staff member of the Princeton University Observatory. In 1945 Moore moved to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), to supervise preparation of the widely-used tables of atomic energy levels. Following the successful launching (1946) of a V2 rocket to obtain the ultraviolet spectrum of the Sun, she started working also with Richard Tousey and his group at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Ultimately, they extended the solar spectrum down to 2200 angstroms. She continued her affiliations with both the NBS and the NRL until her death in 1990. Charlotte Moore was a rare scientist who devoted her career to obtaining accurate numbers, thus enabling the scientific community to open her tables and know that the data are reliable.

  2. Dynamic analysis of moored tankers

    SciTech Connect

    Dercksen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A loaded 200 kDWT tanker moored, in shallow water, by means of a single bow anchor chain is subjected to wind and waves. Wind loads on the tanker were measured in a stiff mooring arrangement. The measured wind loads together with the calibrated wave train were used as input to a numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of the anchored tanker. A good correlation with the measured tanker motions and mooring loads was found. The model can be used in the design of mooring systems and anchoring equipment for arbitrary water depths. Important features which are accounted for include bottom friction, low and high frequency tanker motions and chain dynamics.

  3. SEEP II, Shelf Edge Exchange Processes-II: Chlorophyll a fluorescence, temperature, and beam attenuation measurements from moored fluorometers

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, W.H.; Wirick, C.D.

    1992-02-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. The first SEEP experiment (SEEP I) was across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 and consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array. The second experiment (SEEP II) focused specifically of the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic Bight off the Delmarva peninsula. This report presents data collected during SEEP II. The SEEP II experiment consisted of a series of ten cruises and mooring arrays as well as over-flights by NASA aircraft. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Hydrographic data were collected on all cruises except SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07 during which benthic processes were investigated. Mooring arrays were deployed during three cruises in the Spring, Summer and Winter of 1988. Brookhaven National Laboratory deployed sixteen fluorometer instrument packages on their moorings with sensors to measure: the in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton, temperature, subsurface light, dissolved oxygen, and water transparency. Data from the fluorometer, temperature, and transmissometer sensors are reported herein.

  4. New mooring chain designs

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, L.; Vicinay, J.; Sanz, A.; Lopez, E.

    1996-12-31

    The present work introduces the readers to the developments the high technology offshore chain industry has carried out in recent years, in an effort to offer products that meet the needs of petroleum exploration and production. In this manner the industry can continue to regard chain as a fundamental element in its moorings system, whether for projects with a 25 year life, or projects at depths of over 1,000 meters, or in such severe environments as those faced in the Sub-Arctic. Data are presented on Studless Chain and VGW or Variable Geometry and Weight chain. These will allow engineers designers to forget the needs for chains to be circumscribed to rigid guidelines of geometry or dimensions. Instead they can design mooring systems specific for the particular situations they face. No longer shall chain have to meet geometric standardization derived from the middle of the 19th century while meeting the requirements of the 2nd half of the 20th century.

  5. Manned Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV). Volume 5: Turnaround analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyland, R. E.; Sherman, S. W.; Morfin, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a low-cost reliable turnaround process to employ the MOTV in enhancing the utilization of the geosynchronous space region is analyzed. It is indicated that a routine effective turnaround/maintenance plan must make maximum use of flight data for maintenance planning, a high degree of test automation, and MOTV maintainability features in order to minimize tests, facilitate repair, and reduce manpower requirements. An effective turnaround plan provides a payback of reduced risks.

  6. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  7. School Turnaround Teachers: Selection Toolkit. Part of the School Turnaround Collection from Public Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Impact, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit includes these separate sections: (1) Selection Preparation Guide; (2) Day-of-Interview Tools; (3) Candidate Rating Tools; and (4) Candidate Comparison and Decision Tools. Each of the sections is designed to be used at different stages of the selection process. The first section provides turnaround teacher competencies that are the…

  8. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  9. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships. PMID:26350312

  10. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships.

  11. The State Role in School Turnaround: Emerging Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhim, Lauren Morando, Ed.; Redding, Sam, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This publication explores the role of the state education agency (SEA) in school turnaround efforts. An emphasis is placed on practical application of research and best practices related to the SEA's critical leadership role in driving and supporting successful school turnaround efforts. The publication is organized around the four goals of…

  12. Using Competencies to Improve School Turnaround Principal Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Lucy; Hassel, Emily Ayscue

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims first to shed light on one element of leadership: the characteristics--or "competencies"--of turnaround leaders who succeed in driving rapid, dramatic change. Second, it recounts the elements of support that districts must provide these leaders to enable and sustain a portfolio of successful school turnarounds. Fortunately, decades…

  13. "Turnaround" as Shock Therapy: Race, Neoliberalism, and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amanda Walker

    2013-01-01

    "Turnaround" strategies of educational reform promise that school closure, reconstitution, privatizing, and reopening them will bring miraculous results. Questioning the implications, this article situates "turnaround" strategies locally, following the closure of a predominantly minority high school in 2008, in Austin, Texas. The neoliberal…

  14. The Effect of Locus of Control on School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walston, Bradford

    2012-01-01

    This research focused on the school turnaround process in six turnaround elementary schools located in urban and rural areas of the state of North Carolina. The purpose of the study was to learn about the challenges facing the six schools, the process of improving student achievement, and, more specifically, the degree to which adaptive leadership…

  15. Turnaround as Reform: Opportunity for Meaningful Change or Neoliberal Posturing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mette, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the neoliberal agenda of turnaround school reform efforts in America by examining the application and transformation of a Midwest State Turnaround Schools Project for the public school system. Perceptions of administrators and state-level policy actors are considered. Data were collected from 13 participants during the…

  16. Windows of National Opportunity: An Excerpt from the Center on School Turnaround's Report on State Supports for Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin; Lasley, Nora

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, state and national leaders found many aspects of turning around America's low-performing schools even more daunting than in the previous year. These views were revealed in the Center on School Turnaround's (CST's) 2014 February/March survey of school turnaround leaders in State Education Agencies (SEA) and directors of the nation's…

  17. The US Cruise Ship Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Willis H.

    1985-01-01

    The cruise ship industry relates directly to many features of the natural and cultural environments. The U.S. cruise ship industry is analyzed. Discusses the size of the industry, precruise passenger liners, current cruise ships, cruise regions and routes, ports of call, major ports, passengers, and future prospects. (RM)

  18. Supersonic Cruise Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, F. Edward

    1985-01-01

    The history and status of supersonic cruise research is covered. The early research efforts of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and efforts during the B-70 and SST phase are included. Technological progress made during the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research and Variable Cycle Engine programs are presented. While emphasis is on NASA's contributions to supersonic cruise research in the U.S., also noted are developments in England, France, and Russia. Written in nontechnical language, this book presents the most critical technology issues and research findings.

  19. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Yan

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. They are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JGOFS cruise designated TN039. Table 1 lists start and end dates of each cruise with its mission. All but the first cruise have been or will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Each cruise is scheduled for a duration of between two weeks and one month. Seven of the cruises, referred to as process cruises, follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipments and towing of a SeaSoar. ADCP data are collected using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises, named the AutoADCP system. The system is an extension of RD instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with {open_quotes}user-exit{close_quotes} programs. It makes it possible to collect ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and insures constant data coverage and uniform data quality.

  20. Participation in the 1996 Arlindo Cruise to the Indonesian Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, John

    1997-01-01

    The objective of Arlindo-Productivity is to understand the factors responsible for regional differences in the response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to the SE and NW Monsoons in Indonesia. The hypothesis is that an interplay between circulation and shoaling of the nutricline, as a response to the monsoons, regulates productivity in the Indonesian Seas. My o@jective for the cruise in 1996 was to continue our collaboration with Indonesian scientists by conducting a set of hydrographic, primary production and spectral irradiance observations in the Indonesian Seas. This grant paid for shipping, travel and incidental costs associated with participation in the cruise in December, 1996. Ship costs were borne by the Indonesian Institute of Sciences as part of the collaborative effort. A plan for Arlindo in 1996 was agreed upon in March, 1996, by Indonesian scientists together with Arnold Gordon. The plan called for a 20-day physical oceanography and mooring cruise in November, 1996, followed by a 5-day bio-optical cruise. The bio-optical cruise departed from, and returned to, Ambon, and sampled in the Banda Sea. We completed a series of chlorophyll analyses, both a sampling of surface variability and depth profiles in the Banda Sea. We also completed three MER profiles for depth profiles of spectral irradiance. These data have a useful by-product in that they can be used for vicarious calibration of the OCTS sensor aboard the ADEOS satellite. As such, the data has been transmitted to NASDA in Japan for their use.

  1. Moored offshore structures - evaluation of forces in elastic mooring lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crudu, L.; Obreja, D. C.; Marcu, O.

    2016-08-01

    In most situations, the high frequency motions of the floating structure induce important effects in the mooring lines which affect also the motions of the structure. The experience accumulated during systematic experimental tests and calculations, carried out for different moored floating structures, showed a complex influence of various parameters on the dynamic effects. Therefore, it was considered that a systematic investigation is necessary. Due to the complexity of hydrodynamics aspects of offshore structures behaviour, experimental tests are practically compulsory in order to be able to properly evaluate and then to validate their behaviour in real sea. Moreover the necessity to carry out hydrodynamic tests is often required by customers, classification societies and other regulatory bodies. Consequently, the correct simulation of physical properties of the complex scaled models becomes a very important issue. The paper is investigating such kind of problems identifying the possible simplification, generating different approaches. One of the bases of the evaluation has been found consideringtheresults of systematic experimental tests on the dynamic behaviour of a mooring chain reproduced at five different scales. Dynamic effects as well as the influences of the elasticity simulation for 5 different scales are evaluated together. The paper presents systematic diagrams and practical results for a typical moored floating structure operating as pipe layer based on motion evaluations and accelerations in waves.

  2. Selection of Ka-Band Transponder Turnaround Frequency Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koukos, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems has issued recommendations specifying Transponder Turn-around Frequency Ratios for S-band and X-band coherent earth-to-space and space-to earth links.

  3. Turnaround operations analysis for OTV. Volume 2: Detailed technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The objectives and accomplishments were to adapt and apply the newly created database of Shuttle/Centaur ground operations. Previously defined turnaround operations analyses were to be updated for ground-based OTVs (GBOTVs) and space-based OTVs (SBOTVs), design requirements identified for both OTV and Space Station accommodations hardware, turnaround operations costs estimated, and a technology development plan generated to develop the required capabilities. Technical and programmatic data were provided for NASA pertinent to OTV round and space operations requirements, turnaround operations, task descriptions, timelines and manpower requirements, OTV modular design and booster and Space Station interface requirements. SBOTV accommodations development schedule, cost and turnaround operations requirements, and a technology development plan for ground and space operations and space-based accommodations facilities and support equipment. Significant conclusion are discussed.

  4. 34. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR AND TURNAROUND TRACK FOR COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR AND TURN-AROUND TRACK FOR COAL CARS (NOTE: COAL CAR No. 6 IN FAR BACK GROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  5. Acoustic doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. The first of these cruises, a transit of the R/V THOMPSON into the northern Arabian Sea area from Singapore, was a calibration and training cruise that took place between September 18 and October 7, 1994. (The cruises on the THOMPSON are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JOGFS cruise designated TN039.) The remaining cruises have been and will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Seven of these cruises, referred to as process cruises, will follow a set cruise track, making hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The remainder of the cruises while not restricted to the set cruise track, will generally stay within the region defined by the track during the deployment and retrieval of moored equipment and the towing of a SeaSoar. Each cruise will last between two weeks and one month. ADCP data will be collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. The AutoADCP system is an extension of RD Instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with ``user exit`` programs. This data report presents ADCP results from the first four JGOFS cruises, TN039 through TN042, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods.

  6. Unocal restarts Parachute Creek plant after turnaround

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    In late November, Unocal Corporation restarted its Parachute Creek shale oil project after a two-month turnaround, or overhaul operation. The plant is again operating at about 50% of its 10,000 barrel/day design capacity. This is the maximum rate which has been achieved for long periods of time. Unocal has been continuing to explore the possibility of adding a fluidized bed combustor to the retorting system. A decision on whether to proceed with building the FBC is expected to be made by July, 1987. The Colorado Mined Land Reclamation Board has allowed Unocal to make changes at Parachute Creek to better accommodate the handling of spent shale. These changes are described. Operating problems at the plant from start-up and modifications required are reviewed. Upgrading of the shale oil syncrude cannot be done at the Gary, Indiana refinery as planned. Current plans are to truck it to Utah, place it in a pipeline to Midland, Texas, then pipe it through Cushing, Oklahoma to the Unocal refinery in Lemont, Illinois.

  7. Leadership and the psychology of turnarounds.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2003-06-01

    Turnaround champions--those leaders who manage to bring distressed organizations back from the brink of failure--are often acclaimed for their canny financial and strategic decision making. But having studied their work closely, Harvard Business School's Rosabeth Moss Kanter emphasizes another aspect of their achievement. These leaders reverse the cycle of corporate decline through deliberate interventions that increase the level of communication, collaboration, and respect among their managers. Ailing companies descend into what Kanter calls a "death spiral," which typically works this way: After an initial blow to the company's fortunes, people begin pointing fingers and deriding colleagues in other parts of the business. Tensions rise and collaboration declines. Once they are no longer acting in concert, people find themselves less able to effect change. Eventually, many come to believe they are helpless. Passivity sets in. Finally, the ultimate pathology of troubled companies takes hold: denial. Rather than volunteer an opinion that no one else seems to share, people engage in collective pretense to ignore what they individually know. To counter these dynamics, Kanter says, and reverse the company's slide, the CEO needs to apply certain psychological interventions--specifically, replacing secrecy and denial with dialogue, blame and scorn with respect, avoidance and turf protection with collaboration, and passivity and helplessness with initiative. The author offers in-depth accounts of how the CEOs at Gillette, Invensys, and the BBC used these interventions to guide their employees out of corporate free fall and onto a more productive path.

  8. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  9. Reconsidering Moore's Transactional Distance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giossos, Yiannis; Koutsouba, Maria; Lionarakis, Antonis; Skavantzos, Kosmas

    2009-01-01

    One of the core theories of distance education is Michael Graham Moore's "Theory of Transactional Distance" that provides the broad framework of the pedagogy of distance education and allows the generation of almost infinite number of hypotheses for research. However, the review of the existing studies relating to the theory showed the use of a…

  10. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mooring lines. 401.10 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a) Mooring lines shall: (1) Be of a uniform thickness throughout their length; (2) Have a diameter not greater...

  11. Development of moored oceanographic spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Charles R.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Holm-Hansen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Biospherical Instruments has successfully completed a NASA sponsored SBIR (Small Business Innovational Research Program) project to develop spectroradiometers capable of being deployed in the ocean for long periods of time. The completion of this project adds a valuable tool for the calibration of future spaceborne ocean color sensors and enables oceanographers to extend remote sensing optical techniques beyond the intermittent coverage of spaceborne sensors. Highlights of the project include two moorings totalling 8 months generating extensive sets of optical, biological, and physical data sets in the ocean off La Jolla, California, and a 70 day operational deployment of the resulting commercial product by the ONR and NASA sponsored BIOWATT program. Based on experience gained in these moorings, Biospherical Instruments has developed a new line of spectroradiometers designed to support the oceanographic remote sensing missions of NASA, the Navy, and various oceanographers.

  12. Analytical study of flow phenomena in SSME turnaround duct geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLallin, K. L.

    1985-04-01

    The SSME fuel turbopump hot gas manifold was identified as a source of loss and flow distortion which significantly affects the performance and durability of both the drive turbine and the LOX injector area of the main combustion chamber. Two current SSME geometries were studied, the full power level (FPL) and the first manned orbital flight (FMOF) configuration. The effects of turnaround duct geometry on flow losses and distortions, by varying wall curvature and flow area variation in the 180 deg turnaround region were examined. The effects of the duct inlet flow phenomena such as the radial distortion of the inlet flow and inlet swirl level on turnaround duct performance were also investigated. It is shown that of the two current geometries, the FMOF configuration had lower pressure losses and generated less flow distortion, but had a small flow separation bubble at the 180 deg turnaround exit. It is found that by optimizing wall curvature and flow diffusion in the turnaround, improved duct performance can be achieved.

  13. Improving Reports Turnaround Time: An Essential Healthcare Quality Dimension.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mustafa; Khalid, Parwaiz; Al-Said, Youssef; Cupler, Edward; Almorsy, Lamia; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Turnaround time is one of the most important healthcare performance indicators. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia worked on reducing the reports turnaround time of the neurophysiology lab from more than two weeks to only five working days for 90% of cases. The main quality improvement methodology used was the FOCUS PDCA. Using root cause analysis, Pareto analysis and qualitative survey methods, the main factors contributing to the delay of turnaround time and the suggested improvement strategies were identified and implemented, through restructuring transcriptionists daily tasks, rescheduling physicians time and alerting for new reports, engaging consultants, consistent coordination and prioritizing critical reports. After implementation; 92% of reports are verified within 5 days compared to only 6% before implementation. 7% of reports were verified in 5 days to 2 weeks and only 1% of reports needed more than 2 weeks compared to 76% before implementation. PMID:27350505

  14. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  15. Combining Quick-Turnaround and Batch Workloads at Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    NAS uses PBS Professional to schedule and manage the workload on Pleiades, an 11,000+ node 1B cluster. At this scale the user experience for quick-turnaround jobs can degrade, which led NAS initially to set up two separate PBS servers, each dedicated to a particular workload. Recently we have employed PBS hooks and scheduler modifications to merge these workloads together under one PBS server, delivering sub-1-minute start times for the quick-turnaround workload, and enabling dynamic management of the resources set aside for that workload.

  16. Emergency care center turnaround time--an improvement story.

    PubMed

    Gelrud, Joan; Burroughs, Helen; Koterwas, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a nationally recognized barrier to patient safety. Other obstacles to efficiency and adequate care in emergency rooms include lengthy patient waits and side-tracked ambulances. This article explores one community hospital's approach to significantly decreasing emergency visit turnaround times while increasing patient satisfaction.

  17. Can Principals' Emotional Intelligence Matter to School Turnarounds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Qijie

    2011-01-01

    Through the literature review, the study aims to explore the relationship between the emotional intelligence (EI) of principals and the turnarounds of low-performing schools and generate some hypotheses regarding this issue. Rigorous, empirical studies published in the last 15 years are selected and reviewed around three relevant topics: the…

  18. Series Overview. Sustaining School Turnaround at Scale. Brief 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Members of the non-profit organization Education Resource Strategies (ERS) have worked for over a decade with leaders of urban school systems to help them organize talent, time and technology to support great schools at scale. One year into the Federal program they are noticing significant differences in district turnaround approaches, engagement…

  19. The Turnaround Mindset: Aligning Leadership for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Tierney Temple; DeMary, Jo Lynne

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a valuable balance between what one must know and what one must do to turn around low-performing schools. The 3-E framework simplifies this complex process by focusing resources on the environment, the executive, and the execution of the turnaround plan. Central to each of these components is a spotlight on the values supporting…

  20. Importing Leaders for School Turnarounds: Lessons and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Hassel, Emily Ayscue

    2011-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in education today is identifying talented candidates to successfully lead turnarounds of persistently low-achieving schools. Evidence suggests that the traditional principal pool is already stretched to capacity and cannot supply enough leaders to fix failing schools. But potentially thousands of leaders capable of…

  1. Policy Perspective: School Turnaround in England. Utilizing the Private Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper, written by strategic partner of the Center on School Turnaround (CST), Julie Corbett, provides research and examples on England's approach to turning around its lowest performing schools. The English education system utilizes private vendors to support chronically low-performing schools and districts. The introduction is followed by…

  2. Democratic School Turnarounds: Pursuing Equity and Learning from Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Tina; Renée, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    the report "Democratic School Turnarounds" considers the democratic tensions inherent in the federal School Improvement Grant (SIG) policy's market-based school reforms and critiques the research base that many of these reforms are based on. It concludes with a set of recommendations that re-center the purposes of public education…

  3. California Turnaround Schools: An Analysis of School Improvement Grant Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Khalil N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of School Improvement Grants (SIGs) in the state of California (CA) in increasing student achievement using the turnaround implementation model. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) included educational priorities focused on fixing America's lowest achieving schools.…

  4. Mixing Metaphors: Building Infrastructure for Large Scale School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peurach, Donald J.; Neumerski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to increase understanding of the possibilities and challenges of building educational infrastructure--the basic, foundational structures, systems, and resources--to support large-scale school turnaround. Building educational infrastructure often exceeds the capacity of schools, districts, and state education…

  5. Negotiation Areas for "Transformation" and "Turnaround" Intervention Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    To receive School Improvement Grant (SIG) funding, districts must submit an application to the state that outlines their strategic plan to implement one of four intervention models in their persistently lowest-achieving schools. The four intervention models include: (1) School Closure; (2) Restart; (3) Turnaround; and (4) Transformation. The…

  6. Turnaround Time and Market Capacity in Contract Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Melisa J.; Newton, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Contract cheating is the process whereby students auction off the opportunity for others to complete assignments for them. It is an apparently widespread yet under-researched problem. One suggested strategy to prevent contract cheating is to shorten the turnaround time between the release of assignment details and the submission date, thus making…

  7. Portrait of a Turnaround Leader in a High Needs District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Reitzug, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Using portraiture methodology involving interview, observation, and artifact data, this study portrays a turnaround leader, Dr. Susan Gray, in a high needs, rural district in the Southeast. In three years, Gray led Lincoln Elementary from nearly being reconstituted to being an award-winning school. Gray has subsequently been assigned other…

  8. Rebuilding Organizational Capacity in Turnaround Schools: Insights from the Corporate, Government, and Non-Profit Sectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph; Meyers, Coby V.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we provide a grounded narrative of capacity building in the turnaround equation by exploring the turnaround literature outside of education and applying it to troubled schools. Our analysis is based upon reviews of: (1) 14 comprehensive, historical volumes that examine the turnaround phenomenon; (2) 16 book-length analyses of…

  9. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  10. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  11. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  12. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  13. 33 CFR 62.35 - Mooring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.35 Mooring buoys. Mooring... identification and to avoid confusion with aids to navigation....

  14. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certified and a test certificate for each mooring line containing information on breaking strength, material....10 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 401.10 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certified and a test certificate for each mooring line containing information on breaking strength, material....10 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.10 Mooring lines. (a)...

  16. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for the size of the vessel and local conditions. (b) While the vessel is moored or anchored in a port area... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL...

  17. Baseline designs of moored and grazing 40-MW OTEC pilot plants. Volume B: Engineering drawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    Baseline design data are presented for two types of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) pilot plants: (1) a moored plant that uses underwater cables to transmit electric power to a shore-based utility company, and (2) a cruising plantship that uses the OTEC electric power to produce an energy-intensive product onboard, where it is stored for later transshipment to market. Engineering drawings of the hull, cold-water pipe, ship outfitting and machinery, OTEC power system, electrical system, and folded-tube heat exchangers are provided.

  18. Baseline designs of moored and grazing 40-MW OTEC pilot plants. Volume A: Detailed report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, J. F.; Richards, D.

    1980-06-01

    Baseline designs of two types of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) pilot plants are presented. Both designs feature floating concrete hull structures that house up to 40 MW sub e (net) of OTEC power systems. One plant is designed for moored operation at an island site, and use underwater cables to transmit electric power to a shore-based utility company. The other plant is self-propelled and cruises slowly through tropical waters, using the OTEC electric power to produce an energy intensive product onboard, where it is stored for later transshipment to market.

  19. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes-2: Seep2-02, R/V CAPE HATTERAS cruise CH01-88

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-11-01

    The R/V CAPE HATTERAS cruise CH01-88, SEEP2-02, took place from 3--20 March, 1988 and focused primarily on biological processes in the SEEP2 area. A short term sediment trap mooring was deployed near mooring 1 and recovered during the cruise. The mooring consisted of two 0.07 sq. meter and one 0.7 sq. meter sediment traps. Two time series, approximately 48 hours each, were conducted in the area of the sediment trap mooring. The time series were designed to study primary and secondary productivity and involved sampling nutrients, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, zooplankton abundance and distribution, and zooplankton fecal pellet distribution. Experiments to estimate grazing rates and fecal pellet production of the dominant copepods were also done. Sediment trap and zooplankton data are not reported here. During this cruise 99 CTD casts were made measuring pressure, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and light transmission. Discrete samples were taken in rosette-mounted Niskin bottles and analyzed for concentration of nutrients, chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen, and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen.

  20. BENCAL Cruise Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barlow, Ray; Sessions, Heather; Silulwane, Nonkqubela; Engel, Hermann; Aiken, James; Fishwick, James; Martinez-Vicente, Victor; Morel, Andre

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities on board the South African Fisheries Research Ship (FRS) Africana during an ocean color calibration and validation cruise in the Benguela upwelling ecosystem (BEN-CAL), 4-17 October 2002. The cruise, denoted Afncana voyage 170, was staged in the southern Benguela between Cape Town and the Orange River within the region 14-18.5 deg E,29-34 deg S, with 15 scientists participat- ing from seven different international organizations. Uniquely in October 2002, four high-precision ocean color sensors were operational, and these included the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Aqua and Terra spacecraft, the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). SeaWiFS imagery was transmitted daily to the ship to assist in choosing the vessel's course and selecting stations for bio-optical deployments. There were four primary objectives of the cruise. The first was to conduct bio-optical measurements with above- and in-water optical instruments to vicariously calibrate the satellite sensors. The second was to interrelate diverse measurements of the apparent optical properties (AOPs) at satellite sensor wavelengths with inherent optical properties (IOPs) and bio-optically active constituents of seawater such as particles, pigments, and dissolved compounds. The third was to determine the interrelationships between optical properties, phytoplankton pigment composition, photosynthetic rates, and primary production, while the fourth objective was to collect samples for a second pigment round-robin intercalibration experiment. Weather conditions were generally very favorable, and a range of hyperspectral and fixed wavelength AOP instruments were deployed during daylight hours. Various IOP instruments were used to determine the absorption, attenuation, scattering, and backscattering properties of particulate matter and dissolved substances, while

  1. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Die adaptive Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung (ACC, Adaptive Cruise Control) ist eine Weiterentwicklung der konventionellen Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung, die eine konstante Fahrgeschwindigkeit einstellt. ACC überwacht mittels eines Radarsensors den Bereich vor dem Fahrzeug und passt die Geschwindigkeit den Gegebenheiten an. ACC reagiert auf langsamer vorausfahrende oder einscherende Fahrzeuge mit einer Reduzierung der Geschwindigkeit, sodass der vorgeschriebene Mindestabstand zum vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug nicht unterschritten wird. Hierzu greift ACC in Antrieb und Bremse ein. Sobald das vorausfahrende Fahrzeug beschleunigt oder die Spur verlässt, regelt ACC die Geschwindigkeit wieder auf die vorgegebene Sollgeschwindigkeit ein (Bild 1). ACC steht somit für eine Geschwindigkeitsregelung, die sich dem vorausfahrenden Verkehr anpasst.

  2. Teacher Techniques: Exploring Timber Cruising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    A timber cruise is an estimate of the timber in a stand to see what kinds of trees are growing, how many are marketable, and whether good forest management practices are followed. The objectives of timber cruising are to secure information to recommend good management practices to the land owner and to determine the commercial value of the trees.…

  3. Norovirus transmission on cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Isakbaeva, Elmira T; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Beard, R Suzanne; Bulens, Sandra N; Mullins, James; Monroe, Stephan S; Bresee, Joseph; Sassano, Patricia; Cramer, Elaine H; Glass, Roger I

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis affected passengers on two consecutive cruises of ship X and continued on 4 subsequent cruises despite a 1-week sanitization. We documented transmission by food and person-to-person contact; persistence of virus despite sanitization onboard, including introductions of new strains; and seeding of an outbreak on land.

  4. Oceanographic Mower Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, J.; Ercilla, G.; Hernández-Molina, F. J.; Casas, D.

    2015-04-01

    The MOWER Cruise has executed a geophysics and geologic expedition in the Gulf of Cádiz (sector adjacent to the Strait of Gibraltar) and west off Portugal, in the framework of the coordinate research project MOWER "Erosive features and associated sandy deposits generated by the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) around Iberia: paleoceanographic, sedimentary & economic implications" (CTM 2012-39599-C03). The main aim of this project is to identify and study the erosional features (terraces and channels) and associated sedimentary deposits (sandy contourites) generated by the Mediterranean Water Masses around the middle continental slope of Iberia (The Mediterranean Outflow Water - MOW - in the Atlantic margins), their Pliocene and Quaternary evolution and their paleoceanographic, sedimentary and economic implications. This objective directly involves the study of alongslope (contourite) processes associated with the MOW and across-slope (turbiditic flows, debris flows, etc.) processes in the sedimentary stacking pattern and evolution of the Iberian margins. The MOWER project and cruise are related to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 339 (Mediterranean Outflow). It is also linked and coordinated with CONDRIBER Project "Contourite drifts and associated mass-transport deposits along the SW Iberia margin - implications to slope stability and tsunami hazard assessment" (2013-2015) funded by the Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia, Portugal (PTDC/GEO-GEO/4430/2012).

  5. CMO: Cruise Metadata Organizer for JAMSTEC Research Cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, K.; Saito, H.; Hanafusa, Y.; Vanroosebeke, A.; Kitayama, T.

    2011-12-01

    JAMSTEC's Data Research Center for Marine-Earth Sciences manages and distributes a wide variety of observational data and samples obtained from JAMSTEC research vessels and deep sea submersibles. Generally, metadata are essential to identify data and samples were obtained. In JAMSTEC, cruise metadata include cruise information such as cruise ID, name of vessel, research theme, and diving information such as dive number, name of submersible and position of diving point. They are submitted by chief scientists of research cruises in the Microsoft Excel° spreadsheet format, and registered into a data management database to confirm receipt of observational data files, cruise summaries, and cruise reports. The cruise metadata are also published via "JAMSTEC Data Site for Research Cruises" within two months after end of cruise. Furthermore, these metadata are distributed with observational data, images and samples via several data and sample distribution websites after a publication moratorium period. However, there are two operational issues in the metadata publishing process. One is that duplication efforts and asynchronous metadata across multiple distribution websites due to manual metadata entry into individual websites by administrators. The other is that differential data types or representation of metadata in each website. To solve those problems, we have developed a cruise metadata organizer (CMO) which allows cruise metadata to be connected from the data management database to several distribution websites. CMO is comprised of three components: an Extensible Markup Language (XML) database, an Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) software, and a web-based interface. The XML database is used because of its flexibility for any change of metadata. Daily differential uptake of metadata from the data management database to the XML database is automatically processed via the EAI software. Some metadata are entered into the XML database using the web

  6. Beyond moore computing research challenge workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Mark C.; Aidun, John Bahram

    2013-10-01

    We summarize the presentations and break out session discussions from the in-house workshop that was held on 11 July 2013 to acquaint a wider group of Sandians with the Beyond Moore Computing research challenge.

  7. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  8. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  9. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  10. 49 CFR 176.178 - Mooring lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed... lines. (a) All lines used in mooring the vessel must be of sufficient strength, type, and number for...

  11. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  12. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior…

  13. Staying Healthy on a Cruise

    MedlinePlus

    ... get the most out of your cruise vacation. Zika Travel Information The 2016 Olympics in Brazil, Reggae ... the summer is full of great international celebrations! Zika has been reported in many popular event destinations ...

  14. A Simulation Based Approach for Contingency Planning for Aircraft Turnaround Operation System Activities in Airline Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeleye, Sanya; Chung, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Commercial aircraft undergo a significant number of maintenance and logistical activities during the turnaround operation at the departure gate. By analyzing the sequencing of these activities, more effective turnaround contingency plans may be developed for logistical and maintenance disruptions. Turnaround contingency plans are particularly important as any kind of delay in a hub based system may cascade into further delays with subsequent connections. The contingency sequencing of the maintenance and logistical turnaround activities were analyzed using a combined network and computer simulation modeling approach. Experimental analysis of both current and alternative policies provides a framework to aid in more effective tactical decision making.

  15. The reversal of the migration turnaround: resumption of traditional trends?

    PubMed

    Champion, A G

    1988-01-01

    "Cochrane and Vining's study of recent trends in core-periphery migration, while suffering from some weaknesses in methodology and interpretation, confirms very clearly that the reversal of the metropolitan migration turnaround is a widespread phenomenon in the developed non-Communist world. Evidence from the United Kingdom also supports this observation. An examination of the possible factors responsible for the rise and fall of counterurbanization over the past two decades suggests that two major forces--population deconcentration and regional restructuring--are operating simultaneously but relatively independently and that they both fluctuate in their nature and strength over time in response to prevailing demographic and economic circumstances."

  16. Meeting the challenge of a group practice turnaround.

    PubMed

    Porn, L M

    2001-03-01

    Many healthcare organizations that acquired group practices to enhance their market share have found that the practices have not met their financial goals. Turning around a financially troubled, hospital-owned group practice is challenging but not impossible for healthcare organizations that take certain basic actions. Direction, data, desire, dedication, and drive must be present to effect the financial turnaround of a group practice. The healthcare organization needs to evaluate the practice's strategy and operations and identify the issues that are hindering the practice's ability to optimize revenues. Efforts to achieve profitable operations have to be ongoing.

  17. SSME 3-D Turnaround Duct flow analysis - CFD predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Stowers, Steven T.; Mcconnaughey, Paul

    1988-01-01

    CFD analysis is presently employed to obtain an improved flowfield for an individual flowpath in the case of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Turn-Around Duct (TAD), which conducts the flow exiting from the gas turbines into the fuel bowl. It is demonstrated that the application of CFD to TAD flow analysis, giving attention to the duct's configuration and to the number, shape, and alignment of the diffuser struts, can enhance understanding of flow physics and result in improved duct design and performance.

  18. The Cole-Moore Effect: Still Unexplained?

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Toshinori; Armstrong, Clay M

    2015-10-01

    In the first issue, on the first page of the Biophysical Journal in 1960, Cole and Moore provided the first confirmation of the Hodgkin and Huxley formulation of the sodium and potassium conductances that underlie the action potential. In addition, working with the squid giant axon, Cole and Moore noted that strong hyperpolarization preceding a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse delayed the rise of the potassium conductance: once started, the time course of the rise was always the same but after significant hyperpolarization there was a long lag before the rise began. This phenomenon has come to be known as the Cole-Moore effect. Their article examines and disproves the hypothesis that the lag reflects the time required to refill the membrane with potassium ions after the ions are swept out of the membrane into the axoplasm by hyperpolarization. The work by Cole and Moore indirectly supports the idea of a membrane channel for potassium conductance. However, the mechanism of the Cole-Moore effect remains a mystery even now, buried in the structure of the potassium channel, which was completely unknown at the time.

  19. The Cole-Moore Effect: Still Unexplained?

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Toshinori; Armstrong, Clay M.

    2015-01-01

    In the first issue, on the first page of the Biophysical Journal in 1960, Cole and Moore provided the first confirmation of the Hodgkin and Huxley formulation of the sodium and potassium conductances that underlie the action potential. In addition, working with the squid giant axon, Cole and Moore noted that strong hyperpolarization preceding a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse delayed the rise of the potassium conductance: once started, the time course of the rise was always the same but after significant hyperpolarization there was a long lag before the rise began. This phenomenon has come to be known as the Cole-Moore effect. Their article examines and disproves the hypothesis that the lag reflects the time required to refill the membrane with potassium ions after the ions are swept out of the membrane into the axoplasm by hyperpolarization. The work by Cole and Moore indirectly supports the idea of a membrane channel for potassium conductance. However, the mechanism of the Cole-Moore effect remains a mystery even now, buried in the structure of the potassium channel, which was completely unknown at the time. PMID:26445430

  20. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  1. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  2. School Turnaround Fever: The Paradoxes of a Historical Practice Promoted as a New Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Craig; Reitzug, Ulrich C.

    2014-01-01

    School "turnaround" has received significant attention recently in education literature and policy action, especially as a means to dramatically improve urban education. In current common education usage, "turnaround" refers to the rapid, significant improvement in the academic achievement of persistently low-achieving schools.…

  3. On the Edge: A Study of Small Private Colleges That Have Made a Successful Financial Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Amy Bragg

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation was a qualitative research study regarding two small private universities and their process of transformation from an institution headed toward closure to a successful turnaround. The primary questions that guided the study included the factors and persons that contributed to the institutional turnaround, the issues and…

  4. On the Edge: A Study of Small Private Colleges That Have Made a Successful Financial Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Amy Bragg

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study that involved two small private universities, examining their process of transformation from institutions headed toward closure to institutions that underwent a successful turnaround. The primary questions that guided the study included the issues and circumstances that led to the need for a turnaround,…

  5. School Turnarounds: Resisting the Hype, Giving Them Hope. Education Outlook No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; Gift, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Education reformers are abuzz over school "turnarounds," a simple idea that has undeniable appeal. School turnarounds offer the opportunity to take familiar educational institutions and improve them through coaching, mentoring, capacity building, best practices, and other existing tools. Unlike most reform efforts, which focus on incremental…

  6. How One Historically Underperforming Rural and Highly Diverse High School Achieved a Successful Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gerri M.; Huggins, Kristin S.; Scheurich, James J.

    2010-01-01

    "Central High School," a rural school composed largely of students of color from low income homes, experienced a quick, remarkable turnaround of student academic success, measured by State and Federal accountability standards. This turnaround began with an external restructuring grant initiative that required a state-approved external consultant.…

  7. Sample Language of Modified Contract Elements from Existing CBAs, MOUs, or EWAs to Support Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Organized by the key conditions areas for turnaround, "People, Program, Time and Money," this tool offers sample language for each contract element to serve as a model for modifications from a traditional CBA that may support a district's turnaround efforts. Sample language is offered from existing provisions in district-wide collective bargaining…

  8. OTEC mooring system development: recent accomplishments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.M.; Wood, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    The mooring system for a floating OTEC platform consists of a seafloor foundation, a platform foundation, and a connecting line. This paper introduces the OTEC mooring system with a brief historical overview, reviews developmental work accomplished during the past year, and then presents a new look at life cycle costs for an example mooring system. Since June 1980, a significant effort within the OTEC Program has been directed toward the further development of mooring systems. The effort has included work leading to a better understanding of anchoring capabilities and problems, refinement of an existing mooring analytical model, a review of OTEC past mooring designs, and the production of a mooring system technology development plan. A major finding of the past year was a new upward estimate of mooring system lifetime costs as a result of downward-revised estimates of wire rope service life.

  9. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter ... Zerhouni, Rep. Ralph Regula (R-OH), Mary Tyler Moore, former Rep. Paul Rogers, and NLM Director Dr. ...

  10. The Divisiveness of Diversity: President Bush's University of Michigan Commencement Speech as an Example of the Linguistic "Turnaround."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palczewski, Catherine Helen; Madsen, Arnie

    1993-01-01

    Uses President Bush's commencement speech to compare and contrast the "link and impact turnaround," an accepted form of argument in academic debate, with the "linguistic turnaround" as executed in political discourse. (NH)

  11. Progress in supersonic cruise technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, C.

    1983-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program identified significant improvements in the technology areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, noise reduction, takeoff and landing procedures, and advanced configuration concepts. These improvements, when combined in a large supersonic cruise vehicle, offer a far greater technology advance than generally realized. They offer the promise of an advanced commercial family of aircraft which are environmentally acceptable, have flexible range-payload capability, and are economically viable. These same areas of technology have direct application to smaller advanced military aircraft and to supersonic executive aircraft. Several possible applications will be addressed.

  12. Evolutionary Excesses: A Response to Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    The physicist Edward Teller once gave an interview to a woman from a popular science magazine. He began the interview by saying, "You have heard many bad things about the Hydrogen Bomb. Now I am going to tell you some nice things about it." In reflecting upon a response to Dr. Randy Moore, the author thought of Teller, seeing his role here in…

  13. In the Style of Henry Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by Henry Moore's sculptures. This project consists of two activities. In the first activity, students select, sand and stain a wood block that would become a base for their plaster sculpture. This activity would keep the students independently engaged (classroom management) while the…

  14. The Convergence of Moore's/Mooers' Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael E. D.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a four-stage hypothesis of information systems development based on computational capability, storage capability, communications capability, and effective voice input. Moore's Law and Mooers' Law are explained, the interface between the system and the user is discussed, and projections for the future are suggested. (21 references)…

  15. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  16. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  17. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  18. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  19. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel... ground tackle and hawsers deemed necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, depending...

  20. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  1. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  2. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  3. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  4. District Readiness to Support School Turnaround: A Users' Guide to Inform the Work of State Education Agencies and Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Player, Daniel; Hambrick Hitt, Dallas; Robinson, William

    2014-01-01

    This guide provides state education agencies (SEAs) and districts (LEAs) with guidance about how to assess the district's readiness to support school turnaround initiatives. Often, school turnaround efforts focus only on the school's structure and leadership. Rarely do policymakers or practitioners think about school turnaround as a system-level…

  5. The structure of the microbial communities in low-moor and high-moor peat bogs of Tomsk oblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Kukharenko, O. S.; Yakushev, A. V.; Semenova, T. A.; Inisheva, L. A.

    2012-03-01

    The number, structure, and physical state of the microbial communities in high-moor and low-moor peat bogs were compared. Distinct differences in these characteristics were revealed. The microbial biomass in the high-moor peat exceeded that in the low-moor peat by 2-9 times. Fungi predominated in the high-moor peat, whereas bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the low-moor peat. The micromycetal complexes of the high-moor peat were characterized by a high portion of dark-colored representatives; the complexes of the low-moor peat were dominated by fast-growing fungi. The species of the Penicillum genus were dominant in the high-moor peat; the species of Trichoderma were abundant in the low-moor peat. In the former, the bacteria were distinguished as minor components; in the latter, they predominated in the saprotrophic bacterial complex. In the high-moor peat, the microorganisms were represented by bacilli, while, in the low-moor peat, by cytophages, myxobacteria, and actinobacteria. The different physiological states of the bacteria in the studied objects reflecting the duration of the lag phase and the readiness of the metabolic system to consume different substrates were demonstrated for the first time. The relationships between the trophic characteristics of bacterial habitats and the capacity of the bacteria to consume substrates were established.

  6. Nonlinear response of floating buoys with hydro-elastic moors

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, K.; Leonard, J.W.; Yim, S.C.S.

    1996-12-31

    A time-domain model was developed to predict the response of a moored buoy subject to hydrodynamic loadings. External loadings on the buoy include hydrodynamic forces, mooring tension, wind loading and weight. A coupled analysis of the interaction of a buoy and its mooring is included and three-dimensional response is assumed. System nonlinearities include, large translational motions of the buoy and mooring line, large rotations of the mooring line and non-conservative fluid loadings. Numerical examples and experimental results are compared to contrast the validity and capability of the formulations and solution techniques.

  7. Selection of the mooring system for an FSO vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.M.

    1996-09-01

    Options to be selected are proposed for the mooring system deployed for a floating-storage-and-offloading (FSO) vessel. The vessel and affiliated installations form a product crude oil exporting facility. Each option is comparatively evaluated against the relevant agenda which is important from view points of facility operation and maintenance. Options for the mooring system include the turret, jacket, and buoy single-point mooring (SPM) systems as well as the spread mooring system. There is no one options which is a one-fit-all agenda for the mooring system. Other generalized conclusions are also presented.

  8. Moore v. Regents of the University of California.

    PubMed

    1988-07-21

    In 1976, John Moore had his spleen removed in the course of treatment for hairy cell leukemia at the UCLA Medical Center. Subsequently, a cell line was developed from Moore's tissues that offered enormous therapeutic value. Doctors applied for patents on the cell line and entered into contracts for its commercial exploitation. Moore claimed the modified tissue to be his own property and sued to recover deserved profits. The trial court dismissed Moore's case because it failed to set forth a proper claim at law. The appellate court reversed, interpreting the claim to be adequate for recovery. The court held that the removed tissue was Moore's property; that consent forms signed by Moore only applied to the removal of tissue and did not imply his consent to its commercial exploitation; and that Moore need not allege either the defendent's knowledge of the cells' value, or of the defendant's intent to exploit the cells, in order to assert his claim.

  9. The use of rapid turnaround heated headspace/gas chromatography to support regulatory soil cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, J.; Evans, C.; Francoeur, T.L.; Guerra, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper addresses the use of rapid turnaround, heated headspace/gas chromatography (GC) to support a soil remediation project in the state of New Jersey. In the past, rapid turnaround, heated head space/GC procedures have been used primarily as a screening tool to delineate areas of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination on-site. For this project, the heated headspace/GC method was the primary analytical tool used to support a large soil remediation project. This paper reviews the project goals, presents analytical protocol, presents internal quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), evaluates laboratory split data, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of this rapid turnaround method.

  10. Molecular computing revisited: a Moore's Law?

    PubMed

    Livstone, Michael S; van Noort, Danny; Landweber, Laura F

    2003-03-01

    Moore's Law states that the processing power of microchips doubles every one to two years. This observation might apply to the nascent field of molecular computing, in which biomolecules carry out logical operations. Incorporation of new technologies that improve sensitivity and throughput has increased the complexity of problems that can be addressed. It is an ultimate goal for molecular computers to use the full potential of massive parallelism.

  11. A NANO enhancement to Moore's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry; Shen, Yin-Lin; Reinhardt, Kitt; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    In the past 46 years, Intel Moore observed an exponential doubling in the number of transistors in every 18 months through the size reduction of individual transistor components since 1965. In this paper, we are exploring the nanotechnology impact upon the Law. Since we cannot break down the atomic size barrier, the fact implies a fundamental size limit at the atomic or Nanotechnology scale. This means, no more simple 18 month doubling as in Moore's Law, but other forms of transistor doubling may happen at a different slope in new directions. We are particularly interested in the Nano enhancement area. (i) 3-D: If the progress in shrinking the in-plane dimensions (2D) is to slow down, vertical integration (3D) can help increasing the areal device transistor density and keep us on the modified Moore's Law curve including the 3rd dimension. As the devices continue to shrink further into the 20 to 30 nm range, the consideration of thermal properties and transport in such nanoscale devices becomes increasingly important. (ii) Carbon Computing: Instead of traditional Transistors, the other types of transistors material are rapidly developed in Laboratories Worldwide, e.g. IBM Spintronics bandgap material and Samsung Nano-storage material, HD display Nanotechnology, which are modifying the classical Moore's Law. We shall consider the overall limitation of phonon engineering, fundamental information unit 'Qubyte' in quantum computing, Nano/Micro Electrical Mechanical System (NEMS), Carbon NanoTubes (CNTs), single layer Graphemes, single strip Nano-Ribbons, etc., and their variable degree of fabrication maturities for the computing and information processing applications.

  12. Charlotte Moore Sitterly: A Life of Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Charlotte Moore Sitterly was a scientist in an era when it was rare for a woman to have the opportunity to devote her life to forefront science. Following her graduation from Swarthmore College in 1920, she accepted a position at Princeton University as an assistant to Henry Norris Russell. In 1925 she started a study of the solar spectrum. She could then not know that she would devote much of her scientific career to gathering basic atomic data that are invaluable to the scientific community, even today. In 1931 she obtained a PhD degree at U. California, Berkeley, and returned to Princeton as a staff member of the Princeton University Observatory. In 1945 she moved to the National Bureau of Science (NBS), to supervise preparation of the widely used tables of atomic energy levels. Following the successful lunching (1946) of a V2 rocket to obtain the ultra violet spectrum of the sun, Moore started working with Richard Tousey and his group at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Ultimately, they extended the solar spectrum down to 2200 angstroms. She continued her affiliations with NBS and NRL until her death in 1990. Charlotte Moore was rare scientist who devoted her career to obtaining accurate numbers, thus enabling the scientific community to open her tables and know that the data are accurate.

  13. Teacher Pay-for-Performance in School Turnaround: How Bonuses and Differentiated Pay Scales Can Help Support School Turnaround. Meeting the Turnaround Challenge: Strategies, Resources & Tools to Transform a Framework into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Given the importance of good teaching and leadership for school success, turnaround schools should think carefully about how to structure professional environments that reward and motivate excellence. A system of "Pay-for-Contribution" that includes tools such as hard-to-staff and skill shortage pay, performance pay, and/or retention pay, will…

  14. Monitoring operating room turnaround time: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Scagliarini, Michele; Apreda, Mariarosaria; Wienand, Ulrich; Valpiani, Giorgia

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Operating room (OR) turnaround time is a key process indicator for hospital business management: delays lead to a reduced surgical interventions per day with a consequent increase in costs and decrease in efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding by assessing the process' steady-state behaviour and identifying changes that indicate either improvement or deterioration in quality. Design/methodology/approach - With this purpose, the authors retrospectively applied Shewhart control charts and exponentially weighted moving average control charts to data extracted from an hospital information system. Findings - The results showed that statistical process control is able to identify steady-state behaviour process and to detect positive or negative changes in process performance. In particular the authors detected a deterioration in the process performance coinciding with the change in the operating room patient transfer staff. Practical implications - This study showed that statistical quality control is a valuable tool for monitoring performance indicators. Currently, hospital managers are designing an OR dashboard which also includes the control charts. Originality/value - The paper highlights the control chart application to organizational indicators allowing an objective OR system performance assessment. PMID:27120511

  15. Improving medical imaging report turnaround times: the role of technolgy.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Luis O; Stewart, Howard

    2005-01-01

    At Southern Ohio Medical Center (SOMC), the medical imaging department and the radiologists expressed a strong desire to improve workflow. The improved workflow was a major motivating factor toward implementing a new RIS and speech recognition technology. The need to monitor workflow in a real-time fashion and to evaluate productivity and resources necessitated that a new solution be found. A decision was made to roll out both the new RIS product and speech recognition to maximize the resources to interface and implement the new solution. Prior to implementation of the new RIS, the medical imaging department operated in a conventional electronic-order-entry to paper request manner. The paper request followed the study through exam completion to the radiologist. SOMC entered into a contract with its PACS vendor to participate in beta testing and clinical trials for a new RIS product for the US market. Backup plans were created in the event the product failed to function as planned--either during the beta testing period or during clinical trails. The last piece of the technology puzzle to improve report turnaround time was voice recognition technology. Speech recognition enhanced the RIS technology as soon as it was implemented. The results show that the project has been a success. The new RIS, combined with speech recognition and the PACS, makes for a very effective solution to patient, exam, and results management in the medical imaging department.

  16. Mooring Line Damping Estimation for a Floating Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  17. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  18. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design.

  19. A comparison of the impact of 'seagrass-friendly' boat mooring systems on Posidonia australis.

    PubMed

    Demers, Marie-Claire A; Davis, Andrew R; Knott, Nathan A

    2013-02-01

    Permanent boat moorings have contributed to the decline of seagrasses worldwide, prompting the development of 'seagrass-friendly' moorings. We contrasted seagrass cover and density (predominantly Posidonia australis) in the vicinity of three mooring types and nearby reference areas lacking moorings in Jervis Bay, Australia. We examined two types of 'seagrass-friendly' mooring and a conventional 'swing' mooring. 'Swing' moorings produced significant seagrass scour, denuding patches of ~9 m radius. Seagrass-friendly 'cyclone' moorings produced extensive denuded patches (average radius of ~18 m). Seagrass-friendly 'screw' moorings, conversely, had similar seagrass cover to nearby reference areas. Our findings reinforce previous work highlighting the negative effects of 'swing' and 'cyclone' moorings. In contrast, the previously unstudied 'screw' moorings were highly effective. We conclude that regular maintenance of moorings and the monitoring of surrounding seagrass are required to ensure that 'seagrass-friendly' moorings are operating effectively. This is important, as following damage Posidonia will take many decades to recover.

  20. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamics, stability and control, propulsion, and environmental factors of the supersonic cruise aircraft are discussed. Other topics include airframe structures and materials, systems integration, and economics.

  1. Turnaround Time (TAT): Difference in Concept for Laboratory and Clinician.

    PubMed

    Pati, Hara P; Singh, Gurmeet

    2014-06-01

    Lab investigations are essential in patient management and qualities of the tests reports are emphasized. But there is another aspect of quality which is often overlooked and that is timeliness which is expressed as turnaround time (TAT). Mostly the laboratory services are directed at providing a rapid, reliable report at a reasonable cost. However, most laboratories put undue stress on only reliability, where as the clinician gives more stress on how soon (TAT) a report would be available to them. There is no clear definition of TAT, as to which period should be included in determining TAT for a specific test. For laboratory personnel, it would be from the time of receipt of sample in laboratory till report is generated. However, for a clinician, it would appropriate from the time of his/her requisition of a test till the report reaches him/her. The TAT would not be similar for routine tests versus in STAT/urgent tests. TAT would be different for ICU/emergency services. The causes of poor satisfaction level from lab users includes stat and routine test TAT and stat test TAT is considered by majority as the most important indicator of laboratories functioning. Hospital computerization with record of time from test request, sample collection, report generation and receipt of report by clinician would help in generating TAT. Analyzing outliers in TAT in a lab gives insight of causes delay in TAT and the areas need improvement. Laboratories in developing countries are yet to use TAT and analyze them for laboratory improvement.

  2. Turnaround Time (TAT): Difference in Concept for Laboratory and Clinician.

    PubMed

    Pati, Hara P; Singh, Gurmeet

    2014-06-01

    Lab investigations are essential in patient management and qualities of the tests reports are emphasized. But there is another aspect of quality which is often overlooked and that is timeliness which is expressed as turnaround time (TAT). Mostly the laboratory services are directed at providing a rapid, reliable report at a reasonable cost. However, most laboratories put undue stress on only reliability, where as the clinician gives more stress on how soon (TAT) a report would be available to them. There is no clear definition of TAT, as to which period should be included in determining TAT for a specific test. For laboratory personnel, it would be from the time of receipt of sample in laboratory till report is generated. However, for a clinician, it would appropriate from the time of his/her requisition of a test till the report reaches him/her. The TAT would not be similar for routine tests versus in STAT/urgent tests. TAT would be different for ICU/emergency services. The causes of poor satisfaction level from lab users includes stat and routine test TAT and stat test TAT is considered by majority as the most important indicator of laboratories functioning. Hospital computerization with record of time from test request, sample collection, report generation and receipt of report by clinician would help in generating TAT. Analyzing outliers in TAT in a lab gives insight of causes delay in TAT and the areas need improvement. Laboratories in developing countries are yet to use TAT and analyze them for laboratory improvement. PMID:24839360

  3. 1. Photocopy of photograph, 1893 (Moore Memorial Library) CHRISTIANA BOROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph, 1893 (Moore Memorial Library) CHRISTIANA BOROUGH BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION CREW - Christiana Borough Bridge, Bridge Street over Pennsylvania Railroad, Christiana, Lancaster County, PA

  4. Mooring Design for the Floating Oscillating Water Column Reference Model

    SciTech Connect

    Brefort, Dorian; Bull, Diana L.

    2014-09-01

    To reduce the price of the reference Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), a study was done analyzing the effects of reducing the mooring line length, and a new mooring design was developed. It was found that the overall length of the mooring lines could be reduced by 1290 meters, allowing a significant price reduction of the system. In this paper, we will first give a description of the model and the storm environment it will be subject to. We will then give a recommendation for the new mooring system, followed by a discussion of the severe weather simulation results, and an analysis of the conservative and aggressive aspects of the design.

  5. Effect of mooring line arrangement on the dynamics of spread mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, M.M.; Garza-Rios, L.O.

    1995-12-31

    A design methodology is formulated to reveal the dependence of nonlinear slow motion dynamics of Spread Mooring Systems (SMS) on mooring line arrangement. For a given SMS configuration, catastrophe sets are developed in the parametric design space showing the dependence of stability boundaries and singularities of bifurcations on design variables. This approach eliminates the need for nonlinear simulations. For general SMS design, however, the designer relies on experience rather than scientific understanding of SMS nonlinear dynamics, due to the high number of design variables. Several numerical applications are used to demonstrate counter intuitive ways of improving SMS dynamics. The SMS design methodology formulated in this paper aims at providing fundamental understanding of the effects of mooring line arrangement and pretension on SMS horizontal plane dynamics. Thus, the first guidelines are developed to reduce trial and error in SMS design. The methodology is illustrated by comparing catastrophe sets for various SMS configurations with up to three mooring lines. Numerous examples for a barge and a tanker SMS which exhibit qualitatively different nonlinear dynamic behavior are provided.

  6. Testing ΛCDM cosmology at turnaround: where to look for violations of the bound?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoglidis, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Tomaras, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In ΛCDM cosmology, structure formation is halted shortly after dark energy dominates the mass/energy budget of the Universe. A manifestation of this effect is that in such a cosmology the turnaround radius—the non-expanding mass shell furthest away from the center of a structure— has an upper bound. Recently, a new, local, test for the existence of dark energy in the form of a cosmological constant was proposed based on this turnaround bound. Before designing an experiment that, through high-precision determination of masses and —independently— turnaround radii, will challenge ΛCDM cosmology, we have to answer two important questions: first, when turnaround-scale structures are predicted to be close enough to their maximum size, so that a possible violation of the bound may be observable. Second, which is the best mass scale to target for possible violations of the bound. These are the questions we address in the present work. Using the Press-Schechter formalism, we find that turnaround structures have in practice already stopped forming, and consequently, the turnaround radius of structures must be very close to the maximum value today. We also find that the mass scale of ~ 1013 Msolar characterizes the turnaround structures that start to form in a statistically important number density today —and even at an infinite time in the future, since structure formation has almost stopped. This mass scale also separates turnaround structures with qualitatively different cosmological evolution: smaller structures are no longer readjusting their mass distribution inside the turnaround scale, they asymptotically approach their ultimate abundance from higher values, and they are common enough to have, at some epoch, experienced major mergers with structures of comparable mass; larger structures exhibit the opposite behavior. We call this mass scale the transitional mass scale and we argue that it is the optimal for the purpose outlined above. As a corollary, we

  7. Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report in response to a petition the agency received in March 2000. The petition requested that EPA assess and where necessary control discharges from cruise ships. Comments received during public hearings, in 2000, resulted in the EPA agreeing to conduct a survey to assess the discharge plumes resulting from cruise ships, operating in ocean waters off the Florida coast and to compare the results to the Alaska dispersion models. This survey report describes the daily activities of August 2001 Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey, and provides a synopsis of the observations from the survey. It also provides data that can be used to assess dispersion of cruise ship wastewater discharges, while in transit. A description of the survey methods is provided in Section 2. Survey results are presented in Section 3. Findings and conclusions are discussed in Section 4.

  8. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  9. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  10. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  11. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  12. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  13. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  14. 75 FR 73072 - Moore, Cody; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moore, Cody; Notice of Filing November 19, 2010. Take notice that, on November 17, 2010, Cody Moore filed an application to hold an interlocking position, pursuant to...

  15. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  16. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  17. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  18. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  19. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  20. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  1. 33 CFR 90.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 90.5... NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.5 Lights for moored vessels. A vessel at...

  2. 33 CFR 82.5 - Lights for moored vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... anchor in accordance with Rule 30, or may be lighted on the corners in accordance with 33 CFR 88.13. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights for moored vessels. 82.5... NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.5 Lights for moored vessels. For the purposes of...

  3. 33 CFR 88.13 - Lights on moored barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on moored barges. 88.13... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.13 Lights on moored barges. (a) The following barges shall display at night and if practicable in periods of restricted visibility the lights described in paragraph...

  4. Preliminary investigations into mooring forces on a semisubmersible and a turret moored tanker in pack ice, current and waves

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.J.; Spencer, D.

    1996-12-01

    Physical model tests were carried out on a scale model of a semisubmersible and a monohull tanker in drifting pack ice. The tests covered a range of drift velocities, directions and ice concentrations. The models were tested in both a fully restrained and moored condition. Data from the experiments were used to develop a semi-empirical numerical model to predict maximum global loads on the mooring system. These results were compared with the maximum loads on the mooring system caused by hydrodynamic forces (waves and current) predicted from a linear numerical model for waves. Analysis results showed that the maximum mooring loads due to the pack ice on the semisubmersible were considerably higher than those caused by the hydrodynamic forces on the same vessel. Also, the maximum mooring loads due to pack ice on the tanker were close to the maximum mooring loads caused by the hydrodynamic forces. Maximum mooring loads related to pack ice forces were realized in ice concentrations of 10/10 coverage while for concentrations less than 6/10 coverage loads attributed to pack ice were negligible in comparison to the hydrodynamic forces. The paper also presents a number of recommendations, based on these findings, to improve the performance of both vessel types and to advance the general state-of-the-art for analysis procedures related to offshore vessel moored in pack ice.

  5. A strategy for reducing turnaround time in design optimization using a distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Katherine C.; Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to explore methods for reducing lengthly computer turnaround or clock time associated with engineering design problems. Different strategies can be employed to reduce this turnaround time. One strategy is to run validated analysis software on a network of existing smaller computers so that portions of the computation can be done in parallel. This paper focuses on the implementation of this method using two types of problems. The first type is a traditional structural design optimization problem, which is characterized by a simple data flow and a complicated analysis. The second type of problem uses an existing computer program designed to study multilevel optimization techniques. This problem is characterized by complicated data flow and a simple analysis. The paper shows that distributed computing can be a viable means for reducing computational turnaround time for engineering design problems that lend themselves to decomposition. Parallel computing can be accomplished with a minimal cost in terms of hardware and software.

  6. Henry (Hank) J. Moore (1928-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.

    Henry (Hank) J. Moore, a member of the AGU Planetary Sciences section, died of a heart attack on September 21, 1998. He was in Utah while on a family trip to visit his daughter. His 70th birthday occurred just 3 weeks before his death. Henry, who was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, took great pride in having found and visited the small town of Albuquerque in the Extremadura region of Spain, noting the geologic similarities between that part of Spain and his birthplace in America.Henry, known for his contributions to the Apollo,Viking, Magellan, and Mars Pathfinder missions, attributed his career to a chance encounter with Gene Shoemaker in 1960. Henry was completing his Ph.D. work in geology at Stanford University and Gene obviously had spotted Henry's keen analytical mind. I suspect this pivotal meeting was far from a chance encounter.

  7. Extending the Capabilities of the Mooring Analysis Program: A Survey of Dynamic Mooring Line Theories for Integration into FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-03-01

    Techniques to model dynamic mooring lines come in various forms. The most widely used models include either a heuristic representation of the physics (such as a Lumped-Mass, LM, system), a Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) discretization of the lines (discretized in space), or a Finite-Difference (FD) model (which is discretized in both space and time). In this paper, we explore the features of the various models, weigh the advantages of each, and propose a plan for implementing one dynamic mooring line model into the open-source Mooring Analysis Program (MAP). MAP is currently used as a module for the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to model mooring systems quasi-statically, although dynamic mooring capabilities are desired. Based on the exploration in this manuscript, the lumped-mass representation is selected for implementation in MAP based on its simplicity, computational cost, and ability to provide similar physics captured by higher-order models.

  8. The Impact of Turnaround Reform on Student Outcomes: Evidence and Insights from the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine O.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hashim, Ayesha K.; Bush-Mecenas, Susan; Weinstein, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    We examine the Los Angeles Unified School District's Public School Choice Initiative (PSCI), which sought to turnaround the district's lowest-performing schools. We ask whether school turnaround impacted student outcomes, and what explains variations in outcomes across reform cohorts. We use a Comparative Interrupted Time Series approach using…

  9. Sustaining Turnaround at the School and District Levels: The High Reliability Schools Project at Sandfields Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Eugene; Reynolds, David; Stringfield, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Beginning from 1 high-poverty, historically low-achieving secondary school's successful turnaround work, this article provides data relative to a successful school turnaround, the importance of external and system-level supports, and the importance of building for sustainable institutionalization of improvements. The evidence suggests the…

  10. Mapping Turnaround Times (TAT) to a Generic Timeline: A Systematic Review of TAT Definitions in Clinical Domains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Assessing turnaround times can help to analyse workflows in hospital information systems. This paper presents a systematic review of literature concerning different turnaround time definitions. Our objectives were to collect relevant literature with respect to this kind of process times in hospitals and their respective domains. We then analysed the existing definitions and summarised them in an appropriate format. Methods Our search strategy was based on Pubmed queries and manual reviews of the bibliographies of retrieved articles. Studies were included if precise definitions of turnaround times were available. A generic timeline was designed through a consensus process to provide an overview of these definitions. Results More than 1000 articles were analysed and resulted in 122 papers. Of those, 162 turnaround time definitions in different clinical domains were identified. Starting and end points vary between these domains. To illustrate those turnaround time definitions, a generic timeline was constructed using preferred terms derived from the identified definitions. The consensus process resulted in the following 15 terms: admission, order, biopsy/examination, receipt of specimen in laboratory, procedure completion, interpretation, dictation, transcription, verification, report available, delivery, physician views report, treatment, discharge and discharge letter sent. Based on this analysis, several standard terms for turnaround time definitions are proposed. Conclusion Using turnaround times to benchmark clinical workflows is still difficult, because even within the same clinical domain many different definitions exist. Mapping of turnaround time definitions to a generic timeline is feasible. PMID:21609424

  11. "I've Never Seen People Work So Hard!" Teachers' Working Conditions in the Early Stages of School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cucchiara, Maia Bloomfield; Rooney, Erin; Robertson-Kraft, Claire

    2015-01-01

    School turnaround--a reform strategy that strives for quick and dramatic transformation of low-performing schools--has gained prominence in recent years. This study uses interviews and focus groups conducted with 86 teachers in 13 schools during the early stages of school turnaround in a large urban district to examine teachers' perceptions of the…

  12. Academic Turnarounds: Restoring Vitality to Challenged American Colleges and Universities. ACE/Praeger Series on Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacTaggart, Terrence, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the early indicators of a college or university's need for a turnaround. It outlines financial trends and other indicators of distress, as well as benchmarks for the various stages of an effective turnaround strategy. The book will help trustees, presidents, and faculty members diagnose whether they are in denial about the true…

  13. Evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin. Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that currently inhabit the new world was certainly a topic about which zoologists could disagree. But it was in discussing the broader implications of the theory...that tempers flared and statements were made which could transform what otherwise would have been a quiet scholarly meeting into a social scandal' (Farber 1994, 22). Some resistance to the biological thesis of Darwinism sprung from the thought that it was incompatible with traditional morality and, since one of them had to go, many thought that Darwinism should be rejected. However, some people did realize that a secular ethics was possible so, even if Darwinism did undermine traditional religious beliefs, it need not have any effects on moral thought. Before I begin my discussion of evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore, I would like to make some more general remarks about its development. There are three key events during this history of evolutionary ethics. First, Charles Darwin published On the Origin of the Species (Darwin 1859). Since one did not have a fully developed theory of evolution until 1859, there exists little work on evolutionary ethics until then. Shortly thereafter, Herbert Spencer (1898) penned the first systematic theory of evolutionary ethics, which was promptly attacked by T.H. Huxley (Huxley 1894). Second, at about the turn of the century, moral philosophers entered the fray and attempted to demonstrate logical errors in Spencer's work; such errors were alluded

  14. Evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin. Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that currently inhabit the new world was certainly a topic about which zoologists could disagree. But it was in discussing the broader implications of the theory...that tempers flared and statements were made which could transform what otherwise would have been a quiet scholarly meeting into a social scandal' (Farber 1994, 22). Some resistance to the biological thesis of Darwinism sprung from the thought that it was incompatible with traditional morality and, since one of them had to go, many thought that Darwinism should be rejected. However, some people did realize that a secular ethics was possible so, even if Darwinism did undermine traditional religious beliefs, it need not have any effects on moral thought. Before I begin my discussion of evolutionary ethics from Darwin to Moore, I would like to make some more general remarks about its development. There are three key events during this history of evolutionary ethics. First, Charles Darwin published On the Origin of the Species (Darwin 1859). Since one did not have a fully developed theory of evolution until 1859, there exists little work on evolutionary ethics until then. Shortly thereafter, Herbert Spencer (1898) penned the first systematic theory of evolutionary ethics, which was promptly attacked by T.H. Huxley (Huxley 1894). Second, at about the turn of the century, moral philosophers entered the fray and attempted to demonstrate logical errors in Spencer's work; such errors were alluded

  15. Moore's Law, disruptive technologies, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Newbower, Ronald S

    2002-01-01

    The advancement of technical power described by Moore's Law offers great potential for enabling more cost-effective medical devices and systems. However, progress has been slow. Many factors for this failure have been cited, including the anti-rational economic structure of healthcare and the complexity and long time scale of medical development. Christensen et al. suggest that "disruptive technologies" may circumvent some of these difficulties. "Disruptive Technologies" are defined as those that are established in one market, but then penetrate and overwhelm another market. These incursions are accelerated by economic factors, and capitalize on functionality, reliability, and advancements supported by the original market. Christensen has cited many examples from industrial and service businesses, but few examples can be found yet in healthcare. We argue that positive technology impacts in medicine occur most readily when innovators augment the skills of and collaborate with caregivers, rather than seeking to displace them. In the short term, a new approach may improve efficiency or quality. In the longer term, such approaches may obviate human tasks at lower-skill levels, and even permit task automation. One successful example has been the introduction of flexible monitoring for physiologic information. Systems for computer-aided diagnosis, which have failed to impact complex decision making, have succeeded in simpler specialty areas such as the interpretation of EKG's and mammograms, and may do the same with analysis of some pathology images. The next frontier may the operating room, and the adoption of such systemic technologies by caregivers in emergency medicine and general care may then have an even wider "disruptive" effect. Responding to time and cost pressures, and the desire to move care to the patient, other workers, such as radiologists, will drive the trend away from isolated, complex, large-scale devices, and toward integrated, modular, and simpler

  16. Turnaround, Transformational, or Transactional Leadership: An Ethical Dilemma in School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mette, Ian M.; Scribner, Jay P.

    2014-01-01

    This case was written for school leaders, specifically building-level principals and central office administrators attempting to implement school turnaround reform efforts. Often, leaders who embark on this type of organizational change work in intense environments that produce high levels of pressure to demonstrate improvement in student…

  17. Chronically Low-Performing Schools and Turnaround: Evidence from Three States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michael; Choi, Kilchan

    2012-01-01

    The criteria for determining the student outcomes that define a school as having "turned around" are not well defined, and the definition of turnaround performance varies across studies. Although current policy initiatives offer guidelines for identifying CLP schools, there is no standard definition or methodology in common usage. This paper…

  18. The Lay of the Land: State Practices and Needs for Supporting School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin; Lasley, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the Center on School Turnaround (CST) is to provide technical assistance on research-based practices and emerging promising practices that will increase the capacity of states to support their districts in turning around the lowest-performing schools. When the CST opened its doors in October 2012, it began its work by asking the…

  19. A Case Study of Change Strategies Implemented in a Turnaround Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colson, Jo Ann

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the change strategies in a turnaround school at the elementary level to understand and describe how change occurred and was sustained at this campus. This study examined the factors which contributed to the change in academic success of students, examined beliefs about change that led to the change process, identified the…

  20. Achieving Exact and Constant Turnaround Ratio in a DDS-Based Coherent Transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes a non-standard direct digital synthesizer (DDS) implementation that can be used as part of a coherent transponder so as to allow any rational turnaround ratio to be exactly achieved and maintained while the received frequency varies. (A coherent transponder is a receiver-transmitter in which the transmitted carrier is locked to a pre-determined multiple of the received carrier's frequency and phase. That multiple is called the turnaround ratio.) The report also describes a general model for coherent transponders that are partly digital. A partially digital transponder is one in which analog signal processing is used to convert the signals between high frequencies at which they are radiated and relatively low frequencies at which they are converted to or from digital form, with most of the complex processing performed digitally. There is a variety of possible architectures for such a transponder, and different ones can be selected by choosing different parameter values in the general model. Such a transponder uses a DDS to create a low-frequency quasi-sinusoidal signal that tracks the received carrier s phase, and another DDS to generate an IF or near-baseband version of the transmitted carrier. With conventional DDS implementations, a given turnaround ratio can be achieved only approximately, and the error varies slightly as the received frequency changes. The non-conventional implementation employed here allows any rational turnaround ratio to be exactly maintained.

  1. How to Know when Dramatic Change Is on Track: Leading Indicators of School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Ableidinger, Joe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, national policymakers have placed new emphasis on "school turnarounds" as a strategy for rapid, dramatic improvement in chronically failing schools, calling on education leaders to turn around performance in the 5,000 lowest-achieving schools nationwide. This goal may seem daunting, given the dismal success rates of school…

  2. CAD/CAM, Creativity, and Discipline Lead to Turnaround School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Miami Central High School technology teacher Frank Houghtaling thinks the connection between theory and application is one reason his students perform better on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). The impressive turnaround school drew local and national attention last spring when one of Houghtaling's students, Dagoberto Cruz, won…

  3. Turnaround radius in an accelerated universe with quasi-local mass

    SciTech Connect

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne; Prain, Angus E-mail: mlapierre12@ubishops.ca

    2015-10-01

    We apply the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy construct to obtain in a rigorous way the turnaround radius of cosmic structures in General Relativity. A splitting of this quasi-local mass into local and cosmological parts describes the interplay between local attraction and cosmological expansion.

  4. Turnaround High School Principals: Recruit, Prepare and Empower Leaders of Change. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt-Davis, Jon; Bottoms, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies make one reality clear: While multiple factors can cause a low-performing high school to be in a turnaround situation, every high school that makes dramatic academic improvement has strong, effective school leadership. Turning a school around is no work for novices. It takes a skilled, visionary and proactive principal to pull apart…

  5. Predictable turn-around time for post tape-out flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Toshikazu; Park, Minyoung; Ghosh, Pradiptya

    2012-03-01

    A typical post-out flow data path at the IC Fabrication has following major components of software based processing - Boolean operations before the application of resolution enhancement techniques (RET) and optical proximity correctin (OPC), the RET and OPC step [etch retargeting, sub-resolution assist feature insertion (SRAF) and OPC], post-OPCRET Boolean operations and sometimes in the same flow simulation based verification. There are two objectives that an IC Fabrication tapeout flow manager wants to achieve with the flow - predictable completion time and fastest turn-around time (TAT). At times they may be competing. There have been studies in the literature modeling the turnaround time from historical data for runs with the same recipe and later using that to derive the resource allocation for subsequent runs. [3]. This approach is more feasible in predominantly simulation dominated tools but for edge operation dominated flow it may not be possible especially if some processing acceleration methods like pattern matching or hierarchical processing is involved. In this paper, we suggest an alternative method of providing target turnaround time and managing the priority of jobs while not doing any upfront resource modeling and resource planning. The methodology then systematically either meets the turnaround time need and potentially lets the user know if it will not as soon as possible. This builds on top of the Calibre Cluster Management (CalCM) resource management work previously published [1][2]. The paper describes the initial demonstration of the concept.

  6. Turnaround Principals: An Unmistakable Conclusion--Site-Level Success Stems from Superintendent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbach, Harold J.; Butler, Alfred R., IV

    2005-01-01

    The authors of this article were recently privileged to spend five days with a group of 10 talented principals who have been charged with turning around academically low-performing schools in their respective districts. These principals were selected as participants in a Turnaround Specialist Program initiated by Gov. Mark R. Warner of Virginia…

  7. Investigating the Role of Human Resources in School Turnaround: Evidence from Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teachers are generally recognized as the schooling factor accounting for the highest proportion of student learning outcomes (Aaronson et al., 2007; Hanushek, 1986). This implies the quick and dramatic improvement in school performance observed in turnaround (TA) schools was associated with a major change in the performance of its teachers. This…

  8. State Capacity to Support School Turnaround. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2015-4012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanenbaum, Courtney; Boyle, Andrea; Graczewski, Cheryl; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Dragoset, Lisa; Hallgren, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    One objective of the U.S. Department of Education's (ED) School Improvement Grants (SIG) and Race to the Top (RTT) program is to help states enhance their capacity to support the turnaround of low-performing schools. This capacity may be important, given how difficult it is to produce substantial and sustained achievement gains in low-performing…

  9. Operational Authority, Support, and Monitoring of School Turnaround. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2014-4008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rebecca; Graczewski, Cheryl; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Murray, Matthew; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Tanenbaum, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    The federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) program, to which $3 billion were allocated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), supports schools attempting to turn around a history of low performance. School turnaround also is a focus of Race to the Top (RTT), another ARRA-supported initiative, which involved a roughly $4…

  10. Choosing a School Turnaround Provider. Lessons Learned. Volume 1, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Anne Turnbaugh; Fleischman, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Droves of school turnaround providers are chasing the massive federal infusion of funds flowing into failing schools. They arrive armed with glossy materials, impressive sounding claims, and, often, citing their prior relationships or experiences with one's school to support their promises of great service and impressive outcomes. But, are their…

  11. Participatory Democracy and Struggling Schools: Making Space for Youth in School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Ben; Jefferson, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Background/Context:Federal policy, as codified in Race to the Top (RTT) funding guidelines, outlines four types of intervention: turnaround, restart, closure, and transformation. RTT has embraced a technocratic paradigm for school reform that frames choice less as the opportunity for the public to deliberate about what it wants from its schools…

  12. Tinkering and Turnarounds: Understanding the Contemporary Campaign to Improve Low-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    An unprecedented amount of attention in recent years has been focused on turning around low-performing schools. Drawing on insights from Tyack and Cuban's (1995) "Tinkering Toward Utopia," the article analyzes the forces behind the school turnaround phenomenon and how they have evolved since passage of the No Child Left Behind Act. The article…

  13. 61. FAN HOUSE BUILT DURING LOW MOOR ERA; PEDESTALS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. FAN HOUSE BUILT DURING LOW MOOR ERA; PEDESTALS ON WHICH FAN RESTED IS IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Kaymoor Coal Mine, South side of New River, upstream of New River Gorge Bridge, Fayetteville, Fayette County, WV

  14. 26. photographer unknown 29 December 1937 FLOATING MOORING BIT INSTALLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. photographer unknown 29 December 1937 FLOATING MOORING BIT INSTALLED IN LOCK SIDEWALL. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  15. James Moores Ball: Ophthalmologist, medical historian, bibliophile.

    PubMed

    Feibel, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    James Moores Ball (1862-1929) was an ophthalmologist in St. Louis, Missouri, who excelled as a medical historian and collector of rare and historic books about the history of anatomy. During his lifetime, he was best known as the author of a comprehensive, authoritative, and popular textbook titled Modern Ophthalmology First published in 1904, there were five further editions. Ball was very interested in the history of anatomy and wrote two books on this subject, the first being a biography of Andreas Vesalius, one of the earliest in English, and the second a history of the resurrection men or grave robbers who sold corpses to professors of anatomy and surgery for teaching purposes. His legacy today is the 470 volumes of his personal library, which are now in the Archives and Rare Books department of the Becker Medical Library of the Washington University School of Medicine. These texts are one of their major collections, concentrating on the history of anatomy, beginning with a first edition of Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica and holding many important and beautiful landmark volumes of anatomical atlases. PMID:27316691

  16. Josephson-coupled Moore-Read states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormozi, Layla; Moller, Gunnar; Slingerland, Joost; Simon, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We study a quantum Hall bilayer system of bosons at total filling fraction ν = 1, and analyze the the coupled Moore-Read state [PRL 108, 256809 (2012)] that results from the interplay between short-ranged interactions and interlayer pair-tunneling terms. Supported by the exact solution of the full zero-energy quasihole spectrum and a conformal field theory analysis, we develop an intuitive picture of this system as two coupled composite fermion superconductors. In this language, pair tunneling plays the role of Josephson coupling between the superconducting phases of the two layers, which gaps out the Goldstone mode associated with interlayer particle distribution. This coupling further implies that non-Abelian quasiparticles are confined between the layers. In the bulk, the resulting phase has the topological order of the Halperin 220 state i.e. U(1)2 x U(1)2 but the edge spectrum at a fixed particle number reveals an unexpected U(1)4 x U(1) structure. We attribute this behavior to the fact that this state is realized in a rotated basis of layer index, where the charged and neutral sectors are separated. With the charge quantum number being conserved but without any such restriction on the neutral sector we show that the edge spectrum must take the observed form.

  17. Josephson-coupled Moore-Read states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Gunnar; Hormozi, Layla; Slingerland, Joost; Simon, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    We study a quantum Hall bilayer system of bosons at total filling factor ν =1 , and study the phase that results from short-ranged pair tunneling combined with short-ranged interlayer interactions. We introduce two exactly solvable model Hamiltonians which both yield the coupled Moore-Read state [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 256809 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.256809] as a ground state, when projected onto fixed particle numbers in each layer. One of these Hamiltonians describes a gapped topological phase, while the other is gapless. However, on introduction of a pair-tunneling term, the second system becomes gapped and develops the same topological order as the gapped Hamiltonian. Supported by the exact solution of the full zero-energy quasihole spectrum and a conformal field-theory approach, we develop an intuitive picture of this system as two coupled composite fermion superconductors. In this language, pair tunneling provides a Josephson coupling of the superconducting phases of the two layers, and gaps out the Goldstone mode associated with particle transport between the layers. In particular, this implies that quasiparticles are confined between the layers. In the bulk, the resulting phase has the topological order of the Halperin 220 phase with U(1)2× U (1)2 topological order, but it is realized in the symmetric/antisymmetric basis of the layer index. Consequently, the edge spectrum at a fixed particle number reveals an unexpected U(1)4× U (1) structure.

  18. Charles Bachman Moore (1920-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, William; Krehbiel, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Charles B. Moore passed away 2 March 2010 at the age of 89, following a long and varied scientific career in meteorology and the atmospheric sciences. He will be remembered best for his substantial contributions in the field of atmospheric electricity and for the students and faculty he guided as chairman of Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research and professor of physics at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He possessed a unique sense of humor and an excellent memory that served as a reservoir of scientific and historical knowledge. Like many of his generation, Charlie's career was profoundly influenced by the Second World War. Following Pearl Harbor, he interrupted his undergraduate studies in chemical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology to enlist in the Army Air Corps, where he became the chief weather equipment officer in the 10th Weather Squadron, setting up and operating remote meteorological stations behind enemy lines in the China-Burma-India theater. He served with distinction alongside Athelstan Spilhaus Sr., who had been one of Charlie's instructors in the Army meteorology program.

  19. Slow-drift motion: Practical estimation of mooring line damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bompais, X.; Boulluec, M. Le; Dekindt, F.; Marin, S.; Molin, B.

    1994-12-31

    A simple method is presented, that permits to calculate the slow-drift damping induced by mooring lines. It is based on a linearization of the catenary line equations. Comparisons are made with experimental results, and with values obtained with a fully non linear code, with a good agreement. An application case is then presented for a storage barge in the Gulf of Guinea, where it is found that mooring lines bring the dominant contribution to the low-frequency damping.

  20. Actuator for automatic cruising system

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.

    1989-03-07

    An actuator for an automatic cruising system is described, comprising: a casing; a control shaft provided in the casing for rotational movement; a control motor for driving the control shaft; an input shaft; an electromagnetic clutch and a reduction gear which are provided between the control motor and the control shaft; and an external linkage mechanism operatively connected to the control shaft; wherein the reduction gear is a type of Ferguson's mechanical paradox gear having a pinion mounted on the input shaft always connected to the control motor; a planetary gear meshing with the pinion so as to revolve around the pinion; a static internal gear meshing with the planetary gear and connected with the electromagnetic clutch for movement to a position restricting rotation of the static internal gear; and a rotary internal gear fixed on the control shaft and meshed with the planetary gear, the rotary internal gear having a number of teeth slightly different from a number of teeth of the static internal gear; and the electromagnetic clutch has a tubular electromagnetic coil coaxially provided around the input shaft and an engaging means for engaging and disengaging with the static internal gear in accordance with on-off operation of the electromagnetic coil.

  1. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  2. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  3. MITESS: a moored in situ trace element serial sampler for deep-sea moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jory; Betts, Joe; Boyle, Edward

    2002-11-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested a trace element clean sampling device for long term deployment (6 months or longer) on deep-sea moorings. The device collects unfiltered 500 ml samples by opening and closing a bottle originally filled with dilute acid (passively replaced by denser seawater). Each sample is collected by an independent module, so failure of a single unit does not affect others. Seven years of deployments have refined the sampler into a rugged and reliable device. The device also can be hung below a wire to collect water column samples. Automated trace element sampler (ATE), a spinoff from moored in situ trace element serial sampler, is a single-module device for allowing trace metal clean near-surface samples to be collected by personnel not trained in trace element sampling. ATE/VANE, another variation, allows the same personnel to collect upper water column profiles on conventional hydrowire. The systems have been tested by comparing samples collected for lead and iron with those collected by previously proven sampling techniques.

  4. Sampling efficiency of the Moore egg collector

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Mueller, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative studies focusing on the collection of semibuoyant fish eggs, which are associated with a pelagic broadcast-spawning reproductive strategy, are often conducted to evaluate reproductive success. Many of the fishes in this reproductive guild have suffered significant reductions in range and abundance. However, the efficiency of the sampling gear used to evaluate reproduction is often unknown and renders interpretation of the data from these studies difficult. Our objective was to assess the efficiency of a modified Moore egg collector (MEC) using field and laboratory trials. Gear efficiency was assessed by releasing a known quantity of gellan beads with a specific gravity similar to that of eggs from representatives of this reproductive guild (e.g., the Arkansas River Shiner Notropis girardi) into an outdoor flume and recording recaptures. We also used field trials to determine how discharge and release location influenced gear efficiency given current methodological approaches. The flume trials indicated that gear efficiency ranged between 0.0% and 9.5% (n = 57) in a simple 1.83-m-wide channel and was positively related to discharge. Efficiency in the field trials was lower, ranging between 0.0% and 3.6%, and was negatively related to bead release distance from the MEC and discharge. The flume trials indicated that the gellan beads were not distributed uniformly across the channel, although aggregation was reduced at higher discharges. This clustering of passively drifting particles should be considered when selecting placement sites for an MEC; further, the use of multiple devices may be warranted in channels with multiple areas of concentrated flow.

  5. Obituary: Ben Hawkins Moore, 1921-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James F.

    2004-12-01

    Ben H. Moore, emeritus professor of physics, astronomy and earth sciences at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, died 7 November 2003, in South Padre Island, Texas. Ben was born 18 March 1921, in Kansas City, Missouri, to Fraser D. and Cora R. (Hawkins) Moore. Though his parents provided a strong guiding influence on Ben's development, Ben's career was impacted most clearly by his work as a student and research assistant for Allen Basset (Ben's father-in-law) at Park College. This relationship turned Ben's early interest in chemistry and biology toward a focus on physics. Ben received his undergraduate degree from Park College where he graduated Phi Delta Kappa. He received a MS in physics from Kansas State University. He also did post-masters work at the University of Kansas, the University of Colorado, the University of Washington and Temple University. In addition to his work as a research assistant, Ben taught at Park College as well as Washington Kansas High School, Wyandotte High School, and Kansas City Kansas Junior College before moving to St. Cloud State University in 1960. He retired from this teaching position in May 1982 but remained involved in activities of his department, including some teaching, through most of his years in retirement. Ben's accomplishments were mainly centered on his teaching. His development of courses and his rapport with students consistently brought praise from both his colleagues and his students. Above all, his work involved innovative development of the curriculum in the sciences at St. Cloud State. Soon after his arrival at the university, Ben took over the fledgling field geology course and continued to shape this offering into a program in earth sciences. The popularity of his classes, which attracted both general students and a growing number of majors, finally enabled the university to establish an earth sciences department in the late 1960's and Ben was the first chair of that department. In the mid-1960's Ben took

  6. Robust predictive cruise control for commercial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junell, Jaime; Tumer, Kagan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we explore learning-based predictive cruise control and the impact of this technology on increasing fuel efficiency for commercial trucks. Traditional cruise control is wasteful when maintaining a constant velocity over rolling hills. Predictive cruise control (PCC) is able to look ahead at future road conditions and solve for a cost-effective course of action. Model- based controllers have been implemented in this field but cannot accommodate many complexities of a dynamic environment which includes changing road and vehicle conditions. In this work, we focus on incorporating a learner into an already successful model- based predictive cruise controller in order to improve its performance. We explore back propagating neural networks to predict future errors then take actions to prevent said errors from occurring. The results show that this approach improves the model based PCC by up to 60% under certain conditions. In addition, we explore the benefits of classifier ensembles to further improve the gains due to intelligent cruise control.

  7. Distributed temperature measurement using a dual-core fiber with an integrated miniature turn-around

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Hines, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Double-ended configuration is commonly deployed in Raman-based distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems to achieve a high accuracy in temperature measurement. To show the feasibility of multicore optical fiber (MCF) in this application, we will demonstrate distributed temperature measurements using a sensor consisting of a dual-core MCF and an integrated, distal end turn-around in a doubled-ended configuration. The dual-core fiber and turn-around, both coated with polyimide, are suitable for high temperature use. Additionally, the device is ideal for long length, distributed temperature detection in confined spaces, with a finished outer diameter of less than 300 μm. The results show that wavelength dependent loss (WDL) is easily removed in the setup and an accurate temperature measurement can be achieved reliably over a wide temperature range.

  8. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data/Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William; Chachad, Girish; Hochstetler, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Gate Turnaround Management (IGTM) concept was developed to improve the gate turnaround performance at the airport by leveraging relevant historical data to support optimization of airport gate operations, which include: taxi to the gate, gate services, push back, taxi to the runway, and takeoff, based on available resources, constraints, and uncertainties. By analyzing events of gate operations, primary performance dependent attributes of these events were identified for the historical data analysis such that performance models can be developed based on uncertainties to support descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive functions. A system architecture was developed to examine system requirements in support of such a concept. An IGTM prototype was developed to demonstrate the concept using a distributed network and collaborative decision tools for stakeholders to meet on time pushback performance under uncertainties.

  9. Timeliness “at a glance”: assessing the turnaround time through the six sigma metrics.

    PubMed

    Ialongo, Cristiano; Bernardini, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Almost thirty years of systematic analysis have proven the turnaround time to be a fundamental dimension for the clinical laboratory. Several indicators are to date available to assess and report quality with respect to timeliness, but they sometimes lack the communicative immediacy and accuracy. The six sigma is a paradigm developed within the industrial domain for assessing quality and addressing goal and issues. The sigma level computed through the Z-score method is a simple and straightforward tool which delivers quality by a universal dimensionless scale and allows to handle non-normal data. Herein we report our preliminary experience in using the sigma level to assess the change in urgent (STAT) test turnaround time due to the implementation of total automation. We found that the Z-score method is a valuable and easy to use method for assessing and communicating the quality level of laboratory timeliness, providing a good correspondence with the actual change in efficiency which was retrospectively observed.

  10. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows.

    PubMed

    Serrano, O; Ruhon, R; Lavery, P S; Kendrick, G A; Hickey, S; Masqué, P; Arias-Ortiz, A; Steven, A; Duarte, C M

    2016-01-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m(-2) in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m(-2) yr(-1). The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m(-2) in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation. PMID:26979407

  11. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2016-03-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m‑2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m‑2 yr‑1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m‑2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.

  12. Impact of PIRATA Moorings in the Operational MERCATOR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F.; Benkiran, M.; Cousin, R.; Du Penhoat, Y.; Greiner, E.; Provost, C.

    2005-12-01

    We test the impact of assimilating PIRATA mooring temperature and salinity data in the new version of the operational MERCATOR model (PSY1V2 system). The ten PIRATA moorings are situated in the tropical Atlantic, between 15°N and 10°S, and data are collected in real time and provided by the CORIOLIS project. Two run experiments were performed, one assimilating altimetric data and all available in situ data (the operational system) and a second one assimilating the same data set but the PIRATA mooring data. The operational system is sensitive to assimilating PIRATA data in the tropics, on the temperature and salinity profiles as well as on the current fields. Global statistical analyses have been used to estimate the reduction of the biases between prevision model and observations. The impact of PIRATA data is positive in the equatorial band where the equatorial thermocline is better simulated (in term of position and temperature gradient). It is also positive in all layers between surface and 500 meters except in the near surface layer (0-30m) where other assimilated data are more numerous and where the impact of mooring data is probably less sensitive. Direct comparisons with ADCP current moorings are also shown. The comparison is encouraging with significant correlations, even though the time series are limited in time and space.

  13. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m−2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m−2 yr−1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m−2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation. PMID:26979407

  14. Urban-rural migration in Australia: a process view of the turnaround.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G J; Smailes, P J

    1985-01-01

    "This paper summarizes the evidence for the existence of a trend toward population deconcentration in Australia at the macro and meso (national and state) levels. It seeks to relate processes of population dynamics identified at macro, meso and micro levels to several hypotheses which have been put forward to explain the turnaround. A preliminary explanatory model which links causal mechanisms operating at different levels of the spatial and urban hierarchy is outlined."

  15. When propfans cruise, will LDN 65 fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Fred; Dickerson, William

    1990-01-01

    The type and extent of response that may be expected from the persons exposed to the noise of propfans cruising overhead is examined. The cruise mode is of particular interest because it appears that it is in this mode that the propfan airplane noise differs substantially from the noise of present jet-powered airplanes. Early test data on propfan engines suggests that noise levels on the ground under the flight track of commercial propfan transports may approach 65 decibels. To explore the reaction of the exposed population to repeated noise levels of this magnitude, it may be helpful to review some of the pertinent literature on the effects of environmental noise.

  16. Systems integration studies for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Technical progress in each of the disciplinary research areas affecting the design of supersonic cruise aircraft is discussed. The NASA AST/SCAR Program supported the integration of these technical advances into supersonic cruise aircraft configuration concepts. While the baseline concepts reflect differing design philosophy, all reflect a level of economic performance considerably above the current foreign aircraft as well as the former U.S. SST. Range-payload characteristics of the study configurating show significant improvement, while meeting environmental goals such as takeoff and landing noise and upper atmospheric pollution.

  17. Where the world stands still: turnaround as a strong test of ΛCDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidou, V.; Tomaras, T.N. E-mail: tomaras@physics.uoc.gr

    2014-09-01

    Our intuitive understanding of cosmic structure formation works best in scales small enough so that isolated, bound, relaxed gravitating systems are no longer adjusting their radius; and large enough so that space and matter follow the average expansion of the Universe. Yet one of the most robust predictions of ΛCDM cosmology concerns the scale that separates these limits: the turnaround radius, which is the non-expanding shell furthest away from the center of a bound structure. We show that the maximum possible value of the turnaround radius within the framework of the ΛCDM model is, for a given mass M, equal to (3GM/Λ c{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, with G Newton's constant and c the speed of light, independently of cosmic epoch, exact nature of dark matter, or baryonic effects. We discuss the possible use of this prediction as an observational test for ΛCDM cosmology. Current data appear to favor ΛCDM over alternatives with local inhomogeneities and no Λ. However there exist several local-universe structures that have, within errors, reached their limiting size. With improved determinations of their turnaround radii and the enclosed mass, these objects may challenge the limit and ΛCDM cosmology.

  18. The challenge and the future of health care turnaround plans: evidence from the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Francesca; Cuccurullo, Corrado; Lega, Federico

    2012-06-01

    Over the last two decades, health policy and governance in Italy have undergone decentralisation at the regional level. The central government was expected to play a guiding role in defining minimum care standards and controlling health expenditures at the regional level in order to keep the entire Italian National Health System (INHS) on track. Although health performance trends have been consistent across regions, public health expenditures have been variable and contributed to a cumulative deficit of 38 billion Euros from 2001 to 2010. To address the deficit, the government called for a resolution introducing a partial bail-out plan and later institutionalised a process to facilitate a turnaround. The upturn started with the development of a formal regional turnaround plan that proposed strategic actions to address the structural determinants of costs. The effectiveness of this tool was widely questioned, and many critics suggested that it was focused more on methods to address short-term issues than on the long-term strategic reconfiguration that is required for regional health systems to ultimately address the structural causes of deficits.We propose an interpretative framework to understand the advantages and disadvantages of turnaround plans, and we apply the findings to the development of policy recommendations for the structure, methods, processes and contexts of the implementation of this tool.

  19. Obituary: Ben Hawkins Moore, 1921-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James F.

    2004-12-01

    Ben H. Moore, emeritus professor of physics, astronomy and earth sciences at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, died 7 November 2003, in South Padre Island, Texas. Ben was born 18 March 1921, in Kansas City, Missouri, to Fraser D. and Cora R. (Hawkins) Moore. Though his parents provided a strong guiding influence on Ben's development, Ben's career was impacted most clearly by his work as a student and research assistant for Allen Basset (Ben's father-in-law) at Park College. This relationship turned Ben's early interest in chemistry and biology toward a focus on physics. Ben received his undergraduate degree from Park College where he graduated Phi Delta Kappa. He received a MS in physics from Kansas State University. He also did post-masters work at the University of Kansas, the University of Colorado, the University of Washington and Temple University. In addition to his work as a research assistant, Ben taught at Park College as well as Washington Kansas High School, Wyandotte High School, and Kansas City Kansas Junior College before moving to St. Cloud State University in 1960. He retired from this teaching position in May 1982 but remained involved in activities of his department, including some teaching, through most of his years in retirement. Ben's accomplishments were mainly centered on his teaching. His development of courses and his rapport with students consistently brought praise from both his colleagues and his students. Above all, his work involved innovative development of the curriculum in the sciences at St. Cloud State. Soon after his arrival at the university, Ben took over the fledgling field geology course and continued to shape this offering into a program in earth sciences. The popularity of his classes, which attracted both general students and a growing number of majors, finally enabled the university to establish an earth sciences department in the late 1960's and Ben was the first chair of that department. In the mid-1960's Ben took

  20. Barracuda field: New records for turret moored FPSO`s

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, P.R.B.

    1995-12-01

    An early production system will introduce several innovations and set records when it comes on stream at Barracuda, the third largest of the giant oilfields offshore Brazil. The floating production unit will be a 52,000 dwt FPSO, turret type mooring and a process plant with capacity to process 30,000 bopd. It will remain on location for a minimum of five years. The tanker modifications and overhaul are underway. The FPSO will be prepared to process the oil and offload it to a tandem moored shuttle tanker. The produced gas will be both reinjected and exported to shore through a dedicated riser pipeline. This unit will comprise the world`s largest turret with capacity for 34 risers and the world`s deepest FPSO, moored in 840 meters water depth.

  1. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  2. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  3. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  4. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  5. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  6. 48 CFR 225.7007 - Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain. 225.7007 Section 225.7007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... mooring chain....

  7. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  8. Maintaining Moore's law: enabling cost-friendly dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Arindam; Ryckaert, Julien; Mercha, Abdelkarim; Verkest, Diederik; Ronse, Kurt; Thean, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Moore's Law (Moore's Observation) has been driving the progress in semiconductor technology for the past 50 years. The semiconductor industry is at a juncture where significant increase in manufacturing cost is foreseen to sustain the past trend of dimensional scaling. At N10 and N7 technology nodes, the industry is struggling to find a cost-friendly solution. At a device level, technologists have come up with novel devices (finFET, Gate-All-Around), material innovations (SiGe, Ge) to boost performance and reduce power consumption. On the other hand, from the patterning side, the relative slow ramp-up of alternative lithography technologies like EUVL and DSA pushes the industry to adopt a severely multi-patterning-based solution. Both of these technological transformations have a big impact on die yield and eventually die cost. This paper is aimed to analyze the impact on manufacturing cost to keep the Moore's law alive. We have proposed and analyzed various patterning schemes that can enable cost-friendly scaling. We evaluated the impact of EUVL introduction on tackling the high cost of manufacturing. The primary objective of this paper is to maintain Moore's scaling from a patterning perspective and analyzing EUV lithography introduction at a die level.

  9. Getting It Wrong: Comment on Moore's "Behaviorism and the Stages of Scientific Activity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, William M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on Moore's (2010) illogical attack on the matching law which was published by "The Behavior Analyst." Moore begins by attacking the psychophysical power law because he claims it is based on mentalism. One may argue about theory, but one cannot argue with data. Moore's attack on the generalized matching law is…

  10. Thomas E. Moore's "Sour Sofkee" in the Tradition of Muskogee Dialect Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petete, Timothy; Womack, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The Muskogee dialect letters provide one of the most interesting combinations of fictional viewpoints and political commentary in American Indian letters. This article features the life story of Thomas E. Moore. This article also presents the fictional literary works of Moore and compares his dialect writings to Alexander Posey. Moore is the most…

  11. Computing the Moore-Penrose Inverse of a Matrix with a Computer Algebra System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    In this paper "Derive" functions are provided for the computation of the Moore-Penrose inverse of a matrix, as well as for solving systems of linear equations by means of the Moore-Penrose inverse. Making it possible to compute the Moore-Penrose inverse easily with one of the most commonly used Computer Algebra Systems--and to have the blueprint…

  12. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of anchor and mooring chain. 252.225-7019 Section 252.225-7019 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and mooring chain. As prescribed in 225.7007-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Anchor and Mooring Chain (DEC 2009)) (a) Definition. “Component,” as used in this clause, means...

  13. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of anchor and mooring chain. 252.225-7019 Section 252.225-7019 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and mooring chain. As prescribed in 225.7007-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Anchor and Mooring Chain (DEC 2009)) (a) Definition. “Component,” as used in this clause, means...

  14. Will Moores law be sufficient?

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2004-07-01

    It seems well understood that supercomputer simulation is an enabler for scientific discoveries, weapons, and other activities of value to society. It also seems widely believed that Moore's Law will make progressively more powerful supercomputers over time and thus enable more of these contributions. This paper seeks to add detail to these arguments, revealing them to be generally correct but not a smooth and effortless progression. This paper will review some key problems that can be solved with supercomputer simulation, showing that more powerful supercomputers will be useful up to a very high yet finite limit of around 1021 FLOPS (1 Zettaflops) . The review will also show the basic nature of these extreme problems. This paper will review work by others showing that the theoretical maximum supercomputer power is very high indeed, but will explain how a straightforward extrapolation of Moore's Law will lead to technological maturity in a few decades. The power of a supercomputer at the maturity of Moore's Law will be very high by today's standards at 1016-1019 FLOPS (100 Petaflops to 10 Exaflops), depending on architecture, but distinctly below the level required for the most ambitious applications. Having established that Moore's Law will not be that last word in supercomputing, this paper will explore the nearer term issue of what a supercomputer will look like at maturity of Moore's Law. Our approach will quantify the maximum performance as permitted by the laws of physics for extension of current technology and then find a design that approaches this limit closely. We study a 'multi-architecture' for supercomputers that combines a microprocessor with other 'advanced' concepts and find it can reach the limits as well. This approach should be quite viable in the future because the microprocessor would provide compatibility with existing codes and programming styles while the 'advanced' features would provide a boost to the limits of performance.

  15. Turnaround Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Obama administration has grand hopes for turning around the nation's lowest-performing schools, in part by allocating $3.5 billion for School Improvement Grants. Unfortunately, there simply aren't enough qualified principals to replace those mandated to be fired under two of the four school improvement models that the federal government says…

  16. Worry and its correlates onboard cruise ships.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Katharina; Larsen, Svein; Marnburg, Einar; Øgaard, Torvald

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined job-specific worry, as well as possible predictors of such worry, namely job-specific self-efficacy and supervisor dispositionism. 133 non-supervising crew members at different departments onboard upmarket cruise ships filled in a questionnaire during one of their journeys. Findings show that employees report moderate amounts of job-specific worry and the galley crew reports significantly greater amounts of worry than the other departments. Results also indicate that cruise ship crews worry somewhat more than workers in the land based service sector. Furthermore it was found that supervisor dispositionism, i.e. supervisors with fixed mindsets, was related to greater amounts of worry among the crew. Surprisingly, job-specific self-efficacy was unrelated to job-specific worry.

  17. Tom Cruise is dangerous and irresponsible.

    PubMed

    Neill, Ushma S

    2005-08-01

    Yes, even the JCI can weigh in on celebrity gossip, but hopefully without becoming a tabloid. Rather, we want to shine a light on the reckless comments actor Tom Cruise has recently made that psychiatry is a "quack" field and his belief that postpartum depression cannot be treated pharmacologically. We can only hope that his influence as a celebrity does not hold back those in need of psychiatric treatment. PMID:16075033

  18. Tom Cruise is dangerous and irresponsible

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2005-01-01

    Yes, even the JCI can weigh in on celebrity gossip, but hopefully without becoming a tabloid. Rather, we want to shine a light on the reckless comments actor Tom Cruise has recently made that psychiatry is a “quack” field and his belief that postpartum depression cannot be treated pharmacologically. We can only hope that his influence as a celebrity does not hold back those in need of psychiatric treatment. PMID:16075033

  19. Supersonic cruise aircraft research: An annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography, with abstracts, consists of 69 publications arranged in chronological order. The material may be useful to those interested in supersonic cruise fighter/penetrator/interceptor airplanes. Two pertinent conferences on military supercruise aircraft are considered as single items; one contains 37 papers and the other 29 papers. In addition, several related bibliographies are included which cover supersonic civil aircraft and military aircraft studies at the Langley Research Center. There is also an author index.

  20. Mars Global Surveyor: Cruising to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Glenn E.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft was launched on November 7, 1996, and is now cruising to Mars. While the launch was excellent, and the spacecraft and its science payload are in perfect operating condition, a broken deployment damper on one of the two solar arrays has posed some concern relative to the use of that solar array as a drag surfae during aerobraking operations at Mars.

  1. Mooring apparatus and method of installation for deep water tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, A.F.; Zimmer.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for mooring a floating tension leg platform to a subsea anchorage utilizing a plurality of linear mooring tendons which each may be provided with an enlarged upper connector. The apparatus comprises a plurality of mooring porches attached to an external surface of the floating platform, each mooring porch including at least one load ring having an upwardly facing bearing surface and being interrupted creating a side-entry opening for receiving one of the linear mooring tendons whereby each one of the linear mooring tendons may be moved laterally through one of the side-entry openings and the enlarged upper connector received in the upwardly facing bearing surface to attach the mooring tendon to the floating platform.

  2. Anatomy of a public health agency turnaround: the case of the general health district in Mahoning County.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Peggy A; Stefanak, Matthew; Dessens, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A turnaround describes an organization's ability to recover from successive periods of decline. Current and projected declines in US economic conditions continue to place local public health departments at risk of fiscal exigency. This examination focused on turnaround methodologies used by a local public health department to reverse successive periods of operational and financial declines. Illustrations are provided on the value added by implementing financial ratio and trend analysis in addition to using evidence-based private sector turnaround strategies of retrenchment, repositioning, and reorganization. Evidence has shown how the financial analysis and strategies aided in identifying operational weakness and set in motion corrective measures. The Public Health Uniform Data System is introduced along with a list of standards offered for mainstreaming these and other routine stewardship practices to diagnose, predict, and prevent agency declines.

  3. On the turn-around phenomenon in n-MOS transistors under NBTI conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabdelmoumene, A.; Djezzar, B.; Chenouf, A.; Tahi, H.; Zatout, B.; Kechouane, M.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally analyzed negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) stress/recovery cycle on n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (n-MOSFET's). Data obtained by current-voltage (I-V) and charge pumping (CP) techniques have revealed a turn-around phenomenon in both threshold voltage shift (ΔVth) and maximum CP current shift (ΔICP-Max). This allows us to separate the evolution of interface traps (permanent) and near interfacial oxide traps "border traps" (recoverable) as a function of the stress time. The ability of separation comes from the fact that interface and oxide traps induce opposite shifts in ΔVth. Contrarily to NBTI/n-MOSFET, NBTI/p-MOSFET is unable to achieve trap separation because both trap types induce shifts in the same direction. Exploiting the turn-around effect, we have been able to follow the evolution of the degradation over the stress time. NBTI stress/relaxation cycle CP measurements on n-MOSFET have shown a progressive creation of traps; starting from the interface traps to near interfacial traps. This new and simple procedure will give a deeper insight into the dynamics of traps build up under NBTI conditions.

  4. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William W.; Ingram, Carla D.; Ahlquist, Douglas Kurt; Chachad, Girish H.

    2016-01-01

    "Gate Turnaround" plays a key role in the National Air Space (NAS) gate-to-gate performance by receiving aircraft when they reach their destination airport, and delivering aircraft into the NAS upon departing from the gate and subsequent takeoff. The time spent at the gate in meeting the planned departure time is influenced by many factors and often with considerable uncertainties. Uncertainties such as weather, early or late arrivals, disembarking and boarding passengers, unloading/reloading cargo, aircraft logistics/maintenance services and ground handling, traffic in ramp and movement areas for taxi-in and taxi-out, and departure queue management for takeoff are likely encountered on the daily basis. The Integrated Gate Turnaround Management (IGTM) concept is leveraging relevant historical data to support optimization of the gate operations, which include arrival, at the gate, departure based on constraints (e.g., available gates at the arrival, ground crew and equipment for the gate turnaround, and over capacity demand upon departure), and collaborative decision-making. The IGTM concept provides effective information services and decision tools to the stakeholders, such as airline dispatchers, gate agents, airport operators, ramp controllers, and air traffic control (ATC) traffic managers and ground controllers to mitigate uncertainties arising from both nominal and off-nominal airport gate operations. IGTM will provide NAS stakeholders customized decision making tools through a User Interface (UI) by leveraging historical data (Big Data), net-enabled Air Traffic Management (ATM) live data, and analytics according to dependencies among NAS parameters for the stakeholders to manage and optimize the NAS performance in the gate turnaround domain. The application will give stakeholders predictable results based on the past and current NAS performance according to selected decision trees through the UI. The predictable results are generated based on analysis of the

  5. Technical note: GODESS - a profiling mooring in the Gotland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prien, Ralf D.; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2016-07-01

    This note describes a profiling mooring with an interdisciplinary suite of sensors taking profiles between 180 and 30 m depth. It consists of an underwater winch, moored below 180 m depth, and a profiling instrumentation platform. In its described setup it can take about 200 profiles at pre-programmed times or intervals with one set of batteries. This allows for studies over an extended period of time (e.g. two daily profiles over a time of 3 months). The Gotland Deep Environmental Sampling Station (GODESS) in the Eastern Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea is aimed at investigations of redoxcline dynamics. The described system can be readily adapted to other research foci by changing the profiling instrumentation platform and its payload.

  6. Hip hemiarthroplasty: from Venable and Bohlman to Moore and Thompson.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Quiennec, Steffen; Guissou, Isaac

    2014-03-01

    In 1939, Frederick R. Thompson of New York and Austin T. Moore of South Carolina separately developed replacements for the entire ball of the hip. These were used to treat hip fractures and also certain arthritis cases. This type of hemiarthroplasty addressed the problem of the arthritic femoral head only. The diseased acetabulum (hip socket) was not replaced. This prosthesis consisted of a metal stem that was placed into the marrow cavity of the femur, connected in one piece with a metal ball fitted into the hip socket. Bohlman and Austin T. Moore (1939) collaborated for the fabrication and implantation of a custom made 12-inch-long vitallium (metal alloy invented by Venable) femoral head prosthesis for a patient with a recurrent giant cell tumour. This prosthesis functioned well and later on influenced the development of long stem femoral head prostheses.

  7. Genes and social justice: a Rawlsian reply to Moore.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colin

    2002-02-01

    In this article I critically examine Adam Moore's claim that the threshold for overriding intangible property rights and privacy rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. I argue that Moore fails to see how important advances in genetic research are to social justice. Once this point is emphasized one sees that the issue of how formidable overriding these rights are is open to much debate. There are strong reasons, on grounds of social justice, for thinking the importance of such rights is likely to be diminished in the interests of ensuring a more just distribution of genes essential to pursuing what John Rawls calls a person's 'rational plan of life'.

  8. The Moore-Penrose Inverse of Block Magic Rectangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakopian, Y. R.; Eloyan, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    As is known, a semi-magic square is an "n x n" matrix having the sum of entries in each row and each column equal to a constant. This note generalizes this notion and introduce a special class of block matrices called "block magic rectangles." It is proved that the Moore-Penrose inverse of a block magic rectangle is also a block magic rectangle.

  9. A study of altitude-constrained supersonic cruise transport concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tice, David C.; Martin, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of restricting maximum cruise altitude on the mission performance of two supersonic transport concepts across a selection of cruise Mach numbers is studied. Results indicate that a trapezoidal wing concept can be competitive with an arrow wing depending on the altitude and Mach number constraints imposed. The higher wing loading of trapezoidal wing configurations gives them an appreciably lower average cruise altitude than the lower wing loading of the arrow wing configurations, and this advantage increases as the maximum allowable cruise altitude is reduced.

  10. On tethered sample and mooring systems near irregular asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-10-01

    A tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is investigated in this paper. In this system the spacecraft is moored to the surface of an irregular asteroid such as 216 Kleopatra by using a rocket-propelled anchor with a cable. The rocket-propelled anchor is a kind of space penetrator, which can inject into asteroids at high speeds generated by its own rocket engine. It can be used to explore the interior structure of asteroids, and it can also be used as a sample collector. When the sampling mission is done, the sample can be pulled back to the spacecraft with the anchor. Using this method, the spacecraft can be kept in a safe region in which it cannot be trapped by the gravitational field of the asteroid. This work is concerned with the dynamics of the tethered system near irregular asteroids. First, a shape model and gravitational field model of irregular asteroids are built. Then, the configuration and the stability of the tethered system are investigated, and the quasi-periodic motion near the equilibrium point of the tethered system is analyzed. Finally, the non-uniform density distribution of the asteroids is considered. The deployment process and the oscillation of the tethered system in the uncertain asteroid gravity field are simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The feasibility of the tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is proved.

  11. Analysis of single point moored tanker using maneuvering hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, K.; Brinati, H.L.; Fucatu, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Single Point Mooring Systems (SPM) are widely used as a tanker terminal in Brazilian south coast by Petrobras, Brazilian oil company. Although different authors (Wichers, 1987, Obokata, 1987, and Jiang et al., 1988) had analyzed the dynamic stability of SPM system, the down time of these systems due to large oscillatory ship motion in the horizontal plane is significant until now. The main source of the instability of these systems is considered to be the use of inadequate hawser length and bad weather. This paper deals with the dynamic behavior of SPM moored vessels considering the influence of the environmental forces as well as shallow water effects. In a first step, a nonlinear mathematical model developed for the simulation of low speed ship maneuvers (Takashina, 1986) is extended to study the behavior of a tanker moored to a single buoy in comparison with the Obokata`s SPM model, 1987. A large number of tanker motion simulations were carried out both for deep and shallow water and different environmental conditions. The influence of the system parameters shown by the study is, in general, in a good agreement with those obtained by the traditional SPM system analysis.

  12. Uraniferous asphaltite in Moore and Potter Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.; Granata, G.E.

    1980-06-01

    Asphaltite is present in facies of the Red Cave and Panhandle lime Formation. Drill cuttings from 30 Moore County wells and 4 cores distributed across Moore and Potter Counties were examined for asphaltite. Results show that asphaltite is widespread but seems to be most abundant over structural highs, and that there is a facies control of asphaltite occurrences. In drill cuttings sandstones contain most abundant nodules yet the nodules are generally very small. Largest nodules were commonly observed in mudstone core samples. A potential exploration program should take those observations into account. Once exploitable deposits are located and if proper in situ leaching materials were developed for extraction of uranium, only sandstones could be worked. Interchannel mudstones are too impermeable and nonporous. Subsurface mining would be forced to address potential problems derived from high concentrations of hydrocarbons in the target rocks (Red Cave Formation produces oil and gas in Moore County) as well as high levels of radon (averages 100 x 10/sup -12/ curies per liter STP) in gas produced from the Panhandle Field.

  13. Auger`s lateral mooring system: Key learnings

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Installation of the Auger TLP was completed in February 1994 with first production in April 1994. The lateral mooring system (LMS) was critical to the successful mating of the hull and deck and installation of the tendons. The LMS is currently used to position the TLP over the wells during drilling operations and to assist the tendons in holding station during storm events. This paper describes the most significant lessons learned during design, fabrication, installation and operation of the LMS. The results presented in this paper will be useful to mooring system designers, component manufacturers, installation contractors and other operators pursuing floating system options for development of deepwater fields. Specific results to be addressed include design criteria, component selection, corrosion protection systems, component manufacture, anchor performance, locked coil failures, buoy pin procedures and offshore operations. The most significant aspect of this paper will be to provide the industry with the key learnings from the Auger LMS so that deepwater mooring systems may be further improved for future applications.

  14. The Turnaround Challenge: Why America's Best Opportunity to Dramatically Improve Student Achievement Lies in Our Worst-Performing Schools. Supplement to the Main Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Andrew; Guenther, William; Belfiore, Grace; Lash, Dave

    2007-01-01

    The turnaround recommendations and framework in "The Turnaround Challenge" grew out of both new research and synthesis of extensive existing research, as carried out by Mass Insight Education & Research Institute and its partners since September 2005. If the main report is the tip of the proverbial iceberg, this supplement represents at least part…

  15. Global mortality attributable to aircraft cruise emissions.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Steven R H; Britter, Rex E; Waitz, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft cruise emissions impact human health over a hemispheric scale and provide the first estimate of premature mortalities attributable to aircraft emissions globally. We estimate ∼8000 premature mortalities per year are attributable to aircraft cruise emissions. This represents ∼80% of the total impact of aviation (where the total includes the effects of landing and takeoff emissions), and ∼1% of air quality-related premature mortalities from all sources. However, we note that the impact of landing and takeoff emissions is likely to be under-resolved. Secondary H(2)SO(4)-HNO(3)-NH(3) aerosols are found to dominate mortality impacts. Due to the altitude and region of the atmosphere at which aircraft emissions are deposited, the extent of transboundary air pollution is particularly strong. For example, we describe how strong zonal westerly winds aloft, the mean meridional circulation around 30-60°N, interaction of aircraft-attributable aerosol precursors with background ammonia, and high population densities in combination give rise to an estimated ∼3500 premature mortalities per year in China and India combined, despite their relatively small current share of aircraft emissions. Subsidence of aviation-attributable aerosol and aerosol precursors occurs predominantly around the dry subtropical ridge, which results in reduced wet removal of aviation-attributable aerosol. It is also found that aircraft NO(x) emissions serve to increase oxidation of nonaviation SO(2), thereby further increasing the air quality impacts of aviation. We recommend that cruise emissions be explicitly considered in the development of policies, technologies and operational procedures designed to mitigate the air quality impacts of air transportation.

  16. Marine Educational and Research Cruise in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Lallemand, S.; Wu, F. T.

    2009-12-01

    During April 2009, we conducted a seismic and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) cruise as part of the Taiwan mountain building process study, called the TAIGER. The seismic is shot by the US Columbia University’s research vessel Langseth and the OBSs, including Taiwan, French and American OBSs, are carried out by a Taiwanese student training ship, called Yu-Yin (means to educate the young people) No. 2. Both ships take a big number of research scientists and technical staff (15-25 people) to conduct the seismic and OBS survey. In addition, the Yu-Yin No. 2 ship hosts a total of 25 students, both MS and PhD graduate students, from Taiwan, France and USA. The student group consists of 13 from the National Taiwan Ocean University (Taiwan), 1 from the National Central University (Taiwan), 9 from the Montpellier University (France) and 2 from the New York State University. Nearly all the French and American students are on their very first trip to Taiwan. The research activities will be reported in the T25 Tectonophysics Section. This paper only deals with the educational events. The cruise includes two parts: the first mainly to deploy the OBSs and the second to retrieve the OBSs back to the ship. In addition, the French group arranges a field geological trip onshore Taiwan to put into their hands of the actions of Taiwan mountain building processes. The marine educational courses are filled in the daily ship time at 4 hours per day. As a result, we believe that we have achieved the followings: (1) mix the students and encourage a lovely study environment, (2) mix the teachers and enhance their teaching spectrum, (3) stay in a live and work together boat, allowing more and wider culture exchange. In the future, we certainly will use every possible opportunity to promote more Marine Educational and Research Cruises.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Cruise Propulsion Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Raymond S.; Mizukami, Masahi; Barber, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" is NASA's most recent mission to Mars, launched in November 2011, and landed in August 2012. It is a subcompact car-sized nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. Entry, descent and landing used a unique "skycrane" concept. This report describes the propulsive maneuvering operations during cruise from Earth to Mars, to control attitudes and to target the vehicle for entry. The propulsion subsystem, mission operations, and flight performance are discussed. All trajectory control maneuvers were well within accuracy requirements, and all turns and spin corrections were nominal.

  18. Portfolio District Reform Meets School Turnaround: Early Implementation Findings from the Los Angeles Public School Choice Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; Strunk, Katharine O.; Bush, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the popularity of school "turnaround" and "portfolio district" management as solutions to low performance, there has been limited research on these strategies. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by exploring the strategic case of Los Angeles Unified School District's Public School Choice…

  19. School Improvement and Urban Renewal: The Impact of a Turnaround School's Performance on Real Property Values in Its Surrounding Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen L.; Szczesek, Jill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of a "turnaround" school on real property values in its surrounding community as related to the argument introduced by Tiebout in 1956 correlating local public goods, in this case school success, to housing-location decision making. Using single-family home sales found on the Multiple Listing System and…

  20. The Double Bind for Women: Exploring the Gendered Nature of Turnaround Leadership in a Principal Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jennie Miles; Burton, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study of nine participants in a turnaround principal preparation program, Jennie Miles Weiner and Laura J. Burton explore how gender role identity shaped participants' views of effective principal leadership and their place within it. The authors find that although female and male participants initially framed effective leadership…

  1. The Reading Turn-Around: A Five Part Framework for Differentiated Instruction. Practitioners Bookshelf, Language & Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stephanie; Clarke, Lane; Enriquez, Grace

    2009-01-01

    This book demonstrates a five-part framework for teachers, reading specialists, and literacy coaches who want to help their least engaged students become powerful readers. Merging theory and practice, the guide offers successful strategies to reach your "struggling" learners. The authors show how you can "turn-around" your instructional practice,…

  2. Developing Arizona Turnaround Leaders to Build High-Capacity Schools in the Midst of Accountability Pressures and Changing Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylimaki, Rose M.; Brunderman, Lynnette; Bennett, Jeffrey V.; Dugan, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Today's accountability policies and changing demographics have created conditions in which leaders must rapidly build school capacity and improve outcomes in culturally diverse schools. This article presents findings from a mixed-methods evaluation of an Arizona Turnaround Leadership Development Project. The project drew on studies of…

  3. A Rural School/Community: A Case Study of a Dramatic Turnaround & Its Implications for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    This paper presents a case study of a rural community exhibiting a dramatic turnaround in community support for a new school bond issue. Demographic change was partly responsible for the change in community attitudes, with two waves of immigration altering the long-term conservative orientation of this community. After a series of failed…

  4. Orbit-on-demand vehicles - Mission possible, but one-day turnaround?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.; Morris, W. D.; Lemessurier, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The next generation launch-on-demand manned orbital vehicles will ideally be able to perform plane change maneuvers for rendezvous. Plane-changes of, e.g., 11 deg, will require a 3000 fps on-orbit maneuver velocity. Any plane-change capabilities beyond 800 fps rapidly increase the necessary vehicle weight. Sensitivity studies of the payload weight/vehicle weight, the presence or absence of air-breathing engines, high acceleration, etc., indicated that advances are required in the payload stowage pallet, thermal protection system, fault detection electronics, line-replaceable units, and accessibility to realize one-day turnaround. The spacecraft would also need autonomous systems checks and launch from minimum support sites reached by air ferry. A horizontal take-off, two-stage subsonic launch vehicle so far offers the lowest weight, maximum flexibility and minimum support combination of all configurations under consideration.

  5. Real time application of whole genome sequencing for outbreak investigation - What is an achievable turnaround time?

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick; Bunin, Jessica L; Snesrud, Erik; Singh, Seema; Maybank, Rosslyn; Ong, Ana C; Kwak, Yoon I; Seronello, Scott; Clifford, Robert J; Hinkle, Mary; Yamada, Stephen; Barnhill, Jason; Lesho, Emil

    2016-07-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is increasingly employed in clinical settings, though few assessments of turnaround times (TAT) have been performed in real-time. In this study, WGS was used to investigate an unfolding outbreak of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) among 3 patients in the ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Including overnight culturing, a TAT of just 48.5 h for a comprehensive report was achievable using an Illumina Miseq benchtop sequencer. WGS revealed that isolates from patient 2 and 3 differed from that of patient 1 by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indicating nosocomial transmission. However, the unparalleled resolution provided by WGS suggested that nosocomial transmission involved two separate events from patient 1 to patient 2 and 3, and not a linear transmission suspected by the time line. Rapid TAT's are achievable using WGS in the clinical setting and can provide an unprecedented level of resolution for outbreak investigations. PMID:27185645

  6. Cruise missiles should not stop START

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipis, K.

    1988-11-01

    A method for verifying a cruise-missile agreement that would be acceptable to the military, industrial, and intelligence communities in both nations must be as unintrusive as possible, while remaining immune to cheating of any significance. This is the goal of the technical solutions outlined here. The elements of a verification regime described do not require routine, intrusive, on-site visits to naval vessels, aircraft, air bases, or weapons magazines where missiles may be stored. They do not interfere with the operational readiness of the missiles, and they protect legitimate military secrets of the inspected nation. If supported by competent national technical means of verification such as those both sides already employ, with a small number of on-site challenge inspections, a combination of technical solutions and procedures such as these could be effective. They would adequately safeguard the national security and sovereignty of the participating nations while providing policymakers with the option of a treaty that limits the number of long-range nuclear cruise missiles or eliminates them completely. As discussed, there are problems that remain to be addressed, but they should not be allowed to block a U.S.-Soviet agreement significantly reducing strategic nuclear arsenals.

  7. The impact energy of a moored tanker under the action of regular waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Cheng Li

    1982-09-01

    The influence that factors such as mooring line conditions, fender arrangements, dolphin arrangements, degree of ship loading, waves of long period, wave direction, and wind on the impact energy of a moored tanker were studied. Based on systematic test data, a semi-empirical formula was developed to calculate the impact energy of the moored ship on the berthing facilities under the action of regular waves. It was shown by experiment that this method is suitable for calculating the impact energy of moored ships of capacities as great as 200 X 10/sup 3/ t.

  8. Intel turns to photonics to extend Moore's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitz, Breck

    2009-07-01

    Mario Paniccia settles into his chair with an air of confidence that comes from having been right all along. "We have done all the things that sceptics said we could not," he says. Paniccia, who is director of Intel's Photonics Technology Laboratory in Santa Clara, California, ticks off his group's accomplishments: silicon lasers; high-speed silicon modulators; fast, sensitive silicon photodetectors in the infrared. "We have got beyond the proof-of-principle stage," he says. "Now we're putting it all together so that Moore's law can extend for decades into the future."

  9. Patrick Moore's millennium yearbook : the view from AD 1001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick, Chapman, Allan

    In a year that will probably be remembered almost as much for books about the millennium as for the turn of 2000 A.D itself, Patrick Moore's Millennium Yearbook celebrates.....well, the wrong millennium! This thoroughly entertaining book - which is for everyone, not just astronomers - contains articles on King Alfred's chronological work, reviews of the new Star Catalogue by the Arab Al-Sufi and the latest edition of Ptolemy's Almagast. And foreshadowing the change to metric units by 1000 years, the book uses arabic numbers instead of Roman - but there is a conversion table if you have trouble with the idea of "zero" and prefer the older system.

  10. Cabled-observatory Regional Circulation Moorings on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    In September of 2010, one of four moorings was deployed on the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada cabled-observatory network. The installation included the laying of a 7km cable from the node to the mooring site in the axial valley about 3km north of the Main Endeavour Vent Field over extraordinary bathymetry. This September, three more cables and secondary junction boxes will be deployed to support the three additional moorings that complete the regional circulation array. The cable-laying is facilitated by the Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility's ROV ROPOS and a remotely operated cable-laying system, whereas the actual deployment of the moorings is a two ship operation. The CCGS John P. Tully lowers the mooring anchor first, while the RV Thomas G. Thompson supports the ROV operations which navigate the mooring to underwater mateable cable end. Precise navigation is needed because there are few areas suitable for placement of the junction boxes. Scientifically, the moorings are designed and located to best constrain the hydrothermally driven circulation within the rift valley, the regional circulation can then be used as a proxy measurement for hydrothermal fluxes. Each mooring carries a current meter/ ctd pair at 4, 50, 125, and 200m, with an upward looking ADCP at 250m. The northern moorings are located between the Hi-Rise and Salty Dawg fields about 700m apart in the ~1km wide rift valley and the southern moorings are located south of the Mothra vent field. Here we present initial results from the four mooring array.

  11. Tender mooring for infill drilling operations: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Tapis-pump platform is a four-leg jacket structure located 230 ft south of the Tapis-D platform and connected to it by a walkway bridge. All crude production (360,000 B/D) from Esso Production Malaysia Inc. (EPMI) wells in the South China Sea offshore Terengganu is piped to the Tapais-pump platform for pumping to an onshore terminal. The continuous operation of this platform is essential. The Tapis-D platform is a manned production platform that also acts as a central communication center and emergency response command center for EPMI`s offshore operations in the South China Sea. A total of nine wells is planned for an infill drilling program at the Tapis-D platform. The rig selected for this infill drilling program is a self-erecting tender-assisted rig that uses an eight-point wire rope mooring system. Eleven pipelines are connected to the Tapis-pump/Tapis-D platform complex. All the pipelines were laid on the seafloor without any special external protection and were not tied down or anchored. The paper describes the planning of the mooring system for drilling.

  12. Samuel Preston Moore: Surgeon-General of the Confederacy.

    PubMed

    Purcell, P N; Hummel, R P

    1992-10-01

    Samuel Preston Moore was trained as a military surgeon in the US Army but resigned his commission and was appointed Surgeon-General of the Confederate States Army Medical Department at the beginning of the American Civil War. He reformed the mediocre medical corps by raising recruiting standards and improving treatment protocols and by placing the most capable surgeons in positions of authority. He improved the ambulance corps and directed the construction of many new hospitals for Confederate casualties. He was directly responsible for the barracks hospital design, which is still used today. He established the Confederate States Medical and Surgical Journal and directed a successful effort to develop substitutes for scarce pharmaceuticals from the indigenous flora of the South. He founded the Association of Army and Navy Surgeons of the Confederate States of America. With skill and dedication, Dr. Moore transformed the medical corps into one of the most effective departments of the Confederate military and was responsible for saving thousands of lives on the battlefield. PMID:1415944

  13. Structural design of supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The major efforts leading to an efficient structural design include: (1) the analysis methods used to improve the structural model optimization and compare the structural concepts, (2) the analysis and description of the fail-safe, crack growth, and residual strength studies and tests, (3) baseline structural trade studies to determine optimum structural weights including effects of geometry changes, strength, fail-safety, aeroelastics and flutter, 6AL-4V annealed titanium in structural efficiency after 70,000 hours at temperature, (5) the study of three structural models for aircraft at 2.0 Mach, 2.2 Mach, and 2.4 Mach cruise speeds, (6) the study of many structural concepts to determine their weight efficiencies; and (7) the determination of the requirements for large-scale structural development testing.

  14. Hepatitis E Outbreak on Cruise Ship

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Samreen; Kafatos, George; Booth, Linda; Thomas, H. Lucy; Walsh, Amanda; Ramsay, Mary; Morgan, Dilys

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, acute hepatitis E infection was confirmed in 4 passengers returning to the United Kingdom after a world cruise. Epidemiologic investigation showed that of 789 persons who provided blood samples, 195 (25%) were seropositive, 33 (4%) had immunoglobulin [Ig] M levels consistent with recent acute infection (11 of these persons were symptomatic), and 162 (21%) had IgG only, consistent with past infection. Passenger mean age was 68 years. Most (426/789, 54%) passengers were female, yet most with acute infection (25/33, 76%) were male. Sequencing of RNA from 3 case-patients identified hepatitis E virus genotype 3, closely homologous to genotype 3 viruses from Europe. Significant association with acute infection was found for being male, drinking alcohol, and consuming shellfish while on board (odds ratio 4.27, 95% confidence interval 1.23–26.94, p = 0.019). This was probably a common-source foodborne outbreak. PMID:19891860

  15. Benjamin Moore, Science, and Medical Planning in Early Twentieth-Century Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Gordon S.

    2008-01-01

    Benjamin Moore (1867-1922), physiologist and biochemist, was an eminent member of the British scientific and medical community in the early twentieth century. As a founder and president of the State Medical Services Association (SMSA) from its establishment in 1912 until his untimely death in 1922, Moore was a prominent medical services activist…

  16. Welcome Home Annie: Rethinking Ellis Island and Annie Moore in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Mia

    2008-01-01

    The story of the United States and the people who have made it their home would not be complete without considering the experience of Irish immigrants--particularly the experience of Annie Moore, the first immigrant to be processed on Ellis Island. However, the story of Annie Moore, and how it has been recounted and taught to date, is inaccurate.…

  17. Using the "Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a Feminist Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jule, Allyson

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" as a teaching tool used with a group of final-year undergraduate students who gathered together last academic year (2007-8) to explore Women in Leadership, as part of a Communications course. The research focus was: How can the use of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (a 1970-7 American…

  18. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  19. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  20. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  1. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. 165.751 Section 165.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.751 Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia. (a) Security zone. The... South shoreline of the mooring slip to the shoreline of the right descending bank of the Savannah...

  2. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall lead forward from the break of the bow and one line shall lead astern from the quarter and be... astern from the break of the bow through chocks to suitable mooring bitts on deck; (2) Vessels of more... operated by the main drums of adequate power operated winches as follows: (i) One mooring line shall...

  3. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  4. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  5. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  6. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  7. 33 CFR 401.37 - Mooring at tie-up walls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mooring at tie-up walls. 401.37...-up walls. (a) Upon arrival at a lock, a vessel awaiting instructions to advance shall moor at the tie-up wall, close up to the designated limit or approach sign or to the ship preceding it, whichever...

  8. Additional technician tasks and turnaround time in the clinical Stat laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lillo, Rosa; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many additional tasks in the Stat laboratory (SL) increase the workload. It is necessary to control them because they can affect the service provided by the laboratory. Our aim is to calculate these tasks, study their evolution over a 10 year period, and compare turnaround times (TAT) in summer period to the rest of the year. Materials and methods Additional tasks were classified as “additional test request” and “additional sample”. We collected those incidences from the laboratory information system (LIS), and calculated their evolution over time. We also calculated the monthly TAT for troponin for Emergency department (ED) patients, as the difference between the verification and LIS registration time. A median time of 30 minutes was our indicator target. TAT results and tests workload in summer were compared to the rest of the year. Results Over a 10-year period, the technologists in the SL performed 51,385 additional tasks, a median of 475 per month. The workload was significantly higher during the summer (45,496 tests) than the rest of the year (44,555 tests) (P = 0.019). The troponin TAT did not show this variation between summer and the rest of the year, complying always with our 30 minutes indicator target. Conclusion The technicians accomplished a significant number of additional tasks, and the workload kept increasing over the period of 10 years. That did not affect the TAT results. PMID:27346970

  9. Residual life assessment of the SSME/ATD HPOTP turnaround duct (TAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. Steven

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the prediction of the low cycle thermal fatigue behavior of a component in a developmental (ATD) high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This component is called the Turnaround Duct (TAD). The TAD is a complex single piece casting of MAR-M-247 material. Its function is to turn the hot turbine exhaust gas (1200 F hydrogen rich gas steam) such that it can exhaust radially out of the turbopump. In very simple terms, the TAD consists of two rings connected axially by 22 hollow airfoil shaped struts with the turning vanes placed at the top, middle, and bottom of each strut. The TAD is attached to the other components of the pump via bolts passing through 14 of the 22 struts. Of the remaining 8 struts, four are equally spaced (90 deg interval) and containing a cooling tube through which liquid hydrogen passes on its way to cool the shaft bearing assemblies. The remaining 4 struts are empty. One of the pump units in the certification test series was destructively examined after 22 test firings. Substantial axial cracking was found in two of the struts which contain cooling tubes. None of the other 20 struts showed any sign of internal cracking. This unusual low cycle thermal fatigue behavior within the two cooling tube struts is the focus of this study.

  10. An outbreak of Cyclospora infection on a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R A; Nanyonjo, R; Pingault, N M; Combs, B G; Mazzucchelli, T; Armstrong, P; Tarling, G; Dowse, G K

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of cyclosporiasis affected passengers and crew on two successive voyages of a cruise ship that departed from and returned to Fremantle, Australia. There were 73 laboratory-confirmed and 241 suspected cases of Cyclospora infection reported in passengers and crew from the combined cruises. A case-control study performed in crew members found that illness was associated with eating items of fresh produce served onboard the ship, but the study was unable conclusively to identify the responsible food(s). It is likely that one or more of the fresh produce items taken onboard at a south-east Asian port during the first cruise was contaminated. If fresh produce supplied to cruise ships is sourced from countries or regions where Cyclospora is endemic, robust standards of food production and hygiene should be applied to the supply chain. PMID:22687637

  11. Galileo post-Gaspra cruise and Earth-2 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Andrews, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    This article documents DSN support for the Galileo cruise after the Oct. 1991 encounter with the asteroid Gaspra. This article also details the Earth-2 encounter and the special non-DSN support provided during the Earth-2 closest approach.

  12. An outbreak of Cyclospora infection on a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R A; Nanyonjo, R; Pingault, N M; Combs, B G; Mazzucchelli, T; Armstrong, P; Tarling, G; Dowse, G K

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of cyclosporiasis affected passengers and crew on two successive voyages of a cruise ship that departed from and returned to Fremantle, Australia. There were 73 laboratory-confirmed and 241 suspected cases of Cyclospora infection reported in passengers and crew from the combined cruises. A case-control study performed in crew members found that illness was associated with eating items of fresh produce served onboard the ship, but the study was unable conclusively to identify the responsible food(s). It is likely that one or more of the fresh produce items taken onboard at a south-east Asian port during the first cruise was contaminated. If fresh produce supplied to cruise ships is sourced from countries or regions where Cyclospora is endemic, robust standards of food production and hygiene should be applied to the supply chain.

  13. A Bound Violation on the Galaxy Group Scale: The Turn-around Radius of NGC 5353/4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-12-01

    The first observational evidence for the violation of the maximum turn-around radius on the galaxy group scale is presented. The NGC 5353/4 group is chosen as an ideal target for our investigation of the bound-violation because of its proximity, low-density environment, optimal mass scale, and the existence of a nearby thin straight filament. Using the observational data on the line-of-sight velocities and three-dimensional distances of the filament galaxies located in the bound zone of the NGC 5353/4 group, we construct their radial velocity profile as a function of separation distance from the group center and then compare it to the analytic formula obtained empirically by Falco et al. to find the best-fit value of an adjustable parameter with the help of the maximum likelihood method. The turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 is determined to be the separation distance where the adjusted analytic formula for the radial velocity profile yields zero. The estimated turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 turned out to substantially exceed the upper limit predicted by the spherical model based on the ΛCDM cosmology. Even when the restrictive condition of spherical symmetry is released, the estimated value is found to be only marginally consistent with the ΛCDM expectation.

  14. Jet aircraft emissions during cruise: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Forecasts of engine exhaust emissions that may be practicably achievable for future commercial aircraft operating at high altitude cruise conditions are compared to cruise emission for present day aircraft. The forecasts are based on: (1) knowledge of emission characteristics of combustors and augmentors; (2) combustion research in emission reduction technology, and (3) trends in projected engine designs for advanced subsonic or supersonic commercial aircraft. Recent progress that was made in the evolution of emissions reduction technology is discussed.

  15. Transaction Performance vs. Moore's Law: A Trend Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Raghunath; Poess, Meikel

    Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore postulated in his famous 1965 paper that the number of components in integrated circuits had doubled every year from their invention in 1958 until 1965, and then predicted that the trend would continue for at least ten years. Later, David House, an Intel colleague, after factoring in the increase in performance of transistors, concluded that integrated circuits would double in performance every 18 months. Despite this trend in microprocessor improvements, your favored text editor continues to take the same time to start and your PC takes pretty much the same time to reboot as it took 10 years ago. Can this observation be made on systems supporting the fundamental aspects of our information based economy, namely transaction processing systems?

  16. Whose waste is it anyway? The case of John Moore.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1988-01-01

    The author reports on a July 1988 decision of a California Court of Appeals (Moore v. Regents of the University of California) that recognized a proper cause of action against a doctor who used the diseased spleen he had removed from a patient to produce a product now being tested as an AIDS treatment without the patient's consent to this use of his spleen cells. The legal concepts of ownership, abandonment, and consent are analyzed as they apply to human body parts, and it is proposed that the Patent Act should be amended to prohibit the patenting of human cells and that the Organ Transplant Act should include a prohibition on the sale of human tissue and cells for any purpose, so that human cells can no longer be the source of commercial profit.

  17. 75 FR 1839 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Moore County Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Moore County Airport, Pinehurst/Southern Pines, NC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... that the FAA is considering a request from the Moore County Airport Authority to waive the requirement that a 27.7 acre parcel of surplus property, located at the Moore County Airport, be used...

  18. 33 CFR 149.650 - What are the requirements for single point moorings and their attached hoses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 2003, by any recognized classification society as defined in 46 CFR 8.100. Helicopter Fueling... single point moorings and their attached hoses? 149.650 Section 149.650 Navigation and Navigable Waters... single point moorings and their attached hoses? Each single point mooring and its attached hose must...

  19. Parallel finite element simulation of mooring forces on floating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, S.; Abedi, J.; Zellars, B.

    2003-03-01

    The coupling between the equations governing the free-surface flows, the six degrees of freedom non-linear rigid body dynamics, the linear elasticity equations for mesh-moving and the cables has resulted in a fluid-structure interaction technology capable of simulating mooring forces on floating objects. The finite element solution strategy is based on a combination approach derived from fixed-mesh and moving-mesh techniques. Here, the free-surface flow simulations are based on the Navier-Stokes equations written for two incompressible fluids where the impact of one fluid on the other one is extremely small. An interface function with two distinct values is used to locate the position of the free-surface. The stabilized finite element formulations are written and integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian domain. This allows us to handle the motion of the time dependent geometries. Forces and momentums exerted on the floating object by both water and hawsers are calculated and used to update the position of the floating object in time. In the mesh moving scheme, we assume that the computational domain is made of elastic materials. The linear elasticity equations are solved to obtain the displacements for each computational node. The non-linear rigid body dynamics equations are coupled with the governing equations of fluid flow and are solved simultaneously to update the position of the floating object. The numerical examples includes a 3D simulation of water waves impacting on a moored floating box and a model boat and simulation of floating object under water constrained with a cable.

  20. Cruise ship's doctors - company employees or independent contractors?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cruise companies have stated that they are in the transport business but not in the business of providing medical services to passengers. They have claimed not to be able to supervise or control the ship's medical personnel and cruise ship's doctors have therefore mostly been signed on as independent contractors, not employees. A United States court decision from 1988, Barbetta versus S/S Bermuda Star, supported this view and ruled that a ship's owner cannot be held vicariously liable for the negligence of the ship's doctor directed at the ship's passengers. Some years ago a cruise passenger fell and hit his head while boarding a trolley ashore. Hours later he was seen aboard by the ship's doctor, who sent him to a local hospital. He died 1 week later, and his daughter filed a complaint alleging the cruise company was vicariously liable for the purported negligence of the ship's doctor and nurse, under actual or apparent agency theories. A United States district court initially dismissed the case, but in November 2014 the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit disagreed and reversed. From then on independently contracted ship's doctors may be considered de facto employees of the cruise line. The author discusses the employment status of physicians working on cruise ships and reviews arguments for and against the Appellate Court's decision. PMID:27681214

  1. Cruise ship's doctors - company employees or independent contractors?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cruise companies have stated that they are in the transport business but not in the business of providing medical services to passengers. They have claimed not to be able to supervise or control the ship's medical personnel and cruise ship's doctors have therefore mostly been signed on as independent contractors, not employees. A United States court decision from 1988, Barbetta versus S/S Bermuda Star, supported this view and ruled that a ship's owner cannot be held vicariously liable for the negligence of the ship's doctor directed at the ship's passengers. Some years ago a cruise passenger fell and hit his head while boarding a trolley ashore. Hours later he was seen aboard by the ship's doctor, who sent him to a local hospital. He died 1 week later, and his daughter filed a complaint alleging the cruise company was vicariously liable for the purported negligence of the ship's doctor and nurse, under actual or apparent agency theories. A United States district court initially dismissed the case, but in November 2014 the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit disagreed and reversed. From then on independently contracted ship's doctors may be considered de facto employees of the cruise line. The author discusses the employment status of physicians working on cruise ships and reviews arguments for and against the Appellate Court's decision.

  2. Results from a winter 2009-2010 nearshore mooring test in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dever, E. P.; Waldorf, B. W.; Risien, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), two surface moorings will be placed in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon and Grays Harbor, Washington. These moorings are intended to acquire continuous observations over the inner-shelf, where the surface boundary layer interacts continuously with the ocean bottom boundary layer. The moorings will utilize the WHOI-developed stretch hose technology implemented at several operational moorings along the US east coast. For the purposes of mooring survival, the largest significant waves need to be considered. Analysis of the historical record indicates the 100-year return period storm would generate 14.5 m high waves. The harsh wind and wave conditions encountered over the inner-shelf have the potential to cause mooring failure either by destroying surface buoy components, or by causing subsurface mooring components to fail. For example, during a winter storm in December 2007, several NDBC moorings along the Oregon and Washington coasts broke. To test modeling of mooring performance under winter conditions we constructed a test/pilot mooring with hardware, communications and power similar to the OOI buoy design. The test focused on the survivability of components. The mooring was equipped with a load cell to examine responses under varying wave and mean flow conditions. A secondary objective of the deployment was to test Ship-to-Ship/Ship-to-Shore Wireless Access Protocol (SWAP) telemetry from the buoy to shore over a distance of 1.5 km. Load cell data as well as buoy instruments (conductivity, temperature) were telemetered. This test mooring was deployed near one of the OOI sites in 25 m of water off Newport, Oregon in late October 2009. The mooring parted in mid-March 2010, two weeks prior to planned recovery. We recovered all mooring components, and we will report on the mooring design, the test, and the science and engineering data received.

  3. Optimization and automation of the semi-submersible platforms mooring design

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, J.A. Jr.; Morooka, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    There are a few calculation programs around the world used for determining the main aspects of the Mooring Design of Semi-Submersible Platforms . These programs bold a worldwide acknowledgement and their results are actually reliable. But they require many runs to get a solution that comply with the Classification Society requirements. This paper presents some procedures in order to optimize the semi-submersible mooring design as well as to make it automatic. Regarding the optimization philosophies, the following aspects are treated: (1) the optimization of the platform heading and the mooring pattern based on the spreading of the environmental forces; (2) the searching for the optimum mooring line composition in an automatic mode. Basically, the paper`s main goal is to introduce some methods to find the lowest cost solution for the mooring system in a short time. All of these methods were computationally implemented creating the intelligent system named PROANC, which deals with the semi-submersible mooring design in a quasi-static and deterministic approach. It should be noted that the proposed system exerts a strong appeal as a design tool for feasibility studies of a given oil field and its quasi-static results can be directly applied to a mooring program capable of performing dynamic analysis. Finally some simulations are executed for different water depths and its final results, including the expended time to run, are presented in order to prove the PROANC system wide potential as a design tool.

  4. Autonomous and rapid deployment of a compact taut-wire mooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Theo; van Heerwaarden, Johan; Laan, Martin; Bakker, Roel; Groenewegen, Ruud; van Haren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    The deployment time of a taut-wire mooring is reduced to the time any transportation/hoisting device needs to put a payload at the sea surface. This is a matter of minutes rather than hours needed for deployment of long deep-ocean moorings in the regular way. It is achieved by extending the basic function of mooring parts to temporarily form a Launcher for Oceanographic Equipment and Instruments (LOEI). Full preparation of the mooring is done onshore where the instruments are prepared and programmed, and spooled onto the top-buoy together with the line. At sea, no other gear is required than a device that is able to lift a load of, say, 2000 kg, even for long deep-ocean moorings. The compact mooring method realizes considerable budget savings through deployments from non-research vessels and airborne transportation-deployment. Limitations lay in size and weight of the oceanographic instruments. We present a test-design shaped as a barbell and loaded with 940 m line and 3 current meters. Unfurling speed was maximally 2.3 m s -1 and the descent speed amounted 1.2 m s -1 until landing on the seabed. These speeds are comparable to those acquired during a conventional free-falling mooring deployment.

  5. Policy change to improve pathology turnaround time and reduce costs – possible to do both?

    PubMed Central

    Dimeski, Goce; Silvester, Breeann; Ungerer, Jacobus; Johnson, Leslie; Martin, Jennifer H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Overcrowding and prolonged length of stay in emergency departments (ED) are increasing problems in hospitals. Rapid availability of all laboratory results has an impact on clinical decision-making, admissions or discharge decisions and resource utilisation. Increasing number of our urinary drugs of abuse (DOA) screens had a turnaround time (TAT) of up to 33 days after the discharge of the patient. Materials and methods: Following an audit and a consultation period with clinicians using the service, a policy change was implemented to reduce the use of gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS): all requests would have a standard immunoassay (IA) test panel undertaken unless specifically they requested GCMS (including medico-legal) analysis. Results: Almost all of the clinicians interviewed had no understanding of the DOA screening or the difference in the information generated between a confirmatory GCMS urine toxicology screen and IA DOA panel. It appeared none of the patients surveyed in the audit would have had a different clinical decision made if a GCMS had not been undertaken. Post change audit showed only 4.3% of drug requests for IA also received a confirmatory GCMS testing. The estimated saving post change implementation was $127,000 (AU $) in test costs alone over a two year period. The TAT of GCMS results was reduced to 3–4 days. Conclusion: A laboratory-led behavioural change in test requesting is possible and sustainable provided the reason is clinically sound and accompanied by consultation and availability of advice by phone when requested on test requesting or interpretation. PMID:24266298

  6. The Impact of a Health IT Changeover on Medical Imaging Department Work Processes and Turnaround Times

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, A.; Lymer, S.; Hordern, A.; Ridley, L.; Westbrook, J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To assess the impact of introducing a new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and Radiology Information System (RIS) on: (i) Medical Imaging work processes; and (ii) turnaround times (TATs) for x-ray and CT scan orders initiated in the Emergency Department (ED). Methods We employed a mixed method study design comprising: (i) semi-structured interviews with Medical Imaging Department staff; and (ii) retrospectively extracted ED data before (March/April 2010) and after (March/April 2011 and 2012) the introduction of a new PACS/RIS. TATs were calculated as: processing TAT (median time from image ordering to examination) and reporting TAT (median time from examination to final report). Results Reporting TAT for x-rays decreased significantly after introduction of the new PACS/RIS; from a median of 76 hours to 38 hours per order (p<.0001) for patients discharged from the ED, and from 84 hours to 35 hours (p<.0001) for patients admitted to hospital. Medical Imaging staff reported that the changeover to the new PACS/RIS led to gains in efficiency, particularly regarding the accessibility of images and patient-related information. Nevertheless, assimilation of the new PACS/RIS with existing Departmental work processes was considered inadequate and in some instances unsafe. Issues highlighted related to the synchronization of work tasks (e.g., porter arrangements) and the material set up of the work place (e.g., the number and location of computers). Conclusions The introduction of new health IT can be a “double-edged sword” providing improved efficiency but at the same time introducing potential hazards affecting the effectiveness of the Medical Imaging Department. PMID:26448790

  7. Load transfer with the Austin Moore cementless hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Keaveny, T M; Bartel, D L

    1993-03-01

    More than 1,300 Austin Moore hemiarthroplasties have been reviewed in the literature, with no reports of fracture of the stem. Many patients with these hip implants had good function. The lack of stem fractures in patients with good functions has not been explained and contrasts with stem fractures that have occurred in patients with cemented prostheses of other designs during the same time. We used three-dimensional finite-element analysis and free-body diagrams to explain the lack of fractures for this device by a description of the probable load-transfer mechanisms between the prosthesis and the bone. Results from our finite-element analysis indicate that, with good calcar-collar support, the stresses in the stem are small because the stem portion of the prosthesis and the bone are uncoupled and, consequently, do not share the resultant bending moment of the head and abductor forces. If the stem is coupled to the bone so that the resultant bending moment is shared, high stresses in the stem are predicted; such stresses are inconsistent with the complete absence of fractures of these prostheses. The results of the finite-element analysis further showed that loss of calcar-collar support with proximal fixation through the fenestrations resulted in high stresses in the stem and stress shielding of the proximal medial cortex. The uncoupled prosthesis also may be modeled with a free-body diagram as a three-force member loaded at the head, stem tip, and in the proximal region. With this model, it can be shown that the reaction force of the stem tip, and thus the peak bending stress in the stem, increases as calcar-collar support is decreased. If there is no calcar-collar support, proximal support must be provided by some combination of integration of bone in the fenestrations and wedging due to the lateral-medial taper of the device. Stresses in the stem are largest when there is no wedging, but high stresses develop in the cancellous bone in the fenestrations. When

  8. The Bermuda Testbed Mooring and Emerging Technologies for Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    The Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) program provides the oceanographic community with a deep-water platform for testing new instrumentation. Scientific studies also utilize data collected from the BTM, particularly in conjunction with the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program. Additionally, the BTM has been used for groundtruthing of satellite ocean color imager (SeaWiFS) data. The mooring is located about 80 km southeast of Bermuda. Surface instruments have collected meteorological and spectral radiometric data from the buoy tower and measurements at depth have included: currents, temperature, bio-optical, chemical, and acoustical variables. The BTM captures a broad dynamic range of oceanic variability (minutes to years). Key results include: 1. Data obtained during passages of cold-core eddies have been used to estimate the role of such features on new production and carbon flux to the deep ocean. One of the observed features contained the greatest values of chlorophyll observed during the decade of observations at the site (based on BATS historical data base). The measurements provide high frequency, long-term data, which can be used for a) detailed studies of a variety of physical, chemical, bio-optical, and ecological processes on time scales from minutes to years, b) contextual information for many other observations made near the BTM/BATS sites, c) evaluation of undersampling/aliasing effects, and d) developing/testing models. 2. The dynamics of the upper ocean have been observed during transient re-stratification events and during passages of hurricanes and other intense storms. These observations are unique and the subject of ongoing modeling efforts. 3. BTM papers have provided new insights concerning bio-optical variability on short (minutes to day) time scales and have proven valuable for ocean color satellite groundtruthing. 4. During the BTM project, several new sensors and systems have been tested by U.S. and international groups

  9. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  10. 48 CFR 252.225-7019 - Restriction on acquisition of anchor and mooring chain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the United States or its outlying areas, including cutting, heat treating, quality control... items containing welded shipboard anchor and mooring chain, four inches or less in diameter. (End...

  11. MOORE: A prototype expert system for diagnosing spacecraft problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlin, Katherine; Weissert, Jerry; Krantz, Kerry

    1988-01-01

    MOORE is a rule-based, prototype expert system that assists in diagnosing operational Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) problems. It is intended to assist spacecraft engineers at the TDRS ground terminal in trouble shooting problems that are not readily solved with routine procedures, and without expert counsel. An additional goal of the prototype system is to develop in-house expert system and knowledge engineering skills. The prototype system diagnoses antenna pointing and earth pointing problems that may occur within the TDRS Attitude Control System (ACS). Plans include expansion to fault isolation of problems in the most critical subsystems of the TDRS spacecraft. Long term benefits are anticipated with use of an expert system during future TDRS programs with increased mission support time, reduced problem solving time, and retained expert knowledge and experience. Phase 2 of the project is intended to provide NASA the necessary expertise and capability to define requirements, evaluate proposals, and monitor the development progress of a highly competent expert system for NASA's Tracking Data Relay Satellite. Phase 2 also envisions addressing two unexplored applications for expert systems, spacecraft integration and tests (I and T) and support to launch activities. The concept, goals, domain, tools, knowledge acquisition, developmental approach, and design of the expert system. It will explain how NASA obtained the knowledge and capability to develop the system in-house without assistance from outside consultants. Future plans will also be presented.

  12. Mooring system of ocean turbulence observation based on submerged buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Da-lei; Sun, Jing-jing; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Qian-li; Wu, Bing-wei

    2013-06-01

    A comparison experiment has been taken in the Kiaochow Bay between a newly designed mooring turbulence observation instrument (MTOI) and microstructure profiler MSS60 made by Sea & Sun. The whole observing system is based on a submerged buoy, in which the turbulence observation instrument is embedded, with a streamline-shape floating body, which is made of buoyancy material of glass microsphere. For the movement of seawater and the cable shaking strongly anytime influence the behaviors of the floating body, the accelerate sensors are used for the vibration measurement in the instrument together with the shear probe sensor. Both the vibration data and the shear data are acquired by the instrument at the same time. During data processing, the vibration signals can be removed and leave the shear data which we really need. In order to prove the reliability of the new turbulence instrument MTOI, a comparison experiment was designed. The measuring conditions are the same both in time and space. By this way, the two groups of data are comparable. In this paper, the conclusion gives a good similarity of 0.93 for the two groups of shear data in dissipation rate. The processing of the data acquired by MTOI is based on the cross-spectrum analysis, and the dissipation rate of it matches the Nasmyth spectrum well.

  13. Study on global performances and mooring-induced damping of a semi-submersible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning; Zhao, Wen-hua; Kou, Yu-feng

    2016-10-01

    The harsh environmental conditions bring strong nonlinearities to the hydrodynamic performances of the offshore floating platforms, which challenge the reliable prediction of the platform coupled with the mooring system. The present study investigates a typical semi-submersible under both the operational and the survival conditions through numerical and experimental methods. The motion responses, the mooring line tensions, and the wave loads on the longitudinal mid-section are investigated by both the fully non-linearly coupled numerical simulation and the physical experiment. Particularly, in the physical model test, the wave loads distributed on the semi-submersible's mid-section were measured by dividing the model into two parts, namely the port and the starboard parts, which were rigidly connected by three six-component force transducers. It is concluded that both the numerical and physical model can have good prediction of the semi-submersible's global responses. In addition, an improved numerical approach is proposed for the estimation of the mooring-induced damping, and is validated by both the experimental and the published results. The characteristics of the mooring-induced damping are further summarized in various sea states, including the operational and the survival environments. In order to obtain the better prediction of the system response in deep water, the mooring-induced damping of the truncated mooring lines applied in the physical experiment are compensated by comparing with those in full length. Furthermore, the upstream taut and the downstream slack mooring lines are classified and investigated to obtain the different mooring line damping performances in the comparative study.

  14. The ARGOS contribution to the successful dredging of a deep moored current meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, J.; Ollivier, B.

    Current meters moored at 1200 m from a seabed 4600 m deep in the Indian Ocean were recovered using the ARGOS system after failure of the explosive anchor-release bolts prevented recovery using acoustic methods. The position of each mooring was known to within 0.25 nautical miles, so the ARGOS system was used to position the recovery ships to within 100 m of the targets.

  15. Preparing printed circuit boards for rapid turn-around time on a plotter

    SciTech Connect

    Hawtree, J.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the use of the LPKF ProtoMat mill/drill unit circuit board Plotter, with the associated CAD/CAM software BoardMaster and CircuitCAM. At present its primarily use here at Fermilab`s Particle Physics Department is for rapid-turnover of prototype PCBs double-sided and single-sided copper clad printed circuit boards (PCBs). (The plotter is also capable of producing gravure films and engraving aluminum or plastic although we have not used it for this.) It has the capability of making traces 0.004 inch wide with 0.004 inch spacings which is appropriate for high density surface mount circuits as well as other through-mounted discrete and integrated components. One of the primary benefits of the plotter is the capability to produce double-sided drilled boards from CAD files in a few hours. However to achieve this rapid turn-around time, some care must be taken in preparing the files. This document describes how to optimize the process of PCB fabrication. With proper preparation, researchers can often have a completed circuit board in a day`s time instead of a week or two wait with usual procedures. It is assumed that the software and hardware are properly installed and that the machinist is acquainted with the Win95 operating system and the basics of the associated software. This paper does not describe its use with pen plotters, lasers or rubouts. The process of creating a PCB (printed circuit board) begins with the CAD (computer-aided design) software, usually PCAD or VeriBest. These files are then moved to CAM (computer-aided machining) where they are edited and converted to put them into the proper format for running on the ProtoMat plotter. The plotter then performs the actual machining of the board. This document concentrates on the LPKF programs CircuitCam BASIS and BoardMaster for the CAM software. These programs run on a Windows 95 platform to run an LPKF ProtoMat 93s plotter.

  16. Evolution and formation of North Atlantic Eighteen Degree Water in the Sargasso Sea from moored data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Xujing Jia; Straneo, Fiammetta; Kwon, Young-Oh; Kelly, Kathryn A.; Toole, John M.

    2013-07-01

    Two profiling subsurface moorings were deployed as part of the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE) to study the formation and evolution of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) from November 2006 to November 2007. Both moorings were deployed south of the Gulf Stream in the EDW outcrop region, the northwestern part of the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic. The two moorings captured the seasonal evolution of EDW characterized by gradual mixed layer deepening and wintertime outcrop, rapid restratification from May to June and slower dissipation during the rest of the year. Superimposed on this seasonal cycle, the moored records are characterized by high frequency passing of eddies with a characteristic time scale of ˜10 days, i.e. it took about 10 days for eddies to pass the mooring sites. The net impact of these eddy fluxes is evaluated by analyzing one-dimensional heat and salt budgets of the upper ocean at the moorings and comparing them to the local air-sea fluxes. It is shown that oceanic lateral fluxes converge heat and salt into the formation region during winter thus offsetting the heat loss to the atmosphere and influencing the formation of EDW. A comparison with results from a one-dimensional model shows that without the lateral fluxes EDW would outcrop earlier and it would be colder and fresher. The warm, salty waters transported into the region originate from the Gulf Stream and this suggests that frontal processes likely play a fundamental role in EDW formation and its evolution.

  17. Mooring systems design based on analytical expressions of catastrophes of slow motion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, M.M.; Garza-Rios, L.O.

    1996-12-31

    Analytical expressions of the necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of mooring systems representing bifurcation boundaries, and expressions defining the morphogeneses occurring across boundaries are presented. These expressions provide means for evaluating the stability of a mooring system around an equilibrium position and constructing catastrophe sets in any parametric design space. These expressions allow the designer to select appropriate values for the mooring parameters without resorting to trial and error. A number of realistic applications are provided for barge and tanker mooring systems which exhibit qualitatively different nonlinear dynamics. The mathematical model consists of the nonlinear, third order maneuvering equations of the horizontal plane slow motion dynamics of a vessel moored to one or more terminals. Mooring lines are modeled by synthetic nylon ropes, chains, or steel cables. External excitation consists of time independent current, wind, and mean wave drift forces. The analytical expressions presented in this paper apply to nylon ropes and current excitation. Expressions for other combinations of lines and excitation can be derived.

  18. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-15

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented.

  19. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-01

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented. PMID:26766396

  20. FRV Deleware II cruise, 30 June to 7 July 1978. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K.

    1982-05-01

    This was the last of three companion cruises designed to provide broad-scale coverage of seasonal shelf conditions occurring between the April and October investigations undertaken aboard ATLANTIS II cruises 99 and 104.

  1. An economic study of an advanced technology supersonic cruise vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Williams, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the methods used and the results of an economic study of an advanced technology supersonic cruise vehicle. This vehicle was designed for a maximum range of 4000 n.mi. at a cruise speed of Mach 2.7 and carrying 292 passengers. The economic study includes the estimation of aircraft unit cost, operating cost, and idealized cash flow and discounted cash flow return on investment. In addition, it includes a sensitivity study on the effects of unit cost, manufacturing cost, production quantity, average trip length, fuel cost, load factor, and fare on the aircraft's economic feasibility.

  2. Performance and benefits of an advanced technology supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The results of four years research on technology are synthesized in an advanced supersonic cruise aircraft design. Comparisons are presented with the former United States SST and the British-French Concorde, including aerodynamic efficiency, propulsion efficiency, weight efficiency, and community noise. Selected trade study results are presented on the subjects of design cruise Mach number, engine cycle selection, and noise suppression. The critical issue of program timing is addressed and some observations made regarding the impact that timing has on engine selection and minimization of program risk.

  3. Some design considerations for supersonic cruise mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    A mixed compression inlet designed for supersonic cruise has very demanding requirements for high total pressure recovery and low bleed and cowl drag. However, since the optimum inlet for supersonic cruise performance may have other undesirable characteristics, it is necessary to establish trade-offs between inlet performance and other inlet characteristics. Some of these trade-offs between the amount of internal compression, aerodynamic performance and angle-of-attack tolerance are reviewed. Techniques for analysis of boundary layer control and subsonic diffuser flow are discussed.

  4. Processes Influencing Regolith Development on Bodmin Moor, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggins, S. G.; Tye, A. M.; Anderson, S. P.; Smith, B.

    2007-12-01

    Regolith is disaggregated, transportable material above bedrock created by physical processes such as fracture generation, frost cracking, tree throw, and animal burrowing and chemical processes such as dissolution and mineral transformation. Models typically parameterize the rate of regolith generation as a function of its thickness, without specifying the physical and chemical processes involved. This study examines a non-glaciated, granitic hillslope on Bodmin Moor, southwest England, UK, to identify processes creating regolith. The site has a temperate climate with relatively high mean annual temperature (MAT,~10°C) and rainfall (1381- 2580mm). We dug five soil pits ~80cm deep along a 120 m transect to examine the saprolite-regolith interface and extract solid phase and soil pore water samples. We find no evidence of physical processes such as frost cracking or bioturbation creating regolith. The site is treeless with vegetation dominated by grass. Although the site experiences ground frost and has sufficient water content to support frost cracking, a model of freezing front penetration indicates that the saprolite-regolith boundary does not fall within the frost cracking window of -3 to -10°C. A decrease in MAT of ~3°C would lower the depth of frost penetration to the current saprolite-regolith boundary (80cm). We speculate that frost cracking may have operated during the periglacial conditions of the Quaternary and would have pre-conditioned the bedrock for chemical processes currently operating. We use soil pore water and solid phase chemistry to determine the chemical processes at work. Pore water concentrations of K (4.5 mg/L), Na (14.2 mg/L), SO42- (24.9 mg/L), Mg (1.7 mg/L), and Ca (1.7 mg/L) are highest in O-horizons and decrease as a function of distance from the surface, indicating that biological processes have a strong effect on geochemical cycling in the upper part of the soil. Soil water at greater depths within the regolith are likely under

  5. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  6. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  7. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San... § 165.1154 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San... § 165.1154 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  12. A quality initiative of postoperative radiographic imaging performed on mastectomy specimens to reduce histology cost and pathology report turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Sim, Myung S; Radosavcev, Bryan L; Humphries, Romney M; Ward, Dawn C; Apple, Sophia K

    2015-10-01

    Breast pathology relies on gross dissection for accurate diagnostic work, but challenges can necessitate submission of high tissue volumes resulting in excess labor, laboratory costs, and delays. To address these issues, a quality initiative was created through implementation of the Faxitron PathVision specimen radiography system as part of the breast gross dissection protocol; this report documents its impact on workflow and clinical care. Retrospective data from 459 patients who underwent simple or modified radical mastectomy at our institution between May 2012 and December 2014 were collected. Comparison was made between the mastectomy specimen control group before radiography use (233 patients, 340 breasts) and Faxitron group that underwent postoperative radiography (226 patients, 338 breasts). We observed a statistically significant decrease in mean number of blocks between control and Faxitron groups (47.0 vs 39.7 blocks; P<.0001), for calculated cost savings of US $146 per mastectomy. A statistically significant decrease in pathology report turnaround time was also observed (4.2 vs 3.8days; P=.038). Postoperative mastectomy specimen radiography has increased workflow efficiency and decreased histology costs and pathology report turnaround time. These findings may underestimate actual benefits and highlight the importance of quality improvement projects in anatomical pathology.

  13. Learning to Work on a Cruise Ship: Accounts from Bali

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artini, Luh Putu; Nilan, Pam

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at motivations and both formal and informal learning contexts for well-educated young Balinese from poorer areas who enrol in cruise ship training colleges. The major motivations were getting a high income and helping the family. While basic hospitality and tourism skills are acquired, trainees also named other capacities such…

  14. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a reasonable... CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a reasonable basis, consisting of... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600...

  15. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are...-1993-05-20, “Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure.” This incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1...

  16. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are... set forth in Society of Automotive Engineers (“SAE”) Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice SAE J1634... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1...

  17. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a...

  18. Yet More Visualized JAMSTEC Cruise and Dive Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, T.; Hase, H.; Fukuda, K.; Saito, H.; Kayo, M.; Matsuda, S.; Azuma, S.

    2014-12-01

    Every year, JAMSTEC performs about a hundred of research cruises and numerous dive surveys using its research vessels and submersibles. JAMSTEC provides data and samples obtained during these cruises and dives to international users through a series of data sites on the Internet. The "DARWIN (http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/darwin/e)" data site disseminates cruise and dive information. On DARWIN, users can search interested cruises and dives with a combination search form or an interactive tree menu, and find lists of observation data as well as links to surrounding databases. Document catalog, physical sample databases, and visual archive of dive surveys (e. g. in http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/jmedia/portal/e) are directly accessible from the lists. In 2014, DARWIN experienced an update, which was arranged mainly for enabling on-demand data visualization. Using login users' functions, users can put listed data items into the virtual basket and then trim, plot and download the data. The visualization tools help users to quickly grasp the quality and characteristics of observation data. Meanwhile, JAMSTEC launched a new data site named "JDIVES (http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/jdives/e)" to visualize data and sample information obtained by dive surveys. JDIVES shows tracks of dive surveys on the "Google Earth Plugin" and diagrams of deep-sea environmental data such as temperature, salinity, and depth. Submersible camera images and links to associated databases are placed along the dive tracks. The JDVIES interface enables users to perform so-called virtual dive surveys, which can help users to understand local geometries of dive spots and geological settings of associated data and samples. It is not easy for individual researchers to organize a huge amount of information recovered from each cruise and dive. The improved visibility and accessibility of JAMSTEC databases are advantageous not only for second-hand users, but also for on-board researchers themselves.

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion moored pipe/mobile platform design study

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, H.O.; McNatt, T.R.; Ross, J.M.; Stambaugh, K.A.; Watts, J.L.

    1982-07-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Moored Pipe/Mobile Platform (MP-Squared) Design Study was carried out to investigate an innovative approach to the moored floating OTEC plant. In the past, a number of concepts have been examined by NOAA for floating OTEC plants. These concepts have considered various configurations for platforms, cold water pipes and mooring systems. In most cases the cold water pipe (CWP) was permanently attached to the platform and the platform was permanently moored on station. Even though CWP concepts incorporating articulated joints or flexible pipes were used, the CWP stresses induced by platform motion were frequently excessive and beyond the design limits of the CWP. This was especially true in the survival (100-year storm) case. It may be feasible that the concept of a permanently moored CWP attached through a flexible transition CWP to the platform could reduce the degree of technical risk by de-coupling the CWP from the motions of the platform. In addition, if the platform is capable of disconnecting from the CWP during survival conditions, even less technical risk may be inherent in the OTEC system. The MP-Squared Design Study was an engineering evaluation of the concepts described above. The effort has been carried through to the conceptual design level, and culminated in model tests in an experimental wave basin.

  20. Building oceanographic moorings in a non-lab introductory ocean science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    A methodology for building low-cost ocean moorings in an introductory ocean sciences course, using HOBO temperature and light pendants, is presented. The moorings, which collect water temperature and light intensity data at high temporal frequency and at multiple depths, are relatively inexpensive, with a total cost of approximately 15 to 30 per student, depending on the configuration. Deployments of multiple months, or even longer, are possible, but in this presentation two ~3-week long deployments are described. Students in an Introduction to Oceanography course at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Washington (USA) designed and constructed moorings for deployment in an enclosed harbor at depths of ~8 meters. The HOBO pendants integrated into the moorings were set to log observations at one hour intervals. After mooring recovery students downloaded data, which were both incorporated into class lessons where feasible, but were also utilized in a fully inquiry-based research paper. The exercise was often cited in students' evaluations as a highlight, and served to both teach and reinforce oceanographic concepts, introduce students to professional options within ocean science and engineering fields, and provide skills training (by requiring students to work in Excel for data manipulation, for example).

  1. Frontiers of More than Moore in Bioelectronics and the Required Metrology Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; Kotanen, Christian; Wilson, A. Nolan

    2011-11-01

    Silicon's intersection with biology is a premise inherent in Moore's prediction. Distinct from biologically inspired molecular logic and storage devices (more Moore) are the integration of solid state electronic devices with the soft condensed state of the body (more than Moore). Developments in biomolecular recognition events per sq. cm parallel those of Moore's Law. However, challenges continue in the area of "More than Moore". Two grand challenge problems must be addressed—the biocompatibility of synthetic materials with the myriad of tissue types within the human body and the interfacing of solid state micro- and nano-electronic devices with the electronics of biological systems. Electroconductive hydrogels have been developed as soft, condensed, biomimetic but otherwise inherently electronically conductive materials to address the challenge of interfacing solid state devices with the electronics of the body, which is predominantly ionic. Nano-templated interfaces via the oriented immobilization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) onto metallic electrodes have engendered reagentless, direct electron transfer between biological redox enzymes and solid state electrodes. In addressing these challenges, metrology needs and opportunities are found in such widely diverse areas as single molecule counting and addressing, sustainable power requirements such as the development of implantable biofuel cells for the deployment of implantable biochips, and new manufacturing paradigms to address plura-biology needs on solid state devices.

  2. Investigation on the dynamic responses of a truss spar platform for different mooring line groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Montasir Osman; Yenduri, Anurag; Kurian, V. J.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic responses of any floating platform are dependent on the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics of the body as well as mooring system. Therefore, it is very essential to study the effect of individual contributions to the system that can finally help to economise their cost. This paper focuses on the effect of mooring stiffness on the responses of a truss spar platform, obtained by different grouping of lines. The study is part of our present researches on mooring systems which include the effect of line pretension, diameter and azimuth angles. The platform is modelled as a rigid body with three degrees-of-freedom and its motions are analyzed in time-domain using the implicit Newmark Beta technique. The mooring lines restoring force-excursion relationship is evaluated using a quasi-static approach. It is observed that the mooring system with lines arranged in less number of groups exhibits better performance in terms of the restoring forces as well as mean position of platform. However, the dynamic motions of platform remain unaffected for different line groups.

  3. Near-surface salinity and stratification in the north Bay of Bengal from moored observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Debasis; Bharath Raj, G. N.; Ravichandran, M.; Sree Lekha, J.; Papa, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    A thin layer of fresh water from summer monsoon rain and river runoff in the Bay of Bengal (BoB) has profound influence on air-sea interaction across the south Asian region, but the mechanisms that sustain the low-salinity layer are as yet unknown. Using the first long time series of high-frequency observations from a mooring in the north BoB and satellite salinity data, we show that fresh water from major rivers is transported by large-scale flow and eddies, and shallow salinity stratification persists from summer through the following winter. The moored observations show frequent 0.2-1.2 psu salinity jumps with time scales of 10 min to days, due to O(1-10) km submesoscale salinity fronts moving past the mooring. In winter, satellite sea surface temperature shows 10 km wide filaments of cool water, in line with moored data. Rapid salinity and temperature changes at the mooring are highly coherent, suggesting slumping of salinity-dominated fronts. Based on these observations, we propose that submesoscale fronts may be one of the important drivers for the persistent fresh layer in the north BoB.

  4. Dynamics of the interaction of mooring line with the sea bed

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Y.; Surendran, S.

    1994-12-31

    Lumped Mass method is a proven numerical approach to analyze the problems of mooring lines. The two-dimensional method was originally developed by Walton and Polachek (1959) for various conditions of frequency and amplitude. Nakajima et al (1982) carried out investigation on the dynamics of mooring lines. In this paper, the interaction of mooring line with the ocean bottom is highlighted and the resulted reduction in dynamic tension is discussed. The line is divided into finite number of lumped masses and linear springs without mass. The damping, associated with the interaction of vibrating chain with the sea bed which is considered to be elastic, is incorporated in the computations. In normal case some part of mooring line will be on the surface of sea floor. Modification to the lumped mass method is done in view of the changed external forces with the change of mode of velocity amplitude along the length of the chain embedded in the sea bottom media. The validation of the modified Lumped Mass method is confirmed by comparing the dynamics of chain on elastic foundation by N.C. Perkins (1990). The sea floor conditions can be found varied for different locations of anchoring and the properties of the sea bottom media influences energy dissipation when the mooring line is interacting with it. The dynamic behavior of chain will be different depending upon the change in sea bottom conditions.

  5. Development of optimization program for single point mooring floating production system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, H.; Kanda, M. Mikami, T.; Kamishohara, A.; Kojima, T.; Yoshizawa, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Floating Production Systems (FPS) or the Floating, Storage and Offloading Systems (FPSO) have been applied to marginal oil fields or early production systems since late `70 in view of less capital and short delivery. There are two types of floating production systems: semi-submersible based spread mooring type and tanker-based single point mooring. This paper describes the analysis method, the technical development of optimization programs and the model experiments for the Single Point Mooring (SPM) systems for FPSO, which have been carried out as a joint research project by Japan National Oil Corporation, Akishima Laboratories Inc. and MODEC Inc. The detailed analysis program is developed based on the constraint matrix method in frequency and time domains and is capable of calculating the motions and constraint forces of SPM in wind, current and random waves. Outline of calculation method is presented.

  6. On the pole of non-square transfer function matrix Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ou, Linlin; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    An essential step in many controller design approaches is computing the inverse of the plant. For a square plant, its inverse is stable if the plant is minimum phase (MP). Nevertheless, this conclusion does not hold for a non-square plant. In this paper, the pole feature of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix is analysed. Instead of complicated advanced mathematical tools, only basic results of polynomial theory and the Binet-Cauchy theorem are used in the analysing procedure. The condition for testing the stability of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of an MP non-square transfer function matrix is given. This condition implies that the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix cannot be directly used as the optimal controller. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the correctness of the condition.

  7. Tunneling-injection-induced turnaround behavior of threshold voltage in thermally nitrided oxide n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. J.; Lai, P. T.; Liu, Z. H.; Fleischer, S.; Cheng, Y. C.

    1990-12-01

    The threshold voltage (VT) degradation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with thermally nitrided oxide or pure oxide as gate dielectric was determined under Fowler-Nordheim (FN) stressing. A typical VT turnaround behavior was observed for both kinds of devices. The VT for nitrided oxide MOSFETs shifts more negatively than that for pure oxide MOSFETs during the initial period of FN stressing whereas the opposite is true for the positive shift after the critical time at turnaround point. The discovery that the shift of substrate current peak exhibits similar turnaround behavior reinforces the above results. In the meantime, the field-effect electron mobility and the maximum transconductance in the channel for nitrided oxide MOSFETs are only slightly degraded by stressing as compared to that for pure oxide MOSFETs. The VT turnaround behavior can be explained as follows: Net trapped charges in the oxide are initially positive (due to hole traps in the oxide) and result in the negative shift of VT. With increasing injection time, trapped electrons in the oxide as well as acceptortype interface states increase. This results in the positive shift in VT. It is revealed that VT degradation in MOSFETs is dominated by the generation of acceptortype interface states rather than electron trapping in the oxide after the critical time.

  8. District Support Systems for the Alignment of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Can We Predict Student Achievement in Reading and Writing for School Turnaround?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Laura Lynn Tanner

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental predictive study was to determine if CIA alignment factors and related district support systems are associated with student achievement to enable the turnaround of schools in crisis. This study aimed to utilize the District Snapshot Tool to determine if the district systems that support CIA…

  9. Implementation and Operational Research: Expedited Results Delivery Systems Using GPRS Technology Significantly Reduce Early Infant Diagnosis Test Turnaround Times.

    PubMed

    Deo, Sarang; Crea, Lindy; Quevedo, Jorge; Lehe, Jonathan; Vojnov, Lara; Peter, Trevor; Jani, Ilesh

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of a new technology to communicate the results of an infant HIV diagnostic test on test turnaround time and to quantify the association between late delivery of test results and patient loss to follow-up. We used data collected during a pilot implementation of Global Package Radio Service (GPRS) printers for communicating results in the early infant diagnosis program in Mozambique from 2008 through 2010. Our dataset comprised 1757 patient records, of which 767 were from before implementation and 990 from after implementation of expedited results delivery system. We used multivariate logistic regression model to determine the association between late result delivery (more than 30 days between sample collection and result delivery to the health facility) and the probability of result collection by the infant's caregiver. We used a sample selection model to determine the association between late result delivery to the facility and further delay in collection of results by the caregiver. The mean test turnaround time reduced from 68.13 to 41.05 days post-expedited results delivery system. Caregivers collected only 665 (37.8%) of the 1757 results. After controlling for confounders, the late delivery of results was associated with a reduction of approximately 18% (0.44 vs. 0.36; P < 0.01) in the probability of results collected by the caregivers (odds ratio = 0.67, P < 0.05). Late delivery of results was also associated with a further average increase in 20.91 days of delay in collection of results (P < 0.01). Early infant diagnosis program managers should further evaluate the cost-effectiveness of operational interventions (eg, GPRS printers) that reduce delays.

  10. Reduction in order turnaround time, telephone calls, and trips to the pharmacy by means of facsimile transceivers.

    PubMed

    Newberg, D F; Stevens, J

    1988-02-01

    The facsimile transceiver (FAX) was trialed at Beverly Hospital, Beverly Massachusetts, on the Intensive Care Unit and the Pediatric Floor from March 13 to April 27, 1987. Beverly Hospital is a 233 bed non profit community hospital. The facsimile unit was used to transmit medication orders to the pharmacy over existing telephone lines. The purpose of the trial was to determine the time saved between the writing of the medication order and the arrival of the medication on the nursing unit. This time was considered as medication turnaround time. During the trial period, a total of 1767 medication order sheets were processed via the FAX machine. The results of the trial showed that medication turnaround time has improved by an average of 90 minutes for each order placed. In addition, it was found that a total of 60 phone calls and 14 trips to the pharmacy, per day, were eliminated from both trial units combined. This resulted in an estimated time savings of 6.5 staff hours per day on these two units alone. On a hospital-wide basis, this would result in considerable labor savings for nursing staff on the floors. In addition, supply costs of medication order sheets will be reduced by approximately $3200 per year if the FAX units were used throughout the hospital. As a result of the trial, Beverly Hospital purchased 9 units, at a cost of $17,325 and implemented a hospital-wide policy of sending medication orders to the pharmacy using this equipment. This will result in improved ability of the pharmacy to respond to new orders in a more timely manner, supply cost reductions and improved use of staff.

  11. Transient survival analysis of a moored floating offshore platform: Wind biased

    SciTech Connect

    Falzarano, J.; Vishnubhotla, S.; Zhang, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the authors investigate the very large amplitude roll motions of the capsized MODU Ocean Ranger. They utilize the dynamical systems approach to analyze all possible motions for fixed vessel and environmental conditions. They include the effects of wind bias and an equivalent mooring system. As expected, they find the effects of wind bias to dramatically effect the system`s safe basin, a measure of the vessel`s resistance to capsizing. Somewhat surprisingly, they find the mooring system to have a limited effect on the roll due to its small size relative to the hydrostatic roll restoring moment.

  12. Evolving physically simulated flying creatures for efficient cruising.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Chang-Hun

    2006-01-01

    The body-brain coevolution of aerial life forms has not been developed as far as aquatic or terrestrial locomotion in the field of artificial life. We are studying physically simulated 3D flying creatures by evolving both wing shapes and their controllers. A creature's wing is modeled as a number of articulated cylinders, connected by triangular films (patagia). The wing structure and its motor controllers for cruising flight are generated by an evolutionary algorithm within a simulated aerodynamic environment. The most energy-efficient cruising speed and the lift and drag coefficients of each flier are calculated from its morphological characteristics and used in the fitness evaluation. To observe a wide range of creature size, the evolution is run separately for creatures categorized into three species by body weight. The resulting creatures vary in size from pigeons to pterosaurs, with various wing configurations. We discuss the characteristics of shape and motion of the evolved creatures, including flight stability and Strouhal number.

  13. [MORBIDITY OF SUBMARINE CREW SAILORS IN LONG-DISTANCE CRUISES].

    PubMed

    Myznikov, I L; Burtsev, N N; Bondarenko N V; Khamidullina, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity among the personnel of a Kola-based (beyond the Arctic circle) atomic (ASM) and diesel-powered (DSM) submarines in the course of long-distance cruises in different waters of the world ocean was studied. Statistics was collected from the reports of submarine medical officers since 1969. Levels and causes of morbidity were analyzed. According to the data of many years' observations, within the structure of primary diseases of military contractors on cruises the leading place has been occupied by respiratory disorders followed by skin and subcutaneous fat problems, and digestive diseases. Incidence of chronic diseases among ASM and DSM personnel was evaluated. The authors raise the issue of dental care quality provided to submariners. PMID:26554134

  14. Minimum energy, liquid hydrogen supersonic cruise vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential was examined of hydrogen-fueled supersonic vehicles designed for cruise at Mach 2.7 and at Mach 2.2. The aerodynamic, weight, and propulsion characteristics of a previously established design of a LH2 fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicle (SCV) were critically reviewed and updated. The design of a Mach 2.2 SCV was established on a corresponding basis. These baseline designs were then studied to determine the potential of minimizing energy expenditure in performing their design mission, and to explore the effect of fuel price and noise restriction on their design and operating performance. The baseline designs of LH2 fueled aircraft were than compared with equivalent designs of jet A (conventional hydrocarbon) fueled SCV's. Use of liquid hydrogen for fuel for the subject aircraft provides significant advantages in performance, cost, noise, pollution, sonic boom, and energy utilization.

  15. Relative risk assessment of cruise ships biosolids disposal alternatives.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, Pedro M; Englehardt, James D; Olascoaga, Josefina; Babcock, Elizabeth A; Brand, Larry; Lirman, Diego; Rogge, Wolfgang F; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Tchobanoglous, George

    2011-10-01

    A relative risk assessment of biosolids disposal alternatives for cruise ships is presented in this paper. The area of study encompasses islands and marine waters of the Caribbean Sea. The objective was to evaluate relative human health and ecological risks of (a) dewatering/incineration, (b) landing the solids for disposal, considering that in some countries land-disposed solids might be discharged in the near-shore environment untreated, and (c) deep ocean disposal. Input to the Bayesian assessment consisted of professional judgment based on available literature and modeling information, data on constituent concentrations in cruise ship biosolids, and simulations of constituent concentrations in Caribbean waters assuming ocean disposal. Results indicate that human health and ecological risks associated with land disposal and shallow ocean disposal are higher than those of the deep ocean disposal and incineration. For incineration, predicted ecological impacts were lower relative to deep ocean disposal before considering potential impacts of carbon emissions.

  16. Heavy ion observations by MARIE in cruise phase and Marsorbit

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kerry T.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Zeitlin, Cary

    2004-12-01

    The charged particle spectrum for nuclei from protons to neon, (charge Z = 10) was observed during the cruise phase and orbit around Mars by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer on the Odyssey spacecraft. The cruise data were taken between April 23, 2001 and mid-August 2001. The Mars orbit data were taken March 5, 2002 through May 2002 and are scheduled to continue until August 2004. Charge peaks are clearly separated for charges up to Z = 10. Especially prominent are the carbon and oxygen peaks, with boron and nitrogen also clearly visible. Although heavy ions are much less abundant than protons in the cosmic ray environment, it is important to determine their abundances because their ionization energy losses (proportional to Z2) are far more dangerous to humans and to instruments. Thus the higher charged nuclei make a significant contribution to dose and dose equivalent received in space. Results of the charged particle spectrum measurements will be reported.

  17. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must objects protruding from... objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? (a) Each object protruding from the water that is within 100 yards of a platform or single point mooring...

  18. Overview of NASA's Supersonic Cruise Efficiency - Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The research in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Propulsion (SCE-P) Technical Challenge area of NASA's Supersonics project is discussed. The research in SCE-P is being performed to enable efficient supersonic flight over land. Research elements in this area include: Advance Inlet Concepts, High Performance/Wider Operability Fan and Compressor, Advanced Nozzle Concepts, and Intelligent Sensors/Actuators. The research under each of these elements is briefly discussed.

  19. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, ED; Nicholson, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 General Dynamics demonstrated an AR&D system for members of the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware derived from the Cruise Missile and Centaur avionics systems. The object of this proof of concept demonstration was to show that all the accuracy, reliability, and operational requirements established for a spacecraft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed AR&D system.

  20. Environmental effects of an aircraft at cruise: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararaman, N.

    1980-01-01

    The status of the calculations of ozone change due to high altitude aircraft is critically reviewed and important areas of uncertainty identified. Laboratory determinations of chemical reaction rates and modeling refinements show that the effect of cruise altitude emissions on stratospheric ozone has changed from one of ozone decrease to one of slight increase. It is concluded that the uncertainties in the present understanding of the effects of high altitude aircraft are such as to warrant continued studies.

  1. Impact of cruise ship emissions in Victoria, BC, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poplawski, Karla; Setton, Eleanor; McEwen, Bryan; Hrebenyk, Dan; Graham, Mark; Keller, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Characterization of the effects of cruise ship emissions on local air quality is scarce. Our objective was to investigate community level concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and sulphur dioxide (SO 2) associated with cruise ships in James Bay, Victoria, British Columbia (BC), Canada. Data obtained over four years (2005-2008) at the nearest air quality network site located 3.5 km from the study area, a CALPUFF modeling exercise (2007), and continuous measurements taken in the James Bay community over a three-month period during the 2009 cruise ship season were examined. Concentrations of PM 2.5 and nitrogen oxide (NO) were elevated on weekends with ships present with winds from the direction of the terminal to the monitoring station. SO 2 displayed the greatest impact from the presence of cruise ships in the area. Network data showed peaks in hourly SO 2 when ships were in port during all years. The CALPUFF modeling analysis found predicted 24-hour SO 2 levels to exceed World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines of 20 μg m -3 for approximately 3% of 24-hour periods, with a maximum 24-hour concentration in the community of 41 μg m -3; however, the CALPUFF model underestimated concentrations when predicted and measured concentrations were compared at the network site. Continuous monitoring at the location in the community predicted to experience highest SO 2 concentrations measured a maximum 24-hour concentration of 122 μg m -3 and 16% of 24-hour periods were above the WHO standard. The 10-minute concentrations of SO 2 reached up to 599 μg m -3 and exceeded the WHO 10-minute SO 2 guideline (500 μg m -3) for 0.03% of 10-minute periods. No exceedences of BC Provincial or Canadian guidelines or standards were observed.

  2. Texas Teacher at Sea on the BOLIVAR Project Geophysical Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelan, M.; Sullivan, S.; Ellins, K.

    2004-12-01

    UTIG provides K-12 teachers with research experiences in field programs that involve UTIG scientists. I am a 6th-9th grade science teacher in Van Vleck, Texas and in April 2004 I sailed to the southeastern Caribbean aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing as a member of the BOLIVAR Project alongside scientists from the U.S. and Venezuela. Our goal was collect seismic data to image the crust and mantle beneath the Caribbean as part of a study of the tectonic processes accompanying different stages of the Caribbean arc/South America continental collision process. Throughout the 52-day cruise I worked as a watch stander, interpreted newly collected seismic reflection data, helped deploy the streamer, maintained a cruise blog (a chronological journal weblog documenting personal thoughts about my experience), spoke with students in Texas with the telephone on loan from Iridium Satellite Solutions, and responded to email inquiries from shore-based students. It was hard work, but most importantly, a voyage of discovery. With guidance from scientists and GK-12 Fellows at UTIG, I am using my experience and the data collected as the basis for K-12 curriculum resources, including learning activities and a video documentary. Support for my participation and post-cruise activities was provided by the NSF and the Trull Foundation in Texas. If given the opportunity to do this again, I would, without reservation!

  3. What Cruising Infants Understand about Support for Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah E.; Chan, Gladys L. Y.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    “Cruising” infants can only walk using external support to augment their balance. We examined cruisers’ understanding of support for upright locomotion under four conditions: cruising over a wooden handrail at chest height, a large gap in the handrail, a wobbly unstable handrail, and an ill positioned low handrail. Infants distinguished among the support properties of the handrails with differential attempts to cruise and handrail-specific forms of haptic exploration and gait modifications. They consistently attempted the wood handrail, rarely attempted the gap, and occasionally attempted the low and wobbly handrails. On the wood and gap handrails, attempt rates matched the probability of cruising successfully; but on the low and wobbly handrails, attempt rates under- and over-estimated the probability of success, respectively. Haptic exploration was most frequent and varied on the wobbly handrail, and gait modifications—including previously undocumented “knee cruising”—were most frequent and effective on the low handrail. Results are discussed in terms of developmental changes in the meaning of support. PMID:25221439

  4. 33 CFR 165.751 - Security Zone: LNG mooring slip, Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dolphin located at approximately 32 05.01′ North, 080 59.38′ West, to the southeastern most mooring dolphin located at approximately 32 04.79′ North, 080 59.35′ West, and continues west along the North...

  5. Numerical modeling of a spherical buoy moored by a cable in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangqian; Yoo, Wan-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Floating facilities have been studied based on the static analysis of mooring cables over the past decades. To analyze the floating system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable with a higher accuracy than before, the dynamics of the cables are considered in the construction of the numerical modeling. The cable modeling is established based on a new element frame through which the hydrodynamic loads are expressed efficiently. The accuracy of the cable modeling is verified with an experiment that is conducted by a catenary chain moving in a water tank. In addition, the modeling of a spherical buoy is established with respect to a spherical coordinate in three dimensions, which can suffers the gravity, the variable buoyancy and Froude-Krylov loads. Finally, the numerical modeling for the system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable is established, and a virtual simulation is proceeded with the X- and Y-directional linear waves and the X-directional current. The comparison with the commercial simulation code ProteusDS indicates that the system is accurately analyzed by the numerical modeling. The tensions within the cable, the motions of the system, and the relationship between the motions and waves are illustrated according to the defined sea state. The dynamics of the cables should be considered in analyzing the floating system of a spherical buoy moored by a cable.

  6. ANATOMY, LIFE HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE PARASITIC LEECH OLIGOBDELLA BIANNULATA (MOORE, 1900) (EUHIRUDINEA: GLOSSIPHONIIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligobdella biannulata (Moore, 1900) is a rare, endemic species originally described from a mountain stream near Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Specimens of this species were collected seasonally from fall 1999 to winter 2001 with four new county records in North Carolina (Avery,...

  7. 75 FR 38019 - Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, Oahu, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, Oahu, HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: Due to...

  8. The Impact of a Modified Moore Method on Efficacy and Performance in Precalculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Thomas E.; Bailey, Brad; Briggs, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one section of undergraduate Precalculus was taught using a modified Moore method, a student centered inquiry-based approach, and two control sections were taught in a traditional lecture format. A survey of attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy toward mathematics and Precalculus was administered at the beginning and end of the semester…

  9. Mathematical Understanding and Proving Abilities: Experiment with Undergraduate Student by Using Modified Moore Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maya, Rippi; Sumarmo, Utari

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a post test experimental control group design conducted to investigate the role of modified Moore learning approach on improving students' mathematical understanding and proving abilities. Subjects of study were 56 undergraduate students of one state university in Bandung, who took advanced abstract algebra course.…

  10. A single mooring system with sag-extensibility and flexural rigidity applied to offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.-C.; Lee, Hsien Hua; Lee, Jun-Yen; Hsiao, S.-S.

    2013-06-01

    Floating platform system has been extensively used in ocean exploitation, particularly for a tension-leg platform (TLP) system in deep water. Most of the TLPs are multi-mooring systems, where multi-joints are connected to the tension-legs so that the platform is not allowed to twist freely and may subject to enormous force induced by large incident waves in the weak-direction of the structure. This study aims to exploit a single moored offshore platform system that may attract less force and can be operated with less effort. In our analysis, in addition to mechanical properties of the tether, two important properties are also taken into consideration for the single mooring tether with expanded cross sectional dimension and utilization of stronger material, namely, the sag-extensibility and the flexural rigidity. Finally, the dynamic structural behavior produced by the mechanical effects on the new system is investigated and compared with that of traditional design while the wave-structure interactions of large body are also accounted for. Our study finds that the neglect of sag-extensibility or the flexural rigidity of large, strong mooring cable may result in a conservative but not necessarily safe design.

  11. LIFE HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE LEECH OLIGOBDELLA BIANNULATA (MOORE, 1900) (EUHIRUDINEA: GLOSSIPHONNIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligobdella biannulata (Moore, 1900) is a rare, endemic leech species originally described from a mountain stream near Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Specimens of O. biannulata were collected seasonally from Fall 1999, to Summer 2002, with new county records in North Carolina and ...

  12. Most-Perfect Pandiagonal Magic Squares and Their Moore-Penrose Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Dietrich; Trenkler, Gotz

    2004-01-01

    In this note 4 x 4 most-perfect pandiagonal magic squares are considered in which rows, columns and the two main, along with the broken, diagonals add up to the same sum. It is shown that the Moore-Penrose inverse of these squares has the same magic property.

  13. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall lead forward and one shall lead astern from the break of the bow and one lead astern from the quarter. (ii) One synthetic hawser shall be hand held and lead astern from the break of the bow through... four mooring lines—wires, independently power operated by the main drums of adequate power...

  14. 33 CFR 401.12 - Minimum requirements-mooring lines and fairleads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall lead forward and one shall lead astern from the break of the bow and one lead astern from the quarter. (ii) One synthetic hawser shall be hand held and lead astern from the break of the bow through... four mooring lines—wires, independently power operated by the main drums of adequate power...

  15. Bessie the Builder, Queen Bessie: Profile of Bessie Boehm Moore, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David; Reed, Stan

    Dr. Bessie Boehm Moore has been a major contributor to library advancement and economics education in Arkansas and throughout the United States. She began her career as a first grade teacher at the age of 14. As one of the first county supervisors in Arkansas, she became alarmed at the paucity of library materials available for student use and…

  16. Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring cleat on the top edge of the curb at the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Ramps - World War II Type, Southwest and west shore of Ford Island, near Wasp Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Inquiry Based Learning: A Modified Moore Method Approach To Encourage Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoughlin, M. Padraig M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The author of this paper submits that a mathematics student needs to learn to conjecture and prove or disprove said conjecture. Ergo, the purpose of the paper is to submit the thesis that learning requires doing; only through inquiry is learning achieved, and hence this paper proposes a programme of use of a modified Moore method (MMM) across the…

  18. The Pacific and Indian Ocean Exchange: Analysis of the Imos Timor Passage and Ombai Strait Moorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloyan, B.; Wijffels, S. A.; Cowley, R.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental aspect of observing, describing, understanding and modeling the global climate and particularly the Maritime Continent, is a better knowledge of the fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater in the ocean. The Indonesian seas are the only major low-latitude connection in the global oceans. This connection permits the transfer of Pacific waters into the Indian Ocean, known as the Indonesian Throughflow. The interaction of the Pacific and Indian basins and their modes of variability (El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD)), both through atmospheric teleconnections and the ocean link via the Indonesian Throughflow, is now being hotly pursued in the research community. We will present some initial findings from the 3-year time series (2011-2014) of the Timor Passage and Ombai Strait moorings. This mooring array is a component of the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), and builds on the earlier results of the INSTANT (2003-2006) observational program. The moorings comprise of velocity, temperature and salinity instruments. Observations from these moorings provide the required spatial and temporal coverage to understand ocean dynamics, the ocean's role in climate variability and change, investigate forcing of the atmosphere and ocean and assess the realism of data-assimilative ocean models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models.

  19. Federated provenance of oceanographic research cruises: from metadata to data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rob; Leadbetter, Adam; Shepherd, Adam

    2016-04-01

    The World Wide Web Consortium's Provenance Data Model and associated Semantic Web ontology (PROV-O) have created much interest in the Earth and Space Science Informatics community (Ma et al., 2014). Indeed, PROV-O has recently been posited as an upper ontology for the alignment of various data models (Cox, 2015). Similarly, PROV-O has been used as the building blocks of a data release lifecycle ontology (Leadbetter & Buck, 2015). In this presentation we show that the alignment between different local data descriptions of an oceanographic research cruise can be achieved through alignment with PROV-O and that descriptions of the funding bodies, organisations and researchers involved in a cruise and its associated data release lifecycle can be modelled within a PROV-O based environment. We show that, at a first-order, this approach is scalable by presenting results from three endpoints (the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA; the British Oceanographic Data Centre at the National Oceanography Centre, UK; and the Marine Institute, Ireland). Current advances in ontology engineering, provide pathways to resolving reasoning issues from varying perspectives on implementing PROV-O. This includes the use of the Information Object design pattern where such edge cases as research cruise scheduling efforts are considered. PROV-O describes only things which have happened, but the Information Object design pattern allows for the description of planned research cruises through its statement that the local data description is not the the entity itself (in this case the planned research cruise) and therefore the local data description itself can be described using the PROV-O model. In particular, we present the use of the data lifecycle ontology to show the connection between research cruise activities and their associated datasets, and the publication of those data sets online with Digital Object Identifiers and

  20. Use of multi-disciplinary mooring data to extend intermittent OA observations from ship surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, U.; Ohman, M. D.; Martz, T. R.; Dickson, A. G.; Feely, R. A.; Demer, D.; Washburn, L.

    2012-12-01

    Ship surveys along the US West Coast have provided valuable insight into the conditions and changes in the water column that affect the ocean acidification state. Examples are the decades of CalCOFI sampling off southern California, and the West Coast ship survey published in Feely et al 2008. What is lacking in these observations is a description of the temporal variability of the conditions observed, and of the processes at work that lead to observed conditions or changes. Multi-disciplinary moorings are ideally suited for adding this dimension to the available observations which is critical for an understanding of the OA mechanisms. One example is the occurrence of corrosive water near the seafloor on the continental shelf, which was found in the Feely et al survey. Time series data from a mooring off Del Mar, California, with oxygen and pH sensors near the bottom in 100m depth show the frequency and intensity of corrosive and hypoxic conditions there, and how they relate to physical processes (cross-shelf and along-shelf flow), biological conditions, and climate processes (here La Nina). In the upwelling and open-ocean regimes off Pt. Conception two moorings (CCE1, CCE2) have been collecting data since early 2009 and 2010, respectively, co-located with CalCOFI stations and CCE LTER cardinal sites for ship observations. A glider also routinely passes by these moorings (along CalCOFI line 80). The moorings carry physical, oxygen, pH, pCO2, nutrient, and ecosystem sensors (chlorophyll fluorescence, water column irradiance absorption, acoustic backscatter) and telemeter most data in real-time. The mooring time series show the variability of OA parameters on daily, weekly, seasonal, and interannual time scales, and in the context of the spatial and historical sampling from ships. The multi-disciplinary sensor suite allows to study the forcing of the OA variability on those various time scales, and the impact on the ecosystem. Combined with the spatial information

  1. Hydrostatic Mooring System. Final Technical Report: Main Report plus Appendices A, B, and C - Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jens Korsgaard

    2000-08-08

    The main conclusions from the work carried out under this contract are: An ordinary seafarer can learn by training on a simulator, to moor large tanker vessels to the Hydrostatic Mooring, safely and quickly, in all weather conditions up to storms generating waves with a significant wave height of 8 m. Complete conceptual design of the Hydrostatic Mooring buoy was carried out which proved that the buoy could be constructed entirely from commercially available standard components and materials. The design is robust, and damage resistant. The mooring tests had a 100% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being securely attached and moored to the vessel following every mooring attempt. The tests had an 80% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being adequately centered such that petroleum transfer equipment on the vessel could be attached to the corresponding equipment on the buoy. The results given in Table 3-2 of the mooring tests show a consistently improving performance from test to test by the Captain that performed the mooring operations. This is not surprising, in view of the fact that the Captain had only three days of training on the simulator prior to conducting the tests, that the maneuvering required is non-standard, and the test program itself lasted four days. One conclusion of the test performance is that the Captain was not fully trained at the initiation of the test. It may therefore be concluded that a thoroughly trained navigator would probably be able to make the mooring such that the fluid transfer equipment can be connected with reliability in excess of 90%. Considering that the typical standard buoy has enough power aboard to make eight mooring attempts, this implies that the probability that the mooring attempt should fail because of the inability to connect the fluid transfer equipment is of the order of 10{sup {minus}8}. It may therefore be concluded that the mooring operation between a Hydrostatic Mooring and a large

  2. Numerical Modeling of Compliant-Moored System Dynamics with Applications to Marine Energy Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Tyler

    The development of a numerical model simulating the dynamic response of compliant-moored submerged systems to non-uniform fluid flow is presented. The model is meant to serve as a computational tool with applications to compliant-moored marine energy converters by time-domain representation of the mooring dynamics. The scope of the initial code is restricted to full-submerged moored tidal turbines, though the model can be readily expanded to analyze wave energy converters as well. The system is modeled in a Lagrangian frame treating tidal turbines and structural elements as rigid bodies. Mooring lines are modeled as a series of discrete elastic segments, with parameters and force contributions lumped to point-mass nodes joining each segment. Full-range of motion is achieved using the alpha-beta-gamma Euler Angle method. The governing equations of motion of the system are derived computationally through implementation of Lagrange's Equation of Motion. The techniques employed to develop the symbolic expressions for the total kinetic, potential, and damping energies of the system and the forces acting on each element of the system are discussed. The system of differential equations obtained from evaluation of Lagrange's Equation with the developed symbolic expressions is solved numerically using a built-in MATLAB ordinary differential equation solver called ODE15i.m with the user defined initial condition of the system. Several validation tests are presented and their results discussed. Finally, an explanation of future plans for development of the model and application to existing tidal energy systems are presented.

  3. Lesbians and Gay Men's Vacation Motivations, Perceptions, and Constraints: A Study of Cruise Vacation Choice.

    PubMed

    Weeden, Clare; Lester, Jo-Anne; Jarvis, Nigel

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the push-pull vacation motivations of gay male and lesbian consumers and examines how these underpin their perceptions and purchase constraints of a mainstream and LGBT(1) cruise. Findings highlight a complex vacation market. Although lesbians and gay men share many of the same travel motivations as their heterosexual counterparts, the study reveals sexuality is a significant variable in their perception of cruise vacations, which further influences purchase constraints and destination choice. Gay men have more favorable perceptions than lesbians of both mainstream and LGBT cruises. The article recommends further inquiry into the multifaceted nature of motivations, perception, and constraints within the LGBT market in relation to cruise vacations.

  4. EDITORIAL: Moore and more progress in electronics and photonics Moore and more progress in electronics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2009-10-01

    parts. The field of optoelectronics and photonics has been benefiting from the ability to synthesize semiconducting nanowires and quantum dots. Advances in light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, nanolasers, solar cells, and field emission devices have been abundantly reported in the journal. The future of these devices depends on our ability to control the size, orientation and properties of one- and zero-dimensional materials. The forecast for electronics and photonics has vastly underestimated developments, with predictions such as 'future computers will weigh no less than 1.5 tons'. Over the past twenty years, the number of transistors on a chip has risen from just 1 million to 2 billion, and is still increasing. Now the biggest question is: what will take over from Moore's law in about a decade? This question has been driving the research agenda in electronics across the industrial and academic world. The first answer appears to be integrating other functional components with logic and memory such as miniature camera modules, GPS, accelerometers, biometric identification, health monitoring systems, etc. Such integration is actively being pursued by industry. In contrast, a lot of new research is still driven by material innovations, for example, carbon nanotube based electronics. Rudimentary devices and circuits using SWCNTs have been demonstrated to outperform silicon devices of comparable size. However, controlling the chirality and diameter of SWCNTs is still a problem, as is the manufacture of 300-400 mm wafers with over 5-10 billion transistors, and all of this assumes that continuing on the path of CMOS but using a different material is the right approach in the first place. In the meantime, silicon and germanium in the form of nanowires may make their way into electronics. Then there is molecular electronics where conducting organic molecules could now become the heart of electronic components, although the precision and controllability of electrical contact

  5. An investigation on low frequency fatigue damage of mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junfeng; Wang, Shuqing; Chang, Anteng; Li, Huajun

    2016-06-01

    Assessing the fatigue life of mooring systems is important for deep water structures. In this paper, a comprehensive fatigue analysis is conducted on the mooring lines applied in a semi-submersible platform with special focus on the low frequency (LF) fatigue damage. Several influential factors, including water depth, wave spectral parameters, and riser system, are considered. Numerical simulation of a semi-submersible platform with the mooring/riser system is executed under different conditions, and the fatigue damage of mooring lines is assessed by using the time domain analysis method as a benchmark. The effects of these factors on the mooring line tension and the fatigue damage are investigated and discussed in detail. Research results indicate that the LF fatigue damage only accounts for a very small portion of the total damage, although the LF components dominate the global motion response and the mooring line tension of the semi-submersible platform. However, it is demonstrated that the LF fatigue damage is clearly affected by the influential factors. The increase in water depth and spectral peak periods, and the existence of risers can weaken the contribution of the LF components to the mooring line fatigue damage, while the fatigue damage due to the LF components increases with the increase of significant wave height.

  6. [Medicine aboard cruise ships--law insurance specifics].

    PubMed

    Ottomann, C; Frenzel, R; Muehlberger, T

    2013-04-01

    The booming cruise industry, associated with ships with more passengers and crew on board, results in growing medical needs for the ship doctor. The ship's doctor insurance policy includes different jurisdictions, namely national law, international law, tort law, insurance law and labor law. In addition, international agreements must be taken into account, which complicates the design of an adequate insurance policy. Equally high are the costs and defense costs for the ship's doctor in case of liability. In order to limit the liability for all parties is to ask for appropriately qualified medical staff, hired on board.

  7. Computer assessment of electromagnetic means of detecting approaching cruise missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.; King, R.J.; Lytle, R.J.; Miller, E.K.

    1983-11-01

    Numerical modeling of Beverage and monopole antennas shows the fields of both antennas to have a similar dependence on range and height above ground, with the Beverage antenna having slightly greater gain in the forward direction due to its directivity. The use of multiple Beverage antennas closely spaced was found to increase the efficiency and gain in the forward direction for short Beverage antennas. For the longer antenna considered for the cruise missile radar, the decrease in directivity for two closely spaced antennas reduced the forward gain.

  8. Maneuver Design for the Juno Mission: Inner Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlak, Thomas A.; Frauenholz, Raymond B.; Bordi, John J.; Kangas, Julie A.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    2014-01-01

    The Juno spacecraft launched in August 2011 and, following a successful Earth flyby in October 2013, is on course for a nominal orbit insertion at Jupiter in July 2016. This paper examines the design and execution of deterministic and statistical trajectory correction maneuvers during the first approximately 27 months of post-launch operations that defined the "Inner Cruise" phase of the Juno mission. Topics of emphasis include the two deep space maneuvers, Earth flyby altitude biasing strategy, and the sequence of trajectory correction maneuvers executed in the weeks prior to the successful Earth gravity assist.

  9. Cruise aerodynamics of USB nacelle/wing geometric variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on aerodynamic effects of geometric variations in upper surface blown nacelle configurations at high speed cruise conditions. Test data include both force and pressure measurements on two and three dimensional models powered by upper surface blowing nacelles of varying geometries. Experimental results are provided on variations in nozzle aspect ratio, nozzle boattail angle, and multiple nacelle installations. The nacelles are ranked according to aerodynamic drag penalties as well as overall installed drag penalties. Sample effects and correlations are shown for data obtained with the pressure model.

  10. Flying qualities design criteria applicable to supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalk, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive set of flying qualities design criteria was prepared for use in the supersonic cruise research program. The framework for stating the design criteria is established and design criteria are included which address specific failures, approach to dangerous flight conditions, flight at high angle of attack, longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control, the primary flight control system, and secondary flight controls. Examples are given of lateral directional design criteria limiting lateral accelerations at the cockpit, time to roll through 30 deg of bank, and time delay in the pilot's command path. Flight test data from the Concorde certification program are used to substantiate a number of the proposed design criteria.

  11. Engine/airframe compatibility studies for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Technology assessment studies were conducted to provide an updated technology base from which an advanced supersonic cruise aircraft can be produced with a high probability of success. An assessment of the gains available through the application of advanced technologies in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and active controls is developed. The potential market and range requirements as well as economic factors including payload, speed, airline operating costs, and airline profitability are analyzed. The conceptual design of the baseline aircraft to be used in assessing the technology requirements is described.

  12. Variability of cloudiness at airline cruise altitudes from GASP measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Additional statistics relating to the climatology of cloud cover at airline cruise altitudes are presented. The data were obtained between 1975 and 1979 from commercial airliners participating in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). The statistics describe the seasonal, latitudinal and altitudinal variation in cloudiness parameters as well as differences in the high-altitude cloud structure attributed to cyclone and convective-cloud generation processes. The latitudinal distribution of cloud cover derived form the GASP data was found to agree with high-altitude satellite observations. The relationships between three different measures of cloudiness and the relative vorticity at high altitudes is also discussed.

  13. NASA/Navy life/cruise fan preliminary design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary design studies were performed to define a turbotip lift/cruise fan propulsion system for a Navy multimission aircraft. The fan is driven by the exhausts of the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet or a 20 percent Growth J97 configuration as defined during the studies. The LCF459 fan configuration defined has a tip diameter of 1.50 meters (59.0 inches) and develops a design point thrust of 75,130 N (16,890 lbs) at a fan pressure ratio of 1.319. The fan has an estimated weight of 386 kg (850 lbs). Trade studies performed to define the selected configuration are described.

  14. Laboratory Automation and Intra-Laboratory Turnaround Time: Experience at the University Hospital Campus Bio-Medico of Rome.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; De Cesaris, Marina; Hart, Jonathan George; Urbano, Michele; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Fragliasso, Fulvio; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2015-12-01

    Intra-laboratory turnaround time (TAT) is a key indicator of laboratory performance. Improving TAT is a complex task requiring staff education, equipment acquisition, and adequate TAT monitoring. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intra-laboratory TAT after laboratory automation implementation (June 2013-June 2014) and to compare it to that in the preautomation period (July 2012-May 2013). Intra-laboratory TAT was evaluated both as the mean TAT registered and the percentage of outlier (OP) exams. The mean TAT was 36, 38, and 34 min during the study periods, respectively. These values respected the goal TAT established at 45 min. The OP, calculated at 45 min as well as at 60 min, decreased from 26 to 21 and from 11 to 5, respectively. From a focused analysis on blood count cell, troponin I, and prothrombin (PT) test, TAT improvement was more evident for tests requiring longer preanalytical process. The follow-up of TAT from June 2013 to June 2014 revealed the reduction of the mean TAT as well as of the OP exams after automation implementation and that automation more strongly affects the test in the preanalytical phase including centrifugation of the sample, such as troponin I and PT.

  15. Total Automation for the Core Laboratory: Improving the Turnaround Time Helps to Reduce the Volume of Ordered STAT Tests.

    PubMed

    Ialongo, Cristiano; Porzio, Ottavia; Giambini, Ilio; Bernardini, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    The transition to total automation represents the greatest leap for a clinical laboratory, characterized by a totally new philosophy of process management. We have investigated the impact of total automation on core laboratory efficiency and its effects on the clinical services related to STAT tests. For this purpose, a 47-month retrospective study based on the analysis of 44,212 records of STAT cardiac troponin I (CTNI) tests was performed. The core laboratory reached a new efficiency level 3 months after the implementation of total automation. Median turnaround time (TAT) was reduced by 14.9±1.5 min for the emergency department (p < 0.01), reaching 41.6±1.2 min. In non-emergency departments, median TAT was reduced by 19.8±2.2 min (p < 0.01), reaching 52±1.3 min. There was no change in the volume of ordered STAT CTNI tests by the emergency department (p = 0.811), whereas for non-emergency departments there was a reduction of 115.7±50 monthly requests on average (p = 0.026). The volume of ordered tests decreased only in time frames of the regular shift following the morning round. Thus, total automation significantly improves the core laboratory efficiency in terms of TAT. As a consequence, the volume of STAT tests ordered by hospital departments (except for the emergency department) decreased due to reduced duplicated requests.

  16. 14 CFR 91.159 - VFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false VFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Flight Rules § 91.159 VFR cruising altitude or flight level. Except while holding in a holding pattern of... flight more than 3,000 feet above the surface shall maintain the appropriate altitude or flight...

  17. 14 CFR 91.159 - VFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false VFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Flight Rules § 91.159 VFR cruising altitude or flight level. Except while holding in a holding pattern of... flight more than 3,000 feet above the surface shall maintain the appropriate altitude or flight...

  18. 14 CFR 91.159 - VFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false VFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Flight Rules § 91.159 VFR cruising altitude or flight level. Except while holding in a holding pattern of... flight more than 3,000 feet above the surface shall maintain the appropriate altitude or flight...

  19. 14 CFR 91.159 - VFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false VFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Flight Rules § 91.159 VFR cruising altitude or flight level. Except while holding in a holding pattern of... flight more than 3,000 feet above the surface shall maintain the appropriate altitude or flight...

  20. 76 FR 30374 - Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act of 2010, Available Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act of 2010, Available Technology AGENCY: Coast... public comment on the availability of technology to meet certain provisions of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010(CVSSA), specifically related to video recording and overboard...

  1. 76 FR 31350 - Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act of 2010, Available Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act of 2010, Available Technology AGENCY: Coast... technology to meet certain provisions of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010(CVSSA), specifically related to video recording and overboard detection technologies. The Notice of request...

  2. 29 CFR 788.8 - “Cruising, surveying, or felling timber.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âCruising, surveying, or felling timber.â 788.8 Section 788... timber.” Employees engaged in “cruising * * * timber” include all those members of a field crew whose purpose is to estimate and report on the volume of marketable timber. Employees engaged in...

  3. 29 CFR 788.8 - “Cruising, surveying, or felling timber.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âCruising, surveying, or felling timber.â 788.8 Section 788... timber.” Employees engaged in “cruising * * * timber” include all those members of a field crew whose purpose is to estimate and report on the volume of marketable timber. Employees engaged in...

  4. NASA/Navy lift/cruise fan. Phase 1: Design summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The initial design of the LCF459 lift/cruise fan system is documented. The LCF459 is a 1.5 meter diameter turbotip lift/cruise fan whose design point pressure ratio is 1.32 at a tip speed of 353 meters per second. The gas source for the tip turbine is the YJ97-GE-100 engine.

  5. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Port of San Diego, California. 165.1108 Section 165.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1108 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as... or at a port of call in the San Diego port. (b) Location. The following areas are security zones:...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Diego. (c) Regulations. Under regulations in 33 CFR part 165, subpart D, a person or vessel may not..., Port of San Diego, California. 165.1108 Section 165.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1108 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship”...

  7. 76 FR 50710 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, CA AGENCY... CFR 165.1154, Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California, by providing a...

  8. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1980 to 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliography for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) Programs is presented. An annotated bibliography for the last 123 formal reports and a listing of titles for 44 articles and presentations is included. The studies identifies technologies for producing efficient supersonic commercial jet transports for cruise Mach numbers from 2.0 to 2.7.

  9. 76 FR 5732 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... FR 4833), regarding security zones for cruise ships in the Port of San Diego, California. This..., telephone 202-366-9826. Correction In the notice of proposed rulemaking FR Doc. 2011-1804, beginning on page... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego,...

  10. 77 FR 1025 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Ships, San Pedro Bay, CA in the Federal Register (76 FR 50710). We received no comments on the proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, CA AGENCY... for cruise ships visiting San Pedro Bay, California by providing a common description of all...

  11. Moore's law and the impact on trusted and radiation-hardened microelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwok Kee

    2011-12-01

    In 1965 Gordon Moore wrote an article claiming that integrated circuit density would scale exponentially. His prediction has remained valid for more than four decades. Integrated circuits have changed all aspects of everyday life. They are also the 'heart and soul' of modern systems for defense, national infrastructure, and intelligence applications. The United States government needs an assured and trusted microelectronics supply for military systems. However, migration of microelectronics design and manufacturing from the United States to other countries in recent years has placed the supply of trusted microelectronics in jeopardy. Prevailing wisdom dictates that it is necessary to use microelectronics fabricated in a state-of-the-art technology for highest performance and military system superiority. Close examination of silicon microelectronics technology evolution and Moore's Law reveals that this prevailing wisdom is not necessarily true. This presents the US government the possibility of a totally new approach to acquire trusted microelectronics.

  12. The 3D Moore-Rayleigh test for the quantitative groupwise comparison of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Alize E H; Muskulus, Michael; Staring, Marius; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J V; Lunel, Sjoerd Verduyn; Reiber, J Hans C; van der Weerd, Louise; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2009-01-01

    Non-rigid registration of MR images to a common reference image results in deformation fields, from which anatomical differences can be statistically assessed, within and between populations. Without further assumptions, nonparametric tests are required and currently the analysis of deformation fields is performed by permutation tests. For deformation fields, often the vector magnitude is chosen as test statistic, resulting in a loss of information. In this paper, we consider the three dimensional Moore-Rayleigh test as an alternative for permutation tests. This nonparametric test offers two novel features: first, it incorporates both the directions and magnitude of the deformation vectors. Second, as its distribution function is available in closed form, this test statistic can be used in a clinical setting. Using synthetic data that represents variations as commonly encountered in clinical data, we show that the Moore-Rayleigh test outperforms the classical permutation test. PMID:19694294

  13. Study shows turret-moored oil production vessel capabilities in typhoons

    SciTech Connect

    Akiba, Takehiko; Komiya, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Kodan, Norihisa; Mikami, Jun

    1995-08-21

    A turret-moored, floating-type early production and testing system (EPTS) can weather the severe conditions for marginal field exploitation of East Asian offshore oil fields. These vessels are an alternative to permanent facilities such as conventional jackets that often are uneconomical for marginal fields and deepwater, harsh environments. The required production system must withstand the severe weather conditions of a typhoon. Weather downtime and the associated motion performance, weather-vaning capabilities, and mooring system requirements are main considerations in designing EPTSs for these environments. An example of the EPTS concept is the Petrojarl 1, which operates in the North Sea and was built by NKK Corp. The results of 6 years` experience with the Petrojarl 1 have proven that such vessels can operate even in the harsh environment of the North Sea. The study, summarized in this article, verified that satisfactory operational efficiency can be achieved in environments where typhoons exits.

  14. Demonstration of a mid-water mooring for tidal turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Talbert, J.; deKlerk, A.; Richmond, M. C.; Durgesh, V.; Polagye, B. L.; Kilcher, L. F.; Nelson, E.

    2012-12-01

    An approach to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a short demonstration deployment. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspending Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion correction (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are investigated.

  15. Weathering in the cold: Granite hillslopes in Osborn Mountain, WY and Bodmin Moor, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggins, S. G.; Anderson, S. P.; Anderson, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Low temperatures generally limit rates of chemical weathering, and hence might be expected to limit development and evolution of mobile regolith in cold climates. Chemical and physical processes operate to release material from bedrock into the mobile regolith. Rock is weakened by chemical weathering, while physical breakdown produces particles susceptible to transport. We examine two hillslopes mantled with mobile regolith in granitic terrains that formed in cold climates where the rates of chemical processes are expected to be low, while at least some physical processes are expected to be enhanced. These end-member environments provide insight into mobile regolith development. Our study sites are gentle parabolic hillslopes at Osborn Mtn, WY, USA (elevation: 3600 m, MAT: -5°C) and Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, UK (elevation: 370 m, MAT: 9°C) developed on granitic bedrock. Neither site experienced direct glaciation during the LGM, but both were in periglacial zones. At present, the sites are populated by neither trees nor burrowing mammals. Biotite, which might spawn rock breakdown by hydration/oxidation cracking, is rare. Although there is evidence that trees have grown in Bodmin Moor in the past, frost cracking rather than tree throw has likely been the dominant mechanism releasing intact material into the mobile soil column at both field sites over the Quaternary. Present day ground surface temperatures at Osborn Mtn are below 0°C for ~9 months of the year, as measured by temperature sensors, leaving only 3 months for chemical processes to operate. During winter, temperatures are cold enough for frost cracking to occur down to significant depths. In contrast, we calculate from a numerical model of the annual thermal cycle that the immediate sub-surface of the Bodmin Moor hillslope is not currently cold enough for frost cracking at any time of the year, meaning that chemical processes can operate continuously. However, given temperature drops of order 5-10°C during

  16. Carbon isotopes and lignin composition of POC in a small river in Bekanbeushi Moor, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Seki, Osamu; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    Carbon isotope and lignin phenol compositions were investigated to assess particulate organic carbon (POC) in a small river from the Bekanbeushi Moor in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan. Suspended solids were collected 5 times at a fixed station during July 2004-April 2008. The δ 13C values of the riverine POC are almost constant: -29.1‰ to -28.7‰. In contrast, the POC shows wide variations in Δ 14C values from -103‰ during the snowmelt event to +9 ± 16‰ during summer and winter. The cinnamyl over vanillyl phenol ( C/ V) ratios indicate a predominance of nonwoody materials and no seasonal variation, suggesting that the wetland river transports older POC from the riverbank during the spring snowmelt. The river also transports newly produced and stored soil organic matter as riverine POC from the low moor in times of low flow conditions.

  17. Verifying the interactive convergence clock synchronization algorithm using the Boyer-Moore theorem prover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The application of formal methods to the analysis of computing systems promises to provide higher and higher levels of assurance as the sophistication of our tools and techniques increases. Improvements in tools and techniques come about as we pit the current state of the art against new and challenging problems. A promising area for the application of formal methods is in real-time and distributed computing. Some of the algorithms in this area are both subtle and important. In response to this challenge and as part of an ongoing attempt to verify an implementation of the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm (ICCSA), we decided to undertake a proof of the correctness of the algorithm using the Boyer-Moore theorem prover. This paper describes our approach to proving the ICCSA using the Boyer-Moore prover.

  18. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  19. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  20. Objective measures of laryngeal imaging: what have we learned since Dr. Paul Moore.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peak

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Paul Moore pioneered the use of high-speed cinematography for observation of normal and abnormal vocal fold vibrations during phonation. His analysis of the glottal area waveform, opening and closing speed index, and open quotient from the high-speed films were labor intensive but relevant today. With advances in digital image capture and automated image extraction techniques, stroboscopy and high-speed images of vocal fold vibration may be analyzed with objective measures. Digital high-speed image capture in color is now clinically practical at high resolution. Digital kymography now allows analysis of the vibratory waveform from each vocal fold. Serial capture and comparison can document changes in vibratory function with treatment. Quantification of vocal fold vibration using such techniques is now practical. This is a review of vocal fold vibration capture and analysis techniques since Dr. Moore. PMID:24094798

  1. Hydrographic data from R/V endeavor cruise #90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalcup, M. D.; Joyce, T. M.; Barbour, R. L.; Dunworth, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The final cruise of the NSF sponsored Warm Core Rings Program studied a Warm Core Ring (WCR) in the Fall of 1982 as it formed from a large northward meander of the Gulf Stream. This ring, known as 82-H or the eighth ring identified in 1982, formed over the New England Seamounts near 39.5 deg N, 65 deg W. Surveys using Expendable Bathythermographs, Conductivity-Temperature-Depth-Oxygen stations and Doppler Current Profiling provide a look at the genesis of a WCR. These measurements reveal that WCR 82-H separated from the Gulf Stream sometime between October 2-5. This ring was a typical WCR with a diameter of about 200 km and speeds in the high velocity core of the 175 cm/sec. Satellite imagery of 82-H following the cruise showed that it drifted WSW in the Slope Water region at almost 9 km/day, had at least one interaction with the Gulf Stream and was last observed on February 8, 1983 at 39 deg N, 72 deg W.

  2. Computer aided design and manufacturing of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.; Downey, Kevin M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the propulsion concepts being investigated for future cruise missiles is advanced unducted propfans. To support the evaluation of this technology applied to the cruise missile, a joint DOD and NASA test project was conducted to design and then test the characteristics of the propfans on a 0.55-scale, cruise missile model in a NASA wind tunnel. The configuration selected for study is a counterrotating rearward swept propfan. The forward blade row, having six blades, rotates in a counterclockwise direction, and the aft blade row, having six blades, rotates in a clockwise direction, as viewed from aft of the test model. Figures show the overall cruise missile and propfan blade configurations. The objective of this test was to evaluate propfan performance and suitability as a viable propulsion option for next generation of cruise missiles. This paper details the concurrent computer aided design, engineering, and manufacturing of the carbon fiber/epoxy propfan blades as the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  3. Oscillation Responses to an Extreme Weather Event from a Deep Moored Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Dimarco, S. F.; Stoessel, M. M.; Zhang, X.; Ingle, S.

    2011-12-01

    In June 2007 tropical Cyclone Gonu passed directly over an ocean observing system consisting of four, deep autonomous mooring stations along the 3000 m isobath in the northern Arabian Sea. Gonu was the largest cyclone known to have occurred in the Arabian Sea or to strike the Arabian Peninsula. The mooring system was designed by Lighthouse R & D Enterprises, Inc. and installed in cooperation with the Oman Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth. The instruments on the moorings continuously recorded water velocities, temperature, conductivity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and turbidity at multiple depths and at hourly intervals during the storm. Near-inertial oscillations at all moorings from thermocline to seafloor are coincident with the arrival of Gonu. Sub-inertial oscillations with periods of 2-10 days are recorded at the post-storm relaxation stage of Gonu, primarily in the thermocline. These oscillations consist of warm, saline water masses, likely originating from the Persian Gulf. Prominent 12.7-day sub-inertial waves, measured at a station ~300 km offshore, are bottom-intensified and have characteristics of baroclinic, topographically-trapped waves. Theoretical results from a topographically-trapped wave model are in a good agreement with the observed 12.7-day waves. The wavelength of the 12.7-day waves is about 590 km calculated from the dispersion relationship. Further analysis suggests that a resonant standing wave is responsible for trapping the 12.7-day wave energy inside the Sea of Oman basin. The observational results reported here are the first measurements of deepwater responses to a tropical cyclone in the Sea of Oman/Arabian Sea. Our study demonstrates the utility of sustained monitoring for studying the impact of extreme weather events on the ocean.

  4. Autonomous system for vertical profiling of the marine environment at a moored station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, A. G.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Soloviev, V. A.; Tsibulsky, A. L.; Shvoev, D. A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents new results of the research and development project on the moored profiler Aqualog aimed at multidisciplinary studies and ecological monitoring of the marine environment. The data on the profiler's operation are summarized based upon the field experiments in the northeastern Black Sea in 2011. An important scientific result obtained by using the profiler during the experiments was the discovery of the countercurrent below the Black Sea Rim Current in the layer between the 500 m and 900 m depth.

  5. Hydrography of the Gulf of Maine and Massachusetts Bay, data report for R/V OCEANUS cruise 181, 5-15 February 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.; Butman, Bradford; Shoukimas, Polly; Donoghue, Terence G.

    1990-01-01

    During Cruise 181, a total of 95 hydrographic profiles were obtained by means of a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiler. Stations are numbered sequentially and station information is tabulated in table 1. The stations were arranged in ten transects (figure 1). Section 1 was across the Great South Channel and section 7 was across the Northeast Channel--the two main oceanic entrances and exits of the Gulf of Maine. Section 2 was along a saddle (Rodgers Pass) separating Wilkinson Basin from Georges Basin. Sections 3,5, and 10 were across different regions of Wilkinson Basin and all intersected at the longterm mooring site W1 in the center of Wilkinson Basin; section 8 was a dog-leg section through the southern portion of Jordan Basin; and sections 6 (east-west) and 9 (north-south) were within Georges Basin. A severe winter storm (see table 2 and 3) occurred between February 9 and 10 and work was stopped while the OCEANUS rode out the storm in Cape Cod Bay and repaired storm damage. Section 4 across Massachusetts Bay and section 5 across Wilkinson Basin, were repeated twice, once before the storm (sections 4a and 5a) and once after the storm (sections 4b and 5b).

  6. Phytoplankton production in the Sargasso Sea as determined using optical mooring data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, K. J.; Smith, R. C.; Marra, J.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements from an untended mooring provide high-frequency observations of in-water optical properties and permit the estimation of important biological parameters continuously as a function of time. A 9-month time series, composed of three separate deployments, of optical data from the BIOWATT 1987 deep-sea mooring located in the oligotrophic waters of the Sargasso Sea at 34 deg N, 70 deg W are presented. These data have been tested using several bio-optical models for the purpose of providing a continuous estimate of phytoplankton productivity. The data are discussed in the context of contemporaneous shipboard observations and for future ocean color satellite observations. We present a continuous estimation of phytoplankton productivity for the 9-month time series. Results from the first 70-day deployment are emphasized to demonstrate the utility of optical observations as proxy measures of biological parameters, to present preliminary analysis, and to compare our bio-optical observations with concurrent physical observations. The bio-optical features show variation in response to physical forcings including diel variations of incident solar irradiance, episodic changes corresponding to wind forcing, variability caused by advective mesoscale eddy events in the vicinity of the mooring, and seasonal variability corresponding to changes in solar radiation, shoaling of the mixed layer depth, and succession of phytoplankton populations.

  7. An in vitro study of the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yin-Ru; Li, Ann; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Yin-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Indigo naturalis is effective in treating nail psoriasis coexisting with microorganism infections. This study examines the antimicrobial effects of indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. Eight bacterial and seven fungal strains were assayed using the agar diffusion method to examine the effects of indigo naturalis and its bioactive compounds. The bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis were purified sequentially using GFC, TLC, and HPLC. Their structures were identified using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. UPLC-MS/MS was applied to compare the metabolome profiles of indigo naturalis ethyl-acetate (EA) extract and its source plant, Strobilanthes formosanus Moore. The results of in vitro antimicrobial assays showed that indigo naturalis EA-extract significantly (≥1 mg/disc) inhibits Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermis and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and mildly inhibits non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens (Aspergillus fumigates and Candida albicans), but has little effect on dermatophyes. Isatin and tryptanthrin were identified as the bioactive compounds of indigo naturalis using S. aureus and S. epidermis as the bioassay model. Both bioactive ingredients had no effect on all tested fungi. In summary, indigo naturalis prepared from Strobilanthes formosanus Moore exhibits antimicrobial effects on Staphylococcus and non-dermatophytic onychomycosis pathogens. Tryptanthrin and isatin may be its major bioactive ingredients against Staphylococcus and the inhibitory effect on MRSA may be due to other unidentified ingredients. PMID:24284490

  8. Dynamic analysis of turret-moored FPSO system in freak wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, You-gang; Li, Yan; Wang, Bin; Liu, Shu-xiao; Zhu, Long-huan

    2016-07-01

    Freak wave is the common wave which has significant wave height and irregular wave shape, and it is easy to damage offshore structure extremely. The FPSOs (Floating Production Storage and Offloading) suffer from the environment loads, including the freak wave. The freak waves were generated based on the improved phase modulation model, and the coupling model of FPSO-SPM (Single Point Mooring) was established by considering internal-turret FPSO and its mooring system. The dynamic response characteristics of both FPSO and SPM affected by the freak wave were analyzed in the time domain. According to the results, the freak waves generated by original phase modulation model mainly affect the 2nd-order wave loads. However, the freak waves which are generated by random frequencies phase modulation model affect both 1st-order and 2nd-order wave loads on FPSO. What is more, compared with the irregular waves, the dynamic responses of mooring system are larger in the freak waves, but its amplitude lags behind the peak of the freak wave.

  9. Combined string searching algorithm based on knuth-morris- pratt and boyer-moore algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarev, R. Yu; Chernigovskiy, A. S.; Tsareva, E. A.; Brezitskaya, V. V.; Nikiforov, A. Yu; Smirnov, N. A.

    2016-04-01

    The string searching task can be classified as a classic information processing task. Users either encounter the solution of this task while working with text processors or browsers, employing standard built-in tools, or this task is solved unseen by the users, while they are working with various computer programmes. Nowadays there are many algorithms for solving the string searching problem. The main criterion of these algorithms’ effectiveness is searching speed. The larger the shift of the pattern relative to the string in case of pattern and string characters’ mismatch is, the higher is the algorithm running speed. This article offers a combined algorithm, which has been developed on the basis of well-known Knuth-Morris-Pratt and Boyer-Moore string searching algorithms. These algorithms are based on two different basic principles of pattern matching. Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm is based upon forward pattern matching and Boyer-Moore is based upon backward pattern matching. Having united these two algorithms, the combined algorithm allows acquiring the larger shift in case of pattern and string characters’ mismatch. The article provides an example, which illustrates the results of Boyer-Moore and Knuth-Morris- Pratt algorithms and combined algorithm’s work and shows advantage of the latter in solving string searching problem.

  10. What is Radical Behaviorism? A Review of Jay Moore's Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2011-01-01

    B. F. Skinner founded both radical behaviorism and behavior analysis. His founding innovations included: a versatile preparation for studying behavior; explicating the generic nature of stimulus and response; a pragmatic criterion for defining behavioral units; response rate as a datum; the concept of stimulus control; the concept of verbal behavior; and explicating the explanatory power of contingencies. Besides these achievements, however, Skinner also made some mistakes. Subsequent developments in radical behaviorist thought have attempted to remedy these mistakes. Moore's book presents a “party line” version of radical behaviorism. It focuses narrowly on a few of Skinner's concepts (mostly mentalism and verbal behavior) and contains no criticism of his mistakes. In fact, Moore adds a few mistakes of his own manufacture; for example, he insists that the mental realm does not exist—an unprovable and distracting assertion. The book's portrayal of behavior analysis would have been current around 1960; it mentions almost none of the developments since then. It also includes almost no developments in radical behaviorism since Skinner. Moore's book would give an unwary reader a highly distorted picture of contemporary behavior analysis and radical behaviorism.

  11. Mooring apparatus and method of installation for deep water tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, A.F.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of mooring an offshore platform in a body of water having a surface and a floor comprising the steps of: locating anchoring means on the floor of the body of water, the anchoring means adapted for receipt of mooring tendons through a side entry opening therein; stationing a semi-submersible floating structure on the surface of the body of water above the anchoring means. The floating structure consists of external tendon receptacles adapted for side entry receipt of the plurality of mooring tendons, the tendon receptacles being located at an initial distance above the anchoring means; providing one piece, substantially rigid tendons disposed substantially horizontally near the surface and adjacent the floating structure, the tendons having enlarged top and bottom end connectors and an actual length which is greater than the initial distance; swinging the enlarged bottom end connector of one of the tendons downwardly into a position adjacent one of the plurality of anchoring means; pulling the enlarged bottom end connector of one of the tendons through the side opening in one of the anchoring means.

  12. Analysis of ecological factors limiting the destruction of high-moor peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    This review presents an analysis of literature data and original studies by the authors aimed at revealing the factors inhibiting the destruction of high-moor (oligotrophic) peat. Each of the ecological factors that prevent the decomposition of the high-moor peat by different groups of microorganisms is considered. The acid reaction, low temperatures, and lack of nutrients were found not to be the primary factors inhibiting the destruction of the peat. The limited content of oxygen in the peatbogs leads to a drastic decrease in the number of mycelial microorganisms and a reduction of the activity of hydrolytic and oxidizing enzymes. The main factor inhibiting the decomposition of sphagnum is its mechanical and chemical stability, since animals crushing sphagnum are absent in the soil, and this moss has polysaccharides of special composition. The toxicity of phenol compounds, which is manifested under the aerobic conditions, prevents the activity of all the hydrolytic enzymes. This is the main reason for the slow decomposition of sphagnum peat and the long-term preservation of the residues of bodies and food in high-moor peatlands.

  13. Advanced missile technology. A review of technology improvement areas for cruise missiles. [including missile design, missile configurations, and aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Liepman, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    Technology assessments in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures and materials for cruise missile systems are discussed. The cruise missiles considered cover the full speed, altitude, and target range. The penetrativity, range, and maneuverability of the cruise missiles are examined and evaluated for performance improvements.

  14. Static and dynamic mooring analysis - Stability of floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) risers for extreme environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Yu-Ho; Kim, Kookhyun; Jo, Chul-Hee; Kim, Do-Youb

    2013-06-01

    Floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) facilities are used at most of the offshore oil fields worldwide. FPSO usage is expected to grow as oil fields move to deeper water, thus requiring the reliability and stability of mooring wires and risers in extreme environmental conditions. Except for the case of predictable attack angles of external loadings, FPSO facilities with turret single point mooring (SPM) systems are in general use. There are two types of turret systems: permanent systems and disconnectable turret mooring systems. Extreme environment criteria for permanent moorings are usually based on a 100-year return period event. It is common to use two or three environments including the 100-year wave with associated wind and current, and the 100-year wind with associated waves and current. When fitted with a disconnectable turret mooring system, FPSOs can be used in areas where it is desirable to remove the production unit from the field temporarily to prevent exposure to extreme events such as cyclones or large icebergs. Static and dynamic mooring analyses were performed to evaluate the stability of a spider buoy after disconnection from a turret during cyclone environmental conditions

  15. Computation of flows in a turn-around duct and a turbine cascade using advanced turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out to evaluate the capability of the Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model (ARSM) and the Nonlinear Stress Model (NLSM) to predict strongly curved turbulent flow in a turn-around duct (TAD). The ARSM includes the near-wall damping term of pressure-strain correlation phi(sub ij,w), which enables accurate prediction of individual Reynolds stress components in wall flows. The TAD mean flow quantities are reasonably well predicted by various turbulence models. The ARSM yields better predictions for both the mean flow and the turbulence quantities than the NLSM and the k-epsilon (k = turbulent kinetic energy, epsilon = dissipation rate of k) model. The NLSM also shows slight improvement over the k-epsilon model. However, all the models fail to capture the recovery of the flow from strong curvature effects. The formulation for phi(sub ij,w) appears to be incorrect near the concave surface. The hybrid k-epsilon/ARSM, Chien's k-epsilon model, and Coakley's q-omega (q = the square root of k, omega = epsilon/k) model have also been employed to compute the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a transonic turbine cascade. The surface pressure distributions and the wake profiles are predicted well by all the models. The k-epsilon model and the k-epsilon/ARSM model provide better predictions of heat transfer than the q-omega model. The k-epsilon/ARSM solutions show significant differences in the predicted skin friction coefficients, heat transfer rates and the cascade performance parameters, as compared to the k-epsilon model. The k-epsilon/ARSM model appears to capture, qualitatively, the anisotropy associated with by-pass transition.

  16. Short Planning Turn-Around Time and High Flexibility of the Swedish Astronomy/Aeronomy Satellite Odin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, B.; Karlsson, T.; Nylund, M.; Olsson, T.; Vinterhav, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Swedish small satellite Odin combines two different scientific disciplines, astronomy and atmospheric research. It has a 3-axis stabilized, zero momentum, attitude control system that operates in two different modes, an inertial pointing astronomy mode and an atmospheric mode providing pointing/scanning of the Earth limb. The reference attitude for the atmospheric mode is created by a versatile reference attitude generator, providing also capability for observing and tracking any celestial or solar system objects. The absolute pointing requirements in the scientific modes are 15 arc-seconds inertial pointing and 1.2 arc-minutes in atmospheric mode reconstructed attitude. One part of the Odin mission is to observe the formation of the ozone holes at the poles in spring and fall and another is to observe moving celestial objects such as comets. The unpredictability of when such observation opportunities occur together with rapidly changing scientific demands put high requirements on a short turn- around time for the Operations Cycle - science demand, planning and command generation, reconstruction of attitude history, feedback and delivery to scientists. A small efficient team, including also members that was deeply involved with and responsible for the design and development of the system, has been a key to provide this a short turn-around time for the Operations Cycle. It is possible to safely reconfigure the satellite for either of two disciplines with short notice and have a reconstructed attitude available to the users shortly after the observations have been done. The small efficient team together with modular software based on MATLAB also facilitates in rapidly meeting new demands on the planning and attitude reconstruction from the users.

  17. PREFACE: E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Symposium M: More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Christian; Fompeyrine, Jean; Vallée, Christophe; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    More than Moore explores a new area of Silicon based microelectronics, which reaches beyond the boundaries of conventional semiconductor applications. Creating new functionality to semiconductor circuits, More than Moore focuses on motivating new technological possibilities. In the past decades, the main stream of microelectronics progresses was mainly powered by Moore's law, with two focused development arenas, namely, IC miniaturization down to nano scale, and SoC based system integration. While the microelectronics community continues to invent new solutions around the world to keep Moore's law alive, there is increasing momentum for the development of 'More than Moore' technologies which are based on silicon technologies but do not simply scale with Moore's law. Typical examples are RF, Power/HV, Passives, Sensor/Actuator/MEMS or Bio-chips. The More than Moore strategy is driven by the increasing social needs for high level heterogeneous system integration including non-digital functions, the necessity to speed up innovative product creation and to broaden the product portfolio of wafer fabs, and the limiting cost and time factors of advanced SoC development. It is believed that More than Moore will add value to society on top of and beyond advanced CMOS with fast increasing marketing potentials. Important key challenges for the realization of the 'More than Moore' strategy are: perspective materials for future THz devices materials systems for embedded sensors and actuators perspective materials for epitaxial approaches material systems for embedded innovative memory technologies development of new materials with customized characteristics The Hot topics covered by the symposium M (More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics) at E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, 14-18 May 2012 have been: development of functional ceramics thin films New dielectric materials for advanced microelectronics bio- and CMOS compatible

  18. Head injury in a cruise passenger during a shore excursion.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old overweight insulin-dependent male passenger with diabetes and severe arthritis was on a 4-week circle-Pacific cruise. He fell ashore and hit his head. The ship was about to leave on a non-stop voyage - without any evacuation possibilities for the next 8 days. He was examined and had X-rays taken at the local hospital, but as his head injury was considered mild, he returned to the ship "for 48 hours of observation for signs of intracranial bleeding" - against the ship's doctor's advice. Delayed suspicion of a non-displaced cervical fracture caused extra work and worries and could have, but did not complicate matters. When there are no life-saving therapy and no timely evacuation possibilities in case of deterioration, on-board observation is counterproductive. The patient should be kept in - or near - the local hospital during the necessary observation period, followed by safe repatriation. PMID:27681216

  19. Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment - Initial Venus and interplanetary cruise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, C. W.; Barth, C. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Mcclintock, W. E.; Pryor, W. R.; Simmons, K. E.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Thomas, G. E.; Ajello, J. M.; Lane, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Galileo Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer obtained a spectrum of Venus atmospheric emissions in the 55.0- to 125.0-nm wavelength region. Emissions of helium (58.4 nm), ionized atomic oxygen (83.4 nm), and atomic hydrogen (121.6 nm), as well as a blended spectral feature of atomic hydrogen (Lyman-beta) and atomic oxygen (102.5 nm), were observed at 3.5-nm resolution. During the Galileo spacecraft cruise from Venus to earth, Lyman-alpha emission from solar system atomic hydrogen (121.6 nm) was measured. The dominant source of the Lyman-alpha emission is atomic hydrogen from the interstellar medium. A model of Galileo observations at solar maximum indicates a decrease in the solar Lyman-alpha flux near the solar poles. A strong day-to-day variation also occurs with the 27-day periodicity of the rotation of the sun.

  20. Active Tailoring of Lift Distribution to Enhance Cruise Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Pfeiffer, Neal J.; Christians, Joel G.

    2005-01-01

    During Phase I of this project, Raytheon Aircraft Company (RAC) has analytically and experimentally evaluated key components of a system that could be implemented for active tailoring of wing lift distribution using low-drag, trailing-edge modifications. Simple systems such as those studied by RAC could be used to enhance the cruise performance of a business jet configuration over a range of typical flight conditions. The trailing-edge modifications focus on simple, deployable mechanisms comprised of extendable small flap panels over portions of the span that could be used to subtly but positively optimize the lift and drag characteristics. The report includes results from low speed wind tunnel testing of the trailing-edge devices, descriptions of potential mechanisms for automation, and an assessment of the technology.

  1. Status of noise technology for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in acoustic technology applicable to advanced supersonic cruise aircraft, particularly those which relate to jet noise and its suppression are reviewed. The noise reducing potential of high radius ratio, inverted velocity profile coannular jets is demonstrated by model scale results from a wide range of nozzle geometries, including some simulated flight cases. These results were verified statistically at large scale on a variable cycle engine (VCE) testbed. A preliminary assessment of potential VCE noise sources such as fan and core noise is made, based on the testbed data. Recent advances in the understanding of flight effects are reviewed. The status of component noise prediction methods is assessed on the basis of recent test data, and the remaining problem areas are outlined.

  2. Art concept of Magellan spacecraft in cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Magellan spacecraft cruise configuration is illustrated in this artist concept. With solar panels deployed and having jettisoned the inertial upper stage (IUS), Magellan approaches the sun which it will orbit approximately 1.6 times before encountering Venus. Magellan, named after the 16th century Portuguese explorer, will orbit Venus about once every three hours, acquiring radar data for 37 minutes of each orbit when it is closest to the surface. Using an advanced instrument called a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), it will map more than 90 per cent of the surface with resolution ten times better than the best from prior spacecraft. Magellan is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Martin Marietta Aerospace is developing the spacecraft and Hughes Aircraft Company, the advanced imaging radar. Magellan will be deployed from payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the STS-30 mission.

  3. Connected cruise control: modelling, delay effects, and nonlinear behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Gábor

    2016-08-01

    Connected vehicle systems (CVS) are considered in this paper where vehicles exchange information using wireless vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. The concept of connected cruise control (CCC) is established that allows control design at the level of individual vehicles while exploiting V2V connectivity. Due to its high level of modularity the proposed design can be applied to large heterogeneous traffic systems. The dynamics of a simple CVS is analysed in detail while taking into account nonlinearities in the vehicle dynamics as well as in the controller. Time delays that arise due to intermittencies and packet drops in the communication channels are also incorporated. The results are summarised using stability charts which allow one to select control gains to maintain stability and ensure disturbance attenuation when the delay is below a critical value.

  4. Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment: initial venus and interplanetary cruise results.

    PubMed

    Hord, C W; Barth, C A; Esposito, L W; McClintock, W E; Pryor, W R; Simmons, K E; Stewart, A I; Thomas, G E; Ajello, J M; Lane, A L; West, R W; Sandel, B R; Broadfoot, A L; Hunten, D M; Shemansky, D E

    1991-09-27

    The Galileo Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer obtained a spectrum of Venus atmospheric emissions in the 55.0- to 125.0-nanometer (nm) wavelength region. Emissions of helium (58.4 nm), ionized atomic oxygen (83.4 nm), and atomic hydrogen (121.6 nm), as well as a blended spectral feature of atomic hydrogen (Lyman-beta) and atomic oxygen (102.5 nm), were observed at 3.5-nm resolution. During the Galileo spacecraft cruise from Venus to Earth, Lyman-alpha emission from solar system atomic hydrogen (121.6 nm) was measured. The dominant source of the Lyman-alpha emission is atomic hydrogen from the interstellar medium. A model of Galileo observations at solar maximum indicates a decrease in the solar Lyman-alpha flux near the solar poles. A strong day-to-day variation also occurs with the 27-day periodicity of the rotation of the sun.

  5. Structural design studies of a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski, J.; Mccullers, L. A.; Ricketts, R. H.; Santoro, N. J.; Beskenis, S. D.; Kurtze, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Structural member cross sections were sized with a system of integrated computer programs to satisfy strength and flutter design requirements for several variants of the arrow wing supersonic cruise vehicle. The resulting structural weights provide a measure of the structural efficiency of the planform geometry, structural layout, type of construction, and type of material including composites. The material distribution was determined for a baseline metallic structure and the results indicate that an approximate fatigue constraint has an important effect on the structural weight required for strength but, in all cases, additional material had to be added to satisfy flutter requirements with lighter mass engines with minimum fuel onboard. The use of composite materials on the baseline configuration was explored and indicated increased structural efficiency. In the strength sizing, the all-composite construction provided a lower weight design than the hybrid construction which contained composites only in the wing cover skins. Subsequent flutter analyses indicated a corresponding lower flutter speed.

  6. First-Order Altitude Effects on the Cruise Efficiency of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft fuel efficiency is a function of many different parameters, including characteristics of the engines, characteristics of the airframe, and the conditions under which the aircraft is operated. For a given vehicle, the airframe and engine characteristics are for the most part fixed quantities and efficiency is primarily a function of operational conditions. One important influence on cruise efficiency is cruise altitude. Various future scenarios have been postulated for cruise altitude, from the freedom to fly at optimum altitudes to altitude restrictions imposed for environmental reasons. This report provides background on the fundamental relationships determining aircraft cruise efficiency and examines the sensitivity of efficiency to cruise altitude. Analytical models of two current aircraft designs are used to derive quantitative results. Efficiency penalties are found to be generally less than 1% when within roughly 2000 ft of the optimum cruise altitude. Even the restrictive scenario of constant altitude cruise is found to result in a modest fuel consumption penalty if the fixed altitude is in an appropriate range.

  7. Diatom community structure on in-service cruise ship hulls.

    PubMed

    Hunsucker, Kelli Zargiel; Koka, Abhishek; Lund, Geir; Swain, Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    Diatoms are an important component of marine biofilms found on ship hulls. However, there are only a few published studies that describe the presence and abundance of diatoms on ships, and none that relate to modern ship hull coatings. This study investigated the diatom community structure on two in-service cruise ships with the same cruise cycles, one coated with an antifouling (AF) system (copper self-polishing copolymer) and the other coated with a silicone fouling-release (FR) system. Biofilm samples were collected during dry docking from representative areas of the ship and these provided information on the horizontal and vertical zonation of the hull, and intact and damaged coating and niche areas. Diatoms from the genera Achnanthes, Amphora and Navicula were the most common, regardless of horizontal ship zonation and coating type. Other genera were abundant, but their presence was more dependent on the ship zonation and coating type. Samples collected from damaged areas of the hull coating had a similar community composition to undamaged areas, but with higher diatom abundance. Diatom fouling on the niche areas differed from that of the surrounding ship hull and paralleled previous studies that investigated differences in diatom community structure on static and dynamically exposed coatings; niche areas were similar to static immersion and the hull to dynamic immersion. Additionally, diatom richness was greater on the ship with the FR coating, including the identification of several new genera to the biofouling literature, viz. Lampriscus and Thalassiophysa. These results are the first to describe diatom community composition on in-service ship hulls coated with a FR system. This class of coatings appears to have a larger diatom community compared to copper-based AF systems, with new diatom genera that have the ability to stick to ship hulls and withstand hydrodynamic forces, thus creating the potential for new problematic species in the biofilm.

  8. Characterization of aerosol over the Northern South China Sea during two cruises in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingying; Zhuang, Guoshun; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Kedong; Zhang, Peng

    Atmospheric transport of trace elements has been found to be an important pathway for their input to the ocean. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected over the Northern South China Sea in two cruises in 2003 to estimate the input of aerosol from continent to the ocean. About 23 elements and 14 soluble ions in aerosol samples were measured. The average mass concentration of TSP in Cruise I in January (78 μg m -3) was ˜twice of that in Cruise II in April (37 μg m -3). Together with the crustal component, heavy metals from pollution sources over the land (especially from the industry and automobiles in Guangzhou) were transported to and deposited into the ocean. The atmospheric MSA concentrations in PM2.5 (0.048 μg m -3 in Cruise I and 0.043 μg m -3 in Cruise II) over Northern South China Sea were comparable to those over other coastal regions. The ratio of non-sea-salt (NSS)-sulfate to MSA is 103-655 for Cruise I and 15-440 for Cruise II in PM2.5 samples, which were much higher than those over remote oceans. The estimated anthropogenic sulfate accounts for 83-98% in Cruise I and 63-95% in Cruise II of the total NSS-sulfate. Fe (II) concentration in the aerosols collected over the ocean ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 μg m -3, accounting for 16-82% of the total iron in the aerosol, which could affect the marine biogeochemical cycle greatly.

  9. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-05-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  10. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-09-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  11. Analysis of various descent trajectories for a hypersonic-cruise, cold-wall research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The probable descent operating conditions for a hypersonic air-breathing research airplane were examined. Descents selected were cruise angle of attack, high dynamic pressure, high lift coefficient, turns, and descents with drag brakes. The descents were parametrically exercised and compared from the standpoint of cold-wall (367 K) aircraft heat load. The descent parameters compared were total heat load, peak heating rate, time to landing, time to end of heat pulse, and range. Trends in total heat load as a function of cruise Mach number, cruise dynamic pressure, angle-of-attack limitation, pull-up g-load, heading angle, and drag-brake size are presented.

  12. Fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, R.C.H.

    1982-01-01

    The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its simplicity and low volume data storage requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  13. Making a Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2010-01-01

    It's true that each school and each classroom presents its own unique challenges. But Kevin Mixon--who in October traded his instrumental music instructor duties at Blodgett School on the west side of Syracuse, New York, for a job as fine arts coordinator for Syracuse City Schools--knows from experience that some schools are far more challenging…

  14. Engineering a Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Soddy-Daisy High School in southeastern Tennessee. It used to be that vocational training and a focus on academic studies were considered completely different means of education. But in Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee, the two go hand in hand. Eric Thomas and his brother Mark, teach side by side in adjacent rooms, where computer…

  15. Mexico's population policy turnaround.

    PubMed

    Nagel, J S

    1978-12-01

    Until 1972 Mexico's officials seemed to believe that the annual population growth rate of 3.5% was not really a problem as long as the economic development rate could be kept ahead of the population growth rate. The General Law of Population of 1947 was actually promoting population growth. It was only during the 1960s that elite opinion shifted, and privately funded family planning programs became increasingly active. By 1972 the population had reached 54 million, from 20 million in 1940. President Echevarria, till then a traditional pronatalist, announced in 1972 the creation of a national family planning program, and, in 1974, the creation of a national population council. Since then the Mexican government has embarked on ambitious programs of mass communication and sex education to make the population receptive to its new attitudes. The plans have worked: by mid-1979 estimates put the population growth rate at 2.9%, within sight of the 2.5% target set for 1982 by new president Lopez Portillo. According to a survey conducted by the National Fertility Survey, by late 1976 41.50% of Mexican women of childbearing age were practicing contraception. Within the 41.50% of active contraceptors, 14.9% use the pill, and 7.8% the IUD. New channels of information and of contraceptive delivery are being explored to reach Mexico's widely scattered rural population, and to bring the average family size down to 2 children from the average of 6.5 children per woman for 1973-1975. The government goal is of a 1% population increase by the year 2000.

  16. Geology and mineral deposits of the Minnie Moore and Bullion mineralized areas, Blaine County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Paul Karl; Worl, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    In the early 1880?s the discovery of rich ores in the Minnie Moore and Bullion mineralized areas sparked a rush to settle and develop the Wood River valley. Silver and lead discoveries in these areas spurred the boom in mining after completion of the Oregon Short Line Railroad to Hailey in 1883. In both areas the ore comprises galena, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite in a gangue of siderite, calcite, or quartz. Minor goldbearing quartz veins are also present. The ore is in fissure and replacement veins along fracture systems that formed in Late Cretaceous time, after intrusion of nearby granodiorite or quartz diorite stocks. The ore formed under mesothermal conditions and heat was supplied by the nearby plutons. In the Minnie Moore area, the mineralized veins are cut by low-angle normal faults that are of probable Eocene age. In the Minnie Moore mineralized area, the host rock is the middle part of the Devonian Milligen Formation, (the informal Lucky Coin limestone and Triumph argillite), which is the same stratigraphic level as the host ore in the rich Triumph mine northeast of Hailey. In the Bullion mineralized area, the ore is hosted by the lower member of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Dollarhide Formation. Rich ore was mined in several tunnels that reached the Mayflower vein, a northwest-striking mineralized shear zone. The deposits are thought to be mainly mesothermal veins that formed in association with Cretaceous magmatism. The syngenetic stratiform model of ore formation has often been applied to these deposits, however, no evidence of syngenetic mineralization was found in this study. Faulting has displaced most of the major orebodies and thus has made mining these deposits a challenge.

  17. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Mooring Masts for Remotely Controlled Indoor and Outdoor Airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleelullah, Syed; Bhardwaj, Utsav; Pant, Rajkumar Sureshchandra

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and structural details of two mooring masts, one for remotely controlled outdoor airships and another one for remotely controlled indoor airships. In a previous study, a mast for outdoor remotely controlled airship was designed to meet several user-specified operating requirements, and a simplified version of the same was fabricated. A spring loaded device was incorporated that sounds an alarm when the wind-loads exceed a threshold value, so that the airship can be taken indoors. The present study started with a critical analysis of that mast, and a new mast was designed and fabricated to remove several of its shortcomings. This mast consists of power screw operated telescopic module made of aluminium, mounted on a five legged base with castor wheels, for ease in mobility. Components of the existing mast were used to the possible extent, and the design was simplified to meet the assembly and transportation requirements. The spring mechanism used in alarming device was also modified to ensure higher sensitivity in the range of maximum expected wind-loads acting on the airship. A lightweight mooring mast for indoor remotely controlled airships was also designed and fabricated, which can accommodate non-rigid indoor airships of length up to 5 m. The mast consists of an elevating bolt operated telescopic module mounted on a tripod adapter base, with lockable castor wheels, and has a specially designed mooring-clamp at the top. The various modules and components of the mast were designed to enable quick assembly and transportation.

  18. Design and performance of a horizontal mooring for upper-ocean research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosenbaugh, Mark; Anderson, Steven; Trask, Richard; Gobat, Jason; Paul, Walter; Butman, Bradford; Weller, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a two-dimensional moored array for sampling horizontal variability in the upper ocean. The mooring was deployed in Massachusetts Bay in a water depth of 84 m for the purpose of measuring the horizontal structure of internal waves. The mooring was instrumented with three acoustic current meters (ACMs) spaced along a 170-m horizontal cable that was stretched between two subsurface buoys 20 m below the sea surface. Five 25-m-long vertical instrument strings were suspended from the horizontal cable. A bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was deployed nearby to measure the current velocity throughout the water column. Pressure sensors mounted on the subsurface buoys and the vertical instrument strings were used to measure the vertical displacements of the array in response to the currents. Measurements from the ACMs and the ADCP were used to construct time-dependent, two-dimensional current fields. The current fields were used as input to a numerical model that calculated the deformation of the array with respect to the nominal zero-current configuration. Comparison of the calculated vertical offsets of the downstream subsurface buoy and downstream vertical instrument string with the pressure measurements were used to verify the numerical code. These results were then used to estimate total deformation of the array due to the passage of the internal waves. Based on the analysis of the three internal wave events with the highest measured vertical offsets, it is concluded that the geometry of the main structure (horizontal cable and anchor legs) was kept to within ±2.0 m, and the geometry of the vertical instrument strings was kept to within ±4.0 m except for one instance when the current velocity reached 0.88 m s−1.

  19. Diagnosis: Michael Moore--media paint filmmaker to be health care system's main problem.

    PubMed

    Kao, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The media reporting on Sicko, Michael Moore's documentary about the failures of the U.S. health care system, provides an example of how corporate media continue to twist and restrict the much-needed debate on health care reform. Aside from an occasional concession that having 46 million uninsured Americans is indeed problematic, the media's hype-filled conversation on health care avoids the issues and echoes old myths about the dangers of "government-run" and "socialized" health care. But in the face of the media demonization, universal health care is remarkably popular among the public. PMID:18341130

  20. Equity and health policy in Africa: Using concept mapping in Moore (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Ridde, Valéry

    2008-01-01

    Background This methodological article is based on a health policy research project conducted in Burkina Faso (West Africa). Concept mapping (CM) was used as a research method to understand the local views of equity among stakeholders, who were concerned by the health policy under consideration. While this technique has been used in North America and elsewhere, to our knowledge it has not yet been applied in Africa in any vernacular language. Its application raises many issues and certain methodological limitations. Our objective in this article is to present its use in this particular context, and to share a number of methodological observations on the subject. Methods Two CMs were done among two different groups of local stakeholders following four steps: generating ideas, structuring the ideas, computing maps using multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis methods, and interpreting maps. Fifteen nurses were invited to take part in the study, all of whom had undergone training on health policies. Of these, nine nurses (60%) ultimately attended the two-day meeting, conducted in French. Of 45 members of village health committees who attended training on health policies, only eight were literate in the local language (Moore). Seven of these (88%) came to the meeting. Results The local perception of equity seems close to the egalitarian model. The actors are not ready to compromise social stability and peace for the benefit of the worst-off. The discussion on the methodological limitations of CM raises the limitations of asking a single question in Moore and the challenge of translating a concept as complex as equity. While the translation of equity into Moore undoubtedly oriented the discussions toward social relations, we believe that, in the context of this study, the open-ended question concerning social justice has a threefold relevance. At the same time, those limitations were transformed into strengths. We understand that it was essential to resort to the

  1. Complications of Austin Moore arthroplasty. Their incidence and relationship to potential predisposing factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, D M; Oliver, C H; Ryder, C T; Stinchfield, F E

    1975-01-01

    In a retrospective computerized study of 451 Austin Moore arthroplasties (211 for acute hip fractures and 240 for hip reconstruction), the operative and general complications were correlated with the historical, preoperative, operative, and early and late postoperative factors usually thought to influence the results. Wound complications were significantly associated with diabetes and fracture, obesity and fracture, and procedures lasting two hours or more. General complications showing significant associations were: death or pneumonia with fractures, phlebitis with obesity, and myocardial infarction with fracture. Factors not significantly associated with complications included age, previous hip surgery, time of day of the operation, surgical approach, wound irrigation, use of drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and reaming of the acetabulum.

  2. [Number, viability, and diversity of the filterable forms of prokaryotes in sphagnous high-moor peat].

    PubMed

    Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Kadulin, M S; Konova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The number, potential viability, and taxonomic diversity (at the level of phylum) of the filterable forms of prokaryotes (FFP) are estimated in the main genetic horizons of high-moor peat. It was shown that the number of FFP reached 500 million cells in 1 g, i.e., up to 5% of the general size bacteria. The portion of viable cells among FFP (93-98%) was higher than that for the general size bacteria (60-68%). FISH-analysis (fluorescence in situ hybridization) showed that FFP contained the same phylogenetic groups as the population of general size bacteria (domain Archea and phylum Actinobacteria, Cytophaga, and Proteobacteria of the domain Bacteria).

  3. Cruise report, RV ocean alert cruise A1-98-HW; January 30 through February 23, 1998, Honolulu to Honolulu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of cruise A1-98 was to map portions of the insular slopes of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii and to survey in detail US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ocean dumping sites using a Simrad EM300 high-resolution multibeam mapping system. The cruise was a jointly funded project between the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE), USEPA, and the US Geological Survey (USGS). The USACOE and EPA are interested in these areas because of a series of ocean dump sites off Oahu, Kauai, Maui, and Hawaii (Fig. 1) that require high-resolution base maps for site monitoring purposes. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program has several on-going projects off Oahu and Maui that lack high-precision base maps for a variety of ongoing geological studies. The cruise was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement between the USGS and the Ocean Mapping Group, University of New Brunswick, Canada.

  4. Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Dunoyer, Alain; Leatherland, Adam

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of in-car displays used to support Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control. Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control is an extension of Adaptive Cruise Control, as it is able to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Previous versions of Adaptive Cruise Control have only operated above 26 kph. The greatest concern for these technologies is the appropriateness of the driver's response in any given scenario. Three different driver interfaces were proposed to support the detection of modal, spatial and temporal changes of the system: an iconic display, a flashing iconic display, and a representation of the radar. The results show that drivers correctly identified more changes detected by the system with the radar display than with the other displays, but higher levels of workload accompanied this increased detection.

  5. Bound for Sydney town: health surveillance on international cruise vessels visiting the Port of Sydney.

    PubMed

    Ferson, Mark J; Ressler, Kelly-Anne

    2005-04-18

    A program for routine health surveillance on international cruise ships visiting the Port of Sydney has been developed since 1998. Before introduction of this program, ships only reported quarantinable diseases and were not aware of the Australian requirement to report other infectious diseases. Voluntary routine reporting, developed in partnership with the cruise ship industry, provides timely information on all infectious diseases of public health interest during every cruise. During 1999-2003, the program resulted in detection of and response to 14 outbreaks of gastroenteritis or acute respiratory infection, affecting more than 1400 passengers and crew. The program has improved preventive action, and risk communication and management by cruise ship operators, and led to more timely investigation and support by public health authorities.

  6. Lesbians and Gay Men's Vacation Motivations, Perceptions, and Constraints: A Study of Cruise Vacation Choice.

    PubMed

    Weeden, Clare; Lester, Jo-Anne; Jarvis, Nigel

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the push-pull vacation motivations of gay male and lesbian consumers and examines how these underpin their perceptions and purchase constraints of a mainstream and LGBT(1) cruise. Findings highlight a complex vacation market. Although lesbians and gay men share many of the same travel motivations as their heterosexual counterparts, the study reveals sexuality is a significant variable in their perception of cruise vacations, which further influences purchase constraints and destination choice. Gay men have more favorable perceptions than lesbians of both mainstream and LGBT cruises. The article recommends further inquiry into the multifaceted nature of motivations, perception, and constraints within the LGBT market in relation to cruise vacations. PMID:26983585

  7. R2R Eventlogger: Community-wide Recording of Oceanographic Cruise Science Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Stolp, L.; Lerner, S.; Avery, J.; Thiel, T.

    2012-12-01

    Methods used by researchers to track science events during a science research cruise - and to note when and where these occur - varies widely. Handwritten notebooks, printed forms, watch-keeper logbooks, data-logging software, and customized software have all been employed. The quality of scientific results is affected by the consistency and care with which such events are recorded and integration of multi-cruise results is hampered because recording methods vary widely from cruise to cruise. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program has developed an Eventlogger system that will eventually be deployed on most vessels in the academic research fleet. It is based on the open software package called ELOG (http://midas.psi.ch/elog/) originally authored by Stefan Ritt and enhanced by our team. Lessons have been learned in its development and use on several research cruises. We have worked hard to find approaches that encourage cruise participants to use tools like the eventlogger. We examine these lessons and several eventlogger datasets from past cruises. We further describe how the R2R Science Eventlogger works in concert with the other R2R program elements to help coordinate research vessels into a coordinated mobile observing fleet. Making use of data collected on different research cruises is enabled by adopting common ways of describing science events, the science instruments employed, the data collected, etc. The use of controlled vocabularies and the practice of mapping these local vocabularies to accepted oceanographic community vocabularies helps to bind shipboard research events from different cruises into a more cohesive set of fleet-wide events that can be queried and examined in a cross-cruise manner. Examples of the use of the eventlogger during multi-cruise oceanographic research programs along with examples of resultant eventlogger data will be presented. Additionally we will highlight the importance of vocabulary use strategies to the success of the

  8. Cruise Report for G1-03-GM, USGS Gas Hydrates Cruise, R/V Gyre, 1-14 May 2003, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2004-01-01

    This report gives a summary of the field program and instrumentation used on the R/V Gyre in the Gulf of Mexico in May, 2003, to collect multichannel seismic data in support of USGS and Department of Energy gas hydrate studies. Tabulated statistics, metadata, figures and maps are included to show the breadth of data collected and preliminary interpretations made during the field program. Geophysical data collected during this cruise will be released in a separate report. At the start of the cruise, three test lines were run to compare different source configurations in order to optimize data quality for the objectives of the cruise. The source chosen was the 13/13 in3 Generator-Injector (GI) Gun. Following these tests, a total of 101 lines (approximately 1033 km) of 24-channel high-resolution seismic reflection data were collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico. 59 lines (about 600 km) were collected in and around lease block Keathley Canyon 195. An additional 4 lines (85 km) provided a seismic tie between the Keathley Canyon data and USGS multichannel data collected in 1999. About 253 km of data were collected along 35 short lines in and around lease block Atwater Valley 14 on the floor of the Mississippi Canyon. Three lines (53 km) completed the cruise and provided a seismic tie to USGS multichannel data collected in 1998. Two on-board trained marine-mammal observers fulfilled the requirements determined by NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service to avoid incidental harassment of marine mammals as established in the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). A total of three species of dolphins were observed during the cruise and one basking shark. No sperm whales were sighted. During the cruise, seismic operations were not delayed or terminated because of marine mammal activity.

  9. Study on a human guidance method for autonomous cruise of indoor robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bao-Zhi; Zhu, Ming

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a method of human guidance for autonomous cruise of indoor robot. A low-cost robot follows a person in a room and notes the path for autonomous cruise using its monocular vision. A method of video-based object detection and tracking is taken to detect the target by the video received from the robot's camera. The validity of the human guidance method is proved by the experiment.

  10. Ship's doctors qualifications required for cruise ships: Recruiter's comments on the German-Norwegian debate.

    PubMed

    Ottomann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This contribution is intended to fertilise the current discussion of ship's doctors qualifications required for cruise ships. Therefore 10 points are added to the debate containing different considerations focussing on the recommendations of the German Society of Maritime Medicine, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP's) Health Care Guidelines for Cruise Ship Medical Facilities and the different skills a ship's doctor should have from the perspective of the recruiter. PMID:26394316

  11. Ship's doctors qualifications required for cruise ships: Recruiter's comments on the German-Norwegian debate.

    PubMed

    Ottomann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This contribution is intended to fertilise the current discussion of ship's doctors qualifications required for cruise ships. Therefore 10 points are added to the debate containing different considerations focussing on the recommendations of the German Society of Maritime Medicine, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP's) Health Care Guidelines for Cruise Ship Medical Facilities and the different skills a ship's doctor should have from the perspective of the recruiter.

  12. Novel approach for designing a hypersonic gliding-cruising dual waverider vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Ding, Feng; Huang, Wei; Jin, Liang

    2014-09-01

    For a hypersonic gliding-cruising vehicle, the gliding Mach number is larger than the cruising Mach number. It may be useful to design the inlet shroud to act as the compression surface of the waverider, to ensure that the vehicle rides on the shock wave, during both the gliding and cruising phases. A new design concept, namely a gliding-cruising dual waverider, is proposed in the current study. During the gliding phase, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design gliding Mach number, as the inlet shroud is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. During the cruising phase, when the inlet shroud is cast away or jettisoned, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design cruising Mach number, as the forebody is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. Thus, the design methodology of the dual-cone-derived waverider is described based on the theory of conical flow. Finally, the numerical methods are utilized to verify the new design method of the aerodynamic configuration. This methodology proposed is useful to design a hypersonic vehicle for two regimes of flight.

  13. Numerical simulations and model tests of the mooring characteristic of a tension leg platform under random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jia-yang; Yang, Jian-min; Lü, Hai-ning

    2013-10-01

    Analyzing the dynamic response and calculating the tendon tension of the mooring system are necessary for the structural design of a tension leg platform (TLP). The six-degree-of-freedom dynamic coupling responses and the mooring characteristics of TLP under random waves are studied by using a self-developed program. Results are verified by the 1:40 scaling factor model test conducted in the State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering at Shanghai JiaoTong University. The mean, range, and standard deviation of the numerical simulation and model test are compared. The influences of different sea states and wave approach angles on the dynamic response and tendon tension of the mooring system are investigated. The acceleration in the center and corner of the deck is forecasted.

  14. Numerical investigation of mooring line damping and the drag coefficients of studless chain links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengqiang; Huang, Shan

    2014-03-01

    The chain/wire rope/chain combination is a common choice for mooring offshore floating platforms. However, data of the drag coefficients of chain links are rather limited, resulting in uncertainties with the calculations of the drag force, and hence the damping of the mooring system. In this paper, the importance of the selection of the drag coefficient is first investigated. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is then used to determine the drag coefficients of a studless chain under steady flows. Numerical model validation is first completed by simulating a smooth circular cylinder under steady flows. In particular, the performance of different turbulence models is assessed through the comparisons between the calculations and the experimental results. The large eddy simulation (LES) model is finally selected for the simulation of steady flows past a chain. The effects of the Reynolds number on the drag coefficient of a stud-less chain is also studied. The results show that the calculated drag coefficients of a stud-less chain are fairly consistent with the available experimental data.

  15. A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

    2014-01-01

    In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

  16. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  17. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton at the S1 biogeochemical mooring revealed from acoustic backscattering strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryuichiro; Kitamura, Minoru; Fujiki, Tetsuichi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the diel vertical migration of zooplankton by using the backscatter strength obtained from moored acoustic Doppler current profilers at mooring site S1 in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. There was seasonal variability in the vertical distribution and migration of the high-backscatter layers in that they became deeper than the euphotic zone (<100 m) in winter and were confined above this depth in other seasons. Seasonal changes in daylight hours also affected the timing of the diel migration. We found that lunar cycles affected vertical distributions of zooplankton near the surface by changing the light intensity. Physical events, such as mixed-layer deepening and restratification and the passage of a mesoscale eddy, also affected zooplankton behavior possibly by changing food environment in the euphotic zone. Since the comparison with net samples indicated that the backscatter likely represents the bulk biomass, the accuracy of biomass estimates based on net samples could be influenced by the high temporal variability of zooplankton distributions.

  18. Line-edge roughness and the impact of stochastic processes on lithography scaling for Moore's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2014-09-01

    Moore's Law, the idea that every two years or so chips double in complexity and the cost of a transistor is always in decline, has been the foundation of the semiconductor industry for nearly 50 years. The main technical force behind Moore's Law has been lithography scaling: shrinking of lithographic features at a rate faster than the increase in finished wafer costs. With smaller feature size comes the need for better control of those sizes during manufacturing. Critical dimension and overlay control must scale in proportion to feature size, and has done so for the last 50 years. But in the sub-50-nm feature size regime, a new problem has arisen: line-edge roughness due to the stochastic nature of the lithography process. Despite significant effort, this line-edge roughness has not scaled in proportion to feature size and is thus consuming an ever larger fraction of the feature size control budget. Projection of current trends predicts a collision course between lithography scaling needs and line-edge roughness reality. In the end, stochastic uncertainty in lithography and its manifestation as line-edge roughness will prove the ultimate limiter of resolution in semiconductor manufacturing.

  19. Moored observations of synoptic and seasonal variability in the East Greenland Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, B. E.; Straneo, F.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a year-round assessment of the hydrographic variability within the East Greenland Coastal Current on the Greenland shelf from five synoptic crossings and 4 years of moored hydrographic data. From the five synoptic sections the current is observed as a robust, surface intensified flow with a total volume transport of 0.66 ± 0.18 Sv and a freshwater transport of 42 ± 12 mSv. The moorings showed heretofore unobserved variability in the abundance of Polar and Atlantic water masses in the current on synoptic scales. This is exhibited as large vertical displacement of isotherms (often greater than 100 m). Seasonally, the current is hemmed into the coast during the fall by a full depth Atlantic Water layer that has penetrated onto the inner shelf. The Polar Water layer in the current then thickens through the winter and spring seasons increasing the freshwater content in the current; the timing implies that this is probably driven by the seasonally varying export of freshwater from the Arctic and not the local runoff from Greenland. The measured synoptic variability is enhanced during the winter and spring period due to a lower halocline and a concurrent enhancement in the along-coast wind speed. The local winds force much of the high-frequency variability in a manner consistent with downwelling, but variability distinct from downwelling is also visible.

  20. Two-year moored instrument results along 152 deg E. [of North Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, William J., Jr.; Niiler, Pearn P.; Koblinsky, Chester J.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a 2-year (nominal) deployment of a moored array along 152 deg E from 28 deg N to 41 deg N are presented, with emphasis on similarities and differences between settings (approximately year-to-year). Ten moorings and 38 instruments were involved, from the fall of 1980 to 1982. Current-temperature meters spanned the water column from 500- to 4000-m depths, with occasional instruments in the vicinity of 300 m and near the bottom (about 6000 m). Upper level features located in the center of the array near 35-36 deg N were generally stable relative to the axis of the Kuroshio Extension, varying from deployment to deployment with meanders in this flow regime. Some properties of the abyssal (about 4000 m) currents were comparatively more variable, with these changes not connected to meandering of the Kuroshio Extension in an obvious way. The vertical structure and frequency distributions of eddy kinetic energy were similar in shape and to some extent in amplitude from deployment to deployment, especially relative to meanders of the Kuroshio Extension, but translated in the opposite direction.

  1. High Frequency, Long Time Series Measurements from the Bermuda Testbed Mooring in Support of SIMBIOS. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Tommy; Dobeck, Laura; Sigurdson, David; Zedler, Sarah; Manov, Derek; Yu, Xuri

    2001-01-01

    It has been recognized that optical moorings are important platforms for the validation of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). It was recommended that optical moorings be maintained in order to: (1) provide long-term time series comparisons between in situ and SeaWIFS measurements of normalized water-leaving radiance; (2) develop and test algorithms for pigment biomass and phytoplankton primary productivity; and (3) provide long-term, virtually continuous in situ observations which can be used to determine and optimize the accuracy of derived satellite products. These applications require the use of in situ radiometers for long periods of time to evaluate and correct for inherent satellite undersampling (aliasing and biasing) and degradation of satellite color sensors (e.g., drifts as experienced by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner). The Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) program was initiated in 1994 at a site located about 80km southeast of Bermuda in waters of about 4530 m depth. In August 1997, with NASA's support, we started to provide the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) program with large volumes of high frequency, long-term time-series bio-optical data from the BTM for SeaWiFS satellite ocean color groundtruthing and algorithm development. This NASA supported portion of the BTM activity spanned three years and covered five BTM deployments. During these three years, the quality of radiometric data has improved dramatically. Excellent agreement between BTM moored data and both SeaWiFS and nearby ship profile radiometric data demonstrate that technical advances in the moored optical observations have reduced the major difficulties that moored platforms face: biofouling and less frequent calibration.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  3. SAFARI cruise: Mapping river discharge effects on Southern Brazilian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, P. O.; Kostianoy, A. G.; Möller, O. O.

    2003-11-01

    We report results of a hydrographic cruise organized within the framework of the Russian-Brazilian joint project SAFARI (Southwestern Atlantic Freshwater Assimilation and River Inputs) and aimed at mapping special features of salinity and temperature distributions connected with the freshwater discharges from the Plata river and Patos-Mirim lagoon estuaries on the Southern Brazilian shelf. Apart from the low salinity tongue in the inner shelf that has not been mapped in detail before, the intense river runoff results in strong temperature inversions (up to 4°C per 20-30 m) seen in the upper layer in winter. We argue that these inversions cannot result from the advective mechanism alone and should also be attributed to the freshwater related increase of vertical stability that leads to reduced mixing and thus enhanced winter cooling of the sea surface. Spatial distributions of salinity, inversion layer thickness and inversion magnitude over the shelf and continental slope are presented. In a belt extending for hundreds kilometers northward from the Plata estuary in the inner part of the shelf, salinity is up to 10 psu lower than that in the adjacent ocean beyond the river plumes. The spatial extent of the Patos-Mirim lagoon plume is determined and the fine structure of the salinity distribution near the lagoon mouth is described.

  4. Control integration concept for hypersonic cruise-turn maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Lallman, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    Piloting difficulties associated with conducting aircraft maneuvers in hypersonic flight are caused in part by the nonintuitive nature of the aircraft response and the stringent constraints anticipated on allowable angle of attack and dynamic pressure variations. An approach is documented that provides precise, coordinated maneuver control during excursions from a hypersonic cruise flight path and the necessary flight condition constraints. The approach is to achieve specified guidance commands by resolving altitude and cross range errors into a load factor and bank angle command by using a coordinate transformation that acts as an interface between outer and inner loop flight controls. This interface, referred to as a 'resolver', applies constraints on angle of attack and dynamic pressure perturbations while prioritizing altitude regulation over cross range. An unpiloted test simulation, in which the resolver was used to drive inner loop flight controls, produced time histories of responses to guidance commands and atmospheric disturbances at Mach numbers of 6, 10, 15, and 20. Angle of attack and throttle perturbation constraints, combined with high speed flight effects and the desire to maintain constant dynamic pressure, significantly impact the maneuver envelope for a hypersonic vehicle.

  5. Research combines with public outreach on a cruise ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Elizabeth; Prager, Ellen; Wilson, Doug

    An innovative partnership among academia, government, and private industry has created a unique opportunity for oceanographic and meteorological research on a cruise ship. The University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Royal Caribbean International, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Office of Naval Research have collaborated to establish two modern laboratories for oceanic and atmospheric research on the 142,000-ton Royal Caribbean ship Explorer of the Seas.The Explorer of the Seas combines extensive research capabilities with public outreach. Hundreds of passengers experience the planet's atmosphere-ocean systems through laboratory tours and presentations given by experienced guest scientists and graduate students. In addition to weekly public lectures, guided tours of the ocean and atmospheric laboratories are available, and ocean-related films are shown during selected afternoons. Two interactive eco-learning areas onboard are equipped with a series of interactive displays and large informational touch screens that illustrate marine and atmospheric concepts as well as the onboard research program.

  6. Rapid Deployment of a RESTful Service for Oceanographic Research Cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Linyun; Arko, Robert; Leadbetter, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) seeks to increase data sharing across scientific domains and international boundaries, by providing a forum to harmonize diverse regional data systems. ODIP participants from the US include the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program, whose mission is to capture, catalog, and describe the underway/environmental sensor data from US oceanographic research vessels and submit the data to public long-term archives. R2R publishes information online as Linked Open Data, making it widely available using Semantic Web standards. Each vessel, sensor, cruise, dataset, person, organization, funding award, log, report, etc, has a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). Complex queries that federate results from other data providers are supported, using the SPARQL query language. To facilitate interoperability, R2R uses controlled vocabularies developed collaboratively by the science community (eg. SeaDataNet device categories) and published online by the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). In response to user feedback, we are developing a standard programming interface (API) and Web portal for R2R's Linked Open Data. The API provides a set of simple REST-type URLs that are translated on-the-fly into SPARQL queries, and supports common output formats (eg. JSON). We will demonstrate an implementation based on the Epimorphics Linked Data API (ELDA) open-source Java package. Our experience shows that constructing a simple portal with limited schema elements in this way can significantly reduce development time and maintenance complexity.

  7. Structural concept trends for commercial supersonic cruise aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakat, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Saelman, B.

    1980-01-01

    Structural concept trends for future commercial supersonic transport aircraft are considered. Highlights, including the more important design conditions and requirements, of two studies are discussed. Knowledge of these design parameters, as determined through studies involving the application of flexible mathematical models, enabled inclusion of aeroelastic considerations in the structural-material concepts evaluation. The design trends and weight data of the previous contractual study of Mach 2.7 cruise aircraft were used as the basis for incorporating advanced materials and manufacturing approaches to the airframe for reduced weight and cost. Structural studies of design concepts employing advanced aluminum alloys, advanced composites, and advanced titanium alloy and manufacturing techniques are compared for a Mach 2.0 arrow-wing configuration concept. Appraisals of the impact of these new materials and manufacturing concepts to the airframe design are shown and compared. The research and development to validate the potential sources of weight and cost reduction identified as necessary to attain a viable advanced commercial supersonic transport are discussed.

  8. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  9. Laser rangefinders for autonomous intelligent cruise control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, Bernard A.; Bazin, Gaelle

    1998-01-01

    THe purpose of this paper is to show to what kind of application laser range-finders can be used inside Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control systems. Even if laser systems present good performances the safety and technical considerations are very restrictive. As the system is used in the outside, the emitted average output power must respect the rather low level of 1A class. Obstacle detection or collision avoidance require a 200 meters range. Moreover bad weather conditions, like rain or fog, ar disastrous. We have conducted measurements on laser rangefinder using different targets and at different distances. We can infer that except for cooperative targets low power laser rangefinder are not powerful enough for long distance measurement. Radars, like 77 GHz systems, are better adapted to such cases. But in case of short distances measurement, range around 10 meters, with a minimum distance around twenty centimeters, laser rangefinders are really useful with good resolution and rather low cost. Applications can have the following of white lines on the road, the target being easily cooperative, detection of vehicles in the vicinity, that means car convoy traffic control or parking assistance, the target surface being indifferent at short distances.

  10. Investigation of a supersonic cruise fighter model flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.; Bare, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to survey the flow field around a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration. Local values of angle of attack, side flow, Mach number, and total pressure ratio were measured with a single multi-holed probe in three survey areas on a model previously used for nacelle/nozzle integration investigations. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2, and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. The purpose of the investigation was to provide a base of experimental data with which theoretically determined data can be compared. To that end the data are presented in tables as well as graphically, and a complete description of the model geometry is included as fuselage cross sections and wing span stations. Measured local angles of attack were generally greater than free stream angle of attack above the wing and generally smaller below. There were large spanwise local angle-of-attack and side flow gradients above the wing at the higher free stream angles of attack.

  11. Integration of multi-objective structural optimization into cementless hip prosthesis design: Improved Austin-Moore model.

    PubMed

    Kharmanda, G

    2016-11-01

    A new strategy of multi-objective structural optimization is integrated into Austin-Moore prosthesis in order to improve its performance. The new resulting model is so-called Improved Austin-Moore. The topology optimization is considered as a conceptual design stage to sketch several kinds of hollow stems according to the daily loading cases. The shape optimization presents the detailed design stage considering several objectives. Here, A new multiplicative formulation is proposed as a performance scale in order to define the best compromise between several requirements. Numerical applications on 2D and 3D problems are carried out to show the advantages of the proposed model. PMID:27028554

  12. Making the Connection: Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance and Its Relevance to the Use of a Virtual Classroom in Postgraduate Online Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falloon, Garry

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the use of the Web-based virtual environment, Adobe Connect Pro, in a postgraduate online teacher education programme at the University of Waikato. It applied the tenets of Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance (Moore, 1997) in examining the efficacy of using the virtual classroom to promote quality dialogue and explored how…

  13. 78 FR 16650 - In the Matter of: Dan Tran Dang, 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA 92707; Order Denying Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699... Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Dan Tran Dang, 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA... address at: 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA 92707, and when acting for or on behalf of Dang,...

  14. Cruise report RV Inland Surveyer Cruise IS-98; the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, August 2 through August 17, 1998, Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Hughes-Clarke, John

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of cruise IS-98 was to map the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (Fig. 1) to fulfill a commitment made during the Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum in 1997. The only existing bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, collected in 1923, was recently compiled by Rowe and Stone (1997), but the data density is inadequate for the level of scientific studies ongoing and anticipated in the near future for Lake Tahoe. Recent advances in marine multibeam-sonar capabilities now permit a cost-effective way, to precisely map the bathymetry of large areas of the ocean floor with 100% coverage. Cruise IS-98 applied this state-of-the-art ocean technology to Lake Tahoe. The newest of these high-resolution multibeam mapping systems also simultaneously collects backscatter (similar to sidescan sonar) imagery that results in a complimentary and co-registered data set that is related to the distribution of lake-floor materials and textures. The two types of maps that resulted from this cruise provide the multidisiplinary Lake Tahoe research community an unprecedented set of base maps upon which to build their studies. This report describes the high-resolution multibeam mapping system used at Lake Tahoe, outlines the data-processing steps used to produce the maps, and includes the daily log of the cruise.

  15. Phase II of a Six sigma Initiative to Study DWPF SME Analytical Turnaround Times: SRNL's Evaluation of Carbonate-Based Dissolution Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) and the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are participating in a Six Sigma initiative to improve the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory. The Six Sigma initiative has focused on reducing the analytical turnaround time of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) by developing streamlined sampling and analytical methods [1]. The objective of Phase I was to evaluate the sub-sampling of a larger sample bottle and the performance of a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) digestion method. Successful implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} fusion method in the DWPF would have important time savings and convenience benefits because this single digestion would replace the dual digestion scheme now used. A single digestion scheme would result in more efficient operations in both the DWPF shielded cells and the inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) laboratory. By taking a small aliquot of SME slurry from a large sample bottle and dissolving the vitrified SME sample with carbonate fusion methods, an analytical turnaround time reduction from 27 hours to 9 hours could be realized in the DWPF. This analytical scheme has the potential for not only dramatically reducing turnaround times, but also streamlining operations to minimize wear and tear on critical shielded cell components that are prone to fail, including the Hydragard{trademark} sampling valves and manipulators. Favorable results from the Phase I tests [2] led to the recommendation for a Phase II effort as outlined in the DWPF Technical Task Request (TTR) [3]. There were three major tasks outlined in the TTR, and SRNL issued a Task Technical and QA Plan [4] with a corresponding set of three major task activities: (1) Compare weight percent (wt%) total solids measurements of large volume samples versus peanut vial samples. (2) Evaluate Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3

  16. Overview of Hydrographic Data From the GEOTRACES EPZT Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Swift, J. H.; Moffett, J. W.; Cutter, G. A.; Becker, S. M.; Johnson, M. C.; Miller, M. T.; Palomares, R.

    2014-12-01

    During the US GEOTRACES East Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) cruise extensive use was made of the hydrographic data collected by the SIO Shipboard Technical Support team aboard ship to select suitable depths for water column sampling at all stations. Across the eastern half of the section, starting from the Peru Margin and spanning the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), attention was paid to not only the standard hydrographic sensors but also the fluorometer and dissolved oxygen sensors interfaced to the CTD, for example to select depths associated with the chlorophyll maximum in the uppermost water column and also the underlying low oxygen waters which formed a primary focus for sampling to investigate redox-cycling within the OMZ. In the western half of the section, attention turned toward the extensive hydrothermal plume which was first intercepted directly above the southern East Pacific Rise ridge axis near 15°S. There, the depth and intensity of the hydrothermal plume was revealed by a combination of the standard sensor suite interfaced to the CTD/rosette, augmented with an Oxygen Reduction Potential (ORP) probe provided by NOAA-PMEL and a SeaPoint optical back scatter sensor provided by WHOI. Thorough on-board salinity, dissolved oxygen, and nutrient analyses provided key data for CTD calibration, quality control and hydrographic interpretation including clear evidence for dissolved phosphate scavenging in the near-field hydrothermal plume. We will compare the EPZT CTD/hydrographic data with WOCE-era (1991-1994) sections including zonal section P21, which parallels the new transect, and crossovers with WOCE meridional sections P16, P17, P18, and P19.

  17. Interpopulation study of medical attendance aboard a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Nahorski, Wacław Leszek

    2008-01-01

    The study carried out aboard a cruise ship in the years 1993-1998 involved ship passengers of various nationalities including 3872 Germans aged 23-94 years and 1281 Americans aged 25-94 years. Both nationality groups were divided into two age subgroups: till 64, and 65-94 years. The German younger age subgroup (mean age 53.2 years) consisted of 59% of the passengers, whereas the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 72 years) was made up of 41% of the ships passengers. On the other hand, 73% of the Americans belonged to the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 73,4 years), whereas 27% to the younger one (mean age 52.8 years). The number of onboard consultations and their causes were determined. The occurrence of chronic illnesses in both 65-94 years subgroups was assessed by means of a questionnaire. A higher frequency of consultations was found in the Germans (24.38%) than in the Americans (14.05%) (p=0.001). The difference was particularly striking in the people over 65 years of age (30.87% of the Germans as compared with 14.22% of the Americans, p=0.001). The Germans were nearly 4-times more frequently seen than the Americans for cardio-vascular diseases and almost 3-times more often because of gastrointestinal disorders. The discrepancies in the consultation rates were mainly caused by the different insurance systems of both nations. Chronic illnesses as estimated by means of the questionnaire prevailed in the German passengers. The statistically significant differences (13.3% versus 20%, p=0.01 and 0.001) regarded the locomotor system, urinary tract diseases and a group of illnesses including neurological, ophthalmological, ear, skin, malignant diseases and diabetes.

  18. Enhanced-Group Moore Method: Effects on van Hiele Levels of Geometric Understanding, Proof-Construction Performance and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the van Hiele levels of geometric understanding, proof-construction performance and beliefs about proofs of the research respondents: future mathematics teachers exposed to the traditional (instructor-based) method and the enhanced-group Moore method. By using the quasi-experimental method of research, the study…

  19. 75 FR 6065 - Extension of Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Moore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ..., 2009, in the Federal Register (74 FR 65806), which announced, in part, that the public comment period... since the initial notice of availability was published on December 11, 2009 (74 FR 65806). In response... COMMISSION Extension of Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Moore...

  20. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone. (a) The following is a safety zone: (1) The west and northwest shores of Snake Island; (2)...