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  1. New Meds Make Inroads Against Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164622.html New Meds Make Inroads Against Crohn's Disease Study finds ... hospital than in the past, according to a new federal study. Crohn's is a chronic inflammatory bowel ...

  2. [Radiotherapy in benign diseases: Morbus Peyronie].

    PubMed

    Meineke, Viktor; Uebler, Christian; Köhn, Frank-Michael; Hofmann, Heidelore; Cordes, Nils; Ring, Johannes; Vogt, Hermann-Josef

    2003-03-01

    The induratio penis plastica (IPP) or the so-called Morbus Peyronie is a burdening disease for patients with three main symptoms, induration, deviation and pain. The etiology of this fibrosing and plaque forming disease is largely unknown up to now. The presented data refer to a retrospective univariant examination of 67 patients, which have been treated for IPP with soft X-rays in the Dermatological Clinic of the Technical University of Munich between 1990 and 1995. The aim of the study was to examine, how far a progression of the disease can be stopped with soft X-rays and how the pain symptomatic is reduced. In 58 of 67 examined patients (86.6%) a progression of the disease could be stopped. 25 out of 67 patients (37.3%) complained of pain before therapy. This symptomatic mostly improved totally in 21 patients (84% of the patients with pain). A complete or partial dissolution of the indurations was to be noticed in 41 of 70 indurations (58.6%). In 23 of 60 patients (38.3%) an improvement or totally regression of the deviation was observed. It could be shown that therapeutic outcome significantly correlates to a shorter duration of anamnesis (p < 0.05), smaller plaque size (p < 0.025) and a tendency to lower age of the patients. Radiotherapy of Morbus Peyronie is extremely effective and has a low rate of side effects.

  3. Morbus-Locke's early essay on disease.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, J

    2000-01-01

    John Locke engaged in a systematic study of medicine from the late 1650's. In this period he acquainted himself with the three main competing natural philosophical theories of the time -Galenism, Paracelsianism and Mechanism. He was particularly interested in the work of Sennert, Helmont and Doyle. In 1666, just after the publication of Boyle's The Origine of Formes and Qualities, Locke wrote a short paper entitled Morbus. This paper gave Locke's own view of the nature of disease. Locke went out of his way to criticise Boyle's attempts to give mechanical explanations for biological phenomena. He endorsed Helmont's theory that disease was caused by "ferments" and "Archei" and re-introduced Galenic temperaments as factors of susceptibility in seminal diseases. Locke did not endorse a mechanical corpuscularianism at this stage in his career, when his contact with Boyle was most frequent. Consequently, Locke's espousal of the corpuscular philosophy in the Essay cannot be attributed to Locke's association with Boyle at this time.

  4. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  5. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... prognosis of Crohn's disease in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 2, 2014. Smoking and ... cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 9, 2014. Inflammatory bowel ...

  6. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... large bowel ( colon ). Crohn's disease may lead to deep ulcers in the intestinal tract, giving a "cobblestone" ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  7. Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013;309(20):2150-2158. PMID: 23695484 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23695484 . Fry RD, Mahmoud ... 2009;104(2):465-483. PMID: 19174807 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19174807 . Sandborn WJ. Crohn's ...

  8. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments to induce remission in adults with Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce and maintain remission in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce remission in adults with colonic Crohn's disease? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 93 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:21524318

  9. [Morbus Addison in five-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Smedegaard, Heidi; Jensen, Rikke Beck; Holm, Kirsten

    2010-05-10

    This case-report presents a 5-year-old girl with gastrointestinal symptoms, who became increasingly confused over the last day before admission. She was believed to be in septic shock or have meningitis and was treated with normal saline infusion, glucocorticoid and antibiotics intravenously. A few days later she was diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency (Morbus Addison), which is a very rare disorder among children. If untreated, the condition is lethal, and should always be considered as a differential diagnosis in severely ill patients.

  10. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  11. MEDLI Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Animation of MEDLI, the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument, which contains multiple sophisticated temperature sensors to measure atmospheric conditions and performance o...

  12. [Morbus Behçet or inflammatory bowel disease--a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma].

    PubMed

    Schack, S; Weber, M; Oelzner, P; Mireskandari, M; Antonov, D; Stallmach, A

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 43-year old caucasian male suffering from a condition initially diagnosed as colitis ulcerosa. For 2 years Azathioprine and anti-TNF-alpha antibodies were used for treatment without convincing benefit but with serious adverse events. After the first occurrence of complex accompanying symptoms like oral and scrotal ulcerations, arthritis and scratch-induced skin lesions the differential diagnosis of a Morbus Adamantiades-Behçet with intestinal evolvement was considered. After introduction of a parenteral Ciclosporin medication, which was later switched to Tacrolimus and Azathioprin, a remission could be achieved that lasted for several months. When a drug-induced acute kidney injury occurred, the regime was changed to Golimumab and a delayed but significant improvement was achieved. To separate Morbus Adamantiades-Behçet from inflammatory bowel disease is of some difficulty, demands interdisciplinary cooperation and is the basis for a successful therapy.

  13. Treatment of morbus Peyronie--how I do it? Twenty years of experience.

    PubMed

    Kelâmi, A

    1991-01-01

    Non-operative treatment of morbus Peyronie with 1000 mg of vitamin E daily is warranted as long as the penetration of the penis into the vagina is not hindered. As soon as sexual problems occur, depending on the age, either a corporaplasty (Nesbit-Kelâmi) or implantation of penile prostheses without plaque surgery (Kelâmi) is performed with an excellent late result rate of 96%.

  14. [Orthopedic aspects of Crohn disease. Examples of extra-intestinal organ manifestations].

    PubMed

    Sons, H U; Dannberg, A; Jerosch, J; Dellmann, A

    1990-10-01

    Articular changes in Chron's disease represent extraintestinal organic manifestations which generally take the form of so-called enteropathic synovitis. Articular alterations - diagnosed as non-specific arthritis in the great majority of cases--may precede the intestinal disease. In very rare cases it can be shown that the joints display histological changes typical of Morbus Crohn. The etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of the articular changes are not clear. Probable factors are: autoimmune disease, stimulation of the immunological system by exogenous antigens, induction of a self-sustaining inflammatory process, and demonstrable circulation of antigen-antibody complexes. Genetic factors seem to play a role (familial disposition). A pure "colonic Crohn" (= colitis granulomatosa) leads to a higher degree of articular alteration than a pure "small-intestine Crohn" (= ileitis terminalis). The joints preferentially affected are in the region of the lower extremities (knee and ankle joints). Concomitant Bekhterev's disease (spondylitiis ankylopoietica) is found in 7-10% of cases. Osteomyelitis represents a rare and serious complication: it can appear in the course of chronic Chron's disease (mainly with intestinal fistulas), especially in the region of the pelvic bones. Further aspects of interest from an orthopedic viewpoint are hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with periossal neoformation, granulomatous changes in the bone itself, and aseptic osteonecrosis.

  15. Crohn's Disease - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Crohn's Disease URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/crohnsdisease.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  16. Crohn Disease: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Joseph D; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2017-07-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease condition characterized by skip lesions and transmural inflammation that can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. For this review article, we performed a review of articles in PubMed through February 1, 2017, by using the following Medical Subject Heading terms: crohns disease, crohn's disease, crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Presenting symptoms are often variable and may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, and in certain cases fevers or chills. There are 3 main disease phenotypes: inflammatory, structuring, and penetrating. In addition to the underlying disease phenotype, up to a third of patients will develop perianal involvement of their disease. In addition, in some cases, extraintestinal manifestations may develop. The diagnosis is typically made with endoscopic and/or radiologic findings. Disease management is usually with pharmacologic therapy, which is determined on the basis of disease severity and underlying disease phenotype. Although the goal of management is to control the inflammation and induce a clinical remission with pharmacologic therapy, most patients will eventually require surgery for their disease. Unfortunately, surgery is not curative and patients still require ongoing therapy even after surgery for disease recurrence. Importantly, given the risks of complications from both Crohn disease and the medications used to treat the disease process, primary care physicians play an important role in optimizing the preventative care management to reduce the risk of complications. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    PubMed

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  18. Enterobiasis mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Dajil, Saleh

    2004-01-01

    We report a 20-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort for 2 months. Colonoscopy showed skip areas with ulceration, resembling Crohn's disease. Biopsies showed chronic inflammation and a non-necrotizing granuloma. An adult pinworm was found in the lumen from an uninvolved segment. The patient responded to mebendazole.

  19. The sensitivity of the sole of the foot in patients with Morbus Parkinson.

    PubMed

    Prätorius, B; Kimmeskamp, S; Milani, T L

    2003-08-07

    The sensory input of the foot has an important influence on balance. In patients with Morbus Parkinson (PD-patients) balance control is often impaired. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the sensitivity of the plantar foot in PD-patients. Five sites of the plantar foot were examined in 24 PD-patients and in 20 controls using Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments for touch pressure and a vibration-exciter (30 Hz) for vibration. The results show significantly higher thresholds in PD-patients. For each tested location (except the heel) the thresholds are at least twice as high as in controls. Moreover, this study proved the correlation between motor and somatosensory systems: the stronger the motor deficiencies in PD-patients (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System score) the higher the sensitivity thresholds for vibration. In conclusion, reduced sensitivity of the plantar foot may contribute to impaired balance control.

  20. The Portuguese Cholera morbus epidemic of 1853-56 as seen by the press.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maria Antónia Pires

    2012-03-20

    This is a study of how scientific knowledge reached common citizens in nineteenth-century Portugal, using newspapers as the main source. Despite the population's limited access to written material, each leading newspaper might be read by 30 000 people a day in Lisbon. This made newspapers the most widely available vehicle for the diffusion of the latest scientific information to the general public. With a cholera morbus epidemic affecting the second largest Portuguese town and all the northern regions, as well as the Algarve, reports on the course of the epidemic were considered essential. The author bases her study on a database of news about the disease in 1855 and 1856, especially with regard to prevention and treatment.

  1. [A giant field of death: medical and scientific controversies about the cholera morbus epidemic of 1855].

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciana Dos

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the cholera morbus epidemic that afflicted the province of Pernambuco, Brazil, in 1855, focusing on the medical and scientific controversies about how the disease spread, which split medical opinion into two camps: contagion and infection. Documents and reports produced by the Society of Medicine of Pernambuco and the General Public Health Board were analyzed, based on which it was possible to describe the official medical and sanitation program, involving engineers, scientists, and physicians, designed to plan a salubrious city - a model of civilization that combined redeveloping the urban space and disseminating new habits amongst the local people. It is essentially an exercise in observing a science and a society as they take shape.

  2. [Medicine and humanism: insights of the Nürnberg city physician Theodericus Ulsenius regarding Morbus Gallicus].

    PubMed

    Santing, C G

    1995-01-01

    The Nuremberg physician and humanist Theodericus Ulsenius (c. 1460-1508) was the author of two works on the so-called Morbus Gallicus. In 1496 he published a Vaticinium in epidemicam scabiem, and he also wrote fifty aphorisms, entitled Cura mali francici. In this article I will characterize Ulsenius' ideas and compare these to the measures the Nuremberg town government took to diminish the dangerous effects of the epidemic. In the function of official town physician, Ulsenius was one of the chief advisers and executives of the Nuremberg health policy. As the 'Ratsverlässe' (records of the town-council meetings) give detailed information, the reactions of senate and physicians can be followed from day to day. The Vaticinium a poem of 100 hexameters was printed at the office of Hans Mair and presented as a pamphlet with a woodcut from the workshop of Albrecht Dürer. The verses refer to a dream of the poet, in which the God Apollo addresses him and talks about the terrible disease. The origin and symptoms of the illness are discussed extensively, in accordance with the prevailing medico-astrological conceptions. Nevertheless, the poem ist not a medical piece of work, but a literary-styled and humanistically appropriate description of the recent epidemic, meant for fellow members of the German respublica litteraria. Like most of Ulsenius' writings, the Cura mali francici only survived as a copy made by his colleague Hartmann Schedel. It seems that the author had different types of audience in mind. The aphorisms refer to the Aphorisms of his great example, the famous Ancient medical doctor Hippocrates of Kos. The addresses of the Cura are obviously medical professionals: the physician in the towns harassed by the Morbus Gallicus and especially the medical professors who hat to lecture on the new ailment.

  3. [Electrocochleography using Transtympanic, Ear Drum and Ear Canal Electrode in Diagnosis of Morbus Menière].

    PubMed

    Tiefenbach, M; Shehata-Dieler, W; Cebulla, M

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study was to explore the clinical value of non-invasive recordings of electrocochleography in comparison to the use of invasive electrodes for the diagnosis of endolymphatic hydrops in patients with suspicious Morbus Menière. 15 patients with clinical suspicion of Morbus Menière underwent electrocochleography with transtympanic needle-electrode as well as tympanic membrane electrode. 10 patients received electrocochleography with transtympanic needle-electrode and ear canal electrode. A control group of 12 healthy adults was evaluated using tympanic membrane electrode. The negative electrode was placed on the ipsilateral mastoid, the ground electrode in the middle of the forehead. For stimulation broadband click stimulus as well as long tone bursts of 1, 2 and 4 kHz were applied. In addition the impedance of the electrode was registered. While transtympanic electrocochleography gave reliable results in 100% of these cases, extratympanic recordings often manifested poor wave morphology. The electrocochleographic measures following stimulation with 1 and 2 kHz long tone bursts were the best measures to identify endolymphatic hydrops. This was the case with transtympanic as well as with tympanic membrane electrodes. There was no correlation between impedance and wave morphology. For the evaluation of Morbus Menière non-invasive electrocochleography showed good results using a tympanic canal electrode with 1 and 2 kHz tone bursts. Yet in unclear cases transtympanic electrocochleography should be preferred. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Imaging Crohn disease: MR enterography.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pablo; Mendez, Ramiro; Matute, Fatima; Hernandez, Paula; Mendoza, Juan Luis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography in Crohn disease management has been rapidly growing in importance during recent years. Being familiar to this technique is essential for radiologists and also, to some extent, for gastroenterologists. Our aim is to study and describe the imaging findings in magnetic resonance enterography in Crohn disease to develop a comprehensive and useful review article and imaging atlas.

  5. Management of active Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Cheifetz, Adam S

    2013-05-22

    Treatment of Crohn disease is rapidly evolving, with the induction of novel biologic therapies and newer, often more intensive treatment approaches. Knowing how to treat individual patients in this quickly changing milieu can be a challenge. To review the diagnosis and management of moderate to severe Crohn disease, with a focus on newer treatments and goals of care. MEDLINE was searched from 2000 to 2011. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Evidence was graded using the American Heart Association level-of-evidence guidelines. Although mesalamines are still often used to treat Crohn disease, the evidence for their efficacy is lacking. Corticosteroids can be effectively used to induce remission in moderate to severe Crohn disease, but they do not maintain remission. The mainstays of treatment are immunomodulators and biologics, particularly anti-tumor necrosis factor. Immunomodulators and biologics are now the preferred treatment options for Crohn disease.

  6. Perianal Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Asma, Sioud Dhrif; Soumaya, Youssef; Kahena, Jaber; Raouf, Dhaoui Mohamed; Nejib, Doss

    2006-12-10

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by sharply demarcated segments of gastrointestinal involvement from mouth to anus. Its perineal manifestations are among the most devastating and mutilating complications. They occur at any time and may precede the intestinal manifestations. Their most common presentations are perineal ulceration, fistula, and abscess. Proliferative and polypoid morphology of the cutaneous lesions mimicking warts and condyloma are rarely described. We report a 25-year-old woman with a 4-month history of confluent plaques of the perineal region with vegetant surfaces, suspected to be genital warts. The lesions progressed to fistulas, inducing deep ulcerations surrounded by pseudocondylomatous tumors. About 2 months prior to presentation she began to suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms and noted weight loss. Physical examination, endoscopic examination, and pathological interpretation led to the diagnosis of Crohn disease with perineal involvement being the initial presenting sign. Significant improvement was induced with prednisone (45 mg daily) and azathioprine. Our observation is notable for the pseudocondylomatous appearance and the dramatic response to medical treatment despite severe involvement.

  7. Anogenital Crohn's disease with vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Gargi R.; Mehta, Hita H.; Jhamwar, Mugdha M.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Crohn's or anogenital granulomatosis is a rare disorder, which presents commonly as swelling and erosions on anogenital area and associated with features of intestinal Crohn's disease. We report a case of 23-year-old female who presented with vitiligo patches on back and legs for 1-year, painful edema and ulcers on anogenital area and oral cavity for 9 months and diarrhea with bleeding per annum for 1 month. Features on ultrasonography, multislice computed tomography scan, colonoscopy, and biopsy from nodule on anal wall were suggestive of granulomatous Crohn's disease. Thus, we present the case due to its rarity. PMID:24958989

  8. Crohn disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... diet Nasogastric feeding tube Small bowel resection - discharge Review Date 12/2/2014 Updated by: Jenifer K. ... Frankford-Torresdale Hospital, Aria Health System, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  9. Morbus sacer in Africa: some religious aspects of epilepsy in traditional cultures.

    PubMed

    Jilek-Aall, L

    1999-03-01

    Epilepsy when manifested as grand mal seizure provokes strong and ambivalent feelings in those witnessing it. Terms such as morbus sacer, denoting both a sacred and demoniac condition, or folk names indicating divine punishment, have expressed these feelings in European societies from antiquity to the Middle Ages and beyond. An atmosphere of fear, shame and mysticism surrounds epilepsy even in our days in many non-Western and also in Western cultures. In the course of work and studies in Tanzania, where I organized the Mahenge Clinic for Epilepsy in 1960, and in other parts of Africa, I found that epilepsy is conceived of as an "African'' affliction, a manifestation of supernatural forces that makes it difficult to reach epilepsy sufferers with modern medical treatment. Epilepsy is traditionally looked on as caused by ancestral spirits or attributed to possession by evil spirits. It is also thought to be due to witchcraft, and "poisoning," and often taken to be contagious. Epilepsy may, under Christian missionary teaching, have come to be considered as due to demoniac possession or divine punishment for sins, in accordance with biblical examples. In many parts of Africa, syncretic amalgamation of indigenous traditions with Judeo-Christian doctrines influenced popular attitudes toward epilepsy. We demonstrated that persistent efforts at health education in the context of organized treatment of epilepsy can result in a change of popular notions about epilepsy and consequently lead to significant improvement in the quality of life of epilepsy sufferers.

  10. Induction of chromosome aberrations during the course of radiation therapy for morbus Hodgkin

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, A.; Stephan, G.; Vogl, T.; Lissner, J.

    1988-06-01

    In a patient with Morbus Hodgkin, structural aberrations of the chromosome type in peripheral lymphocytes were analyzed during radiation therapy (accumulated target dose 44.6 Gy: 22 fractions of 1.8 Gy each and 2 fractions of 2.5 Gy each at the end of the therapy). The blood was sampled about 5 min after a fraction and/or 24, 48, or 72 h thereafter. The frequency of dicentric chromosomes:acentric fragments:centric ring chromosomes is 37:14:1 throughout the therapy. Independent of the time of blood sampling after a fraction, the distributions of dicentrics and acentrics are overdisperse and represent negative binomial distributions. The yields from these aberrations, as determined during the course of radiotherapy, are best fitted to a linear-quadratic function with a negative quadratic term. The two dose-effect curves (blood sampling about 5 min and 24 to 72 h after a fraction) of dicentrics and acentrics do not differ significantly. Up to an accumulated target dose of about 20 Gy the percentages of cells with chromosome aberrations increase to about 48 to 65% and, at this level, remain constant until the end of therapy.

  11. Surgical management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kim C; Hunt, Steven R

    2013-02-01

    Although medical management can control symptoms in a recurring incurable disease, such as Crohn's disease, surgical management is reserved for disease complications or those problems refractory to medical management. In this article, we cover general principles for the surgical management of Crohn's disease, ranging from skin tags, abscesses, fistulae, and stenoses to small bowel and extraintestinal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Scientists Spot Genes Behind Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166957.html Scientists Spot Genes Behind Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis Large study finds key ... Researchers say they've come closer to pinpointing genes linked with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's ...

  13. Crohn disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Crohn disease (often seen in the literature as "Crohn's disease"), an autoimmune disease with debilitating gastrointestinal and extragastrointestinal manifestations, is on the rise in the United States and Europe. This article discusses the disease process, clinical presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for Crohn disease. Statistics regarding disease prevalence and epidemiology also are reported.

  14. Pancreatic function in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hegnhøj, J; Hansen, C P; Rannem, T; Søbirk, H; Andersen, L B; Andersen, J R

    1990-01-01

    We investigated exocrine pancreatic function in a population of patients with Crohn's disease in order to correlate the pancreatic function with clinical and laboratory variables. A total of 143 patients affected by Crohn's disease and 115 control subjects were studied. All had a Lundh meal test. As a group patients with Crohn's disease had significantly decreased activity of both amylase (p less than 0.02) and lipase (p less than 0.001) in duodenal aspirates. In patients with Crohn's disease enzyme activities were not correlated to duration of disease or to extent or localisation of previous bowel resection. The lowest enzyme values were found in patients with the most extensive bowel involvement, and they were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) than in patients with disease confined to the terminal ileum. The differences between enzyme values in other subgroups of patients were not significant. For the patient group as a whole no correlation was found between disease activity and enzyme values, but for the most uniform group of patients, those with terminal ileitis, pancreatic function was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in patients with moderate and severe disease compared with patients with mild disease. Thus at least two factors seem to be responsible for impaired pancreatic function in Crohn's disease: firstly disease activity and secondly localisation or extent of disease. PMID:1698692

  15. [Acne inversa in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Goischke, H K; Ochsendorf, F R

    2001-11-01

    We report 2 patients with the association of Crohn's disease and acne inversa (= hidradenitis suppurativa). A 50-year-old woman with a 10-year-history of Crohn's disease developed suppurative nodules and abscesses in the genitoanal region. Over several years these lesions were hidden from everybody including the family physician. In a 42-year-old female patient abscesses appeared in the axilla 4 years after the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. During the next years these draining lesions also developed in both groins and the perineum. The differential diagnosis included cutaneous manifestations of Crohn's disease in both cases. The clinical picture with draining abscesses and sinuses with communicating channels, cystic nodules, hypertrophic scars and foul-smelling discharge were typical findings of acne inversa. In the last years this entity was reported several times in patients with Crohn's disease. Acne inversa starts with a compact hyperkeratosis of the infundibulum in terminal hair follicles, followed by a segmental rupture of the follicular epithelium and a spreading inflammatory reaction. As pathogenic factors genetic disposition and smoking were discussed. The only curative therapy is excision of the affected area. The reported association should be known in order to recognize the disease and institute the right therapy.

  16. Crohn's Disease: The First Visit

    PubMed Central

    Farraye, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A Crohn's disease patient's first visit to a new practice is the optimal time to collect important clinical data and identify appropriate therapies. A methodologic approach to this visit is crucial. The focus of this visit should be on preparing the patient for the initiation of treatment, with particular attention to the necessary steps prior to the use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This paper is intended to provide recommendations and a checklist for the initial assessment and evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21528042

  17. [Free perforation in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Patti, R; Arcara, M; Daví, V; Leo, P; Di Vita, G

    2004-01-01

    Free perforation in abdominal cavity in patients with Crohn's disease is a rare entity as attested from the data reported in the literature. It is a very dangerous event and requires a surgical urgency management. The Authors reported two cases of free perforation, in patients with Crohn' disease, undergoing surgical operation in urgency. Analyzing pathogenesis, difficulty in diagnosis making and therapeutic choices, they underline that CT is very useful in the diagnosis, while resection of the perforated intestinal tract represent the best surgical treatment.

  18. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decoding norovirus infection in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chamaillard, Mathias; Cesaro, Annabelle; Lober, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hober, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Although a causing viral infectious agent remains untraceable in Crohn's disease, most recent genome-wide association studies have linked the FUT2 W143X mutation (resulting in asymptomatic norovirus infection) with the pathogenesis of Crohn's ileitis and with vitamin B12 deficiency (i.e., a known risk factor for Crohn's disease with ileal involvement). In line with these findings, host variations in additional genes involved in host response to norovirus infection (such as ATG16L1 and NOD2) predispose humans to Crohn's ileitis. One may therefore presume that asymptomatic norovirus infection may contribute to disruption of the stability of the gut microbiota leading to Crohn's ileitis. These paradigms highlight not only the need to revisit the potential transmissibility of Crohn's disease, but also potential safety issues of forthcoming clinical trials on human probiotic infusions in Crohn's ileitis by rigorous donors screening program.

  20. MED12 Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John M.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    MED12 is a member of the large Mediator complex, which has a critical and central role in RNA polymerase II transcription. As a multiprotien complex, Mediator regulates signals involved in cell growth, development and differentiation, and it is involved in a protein network required for extraneuronal gene silencing and also functions as a direct suppressor of Gli3-dependent Sonic hedgehog signaling. This may may explain its role in several different X-linked intellectual disability syndromes that share some overlapping clinical features. This review will compare and contrast four different clinical conditions that have been associated with different mutations in MED12, which is located at Xq13. To date, these conditions include Opitz–Kaveggia (FG) syndrome, Lujan syndrome, Ohdo syndrome (Maat-Kievit-Brunner type, or OSMKB), and one large family with profound X-linked intellectual disability due to a novel c.5898insC frameshift mutation that unlike the other 3 syndromes, resulted in affected female carriers and truncation of the MED12 protein. It is likely that more MED12 mutations will be detected in sporadic patients and X-linked families with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features as exome sequencing becomes more commonly utilized, and this overview of MED12-related disorders may help to correlate MED12 genotypes with clinical findings. PMID:24123922

  1. Living MedsCheck

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Niki; Rahmaan, Israa; Roy, Meghna; Tritt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To share the experiences of graduating students as they learn to deliver a new medication review service in community pharmacies in Ontario, Canada. Practice description: Four graduating pharmacy students volunteered in different community pharmacies to learn how to navigate a new provincial program called MedsCheck, which pays pharmacists to do medication reviews. Each student selected his or her own practice site, including 2 independent community pharmacies, a grocery store chain pharmacy and a hospital outpatient pharmacy. Practice innovation: To help the students learn to deliver the new MedsCheck services, a faculty mentor met with them on a weekly basis. To reflect on doing MedsChecks in the “real world” and to elicit feedback from the online community, each student blogged about his or her experiences. Results: All 4 students felt that peer mentoring improved their ability to deliver MedsCheck services. They also identified a number of barriers to delivering the MedsChecks and helped each other try to overcome the barriers. Conclusion: MedsCheck is a new service in Ontario and is not easily implemented in the current pharmacy model of practice. Peer mentoring is a helpful way to share successes and overcome barriers to delivery. Can Pharm J 2013;146:33-38. PMID:23795167

  2. Rectovaginal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Andreani, S M; Dang, H H; Grondona, P; Khan, A Z; Edwards, D P

    2007-12-01

    Crohn's disease is characterized by transmural bowel inflammation and a tendency to form fistulas with adjacent structures. Several different fistulas have been described: enterocutaneous, enteroenteric, enterovesical, enterovaginal, and perineal. Rectovaginal fistulas are difficult to treat despite multimodal therapy. This study was designed to review the current strategic options to best manage this condition. We reviewed the English-language literature from 1966 to 2006, using PUBMED, targeting Crohn's disease involving vagina using key words "rectovaginal fistula and CD," "anovaginal fistula and CD," "anovaginal fistula," and "rectovaginal fistula." We excluded the involvement of the vagina from a pouch after a proctectomy. A total of 776 articles were found; 206 articles were identified and judged as being relevant on the basis of title-related articles and links were reviewed. Fifty-three articles were selected after reading the abstract or full manuscript. The management of rectovaginal fistula, representing 9 percent of all fistulas, remains a challenge in the setting of Crohn's disease. Medical treatments are not favorable with low rates of long-term symptomatic control and unacceptable high rates of recurrence. Several novel and new surgical techniques have been described, and rectal advancement flap, in selected patients, seems to have the most successful results. The management of rectovaginal fistula of Crohn's origin should involve both gastroenterologists and coloproctologists, with the best surgical results being achieved in patients receiving optimum medical therapy. More focused studies targeting these patients with the use of combined medical and surgical therapy are necessary.

  3. Crohn's disease and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, C D; Andrews, H A; Prior, P; Allan, R N

    1994-01-01

    The colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease eliminating all known biases was assessed in a cohort of 281 patients with Crohn's disease who resided in the West Midlands at the time of diagnosis, and were first seen within five years of onset of symptoms between 1945-1975. All patients were 15 years of age or more at onset and were followed up from 12-35 years (total 5213 person years at risk (PYR)). The colorectal cancer risk in the series compared with the risk in the general population was computed by applying sex and age specific PYRs to the date of death or end of the study period 31 December 1991. There were six colonic and two rectal cancers. Six of the eight colorectal cancers were diagnosed 20 or more years after the onset of Crohn's disease. The relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer for the series as a whole was 3.4 (p < 0.001), with a fivefold excess in the colon, but no significant excess in the rectum. Patients with extensive colitis showed an 18-fold increase in risk (RR = 18.2, p < 0.001), which decreased with increasing age at onset. This study shows that there is a statistical excess risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients who develop their Crohn's disease at a young age of onset (less than 30 years of age). PMID:8200559

  4. Urolithiasis and crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Sandro Roberto da Silva; Mendonça, Tiago; Oliveira, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Dias, José; Lopes, Tomé

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated description of the relation between Crohn's disease (CD) and Urolithiasis. Patients and Methods: A literature search for English-language original and review articles was conducted in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases in the month of December 2014 for papers either published or e-published up to that date, addressing the association between CD and urolithiasis as its consequence. All articles published in English language were selected for screening based on the following search terms: “CD,” “renal calculus,” “IBD,” and “urolithiasis.” We restricted the publication dates to the last 15 years (2000–2014). Results: In total, 901 patients were included in this review of which 95 were identified as having CD and urolithiasis simultaneously, for a total of 10.5%. Average age was 45.07 years old, irrespective of gender. 28.6% of patients received some kind of medical intervention without any kind of surgical technique involved, 50% of patients were submitted to a surgical treatment, and the remaining 21.4% were submitted to a combination of surgical and medical treatment. Urolithiasis and pyelonephritis incidence ranged from 4% to 23% with a risk 10–100 times greater than the risk for general population or for patients with UC, being frequent in patients with ileostomy and multiple bowel resections. We found that urolithiasis occurred in 95 patients from a total of 901 patients with CD (10.5%); 61.81% in men and 38.19% in women. Stone disease seems to present approximately 4–7 years after the diagnosis of bowel disease and CaOx seems to be the main culprit. Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary

  5. [Cholera and environmental medicine in the manuscript "Cholera-morbus" (1832), by Antonio Correa de Lacerda (1777-1852)].

    PubMed

    Sanjad, Nelson

    2004-01-01

    In the first half of the nineteenth century, the environmentalist paradigm dominated medical debate. In Brazil, it engendered the construction of a hygienist agenda that framed physicians' work and provided an interpretive key to public health-related issues The article addresses these and other questions from teh perspective of a text by Portuguese physician Antonio Correa de Lacerda who resided in Belém (Pará) and São Luís (Maranhão) between 1818 and 1852. Entitled "Cholera-morbus," the manuscript was written in 1832, the year the epidemic hit Paris. Lacerda calls on different areas of knowledge in his presentation of a coherent explanation of the disease, affording us a view of an anticontagionist interpretation grounded in anatomopathological practice. He likewise demonstrates how it was possible for a provincial doctor to produce original knowledge on the relation between climate, health, and culture, including the medicinal use of Amazon plants.

  6. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; de Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  7. Fabry disease simulating Crohn's ileitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A; Villnow, Elizabeth; Sundelin, Birgitta; Eriksson, Elina; Dolapcsiev, Karoli; Björk, Jan; Befrits, Ragnar; Tengvar, Magnus; Iversen, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited (X-linked) lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, leading to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in various tissues. A 57-year-old male with a family history and laboratory findings of Fabry disease, was consulted for severe abdominal pain, undulating pyrexia, weight loss and diarrhea. The tentative clinical diagnosis of Crohn's ileitis was supported at computed tomographic examination, at laparotomy and at inspection of the resected ileal segment. Histology revealed chronic and acute inflammation, thick-walled occluded vessels, fibrosis and characteristic bi-refringent lamellar deposits of globotriaosylceramide and calcifications. Multi-nucleated giant cells contained phagocytized bi-refringent material. Transmission electron microscopy showed cells with irregular cytoplasmic bodies displaying distinctive zebra-like lamellar structures. It is submitted that the gastrointestinal phenotype of Fabry disease may concur with symptoms resembling abdominal Crohn's disease.

  8. Intestinal mycoplasma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roediger, W E W

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal diversion with reconnection in active Crohn's disease (CD) indicates that luminal contents or bacteria contribute to the formation of CD lesions. Fluorescent staining for mycoplasma in freshly resected Crohn's tissue and electron microscopy reveal intracellular organisms akin to mycoplasma. Historically, tissue culture of CD has shown mycoplasma described as contaminants. Mycoplasma are surface epithelial parasites requiring exogenous cholesterol for membrane stability and cell entry. PCR of intestinal tissue has shown Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be detectable more significantly in CD. Oral M. iowae in experimental poultry localizes to the distal small bowel and colon. Hypothetically, lipopeptides of mycoplasmal membranes are proposed to cause chronicity and stronger immune responses than by other bacteria. 'Intestinal' mycoplasmas, from a number of observations, deserve consideration as organisms mediating inflammation of acute and chronic CD.

  9. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  10. MedIntegrate

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Marko; Crown, Natalie; Borschel, Debaroti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medication reconciliation (MR) is associated with reduced discrepancies and adverse events within institutions. In ambulatory care, MR is often considered more challenging due to periodic, brief patient encounters and the involvement of multiple prescribers who lack shared records. MedsCheck, a community pharmacy program in Ontario for patients with diabetes or those taking 3 or more medications, generates a best possible medication history (BPMH) that can serve as a starting point for MR. Our objectives were to develop and evaluate a program to integrate MedsCheck into the workflow of an ambulatory clinic. Methods: An initiative was implemented within the Complex Care Clinic (CCC), an academic internal medicine clinic at Women’s College Hospital (WCH). During booking of their first appointment, patients were encouraged to receive a MedsCheck. A letter was faxed to the patient’s preferred community pharmacy with a request to conduct a MedsCheck and send documentation to the clinic. Evaluation included patient and health care provider questionnaires and chart review. Results: Fifty-five of 86 new patients referred to the CCC were eligible for a MedsCheck. Fifty-four patients consented to having their community pharmacy contacted, and documentation was received for 21 (39%) of these reviews. Chart review was conducted for patients who completed the patient feedback questionnaire (n = 32). Community pharmacists reported at least 1 drug therapy problem for 12 (57%) patients with a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.5) per patient. Medical residents reported an estimated mean appointment time savings of 7.9 minutes (SD 2.4). Conclusion: The program was feasibly integrated into clinic workflow and shortened the time spent creating BPMHs. This approach could be adopted by other ambulatory care clinics. PMID:25364339

  11. Abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Biller, J A; Grand, R J; Harris, B H

    1987-09-01

    Little information is available about the development of abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease. We report the clinical presentation of five adolescents with Crohn's disease who developed this complication. The mean time from diagnosis until development of an abdominal abscess was 1.7 years. The admitting diagnosis was an acute abdomen in two patients and recurrent Crohn's disease in the other three. No features of the clinical presentation or laboratory data distinguished this group from other adolescents with Crohn's disease. The use of ultrasound and CT scanning was helpful in making this diagnosis preoperatively. Those patients with active Crohn's disease who do not respond promptly to medical therapy should be evaluated for the development of this complication.

  12. Crohn's Disease of the Colon, Rectum, and Anus.

    PubMed

    Harb, William J

    2015-12-01

    There is no cure for Crohn disease. Newer treatments, such as biological therapy, have led to an improved quality of life. This article focuses on the surgical management of Crohn disease of the colon, rectum, and anus. Restorative and nonrestorative surgical options for colonic Crohn disease are discussed. Treatment options for perianal Crohn disease are also reviewed.

  13. Adalimumab in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish S; Suarez, Lisbet D; Rosh, Joel R

    2016-02-01

    Adalimumab, a human monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), was initially approved for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis in 2002. In the subsequent years, its anti-inflammatory properties were applied to the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, adult Crohn's disease (CD), plaque psoriasis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult ulcerative colitis and most recently in 2014, pediatric CD. The biologic era in pediatric CD has changed and redefined the therapeutic approach to this challenging lifelong disease. This article summarizes the clinical legacy of adalimumab with a focus on its most recent expanded indication, pediatric CD.

  14. Pinworm Infestation Mimicking Crohns' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ignatova, Simone; Ekstedt, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    We here report a case of a young man who presented to his general practitioner with diarrhea. Inflammatory bowel disease was suspected and a colonoscopy showed aphthous lesions suggestive of Crohns' disease but biopsies revealed eggs of Enterobius vermicularis. When treated for this parasite, his symptoms were alleviated and a followup colonoscopy revealed a normal colon and distal ileum. Enterobius vermicularis is the most common parasite worldwide and has been attributed with many different presentations and pathologies. It is therefore necessary to maintain vigilance, even in high-income countries, in order to diagnose patients with one of the many atypical presentations of pinworms. PMID:23555063

  15. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood.

  16. Functional Studies of the Yeast Med5, Med15 and Med16 Mediator Tail Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Miriam; Uvell, Hanna; Sandström, Jenny; Rydén, Patrik; Selth, Luke A.; Björklund, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Mediator complex can be divided into three modules, designated Head, Middle and Tail. Tail comprises the Med2, Med3, Med5, Med15 and Med16 protein subunits, which are all encoded by genes that are individually non-essential for viability. In cells lacking Med16, Tail is displaced from Head and Middle. However, inactivation of MED5/MED15 and MED15/MED16 are synthetically lethal, indicating that Tail performs essential functions as a separate complex even when it is not bound to Middle and Head. We have used the N-Degron method to create temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants in the Mediator tail subunits Med5, Med15 and Med16 to study the immediate effects on global gene expression when each subunit is individually inactivated, and when Med5/15 or Med15/16 are inactivated together. We identify 25 genes in each double mutant that show a significant change in expression when compared to the corresponding single mutants and to the wild type strain. Importantly, 13 of the 25 identified genes are common for both double mutants. We also find that all strains in which MED15 is inactivated show down-regulation of genes that have been identified as targets for the Ace2 transcriptional activator protein, which is important for progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Supporting this observation, we demonstrate that loss of Med15 leads to a G1 arrest phenotype. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the function of the Mediator Tail module. PMID:23991176

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Carucci, Laura R; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Gage, Kenneth L; Noto, Richard B; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Lalani, Tasneem

    2015-10-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by episodic flares and times of remission. Underlying structural damage occurs progressively, with recurrent bouts of inflammation. The diagnosis and management of this disease process is dependent on several clinical, laboratory, imaging, endoscopic, and histologic factors. In recent years, with the maturation of CT enterography, and MR enterography, imaging has played an increasingly important role in relation to Crohn Disease. In addition to these specialized examination modalities, ultrasound and routine CT have potential uses. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and nuclear medicine may be less beneficial depending on the clinical scenario. The imaging modality best suited to evaluating this disease may change, depending on the target population, severity of presentation, and specific clinical situation. This document presents seven clinical scenarios (variants) in both the adult and pediatric populations and rates the appropriateness of the available imaging options. They are summarized in a consolidated table, and the underlying rationale and supporting literature are presented in the accompanying narrative. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  18. Investigational agents for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio; Renna, Sara

    2010-10-01

    Increased understanding of the biological mechanisms of Crohn's disease has opened the door to a large number of new molecules; some of these are approved for clinical use, while others remain under evaluation. In this review, we examine the clinical efficacy of all the new drugs that have been evaluated in controlled trials in the last 12 years. Anti-TNF therapy has been reviewed briefly, given the many comprehensive reviews on this topic; attention is focused mainly on the other biological therapies. In assessing the clinical efficacy of these molecules, we consider only the remission rate, as this is considered the most meaningful end point in clinical practice. We analyzed the main biological mechanisms of Crohn's disease and the new drugs whose use is based on insights into these mechanisms. We reviewed the following new drugs: probiotics, GM-CSF, IL-10, IL-11, anti-IL-6, anti-IL-12/-23, everolimus, anti-IFN-γ, IFN-β-I, co-stimulators, anti-integrins, anti-intercellular adhesion molecule 1, small molecules and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. Anti-TNF therapies remain the best options, followed by anti-integrin drugs. The most promising new therapies are anti-IL-23, but further data are necessary. The disappointing results with other molecules may depend on the quality of trials and possibly on inadequate dosage of the drug.

  19. [Social consequences of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Feurle, G E; Keller, O; Hassels, K; Jesdinsky, H J

    1983-06-24

    Impairment of social function was measured by questionnaire in 270 patients with Crohn's disease. In about half of them, the disease had had its onset below the age of 20 years. In 10%, schooling or job training was delayed or even had to be abandoned. Ten percent of the patients were forced to change their occupation because of the disease. 23.5% of the patients stated that their illness had prevented them from having whole-day jobs. Ten percent had temporary or permanent pensions; 3.8% were unemployed. 43.7% of patients stated that the relation to their family and (or) partner was impaired by the disease; in 36.4% the disease had interfered with leisure time activities. The results show that Crohn's disease has social effects which in the individual case can be very serious; they correlate with the duration and severity of the disease. Nonetheless, the majority of patients succeeds in mastering their chosen training and occupation and leading an active life.

  20. [Treatment of fistulizing Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Tonkić, Ante; Borzan, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    The treatment of fistulating Crohn's disease should include a combined medical and surgical approach and should be defined on an individual basis. Asymptomatic enteroenteric fistulas usually require no treatment, but internal fistulas (gastrocolic, duodenocolic, enterovesical) that cause severe or persistent symptoms require surgical intervention. While low asymptomatic anal-introital fistula may not need surgical treatment, in case of a symptomatic enterovaginal fistula surgery is usually required. There are no controlled-randomized trials to assess the effect of medical treatment for non-perianal fistulating Crohn's disease. The incidence of perianal fistulae varies according to the location of the disease, with its occurrence varying between 21-23%. The diagnostic approach should include an examination under anesthesia, endoscopy, and either MRI or EUS before the treatment begins. Asymptomatic simple perianal fistulas require no treatment. The presence of a perianal abscess should be ascertained and if present should be drained urgently. In case of a complex perianal disease, seton placement should also be recommended. Antibiotics (metronidazole and ciprofloxacine) are useful for treating complex perianal disease, however, when discontinued, most of the fistulas relapse. The current consensus suggests that azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine is the first line medical therapy for complex perianal disease, which is always given in combination with surgical therapy (seton, fistulotomy/fistulectomy). Anti TNF-alpha agents (infliximab and adalimumab) should be used as a second choice medical treatment. In refractory and extensive complex perianal disease a diverting stoma or proctectomy should be performed.

  1. What can Crohn's patients eat?

    PubMed

    McDonald, P J; Fazio, V W

    1988-08-01

    Seventy-one patients with Crohn's disease were interviewed about their diet. All had undergone surgery for the condition. Thirty-seven patients had an ileostomy and 34 patients did not. Information about the effect of 32 foodstuffs and drinks, what advice had been given, who had given it, and the patients' attitude to food, was obtained. Twenty-seven fit health workers acted as a control group. Corn, nuts, fizzy drinks, raw fruits, shellfish and pickles in the ileostomy patients and nuts, raw fruit and tomatoes in the non-ileostomy patients gave rise to problems. These differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.01) when compared to the control group. Chicken, white bread, rice, potatoes and lamb were the foods least likely to provoke symptoms in all the groups. "Eat what you can" was the commonest dietary advice given and physicians were the most important source of that advice. More than half of the patients thought their diet was adequate but more Crohn's patients than controls took regular vitamin supplements. Although only two patients considered that diet might be responsible for their disease, most thought dietary factors important in controlling symptoms or aiding recovery.

  2. Is Crohn's disease due to defective immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Korzenik, J R

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is currently undergoing a reassessment. The concept of this disease as a primary T cell disorder is being questioned, with a new emphasis on the role of innate immunity in initiating early events and in perpetuating the inflammatory state. Crohn's disease has been proposed instead to result from impaired innate immunity, encompassing the mucosal barrier and cellular elements including neutrophils and macrophages. Recent advances in genetics, functional studies on innate immunity and therapeutic trials on patients with Crohn's disease have lent support to this evolving hypothesis. PMID:17172582

  3. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G; Arastu, Sanaa; Henry, Christopher H

    2016-04-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough.

  4. Discs Large Homolog 5 (DLG5) Gene Polymorphism and Crohn's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of the Published Studies.

    PubMed

    Shafieyoun, Arezoo; Moraveji, Sharareh; Bashashati, Mohammad; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-05-01

    The real pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is unknown. The higher prevalence of Crohn's disease in Caucasian and Jewish ethnicities, as well as its familial aggregation and higher concordance among monozygotic twins, suggest some roles for genes in its development, clinical progression, and outcome. Recent original studies have indicated DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism as a risk factor for Crohn's disease. Meanwhile, the results of these studies are not consistent. We performed the current meta-analysis to understand whether there is any association between DLG5 gene polymorphism and the risk of Crohn's disease. PubMed was searched to find the case-control studies on DLG5 gene polymorphisms and Crohn's disease. This search compiled 65 articles and based on our criteria. 11 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The association between the DLG5 113G/A polymorphism and the risk of disease was assessed using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Heterogeneity was evaluated based on I2 values.  Random and fixed-effect models were used when I2>50% and I2≤50%, respectively. Eleven studies with a total of 4648 cases and 5677 controls were pooled. Based on our meta-analysis, DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism both at genotypic and allelic levels were not associated with the risk of Crohn's disease. Pooled data indicated no significant association between DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism and the development of Crohn's disease. In order to achieve a superior conclusion, multicenter studies on larger number of patients are recommended.

  5. Adalimumab for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2006-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory intestinal disorder characterized by chronic, recurrent, often granulomatous inflammation affecting any part of the intestines, but most frequently involving the small bowel and colon. The development of novel biologic agents targeting tumor necrosis factor has revolutionized the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. Adalimumab, a fully human anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody, has recently been evaluated for Crohn's disease and was found to be effective for induction of clinical response and remission in patients with active inflammatory disease. Preliminary experience also indicates that adalimumab is useful in patients with prior intolerance or loss of response to infliximab. The rate of adverse events is comparable to other tumor necrosis factor antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis, but longer studies are needed to evaluate both the long-term efficacy and safety of adalimumab in the treatment of Crohn's disease.

  6. Retinal vasculitis associated with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Diaz, M.; Mira, M.; Nevado, L.; Galván, A.; Berenguer, A.; Bureo, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Although systemic vasculitis can be a complication of inflammatory bowel disease at several locations (skin, eyes, brain, mesentery, and lung) the association of retinal vasculitis with Crohn's disease is rare. We studied a 26-year-old woman with biopsy-demonstrated Crohn's disease who developed a severe bilateral retinal arteritis and phlebitis, with acute loss of vision. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7746779

  7. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease.

  8. Crohn's disease: a surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Bijli, Akram H; Thakur, Natasha; Irshad, Ifat

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is known for wide anatomic distribution, different presentations, life-threatening complications, and multiple modalities of management. Its multiple implications are still unaddressed. Since all the patients do not show a good response to medical modalities of treatment, a significant percentage of these patients are referred to the surgeon for the palliation of complications or for the ultimate curative treatment. Since most surgeons come across such patients only rarely, it is sometimes difficult for them to choose the appropriate procedure at the time of need. Moreover, the various surgical modalities available for the different presentations and complications of the disease have not been adequately discussed. The aim of this review is to offer insight and a detailed account of the management of CD from a surgical perspective. This review offers an overview of the various surgical options available, their utility in context, and an approach to various scenarios of complicated CD.

  9. [Therapy of complicated Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Barthel, Christiane; Rogler, Gerhard

    2014-03-12

    During their disease course, the majority of Crohn's disease patients will develop a complicated disease which is characterized by the occurrence of fistulas and/or stenosis. Symptomatic, perianal fistulas should be surgically drained before anti-inflammatory therapy will be initiated. Antibiotics, such as metronidazole, improve disease symptomatic however, they are not sufficient to induce continuous fistula closure. For this purpose, azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine as well as anti-TNF antibodies are useful when administered continuously. Surgical options include seton drainage, fistula excision, fistula plugs and mucosa flaps. As ultima ratio, temporary ileostomy and proctectomy are to be discussed. Non-perianal fistulas often require surgical approaches. Symptomatic strictures or stenosis can be treated by anti-inflammatory medications (only if they are cause by inflammation), endoscopic balloon dilatation or surgery.

  10. The MedDRA Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Gary H.

    2008-01-01

    MedDRA (the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Terminology) is a controlled vocabulary widely used as a medical coding scheme. However, MedDRA’s characterization of its structural hierarchy exhibits some confusing and paradoxical features. The goal of this paper is to examine these features, determine whether there is a coherent view of the MedDRA hierarchy that emerges, and explore what lessons are to be learned from this for using MedDRA and similar terminologies in a broad medical informatics context that includes relations among multiple disparate terminologies, thesauri, and ontologies. PMID:18998828

  11. The MedDRA paradox.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Gary H

    2008-11-06

    MedDRA (the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Terminology) is a controlled vocabulary widely used as a medical coding scheme. However, MedDRA's characterization of its structural hierarchy exhibits some confusing and paradoxical features. The goal of this paper is to examine these features, determine whether there is a coherent view of the MedDRA hierarchy that emerges, and explore what lessons are to be learned from this for using MedDRA and similar terminologies in a broad medical informatics context that includes relations among multiple disparate terminologies, thesauri, and ontologies.

  12. Successful treatment of metastatic Crohn's disease with cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Dafnis C; Young, Lorraine

    2008-08-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease refers to cutaneous granulomatous lesions that are noncontiguous to the gastrointestinal tract. The treatment of cutaneous Crohn's disease is challenging. A patient with metastatic Crohn's disease whose lesions cleared after a 3-month course of cyclosporine is reported.

  13. Diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Jarvis, Kathryn; Patel, Jigneshkumar

    2011-12-15

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the gastrointestinal tract at any point from the mouth to the rectum. Patients may experience diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, weight loss, abdominal masses, and anemia. Extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn's disease include osteoporosis, inflammatory arthropathies, scleritis, nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, and erythema nodosum. Acute phase reactants, such as C-reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are often increased with inflammation and may correlate with disease activity. Levels of vitamin B12, folate, albumin, prealbumin, and vitamin D can help assess nutritional status. Colonoscopy with ileoscopy, capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, and small bowel follow-through are often used to diagnose Crohn's disease. Ultrasonography, computed axial tomography, scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging can assess for extraintestinal manifestations or complications (e.g., abscess, perforation). Mesalamine products are often used for the medical management of mild to moderate colonic Crohn's disease. Antibiotics (e.g., metronidazole, fluoroquinolones) are often used for treatment. Patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease are treated with corticosteroids, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (e.g., infliximab, adalimumab). Severe disease may require emergent hospitalization and a multidisciplinary approach with a family physician, gastroenterologist, and surgeon.

  14. Vulvoperineal Crohn's disease responsive to metronidazole*

    PubMed Central

    Rosmaninho, Aristóteles; Sanches, Madalena; Salgado, Marta; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a multisystem chronic granulomatous inflammatory disease that primarily affects the gastrointestinal tract. In the majority of the cases, the cutaneous manifestations follow the intestinal disease, but occasionally dermatological lesions are the inaugural event and may constitute the only sign of the disease. Vulvoperineal involvement is rare, may precede bowel symptoms by months to years and may go unrecognized. Due to the paucity of reports of Crohn's disease at this location and in the absence of randomized trials, there are no standard treatments for the cutaneous disease. We describe the case of a 47 year-old woman with vulvoperineal Crohn's disease without digestive involvement, that was successfully managed with metronidazole. PMID:24346884

  15. Crohn's disease with respiratory tract involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Lemann, M; Messing, B; D'Agay, F; Modigliani, R

    1987-01-01

    Symptomatic respiratory tract involvement with granulomatous bronchial lesions has not yet been described in Crohn's disease. We report two patients with colonic Crohn's disease and severe respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea associated in one of the patients with voicelessness); erythema, aphthoid and superficial ulcerations were found in the colon and whitish granulations in the bronchi at endoscopy. Non-caseating tuberculoid granulomas were found in the colonic mucosa of both patients, as well as in the bronchial mucosa of one of them; in the second a diffuse inflammatory infiltrate including epithelioid cells was found underneath an erosion of bronchial epithelium. Both patients improved on oral prednisone. These two patients probably had bronchial involvement by Crohn's disease. Images Figure PMID:3428695

  16. MR Imaging of Perianal Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, Shannon P; Bruining, David H; Dozois, Eric J; Faubion, William A; Fletcher, Joel G

    2017-03-01

    Pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently the standard for imaging perianal Crohn disease. Perianal fistulas are a leading cause of patient morbidity because closure often requires multimodality treatments over a prolonged period of time. This review summarizes clinically relevant anal sphincter anatomy, imaging methods, classification systems, and treatment objectives. In addition, the MR appearance of healing perianal fistulas and fistula complications is described. Difficult imaging tasks including the assessment of rectovaginal fistulas and ileoanal anastomoses are highlighted, along with illustrative cases. Emerging innovative treatments for perianal Crohn disease are now available and have the promise to better control sepsis and maintain fecal continence. Different treatment modalities are selected based on fistula anatomy, patient factors, and management goals (closure versus sepsis control). Radiologists can help maximize patient care by being familiar with MR imaging features of perianal Crohn disease and knowledgeable about what features may influence therapy decisions. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment.

  18. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A.M.E.G.; Christiaans, Maarten H.L.; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G.M.C.; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  19. Viruses, autophagy genes, and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Vanessa M; Cadwell, Ken

    2011-07-01

    The etiology of the intestinal disease Crohn's disease involves genetic factors as well as ill-defined environmental agents. Several genetic variants linked to this disease are associated with autophagy, a process that is critical for proper responses to viral infections. While a role for viruses in this disease remains speculative, accumulating evidence indicate that this possibility requires serious consideration. In this review, we will examine the three-way relationship between viruses, autophagy genes, and Crohn's disease and discuss how host-pathogen interactions can mediate complex inflammatory disorders.

  20. MSL Launches With MEDLI Sensors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA engineers Michelle Munk and David Way explain the MEDLI -- Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation -- package on the MSL aeroshell that will measure the heatin...

  1. Variation in care in pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Richard B; Baldassano, Robert N; Milov, David E; Margolis, Peter A; Bousvaros, Athos; Crandall, Wallace V; Crissinger, Karen D; D'Amico, Michael A; Day, Andrew S; Denson, Lee A; Dubinsky, Marla; Ebach, Dawn R; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Kader, Howard A; Keljo, David J; Leibowitz, Ian H; Mamula, Petar; Pfefferkorn, Marian D; Qureshi, M Azim

    2009-09-01

    Variation in medical care can be a barrier to improving clinical outcomes. We aim to describe the variation in care of Crohn disease as provided by a broad sample of pediatric gastroenterologists. Two hundred forty-six Crohn disease patients of 93 pediatric gastroenterologists from 48 practice sites starting treatment with either thiopurine or infliximab were studied. We assessed variation in diagnostic testing that had been performed to establish the diagnosis of Crohn disease and to assess the phenotype, extent, and severity of disease. We also assessed variation in initial thiopurine and infliximab dosage and in nutritional therapy. Diagnostic studies in which care was uniform included complete blood count, performed in 100% of patients, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and colonoscopy in 96%, and upper endoscopy in 89%. However, imaging of the small bowel had not been performed in 19%, and a stool test for pathogens had not been performed in 29%. Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) had been measured in 61% of patients before treatment with a thiopurine; in 85%, TPMT was normal. Nonetheless, even when TPMT was normal, 40% of patients received an initial dose of thiopurine that was lower than recommended. Testing for tuberculosis before initiating treatment with infliximab was not performed in 30%. In addition, 36% of severely underweight patients were not receiving a multivitamin supplement, supplemental formula, or tube feeding. There is variation in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in the management of pediatric Crohn disease, and gaps exist between recommended and actual care.

  2. Potential value of nutrigenomics in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-03-13

    Crohn's disease is a chronic relapsing condition that has no certain cure. Both genetic susceptibility and nutrition have key roles, but their level of involvement varies between patients. Interacting gene pathways influence the probability of disease development, but these are affected by stress and various environmental factors, including diet. In addition, the role of the gut microbiome must not be underestimated, as it is substantially altered in patients with Crohn's disease. Although an elemental diet might lead to disease remission, reintroducing real foods and sustainable diets in patients with Crohn's disease is currently difficult, and would benefit from the sensitivity and rapid feedback provided by the field of nutrigenomics. Nutrigenomics utilizes high-throughput genomics technologies to reveal changes in gene and protein expression that are modulated by the patient's nutrition. The most widely used technique thus far is transcriptomics, which permits measurement of changes in the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in one sample. Given the volume of numbers generated in such studies, data-basing and bioinformatics are essential to ensure the correct application of nutrigenomics at the population level. These methods have been successfully applied to animal models of Crohn's disease, and the time is right to move them to human studies.

  3. The Mediator Complex Subunits MED14, MED15, and MED16 Are Involved in Defense Signaling Crosstalk in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenggang; Du, Xuezhu; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a highly conserved protein complex that functions as a transcriptional coactivator in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated transcription. The Arabidopsis Mediator complex has recently been implicated in plant immune responses. Here, we compared salicylic acid (SA)-, methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-, and the ethylene (ET) precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)-induced defense and/or wound-responsive gene expression in 14 Arabidopsis Mediator subunit mutants. Our results show that MED14, MED15, and MED16 are required for SA-activated expression of the defense marker gene PATHOEGNESIS-RELATED GENE1, MED25 is required for MeJA-induced expression of the wound-responsive marker gene VEGATATIVE STORAGE PROTEIN1 (VSP1), MED8, MED14, MED15, MED16, MED18, MED20a, MED25, MED31, and MED33A/B (MED33a and MED33B) are required for MeJA-induced expression of the defense maker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2), and MED8, MED14, MED15, MED16, MED25, and MED33A/B are also required for ACC-triggered expression of PDF1.2. Furthermore, we investigated the involvement of MED14, MED15, and MED16 in plant defense signaling crosstalk and found that MED14, MED15, and MED16 are required for SA- and ET-mediated suppression of MeJA-induced VSP1 expression. This result suggests that MED14, MED15, and MED16 not only relay defense signaling from the SA and JA/ET defense pathways to the RNAPII transcription machinery, but also fine-tune defense signaling crosstalk. Finally, we show that MED33A/B contributes to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea-induced expression of the defense genes PDF1.2, HEVEIN-LIKE, and BASIC CHITINASE and is required for full-scale basal resistance to B. cinerea, demonstrating a positive role for MED33 in plant immunity against necrotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:28066497

  4. The Mediator Complex Subunits MED14, MED15, and MED16 Are Involved in Defense Signaling Crosstalk in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggang; Du, Xuezhu; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a highly conserved protein complex that functions as a transcriptional coactivator in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated transcription. The Arabidopsis Mediator complex has recently been implicated in plant immune responses. Here, we compared salicylic acid (SA)-, methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-, and the ethylene (ET) precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)-induced defense and/or wound-responsive gene expression in 14 Arabidopsis Mediator subunit mutants. Our results show that MED14, MED15, and MED16 are required for SA-activated expression of the defense marker gene PATHOEGNESIS-RELATED GENE1, MED25 is required for MeJA-induced expression of the wound-responsive marker gene VEGATATIVE STORAGE PROTEIN1 (VSP1), MED8, MED14, MED15, MED16, MED18, MED20a, MED25, MED31, and MED33A/B (MED33a and MED33B) are required for MeJA-induced expression of the defense maker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2), and MED8, MED14, MED15, MED16, MED25, and MED33A/B are also required for ACC-triggered expression of PDF1.2. Furthermore, we investigated the involvement of MED14, MED15, and MED16 in plant defense signaling crosstalk and found that MED14, MED15, and MED16 are required for SA- and ET-mediated suppression of MeJA-induced VSP1 expression. This result suggests that MED14, MED15, and MED16 not only relay defense signaling from the SA and JA/ET defense pathways to the RNAPII transcription machinery, but also fine-tune defense signaling crosstalk. Finally, we show that MED33A/B contributes to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea-induced expression of the defense genes PDF1.2, HEVEIN-LIKE, and BASIC CHITINASE and is required for full-scale basal resistance to B. cinerea, demonstrating a positive role for MED33 in plant immunity against necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  5. The MedCLIVAR Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Piero; Medclivar Sc, The

    2014-05-01

    MedCLIVAR serves as a scientific network to promote interaction among different scientific disciplines and to develop a multidisciplinary vision of the evolution of the Mediterranean climate through studies that integrate atmospheric, marine, and terrestrial climate components at time scales ranging from paleoreconstructions to future climate scenarios. The network deals with scientific issues including past climate variability; connections between the Mediterranean and global climate; the Mediterranean Sea circulation and sea level; feedbacks on the global climate system; and regional responses to greenhouse gas, air pollution, and aerosols. The MedCLIVAR initiative was proposed at the 2003 European Geosciences Union assembly in Nice, France. In 2005, it was endorsed by the International Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) office. Subsequently, the MedCLIVAR Research Network Project was formally approved by the European Science Foundation and launched in May 2006 for a five year duration. Now MedCLIVAR is continuing with self supporting initiatives, such as the third MedCLIVAR conference, which will be held in June 2014 in Ankara (Turkey) , the publication of a special issue of Regional Environmental Change devoted to the climate of the Mediterranean region, and a newsletter, which is published every six months. More information available in Lionello, P., Gacic, M., Gomis, D., Garcia-Herrera, R., Giorgi, F., Planton, S., Trigo, R., (...), Xoplaki, E. (2012) Program focuses on climate of the Mediterranean region, Eos Trans. AGU 93:105-106

  6. Minimal Erythema Dose (MED) Testing

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, Carolyn J.; Chandler, Rachel; Kloss, Jacqueline D.; Benson, Amy; Rooney, Deborah; Munshi, Teja; Darlow, Susan D.; Perlis, Clifford; Manne, Sharon L.; Oslin, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) therapy is sometimes used as a treatment for various common skin conditions, including psoriasis, acne, and eczema. The dosage of UV light is prescribed according to an individual's skin sensitivity. Thus, to establish the proper dosage of UV light to administer to a patient, the patient is sometimes screened to determine a minimal erythema dose (MED), which is the amount of UV radiation that will produce minimal erythema (sunburn or redness caused by engorgement of capillaries) of an individual's skin within a few hours following exposure. This article describes how to conduct minimal erythema dose (MED) testing. There is currently no easy way to determine an appropriate UV dose for clinical or research purposes without conducting formal MED testing, requiring observation hours after testing, or informal trial and error testing with the risks of under- or over-dosing. However, some alternative methods are discussed. PMID:23748556

  7. Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... How old were you when you first experienced the symptoms that would later be diagnosed as Crohn's ...

  8. Is Fatigue a Common Crohn's Disease Symptom? What Can Be Done about It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Crohn's disease Is fatigue a common Crohn's disease symptom? What can be done about it? Answers from ... M.D. Fatigue is an all too common symptom of Crohn's disease. In one study, about three-quarters of people ...

  9. Long-term results of adipose-derived stem cell therapy for the treatment of Crohn's fistula.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Beom; Park, Kyu Joo; Yoon, Sang Nam; Song, Kee Ho; Kim, Do Sun; Jung, Sang Hun; Kim, Mihyung; Jeong, Hee Young; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-05-01

    A previous phase II clinical trial of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) therapy for fistulae associated with Crohn's disease, a devastating condition with a high recurrence rate, demonstrated safety and therapeutic potential with a 1-year sustained response. In the present study, 41 of the 43 phase II trial patients were followed for an additional year, regardless of response in the initial year. At 24 months, complete healing was observed in 21 of 26 patients (80.8%) in modified per protocol analysis and 27 of 36 patients (75.0%) in modified intention-to-treat analysis. No adverse events related to ASC administration were observed. Furthermore, complete closure after initial treatment was well-sustained. These results strongly suggest that autologous ASCs may be a novel treatment option for Crohn's fistulae. ©AlphaMed Press.

  10. Severe exacerbation of Crohn's disease during sunitinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Boers-Sonderen, Marye J; Mulder, Sasja F; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Wanten, Geert J; Hoentjen, Frank; van Herpen, Carla M

    2014-02-01

    Sunitinib is a multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor pathway and inhibits angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor cell invasion, and stimulates apoptosis. Treatment with sunitinib in first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma improves progression-free survival and overall survival compared with interferon-α. Crohn's disease is characterized by chronic immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. Although the exact pathogenesis of Crohn's disease remains unknown, the involvement of angiogenesis is acknowledged. It is unknown whether sunitinib interferes with the natural course of Crohn's disease. We describe a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma and a history of Crohn's disease who was treated with sunitinib and developed a severe exacerbation of Crohn's disease. After rechallenge with sunitinib, a second exacerbation occurred. We therefore conclude that angiogenesis inhibitors should be administered with care in patients with a history of Crohn's disease.

  11. Treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease with certolizumab.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Camp, Brendan; Adhami, Katayun; Jacob, Vinita; Magro, Cynthia; Wildman, Horatio

    2015-11-18

    Metastatic Crohn disease is a rare cutaneous manifestation of Crohn disease characterized by granulomatous lesions discontinuous with the diseased areas of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with history of Crohn disease who was admitted for treatment of cellulitis after presenting with a tender erythematous plaque of the left calf. Microbiological tests including tissue cultures were negative. A skin biopsy revealed granulomatous dermatitis consistent with metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. Owing to concomitant perianal fistulas and abscesses and prior infusion reaction to infliximab, the patient was treated with certolizumab, a pegylated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor combined with methotrexate resulting in complete resolution of the skin lesion. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing this rare skin manifestation of Crohn disease and adds certolizumab as one of TNF inhibitors useful in the treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease.

  12. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells treatment demonstrated favorable and sustainable therapeutic effect for Crohn's fistula.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Cho, Yong Beom; Yoon, Sang Nam; Song, Kee Ho; Kim, Do Sun; Jung, Sang Hun; Kim, Mihyung; Yoo, Hee-Won; Kim, Inok; Ha, Hunjoo; Yu, Chang Sik

    2013-11-01

    Fistula is a representative devastating complication in Crohn's patients due to refractory to conventional therapy and high recurrence. In our phase I clinical trial, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) demonstrated their safety and therapeutic potential for healing fistulae associated with Crohn's disease. This study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ASCs in patients with Crohn's fistulae. In this phase II study, forty-three patients were treated with ASCs. The amount of ASCs was proportioned to fistula size and fistula tract was filled with ASCs in combination with fibrin glue after intralesional injection of ASCs. Patients without complete closure of fistula at 8 weeks received a second injection of ASCs containing 1.5 times more cells than the first injection. Fistula healing at week 8 after final dose injection and its sustainability for 1-year were evaluated. Healing was defined as a complete closure of external opening without any sign of drainage and inflammation. A modified per-protocol analysis showed that complete fistula healing was observed in 27/33 patients (82%) by 8 weeks after ASC injection. Of 27 patients with fistula healing, 26 patients completed additional observation study for 1-year and 23 patients (88%) sustained complete closure. There were no adverse events related to ASC administration. ASC treatment for patients with Crohn's fistulae was well tolerated, with a favorable therapeutic outcome. Furthermore, complete closure was well sustained. These results strongly suggest that autologous ASC could be a novel treatment option for the Crohn's fistula with high-risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Overview of the MEDLI Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazarik, Michael J.; Little, Alan; Cheatwood, F. Neil; Wright, Michael J.; Herath, Jeff A.; Martinez, Edward R.; Munk, Michelle; Novak, Frank J.; Wright, Henry S.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) Project s objectives are to measure aerothermal environments, sub-surface heatshield material response, vehicle orientation, and atmospheric density for the atmospheric entry and descent phases of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle. The flight science objectives of MEDLI directly address the largest uncertainties in the ability to design and validate a robust Mars entry system, including aerothermal, aerodynamic and atmosphere models, and thermal protection system (TPS) design. The instrumentation suite will be installed in the heatshield of the MSL entry vehicle. The acquired data will support future Mars entry and aerocapture missions by providing measured atmospheric data to validate Mars atmosphere models and clarify the design margins for future Mars missions. MEDLI thermocouple and recession sensor data will significantly improve the understanding of aeroheating and TPS performance uncertainties for future missions. MEDLI pressure data will permit more accurate trajectory reconstruction, as well as separation of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties in the hypersonic and supersonic regimes. This paper provides an overview of the project including the instrumentation design, system architecture, and expected measurement response.

  15. Overview of the MEDLI Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazarik, Michael J.; Hwang, Helen; Little, Alan; Cheatwood, Neil; Wright, Michael; Herath, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) Project's objectives are to measure aerothermal environments, sub-surface heatshield material response, vehicle orientation, and atmospheric density for the atmospheric entry and descent phases of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle. The flight science objectives of MEDLI directly address the largest uncertainties in the ability to design and validate a robust Mars entry system, including aerothermal, aerodynamic and atmosphere models, and thermal protection system (TPS) design. The instrumentation suite will be installed in the heatshield of the MSL entry vehicle. The acquired data will support future Mars entry and aerocapture missions by providing measured atmospheric data to validate Mars atmosphere models and clarify the design margins for future Mars missions. MEDLI thermocouple and recession sensor data will significantly improve the understanding of aeroheating and TPS performance uncertainties for future missions. MEDLI pressure data will permit more accurate trajectory reconstruction, as well as separation of aerodynamic and atmospheric uncertainties in the hypersonic and supersonic regimes. This paper provides an overview of the project including the instrumentation design, system architecture, and expected measurement response.

  16. The MedCLIVAR Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Piero; Medclivar sg, The

    2013-04-01

    The MedCLIVAR initiative was first proposed at the 2003 European Geosciences Union assembly in Nice, France. In 2005, it was endorsed by the International Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) office. Subsequently, the MedCLIVAR Research Network Project was formally approved by the European Science Foundation and launched in May 2006 with the support of funding agencies from 12 countries. Since then, MedCLIVAR has served as a scientific network to promote interaction among different scientific disciplines and to develop a multidisciplinary vision of the evolution of the Mediterranean climate through studies that integrate atmospheric, marine, and terrestrial climate components at time scales ranging from paleoreconstructions to future climate scenarios. Presently, the network continues dealing with scientific issues including past climate variability; connections between the Mediterranean and global climate; the Mediterranean Sea circulation and sea level; feedbacks on the global climate system; and regional responses to greenhouse gas, air pollution, and aerosols. Its present activities include the publication of a newsletter, the organization of the next MedCLIVAR conference in 2014 and the publication of a special issue of Regional Environmental Change devoted to the climate of the Mediterranean region.

  17. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-20

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  18. Scurvy and vitamin C deficiency in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Linaker, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    A case of scurvy presenting in a patient with Crohn's disease is reported. A normal response to replacement therapy is seen. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency was found in 7 out of 10 patients with clinically quiescent Crohn's disease, 4 of whom had an adequate oral intake of vitamin C. There was no significant difference in oral intake between patients with Crohn's disease and matched controls but there was a significant difference (P less than 0.001) in leucocyte ascorbic acid levels. It is recommended that patients with Crohn's disease be screened for vitamin C deficiency and receive prophylactic vitamin C supplements daily. PMID:432168

  19. Cerebral white matter lesions in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Merry; Lee, Grace; Kwong, Lawrence N; Lamont, Sharon; Chaves, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, characteristics, and predisposing factors for cerebral white matter lesions in patients with Crohn's disease. We retrospectively evaluated the incidence and characteristics of cerebral T2 white matter abnormalities in 54 patients with Crohn's disease and compared to 100 age-matched controls. We also investigated potential co-morbidities known to be associated with white matter abnormalities in Crohn's patients with normal and abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Seventy-two percent of patients with Crohn's disease had T2 white matter abnormalities, as compared with 34% of the age-matched controls (P < .001). Lesion severity and size were not significantly different between the two groups; however, periventricular distribution and fulfillment of the Barkhof MRI criteria were overrepresented in Crohn's population. History of hypertension, diabetes, and migraine; gender, duration of disease and prior exposure to anti-tumor necrosis factor were not significantly different between Crohn's patients with and without white matter abnormalities; however, patients with lesions were significantly older than those without. Patients with Crohn's disease have a higher incidence of white matter T2 hyperintensities as compared with controls. Age was the only significant factor for the abnormalities within Crohn's group. White matter T2 hyperintensities are likely another extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. [Crohn disease: diagnosis by graded compression ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Z; Makó, E; Dévai, T; Tulassay, Z

    1995-08-27

    Fifty-four patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel underwent ultrasound examination with graded compression. The pathologic sonographic findings were compared with the clinical, endoscopic and in 32 cases with the parallel performed CT and selective enterographic examinations. Of the 29 proven cases of Crohn's disease 26 (89.7%) had bowel wall thickening detectable with US. The change in the bowel wall structure correlated to the stage of the disease. The luminal narrowing, the mesenteric involvement, the enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the abscesses and fistulas were judged easily, but the length and the location of the bowel segment were estimated only approximately. The characteristic but nonspecific signs observed by ultrasound were found to be a useful adjunct to the endoscopic and roentgen examinations. The ultrasound with graded compression in our view is a well usable alternative method for both diagnosis and follow-up, informing about the transmural spread of the pathology.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for perineal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-02-01

    Perineal lesions are a frequent and troublesome complication of Crohn's disease. Although there are various surgical and medical therapeutic regimens available to treat these lesions, all have significant associated morbidity, mortality, and toxicity. Recently, the beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) have been described in patients with severe or refractory perineal disease, but the role of HBOT in larger groups or less severely affected patients has not yet been studied, nor has the minimum number of treatments required for initial or complete healing of perineal disease in this population been described. This article reviews the known and theoretical tissue effects of HBOT and discusses its potential role in treating patients with perineal Crohn's disease.

  2. Surgical Treatment of Anorectal Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert T.; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2013-01-01

    Crohn disease involves the perineum and rectum in approximately one-third of patients. Symptoms can range from mild, including skin tags and hemorrhoids, to unremitting and severe, requiring a proctectomy in a small, but significant, portion. Fistula-in-ano and perineal sepsis are the most frequent manifestation seen on presentation. Careful diagnosis, including magnetic resonance imaging or endorectal ultrasound with examination under anesthesia and aggressive medical management, usually with a tumor necrosis factor-alpha, is critical to success. Several options for definitive surgical repair are discussed, including fistulotomy, fibrin glue, anal fistula plug, endorectal advancement flap, and ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure. All suffer from decreased efficacy in patients with Crohn disease. In the presence of active proctitis or perineal disease, no surgical therapy other than drainage of abscesses and loose seton placement is recommended, as iatrogenic injury and poor wound healing are common in that scenario. PMID:24436656

  3. Fistulizing Crohn's disease: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gecse, Krisztina; Khanna, Reena; Stoker, Jaap; Jenkins, John T; Gabe, Simon; Hahnloser, Dieter; D'Haens, Geert

    2013-06-01

    Fistulizing Crohn's disease represents an evolving, yet unresolved, issue for multidisciplinary management. Perianal fistulas are the most frequent findings in fistulizing Crohn's disease. While enterocutaneous fistulas are rare, they are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Detailed evaluation of the fistula tract by advanced imaging techniques is required to determine the most suitable management options. The fundamentals of perianal fistula management are to evaluate the complexity of the fistula tract, and exclude proctitis and associated abscess. The main goals of the treatment are abscess drainage, which is mandatory, before initiating immunosuppressive medical therapy, resolution of fistula discharge, preservation of continence and, in the long term, avoidance of proctectomy with permanent stoma. The management of enterocutaneous fistulas comprises of sepsis control, skin care, nutritional optimization and, if needed, delayed surgery.

  4. Impact of preoperative immunosuppressive agents on postoperative outcomes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Martin, Sean T; Rao, Abhishek D; Kiran, Ravi P

    2014-05-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are essential in the management of Crohn's disease. Their safety before surgery, however, is still controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the preoperative use of immunosuppressive agents is associated with increased postoperative complications in Crohn's disease. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library was undertaken in February 2013. All studies describing postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing bowel resections for Crohn's disease were included if they reported data comparing patients on preoperative immunosuppressive agents with an appropriate control group. All immunosuppressive agents used to manage Crohn's disease were studied. The main outcomes measured were total overall complications and total infectious complications. Twenty-one eligible studies (20 retrospective and 1 prospective) with 6899 patients were included. When individual studies were examined, only 2/14 (14%), 4/13 (31%), and 1/8 (13%) studies found an association between postoperative complications and preoperative anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, corticosteroids, and thiopurines. In meta-analyses, patients on anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (risk ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07-1.55), and corticosteroids (risk ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.23-1.95) were found to have a higher risk of postoperative infectious complications. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents was also significantly associated with wound infection (risk ratio, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.34) and septic shock (risk ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.03-3.17). There was no association between the use of thiopurines or combined immunomodulator drugs and postoperative complications. Most studies were retrospectively designed, and there were large variations in the patient populations and outcome definitions. Patients with Crohn's disease on preoperative immunosuppressive agents are at higher risk for complications. Both corticosteroids and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents may

  5. Profile of pediatric Crohn's disease in Belgium.

    PubMed

    De Greef, E; Mahachie John, J M; Hoffman, I; Smets, F; Van Biervliet, S; Scaillon, M; Hauser, B; Paquot, I; Alliet, P; Arts, W; Dewit, O; Peeters, H; Baert, F; D'Haens, G; Rahier, J F; Etienne, I; Bauraind, O; Van Gossum, A; Vermeire, S; Fontaine, F; Muls, V; Louis, E; Van de Mierop, F; Coche, J C; Van Steen, K; Veereman, G

    2013-12-01

    A Belgian registry for pediatric Crohn's disease, BELCRO, was created. This first report aims at describing disease presentation and phenotype and determining associations between variables at diagnosis and registration in the database. Through a collaborative network, children with previously established Crohn's disease and newly diagnosed children and adolescents (under 18 y of age) were recruited over a 2 year period. Data were collected by 23 centers and entered in a database. Statistical association tests analyzed relationships between variables of interest at diagnosis. Two hundred fifty-five patients were included. Median age at diagnosis was 12.5 y (range: 1.6-18 y); median duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 3 m (range: 1-12 m). Neonatal history and previous medical history did not influence disease onset nor disease behavior. Fifty three % of these patients presented with a BMI z-score < -1. CRP was an independent predictor of disease severity. Steroids were widely used as initial treatment in moderate to severe and extensive disease. Over time, immunomodulators and biological were prescribed more frequently, reflecting a lower prescription rate for steroids and 5-ASA. A positive family history was the sole significant determinant for earlier use of immunosuppression. In Belgium, the median age of children presenting with Crohn's disease is 12.5 y. Faltering growth, extensive disease and upper GI involvement are frequent. CRP is an independent predictive factor of disease activity. A positive family history appears to be the main determinant for initial treatment choice. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Morbus Albers Schonberg osteopetrosis].

    PubMed

    Saracević, Ediba; Hasanbegović, Edo

    2005-01-01

    The patient presented has bone disease, so called "mramor disease". The disease is characterized by insuffiticnty of ostcoclasts which results n persisting of primary spongiosis without normal eroding and bone rebuilding. The discase is diagnosed by X rays where the bone density is increased. The medular space is completly closed by dense bone knitting which, with soft cortical space, seems like bone in bone. This is autosomal recessive disease with serious clinical picture in infants.

  7. Medical Therapy of Fibrostenotic Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction The present review serves to provide a concise overview of the current knowledge on therapeutic strategies with regard to fibrostenotic lesions in Crohn's disease. Methods A literature search was performed focusing on the last 5 years, and current concepts of pathophysiology, epidemiology, and treatment have been summarized. Results Fibrostenotic lesions in Crohn's disease are currently considered to be a consequence of the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. Hence, therapeutic strategies are limited to the concept that early treatment of the inflammatory lesions can prevent structural changes, and to various endoscopic and surgical approaches. Direct targeting of the fibrostenotic lesion itself has not been the focus until now. This review will provide an overview of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of fibrostenotic lesions including current therapeutic approaches. Since research with regard to other organ systems and fibrosis is far more advanced, current strategies from available studies in these areas will be discussed. The results and the potential impact for Crohn's disease will be considered. Conclusion The vision of these approaches is to reverse structural changes and restore normal function. PMID:26557834

  8. Medical Therapy of Fibrostenotic Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Britta

    2015-08-01

    The present review serves to provide a concise overview of the current knowledge on therapeutic strategies with regard to fibrostenotic lesions in Crohn's disease. A literature search was performed focusing on the last 5 years, and current concepts of pathophysiology, epidemiology, and treatment have been summarized. Fibrostenotic lesions in Crohn's disease are currently considered to be a consequence of the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. Hence, therapeutic strategies are limited to the concept that early treatment of the inflammatory lesions can prevent structural changes, and to various endoscopic and surgical approaches. Direct targeting of the fibrostenotic lesion itself has not been the focus until now. This review will provide an overview of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of fibrostenotic lesions including current therapeutic approaches. Since research with regard to other organ systems and fibrosis is far more advanced, current strategies from available studies in these areas will be discussed. The results and the potential impact for Crohn's disease will be considered. The vision of these approaches is to reverse structural changes and restore normal function.

  9. Cross-sectional imaging in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akira; Saotome, Takao; Yamasaki, Michio; Maeda, Kiyosumi; Nitta, Norihisa; Takahashi, Masashi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Murata, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    The role of cross-sectional imaging in the diagnosis of Crohn disease has expanded with recent technologic advances in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution images of the intestines. To acquire images of diagnostic quality, administration of a fairly large amount of intraluminal contrast agent prior to examination and scanning with intravenous contrast material injection are necessary. Both CT and MR imaging are reported to have a sensitivity of over 95% for the detection of Crohn disease; however, they may not allow early diagnosis. Colonoscopy and conventional enteroclysis studies are indicated for patients with early-stage disease. At more advanced stages, CT and MR imaging can help identify and characterize pathologically altered bowel segments as well as extraluminal lesions (eg, fistulas, abscesses, fibrofatty proliferation, increased vascularity of the vasa recta, mesenteric lymphadenopathy). These modalities can also clearly depict inflammatory lesion activity and conditions that require elective gastrointestinal surgery, thereby aiding in treatment planning. In the clinical setting, CT is currently the imaging modality of choice at most institutions; however, it is expected that MR imaging will soon play a comparable role. CT or MR imaging should be included in a comprehensive evaluation of patients with Crohn disease, along with conventional imaging and clinical and laboratory tests.

  10. MR enteroclysis imaging of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Prassopoulos, P; Papanikolaou, N; Grammatikakis, J; Rousomoustakaki, M; Maris, T; Gourtsoyiannis, N

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enteroclysis imaging is emerging as a technique for evaluation of the small bowel in patients with Crohn disease. Administration of 1.5-2 L of isosmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter ensures distention of the bowel and facilitates identification of wall abnormalities. True fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP), half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE), and postgadolinium T1-weighted three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequences can be employed in a comprehensive and integrated MR enteroclysis examination protocol to overcome specific disadvantages of each of the sequences involved. Superficial abnormalities that are ideally delineated with conventional enteroclysis are not consistently depicted with MR enteroclysis. The characteristic transmural abnormalities of Crohn disease such as bowel wall thickening, linear ulcers, and cobblestoning are accurately shown with MR enteroclysis imaging, especially with the true FISP sequence. MR enteroclysis is comparable to conventional enteroclysis in the detection of the number and extent of involved small bowel segments and in the disclosure of luminal narrowing or prestenotic intestinal dilatation. The clinical utility of MR enteroclysis in Crohn disease has not been fully established. At present, the method may be used for follow-up studies of known disease, estimation of disease activity, and determination of the extramucosal extent and spread of the disease process.

  11. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  12. Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules: a rare extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Warwick, G; Leecy, T; Silverstone, E; Rainer, S; Feller, R; Yates, D H

    2009-03-01

    The present article reports the case of a 22-yr-old female with new onset Crohn's colitis, anterior uveitis and multiple pulmonary nodules which, on histological examination, were necrobiotic nodules. This is a rare but recognised pulmonary extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease and only the fourth reported case. The present case report is followed by a brief review of the relevant literature.

  13. Distinct management issues with Crohn's disease of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fong, Steven C M; Irving, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Small bowel Crohn's disease can present with clinical challenges that are specific to its location. In this review, we address some of the areas that present particular problems in small bowel Crohn's disease. A key issue specific to small bowel Crohn's disease relates to its diagnosis given that access to the small bowel is limited. Radiological advances, particularly in small bowel ultrasonography and MRI, as well as the introduction of capsule endoscopy and balloon enteroscopy are helping to address this. In addition, our ability to differentiate small bowel Crohn's disease from other causes of inflammation, such as tuberculosis, is improving on the basis of better understanding of the features that differentiate these conditions. It is also becoming apparent that jejunal Crohn's disease represents a distinct disease phenotype with potentially worse clinical outcomes. Finally, because it is a rare complication, our understanding of small bowel cancer associated with Crohn's disease remains limited. Recent publications are, however, starting to improve our knowledge of this condition. Although small bowel Crohn's disease presents specific management issues not seen in patients with Crohn's disease elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract, our knowledge of how to manage these is improving.

  14. Perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease: MRI diagnosis and surgical planning: MRI in fistulazing perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Szurowska, Edyta; Wypych, Joanna; Izycka-Swieszewska, Ewa

    2007-11-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic, transmural inflammatory process of the gastrointestinal tract. It often affects the colon with the perianal area. The most common intestinal manifestations include external and/or internal fistulas and abscesses. Assessment of the activity of perianal fistulas in the course of Crohn's disease seems to be an important factor influencing therapeutic approach. Fistula's activity is evaluated by such methods as magnetic resonance imaging, anal ultrasound and examination under anaesthesia. Usefulness of imaging methods in the diagnosis of fistulas still remains to be defined.MRI is used to present a wide spectrum of perianal fistulazing Crohn's disease. Additionally, it is an important instrument revealing location, extent and severity of inflammation. It is also very helpful to detect clinically silent sepsis related to small, local inflammation. The most common method used in MR imaging to assess topography of a fistula's track, is Parks' classification.Clinical indications to MRI may include follow-up studies of a diagnosed disease, classification of fistulas' subtypes in the course of Crohn's disease, determination of the extent of fistulas' tracts and spread of an inflammatory process what can guide surgical procedures.

  15. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    McNees, Adrienne L; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R; Graham, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50-100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis.

  16. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Adrienne L.; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R.; Graham, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50 to 100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis. PMID:26474349

  17. Orofacial granulomatosis in children: think about Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, Marzia; Martelossi, Stefano; Cont, Gabriele; Bersanini, Chiara; Ventura, Giovanna; Fontana, Massimo; Zuin, Giovanna; Ventura, Alessandro; Taddio, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The term orofacial granulomatosis is conventionally used to describe patients with granulomatous lesions affecting the orofacial tissues, in absence of intestinal lesions. Lip swelling and facial swelling are the most common clinical signs. Despite the fact that histologically it is not distinguishable from Crohn's disease, and that both diseases have a chronic/recurrent course, the relationship between orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease is still debated. Herein we present five cases of orofacial granulomatosis. All patients presented concomitant Crohn's disease, supporting the hypothesis that orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease may be one single disease. Thalidomide was effective in inducing remission of oral and intestinal symptoms in all five cases and could be considered a valid treatment opportunity for these patients. Orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease may be part of the same disease; both may respond to thalidomide. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MED-SUV Data policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangianantoni, Agata; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    MED-SUV proposes the development and implementation of a digital infrastructure for data access and for volcanic risk management aimed at applying the rationale of Supersites GEO initiative to Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Mt. Etna. It's fully recognized the clear need of an open data policy in order to ensure that data will be properly and in an ethical manner managed and can be used and accessed from its community. In MED-SUV there is a multitude of different partners with varying scientific, technical, legal and economical interests and therefore data and data products produced will be wide-ranging so it's necessary to set principles and legal arrangements. Within Europe several Directives and Regulations have brought into force which provide the leading guidelines in terms of the principle of openness to knowledge and access to scientific information. So in creating a suite policy the EC Supersites (MarSite and FutureVolc, under the EPOS umbrella) projects need to strength their efforts in defining a common data management strategy. In this presentation we will show the leading principles of the data policy, as for instance Open Access, flexibility of approach in order to harmonize the different methods of data distribution among its partners, Creative Commons licensing, data preservation and unique identification through Persistent Identifiers.

  19. Crohn's Disease of the Ileoanal Pouch.

    PubMed

    Lightner, Amy L; Pemberton, John H; Loftus, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) of the pouch is an increasingly recognized diagnosis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This post-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis diagnosis in conjunction with pouchitis remains the leading reason for pouch excision. Unfortunately, CD of the pouch remains a difficult diagnosis with lack of a uniform definition largely because of its similarity to common postoperative pouch complications, including pouchitis, abscess formation, or stricture at the anastomosis. Once diagnosed, treatment algorithms largely include multimodal therapy including biologics. This review focuses on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for CD of the pouch, a postoperative de novo diagnosis of CD.

  20. Mini-Med School Planning Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Mini-Med Schools are public education programs now offered by more than 70 medical schools, universities, research institutions, and hospitals across the nation. There are even Mini-Med Schools in Ireland, Malta, and Canada! The program is typically a lecture series that meets once a week and provides "mini-med students" information on some of the…

  1. Concepts of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A

    2013-10-21

    Oxygen free radical and lipid peroxides (oxidative stress) are highly reactive and represent very damaging compounds. Oxidative stress could be a major contributing factor to the tissue injury and fibrosis that characterize Crohn's disease. An imbalance between increased reactive oxygen species levels and decreased antioxidant defenses occurs in Crohn's patients. Decreased blood levels of vitamins C and E and decreased intestinal mucosal levels of CuZn superoxide dismutase, glutathione, vitamin A, C, E, and β-carotene have been reported for Crohn's patients. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and -8 and tumor necrosis factor, have been detected in inflammatory bowel disease. Oxidative stress significantly increased the production of neutrophils, chemokines, and interleukin-8. These effects were inhibited by antioxidant vitamins and arachidonic acid metabolite inhibitors in human intestinal smooth muscle cells isolated from the bowels of Crohn's disease patients. The main pathological feature of Crohn's disease is an infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mononuclear cells into the affected part of the intestine. Activated neutrophils produce noxious substances that cause inflammation and tissue injury. Due to the physiological and biochemical actions of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides, many of the clinical and pathophysiological features of Crohn's disease might be explained by an imbalance of increased reactive oxygen species and a net decrease of antioxidant molecules. This review describes the general concepts of free radical, lipid peroxide and antioxidant activities and eventually illustrates their interferences in the development of Crohn's strictures.

  2. Surgical treatment of complex small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Michelassi, Fabrizio; Sultan, Samuel

    2014-08-01

    The clinical presentations of Crohn disease of the small bowel vary from low to high complexity. Understanding the complexity of Crohn disease of the small bowel is important for the surgeon and the gastroenterologist caring for the patient and may be relevant for clinical research as a way to compare outcomes. Here, we present a categorization of complex small bowel Crohn disease and review its surgical treatment as a potential initial step toward the establishment of a definition of complex disease. The complexity of small bowel Crohn disease can be sorted into several categories: technical challenges, namely, fistulae, abscesses, bowel or ureteral obstruction, hemorrhage, cancer and thickened mesentery; extensive disease; the presence of short gut; a history of prolonged use of medications, particularly steroids, immunomodulators, and biological agents; and a high risk of recurrence. Although the principles of modern surgical treatment of Crohn disease have evolved to bowel conservation such as strictureplasty techniques and limited resection margins, such practices by themselves are often not sufficient for the management of complex small bowel Crohn disease. This manuscript reviews each category of complex small bowel Crohn disease, with special emphasis on appropriate surgical strategy.

  3. [Crohn's disease in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Le Luyer, B; Morin, C L; Roy, C C; Weber, A; Chouraqui, J P; Bensoussan, A

    1985-10-01

    93 children and adolescents with Crohn's disease have been studied. Terminal ileum (25.8%) and ileum and colon (61.3%) were the most common sites of involvement as determined by X-ray examination. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 13.2 years. A familial incidence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease was found in 12 patients (12.9%). The most common symptoms were: abdominal pain, anorexia, lassitude, diarrhea, loss of weight. Weight below the third percentile, pain on abdominal palpation, anal lesions, mouth ulcers and clubbing of the fingers were the most common clinical signs at the time of diagnosis. Growth retardation (below the third percentile) was present in 22 of 79 children (27.8%) with a mean follow-up of 40 months. 16 patients out of 75 had initial rectal biopsies with histologic changes characteristic of Crohn's disease. 27 patients had surgical treatment; six of them experienced a relapse within a mean period of 26.7 months. Lastly, the authors show that continuous elemental enteral alimentation (CEEA) during 3 weeks induces a remission. CEEA on a longer period is specially targetted to the treatment of growth retardation.

  4. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma and Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Butnor, Kelly J; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Sporn, Thomas A; Roggli, Victor L

    2017-03-01

    Mesothelial reaction simulating peritoneal diffuse malignant mesothelioma (MM) has been reported in the setting of Crohn ileitis. To our knowledge, peritoneal MM arising in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to report the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with peritoneal MM and IBD. A database of approximately 3800 MM was reviewed for cases of MM in patients with IBD. Three patients (0.08%) with peritoneal MM and Crohn disease (CD) were identified, including two women and one man ranging in age from 56 to 65 years. All had a long-standing history of diarrhoea and an established diagnosis of CD of 3 years or greater duration. Two had epithelial MM and one had biphasic MM. Only one had documented asbestos exposure. Peritoneal MM occurs rarely in patients with IBD, but interestingly, has only been observed in the setting of CD and not in patients with ulcerative colitis. Chronic inflammation has been associated with the development of MM in rare instances and these three cases suggest that CD with transmural inflammation may also be a precursor. The precise role of CD-related transmural inflammation in the carcinogenesis of peritoneal MM remains to be determined. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Crohn disease in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Fidder, Herma H; Chowers, Yehuda; Lidar, Merav; Sternberg, Matan; Langevitz, Pnina; Livneh, Avi

    2002-11-01

    Crohn disease and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) are inflammatory diseases characterized by abdominal pain and fever. The concurrence of the 2 diseases (FMF-CD) may pose a challenge to diagnosis and treatment. We undertook the present study to determine the prevalence of Crohn disease in FMF and to characterize FMF-CD patients clinically and genetically. Using a computerized search, the patients of our FMF clinic were screened for a concomitant diagnosis of Crohn disease. Patients and their medical records were thoroughly examined, and their DNA was genotyped for mutations in the MEFV gene. Control groups of ethnically and sex-matched patients suffering from each of the diseases alone, either Crohn disease or FMF, were used for comparison. We identified 7 patients with concomitant Crohn disease and FMF, which is more than the expected prevalence in the general population (p = 0.03). Crohn disease presented at a significantly later age in the FMF-CD group (40.6 +/- 10.0 yr versus 26.2 +/- 11.4 yr; p < 0.004). Disease severity and other characteristics of Crohn disease were comparable to the Crohn disease control group. Contrary to the FMF control group patients, FMF in FMF-CD patients was characterized by a higher attack frequency (p < 0.05) and increased prevalence of amyloidosis (p < 0.02). The overall severity score was similar in both groups. In conclusion, Crohn disease appears to be more prevalent in FMF and presents later than in patients without FMF. FMF in this group of patients shows a higher attack frequency and is more often complicated by amyloidosis.

  6. A Practical Approach to Preventing Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Regueiro, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence remains common, and preventing additional surgery remains a challenge. A critical step to postoperative management of Crohn's disease is being able to identify patients who should receive immediate postoperative therapy from the patients who can wait for recurrence prior to starting medications. All patients, regardless of their risk for recurrence, are advised to undergo a colonoscopy at 6 to 12 months after surgery to evaluate for endoscopic evidence of Crohn's disease. Further management of patients depends on symptoms and the presence or absence of endoscopic recurrence.

  7. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature. PMID:27622191

  8. MR enterography of ileocolovesicular fistula in pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Sakala, Michelle D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Ladino-Torres, Maria F; McHugh, Jonathan B; Adler, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    Crohn disease, a form of chronic inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by discontinuous inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract, has a variety of behavioral patterns, including penetrating or fistulous disease. While magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) excellently depicts inflamed bowel segments, it can also be used to assess for a variety of Crohn-disease-related extraintestinal complications, including fistulae. We present the MRE findings of a complex ileocolovesicular fistula in a 14-year-old boy with Crohn disease, where the fistulous tract to the urinary bladder was best delineated on precontrast T1-W imaging because of the presence of fecal material.

  9. MR enterography in children with Crohn disease: results from the Belgian pediatric Crohn registry (Belcro).

    PubMed

    Alliet, P; Desimpelaere, J; Hauser, B; Janssens, E; Khamis, J; Lewin, M; De Greef, E; Smets, F; Paquot, I; Veereman, G; Souverijns, G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance enterography (MRE) is an imaging modality avoiding ionizing radiation and the discomfort associated with enteroclysis. The results of MRE at diagnosis in the patients of the Belgian pediatric Crohn registry (Belcro) are compared to endoscopical and histological results. Results of MRE, endoscopy and histology were obtained from the medical charts and assigned to one of the following segments: jejunum, ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon or rectosigmoid. MRE images were reviewed in a blinded way by 4 radiologists with specific interest in pediatric MRE. From the Belcro registry, twenty-two patients underwent a MRE during their work-up for Crohn disease. The results of endoscopy, histology and MRE were concordant (either all negative or positive) in the ileum in 16/18 patients and in the rectosigmoid, descending colon, transverse colon and ascending colon in resp 9, 8, 8 and 8/22 patients. In the non-concordant cases (MRE colon negative but endoscopy and/or histology positive), MRE could not reflect the subtle endoscopic or histologic lesions such as erosions that were described.In 4 cases where ileocaecal valve intubation was impossible ileal MRE findings were abnormal. MRE detected ileal stenosis, jejunal lesions and fistula in resp 4/22, 3/22 en 2/22 patients. The 100% and 75% interobserver agreement was resp 50-82% and 773-100% according to the different intestinal segments. MRE is a promising imaging modality avoiding radiation in Crohn disease. It should probably become the technique of first choice for the evaluation of extensive small bowel disease in children with Crohn disease.

  10. The MUN Med Gateway Project

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Brunger, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Access to a continuum of care from a family physician is an essential component of health and well-being; however, refugees have particular barriers in accessing medical care. Objective of program To provide access to family physicians and continuity of care for newly arrived refugees; to provide opportunities for medical students to practise cross-cultural health care; and to mentor medical students in advocacy for underserved populations. Program description The MUN Med Gateway Project, based at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St John’s, is a medical student initiative that partners with the local refugee settlement agency to provide health care for new refugees to the province. Medical students conduct in-depth medical histories, with provision of some basic physical screening, while working through an interpreter with supervision by a family doctor and settlement public health nurse. Each patient or family is matched with a family physician. Conclusion The project’s adaptation of student-run clinics, which connects refugees with the existing mainstream medical system, has been an overwhelming success, making it a model for community action as an educational strategy. PMID:25821872

  11. What is Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Crohn's disease, it can conserve portions of your GI tract and return you to the best possible ... of the digestive tract—also called the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The part most commonly affected is the ...

  12. [Adalimumab as induction therapy for Crohn's disease - one center study].

    PubMed

    Gonciarz, Maciej; Mularczyk, Aldona; Szkudłapski, Dawid; Piątek, Iwona; Kopała, Marek

    2016-11-25

    Adalimumab is a subcutaneously administered recombinant fully human monoclonal antibody targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha. It has been approved for use in Poland to treat patients with Crohn's disease under the program of Polish National Health Found since 2010.

  13. Dysbiotic gut microbiome: A key element of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Øyri, Styrk Furnes; Műzes, Györgyi; Sipos, Ferenc

    2015-12-01

    Since the first publication on "regional ileitis", the relevance of this chronic inflammatory disease condition termed finally as Crohn's disease is continuously increasing. Although we are beginning to comprehend certain aspects of its pathogenesis, many facets remain unexplored. Host's gut microbiota is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes including immune system development, and pathogen regulation. Further, the microbiome is thought to play a key role in Crohn's disease. The presence of Crohn's-associated variants of NOD2 and ATG16L genes appears to be associated not only with alterations of mucosal barrier functions, and bacterial killing, but the gut microbiota, as well, reflecting a potential relationship between the host's genotype and intestinal dysbiosis, involved in disease etiology. This review aims to characterize some exciting new aspect of Crohn's disease pathology, focusing mainly on the role of intestinal microbes, and their interplay with the immune system of the host.

  14. Crohn's disease: a review of treatment options and current research.

    PubMed

    Bandzar, Sean; Gupta, Shabnam; Platt, Manu O

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects nearly 1.4 million Americans. The etiology of Crohn's disease is not completely understood, however, research has suggested a genetic link. There is currently no known cure for Crohn's disease and, as a result, most government-funded research is being conducted to increase the quality of life of afflicted patients (i.e. reducing chronic inflammation and alleviating growth impairment in pediatric patients). A number of treatment options are available including an alpha-4 integrin inhibitor and several TNF-alpha inhibitors. Furthermore, research is being conducted on several alternative treatment options to help understand exactly which cellular mechanisms (i.e. inducing apoptosis in leukocytes) are required for clinical efficacy. This review seeks to chronicle the current available treatment options for patients affected by Crohn's disease to aid in understanding potential cellular mechanistic requirements for an efficacious drug, and shed light on potential options for future treatment.

  15. Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Enterography: Focused on Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Mi; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disease of the intestines characterized by frequent relapse and remission. It often develops in children and adolescents, who are vulnerable to repeated exposure to ionizing radiations. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is an increasingly important radiation-free imaging modality that is used to evaluate pediatric patients with Crohn's disease. MRE can evaluate extraluminal and extraintestinal abnormalities as well as the status of the bowel wall. In addition, MRE has an advantage in the evaluation of the small bowel involvement. MRE can be used for the initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease, and can aid in the assessment of disease activity and complications such as penetrating and fibrostenotic diseases. The aims of this article are to review the MRE technique for obtaining diagnostic and high-quality images and to discuss interpretations of imaging findings in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26473134

  16. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy in Patient with Crohn's Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  17. Clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, Pieter; Baert, Filip; Hart, Ailsa; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Panès, Julian; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    It goes back to 1932 when Dr. Burrill Bernard Crohn and co-workers published their landmark paper, describing regional ileitis as a disease entity. However, clinical trial research has been developing rather slowly in luminal Crohn's disease. It took until the early seventies before the first randomized clinical trial was set up by the National Co-operative Crohn's Disease Study (NCCDS) group. Although the efforts of this group triggered a first wave of clinical trials in Crohn's disease, the lack of guidelines for conducting a clinical trial in this research area resulted in a variety of study designs and much criticism. Besides having a rather small sample size and a short follow-up time, they were often characterized by vague and subjective assessment of disease activity and treatment response. Following the advent of a new and very potent drug class in the late nineties, the anti-TNF agents, investigators started to re-think their study protocols and the first guidelines were set up by the regulatory authorities. Over the last 15years, clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease have been evolving significantly. Inclusion criteria have been shifting from clinical scores such as Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) to more objective disease activity parameters such as biomarkers (C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin) and endoscopic lesions. Primary endpoints have been developing from clinical response to corticosteroid-free remission and more ambitious end-points such as mucosal healing. In this paper, we will give a historical overview on clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease, before and within the biologic era, and provide insight into how they have shaped our current understanding of trial designs in Crohn's disease.

  18. Crohn's disease unmasked following etanercept treatment for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, H; Mann, S

    2013-06-21

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis being treated with etanercept who presented with a 1 month history of abdominal pain. CT abdomen revealed an ileocaecal mass associated with an abscess, resulting in a laparotomy and right hemi-colectomy. Histology of the resected specimen showed the classical features of Crohn's disease. Etanercept was stopped and he was started on adalimumab. He is currently in clinical remission from both ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease.

  19. Pathogenesis: common pathways between hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    García Martínez, F J; Menchén, L

    2016-09-01

    Both hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease are considered chronic inflammatory diseases due to immune dysregulation. The high prevalence of Crohn disease patients diagnosed with hidradenitis suppurativa suggests the existence of common pathogenic links. The present literature review analyses the similarities and differences in the pathogenesis of the two diseases, in the search for new research and knowledge targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Hussain, Hero K

    2014-02-01

    MR enterography has an established role in evaluating patients with Crohn disease providing essential complementary information to clinical assessment, and as an indispensible adjunct to clinical tools such as colonoscopy. MR enterography examinations can establish the diagnosis of Crohn disease, evaluate disease activity and complications, and assess treatment response, thus providing support for clinical decision-making. Currently, MR imaging findings are highly predictive of tissue inflammation and can be used clinically to guide clinical care.

  1. Targeting Specific Immunologic Pathways in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Guilherme Piovezani; Faubion, William A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the immunologic pathways in intestinal inflammation is crucial for the development of new therapies that can maximize patient response and minimize toxicity. Targeting integrins and cytokines is intended to control leukocyte migration to effector sites or inhibit the action of proinflammatory cytokines. New approaches to preventing leukocyte migration may target integrin receptors expressed on the intestinal vascular endothelium. The interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23 pathway has been a therapeutic target of interest in controlling active Crohn's disease (CD). New therapeutic approaches in CD may involve the enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokine pathways and modulation of cellular responses and intranuclear signals associated with intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  3. Crohn disease and the gynecologic patient.

    PubMed

    Sides, Cleve; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Heitlinger, Leo; Anasti, James

    2013-01-01

    Although Crohn disease (CD) is considered an inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations are varied, frequent, and oftentimes difficult to manage. Its predilection for young and reproductive-age women makes it an important disease process for the gynecologist to understand, as its complications can have long-term repercussions on the developmental, sexual, reproductive, and psychological health of affected women. Patients may present with a variety of vulvovaginal, perineal, perianal, and urologic complaints. Perianal involvement from an intestinal fistula is the most common skin manifestation seen in CD. Other gynecologic manifestations include metastatic CD and rectovaginal and urovaginal fistulas. Recognition and accurate diagnosis of extraintestinal gynecologic manifestations, as well as a good understanding of the gynecologic effects of chronic disease, are necessary for optimal management. The article provides an overview of CD and highlights the gynecologic considerations in caring for women affected by this disease.

  4. Dietary and enteral interventions for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takayuki; Shimoyama, Takahiro; Kuriyama, Moeko

    2017-04-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that the intestinal bacterial flora together with genetic predisposing factors significantly contribute to the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as reflected by mucosal immune dysregulation. Recently, there has been an increased interest in nutraceutical therapies, including probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics. Other dietary interventions with low carbohydrate diet, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and glutamine have been attempted to downregulate the gut inflammatory response and thereby alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms. Enteral nutrition has been widely used as induction and maintenance therapies in the management of Crohn's disease (CD). In this review, a critical assessment of the results of clinical trial outcomes and meta-analyses was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of dietary and enteral interventions for CD.

  5. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  6. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  7. Nutritional therapy in pediatric Crohn disease: the specific carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Suskind, David L; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Gregory, Nila; Vendettuoli, Heather; Christie, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Crohn disease is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation in the absence of a recognized etiology. Nutritional therapy in the form of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) has an established role within pediatric Crohn disease. Following exclusive enteral nutrition's success, many dietary therapies focusing on the elimination of specific complex carbohydrates have been anecdotally reported to be successful. Many of these therapies have not been evaluated scientifically; therefore, we reviewed the medical records of our patients with Crohn disease on the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD). Seven children with Crohn disease receiving the SCD and no immunosuppressive medications were retrospectively evaluated. Duration of the dietary therapy ranged from 5 to 30 months, with an average of 14.6±10.8 months. Although the exact time of symptom resolution could not be determined through chart review, all symptoms were notably resolved at a routine clinic visit 3 months after initiating the diet. Each patient's laboratory indices, including serum albumin, C-reactive protein, hematocrit, and stool calprotectin, either normalized or significantly, improved during follow-up clinic visits. This chart review suggests that the SCD and other low complex carbohydrate diets may be possible therapeutic options for pediatric Crohn disease. Further prospective studies are required to fully assess the safety and efficacy of the SCD, or any other low complex SCDs in pediatric patients with Crohn disease.

  8. Hidradenitis suppurativa and perianal Crohn disease: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bassas-Vila, J; González Lama, Y

    2016-09-01

    The first description of perianal fistulas and complications in Crohn disease was made 75 years ago by Penner and Crohn. Published studies have subsequently confirmed that perianal fistulas are the most common manifestations of fistulising Crohn disease. Hidradenitis suppurativa was described in 1854 by a French surgeon, Aristide Verneuil. It is a chronic, inflammatory, recurrent and debilitating disease of the pilosebaceous follicle, that usually manifests after puberty with deep, painful and inflamed lesions in the areas of the body with apocrine glands, usually the axillary, inguinal and anogenital regions. The differential diagnosis between hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease can be challenging, especially when the disease is primarily perianal. When they occur simultaneously, hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease show severe phenotypes and patients can respond to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy, although adalimumab is currently the only treatment with demonstrated efficacy in hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn disease. In addition, there is sometimes a need for different complementary surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparative study of metronidazole and sulfasalazine for active Crohn's disease: the cooperative Crohn's disease study in Sweden. II. Result.

    PubMed

    Ursing, B; Alm, T; Bárány, F; Bergelin, I; Ganrot-Norlin, K; Hoevels, J; Huitfeldt, B; Järnerot, G; Krause, U; Krook, A; Lindström, B; Nordle, O; Rosén, A

    1982-09-01

    Seventy-eight patients with active Crohn's disease participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. The study comprised two 4-mo period. The purpose was to test the efficacy of metronidazole in comparison with that of sulfasalazine. As the main evaluation criteria the Crohn's Disease Activity Index and plasma levels of orosomucoid were chosen. In the first period no difference in efficacy as measured by Crohn's Disease Activity Index was found between the treatment groups. The reduction of the plasma orosomucoid level was significantly more pronounced in the metronidazole group. The hemoglobin concentration increased more in this group than in the sulfasalazine group, possibly due to a toxic effect of sulfasalazine. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate decreased similarly with both drugs. In 15 patients who had active disease throughout the first period, Crohn's Disease Activity Index decreased significantly in the second period for those who switched to metronidazole, but not for those who switched to sulfasalazine. After crossover, no apparent further change in Crohn's Disease Activity Index occurred in either of the treatment groups among patients who had responded favorably in the first period. The plasma concentration of orosomucoid increased significantly among the patients in the sulfasalazine group but not in the metronidazole group. It is therefore concluded that metronidazole is slightly more effective than sulfasalazine in the treatment of crohn's disease. It is worthwhile switching the drug regimen from sulfasalazine, when it fails, to metronidazole, but not from metronidazole to sulfasalazine.

  10. Increased pulmonary and intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Adenis, A; Colombel, J F; Lecouffe, P; Wallaert, B; Hecquet, B; Marchandise, X; Cortot, A

    1992-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increased epithelial permeability may affect sites other than the intestine in patients with Crohn's disease by simultaneously evaluating their pulmonary and intestinal permeability. Pulmonary and intestinal permeability were measured by clearance of inhaled technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetate (99mTc-DTPA) and by urinary recovery of chromium-51 ethylene diamine tetracetate respectively in 22 patients with Crohn's disease. The half time clearance of 99mTc-DTPA from lung to blood (t1/2LB) was decreased--that is pulmonary permeability increased--in the whole group of patients with Crohn's disease as compared with 13 controls (median 45.5 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.003)). When analysed separately only patients with active Crohn's disease (n = 15) had a decreased t1/2 lung to blood v controls (42 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.0025)). Among patients with active Crohn's disease, six were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their t1/2 lung to blood did not differ significantly. The intestinal permeability was increased in the whole group of Crohn's disease patients as compared with 15 controls (5.25% (1.2-24) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75) (p less than 0.0002)). When analysed separately both patients with active and inactive Crohn's disease had increased intestinal permeability v controls (8.1% (1.6-24) and 3.5% (1.2.9.2) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75)) (p less than 0.0001, p = 0.05 respectively). Six patients with active Crohn's disease were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their intestinal permeability decreased significantly p less than 0.04). Pulmonary permeability was increased in patients with Crohn's disease but was not greatly influenced by Crohn's disease activity as opposed to intestinal permeability. The mechanism of this increase is unknown, but may be related in some patients to the presence of an alveolitis. PMID:1612487

  11. Redefining the MED13L syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adegbola, Abidemi; Musante, Luciana; Callewaert, Bert; Maciel, Patricia; Hu, Hao; Isidor, Bertrand; Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Le Caignec, Cedric; Delle Chiaie, Barbara; Vanakker, Olivier; Menten, Björn; Dheedene, Annelies; Bockaert, Nele; Roelens, Filip; Decaestecker, Karin; Silva, João; Soares, Gabriela; Lopes, Fátima; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Cox, Gerald F; Angus, Steven P; Staropoli, John F; Fischer, Ute; Suckow, Vanessa; Bartsch, Oliver; Chess, Andrew; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Kaindl, Angela M; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cardiac and neurodevelopmental deficits have been recently linked to the mediator complex subunit 13-like protein MED13L, a subunit of the CDK8-associated mediator complex that functions in transcriptional regulation through DNA-binding transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. Heterozygous MED13L variants cause transposition of the great arteries and intellectual disability (ID). Here, we report eight patients with predominantly novel MED13L variants who lack such complex congenital heart malformations. Rather, they depict a syndromic form of ID characterized by facial dysmorphism, ID, speech impairment, motor developmental delay with muscular hypotonia and behavioral difficulties. We thereby define a novel syndrome and significantly broaden the clinical spectrum associated with MED13L variants. A prominent feature of the MED13L neurocognitive presentation is profound language impairment, often in combination with articulatory deficits. PMID:25758992

  12. European evidence based consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: special situations

    PubMed Central

    Caprilli, R; Gassull, M A; Escher, J C; Moser, G; Munkholm, P; Forbes, A; Hommes, D W; Lochs, H; Angelucci, E; Cocco, A; Vucelic, B; Hildebrand, H; Kolacek, S; Riis, L; Lukas, M; de Franchis, R; Hamilton, M; Jantschek, G; Michetti, P; O'Morain, C; Anwar, M M; Freitas, J L; Mouzas, I A; Baert, F; Mitchell, R; Hawkey, C J

    2006-01-01

    This third section of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) Consensus on the management of Crohn's disease concerns postoperative recurrence, fistulating disease, paediatrics, pregnancy, psychosomatics, extraintestinal manifestations, and alternative therapy. The first section on definitions and diagnosis reports on the aims and methods of the consensus, as well as sections on diagnosis, pathology, and classification of Crohn's disease. The second section on current management addresses treatment of active disease, maintenance of medically induced remission, and surgery of Crohn's disease. PMID:16481630

  13. An unusual cutaneous manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jessica A; Markowitz, David M; Husain, Sameera; Grossman, Marc E

    2011-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with a 12-year history of quiescent Crohn's disease on mesalamine presented to his gastroenterologist in April 2009, complaining of abdominal cramping, diarrhea, and a 25-lb weight loss over 6 weeks. He did not respond to prednisone 50 mg and 6-mercaptopurine 100 mg daily. Abdominal computed tomography findings revealed diffuse submucosal edema consistent with extensive colitis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diffuse inflammation with erythema, friability, and shallow ulcerations in the rectum and colon. Biopsies were consistent with Crohn's colitis. He was admitted for infliximab infusion for his unremitting diarrhea. Five days before admission, the patient noted mild swelling and redness of the left lower eyelid, which progressed to involve the right lower eyelid with frank pus draining from both eyes. He had no visual impairment or eye pain. Two days before admission, an ophthalmologist prescribed a steroid eyedrop with no relief. He also complained of seropurulent painful skin lesions on his face and scalp, which spread to involve his upper trunk and proximal arms. On admission to the hospital, dermatology, ophthalmology, and infectious disease consultations were obtained to rule out disseminated infection before initiation of infliximab therapy. The patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. His oral mucosa was normal. He had prominent bilateral lower eyelid edema, erythema, and superficial erosions with hemorrhagic crusting and frank green purulent drainage from both eyes, with crusting along the lower lash line and bilateral sclera injection (Figure 1). On his scalp, face, trunk, and proximal extremities, he had 25 to 30 erythematous, 4- to 8-mm papulopustules with narrow red halos, some with central necrosis and crusting (Figure 2). Cultures from the purulent ocular drainage and pustules on the trunk and arms were all negative for bacteria, virus, and fungi. Gram stain from the eye drainage showed polymorphonuclear leukocytes without

  14. A simple method for assessing intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tibble, J; Teahon, K; Thjodleifsson, B; Roseth, A; Sigthorsson, G; Bridger, S; Foster, R; Sherwood, R; Fagerhol, M; Bjarnason, I

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Assessing the presence and degree of intestinal inflammation objectively, simply, and reliably is a significant problem in gastroenterology. We assessed faecal excretion of calprotectin, a stable neutrophil specific marker, as an index of intestinal inflammation and its potential use as a screening test to discriminate between patients with Crohn's disease and those with irritable bowel syndrome.
METHODS—The validity of faecal calprotectin as a marker of intestinal inflammation was assessed in 22 patients with Crohn's disease (35 studies) by comparing faecal excretions and concentrations using four day faecal excretion of 111indium white cells. A cross sectional study assessed the sensitivity of faecal calprotectin concentration for the detection of established Crohn's disease (n=116). A prospective study assessed the value of faecal calprotectin in discriminating between patients with Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome in 220 patients referred to a gastroenterology clinic.
RESULTS—Four day faecal excretion of 111indium (median 8.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7-17%; normal <1.0%) correlated significantly (p<0.0001) with daily (median ranged from 39 to 47 mg; normal <3 mg; r=0.76-0.82) and four day faecal calprotectin excretion (median 101 mg; 95% CI 45-168 mg; normal <11 mg; r=0.80) and single stool calprotectin concentrations (median 118 mg/l; 95% CI 36-175 mg/l; normal <10 mg/l; r=0.70) in patients with Crohn's disease. The cross sectional study showed a sensitivity of 96% for calprotectin in discriminating between normal subjects (2 mg/l; 95% CI 2-3 mg/l) and those with Crohn's disease (91 mg/l; 95% CI 59-105 mg/l). With a cut off point of 30 mg/l faecal calprotectin has 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity in discriminating between active Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome.
CONCLUSION—The calprotectin method may be a useful adjuvant for discriminating between patients with Crohn's disease and

  15. Colonic Crohn's disease and use of oral contraception.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, J M; Cockel, R; Allan, R N; Hawker, P C; Dawson, J; Elias, E

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of use of oral contraception before the onset of disease was established in 100 consecutive women attending follow up clinics for inflammatory bowel disease. A significant excess of women with Crohn's disease confined to the colon had taken oral contraceptives in the year before developing symptoms (10/16 (63%] compared with women with small-intestinal Crohn's disease (12/49 (24%); p less than 0.02) and women with ulcerative colitis (3/35 (9%); p less than 0.0005). When the patient groups were matched for age and year of onset of disease usage of oral contraception before the onset of disease was still more common among women with isolated colonic Crohn's disease (9/12, 75%) than among those with ulcerative colitis (2/12 (17%); p less than 0.02) and was also more common than would be expected from reported figures for oral contraception in England and Wales (31.4% of women aged under 41; p less than 0.005). A survey of current patient records showed that isolated colonic disease was at least twice as common among women with Crohn's disease (63/218, 29%) compared with men (25/181, 14%; p less than 0.001). These data support the suggestion made previously that oral contraceptives may predispose to a colitis that resembles colonic Crohn's disease. PMID:6421392

  16. Optimal vitamin D levels in Crohn's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Tara; O'Sullivan, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with Crohn's disease. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is the best measure of an individual's vitamin D status and current cut-off ranges for sufficiency are debatable. Several factors contribute to vitamin D deficiency in Crohn's disease. These include inadequate exposure to sunlight, inadequate dietary intake, impaired conversion of vitamin D to its active metabolite, increased catabolism, increased excretion and genetic variants in vitamin D hydroxylation and transport. The effects of low 25(OH)D on outcomes other than bone health are understudied in Crohn's disease. The aim of the present review is to discuss the potential roles of vitamin D and the possible levels required to achieve them. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D may have roles in innate and adaptive immunity, in the immune-pathogenesis of Crohn's disease, prevention of Crohn's disease-related hospitalisations and surgery, in reducing disease severity and in colon cancer prevention. The present literature appears to suggest that 25(OH)D concentrations of ≥75 nmol/l may be required for non-skeletal effects; however, further research on optimal levels is required.

  17. Development of CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease causes inflammation or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract. The number of patients of Crohn's disease is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of Crohn's disease include intestinal stenosis, longitudinal ulcers, and fistulae. Optical endoscope cannot pass through intestinal stenosis in some cases. We propose a new CAD system using abdominal fecal tagging CT images for efficient diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The system displays virtual unfolded (VU), virtual endoscopic, curved planar reconstruction, multi planar reconstruction, and outside views of both small and large intestines. To generate the VU views, we employ a small and large intestines extraction method followed by a simple electronic cleansing method. The intestine extraction is based on the region growing process, which uses a characteristic that tagged fluid neighbor air in the intestine. The electronic cleansing enables observation of intestinal wall under tagged fluid. We change the height of the VU views according to the perimeter of the intestine. In addition, we developed a method to enhance the longitudinal ulcer on views of the system. We enhance concave parts on the intestinal wall, which are caused by the longitudinal ulcer, based on local intensity structure analysis. We examined the small and the large intestines of eleven CT images by the proposed system. The VU views enabled efficient observation of the intestinal wall. The height change of the VU views helps finding intestinal stenosis on the VU views. The concave region enhancement made longitudinal ulcers clear on the views.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids as adjunctive therapy in Crohns disease.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Angie

    2006-01-01

    Crohns disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that can have a significant impact on the health of those afflicted. The etiology of the disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, dietary, and immunological factors are thought to be involved. Multiple nutrients can become depleted during active disease due to inadequate intake or malabsorption. Preventing these deficiencies is paramount in the care of those suffering from Crohns disease. Often the traditional treatments (medications) have limited effectiveness and negative side effects that inhibit their use. Enteral nutrition has promising therapeutic benefits, but its use is often limited to the pediatric population due to poor patient acceptability. Omega-3 fatty acids have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory properties as an alternative to traditional care. This article reviews the etiology of Crohns disease, nutritional deficiencies, traditional treatments, and the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of Crohns recurrence. The results from clinical trials have been conflicting, but a new fish oil preparation that limits the side effects of traditional fish oil therapy shows promise as an adjunctive treatment for Crohns disease. Continued research is needed to validate these findings.

  19. Littoral Cell Angioma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Bergthor; Ignatova, Simone; Sandström, Per; Ekstedt, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Littoral cell angioma is a rare vascular tumor of the spleen. The pathogenesis is unknown but the lesion is associated with several malignancies and immunological disorders. The diagnosis requires histopathological examination. The malignant potential of this lesion is unknown, which is why splenectomy is recommend for all cases. Symptomatic cases generally suffer from hypersplenism and pyrexia. A previously healthy 20-year-old female was diagnosed with colonic Crohn's disease; as part of the work-up a magnetic resonance enterography was performed which showed multiple signal changes of the spleen. The patient reported chronic abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, malaise, and fever. The unknown splenic lesions prompted a laparoscopic splenectomy; pathology revealed a littoral cell angioma. The abdominal pain and malaise remitted but the fever persisted one year despite adequate treatment of the patient's Crohn's disease. Littoral cell angioma is associated with immune-dysregulation including Crohn's disease with several reported cases. Signs and symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic lesions on imaging should raise suspicion of littoral cell angioma in patients with Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance enterography to assess disease severity in Crohn's disease may provide an opportunity to study the prevalence and natural history of this rare splenic tumor. PMID:25705528

  20. Early and delayed indium 111 leukocyte imaging in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Navab, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Diner, W.C.; Subramani, R.; Chan, C.

    1987-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with Crohn's disease were studied for the presence and location of activity by both early (4 h) and delayed (18-24 h) indium 111 leukocyte imaging. The results were compared with other parameters of disease activity including Crohn's disease activity index, barium studies, and endoscopy. There was a correlation between early images and Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.78) and between delayed images and index (r = 0.82). Based upon the corresponding Crohn's disease activity index, the sensitivity of early and delayed imaging was 81.0% and 95.2%, respectively. Specificity of early and delayed imaging was 75.0% and 87.0%, respectively. Presence of activity on the early and delayed imaging agreed with activity on barium studies and colonoscopy in approximately 80% of cases. Correlation of location of disease by leukocyte imaging and x-ray was observed in 58.9% of early scans and 55.0% of delayed scans. Correlation of the location of disease by imaging and endoscopy was observed in 71.4% of early and 75.0% of delayed studies. Because of the possibility of occurrence of false-negative results in early images, delayed imaging should always be included in evaluation of disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease who are suspected of having mild activity. Delayed imaging is not required if the early imaging study clearly shows activity.

  1. Occupational risk for Crohn's disease: A two-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Xiuwen; Feng, Min; Song, Peng; Ren, Jianan; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-11-01

    Occupational factors have been suggested as possible elements in the etiology of Crohn's disease, although evidences have not been fully obtained. This study is to investigate possible associations between occupation and development of Crohn's disease. This prospective study was carried out in two major hospitals during January 2010 and December 2014. Demographic and clinical data were collected for the calculation of standard incidence ratios and 95% confidence intervals by occupation. A total of 401 patients with Crohn's disease were recruited into this study. Participants were distributed into 8 major occupational groups, among which "professionists" (17.7%), "service and sales" (18.7%) and "unclassified individuals" (mainly students) (20.2%) took up the most proportions. Increased standard incidence ratios were found in "service and sales" (2.526±0.135, 95% CI: 1.939-3.290), "professionists" (4.216±0.142, 95% CI: 3.194-5.565), and most significantly, in "administrative staffs" (5.476±0.170, 95% CI: 3.926-7.639). In contrast, decreased standard incidence ratios for Crohn's disease were observed in the category of "workers in agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, fishery and water conservancy" (0.088±0.146, 95% CIs: 0.066-0.117). Occupational elements are implicated in the likelihood of development of Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Vivian N; Schwartz, David A

    2015-06-01

    Perianal fistula is a complication of Crohn's disease that carries a high morbidity. It is a channel that develops between the lower rectum, anal canal and perianal or perineal skin. The development of perianal fistulas typically connotes a more aggressive disease phenotype and may warrant escalation of treatment to prevent poor outcomes over time. Based on fistula anatomy, debris can form inside these tracts and cause occlusion, which subsequently leads to abscess formation, fever and malaise. The clinical presentation is often with complaints of pain, continuous rectal drainage of fecal matter as well as malodorous discharge. Considering that the presence of fistulas often indicates refractory and aggressive disease, early identification of its presence is important. Some patients may not have the classic symptoms of fistulizing disease at presentation and others may have significant scarring and/or pain from previous fistulizing episodes, which can make an accurate assessment on physical exam alone problematic. As a result, utilizing diagnostic imaging is the best means of identifying the early signs of perianal fistulas or abscess formation in these patients. Several imaging modalities exist which can be used for diagnosis and management. Endoscopic ultrasound and pelvic MRI are considered the most useful in establishing the diagnosis. However, a combination of multiple imaging modalities and/or examination under anesthesia is probably the most ideal. Incomplete characterization of the fistula tract(s) extent or the presence of abscess carries a high morbidity and far-reaching personal expense for the patient - promoting worsening of the disease.

  3. [Surgical treatment for perianal Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Futami, Kitaro; Higashi, Daijiro; Hirano, Yukiko; Ikeda, Yuichi; Mikami, Koji; Hirano, Kimikazu; Miyake, Toru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Maekawa, Takafumi

    2015-03-01

    Perianal lesions are a frequent complication of Crohn's disease (CD) and include fistula, abscess, anal ulcer, skin tag, anal stricture, and carcinoma. Perianal fistula is the most commonly observed condition and exhibits multiple incidence and intractable characteristics. The starting point for the management of perianal fistula is an accurate diagnosis, which requires careful exploration during an EUA. The condition is treated with medications such as antibiotics, immunosuppressants, or anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. However, it is difficult to maintain long-term remission. Surgical therapy is selected according to the type of fistula and can include conventional fistulotomy, seton drainage, diverting stoma, and anorectal amputation. After fistulotomy, recurrence is frequent and there is an increased risk of incontinence. Seton drainage is the preferred treatment to improve symptoms and preserve anal function. Stoma is useful to relieve symptoms but difficult to indicate for young patients. The optimum treatment for perianal fistula associated with CD remains controversial. Currently, the goal of therapy for these patients has shifted from complete fistula closure to reducing drainage from the fistula to improve their quality of life. Ongoing careful management is important to control anal symptoms and maintain long-term anal function in the treatment of patients with CD, while monitoring them to detect possible progression to anorectal carcinoma.

  4. MRI for Crohn's Disease: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with relapsing-remitting behavior, often causing strictures or penetrating bowel damage. Its lifelong clinical course necessitates frequent assessment of disease activity and complications. Computed tomography (CT) enterography has been used as primary imaging modality; however, the concern for radiation hazard limits its use especially in younger population. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has advantages of avoiding radiation exposure, lower incidence of adverse events, ability to obtain dynamic information, and good soft-tissue resolution. MR enterography (MRE) with oral contrast agent has been used as primary MR imaging modality of CD with high sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement. The extent of inflammation as well as transmural ulcers and fibrostenotic diseases can be detected with MRE. Novel MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), motility study, PET-MRI, and molecular imaging are currently investigated for further improvement of diagnosis and management of CD. MR spectroscopy is a remarkable molecular imaging tool to analyze metabolic profile of CD with human samples such as plasma, urine, or feces, as well as colonic mucosa itself. PMID:26413543

  5. Crohn's disease and month of birth.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, Marc; Joossens, Marie; Joossens, Sofie; Van Steen, Kristel; Pierik, Marieke; Vermeire, Severine; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2005-06-01

    Environmental factors trigger the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in genetically predisposed individuals. Exposure to seasonal external factors during the maturation of the immune system is suspected to be an inducing factor for IBD. Some studies suggested an association between the month of birth and the later development of IBD. We studied this putative relationship in a large cohort of Belgian patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Data from 1025 patients born between 1935 and 1990 were collected. Diagnosis of CD was based on generally accepted clinical, endoscopic, and histologic criteria. As a control group, a cohort of 5125 non-IBD patients seen at the same hospital and matched for birth year and sex was used. Odds ratios were calculated using multivariate unconditional logistic regression including the matching variables and allowing for cyclic variation in risk with month of birth. A cyclic pattern described by a 4-month periodic function was observed with peaks in April and August. Moreover, being born in June significantly reduced the risk of developing CD later in life (P = 0.012). In this Belgian cohort, a significant association was found between the month of birth and later development of IBD; a significant reduced risk to develop CD was observed for people born in June. Moreover, environmental yearly reoccurring factors during pregnancy or postpartum might be associated with the occurrence of CD later in life.

  6. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers.

  7. Optimizing post-operative Crohn's disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Domènech, Eugeni; Mañosa, Míriam; Lobatón, Triana; Cabré, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of biological drugs and the widespread and earlier use of immunosuppressants, intestinal resection remains necessary in almost half of the patients with Crohn's disease. The development of new mucosal lesions in previously unaffected intestinal segments (a phenomenon known as post-operative recurrence, POR) occur within the first year in up to 80% if no preventive measure is started soon after resectional surgery, leading to clinical manifestations (clinical recurrence) and even needing new intestinal resection (surgical recurrence) in some patients. That is the reason why endoscopic monitoring has been recommended within 6 to 12 months after surgery. Active smoking is the only indisputable risk factor for early POR development. Among several evaluated drugs, only thiopurine and anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy seem to be effective and feasible in the long-term both for preventing or even treating recurrent lesions, at least in a proportion of patients. However, to date, it is not clear which patients should start with one or another drug right after surgery. It is also not well established how and how often POR should be assessed in patients with a normal ileocolonoscopy within the first 12 months.

  8. Natalizumab in the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Caprilli, Renzo

    2008-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) is multifactorial and the activation of specific pathways of immunological system is important. In particular, the adhesion molecules (integrins) mediate the selective binding between the leukocytes and the endothelial cells regulating the migration of leukocytes into the normal and inflamed intestine. Selective adhesion molecule inhibitors interfere with the migration of leukocytes to the sites of inflammation by targeting adhesion molecules (alpha4-integrin or alpha4beta7-integrin). Natalizumab is a humanized IgG4 anti-alpha4-integrin monoclonal antibody that inhibits both alpha4beta7-integrin/mucosal addressin-cell adhesion molecule-1 (MadCAM-1) interaction and alpha4beta1/vascular-cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) binding. Pooled data from the four studies, analyzed in a Cochrane review, suggest that natalizumab is effective for induction of clinical response and remission in patients with moderately to severely active CD. In particular, natalizumab may be beneficial for patients with active inflammation or chronically active disease despite the use of conventional therapies with high level of C-reactive protein values at baseline time. Nevertheless, many problems about the utilization of natalizumab in CD remain unsolved (such as the high placebo response, the final definition of dosage and timing schedule, the definition of outcomes and the development of adverse events).

  9. Management of postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    van Lent, Anja U; D'Haens, Geert R

    2013-01-01

    The course of Crohn's disease (CD) is unpredictable and potentially destructive. The percentage of patients requiring surgery at some stage in their disease accumulates to over 70%. After resection of the affected intestine, reappearance of CD occurs in the majority of patients. Prophylactic medical therapy to reduce the rate of postoperative recurrence has been proven to be effective, yet the incidence of recurrence remains high. Patient profiling (risk stratification) is important in this postoperative setting. High-risk patients (associated with e.g. smoking, the need of repetitive surgery and penetrating disease) require strong immunosuppressive treatment, which should be commenced immediately after surgery, when recurrent disease activity begins. Additionally, early screening endoscopy should be performed to monitor treatment effect. The efficacy of thiopurines is shown to be higher than mesalazine or imidazole antibiotics alone for preventing and ameliorating endoscopic recurrence of CD postoperatively; however, anti-tumor necrosis factors (anti-TNFs) are increasingly considered the most potent agents. In patients with a risk factor for early postoperative recurrence, the first line of treatment is 6-mercaptopurine, in combination with imidazole antibiotics if tolerated, followed by anti-TNFs. When lesions are found at colonoscopy, therapy should be upscaled. We propose a treatment algorithm to direct therapeutic management of CD postoperatively. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Cancer risks in Crohn disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Li, X; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2009-03-01

    Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) are known to be at an increased risk of bowel cancers and lymphoma. CD is an autoimmune disease and we hypothesize that the patients are predisposed to a wider spectrum of cancers. A CD research database was constructed by identifying hospitalized CD patients from the Hospital Discharge Register and cancer patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Follow-up of 21 788 CD patients first hospitalized during the years 1964-2004 identified 1424 cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated by comparing cancers in CD patients with subjects without CD. In addition to the known sites, many additional sites were in excess in CD patients. These included liver, pancreatic, lung, prostate, testicular, kidney and skin (squamous cell) cancers; nonthyroid endocrine tumors and leukemia. The previously established sites showed the highest SIRs; however, SIRs >2.0 were noted for the novel sites of the liver, testis and kidney. For testicular cancer, the SIR of seminoma was 2.74. Cancer risks were influences by age at first hospitalization for CD but whether the age effects were increasing or decreasing depending on the cancer type. This large study identified many novel subsequent cancers in CD patients.

  11. New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165942.html New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene Two trials ... 25, 2017 THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New gene-based therapies appear to significantly decrease cholesterol ...

  12. [CanMEDS 2015: better doctors?].

    PubMed

    Borleffs, J C C; Mourits, M J E; Scheele, F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the CanMEDS model, which forms the basis for competency-based learning in both undergraduate and postgraduate training, has been renewed by the introduction of CanMEDS 2015. The most prominent change is the emphasis on leadership skills, which is also reflected by the name change for the role of 'manager' to 'leader'. The addition of milestones provides clearly defined targets for learning and assessment, which facilitates the monitoring of the progression in competence. Furthermore, CanMEDS 2015 strongly focusses on the overall coherence of the separate competencies. CanMEDS, designed as a model that helps to train young doctors to become good doctors, also helps us - the trainers - to become better doctors ourselves.

  13. MEDLI Will Aid in Understanding of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The MEDLI instrument package, contained in the heat shield of the Mars Science Laboratory, will help scientists and engineers improve their computer models and simulations, and provide data to help...

  14. Crohn's disease presenting as a ceco-urachal fistula.

    PubMed

    Tsukui, Hidenori; Koinuma, Koji; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kagaya, Yuka; Takahashi, Haruo; Yano, Tomonori; Matsubara, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Hironori; Sata, Naohiro

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a patient with Crohn's disease who initially presented with a ceco-urachal fistula. The patient was a 31-year-old female who underwent an appendectomy 6 years before presenting to our institution. She had a one-year history of diarrhea, and had recently developed polyuria and a sensation of residual urine. She was admitted with fever and lower abdominal pain. Endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a ceco-urachal fistula, which was consistent with Crohn's disease. An urachal resection was performed, which included partial cystectomy and ileocecal resection. A ceco-urachal fistula is a rare initial symptom of Crohn's disease. During the surgical management of such cases, it is necessary to resect the urachus, the affected portion of the bladder, the fistula, and the affected part of the digestive tract in order to avoid recurrence.

  15. Surgery and diagnostic imaging in abdominal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Botti, Fiorenzo; Caprioli, Flavio; Pettinari, Diego; Carrara, Alberto; Magarotto, Andrea; Contessini Avesani, Ettore

    2015-03-01

    Surgery is well-established option for the treatment of Crohn's disease that is refractory to medical therapy and for complications of the disease, including strictures, fistulas, abscesses, bleeding that cannot be controlled endoscopically, and neoplastic degeneration. For a condition like Crohn's disease, where medical management is the rule, other indications for surgery are considered controversial, because the therapeutic effects of surgery are limited to the resolution of complications and the rate of recurrence is high, especially at sites of the surgical anastomosis. In the authors' opinion, however, surgery should not be considered a last-resort treatment: in a variety of situations, it should be regarded as an appropriate solution for managing this disease. Based on a review of the literature and their own experience, the authors examine some of the possibilities for surgical interventions in Crohn's disease and the roles played in these cases by diagnostic imaging modalities.

  16. MR enterography findings in abdominopelvic extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Silvio; Blandino, Alfredo; Scribano, Emanuele; Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Fries, Walter; Bombaci, Francesco; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2013-05-01

    MR of the small bowel is a useful technique for the evaluation of both intraluminal and extraluminal pathologic involvement of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease is associated with a range of extraintestinal complications that sometimes may be the initial presenting symptoms. Some of these extraintestinal complications may not correlate with disease activity, but in general, they tend to follow the clinical course of disease and may have a high impact on life quality, morbidity, and even mortality in these patients. Our purpose is to describe some abdominopelvic extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease, such as hepatopancreatobiliary, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, peritoneal, and lymph-nodal, detectable at MR enterography. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Granulomatous bronchiolitis with necrobiotic pulmonary nodules in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh J; Davis, Jennifer E; Prest, Marcia E; Lawson, Edward J

    2004-11-01

    A 37-year-old man with extensive Crohn's disease of the stomach, small and large intestine for almost a decade developed respiratory symptoms and radiological findings suggestive of pneumonia that failed to resolve with antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography scanning of his lungs showed extensive changes with cavitated parenchymal nodules. Histological evaluation of an open lung biopsy showed granulomatous bronchiolitis and pulmonary necrobiosis. Treatment with steroids and immunosuppression resulted in complete resolution of his clinical symptoms of pneumonia and abnormal computed tomography imaging changes. Granulomatous bronchiolitis and necrobiotic nodules may be a manifestation of Crohn's disease in the absence of microbial agents, including mycobacteria or fungal agents. While a multiplicity of complex pulmonary changes may occur in Crohn's disease, their clinical recognition and precise pathological definition may be particularly important if treatment with a biological agent, such as infliximab, is being considered.

  18. Etiology of Crohn's disease: many roads lead to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lapaquette, Pierre; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Paul; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2012-09-01

    Crohn's disease is a complex multifactor diseases that occur in individuals with genetic predisposition in whom environmental and microbial triggers cause a deleterious chronic immune response. Susceptibility to Crohn's disease is influenced by common variants at many loci. Genetic studies have emphasized the role of host susceptibility in inflammatory bowel disease onset with the identification of about 100 risk loci, most of which encode proteins involved in immunity, host defense against microbes, and gut homeostasis. In this review, we focus on susceptibility genes related to autophagy in the etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) and their complex interplay with the gut microbiota, as illustrated by the relationship between immunity-related GTPase family M alleles, microRNA, and xenophagy in CD predisposition.

  19. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Crohn's Rectovaginal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    García-Olmo, D.; Herreros, D.; De-La-Quintana, P.; Guadalajara, H.; Trébol, J.; Georgiev-Hristov, T.; García-Arranz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic options for recto-vaginal fistula in the setting of Crohn's disease are limited and many data are available in the literature. The manuscript describes the history of a patient who has been the pioneer of our Clinical Trials in treating this disease in fistulizing Crohn's disease environment. We believe it is the first time that a patient with this disease has been treated by adipose-derived stem cells in allogeneic form. The conclusion of our study with Mary is that the use of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue is secure, either in autologous or allogeneic form. Furthermore, we have proved that if we use multi-dose and multiple applications on a patient, it does not produce any adverse effect, which confirms us the safety of using these cells in patients at least in the fistulizing Crohn's disease environment. PMID:20224798

  20. MR enterographic manifestations of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M; Greenhalgh, Rebecca; Zealley, Ian A; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is a clinically useful technique for the evaluation of both intraluminal and extraluminal small bowel disease, particularly in younger patients with Crohn disease. MR enterography offers the advantages of multiplanar capability and lack of ionizing radiation. It allows evaluation of bowel wall contrast enhancement, wall thickening, and edema, findings useful for the assessment of Crohn disease activity. MR enterography can also depict other pathologic findings such as lymphadenopathy, fistula and sinus formation, abscesses, and abnormal fold patterns. Even subtle disease manifestations may be detected when adequate distention of the small bowel is achieved, although endoscopic and double-contrast barium small bowel techniques remain superior in the depiction of changes in early Crohn disease (eg, aphthoid ulceration). Further research will be needed to determine whether MR imaging enhancement patterns may reliably help discriminate between active and inactive disease.

  1. Economic implications of biological therapy for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Paradowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    In the early 90s American authors estimated that if a theoretical new drug was introduced that was capable of changing the natural course of the disease and reducing direct non-drug medical costs (including hospitalisation and surgery) by 20%, despite doubling the overall drugs bill, there would still be a reduction in total direct medical costs of Crohn's disease by 13%. Infliximab proved to be efficacious in reducing and maintaining remission in moderate to severe active Crohn's disease and/or fistulising Crohn's disease. A higher acquisition cost still remains its major limitation. Currently only the use of infliximab in case of treatment for flares seems to be cost-effective. However, this statement may be modified in the near future. PMID:26759625

  2. Angioedema associated with Crohn's disease: response to biologics.

    PubMed

    Habal, Flavio; Huang, Vivian

    2012-09-14

    A 46-year-old female patient with terminal ileum Crohn's disease and ankylosing spondylitis presented with recurrent angioedema and urticaria. Investigations ruled out hereditary angioedema, and environmental or food allergen triggers. She was diagnosed with chronic idiopathic urticaria with angioedema, and was treated with a trial of intravenous immunoglobulin immunotherapy, danazol, prednisone and hydroxyzine. Due to ongoing bowel and arthritic complaints, she was started on infliximab infusions and within 2 treatments, she had complete resolution of the angioedema and urticaria, as well as of the bowel and arthritic symptoms. Unfortunately she developed allergic reactions to the infliximab and was switched to another anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agent, adalimumab. Since then, she has had no further angioedema or urticaria, and her Crohn's disease has been quiescent. This is the first known case report of chronic idiopathic urticaria with angioedema coexistent with Crohn's disease that was successfully treated with anti-TNF-α agents.

  3. Inflammation profile of four early onset Crohn patients.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Girardelli, Martina; Bianco, Anna Monica; Martelossi, Stefano; Magnolato, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-02-10

    Crohn disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder affecting mainly young adults. Sometimes, however, it can present in the first year of life (Early onset Crohn disease (EOCD)) showing an unpredictable course and can often be more severe than at older ages. Some cases have been associated to an underlying primary immunodeficiency such as IL10R deficiency. We studied the functional response to IL-10 and the genotype of IL-10 receptor in four patients with early onset crohn-like colitis. We found an IL10R variant, which may be associated with a decreased response to the cytokine in one patient. Further studies to determine its pathogenic effect should be performed. In addition IL-10 mediated inhibition of LPS-induced TNFα expression was measured in patient's monocytes.

  4. Long-term outcome after surgery for Crohn's anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Graf, W; Andersson, M; Åkerlund, J-E; Börjesson, L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Crohn's anal fistula remains challenging and little is known about factors associated with healing. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of healing after surgical treatment and analyse clinical variables related to healing. A total of 119 patients [63 women, mean age 36 (±13.7) years] with histopathologically verified Crohn's disease underwent a surgical procedure for anal fistula at four main referral centres in Sweden, January 1998 to December 2009. Baseline and treatment-related variables were recorded and analysed for correlation with fistula healing at a final follow-up after a mean of 7.2 (median 7.1, 1.0-17.5) years. Of the 119 patients 62 (52%) were healed at final follow-up. Fourteen healed after one procedure and the remaining 48 healed after a further median of 4.0 (2-20) procedures. Ten (8%) patients were subjected to a proctectomy. Final healing was more common in patients operated with a procedure aiming at eradicating the fistula (P = 0.0001), without proctitis (P = 0.02) and a shorter duration of Crohn's disease (P = 0.0019). Long-term healing of a Crohn's anal fistula can be expected in about half of the patients, usually after repeated surgical treatment. The probability for cure was higher when a curative operation was performed in a patient without proctitis and with a shorter duration of Crohn's disease. An attempt to close a Crohn's anal fistula is thus often worthwhile. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Role of HLA typing on Crohn's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is the main type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Evidence from family and twin studies suggests that genetics plays a significant role in predisposing an individual to develop Crohn's disease. A susceptibility locus for Crohn's disease has been mapped 3 to chromosome 16: a frameshift variant and two missense variants of NOD2, encoding a member of the Apaf-1/Ced-4 superfamily of apoptosis regulators which is expressed in hematopoietic compartment cells and intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells, where NOD2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease in the gastrointestinal system. This leads to alteration the structure of either the leucine-rich repeat domain of the protein or the adjacent region. NOD2 activates nuclear factor NF-kB; this activating function is regulated by the carboxy-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, which has two functions, first an inhibitory role and also acts as an intracellular receptor for components of microbial pathogens. Thus, NOD2 gene product confers susceptibility to Crohn's disease by altering the recognition of these components and/or by over-activating NF-kB in intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells. Further confirmation of a genetic predisposition comes from studies of the association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and CD. The immunogenetic predisposition may be considered an important requirement for the development of CD, as several alleles of human major histocompatibility complex had an association with CD. Although it is difficult to estimate the importance of this region in determining overall genetic susceptibility in a population, studies of HLA allele sharing within families suggest that this region contributes between 10% and 33% of the total genetic risk of Crohn's disease. PMID:26288728

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of perianal Crohn disease in children.

    PubMed

    Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha; Gee, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Perianal penetrating complications of Crohn disease are among the most important causes of symptoms in the pediatric population. High-quality diagnostic imaging of the perianal region is crucial for treatment planning and therapeutic response assessment. MRI, with its absence of ionizing radiation and high soft-tissue resolution, provides an excellent noninvasive tool for evaluation of perianal fistulae and associated abscesses, as well as their anatomical relationship to the anal sphincter complex. In this review we discuss the role of MRI in initial diagnosis and follow-up of perianal fistulizing Crohn disease in the pediatric population.

  7. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  8. A case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia occurring in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Carratú, Pierluigi; Dragonieri, Silvano; Nocerino, Maria Cristina; Trabucco, Senia Maria Rosaria; Lacedonia, Donato; Parisi, Giuseppe; Resta, Onofrio

    2005-01-01

    A 29 year-old-man with Crohn's disease, who developed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia two months following oral administration of mesalazine, was examined. Clinical findings and computed tomography were suggestive of, and lung histology was diagnostic of, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, also known as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Although the data did not allow for definitive conclusions, they did suggest that the pulmonary disease was an extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, rather than an adverse reaction to mesalazine. In fact, the patient showed clinical, radiological and functional improvements, despite the treatment with mesalazine and the withdrawal of steroid therapy.

  9. Ramiprilate inhibits functional matrix metalloproteinase activity in Crohn's disease fistulas.

    PubMed

    Efsen, Eva; Saermark, Torben; Hansen, Alastair; Bruun, Eywin; Brynskov, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -3 and -9 has been demonstrated in Crohn's disease fistulas, but it is unknown whether these enzymes are biologically active and represent a therapeutic target. Therefore, we investigated the proteolytic activity of MMPs in fistula tissue and examined the effect of inhibitors, including clinically available drugs that beside their main action also suppress MMPs. Fistula specimens were obtained by surgical excision from 22 patients with Crohn's disease and from 10 patients with fistulas resulting from other causes. Colonic endoscopic biopsies from six controls were also included. Total functional MMP activity was measured by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based, fluorogenic MMP-substrate cleavage assay, and the specific activity of MMP-2, -3 and -9 by the MMP Biotrak Activity Assay. The MMP inhibitors comprised ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the synthetic broad-spectrum inhibitor, GM6001, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramiprilate, and the tetracycline, doxycycline. In Crohn's disease fistulas, about 50% of the total protease activity was attributable to MMP activity. The average total MMP activity was significantly higher (about 3.5-times) in Crohn's fistulas (471 FU/μg protein, range 49-2661) compared with non-Crohn's fistulas [134 FU/μg protein, range 0-495, (p < 0.05)] and normal colon [153 FU/μg protein, range 77-243, (p < 0.01)]. MMP-3 activity was increased in Crohn's fistulas (1.4 ng/ml, range 0-9.83) compared with non-Crohn's fistulas, [0.32 ng/ml, range 0-2.66, (p < 0.02)]. The same applied to MMP-9 activity [0.64 ng/ml, range 0-5.66 and 0.17 ng/ml, range 0-1.1, respectively (p < 0.04)]. Ramiprilate significantly decreased the average total MMP activity level by 42% and suppressed the specific MMP-3 activity by 72%, which is comparable to the effect of GM6001 (87%). Moreover, MMP-9 activity was completely blunted by ramiprilate. Doxycycline had no

  10. New magnetic resonance imaging modalities for Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Oto, Aytekin

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has an increasing role in the evaluation of the small bowel in patients with Crohn disease. MR enterography is accurate for disease assessment and can influence the choice of therapy. Functional sequences may increase the role of MR enterography in Crohn disease. Techniques such as high-resolution MR enterography, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, magnetization transfer, and MR motility imaging may allow better assessment of disease extent, activity, and severity. Quantitative analysis using these advanced techniques as well as the standard techniques may provide methods for evaluating and following the disease in the future.

  11. [Crohn's disease associated with Berger's disease. A rare complication].

    PubMed

    López Barbarín, J M; Lafuente Martínez, P; García Campos, F; Ibarra Peña, B; Díaz de Otazu, R

    1990-10-01

    We report the case of a male patient with Crohn's disease associated with IgA nephropathy. He was treated surgically for the intestinal disorder and then with corticoids and sulfasalazine. Six years after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. As the intestinal situation improved there was concomitant normalization of urinary sediment, maintaining renal function. The fact that the digestive mucosa is one of the body's major sources of secretory IgA may account for the existence of a common for Crohn's disease and certain forms of IgA nephropathy.

  12. [A case of complex Crohn's disease with severe complication].

    PubMed

    Tian, Li; Tang, Anliu; Liu, Fen; Guo, Qin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Shourong

    2016-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a nonspecific chronic intestinal inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. The course of CD is persistent and recurrent. In the progress, CD can come with many complications such as obstruction, fistula formation, perforation, and hemorrhage. The early diagnosis, treatment, and the time of the surgery for CD pose a big controversy and challenge. There was a female patient diagnosed as Crohn's disease with severe complication in department of Gastroenterology of the Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University.  We reported the diagnosis and treatment on this patient. The choice for the medicine and surgury was discussed.

  13. PubMedAlertMe--standalone Windows-based PubMed SDI software application.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi

    2008-05-01

    PubMedAlertMe is a Windows-based software system for automatically receiving e-mail alert messages about recent publications listed on PubMed. The e-mail messages contain links to newly available abstracts listed on PubMed describing publications that were selectively returned from a specified list of queries. Links are also provided to directly export citations to EndNote, and links are provided to directly forward articles to colleagues. The program is standalone. Thus, it does not require a remote mail server or user registration. PubMedAlertMe is free software, and can be downloaded from: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/PubMedAlertMe/PubMedAlertMe_setup.zip.

  14. PubMedAlertMe - Standalone Windows-based PubMed SDI Software Application

    PubMed Central

    Ma’ayan, Avi

    2008-01-01

    PubMedAlertMe is a Windows-based software system for automatically receiving e-mail alert messages about recent publications listed on PubMed. The e-mail messages contain links to newly available abstracts listed on PubMed describing publications that were selectively returned from a specified list of queries. Links are also provided to directly export citations to EndNote, and links are provided to directly forward articles to colleagues. The program is standalone. Thus, it does not require a remote mail server or user registration. PubMedAlertMe is free software, and can be downloaded from: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/PubMedAlertMe/PubMedAlertMe_setup.zip PMID:18402930

  15. The MED-SUV Multidisciplinary Interoperability Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; D'Auria, Luca; Reitano, Danilo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Roncella, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In accordance with the international Supersite initiative concept, the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to enable long-term monitoring experiment in two relevant geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: Mt. Vesuvio/Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. This objective requires the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases and novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters. Moreover, MED-SUV is also a direct contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as one the volcano Supersites recognized by the Group on Earth Observation (GEO). To achieve its goal, MED-SUV set up an advanced e-infrastructure allowing the discovery of and access to heterogeneous data for multidisciplinary applications, and the integration with external systems like GEOSS. The MED-SUV overall infrastructure is conceived as a three layer architecture with the lower layer (Data level) including the identified relevant data sources, the mid-tier (Supersite level) including components for mediation and harmonization , and the upper tier (Global level) composed of the systems that MED-SUV must serve, such as GEOSS and possibly other global/community systems. The Data level is mostly composed of existing data sources, such as space agencies satellite data archives, the UNAVCO system, the INGV-Rome data service. They share data according to different specifications for metadata, data and service interfaces, and cannot be changed. Thus, the only relevant MED-SUV activity at this level was the creation of a MED-SUV local repository based on Web Accessible Folder (WAF) technology, deployed in the INGV site in Catania, and hosting in-situ data and products collected and generated during the project. The Supersite level is at the core of the MED-SUV architecture, since it must mediate between the disparate data sources in the layer below, and provide a harmonized view to

  16. Narcotic use and misuse in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin A; Yu, Huimin; Conaway, Mark; Tuskey, Anne G; Behm, Brian W

    2014-12-01

    The rate of narcotic misuse in the inflammatory bowel disease population is not well studied. The primary aim of this study was to determine in Crohn's disease (CD) whether a concurrent functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) was associated with increased rates of chronic narcotic use. Second, we aimed to identify potential risk factors for narcotic misuse. A retrospective chart review of patients with CD followed at the University of Virginia's Gastroenterology Clinic from 2006 to 2011 was performed. The prescription monitoring program was accessed to confirm narcotic prescription filling histories. Narcotic misuse was defined as narcotic prescriptions filled from 4 or more prescribers and at 4 or more different pharmacies. Nine hundred thirty-one patients with CD were included in the study cohort. Eighty-seven (9.3%) patients were identified as having a concurrent FGID, and 192 (20%) were taking chronic narcotics. Patients with FGID were more likely to be taking chronic narcotics (44% versus 18%, P < 0.001). Thirty-seven percent (32/87) of patients with an FGID were misusing narcotics, compared with 9.6% (81/844) (P < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a significant association of misuse in patients with a concurrent FGID (odds ratio = 3.33, 95% confidence interval, 1.87-5.93). Twenty percent of patients with CD were using chronic narcotics with higher rates in those with FGID. Using the prescription monitoring program, a significant proportion of patients with CD with an FGID were misusing narcotics. We would recommend screening for narcotic misuse in patients with CD with a concomitant FGID and consider using prescription monitoring programs to identify others at risk for misuse.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of fistulising Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Ljungmann, Ken; Qvist, Niels; Staun, Michael; Tøttrup, Anders

    2011-10-01

    A fistula is defined as a pathological connection between the intestine and an inner (bladder or other intestine) or outer (vagina or skin) epithelial surface. Fistulas are discovered in up to 25% of all Crohn's disease patients during long-term follow-up examinations. Most are perianal fistulas, and these may be classified as simple or complex. The initial investigation of perianal fistulas includes imaging (MRI of the pelvis and rectum), examination under anaesthesia (EUA) with digital imaging, endoscopy, probing and anal ultrasound. Non-perianal fistulas require contrast imaging and/or CT/MRI for complete anatomical definition. Any abscess should be drained, and the disease extent throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract should be evaluated. Treatment goals for perianal fistulas include reduced fistula secretion or none, evaluated by clinical examination; the absence of abscesses; and patient satisfaction. MR imaging is required to demonstrate definitive fistula closure. Fistulotomy is considered for simple perianal fistulas. In complex perianal fistulas, antibiotics and azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine, which are often combined with a loose seton, constitute the first-line medical therapy. In cases with persistent secretion, infliximab at 5 mg/kg is given at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and subsequently every 8 weeks. Adalimumab may improve fistula response in both infliximab-naïve patients and following infliximab treatment failure. Local therapy with fibrin glue or fistula plugs is rarely effective. Definitive surgical closure of perianal fistulas using an advancement flap may be attempted, but this procedure is associated with a high risk of relapse. Colostomy and proctectomy are the ultimate surgical treatment options for fistulas. Intestinal resection is almost always needed for the closure of symptomatic non-perianal fistulas.

  18. Budesonide use in pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Otley, Anthony; LeLeiko, Neal; Langton, Christine; Lerer, Trudy; Mack, David; Evans, Jonathan; Pfefferkorn, Marian; Carvalho, Ryan; Rosh, Joel; Griffiths, Anne; Oliva-Hemker, Maria; Kay, Marsha; Bousvaros, Athos; Stephens, Michael; Samson, Charles; Grossman, Andrew; Keljo, David; Markowitz, James; Hyams, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    Budesonide (BUD) is being used in pediatric Crohn disease (CD) because it is believed to have the potential to reduce corticosteroid-related toxicity; however, few data are available describing its use. The aim of the present study was to describe BUD use in an inception cohort of pediatric patients with CD. Data were derived from the prospective Pediatric IBD Collaborative Research Group Registry established in 2002 in North America. Use of BUD in children with CD was examined. BUD was used in 119 of 932 (13%) of children with newly diagnosed CD, with 56 of 119 (47%) starting BUD ≤ 30 days of diagnosis (26/56 with ileum and/or ascending colon [IAC] disease). BUD was used as monotherapy (9%), in combination with 5-aminosalicylates (77%), or in combination with immunomodulators (43%). Forty-three percent (24/56) went on to receive conventional corticosteroid at some point following their first BUD course. For the 63 of 119 (53%) who started BUD beyond the diagnosis period, 51 of 63 (81%) also received prednisone, with BUD used as a means of weaning from prednisone in 17 of 63 (27%). Patients with IAC disease who received BUD ≤ 30 days of diagnosis were just as likely to have received conventional corticosteroids by 1 year as were those who did not receive BUD ≤ 30 days of diagnosis. Two-thirds (77/119) of patients received BUD for ≤ 6 months. BUD is being used among pediatric patients newly diagnosed as having CD, although the majority does not have disease limited to the IAC. BUD monotherapy was rare, and further data are required to better define the role of BUD in the treatment of pediatric CD.

  19. Bovine lactoferrin and Crohn's disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David B; Iigo, Masaaki; Abdelgied, Mohamed; Ozeki, Keiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Joh, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    A 22-year-old male suffering from abdominal pain, repeated diarrhea, and weight loss visited the Digestive Disease Department of Nagoya City University Hospital on 19 December 2011. He was hospitalized and diagnosed with Crohn's colitis. His Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) was 415. Treatment by granulocyte apheresis, mesalazine, and adalimumab was started. His CDAI was 314 on 30 December and 215 on 5 January. A colonoscopic examination on 19 January showed almost complete remission in the transverse colon and marked remission in the rectum. Mesalazine therapy was stopped on 28 February, and the patient was instructed to self-inject 40 mg of adalimumab every other week. His CDAI was 50 on 10 April, indicating clinical remission. His last self-injection of adalimumab was on 24 April 2012, and he started taking 1 g of bovine lactoferrin (bLF) daily. His CDAI was 35 on 8 January 2013. He continued taking 1 g of bLF daily without any other treatment for Crohn's disease. Laboratory blood tests on 7 September 2015 showed no sign of disease recurrence, and a colonoscopic examination on 23 October 2015 showed almost complete mucosal healing. This case indicates that ingestion of bLF to maintain Crohn's disease in a remissive state should be further explored.

  20. Crohn's-associated chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis responsive to infliximab.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ellen; Jackson, Mary Anne; Friesen, Craig A; Scarbrough, Marc; Roberts, Charles C

    2004-04-01

    We report a case of chronic recurrent clavicular osteomyelitis in association with Crohn disease. Steroid therapy resulted in partial remission; however, intractable shoulder pain and an enlarging clavicular mass subsequently recurred. Infliximab therapy resulted in significant improvement in the degree of bone pain and resolution of the large sclerotic clavicular lesion.

  1. On exploration of medical database of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manerowska, Anna; Dadalski, Maciej; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The primary objective of this article is to find a new, more effective method of diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Having created the database on this disease we wanted to find the most suitable classification models. We used the algorithms with their implementations stored in R environment. Having carried out the investigations we have reached results interesting for clinical practice.

  2. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  3. Medical radar considerations for detecting and monitoring Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.; Messaris, Evangelos

    2014-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a condition that causes inflammation and associated complications along any section of the digestive tract. Over the years, numerous radiological and endoscopic methods as well as the use of ultrasound have been developed to examine and diagnose inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease. While such techniques have much merit, an alternative medical solution that is safe, non-invasive, and inexpensive is proposed in this paper. Reflections from electromagnetic signals transmitted by an ultra-wide band (UWB) radar allow for not only range (or extent) information but also spectral analysis of a given target of interest. Moreover, the radar cross-section (RCS) of an object measures how detectable the electromagnetic return energy of such an object is to the radar. In the preliminary phase of research, we investigate how disparities in the dielectric properties of diseased versus non-diseased portions of the intestines can aid in the detection of Crohn's disease. RCS analysis from finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method simulations using a simple 3D model of the intestines are presented. The ultimate goal of our research is to design a UWB radar system using a suitable waveform to detect and monitor Crohn's disease.

  4. Perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Panés, Julián; Rimola, Jordi

    2017-08-09

    Perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease has a major negative effect on patient quality of life and is a predictor of poor long-term outcomes. Factors involved in the pathogenesis of perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease include an increased production of transforming growth factor β, TNF and IL-13 in the inflammatory infiltrate that induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases, leading to tissue remodelling and fistula formation. Care of patients with perianal Crohn's disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. A complete assessment of fistula characteristics is the basis for optimal management and must include the clinical evaluation of fistula openings, endoscopic assessment of the presence of proctitis, and MRI to determine the anatomy of fistula tracts and presence of abscesses. Local injection of mesenchymal stem cells can induce remission in patients not responding to medical therapies, or to avoid the exposure to systemic immunosuppression in patients naive to biologics in the absence of active luminal disease. Surgery is still required in a high proportion of patients and should not be delayed when criteria for drug failure is met. In this Review, we provide an up-to-date overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of fistulizing Crohn's disease, as well as therapeutic strategies.

  5. Extensive spinal epidural abscess as a complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chez; Kavar, Bhadrakant

    2010-01-01

    A spinal epidural abscess is a neurosurgical emergency. Successful treatment frequently requires decompression of the spinal canal in combination with intravenous antibiotics. We report a patient with Crohn's disease who developed an extensive spinal epidural abscess communicating with an intra-abdominal collection.

  6. Psoas abscess complicating Crohn's disease: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, M; Masaki, T; Watanabe, T; Hatano, K; Matsuda, K; Yahagi, N; Ichinose, M; Seichi, A; Muto, T

    2000-01-01

    We describe herein the case of a psoas abscess complicating Crohn's disease, and present a review of the literature on this unusual disease entity. A 22-year-old Japanese man with a 5-year history of Crohn's ileocolitis presented with right lower abdominal and hip pain, and a diagnosis of right psoas abscess was subsequently made by abdominal computed tomography (CT). Following the administration of antibiotics and CT-guided percutaneous drainage of the abscess, the patient's symptoms temporarily improved; however, 2 weeks later, the abscess cavity was found to have extended around the periarticular tissue of the right hip joint. To prevent the development of septic arthritis of the hip joint, surgical drainage of the abscess cavity and ileocecal resection were immediately performed, after which the patient's condition greatly improved. The resected specimen showed Crohn's ileocolitis with an external fistula in the terminal ileum which was considered to have caused the psoas abscess. Since psoas abscess in Crohn's disease can result in serious complications such as septic arthritis of the hip joint if left untreated, aggressive treatment should be initiated without delay.

  7. Adrenal hemorrhage complicating ACTH therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, T L; Morton, E

    1993-01-01

    Huge dose ACTH therapy is used in some severely ill patients with inflammatory bowel disease. We report a teenage girl with Crohn's disease who developed an acute abdomen following ACTH therapy. CT revealed the mass to be a hemorrhagic adrenal gland; the opposite adrenal gland was hypertrophied but without signs of hemorrhage.

  8. [Obstructive uropathy as initial manifestation of Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Hernández Jaras, J; García-Samaniego Rey, J; Paraiso Cuevas, V; Castaños-Mollor Penalva, R; Pajares García, J M; Traver Aguilar, J A

    1990-10-01

    A patient with renal colicky pain caused by urinary tract obstruction, as a result of psoas abscess, is presented. It was the first manifestation of Crohn's disease. A Gram negative bacteria was isolated from the abscess. The CT images performed to evaluate the abscess suggested this etiology, even though there were no previous symptoms.

  9. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  10. Laparoscopic Ileocolic Resection for Crohn's Disease Associated With Midgut Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Tema, Giorgia; Porokhnavets, Kristina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sica, Giuseppe S.

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is an anomaly of fetal intestinal rotation. Its incidence in adults is rare. A case of midgut malrotation in a 51-year-old man with complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum is presented. Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are reviewed. Preoperative workup led to correct surgical planning that ultimately allowed a successful laparoscopic resection. PMID:25419109

  11. Transperineal ultrasonography in perianal Crohn disease: A valuable imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Wright, Emily K; Novak, Kerri L; Lu, Cathy; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2015-01-01

    Aims of treatment for Crohn disease have moved beyond the resolution of clinical symptoms to objective end points including endoscopic and radiological normality. Regular re-evaluation of disease status to safely, readily and reliably detect the presence of inflammation and complications is paramount. Improvements in sonographic technology over recent years have facilitated a growing enthusiasm among radiologists and gastroenterologists in the use of ultrasound for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. Transabdominal intestinal ultrasound is accurate, affordable and safe for the assessment of luminal inflammation and complications in Crohn disease, and can be performed with or without the use of intravenous contrast enhancement. Perianal fistulizing disease is a common, complex and often treatment-refractory complication of Crohn disease, which requires regular radiological monitoring. Endoanal ultrasound is invasive, uncomfortable and yields limited assessment of the perineal region. Although magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis is established, timely access may be a problem. Transperineal ultrasound has been described in small studies, and is an accurate, painless and cost-effective method for documenting perianal fluid collections, fistulas and sinus tracts. In the present article, the authors review the literature regarding perineal ultrasound for the assessment of perianal Crohn disease and use case examples to illustrate its clinical utility.

  12. Indications of capsule endoscopy in Crohn´s disease.

    PubMed

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Sanchis-Artero, Laura; Suárez-Callol, Patricia; Medina-Chuliá, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy currently plays a relevant role for Crohn´s disease. This manuscript will discuss the current indications and practical uses of capsule endoscopy in this disease. It is a non-invasive technique that represents a significant advance in the endoscopic diagnosis of small bowel conditions. These circumstances, together with its diagnostic yield and excellent tolerability, make it considerably acceptable by both patients and physicians. This paper discusses the current evidence on the specific circumstances where capsule endoscopy may be indicated for three specific scenarios: Suspected Crohn´s disease, indeterminate colitis, and established Crohn´s disease, where it plays an extensive role. Furthermore, the impact and implications of capsule endoscopy results for follow-up are reviewed. These recommendations must be interpreted and applied in the setting of the integral, individual management of these patients. Understanding its appropriate use in daily clinical practice and an analysis of results may define endoscopic scoring systems to assess activity and mucosal healing in this condition. The present role of capsule endoscopy for Crohn´s disease is subject to ongoing review, and appropriate usage uncovers novel applications likely to result in relevant changes for the future management of these patients.

  13. Predicting clicks of PubMed articles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuqing; Lu, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the popularity or access usage of an article has the potential to improve the quality of PubMed searches. We can model the click trend of each article as its access changes over time by mining the PubMed query logs, which contain the previous access history for all articles. In this article, we examine the access patterns produced by PubMed users in two years (July 2009 to July 2011). We explore the time series of accesses for each article in the query logs, model the trends with regression approaches, and subsequently use the models for prediction. We show that the click trends of PubMed articles are best fitted with a log-normal regression model. This model allows the number of accesses an article receives and the time since it first becomes available in PubMed to be related via quadratic and logistic functions, with the model parameters to be estimated via maximum likelihood. Our experiments predicting the number of accesses for an article based on its past usage demonstrate that the mean absolute error and mean absolute percentage error of our model are 4.0% and 8.1% lower than the power-law regression model, respectively. The log-normal distribution is also shown to perform significantly better than a previous prediction method based on a human memory theory in cognitive science. This work warrants further investigation on the utility of such a log-normal regression approach towards improving information access in PubMed.

  14. Predicting clicks of PubMed articles

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuqing; Lu, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the popularity or access usage of an article has the potential to improve the quality of PubMed searches. We can model the click trend of each article as its access changes over time by mining the PubMed query logs, which contain the previous access history for all articles. In this article, we examine the access patterns produced by PubMed users in two years (July 2009 to July 2011). We explore the time series of accesses for each article in the query logs, model the trends with regression approaches, and subsequently use the models for prediction. We show that the click trends of PubMed articles are best fitted with a log-normal regression model. This model allows the number of accesses an article receives and the time since it first becomes available in PubMed to be related via quadratic and logistic functions, with the model parameters to be estimated via maximum likelihood. Our experiments predicting the number of accesses for an article based on its past usage demonstrate that the mean absolute error and mean absolute percentage error of our model are 4.0% and 8.1% lower than the power-law regression model, respectively. The log-normal distribution is also shown to perform significantly better than a previous prediction method based on a human memory theory in cognitive science. This work warrants further investigation on the utility of such a log-normal regression approach towards improving information access in PubMed. PMID:24551386

  15. Crohn's disease and ruminant farming. Got lactase?

    PubMed

    Juste, Ramón A

    2010-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a well known chronic pathological condition whose aetiology has remained unrecognized for nearly a century. Complex immune mechanisms in a specific genetic background causing an abnormal local inflammatory response are thought to be directly responsible for the clinical picture, but no external factor triggering such host responses has been identified. Humans lose the capability of breaking down milk lactose early in life and, afterwards, ingestion of large amounts of lactose causes a transient digestive illness known as lactose intolerance. Some human populations developed mutations for lactase persistence in adulthood that allowed better exploiting a product, milk, from not food-competitive domesticated species. This adaptation to dairy farming could have had as a collateral effect the exposure of human populations to a ruminant parasite with the ability to cause chronic inflammation in the intestine. Humans with a genetic susceptibility might develop a similar inflammatory disease caused by a defect in a highly conserved innate immunity mechanism. Data from different published sources regarding by country CD and type I diabetes incidence, lactose intolerance, livestock population, food production, Gross National Income and human population were submitted to Pearson and Kendall correlation, multiple regression and principal components analyses. Multiple regressions were also applied to a published 20-year time series for CD incidence in Japan. These analyses showed a strong association between country incidence of CD and frequency of lactase persistence as well as other ruminant production and consumption variables that further supports the meaning of those observations. Association of these variables with higher per capita income suggests that IBD incidence would be a side-effect of an otherwise highly successful adaptation. The evolutionarily plausible framework provided by this association with the species suffering a similar

  16. Facial biometrics of peri-oral changes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, L; Adegun, O K; Willis, A; Fortune, Farida

    2014-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition which affects any part of the gastrointestinal tract. In the oro-facial region, patients can present peri-oral swellings which results in severe facial disfigurement. To date, assessing the degree of facial changes and evaluation of treatment outcomes relies on clinical observation and semi-quantitative methods. In this paper, we describe the development of a robust and reproducible measurement strategy using 3-D facial biometrics to objectively quantify the extent and progression of oro-facial Crohn's disease. Using facial laser scanning, 32 serial images from 13 Crohn's patients attending the Oral Medicine clinic were acquired during relapse, remission, and post-treatment phases. Utilising theories of coordinate metrology, the facial images were subjected to registration, regions of interest identification, and reproducible repositioning prior to obtaining volume measurements. To quantify the changes in tissue volume, scan images from consecutive appointments were compared to the baseline (first scan image). Reproducibility test was performed to ascertain the degree of uncertainty in volume measurements. 3-D facial biometric imaging is a reliable method to identify and quantify peri-oral swelling in Crohn's patients. Comparison of facial scan images at different phases of the disease revealed precisely profile and volume changes. The volume measurements were highly reproducible as adjudged from the 1% standard deviation. 3-D facial biometrics measurements in Crohn's patients with oro-facial involvement offers a quick, robust, economical and objective approach for guided therapeutic intervention and routine assessment of treatment efficacy on the clinic.

  17. High-utilizing Crohn's disease patients under psychosomatic therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Deter, Hans-Christian; von Wietersheim, Jörn; Jantschek, Günther; Burgdorf, Friederike; Blum, Brigitta; Keller, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Objective Few studies have been published on health care utilization in Crohn's disease and the influence of psychological treatment on high utilizers. Methods The present sub study of a prospective multi center investigation conducted in 87 of 488 consecutive Crohn's disease (CD) patients was designed to investigate the influence of the course of Crohn's disease on health care utilization (hospital days (HD) and sick leave days (SLD) collected by German insurance companies) and to examine the conditions of high-utilizing patients. Predictors of health care utilization should be selected. Based on a standardized somatic treatment, high health care utilizing patients of the psychotherapy and control groups should be compared before and after a one-year treatment. Results Multivariate regression analysis identified disease activity at randomization as an important predictor of the clinical course (r2 = 0.28, p < 0.01). Health care utilization correlated with duration of disease (p < 0.04), but the model was not significant (r2 = 0.15, p = 0.09). The patients' level of anxiety, depression and lack of control at randomization predicted their health-related quality of life at the end of the study (r2 = 0.51, p < 0.00001). Interestingly, steroid intake and depression (t1) predicted the combined outcome measure (clinical course, HRQL, health care utilization) of Crohn's disease at the end of the study (r2 = 0.22, p < 0.001). Among high utilizers, a significantly greater drop in HD (p < 0.03) and in mean in SLD were found in the treatment compared to the control group. Conclusion The course of Crohn's disease is influenced by psychological as well as somatic factors; especially depression seems important here. A significant drop of health care utilization demonstrates the benefit of psychological treatment in the subgroup of high-utilizing CD patients. Further studies are needed to replicate the findings of the clinical outcome in this CD subgroup. PMID:18851749

  18. A Decade of ChemMedChem.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott D; Ortúzar, Natalia

    2016-01-05

    Happy birthday! Issue 01/2016 marks the 10th anniversary of ChemMedChem. With a complete set of 10 volumes, the Editorial Team takes a look back at how the journal, and indeed the field of medicinal chemistry, have evolved and changed over the past decade.

  19. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography for the detection and assessment of Crohn disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Xue, Luqi; Xu, Jing; Li, Qingfang; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Imaging modalities are essential for the diagnosis and assessment of CD. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a well-tolerated, noninvasive and radiation-free modality and has shown potential in CD assessment. We aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SICUS in the detection and assessment of small-bowel lesions and complications in CD. We searched PubMed database for relevant studies published before April 24, 2016. We integrated the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative into the pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Forest plots were to represent the pooled results of all studies. Thirteen articles were finally considered eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SICUS in detecting small-bowel lesions were 0.883 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.847-0.913) and 0.861 (95% CI 0.828-0.890), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 39.123 (95% CI 20.014-76.476) and the area under the curve of summary receiver operating characteristic was 0.9273 (standard error: 0.0152). In subgroup analyses, SICUS represented fine sensitivity and specificity in proximal and distal small intestine lesion, as well as in CD-related complications such as stricture, dilation, abscess, and fistula. SICUS is accurate enough to make a complete assessment about the location, extent, number, and almost all kinds of complications in CD small-bowel lesions.

  20. MED-SUV Data Life Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangianantoni, Agata; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Letizia; Tulino, Sabrina

    2015-04-01

    The MED-SUV project aims to implement a digital e-infrastructure for data access in order to promote the monitoring and study of key volcanic regions prone to volcanic hazards, and thus improve hazard assessment, according to the rationale of Supersite GEO initiative to Vesuvius- Campi Flegrei and Mt Etna, currently identified as Permanent Supersites. The present study focuses on the life cycle of MED-SUV data generated in the first period of the project and highlights the managing approach, as well as the crucial steps to be implemented for ensuring that data will be properly and ethically managed and can be used and accessed from both MED-SUV and the external community. The process is conceived outlining how research data being handled as the project progresses, describing what data are collected, processed or generated and how these data are going to be shared and made available through Open Access. Data cycle begins with their generation and ends with the deposit in the digital infrastructure, its key series of stages through which MED-SUV data passes are Collection, Data citation, Categorization of data, Approval procedure, Registration of datasets, Application of licensing models, and PID assignment. This involves a combination of procedures and practices taking into account the scientific core mission and the priorities of the project as well as the potential legal issues related to the management and protection of the Intellectual Property. We believe that the implementation of this process constitutes a significant encouragement in MED-SUV data sharing and as a consequence a better understanding on the volcanic processes, hazard assessment and a better integration with other Supersites projects.

  1. Crohn's disease and genetic hitchhiking at IBD5.

    PubMed

    Huff, Chad D; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Gatenbee, Chandler; Denson, Lee A; Kugathasan, Subra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Whiting, April; Davis, Chadwick T; Wu, Wilfred; Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Bamshad, Michael J; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Bulayeva, Kazima; Simonson, Tatum S; Jorde, Lynn B; Guthery, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease 5 (IBD5) is a 250 kb haplotype on chromosome 5 that is associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease in Europeans. The OCTN1 gene is centrally located on IBD5 and encodes a transporter of the antioxidant ergothioneine (ET). The 503F variant of OCTN1 is strongly associated with IBD5 and is a gain-of-function mutation that increases absorption of ET. Although 503F has been implicated as the variant potentially responsible for Crohn's disease susceptibility at IBD5, there is little evidence beyond statistical association to support its role in disease causation. We hypothesize that 503F is a recent adaptation in Europeans that swept to relatively high frequency and that disease association at IBD5 results not from 503F itself, but from one or more nearby hitchhiking variants, in the genes IRF1 or IL5. To test for evidence of recent positive selection on the 503F allele, we employed the iHS statistic, which was significant in the European CEU HapMap population (P=0.0007) and European Human Genome Diversity Panel populations (P≤0.01). To evaluate the hypothesis of disease-variant hitchhiking, we performed haplotype association tests on high-density microarray data in a sample of 1,868 Crohn's disease cases and 5,550 controls. We found that 503F haplotypes with recombination breakpoints between OCTN1 and IRF1 or IL5 were not associated with disease (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05, P=0.21). In contrast, we observed strong disease association for 503F haplotypes with no recombination between these three genes (OR: 1.24, P=2.6×10(-8)), as expected if the sweeping haplotype harbored one or more disease-causing mutations in IRF1 or IL5. To further evaluate these disease-gene candidates, we obtained expression data from lower gastrointestinal biopsies of healthy individuals and Crohn's disease patients. We observed a 72% increase in gene expression of IRF1 among Crohn's disease patients (P=0.0006) and no significant difference in expression of OCTN1

  2. Small bowel adenocarcinoma and Crohn's disease: any further ahead than 50 years ago?

    PubMed

    Cahill, Caitlin; Gordon, Philip H; Petrucci, Andrea; Boutros, Marylise

    2014-09-07

    This review of the literature on small bowel carcinoma associated with Crohn's disease specifically addresses the incidence, risk factors, and protective factors which have been identified. It also reviews the clinical presentation, the current modalities of diagnosis, the pathology, treatment, and surveillance. Finally, the prognosis and future direction are addressed. Our experience with small bowel adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease is reported. Readers will be provided with a better understanding of this rare and often poorly recognized complication of Crohn's disease.

  3. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Children with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Marina; DeWalt, Darren A; Martin, Christopher F; Long, Millie D; Chen, Wenli; Jaeger, Beth; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    To assess the criterion validity and responsiveness of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in a web-based cohort of children with Crohn's disease. We recruited children with Crohn's disease (ages 9-17 years) and their parents from the web-based Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Kids and Teens Study cohort. Upon entry into the cohort and 6 months later, children self-reported Crohn's disease activity, health-related quality of life, and PROMIS domains of pain interference, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and peer relationships. Mean PROMIS scores for the 276 participating patients were worse among those with worse self-reported Crohn's disease activity (per Short Crohn's Disease Activity Index, P < .005 for all), Crohn's disease activity in the prior 6 months (per Manitoba Index, P < .01 for all), and health-related quality of life (per IMPACT-35, P < .001 for all). One hundred forty-three patients and their parents completed follow-up questionnaires, 75% of whom reported stable disease activity. Those with improved Crohn's disease activity reported improved PROMIS scores, and those with worsened Crohn's disease activity reported worse PROMIS scores for all domains except anxiety. All participants reported improved anxiety from baseline, but those with stable or worsened Crohn's disease activity reported less improvement (P = .07). PROMIS scores were significantly associated with Crohn's disease activity in a linear and clinically meaningful manner, and responded to change in Crohn's disease activity over a 6-month period. This supports the criterion validity and responsiveness of pediatric PROMIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Crohn's Disease Associated with Sweet's Syndrome and Sjögren's Syndrome Treated with Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Erina N.; Nguyen, Khanh K.; Sheikh, Rafiq A.; Prindiville, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease (CD) and Sweet's syndrome is rare and the presence of Sjögren's syndrome in Crohn's disease is even rarer, with only three reports found in the literature. We describe two cases of Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome, one of which is the first case of CD and Sweet's concomitantly associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Both cases responded rapidly to Infliximab therapy with complete resolution of the skin lesions. PMID:16050146

  5. DWI at MR Enterography for Evaluating Bowel Inflammation in Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Ho

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review regarding DWI enterography used for evaluating Crohn disease and to summarize the relevant evidence. Active bowel inflammation in Crohn disease causes restricted diffusion on MR enterography with DWI. Enterographic DWI to evaluate Crohn disease is increasingly drawing attention for both academic research and clinical practice and has shown potential as a quantitative tool for assessing bowel inflammation. DWI enterography also has multiple unresolved issues and limitations.

  6. Guillain-Barré syndrome as an extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Fernández, R.; Rubio-Nazabal, E.; de la Iglesia-Martínez, F.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of extraintestinal manifestations, probably immune-mediated, may appear during relapses of Crohn's disease. We report the clinical observation of a 34-year-old woman who developed a Guillain-Barré syndrome, aphthous stomatitis and oligoarthritis during a relapse of Crohn's ileocolitis. This case suggests that the Guillain-Barré syndrome may be another extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:7567741

  7. MED-SUV final strategic issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, Letizia; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2016-04-01

    Aside the scientific, technical and financial aspects managed by the "Project Management" Work Package (WP1), the great challenge and more time consuming task of this WP has surely been the definition and application of some strategic guidelines crucial to trace the project right path to its final success and for the project outcome sustainability after month 36. In particular, given that one of the main objectives of MED-SUV is that to be compliant with the GEO initiative, particularly concerning the data sharing, great efforts have been made by WP1 at first to define the MED-SUV Data Policy Guidelines, and currently to make it suitable for the EU Supersites. At present, WP1 is also dealing with the exploitation of the achieved foreground among the project's participant and to define a Memorandum of Understanding to sustain the monitoring systems and e-infrastructure developed in the project framework. Whilst the Data Policy guidelines document was implemented in the first year of MED-SUV, WP1 is now focused on the last deliverable 'Strategic and Legal deliverables', which includes the remaining issues. To the aim, WP1 has strategically separated the Exploitation of Foreground document preparation from the Memorandum of Understanding definition. The Exploitation of Foreground process has regarded the identification of Foreground, the exploitable results, the purpose of such Foreground, the collection of information from either the scientific community of MED-SUV or industrial participants; to this aim WP1 circulated an ad hoc questionnaire to put together information on (the) every kind of MED-SUV outcome, on their owners, on the kind of ownership (single/joint), on the outcome exploitation, and on proposals for its sustainability. While the first information will allow us to prepare the final Exploitation Agreement among the project's participant, the information on the exploitation of the outcome and likely sustainability proposals will contribute to the

  8. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia With Lung Nodules Secondary to Pulmonary Manifestation of Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Taufiq; Watson, Joseph; Zaman, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Crohn disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations in patients. Pulmonary involvement of Crohn disease is one manifestation. There have been case reports which have shown Crohn disease and lung nodules which were noted to be histopathological as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). In our case, a 22-year-old woman with Crohn disease was seen with complaints of chest pain and cough. Computed tomographic scan of chest showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, for which biopsy was done, which showed COP. The case study is followed by a deeper discussion of COP and the extraintestinal manifestation seen in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28579861

  9. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia With Lung Nodules Secondary to Pulmonary Manifestation of Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Taufiq; Watson, Joseph; Zaman, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Crohn disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations in patients. Pulmonary involvement of Crohn disease is one manifestation. There have been case reports which have shown Crohn disease and lung nodules which were noted to be histopathological as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). In our case, a 22-year-old woman with Crohn disease was seen with complaints of chest pain and cough. Computed tomographic scan of chest showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, for which biopsy was done, which showed COP. The case study is followed by a deeper discussion of COP and the extraintestinal manifestation seen in inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Heartburn and multiple-site foregut perforations as primary manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bona, D; Incarbone, R; Chella, B; Vecchi, M; Bonavina, L

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease may affect any segment of the digestive tract, more commonly the distal ileum, colon and/or perianal region. There is an increasing number of reports dealing with foregut Crohn's disease. We present the case of a patient with a history of heartburn and multiple spontaneous perforations of the esophagus, duodenum and jejunum as a primary manifestation of Crohn's disease who required emergency surgical and endoscopic procedures. Early detection of Crohn's disease may decrease the incidence of acute life-threatening complications provided that appropriate medical treatment is administered and a multidisciplinary approach is offered to these patients.

  11. Is Crohn's disease caused by a mycobacterium? Comparisons with leprosy, tuberculosis, and Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Robert J

    2003-08-01

    Although Crohn's disease is considered to be autoimmune in origin, there is increasing evidence that it may have an infectious cause. The most plausible candidate is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Intriguingly, Koch's postulates may have been fulfilled for MAP and Crohn's disease, even though they still have not been met for Mycobacterium leprae and leprosy. In animals MAP causes Johne's disease, a chronic wasting intestinal diarrhoeal disease evocative of Crohn's disease. Johne's disease occurs in wild and domesticated animals, including dairy herds. Viable MAP is found in human and cow milk, and is not reliably killed by standard pasteurisation. MAP is ubiquitous in the environment including in potable water. Since cell-wall-deficient MAP usually cannot be identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, identification of MAP in human beings requires culture or detection of MAP DNA or RNA. If infectious in origin, Crohn's disease should be curable with appropriate antibiotics. Many studies that argue against a causative role for MAP in Crohn's disease have used antibiotics that are inactive against MAP. However, trials that include macrolide antibiotics indicate that a cure for Crohn's disease is possible. The necessary length of therapy remains to be determined. Mycobacterial diseases have protean clinical manifestations, as does Crohn's disease. The necessity of stratifying Crohn's disease into two clinical manifestations (perforating and non-perforating) when interpreting the results of antibiotic therapy is discussed. Rational studies to evaluate appropriate therapies to cure Crohn's disease are proposed.

  12. Corticosteroids increase protein breakdown and loss in newly diagnosed pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Steven J; Noe, Joshua D; Denne, Scott C

    2011-11-01

    Children with Crohn disease have altered growth and body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated decreased protein breakdown after either corticosteroid or anti-TNF-α therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whole body protein metabolism during corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease. Children with suspected Crohn disease and children with abdominal symptoms not consistent with Crohn disease underwent outpatient metabolic assessment. Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease and prescribed corticosteroid therapy returned in 2 wk for repeat metabolic assessment. Using the stable isotopes [d5] phenylalanine, [1-(13)C] leucine, and [(15)N(2)] urea, protein kinetics were determined in the fasting state. Thirty-one children (18 controls and 13 newly diagnosed with Crohn disease) completed the study. There were no significant differences in protein breakdown or loss between patients with Crohn disease at diagnosis and controls. After corticosteroid therapy in patients with Crohn disease, the rates of appearance of phenylalanine (32%) and leucine (26%) increased significantly, reflecting increased protein breakdown, and the rate of appearance of urea also increased significantly (273%), reflecting increased protein loss. Whole body protein breakdown and loss increased significantly after 2 wk of corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease, which may have profound effects on body composition.

  13. Zinc deficiency in men with Crohn's disease may contribute to poor sperm function and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, A M

    2003-12-01

    In Great Britain, married couples were reported to have between 1.9 and 2.1 children, while men with Crohn's disease had a mean of 1.2 and of 0.4 children before and after diagnosis, respectively. The role of zinc for male fertility is essential. Although lack of zinc in Crohn's disease is well established in up to 70% of patients, a possible relation between zinc deficiency and male subfertility in Crohn's disease remains unclear. This study is aimed at examining a possible link between zinc deficiency in men with Crohn's disease and male subfertility in this group of patients.

  14. Author Name Disambiguation for PubMed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanli; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Kim, Sun; Comeau, Donald C; Kim, Won; Yeganova, Lana; Lu, Zhiyong; Wilbur, W John

    2014-04-01

    Log analysis shows that PubMed users frequently use author names in queries for retrieving scientific literature. However, author name ambiguity may lead to irrelevant retrieval results. To improve the PubMed user experience with author name queries, we designed an author name disambiguation system consisting of similarity estimation and agglomerative clustering. A machine-learning method was employed to score the features for disambiguating a pair of papers with ambiguous names. These features enable the computation of pairwise similarity scores to estimate the probability of a pair of papers belonging to the same author, which drives an agglomerative clustering algorithm regulated by 2 factors: name compatibility and probability level. With transitivity violation correction, high precision author clustering is achieved by focusing on minimizing false-positive pairing. Disambiguation performance is evaluated with manual verification of random samples of pairs from clustering results. When compared with a state-of-the-art system, our evaluation shows that among all the pairs the lumping error rate drops from 10.1% to 2.2% for our system, while the splitting error rises from 1.8% to 7.7%. This results in an overall error rate of 9.9%, compared with 11.9% for the state-of-the-art method. Other evaluations based on gold standard data also show the increase in accuracy of our clustering. We attribute the performance improvement to the machine-learning method driven by a large-scale training set and the clustering algorithm regulated by a name compatibility scheme preferring precision. With integration of the author name disambiguation system into the PubMed search engine, the overall click-through-rate of PubMed users on author name query results improved from 34.9% to 36.9%.

  15. An unusual presentation of fistulating Crohn's disease: Ascites.

    PubMed

    Kia, Richard; White, David; Sarkar, Sanchoy

    2010-01-16

    Whilst ascites is a common presenting complaint in patients with decompensated chronic liver disease and disseminated malignancy, in Crohn's disease however, it is exceptionally rare. We describe a patient with no prior history of inflammatory bowel or liver disease, presenting with rapid onset gross ascites and scrotal swelling. Further investigations revealed severe hypoalbuminemia and transudative ascitic fluid with normal other liver function tests and a negative liver screen. Computed tomography revealed widespread ascites and pleural effusions with no features of malignancy or portal hypertension, and a small bowel barium series showed features of fistulating small bowel Crohn's disease. An ileo-colonoscopy confirmed the presence of terminal ileal inflammatory stricture. The patient's clinical condition and serum albumin improved with a combination of diuretics, elemental diet, antibiotics and oral 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy.

  16. Glutamine for induction of remission in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Akobeng, Anthony K; Elawad, Mamoun; Gordon, Morris

    2016-02-08

    Crohn's disease is a chronic relapsing condition of the alimentary tract with a high morbidity secondary to bowel inflammation. Glutamine plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosa and has been shown to reduce inflammation and disease activity in experimental models of Crohn's disease. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glutamine supplementation for induction of remission in Crohn's disease. We searched the following databases from inception to November 15, 2015: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialised Register. Study references were also searched for additional trials. There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared glutamine supplementation administered by any route to a placebo, active comparator or no intervention in people with active Crohn's disease were considered for inclusion. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess methodological quality. The primary outcome measure was clinical or endoscopic remission. Secondary outcomes included intestinal permeability, clinical response, quality of life, growth in children and adverse events. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the primary outcome was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. Two small RCTs (total 42 patients) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. One study (18 patients) compared four weeks of treatment with a glutamine-enriched polymeric diet (42% amino acid composition) to a standard polymeric diet (4% amino acid composition) with low glutamine content in paediatric patients (< 18 years of age) with active Crohn's disease. The other study (24 patients) compared glutamine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition to non-supplemented total

  17. Genetics of Crohn disease, an archetypal inflammatory barrier disease.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Albrecht, Mario; Hampe, Jochen; Krawczak, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn disease, atopic eczema, asthma and psoriasis are triggered by hitherto unknown environmental factors that function on the background of some polygenic susceptibility. Recent technological advances have allowed us to unravel the genetic aetiology of these and other complex diseases. Using Crohn disease as an example, we show how the discovery of susceptibility genes furthers our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and how it will, ultimately, give rise to new therapeutic developments. The long-term goal of such endeavours is to develop targeted prophylactic strategies. These will probably target the molecular interaction on the mucosal surface between the products of the genome and the microbial metagenome of a patient.

  18. Therapeutic inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Srinivasan; Travis, Simon P L; Ahmad, Tariq; Jazrawi, Riadh

    2002-09-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with refractory ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease have recently been augmented by the introduction of biological therapies. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is present in elevated concentrations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and inhibitors of TNF alpha have proved effective as treatment. Strategies aimed at reducing TNF in patients with Crohn's disease, include the mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Centocor Inc), the humanized monoclonal antibody, CDP-571 (Celltech Group plc), the human recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein, etanercept (Immunex Corp), and thalidomide. New approaches, including the use of soluble TNF receptors, appear promising. This article reviews the evidence of therapeutic inhibition of TNF.

  19. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    The chronic nature of Crohn's disease (CD) implicates necessity of multiple control assessments throughout patient's life. It is accepted that in patients with CD requiring disease monitoring, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are--apart from endoscopy--imaging studies of first choice. In practice, diagnostic imaging of patients with CD is troublesome, since MRE is an expensive and complicated study, and CTE exposes patients to high doses of ionizing radiation. Therefore, there is a need for new, both non-invasive and effective, methods of imaging in CD. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (CEUS) is a relatively new method using gas-filled microbubbles serving as contrast agent. It allows for detailed assessment of blood perfusion within intestine wall and peri-intestinal tissues, which enables detection and monitoring of inflammation and its qualitative assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe CEUS examination technique and its clinical applications in patients with Crohn's disease.

  20. Patient optimization for surgery relating to Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kamal V; Darakhshan, Amir A; Griffin, Nyree; Williams, Andrew B; Sanderson, Jeremy D; Irving, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients with Crohn's disease require abdominal surgery during their lifetime, some of whom will require multiple operations. Postoperative complications are seen more frequently in patients requiring abdominal surgery for Crohn's disease than in patients requiring abdominal surgery for other conditions. In this article, we review the evidence supporting preoperative optimization, discussing strategies that potentially improve surgical outcomes and reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. We discuss the roles of adequate cross-sectional imaging, nutritional optimization, appropriate adjustments of medical therapy, management of preoperative abscesses and phlegmons, smoking cessation and thromboembolic prophylaxis. We also review operation-related factors, and discuss their potential implications with respect to postoperative complications. Overall, the literature suggests that preoperative management has a major effect on postoperative outcomes.

  1. Role of Probiotics in Crohn's Disease and in Pouchitis.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The alterations in the gut microbiota observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in particular in Crohn's disease and in ulcerative colitis patients with pouchitis, provide the rationale for administering probiotic agents in the medical treatment of those conditions. In the maintenance treatment of inactive Crohn's disease probiotics, when administered alone, were found ineffective in preventing clinical and/or endoscopic recurrence. By contrast, a combination of a probiotic agent (eg, Saccharomyces boulardii) with standard pharmacological therapy can promote clinical benefit. In patients with pouchitis, so far only the probiotic mixture VSL #3 proved to effectively prevent relapses after successful antibiotic treatment of active inflammation. Further controlled studies, enrolling higher numbers of patients, are needed to better identify the exact role of probiotics in this area.

  2. Complex partial status epilepticus in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Montserrat G; Vega, Juan; Santamarta, Elena; Caminal, Luis

    2013-09-06

    Few cases of Crohn's disease complicated with meningitis and epidural abscess have been described in literature. We present a case of a 42-year-old former smoker female patient diagnosed with Crohn's disease in September 1995 (with severe nutritional problems). On 20 February 2012, she was admitted due to a probable sepsis (without any previous treatment). After several days she developed a confusion syndrome (probable Wernicke's disease). On 5 March 2012, the patient presented with a febrile episode of 39 ° C. Two days later, the patient presented aphasia and paraparesis, and 3 days later she presented a complex partial status epilepticus. A lumbar puncture was performed and showed 131 leucocytes (63% granulocytes) and proteins 296.3. The abdominopelvic CT scan revealed a presacral collection that seem to extend cranially towards the lumbosacral spine. The lumbar MRI confirmed the lumbar epidural abscess secondary to the fistulisation of the presacral abscess.

  3. Data mining for correlations between diet and Crohn's disease activity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason G; Purcell, Gretchen P

    2006-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a debilitating condition that affects the entire gastrointestinal tract and often requires aggressive and invasive therapies. Several studies have suggested dietary triggers for disease activity. We have created a web-based tool to allow participants to record both daily food intake and wellness (i.e., disease-specific quality of life). We seek to determine if measurable correlations exist between these events in patients with Crohn's disease. Advanced data mining techniques are employed to find such correlations and the efficacies of chosen techniques are assessed. We tested our web-based system in a pilot study involving 7 participants, and we found that traditional statistical techniques identified diet and disease activity correlations in short-term data sets.

  4. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  5. Living MedsCheck: Learning how to deliver MedsCheck in community practice in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Grindrod, Kelly; Sanghera, Niki; Rahmaan, Israa; Roy, Meghna; Tritt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To share the experiences of graduating students as they learn to deliver a new medication review service in community pharmacies in Ontario, Canada. Four graduating pharmacy students volunteered in different community pharmacies to learn how to navigate a new provincial program called MedsCheck, which pays pharmacists to do medication reviews. Each student selected his or her own practice site, including 2 independent community pharmacies, a grocery store chain pharmacy and a hospital outpatient pharmacy. To help the students learn to deliver the new MedsCheck services, a faculty mentor met with them on a weekly basis. To reflect on doing MedsChecks in the "real world" and to elicit feedback from the online community, each student blogged about his or her experiences. All 4 students felt that peer mentoring improved their ability to deliver MedsCheck services. They also identified a number of barriers to delivering the MedsChecks and helped each other try to overcome the barriers. MedsCheck is a new service in Ontario and is not easily implemented in the current pharmacy model of practice. Peer mentoring is a helpful way to share successes and overcome barriers to delivery. Can Pharm J 2013;146:33-38.

  6. Reversal of progressive nyctalopia in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gans, M; Taylor, C

    1990-04-01

    A 51-year-old man who had undergone several partial bowel resections for Crohn's disease presented with progressively decreased night vision. Electroretinography showed a flat scotopic response and a diminished, delayed photopic response. Measurement of stool fat showed marked fat malabsorption. Treatment with parenteral nutrition, including administration of vitamin A, resulted in marked improvement in the scotopic and photopic response and subjective improvement in his night vision. Patients with malabsorption states should be followed to avoid irreversible visual loss.

  7. [Constant flow alimentation in Crohn's disease of children].

    PubMed

    Saint-Raymond, A; Arnaud-Battandier, F; Schmitz, J

    1988-11-01

    Enteral nutrition in children with Crohn's disease is a preferred treatment of acute attacks. When maintained for three months, it effectively acts on digestive symptoms, makes possible the resumption of growth and onset of a delayed puberty. In contrast, it does not appear to modify the long-term course of the disease: 7 out of 10 patients had relapses 3 to 6 months after interruption of enteral nutrition.

  8. The TB--Crohn's affair--a never ending dilemma.

    PubMed

    Praveen, S; Razman, J

    2008-08-01

    An 80 year old lady presented with signs and symptoms of sub-acute intestinal obstruction which failed conservative management. CT scan abdomen revealed circumferential ileum thickening with proximal bowel dilatation. Laparotomy and segmental resection was done. Pathological findings were suggestive of chronic granulomatous ileits with differential of Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal tuberculosis. The patient was presumed to have gastrointestinal tuberculosis and commenced on anti tuberculosis treatment despite inconclusive evidence for confirmation and showed marked clinical improvement.

  9. Low-dose naltrexone therapy improves active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Stock, Heather; Bingaman, Sandra; Mauger, David; Rogosnitzky, Moshe; Zagon, Ian S

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous opioids and opioid antagonists have been shown to play a role in healing and repair of tissues. In an open-labeled pilot prospective trial, the safety and efficacy of low-dose naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist, were tested in patients with active Crohn's disease. Eligible subjects with histologically and endoscopically confirmed active Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) score of 220-450 were enrolled in a study using 4.5 mg naltrexone/day. Infliximab was not allowed for a minimum of 8 wk prior to study initiation. Other therapy for Crohn's disease that was at a stable dose for 4 wk prior to enrollment was continued at the same doses. Patients completed the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) and the short-form (SF-36) quality of life surveys and CDAI scores were assessed pretreatment, every 4 wk on therapy and 4 wk after completion of the study drug. Drug was administered by mouth each evening for a 12-wk period. Seventeen patients with a mean CDAI score of 356 +/- 27 were enrolled. CDAI scores decreased significantly (P= 0.01) with LDN, and remained lower than baseline 4 wk after completing therapy. Eighty-nine percent of patients exhibited a response to therapy and 67% achieved a remission (P < 0.001). Improvement was recorded in both quality of life surveys with LDN compared with baseline. No laboratory abnormalities were noted. The most common side effect was sleep disturbances, occurring in seven patients. LDN therapy appears effective and safe in subjects with active Crohn's disease. Further studies are needed to explore the use of this compound.

  10. Randomized controlled trials in maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    D'Incà, Renata; Caccaro, Roberta

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of medically induced remission is a clinical challenge in Crohn's disease (CD), since it is a chronic disease and that often occurs in young people. The introduction of immunosuppressors and biologics has significantly improved the management of these patients, however efficacy and safety of these treatments in the very long term still needs clarification. Furthermore, scientific research is driven more into new drugs to induce remission rather then maintenance.

  11. Mycobacterium xenopi infection in an immunosuppressed patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Majoor, C; Schreurs, A; Weers-Pothoff, G

    2004-01-01

    A 48 year old patient with active Crohn's disease presented with bilateral nodules over his lungs resembling malignant metastasis. Bronchoscopic and pathological examination of the airways and sputum did not show any malignancy. After 6 weeks Mycobacterium xenopi was cultured from his bronchial washings while all other cultures remained negative. Treatment was started with rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin and, after 9 months of treatment, there was an almost complete resolution of his chest radiograph. PMID:15223876

  12. Crohn's disease and recurrent appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shaoul, Ron; Rimar, Yosi; Toubi, Aurora; Mogilner, Jorge; Polak, Reuven; Jaffe, Michael

    2005-11-21

    The clinical diagnosis of classic Crohn's disease (CD) of the small bowel is based on a typical history, tender right lower quadrant fullness or mass, and characteristic radiographic findings of the terminal ileum. Appendicitis may as well present with chronic or recurrent symptoms and this presentation may be confused with CD. We herein describe the case of a young teenage girl with a presumptive diagnosis of CD, who was ultimately diagnosed as having chronic nongranulomatous appendicitis. The literature on the subject is reviewed.

  13. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Perioperative Considerations in Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, T. Paul; Merchea, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is medically and surgically complex. Numerous patient- and disease-oriented factors must be considered in treating patients with IBD, including nutritional replenishment/support, effect of immunosuppressive medications, extent of resection, and use of proximal diversion. Perioperative planning and optimization of the patient is imperative to ensuring favorable outcomes and limiting morbidity. These perioperative considerations in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are reviewed here. PMID:27247531

  15. Protein-energy intake and malnutrition in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P; Gee, M; Grace, M; Sherbaniuk, R W; Wensel, R H; Thomson, A B

    1984-12-01

    A detailed nutrient assessment was made of 23 male and 24 female patients with Crohn's disease who entered sequentially into an outpatient clinic. Assessment included 48-hour dietary recall, anthropometric measurements, and biochemical and hematological tests appropriate to characterize protein-energy malnutrition. Approximately 40% of patients had energy intakes equal to only two-thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). Three men and five women had relative body weights less than 85% of standard, but body weight was not correlated with energy intake. Relative body weight was correlated with arm muscle circumference in both male and female patients and with triceps skinfold and total lymphocyte count in women. Although the mean protein intake was greater than 150% of the RDA, evidence of protein malnutrition included low arm muscle circumference in 14% of the men and 15% of the women, low serum albumin concentration in 13% of the women, and low total lymphocyte count in one-half of the patients. The Crohn's disease activity index was correlated significantly with serum albumin, energy intake, and duration of disease in men and with serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentration in women. Thus, a reduced relative body weight or reduced serum albumin was not uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease but did not necessarily occur in those with reduced intakes of protein and energy. However, a low relative body weight may indicate need for further nutritional assessment.

  16. Role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Marisa; Moret, Inés; Rausell, Francisco; Bastida, Guillermo; Aguas, Mariam; Cerrillo, Elena; Nos, Pilar; Beltrán, Belén

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing interest in oxidative stress being a potential aetiological factor and/or a triggering factor in Crohn's disease, rather than a concomitant occurrence during the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent research has shown that the immune mononuclear cells of Crohn's disease patients are induced to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Similarly, the regulation of antioxidant enzymes during disease in these cells has been unravelled, showing that SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) activity is increased during active disease and returns to normal in remission phases. However, catalase remains constantly inhibited which supports the idea that catalase is not a redox-sensitive enzyme, but a regulator of cellular processes. ROS (reactive oxygen species) can be produced under the stimulus of different cytokines such as TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α). It has been shown in different experimental models that they are also able to regulate apoptosis and other cellular processes. The status of oxidative stress elements in Crohn's disease and their possible implications in regulating cellular processes are reviewed in the present paper.

  17. Predictors of depression in youth with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jeffrey G; Srinath, Arvind I; Youk, Ada O; Kirshner, Margaret A; McCarthy, F Nicole; Keljo, David J; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R; Szigethy, Eva M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether infliximab use and other potential predictors are associated with decreased prevalence and severity of depression in pediatric patients with Crohn disease (CD). A total of 550 (n = 550) youth ages 9 to 17 years with biopsy-confirmed CD were consecutively recruited as part of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Out of the 550, 499 patients met study criteria and were included in the analysis. At recruitment, each subject and a parent completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). A child or parent CDI score ≥  12 was used to denote clinically significant depressive symptoms (CSDS). Child and parent CDI scores were summed to form total CDI (CDIT). Infliximab use, demographic information, steroid use, laboratory values, and Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) were collected as the potential predictors of depression. Univariate regression models were constructed to determine the relations among predictors, CSDS, and CDIT. Stepwise multivariate regression models were constructed to predict the relation between infliximab use and depression while controlling for other predictors of depression. Infliximab use was not associated with a decreased proportion of CSDS and CDIT after adjusting for multiple comparisons. CSDS and CDIT were positively associated with PCDAI, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and steroid dose (P < 0.01) and negatively associated with socioeconomic status (SES) (P < 0.001). In multivariate models, PCDAI and SES were the strongest predictors of depression. Disease activity and SES are significant predictors of depression in youth with Crohn disease.

  18. MR enterography in the management of patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Leyendecker, John R; Bloomfeld, Richard S; DiSantis, David J; Waters, Gregory S; Mott, Ryan; Bechtold, Robert E

    2009-10-01

    Crohn disease is a complex pathologic process with an unpredictable lifelong course that includes frequent relapses. It often affects young patients, who are most vulnerable to the potential adverse effects of repeated exposure to ionizing radiation from computed tomography performed for diagnosis and surgical planning. The small intestine is the bowel segment that is most frequently affected, but it is the least accessible with endoscopic techniques. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has the potential to safely and noninvasively meet the imaging needs of patients with Crohn disease without exposing them to ionizing radiation. Appropriate use of MR enterography requires a carefully crafted protocol to depict signs of active inflammation as well as complications such as bowel obstruction, fistulas, and abscesses. Interpretation of MR enterographic images requires familiarity with the imaging signs and mimics of active bowel inflammation and stenosis. Although MR enterography currently is helpful for management in individual patients, the standardization of acquisition protocols and interpretive methods would increase its usefulness for more rigorous, systematic assessments of Crohn disease treatment regimens.

  19. Bowel damage assessment in Crohn's disease by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Gionata; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Danese, Silvio

    2012-09-01

    Crohn's disease leads to complications in the majority of patients on the long term. Strictures, fistulas and abscesses usually involve the bowel wall or extra-intestinal compartments, and conventional diagnostic tools, such as colonoscopy or barium studies, are not able to assess them. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to be accurate in detecting activity, severity and complications of Crohn's disease. Because of its reproducibility and safety, it can be considered the first-choice technique to complete Crohn's disease staging, and to monitor disease evolution. Recently, the concept of bowel damage has risen into the field of inflammatory bowel diseases. It has been shown that bowel damage induced by the disease can impact on patients' life, beyond intestinal symptoms. Data coming from rheumatology suggest that blockade of organ damage should be achieved independently from disease-related symptoms, and that a "damage driven" approach should be preferred than a "symptom-driven" one. This review of the literature aims to investigate the role of magnetic resonance imaging in assessing disease complications, which cause organ damage, and to explore future perspective in order to develop new therapeutical strategies and new tailored therapies, based on the prevention of intestinal damage.

  20. Abdominal wall abscesses in patients with Crohn's disease: clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Keidar, Andrei; Gutman, Mordechai; Zissin, Rivka

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal wall abscess due to Crohn's Disease used to be one of the definitive indications for operative treatment. The advent of interventional radiology, the accessibility to percutaneous drainage, and the availability of new medications raised the possibility of nonoperative treatment of this condition. The clinical presentation, treatment, and follow-up of 13 patients with abdominal wall abscesses secondary to Crohn's Disease were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (1993-2003), 13 patients with abdominal wall abscess were treated. Five patients had an anterolateral abdominal wall abscess and eight had a posterior abscess (psoas). In 11 patients, 17 drainage procedures were performed: 12 percutaneous and 5 operative. Despite initial adequate drainage and resolution of the abscess, all 13 patients eventually needed resection of the offending bowel segment, which was undertaken in 12 patients. The mean time between abscess presentation and definitive operation was 2 months. Percutaneous drainage is an attractive option in most cases of abdominal abscesses. However, in Crohn's Disease patients with an abdominal wall abscess, we found a high failure rate despite initial adequate drainage. We suggest that surgical resection of the diseased bowel segment should be the definitive therapy.

  1. Focal non granulomatous orchitis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Piton, Nicolas; Roquet, Marie-Laurence; Sibert, Louis; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-28

    Crohn's disease is a systemic disease and sometimes involves the testicle, usually leading to granulomatous lesions. We report herein a case of focal non-granulomatous orchitis in a 21-year-old patient with active Crohn's disease treated by an anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody. This circumscribed testicular lesion mimicked a tumor, leading to orchiectomy. Pre-operative blood tests (i.e. alpha-fetoprotein, lactate dehydrogenase and human chorionic gonadotrophin) were strictly normal Pathological examination of the testicle revealed a focal inflammatory infiltrate predominantly composed of lymphocytes accompanied by few plasma cells, lacking giant cells or granulomas. Importantly, intratubular germ cell neoplasia, atrophy or lithiasis were not observed.After discussing and excluding other plausible causes (burnt-out /regressed germ cell tumor, infection, vascular or traumatic lesions, iatrogenic effects), we concluded that this particular case of orchitis was most likely an extra-digestive manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease. To our knowledge, this is the first described case of focal non-granulomatous orchitis associated with Crohn's disease. Virtual Slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2117747284160112.

  2. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  3. Technical development of PubMed Interact: an improved interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Background The project aims to create an alternative search interface for MEDLINE/PubMed that may provide assistance to the novice user and added convenience to the advanced user. An earlier version of the project was the 'Slider Interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches' (SLIM) which provided JavaScript slider bars to control search parameters. In this new version, recent developments in Web-based technologies were implemented. These changes may prove to be even more valuable in enhancing user interactivity through client-side manipulation and management of results. Results PubMed Interact is a Web-based MEDLINE/PubMed search application built with HTML, JavaScript and PHP. It is implemented on a Windows Server 2003 with Apache 2.0.52, PHP 4.4.1 and MySQL 4.1.18. PHP scripts provide the backend engine that connects with E-Utilities and parses XML files. JavaScript manages client-side functionalities and converts Web pages into interactive platforms using dynamic HTML (DHTML), Document Object Model (DOM) tree manipulation and Ajax methods. With PubMed Interact, users can limit searches with JavaScript slider bars, preview result counts, delete citations from the list, display and add related articles and create relevance lists. Many interactive features occur at client-side, which allow instant feedback without reloading or refreshing the page resulting in a more efficient user experience. Conclusion PubMed Interact is a highly interactive Web-based search application for MEDLINE/PubMed that explores recent trends in Web technologies like DOM tree manipulation and Ajax. It may become a valuable technical development for online medical search applications. PMID:17083729

  4. Therapeutic efficacy of cyclic home elemental enteral alimentation in Crohn's disease: Japanese cooperative Crohn's disease study.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, K; Shoda, R; Takazoe, M; Hiwatashi, N; Bamba, T; Kobayashi, K; Saito, T; Terano, A; Yao, T

    1995-11-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) often flares up and requires frequent hospitalization and/or surgery. Cyclic home elemental enteral alimentation (C-HEEA) was developed to prevent flare-up of CD and to minimize patient hospitalization. However, its therapeutic efficacy has not been studied in a large patient population. Therefore, questionnaires were sent to members of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Research Group of Japan to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of C-HEEA and to define the factors that may affect the efficacy of the treatment. Data for 410 patients (C-HEEA-treated n = 322; drug-treated n = 88) were collected from 29 institutions and analysis showed the following results. The cumulative remission and non-hospitalization rates of the C-HEEA treated group were significantly higher than the rates of the drug-treated group in all patients and in those with ileitis and ileo-colitis (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.01, respectively), but no significant difference was noted in patients with colitis. Cumulative remission and non-hospitalization rates were also influenced by the daily calorie content of the elemental diet (ED); more than 1200 kcal of the ED per day was found to be more effective than lower amounts to maintain remission and to prevent hospitalization. The therapeutic efficacy of C-HEEA was shown to be superior to that of drug treatment in patients with CD with ileal involvement, and it is suggested that more than 1200kcal per day should be supplied by the ED to enhance its therapeutic efficacy.

  5. New Perpectives at MedNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, S.; Olivieri, M.; Mandiello, A.; Scognamiglio, L.; Pondrelli, S.; Amato, A.

    2007-05-01

    MedNet (Mediterranean Network) is a network of very broad band seismic stations installed in countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The project started in 1987, with the aim of providing high quality real-time data to the comprehension of one of the most active seismic regions of the World. Its main objectives were mapping the structure of the Mediterranean region, studying the seismic source properties of intermediate and large events, and applying this knowledge to measures for hazard mitigation and civil protection. Although general goals still hold, the network has now a different valence in the Euro-Mediterranean seismological landscape. National networks are now equipped with similar high quality instrumentation, real time transmission is adopted everywhere for seismic monitoring and infrastructures can support high rate data exchange among networks. MedNet objectives have then shifted toward contributing to real time monitoring of the Euro-Med region. The network presently comprises 22 operating seismic stations installed and maintained in cooperation with 13 geophysical institutions in Italy and in most of the Euro-Mediterranean. All the stations are equipped with 24-bit digitizers and very broad band sensors (Streckeisen STS2, with a few STS1). The MedNet Data Center (MNDC) exchanges data in real time with many seismological observatories, as well as ORFEUS and IRIS DMS. Over 15 years of archived very broad band data are distributed at users request by standard NetDC and AutoDRM protocols (in SEED and GSE formats respectively). Within the EC Project NERIES, MNDC hosts the European Integrated Data Archive, providing support and/or backup to the partner institutions. Presently, fully automatic network functions include: i)daily monitoring of state of health; ii) data recover after link failures; iii) triggered retrieval of event waveforms (with magnitude- and region- specific selection criteria) from continuous; iv) web pages update (http

  6. PubMed-EX: a web browser extension to enhance PubMed search with text mining features.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Chi-Hsin

    2009-11-15

    PubMed-EX is a browser extension that marks up PubMed search results with additional text-mining information. PubMed-EX's page mark-up, which includes section categorization and gene/disease and relation mark-up, can help researchers to quickly focus on key terms and provide additional information on them. All text processing is performed server-side, freeing up user resources. PubMed-EX is freely available at http://bws.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PubMed-EX and http://iisr.cse.yzu.edu.tw:8000/PubMed-EX/.

  7. Sterile Seroma after Drainage of Purulent Muscle Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Treitman, Adam; Tabriz, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Purulent skeletal muscle abscesses can occur in Crohn's disease. We report a case of a sterile seroma complicating percutaneous drainage of a purulent skeletal muscle abscess in Crohn's ileitis. We compare and contrast this case with a similar case we published earlier. We emphasize the importance of recognition and differentiation from a septic purulent abscess. PMID:27529038

  8. Increased colonic mucosal angiotensin I and II concentrations in Crohn's colitis.

    PubMed

    Jaszewski, R; Tolia, V; Ehrinpreis, M N; Bodzin, J H; Peleman, R R; Korlipara, R; Weinstock, J V

    1990-06-01

    To define a potential role for the angiotensin system in Crohn's colitis, the colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were measured in endoscopic biopsy samples from patients with active Crohn's colitis (n = 20), ulcerative colitis (n = 13), other forms of colitis (n = 3), and normal controls (n = 17). Colonic mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were greater in patients with Crohn's colitis than in normal subjects (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II were also higher in Crohn's colitis than in ulcerative colitis (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.001, respectively), and levels of angiotensin II were higher in Crohn's than in other forms of colitis (p = 0.014). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I and II correlated well with the degree of macroscopic inflammation in Crohn's colitis (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001 and r = 0.68, p less than 0.001, respectively). Mucosal levels of angiotensin I correlated fairly well with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (r = 0.46, p less than 0.05) while angiotensin II levels correlated poorly. These studies suggest that angiotensin I and II may have a role in the inflammation associated with Crohn's colitis.

  9. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease.

  10. Expression of CD45RO on circulating CD19+ B-cells in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yacyshyn, B R; Pilarski, L M

    1993-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an immunoregulatory disorder of the intestine that can be associated with systemic manifestations. This study analysed B-cell differentiation antigens to identify B-cell subpopulations unique to patients with Crohn's disease. CD45 isoform expression was used as an indicator of B-cell differentiation stage. This work shows that B-cells in blood and gut of patients with Crohn's disease are at an advanced stage of differentiation based on their unusual presentation of transitional (RA+ RO+) and late stage (RO+)CD45 isoforms on lamina propria lymphocytes, whereas normal intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes B-cells express primarily CD45RA. Crohn's disease patients had heightened expression of the CD45RO isoform on CD19+ lamina propria lymphocytes, and was found in a statistically significant proportion of Crohn's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) where CD19+ PBMC had an expression pattern affecting an unexpectedly high proportion of these differentiated or late stage CD45RO+ B-cells. The expression of CD45RO varied greatly among CD19+ PBMC from patients with Crohn's disease, so multiple regression analysis was performed between these CD45 isoforms and several clinical parameters. After grouping high and low CD45RO expression on CD19+ B-cells, a significant statistical difference was found between high Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) and low CDAI Crohn's disease patients respectively. PMID:7506695

  11. PubMedMiner: Mining and Visualizing MeSH-based Associations in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yucan; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of biomedical literature provides the opportunity to develop approaches for facilitating the identification of possible relationships between biomedical concepts. Indexing by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) represent high-quality summaries of much of this literature that can be used to support hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery tasks using techniques such as association rule mining. Based on a survey of literature mining tools, a tool implemented using Ruby and R – PubMedMiner – was developed in this study for mining and visualizing MeSH-based associations for a set of MEDLINE articles. To demonstrate PubMedMiner’s functionality, a case study was conducted that focused on identifying and comparing comorbidities for asthma in children and adults. Relative to the tools surveyed, the initial results suggest that PubMedMiner provides complementary functionality for summarizing and comparing topics as well as identifying potentially new knowledge. PMID:25954472

  12. LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Research News From NIH LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... Javascript on. Photo: Comstock LactMed, a free online database with information on drugs and lactation, is one ...

  13. COSMO-SkyMed and GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Pietro; Sole, Aurelia; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing have become key technology tools for the collection, storage and analysis of spatially referenced data. Industries that utilise these spatial technologies include agriculture, forestry, mining, market research as well as the environmental analysis . Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a coherent active sensor operating in the microwave band which exploits relative motion between antenna and target in order to obtain a finer spatial resolution in the flight direction exploiting the Doppler effect. SAR have wide applications in Remote Sensing such as cartography, surface deformation detection, forest cover mapping, urban planning, disasters monitoring , surveillance etc… The utilization of satellite remote sensing and GIS technology for this applications has proven to be a powerful and effective tool for environmental monitoring. Remote sensing techniques are often less costly and time-consuming for large geographic areas compared to conventional methods, moreover GIS technology provides a flexible environment for, analyzing and displaying digital data from various sources necessary for classification, change detection and database development. The aim of this work si to illustrate the potential of COSMO-SkyMed data and SAR applications in a GIS environment, in particular a demostration of the operational use of COSMO-SkyMed SAR data and GIS in real cases will be provided for what concern DEM validation, river basin estimation, flood mapping and landslide monitoring.

  14. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, Crohn's disease and HLA-B27 in black South African women.

    PubMed

    Buchel, O C; Bosch, F J; Janse van Rensburg, J; Bezuidenhout, E; de Vries, C S; van Zyl, J H; Middlecote, B D; de K Grundling, H; Fevery, J

    2012-12-01

    Crohn's disease is rare in South African black people and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is also rare in black patients with IBD, from South Africa. The presence of HLA-B27 is generally associated with seronegative spondylo-arthropathies and correlates with the occurrence of ankylosing spondylitis, recurrent mouth ulcers and uveitis, in patients with IBD. We describe two women with the combination of Crohn's disease, PSC and HLA-B27 from our cohort of the last 5 years of three black patients with Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease, PSC and HLA-B27 respectively, occur rarely in black South Africans and their concurrent presence in two black women suggests a pathogenetic link of HLA-B27 between Crohn's disease and PSC in this population. Female gender might be an additional determinant in this setting.

  15. Adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy promotes successful healing in patients with refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Marley Ribeiro; Féres Filho, Omar; Tamaki, Camila Mussolin; Perazzoli, Camila; Bernardes, Mário Vinícius Angelete Alvarez; Parra, Rogério Serafim; Rocha, José Joaquim Ribeiro da; Féres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    To investigate de adjunctive effect of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in a group of patients with refractory Crohn's disease. A total of 29 subjects with refractory Crohn's disease were submitted to daily sessions of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, in a 2800 Sechrist Monoplace Hyperbaric Chamber (Sechrist, USA) pressurized to 2.4 ATA. Each session lasted 2 hours. The endpoint was closure of enterocutaneous fistulas and complete healing of Pyoderma Gangrenosum and perineal Crohn's disease. A total of 829 HBOT sessions were performed and no complications were noted. Overall success rate was 76% (22 cases). Pyoderma Gangrenosum and enterocutaneous fistulas had the highest successful healing rates (100% and 91%, respectively). Perineal Crohn's disease healing rate was 65%. Adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy promoted satisfactory healing in a group of patients with refractory Crohn's disease.

  16. Chronic granulomatous otitis externa as an initial presentation of cutaneous Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Eileen M

    2014-08-01

    In the limited number of Crohn disease cases involving the head and neck, there is a predilection for mucosal surfaces and rare reports of involvement in the postauricular region. To our knowledge, in all previously reported cases involving the head and neck, the patients had a known diagnosis of Crohn disease. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a history of psoriasis and psoriasiform dermatitis who presented with bilateral chronic granulomatous otitis externa, obliteration of the external auditory canal, and fissuring, resulting in separation of the lobule from the preauricular skin. Pathologic examination results were consistent with granulomatous dermatitis concerning for cutaneous Crohn disease, and a subsequent gastroenterologic workup confirmed the diagnosis of Crohn disease. This is a report of chronic granulomatous otitis as the initial presentation of cutaneous Crohn disease in a child.

  17. Concurrent small bowel adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in Crohn's disease--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Levi, Zohar; Halpern, Marisa; Fraser, Gerald M

    2011-10-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the large and small bowel, as well as intestinal carcinoid tumors have been reported at increased rates in Crohn's disease. We herein report a rare case of concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the small bowel presenting as intestinal obstruction and found incidentally at laparotomy in a 55 year old male with longstanding ileal Crohn's disease. We performed a Medline Pubmed search for cases of synchronous or composite adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in the setting of Crohn's disease and identified four similar cases. Concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor occurred both in newly diagnosed and longstanding Crohn's disease, most commonly involved the terminal ileum and presented with symptoms mimicking Crohn's disease. Diagnosis was made incidentally at laparotomy in all cases. Lymph node involvement was variable. Clinicians should be aware of this rare entity for expeditious surgical intervention.

  18. First-in-Human Case Study: Pregnancy in Women With Crohn's Perianal Fistula Treated With Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Baro, Raquel; García-Arranz, Mariano; Guadalajara, Hector; de la Quintana, Paloma; Herreros, Maria Dolores; García-Olmo, Damián

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) had any influence on fertility, course of pregnancy, newborn weight, or physical condition of newborns. We performed a retrospective study of patients with a desire to become pregnant after having received intralesional injection of autologous ASCs for the treatment of perianal or rectovaginal fistula associated with Crohn's disease. We collected data on the resulting pregnancies, deliveries, and newborns of these patients. ASCs were expanded in vitro and characterized according to the international guidelines for cell surface markers (clusters of differentiation) and differentiated to adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes prior to implantation (except first implant in 2002). We analyzed five young women with Crohn's disease treated with ASCs: one for rectovaginal and perianal fistula, two for rectovaginal fistula only, and two for perianal fistula only. All patients received 2 doses of 20 million and 40 million cells at an interval of 3-4 months. Another patient received 2 doses of 6.6 million and 20 million ASCs with 9 months between each dose. Fertility and pregnancy outcomes were not affected by cell therapy treatment. No signs of treatment-related malformations were observed in the neonates by their respective pediatricians. In the patients studied, cell therapy with ASCs did not affect the course of pregnancy or newborn development. Local treatment with mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue seems not to affect the ability to conceive, the course of pregnancy, pregnancy outcomes, or newborns' health in female patients. This is the first publication about pregnancy outcome in women with perianal fistula and Crohn's disease treated with stem cell therapy, and could be of interest for doctors working in cell therapy. This is a very important question for patients, and there was no answer for them until now. ©AlphaMed Press.

  19. Treatment of Crohn's-Related Rectovaginal Fistula With Allogeneic Expanded-Adipose Derived Stem Cells: A Phase I-IIa Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    García-Arranz, Mariano; Herreros, Maria Dolores; González-Gómez, Carolina; de la Quintana, Paloma; Guadalajara, Héctor; Georgiev-Hristov, Tihomir; Trébol, Jacobo; Garcia-Olmo, Damián

    2016-11-01

    : The aim of this clinical trial was to determine the safety and feasibility of expanded allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells to treat Crohn's-related rectovaginal fistula (CRRVF). We designed a phase I-II clinical trial (https://ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00999115) to treat 10 patients with CRRVF. Patients receiving biological therapy during follow-up were excluded. Curettage was performed, and a vaginal or rectal flap was added if the surgeon considered it necessary. The therapeutic protocol included intralesional injection of 20 million stem cells in the vaginal walls (submucosal area) and fistula tract. Healing was evaluated 12 weeks later. If the fistula had not healed, a second dose of 40 million stem cells was administered. Patient follow-up was 52 weeks from last cell injection. Healing was defined as re-epithelialization of both vaginal and rectal sides and absence of vaginal drainage. Cytokines and immunological blood tests were monitored. Serious adverse events or rejection issues were not observed. Five patients were excluded because biologic drugs were required to treat a Crohn's disease flare-up during follow-up. Cytokine profiles and immunotoxicity assays showed no statistically significant alterations. Sixty percent of the nonexcluded patients achieved a complete healing. Expanded allogeneic adipose-derived stem-cell injection is a safe and feasible therapy for treating CRRVF, and the healing success rate seems promising (60%). The results of this trial encourage further exploration into this therapy. This may be the first publication in which allogeneic stem cells to treat rectovaginal fistula in Crohn´s disease seem to be a feasible and safe treatment. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy profile of the allogeneic stem cells strategy in a controlled design. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. Where Are All the Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in Patients with Crohn's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Ellen S.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestines, Johne's disease, in dairy cows and every other species of mammal in which it has been identified. MAP has been identified in the mucosal layer and deeper bowel wall in patients with Crohn's disease by methods other than light microscopy, and by direct visualization in small numbers by light microscopy. MAP has not been accepted as the cause of Crohn's disease in part because it has not been seen under the microscope in large numbers in the intestines of patients with Crohn's disease. An analysis of the literature on the pathology of Crohn's disease and on possible MAP infection in Crohn's patients suggests that MAP might directly infect endothelial cells and adipocytes and cause them to proliferate, causing focal obstruction within already existing vessels (including granuloma formation), the development of new vessels (neoangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis), and the “creeping fat” of the mesentery that is unique in human pathology to Crohn's disease but also occurs in bovine Johne's disease. Large numbers of MAP might therefore be found in the mesentery attached to segments of intestine affected by Crohn's disease rather than in the bowel wall, the blood and lymphatic vessels running through the mesentery, or the mesenteric fat itself. The walls of fistulas might result from the neoangiogenesis or lymphangiogenesis that occurs in the bowel wall in Crohn's disease and therefore are also possible sites of large numbers of MAP. The direct visualization of large numbers of MAP organisms in the tissues of patients with Crohn's disease will help establish that MAP causes Crohn's disease. PMID:19325887

  1. The MEDIATOR genes MED12 and MED13 control Arabidopsis root system configuration influencing sugar and auxin responses.

    PubMed

    Raya-González, Javier; López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Prado-Rodríguez, José Carlos; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo; López-Bucio, José

    2017-08-05

    Arabidopsis med12 and med13 mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes related to an altered auxin homeostasis. Sucrose supplementation reactivates both cell division and elongation in primary roots as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression in these mutants. An analysis of primary root growth of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants in response to sucrose and/or N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) placed MED12 upstream of auxin transport for the sugar modulation of root growth. The MEDIATOR (MED) complex plays diverse functions in plant development, hormone signaling and biotic and abiotic stress tolerance through coordination of transcription. Here, we performed genetic, developmental, molecular and pharmacological analyses to characterize the role of MED12 and MED13 on the configuration of root architecture and its relationship with auxin and sugar responses. Arabidopsis med12 and med13 single mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes consistent with altered auxin homeostasis including altered primary root growth, lateral root development, and root hair elongation. MED12 and MED13 were required for activation of cell division and elongation in primary roots, as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression. Remarkably, most of these mutant phenotypes were rescued by supplying sucrose to the growth medium. The growth response of primary roots of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants to sucrose and application of auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) revealed the correlation of med12 phenotype with the activity of the auxin intake permease and suggests that MED12 acts upstream of AUX1 in the root growth response to sugar. These data provide compelling evidence that MEDIATOR links sugar sensing to auxin transport and distribution during root morphogenesis.

  2. [Intestinal dysbiosis in pediatric patients with Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Pueyo, Blanca; Mach, Núria

    2013-11-01

    Introducción La enfermedad de Crohn (EC) pediátrica es un desorden caracterizado por presentar inflamación crónica que puede afectar cualquier segmento del tracto gastrointestinal. La disbiosis intestinal es un factor implicado en la patogénesis multifactorial de esta enfermedad. Diferentes suplementos dietarios se han propuesto como terapia alternativa para inducir o mantener la remisión de la EC. Objetivo Revisar las evidencias científicas publicadas sobre disbiosis intestinal en pacientes de Crohn pediátricos y la eficacia de la terapia con suplementos dietarios (especialmente probióticos). Material y métodos Se ha realizado una extensa búsqueda de publicaciones científicas en las principales bases de datos electrónicas especializadas: NCBI, Elsevier, Scielo, Scirus y Science Direct. Resultados y Discusión Se ha observado en la población pediátrica de EC un aumento de Proteobacteria y una reducción de Firmicutes. Los resultados referentes a los phyla Bacteroidetes y Actinobacteria son divergentes. Referente al uso de suplementos dietarios, el uso de probióticos no ha mostrado ningún impacto positivo en la EC pediátrica. Conclusiones Los resultados publicados hasta la fecha referentes a la disbiosis intestinal en pacientes pediátricos de Crohn, contribuyen al mejor conocimiento y entendimiento de las modificaciones en la flora bacteriana. Sin embargo, no es posible definir una microbiota asociada o causante de la EC. Además, los resultados publicados hasta la fecha no aportan evidencias sólidas de la eficacia de los probióticos como terapia en dichos pacientes.

  3. Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent relapse of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bourreille, Arnaud; Cadiot, Guillaume; Le Dreau, Gérard; Laharie, David; Beaugerie, Laurent; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Marteau, Philippe; Rampal, Patrick; Moyse, Dominique; Saleh, Ashraf; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Galmiche, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that has been shown to have beneficial effects on the intestinal epithelial barrier and digestive immune system. There is preliminary evidence that S boulardii could be used to treat patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of S boulardii in patients with CD who underwent remission during therapy with steroids or aminosalicylates. We performed a prospective study of 165 patients who achieved remission after treatment with steroids or salicylates; they were randomly assigned to groups given S boulardii (1 g/day) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage of patients in remission at week 52. Time to relapse, Crohn's disease activity index scores, and changes in parameters of inflammation were secondary end points. CD relapsed in 80 patients, 38 in the S boulardii group (47.5%) and 42 in the placebo group (53.2%, a nonsignificant difference). The median time to relapse did not differ significantly between patients given S boulardii (40.7 weeks) vs placebo (39.0 weeks). There were no significant differences between groups in mean Crohn's disease activity index scores or erythrocyte sedimentation rates or in median levels of C-reactive protein. In a post hoc analysis, nonsmokers given S boulardii were less likely to experience a relapse of CD than nonsmokers given placebo, but this finding requires confirmation. Although the probiotic yeast S boulardii is safe and well tolerated, it does not appear to have any beneficial effects for patients with CD in remission after steroid or salicylate therapies. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mediator subunits MED1 and MED24 cooperatively contribute to pubertal mammary gland development and growth of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Natsumi; Sumitomo, Akiko; Fujita, Azusa; Aritome, Nami; Mizuta, Shumpei; Matsui, Keiji; Ishino, Ruri; Inoue, Kana; Urahama, Norinaga; Nose, Junko; Mukohara, Toru; Kamoshida, Shingo; Roeder, Robert G; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    The Mediator subunit MED1 is essential for mammary gland development and lactation, whose contribution through direct interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) is restricted to involvement in pubertal mammary gland development and luminal cell differentiation. Here, we provide evidence that the MED24-containing submodule of Mediator functionally communicates specifically with MED1 in pubertal mammary gland development. Mammary glands from MED1/MED24 double heterozygous knockout mice showed profound retardation in ductal branching during puberty, while single haploinsufficient glands developed normally. DNA synthesis of both luminal and basal cells were impaired in double mutant mice, and the expression of ER-targeted genes encoding E2F1 and cyclin D1, which promote progression through the G(1)/S phase of the cell cycle, was attenuated. Luciferase reporter assays employing double mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed selective impairment in ER functions. Various breast carcinoma cell lines expressed abundant amounts of MED1, MED24, and MED30, and attenuated expression of MED1 and MED24 in breast carcinoma cells led to attenuated DNA synthesis and growth. These results indicate functional communications between the MED1 subunit and the MED24-containing submodule that mediate estrogen receptor functions and growth of both normal mammary epithelial cells and breast carcinoma cells.

  5. PubMed Informer: monitoring MEDLINE/PubMed through e-mail alerts, SMS, PDA downloads and RSS feeds.

    PubMed

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    PubMed Informer is a Web-based monitoring tool for topics of interest from MEDLINE/PubMed primarily designed for healthcare professionals. Five tracking methods are available: Web access, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), PDA downloads and RSS feeds. PubMed Informer delivers focused search updates and specific information to users with varying information-seeking practices.

  6. Pub-Med-dot-com, here we come!

    PubMed

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    As of April 8, 2016, articles in Neurology® Genetics can be searched using PubMed. Launched in 1996, PubMed is a search engine that accesses citations and abstracts of more than 26 million articles. Its primary sources include the MEDLINE database, which was started in the 1960s, and biomedical and life sciences journal articles that date back to 1946. In addition, PubMed accesses other sources, for example, citations to those life sciences journals that submit full-text articles to PubMed Central (PMC). PubMed Central was launched in 2000 as a free archive of biomedical and life science journals.

  7. Tirofiban-Induced Thrombocytopenia Occurring with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; El Karak, Fady; Araji, Assem; El Rassy, Elie

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man, with severe refractory Crohn's disease, presented with acute coronary syndrome that required angioplasty. He developed severe tirofiban-induced thrombocytopenia (TIT) heralded by type I allergic reaction that required steroids and a combination of antihistamine H1 and antihistamine H2 for symptomatic management. The thrombocytopenia spontaneously resolved uneventfully in 48 hours thereafter. This case report suggests a possible association between TIT and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, strict monitoring of the platelet count is required in patients who develop allergic reactions to tirofiban. PMID:27144035

  8. Primary tuberculous peritonitis during infliximab therapy for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bonse-Geuking, Ulrich; Kraus, Michael

    2012-07-01

    A 64 year old male patient suffering from Crohn's disease received infliximab therapy for a period of 5 months prior to presentation to our hospital. Due to the symptoms fever, ascites, and diffuse abdominal tenderness on palpation of unknown origin, a CT scan of the abdomen was performed and led to the suspected diagnosis of a peritoneal carcinomatosis. QuantiFERON™ test revealed a tuberculosis infection and molecular analyses of a peritoneal specimen obtained by laparoscopy clearly identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. Quadruple tuberculostatic therapy was initiated and the patient's condition continuously improved thereafter.

  9. [Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma in a patient with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Fluxá, Daniela; Kronberg, Udo; Lubascher, Jaime; O'Brien, Andrés; Las Heras, Facundo; Ibáñez, Patricio; Quera, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma is an uncommon lesion arising from the peritoneal mesothelium. It is asymptomatic or presents with unspecific symptoms. Imaging techniques may reveal it, however the final diagnosis can only be made by histopathology. Surgery is the only effective treatment considering its high recurrence rate. We report a 19 years old male with Crohn’s disease. Due to persistent abdominal pain, an abdominal magnetic resonance imaging was performed, showing a complex cystic mass in the lower abdomen. The patient underwent surgery and the lesion was completely resected. The pathological study reported a benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma.

  10. Low dose naltrexone for induction of remission in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dan; Macdonald, John K; Chande, Nilesh

    2014-02-21

    Crohn's disease is a transmural, relapsing inflammatory condition afflicting the digestive tract. Opioid signalling, long known to affect secretion and motility in the gut, has been implicated in the inflammatory cascade of Crohn's disease. Low dose naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, has garnered interest as a potential therapy. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low dose naltrexone for induction of remission in Crohn's disease. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Review Group Specialized Register was performed from inception to February 2013 to identify relevant studies. Abstracts from major gastroenterology conferences including Digestive Disease Week and United European Gastroenterology Week and reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. Randomized controlled trials of low dose naltrexone (LDN) for treatment of active Crohn's disease were included. Data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis using Review Manager (RevMan 5.2). The primary outcome was induction of clinical remission defined by a Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) of < 150 or a pediatric Crohn's disease activity index (PCDAI) of < 10. Secondary outcomes included clinical response (70- or 100-point decrease in CDAI from baseline), endoscopic remission or response, quality of life, and adverse events as defined by the included studies. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the primary outcome and selected secondary outcomes was assessed using the GRADE criteria. Two studies were identified (46 participants). One study assessed the efficacy and safety of 12 weeks of LDN (4.5 mg/day) treatment compared to placebo in adult patients (N = 34). The other study assessed

  11. Vedolizumab as induction and maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sandborn, William J; Feagan, Brian G; Rutgeerts, Paul; Hanauer, Stephen; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Sands, Bruce E; Lukas, Milan; Fedorak, Richard N; Lee, Scott; Bressler, Brian; Fox, Irving; Rosario, Maria; Sankoh, Serap; Xu, Jing; Stephens, Kristin; Milch, Catherine; Parikh, Asit

    2013-08-22

    The efficacy of vedolizumab, an α4β7 integrin antibody, in Crohn's disease is unknown. In an integrated study with separate induction and maintenance trials, we assessed intravenous vedolizumab therapy (300 mg) in adults with active Crohn's disease. In the induction trial, 368 patients were randomly assigned to receive vedolizumab or placebo at weeks 0 and 2 (cohort 1), and 747 patients received open-label vedolizumab at weeks 0 and 2 (cohort 2); disease status was assessed at week 6. In the maintenance trial, 461 patients who had had a response to vedolizumab were randomly assigned to receive placebo or vedolizumab every 8 or 4 weeks until week 52. At week 6, a total of 14.5% of the patients in cohort 1 who received vedolizumab and 6.8% who received placebo were in clinical remission (i.e., had a score on the Crohn's Disease Activity Index [CDAI] of ≤150, with scores ranging from 0 to approximately 600 and higher scores indicating greater disease activity) (P=0.02); a total of 31.4% and 25.7% of the patients, respectively, had a CDAI-100 response (≥100-point decrease in the CDAI score) (P=0.23). Among patients in cohorts 1 and 2 who had a response to induction therapy, 39.0% and 36.4% of those assigned to vedolizumab every 8 weeks and every 4 weeks, respectively, were in clinical remission at week 52, as compared with 21.6% assigned to placebo (P<0.001 and P=0.004 for the two vedolizumab groups, respectively, vs. placebo). Antibodies against vedolizumab developed in 4.0% of the patients. Nasopharyngitis occurred more frequently, and headache and abdominal pain less frequently, in patients receiving vedolizumab than in patients receiving placebo. Vedolizumab, as compared with placebo, was associated with a higher rate of serious adverse events (24.4% vs. 15.3%), infections (44.1% vs. 40.2%), and serious infections (5.5% vs. 3.0%). Vedolizumab-treated patients with active Crohn's disease were more likely than patients receiving placebo to have a remission, but

  12. A case of gas gangrene in an immunosuppressed Crohn's patient.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Natalie; Ho, Vincent; Pascoe, Andrew

    2011-09-07

    Clostridium septicum (C. septicum) gas gangrene is well documented in the literature, typically in the setting of trauma or immunosuppression. In this paper, we report a unique case of spontaneous clostridial myonecrosis in a patient with Crohn's disease and sulfasalazine-induced neutropenia. The patient presented with left thigh pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Blood tests demonstrated a profound neutropenia, and magnetic resonance imaging of the thigh confirmed extensive myonecrosis. The patient underwent emergency hip disarticulation, followed by hemicolectomy. C. septicum was cultured from the blood. Following completion of antibiotic therapy, the patient developed myonecrosis of the right pectoral muscle necessitating further debridement, and remains on lifelong prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

  13. Surgical recurrence in Crohn's disease: Are we getting better?

    PubMed

    Kristo, Ivan; Stift, Anton; Bergmann, Michael; Riss, Stefan

    2015-05-28

    Crohn's disease (CD) still remains a challenging chronic inflammatory disorder, both for colorectal surgeons and gastroenterologists. The need for recurrent surgery following primary intestinal resection is still considerable, though recent evidence suggested a declining rate of recurrence. Several conflicting surgical parameters have been identified that might impact on the postoperative outcome positively, such as access to the abdomen, anastomotic configuration or type of disease. Additionally, promising results have been achieved with the increased use of immunosuppressive medications in CD. Consequently, the question arises if we are getting better as a result of novel medical and surgical strategies.

  14. Multiple pulmonary nodules in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Golpe, Rafael; Mateos, Alfonso; Pérez-Valcárcel, Javier; Lapeña, José A; García-Figueiras, Roberto; Blanco, Joaquín

    2003-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) can be associated with respiratory involvement. Multiple pulmonary nodules are an infrequent finding in patients with CD. When they are found, histology usually shows sterile necrobiotic nodules, which are spherical aggregates of neutrophils, which frequently cavitate. We report a patient with inactive CD treated with mesalazine, who presented with multiple pulmonary nodules. Transthoracic biopsy of one of the nodules disclosed a benign, nongranulomatous inflammatory lymphoid infiltration. The radiographic abnormalities responded well to oral prednisone. Focal, nongranulomatous lymphoid infiltration thus must be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple pulmonary nodules in patients with CD.

  15. Epidemiology, Natural History, and Risk Stratification of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Aniwan, Satimai; Park, Sang Hyoung; Loftus, Edward V

    2017-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic condition that can result in significant morbidity and disability. By studying the association between demographics and initial clinical features and subsequent natural history, one may be able to stratify patients by their risks of clinical relapse, hospitalization, and surgery. Understanding the potential environmental risk factors and natural history of CD in a given patient guides the physician when counseling the patient and selecting a treatment strategy. In this review, updated data regarding the incidence and prevalence of CD, important environmental risk factors, natural history of the disease, and important prognostic factors are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Thalidomide induces mucosal healing in postoperative Crohn disease endoscopic recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Xinying; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thalidomide has been successful use in patients with refractory Crohn disease (CD) in recent years. Methods: We collected the data of a postoperative CD patient who was prescribed thalidomide to induce remission and reviewed the relevant literatures. Results: A 51-year-old female was diagnosed as CD after an urgent terminal intestinal resection and presented endoscopic recurrence despite the prophylactic treatment with azathioprine (AZA). Fortunately, she achieved mucosal healing (MH) at a low dose of thalidomide for 15 months. Conclusion: Thalidomide is effective to induce MH in the postoperative CD endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27603389

  17. Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Rudolf; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In ancient medicine, cannabis has been widely used to cure disturbances and inflammation of the bowel. A recent clinical study now shows that the medicinal plant Cannabis sativa has lived up to expectations and proved to be highly efficient in cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. In a prospective placebo-controlled study, it has been shown what has been largely anticipated from anecdotal reports, i.e. that cannabis produces significant clinical benefits in patients with Crohn's disease. The mechanisms involved are not yet clear but most likely include peripheral actions on cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, and may also include central actions. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Systematic review with meta-analysis: breastfeeding and the risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Lochhead, P; Ko, Y; Claggett, B; Leong, R W; Ananthakrishnan, A N

    2017-09-11

    Breastfeeding is a modifiable factor that may influence development of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, literature on this has been inconsistent and not accounted for heterogeneity in populations and exposure. To conduct a meta-analysis to examine the association between breastfeeding in infancy and risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). A systematic search of Medline/PubMed and Embase was performed for full text, English-language literature through November 2016. Studies were included if they described breastfeeding in infancy in patients with CD or UC, and healthy controls. Data were pooled using a random effects model for analysis. A total of 35 studies were included in the final analysis, comprising 7536 individuals with CD, 7353 with UC and 330 222 controls. Ever being breastfed was associated with a lower risk of CD (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.59-0.85) and UC (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.91). While this inverse association was observed in all ethnicity groups, the magnitude of protection was significantly greater among Asians (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.20-0.48) compared to Caucasians (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.66-0.93; P = .0001) in CD. Breastfeeding duration showed a dose-dependent association, with strongest decrease in risk when breastfed for at least 12 months for CD (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.08-0.50) and UC (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.10-0.43) as compared to 3 or 6 months. Breastfeeding in infancy protects against the development of CD and ulcerative colitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography for the detection and assessment of Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Xue, Luqi; Xu, Jing; Li, Qingfang; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Imaging modalities are essential for the diagnosis and assessment of CD. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a well-tolerated, noninvasive and radiation-free modality and has shown potential in CD assessment. We aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SICUS in the detection and assessment of small-bowel lesions and complications in CD. Methods: We searched PubMed database for relevant studies published before April 24, 2016. We integrated the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative into the pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Forest plots were to represent the pooled results of all studies. Results: Thirteen articles were finally considered eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SICUS in detecting small-bowel lesions were 0.883 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.847–0.913) and 0.861 (95% CI 0.828–0.890), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 39.123 (95% CI 20.014–76.476) and the area under the curve of summary receiver operating characteristic was 0.9273 (standard error: 0.0152). In subgroup analyses, SICUS represented fine sensitivity and specificity in proximal and distal small intestine lesion, as well as in CD-related complications such as stricture, dilation, abscess, and fistula. Conclusion: SICUS is accurate enough to make a complete assessment about the location, extent, number, and almost all kinds of complications in CD small-bowel lesions. PMID:27495028

  20. A systematic review of economic studies on biological agents used to treat Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Derek H; Harrington, Amanda R; Lee, Jeannie K; Lin, Mark; Armstrong, Edward P

    2013-11-01

    Identifying clinical scenarios that maximize the cost-effectiveness of biological treatments can lead to optimized health care cost-saving and clinical effectiveness from a society's perspective. Published articles between January 1995 and June 2012 were searched in PubMed, EMBASE, ABI/INFORM, Tuft's Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry Database, Cochrane National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Studies of interest included the following: (1) cost studies, (2) economic evaluations, or (3) narrative or systematic reviews related to economic evaluations of biological treatments for moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease (CD). The primary outcomes of interest included costs associated with biological treatments and cost-effectiveness measures, including incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. A threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life year (£60,000/quality-adjusted life year) gained was used for treatment cost-effectiveness. Thirty-eight studies were identified, including 15 economic evaluations and 23 cost studies or reviews of economic evaluations. Economic evaluations found that infliximab and adalimumab were more cost-effective than standard therapy for luminal CD when provided as an induction therapy followed by episodic therapy over 5 or more years. The cost-effectiveness of infliximab and adalimumab versus standard therapy for luminal CD was less certain when used as 1-year maintenance treatment with or without previous induction therapy. Cost studies revealed that infliximab therapy reduced health care resource utilization and cost. Older reviews were inconclusive about the cost-effectiveness of biological treatments used for CD. Current evidence suggests that biological treatments may be cost-effective for CD under certain clinical scenarios. Future studies evaluating all biological treatments are needed to compare their respective benefits and costs.

  1. COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation planner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Fabio; Scopa, Tiziana; Serva, Stefano; Caltagirone, Francesco; De Luca, Giuseppe Francesco; Pacaccio, Alessandro; Profili, Mario

    2014-10-01

    COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation (CSG) system has been conceived, according to Italian Space Agency (ASI) and Italian Ministry of Defence (It-MoD) requirements, at the twofold objective of ensuring operational continuity to the current constellation (COSMO-SkyMed - CSK), while improving functionality and performances. It is an "end-to-end" Italian Earth Observation Dual-Use (Civilian and Defence) Space System with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) operating in X-Band. CSG mission planning purpose is to fully employ the system resources, shared between partners with very different needs, producing a mission plan that satisfies the higher priority requests and optimizes the overall plan with the remaining requests according to the users programming rights consumption. CSG Mission Planning tool provides new performances in terms of adaptability and flexibility of the planning and scheduling algorithms conceived to select and synchronize data acquisition and downloading activities. CSG planning and scheduling problem is characterized by a large size of research space and a particular structure of technical and managerial constraints that has led to the implementation of innovative design of the planning algorithms based on both priority criteria and saturation of system resources. This approach envisages two scheduling strategies: the rank-based and the optimization-based. The former strategy is firstly applied to the most important request categories, with an associated rank value or priority level; the latter is subsequently applied to the unranked or lower priority requests. This is an iterative dynamic process of finding optimal solutions able to better answer the demanding requirements coming from the needs of heterogeneous users.

  2. Marker antibody expression stratifies Crohn's disease into immunologically homogeneous subgroups with distinct clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliauskas, E; Kam, L; Karp, L; Gaiennie, J; Yang, H; Targan, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) have been detected in a clinically distinct Crohn's disease subpopulation. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) have been demonstrated in the majority of patients with Crohn's disease.
AIMS—To examine the relationship between selective marker antibody expression in Crohn's disease and disease onset, location, and clinical behaviour patterns.
METHODS—Sera from 156 consecutive patients with established Crohn's disease were evaluated in a blinded fashion for the presence of ASCA and ANCA. Clinical profiles were generated by investigators blinded to immune marker status.
RESULTS—Using multiple regression analyses, higher ASCA levels were shown to be independently associated with early age of disease onset as well as both fibrostenosing and internal penetrating disease behaviours. Higher ANCA levels were associated with later age of onset and ulcerative colitis-like behaviour. Substratification of the Crohn's disease population using selective ANCA and ASCA expression (high levels of a single marker antibody): (1) distinguished homogeneous subgroups that manifested similar disease location and behaviours; and (2) identified patients with more aggressive small bowel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—The findings suggest that by taking into account the magnitude of the host immune response, Crohn's disease can now be stratified on an immunological basis into more homogeneous clinically distinct subgroups, characterised by greater uniformity among anatomical distribution of disease and disease behaviour.


Keywords: antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody; anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody; Crohn's disease; inflammatory bowel disease; ulcerative colitis PMID:10986208

  3. Pilot study of endoscopic retrograde 3-dimensional - computed tomography enteroclysis for the assessment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro; Inaba, Yuhei; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Yoshiki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kashima, Shin; Moriichi, Kentaro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde ileography (ERIG) is developed in our institute and applied clinically for the diagnosis and assessment of the Crohn's disease activity. We have further improved the technique using 3-dimensional - computed tomography enteroclysis (3D-CTE) and conducted a retrospective study to determine the feasibility and the diagnostic value of endoscopic retrograde 3D-CTE (ER 3D-CTE) in Crohn's disease patients in a state of remission. Thirteen Crohn's patients were included in this pilot study. CTE was performed after the infusion of air or CO2 through the balloon tube following conventional colonoscopy. The primary endpoint of this study was to assess the safety of this method. Secondarily, the specific findings of Crohn's disease and length of the visualized small intestine were assessed. The procedures were completed without any adverse events. Gas passed through the small intestine and enterographic images were obtained in 10 out of 13 cases, but, in the remaining patients, insertion of the balloon tubes into the terminal ileum failed. Various features specific to Crohn's disease were visualized using ER 3D-CTE. A cobble stone appearance or hammock-like malformation was specific and effective for diagnosing Crohn's disease and the features of anastomosis after the surgical operations were also well described. Therefore, this technique may be useful after surgery. In this study, ER 3D-CTE was performed safely in Crohn's disease patients and may be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease.

  4. Crohn's disease: a role of gut microbiota and Nod2 gene polymorphisms in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hrnčířová, Lucia; Krejsek, Jan; Šplíchal, Igor; Hrnčíř, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic immune-mediated intestinal inflammation targeted against a yet incompletely defined subset of commensal gut microbiota and occurs on the background of a genetic predisposition under the influence of environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies have identified about 70 genetic risk loci associated with Crohn's disease. The greatest risk for Crohn's disease represent polymorphisms affecting the CARD15 gene encoding nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) which is an intracellular sensor for muramyl dipeptide, a peptidoglycan constituent of bacterial cell wall. The accumulated evidence suggests that gut microbiota represent an essential, perhaps a central factor in the induction and maintaining of Crohn's disease where dysregulation of normal co-evolved homeostatic relationships between intestinal microbiota and host mucosal immune system leads to intestinal inflammation. Taken together, these findings identify Crohn's disease as a syndrome of overlapping phenotypes that involves variable influences of genetic and environmental factors. A deeper understanding of different genetic abnormalities underlying Crohn's disease together with the identification of beneficial and harmful components of gut microbiota and their interactions are essential conditions for the categorization of Crohn's disease patients, which enable us to design more effective, preferably causative, individually tailored therapy.

  5. High frequency of helicobacter negative gastritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, L; Kärkkäinen, P; Rautelin, H; Kosunen, T U; Sipponen, P

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of gastric Crohn's disease has been considered low. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with Crohn's disease. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed on 62 consecutive patients suffering from ileocolonic Crohn's disease. Biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus were processed for both histological and bacteriological examinations. H pylori antibodies of IgG and IgA classes were measured in serum samples by enzyme immunoassay. Six patients (9.7%) were infected with H pylori, as shown by histology, and in five of them the infection was also verified by serology. Twenty one patients (32%) had chronic H pylori negative gastritis (negative by both histology and serology) and one of them also had atrophy in the antrum and corpus. Granulomas were found in four patients. The characteristic appearance of H pylori negative gastritis was focal and mostly mild inflammation resembling the inflammatory changes seen in the gut in Crohn's disease. Patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis had a significantly more active disease in their gut than those with normal gastric mucosa (p < 0.01). It is concluded that H pylori positive gastritis is rare, while H pylori negative gastritis is relatively common in patients with Crohn's disease. H pylori negative 'Crohn's gastritis' seems to be associated with active Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8675090

  6. Small-bowel mucosal healing assessment by capsule endoscopy as a predictor of long-term clinical remission in patients with Crohn's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron

    2017-04-13

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) may be used for the evaluation and follow-up of patients with Crohn's disease. CE scores correspond to the degree of mucosal inflammation, a major therapeutic target. The aim of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to determine whether mucosal healing assessment by CE may serve as a predictor of clinical remission in patients with Crohn's disease. To identify observational or controlled English-language full-text studies assessing mucosal healing by CE in patients with Crohn's disease up to 30 September 2016, we searched PubMed, Embase, Central, Medline, and Scopus using the key words 'mucosal healing' and 'capsule endoscopy'. A meta-analysis was carried out using 'Comprehensive meta-analysis' software. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Five observational studies including 142 patients from five countries fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No publication bias was found by funnel plot. The mucosal healing CE score was found to be significantly associated with improved outcome after a follow-up of 12 weeks to 24 months, with an odds ratio of 11.06 (95% confidence interval: 3.74-32.73, P<0.001). The degree of heterogeneity among the studies was small (Q=2.014, d.f.[Q]=3, P=0.569 and I=0). Endoscopy scores may play a role in the long-term prognostic evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease. Our results may be accepted as proof of concept, but larger studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  7. Site-Specific Immunomodulator: A Novel Treatment for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Brian; Bethel, Kevin P.; Kleef, Ralf; Reynolds, Sophie L.; Sutcliffe, Simon; Mullins, David W.; Gunn, Hal

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of action, safety, and efficacy of the Site-Specific Immunomodulator (SSI) QBECO, a novel immunotherapy for Crohn's disease (CD). Using human monocytic THP-1 cells, we demonstrate that SSI QBECO (derived from the common colon bacteria E. coli) activates macrophages to an M1 phenotype (associated with enhanced capacity to eliminate bacteria and activate innate immune responses). We assessed SSI QBECO in a compassionate use protocol of ten adult patients with active CD. Patients with moderate to severe clinical symptoms receiving conventional CD treatments and/or complementary therapies were included, except patients receiving anti-TNF medications. SSI QBECO was self-administered subcutaneously every second day, for a minimum of 2.5 months and a maximum of 11 months. All 10 patients reported improvement of symptoms while on the SSI QBECO treatment. Seven patients reported full resolution of clinical symptoms during a course of SSI QBECO of at least three months. Three patients have experienced ongoing sustained clinical remission after discontinuing all medications, including SSI treatment. The longest case of clinical remission is still ongoing (>4 years). No serious severe adverse clinical events were reported. Collectively, we conclude that treatment with the immunoactive SSI QBECO was well tolerated and effective for treatment of Crohn's disease in this case series. PMID:26064087

  8. Perioperative endoscopy of the whole small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lescut, D; Vanco, D; Bonnière, P; Lecomte-Houcke, M; Quandalle, P; Wurtz, A; Colombel, J F; Delmotte, J S; Paris, J C; Cortot, A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for small bowel lesions by means of a perioperative endoscopy in 20 patients operated on for Crohn's disease. Seven women and 13 men (mean age 29 years) had a total retrograde exploration to the angle of Treitz during an ileocolectomy (16 of 20 patients) or a colonic or ileal resection (four of 20 patients). Endoscopic exploration was completed, through an enterotomy, from the surgical area to the angle of Treitz. Periendoscopic biopsy samples were taken on macroscopic lesions and every 20 cm systematically. In 13 of 20 cases, various lesions scattered over the whole small intestine were found. These were aphthoid ulcerations (10 patients), superficial ulcerations (seven patients), mucosal oedema (three patients), non-ulcerative stenosis (three patients), erythema (two patients), pseudopolyps (two patients), deep ulcerations (two patients), and ulcerative stenosis (one patient). In seven patients none of the lesions detected at perioperative endoscopy had been recognised by preoperative evaluation or surgical inspection of the serosal surface. A typical granuloma was found at biopsy of lesions identified by endoscopy in three cases and at biopsy of an apparently healthy area in one case. Thus 65% of patients operated on for Crohn's disease had lesions of the small intestine detected by endoscopy, which were unrecognised before surgery in more than half of the cases. PMID:8504965

  9. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life.

  10. Is it Crohn's disease or intestinal tuberculosis? CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, D

    1998-08-01

    A computed tomographic (CT) analysis of 36 patients with differential diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis (IT) or Crohn's disease (CD) in barium gastrointestinal studies was undertaken to identify distinguishing bowel wall or mesenteric features which could provide a radiological definitive diagnosis. Final diagnoses obtained in 32 cases were tuberculosis (N = 18), CD (N = 9), carcinoid (N = 2), chronic appendicitis (N = 2) and bowel infarction (N = 1). In IT, the bowel wall changes were varied: absence of wall thickening (N = 6), minimal asymmetric wall thickening with and without mucosal tethering (N = 8), minimal symmetric wall thickening often with mild peritonitis (N = 3), exophytic mass encircling bowel lumen (N = 4). Mural stratification (target sign) was not found. CD showed concentric or symmetrical wall thickening ranging from 0.6 to 1.5 mm and mural stratification occurred in about a half of the cases. Lymphadenopathy was the commonest associated feature in both but in IT, the nodes were larger and a third had necrotic centers. Displacement of bowel loops was more often due to enlarged lymphadenopathy in IT while in CD it was frequently due to fibrofatty change. CT was able to provide the correct diagnosis in 26 out of these 32 (81%) cases of indeterminate barium studies. CT is recommended when barium gastrointestinal studies are unable to differentiate between intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease.

  11. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  12. Crohn's disease mistaken for long-standing idiopathic mesenteric panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzo, Alexandre; Zappa, Magaly; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mesenteric panniculitis (MP) is mostly an associated sign of an intra-abdominal or systemic inflammatory primary disease. Nevertheless, etiological and differential diagnosis of idiopathic MP can be challenging when an associate primary cause is not in the foreground. Methods: We report here the case of an isolated small bowel Crohn's disease, long time considered as idiopathic MP. Results: This patient presented to our department with a 10-year history of acute abdominal symptoms evolving with flare-up and remission. A diagnosis of idiopathic MP was made based on compatible CT-scan features along with normal laboratory tests and upper and lower bowel endoscopies. As symptoms recurred, a steroid course was proposed which dramatically improved his condition for years. Finally, an explorative laparoscopy was performed because of concern of malignancy when he returned to our unit with a steroid refractory flare-up and weight loss, along with MP nodes growing up to 10 mm. Crohn's disease was eventually diagnosed, based on histopathological middle-gut bowel resection and numerous granulomas in mesenteric nodes without necrosis. Conclusion: This case emphasizes the importance of excluding inflammatory intestinal lesions before making the diagnosis of idiopathic MP (fecal calprotectin, magnetic resonance enterography, wireless capsule endoscopy). PMID:27684882

  13. Lactobacillus GG in inducing and maintaining remission of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Michael; Timmer, Antje; Herfarth, Hans H; Sartor, R Balfour; Vanderhoof, Jon A; Rath, Heiko C

    2004-03-15

    Experimental studies have shown that luminal antigens are involved in chronic intestinal inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Alteration of the intestinal microflora by antibiotic or probiotic therapy may induce and maintain remission. The aim of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to determine the effect of oral Lactobacillus GG (L. GG) to induce or maintain medically induced remission. Eleven patients with moderate to active Crohn's disease were enrolled in this trial to receive either L. GG (2 x 10(9) CFU/day) or placebo for six months. All patients were started on a tapering steroid regime and received antibiotics for the week before the probiotic/placebo medication was initiated. The primary end point was sustained remission, defined as freedom from relapse at the 6 months follow-up visit. Relapse was defined as an increase in CDAI of >100 points. 5/11 patients finished the study, with 2 patients in each group in sustained remission. The median time to relapse was 16 +/- 4 weeks in the L. GG group and 12 +/- 4.3 weeks in the placebo group (p = 0.5). In this study we could not demonstrate a benefit of L. GG in inducing or maintaining medically induced remission in CD.

  14. Genome analysis of E. coli isolated from Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rakitina, Daria V; Manolov, Alexander I; Kanygina, Alexandra V; Garushyants, Sofya K; Baikova, Julia P; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Ladygina, Valentina G; Kostryukova, Elena S; Larin, Andrei K; Semashko, Tatiana A; Karpova, Irina Y; Babenko, Vladislav V; Ismagilova, Ruzilya K; Malanin, Sergei Y; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Ilina, Elena N; Gorodnichev, Roman B; Lisitsyna, Eugenia S; Aleshkin, Gennady I; Scherbakov, Petr L; Khalif, Igor L; Shapina, Marina V; Maev, Igor V; Andreev, Dmitry N; Govorun, Vadim M

    2017-07-19

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). The phylogeny of E. coli isolated from Crohn's disease patients (CDEC) was controversial, and while genotyping results suggested heterogeneity, the sequenced strains of E. coli from CD patients were closely related. We performed the shotgun genome sequencing of 28 E. coli isolates from ten CD patients and compared genomes from these isolates with already published genomes of CD strains and other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. CDEC was shown to belong to A, B1, B2 and D phylogenetic groups. The plasmid and several operons from the reference CD-associated E. coli strain LF82 were demonstrated to be more often present in CDEC genomes belonging to different phylogenetic groups than in genomes of commensal strains. The operons include carbon-source induced invasion GimA island, prophage I, iron uptake operons I and II, capsular assembly pathogenetic island IV and propanediol and galactitol utilization operons. Our findings suggest that CDEC are phylogenetically diverse. However, some strains isolated from independent sources possess highly similar chromosome or plasmids. Though no CD-specific genes or functional domains were present in all CD-associated strains, some genes and operons are more often found in the genomes of CDEC than in commensal E. coli. They are principally linked to gut colonization and utilization of propanediol and other sugar alcohols.

  15. Guidelines for the treatment of Crohn's disease in children.

    PubMed

    Konno, Mutsuko; Kobayashi, Akio; Tomomasa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Toyoda, Shigeru; Nakazato, Yutaka; Nezu, Riichiro; Maisawa, Shun-Ichi; Miki, Kazunori

    2006-06-01

    This paper shows guidelines for the treatment of Crohn's disease in children by the Working Group of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (Chair: Yuichiro Yamashiro) and the Japanese Society for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Chair: Akio Kobayashi). The points in which these guidelines differ from those for adult patients are as follows. (i) Total enteral nutrition in the form of an elemental formula is indicated as primary therapy for children with Crohn's disease at onset as well as the active stage. Oral mesalazine is used together. (ii) Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with oral mesalazine is required for children with serious illness. The use of a corticosteroid should be withheld for at least 1 week after TPN has been started. (iii) When TPN is not considered to be effective, additional corticosteroid is used. Full doses of corticosteroid should be used for at least 2 weeks after clinical improvement has been achieved, and then the dose of the corticosteroid should be tapered carefully. (iv) When surgery is indicated in pediatric patients with stricture or fistula formation and complicated by persistent growth failure despite medical therapy, the optimum time for surgery is thought to be before epiphyseal plates have been closed.

  16. Assessment of the lactulose-mannitol test in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Andre, F; Andre, C; Emery, Y; Forichon, J; Descos, L; Minaire, Y

    1988-01-01

    The mannitol-lactulose intestinal permeability test was evaluated in 100 healthy controls and 47 patients with Crohn's disease. These patients were further separated into three subgroups of increased activity (Harvey-Bradshaw index) and in two subgroups, with elective colonic lesions and associated ileal and colonic lesions. Results were given as percentages of urinary recoveries for mannitol (M), lactulose (L), and L/M ratio. As a whole, patients with Crohn's disease have lower mean M and higher mean L and mean L/M ratios than controls. The magnitude of alterations in M, L, and L/M increased with activity. The sensitivity of the test, however, reached interesting figures (67%:L and 86%:L/M) only in subgroup III which was composed of relapsing patients. Mean M was lower in patients with associated ileal lesion but, whatever the criterion (M, L, or L/M), the test does not provide any clue for the detection of a possible infraclinical associated ileal localisation. PMID:3131194

  17. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  18. The impact of pregnancy on surgical Crohn disease: an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Quinton; Champagne, Bradley J; Maykel, Justin A; Davis, Bradley R; Johnson, Eric K; Bleier, Joshua I; Francone, Todd D; Steele, Scott R

    2014-07-01

    The impact of pregnancy on the course of Crohn disease is largely unknown. Retrospective surveys have suggested a variable effect, but there are limited population-based clinical data. We hypothesized pregnant women with Crohn disease will have similar rates of surgical disease as a nonpregnant Crohn disease cohort. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify female Crohn patients from all patients admitted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998-2009). Women were stratified as either pregnant or nonpregnant. We defined Crohn-related surgical disease as peritonitis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, intra-abdominal abscess, toxic colitis, anorectal suppuration, intestinal-intestinal fistulas, intestinal-genitourinary fistulas, obstruction and/or stricture, or perforation (excluding appendicitis). Of the 92,335 women admitted with a primary Crohn-related diagnosis, 265 (0.3%) were pregnant. Pregnant patients were younger (29 versus 44 y; P<0.001) and had lower rates of tobacco use (6% versus 13%; P<0.001). Pregnant women with Crohn disease had higher rates of intestinal-genitourinary fistulas (23.4% versus 3.0%; P<0.001), anorectal suppuration (21.1% versus 4.1%; P<0.001), and overall surgical disease (59.6% versus 39.2%; P<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis controlling for malnutrition, smoking, age, and prednisone use, pregnancy was independently associated with higher rates of anorectal suppuration (odds ratio [OR], 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8-7.0; P<0.001), intestinal-genitourinary fistulas (OR, 10.4; 95% CI, 7.8-13.8; P<0.001), and overall surgical disease (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.3-3.7; P<0.001). Pregnancy in women with Crohn disease is a significant risk factor for Crohn-related surgical disease, in particular, anorectal suppuration and intestinal-genitourinary fistulas. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Analysis of PubMed User Sessions Using a Full-Day PubMed Query Log: A Comparison of Experienced and Nonexperienced PubMed Users

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background PubMed is the largest biomedical bibliographic information source on the Internet. PubMed has been considered one of the most important and reliable sources of up-to-date health care evidence. Previous studies examined the effects of domain expertise/knowledge on search performance using PubMed. However, very little is known about PubMed users’ knowledge of information retrieval (IR) functions and their usage in query formulation. Objective The purpose of this study was to shed light on how experienced/nonexperienced PubMed users perform their search queries by analyzing a full-day query log. Our hypotheses were that (1) experienced PubMed users who use system functions quickly retrieve relevant documents and (2) nonexperienced PubMed users who do not use them have longer search sessions than experienced users. Methods To test these hypotheses, we analyzed PubMed query log data containing nearly 3 million queries. User sessions were divided into two categories: experienced and nonexperienced. We compared experienced and nonexperienced users per number of sessions, and experienced and nonexperienced user sessions per session length, with a focus on how fast they completed their sessions. Results To test our hypotheses, we measured how successful information retrieval was (at retrieving relevant documents), represented as the decrease rates of experienced and nonexperienced users from a session length of 1 to 2, 3, 4, and 5. The decrease rate (from a session length of 1 to 2) of the experienced users was significantly larger than that of the nonexperienced groups. Conclusions Experienced PubMed users retrieve relevant documents more quickly than nonexperienced PubMed users in terms of session length. PMID:26139516

  20. Imaging techniques and combined medical and surgical treatment of perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Losco, A; Viganò, C; Oreggia, B; Prati, M; Contessini Avesani, E

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease which may involve any segment of the gastrointestinal tract, most frequently the terminal ileum, the large intestine, and the perianal region. The symptoms of perianal Crohn's disease include skin disorders, hemorrhoids, anal ulcers, anorectal stenosis, perianal abscesses and fistulas, rectovaginal fistulas and carcinoma of the perianal region. The perianal manifestations of Crohn's disease cause great discomfort to the patient and are among the most difficult aspects to treat. Management of perianal disease requires a combination of different imaging modalities and a close cooperation between gastroenterologists and dedicated surgeons.

  1. Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules in Crohn's disease: a rare extra-intestinal manifestation.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Fraig, Mostafa; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Saad, Mohamed; Perez, Rafael L

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules represent a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. Histologically, they are composed of sterile aggregates of inflammatory cells with necrosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and exclusion of infectious etiologies is mandatory before starting immunosuppressive therapy. Here, we present the fifth reported case of pulmonary necrobiotic nodules in Crohn's disease. Our patient had new-onset Crohn's disease associated with both cavitating and non-cavitating lung nodules that were confirmed to be necrobiotic nodules by biopsy. The patient was started on mesalamine and prednisone, with subsequent improvement of his gastrointestinal symptoms and regression of the necrobiotic nodules.

  2. PubMed Interact: an Interactive Search Application for MEDLINE/PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Online search and retrieval systems are important resources for medical literature research. Progressive Web 2.0 technologies provide opportunities to improve search strategies and user experience. Using PHP, Document Object Model (DOM) manipulation and Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax), PubMed Interact allows greater functionality so users can refine search parameters with ease and interact with the search results to retrieve and display relevant information and related articles. PMID:17238658

  3. Specific gastroduodenoscopic findings in Crohn's disease: Comparison with findings in patients with ulcerative colitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, M; Kato, J; Morimoto, N; Fujimoto, T; Okada, H; Yamamoto, K

    2008-06-01

    Crohn's disease patients often carry gastroduodenal lesions. However, few reports have addressed specific gastroduodenoscopic findings in Crohn's disease patients. The gastroduodenoscopic findings of 63 Crohn's disease patients were examined. Those of 62 ulcerative colitis and 63 age- and gender-matched gastroesophageal reflux disease patients were also reviewed as controls. Findings of bamboo-joint-like appearance, gastric antral erosions, and duodenal lesions were the specific findings that were highlighted. Of 63 Crohn's disease patients, 47 (75%) had at least one of the specific gastroduodenoscopic findings, and the prevalence of these findings was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease patients (ulcerative colitis, 24/62, 39%; gastroesophageal reflux disease, 15/63, 24%, P < 0.0001). In particular, bamboo-joint-like appearance was almost unique to Crohn's disease patients (Crohn's disease, 28/63, 44%; ulcerative colitis, 3/62, 5%; gastroesophageal reflux disease, 0/63, 0%, P < 0.0001). Analysis of the relationship between the Crohn's disease patient's background and gastrodunodenoscopic findings revealed that both patients with disease affecting the ileum and those with previous gut operations were more likely to exhibit the specific gastroduodenoscopic findings (P = 0.030 and P = 0.043, respectively). Specific gastroduodenoscopic findings were observed in Crohn's disease patients. In particular, bamboo-joint-like appearance could be a unique marker of Crohn's disease.

  4. Perianal Crohn's disease: predictive factors and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Ziad; Ahmad, Surriya; Bilchuk, Natalia; Vahrenhold, Crystal; Pan, Jianmin; Galandiuk, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with perianal Crohn's disease (PCD) in order to determine which factors predispose to development of perianal disease in Crohn's patients. Seven-hundred and ninety-five Caucasian individuals (317 CD patients and 478 controls without inflammatory bowel disease, IBD) were prospectively enrolled into a clinical/genetic database. Demographic and clinical data, as well as peripheral blood leukocyte DNA were obtained from all patients. The following were evaluated: three NOD2/CARD15 polymorphisms: R702W, G908R, and 1007insC; five IL-23r risk alleles: rs1004819, rs10489629, rs2201841, rs11465804, and rs11209026; a well-characterized single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the IBD5 risk haplotype (OCTN1) and two peripheral tag SNPs (IGR2060 and IGR3096). PCD occurred in 147 (46%) of CD patients. There was no significant difference in the age at disease diagnosis between non-PCD and PCD patients (33 vs. 29 years, respectively). PCD patients were more likely to have disease located in the colon and ileocolic regions (79 PCD vs. 57% non-PCD; n = 116 vs. n = 96; p < 0.001), whereas patients with non-PCD were more likely to have Crohn's within the terminal ileum and upper gastrointestinal tract (43% non-PCD vs. 21% PCD; n = 73 vs. n = 31; p < 0.05). Thirty-four percent of patients with PCD required a permanent ileostomy (n = 50) compared to only 4% of non-PCD patients (n = 6; p < 0.05). Mutations in CARD15/NOD2 and IL-23r were risk factors for CD overall; however, in contrast to prior reports, in this patient population, OCTN1 and IGR variations within the IBD5 haplotype were not significant predictors of PCD. Colon/ileocolic CD location appears to be a significant predictor of perianal manifestations of CD. Patients with PCD are more likely to require permanent fecal diversion. We did not identify any genetic variations or combination of clinical findings and genetic variations within the CARD15/NOD2, IL-23r, and OCTN1

  5. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, Crohn's disease and the Doomsday scenario

    PubMed Central

    Hermon-Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    Johne's disease is chronic inflammation of the intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Infection and disease are mainly in domestic livestock but can affect many species including primates. Johne's is a new disease which emerged at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries and principally involved Europe and North America. It has since spread to former low incidence regions to become a global problem. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammation of the intestine in humans which emerged in Europe and North America mid 20th century and increased to become a major healthcare problem. It has now spread to former low incidence regions. Infected animals shed Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk and into the environment. Human populations are widely exposed. Outcomes maybe influenced by microbial phenotype. Exposure to extracellular forms of these pathogens may confer some natural protection; exposure to intracellular forms which have passaged through milk macrophages or environmental protists may pose a greater threat to humans particularly individuals with an inherited or acquired susceptibility. Hot spots of human disease such as in Winnipeg which sits on rock at the junction of two rivers may result from local exposure to high levels of waterborne pathogens brought down from farmland. When appropriate methods are used most people with Crohn's disease are found to be infected. There are no data which demonstrate that these pathogens are harmless to humans. An overwhelming balance of probability and Public health risk favours the conclusion that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is also pathogenic for people. A two tier co-operative pathogenic mechanism is proposed in Crohn's disease. Intracellular infection with the primary pathogen widely distributed throughout the gut causes an immune dysregulation and a specific chronic enteric neuropathy with loss of mucosal integrity. Segments of gross inflammatory disease

  6. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  7. Intestinal tuberculosis masquerading as difficult to treat Crohn disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Niriella, Madunil A; Kodisinghe, S Kuleesha; De Silva, Arjuna P; Hewavisenthi, Janaki; de Silva, Hithanadura J

    2016-08-24

    Crohn disease has low prevalence in Sri Lanka while compared to the West, while intestinal tuberculosis is common in the region. Since clinical, endoscopic and investigation features of Crohn disease overlap with intestinal tuberculosis, differentiating these two conditions becomes a dilemma for the clinician in the intestinal tuberculosis endemic setting. An 18-year old Sri Lankan Muslim female presented with chronic abdominal pain and weight loss. Colonoscopy revealed an ulcerated ileocaecal valve and a terminal ileal stricture. Biopsy confirmed Crohn disease with no supportive features to suggest intestinal tuberculosis. Despite treatment with adequate immunosuppression she failed to improve and underwent a limited right hemicolectomy and terminal ileal resection. Histology confirmed intestinal tuberculosis and she made full recover with 6 months of anti-tuberculosis treatment. This case illustrates the importance of reviewing the diagnosis to include intestinal tuberculosis in an endemic setting, when already diagnosed Crohn disease is treatment refractory.

  8. Crohn Disease of the Vulva without Gastrointestinal Manifestations in a 16-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-jun; Zhan, Shu-hui; Chang, Hong; Gao, Yu-qiang; Li, Yan-qing

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease of the vulva is a rare disease that is difficult to diagnose. There are limited reports describing treatment of this condition. To describe the diagnosis and treatment of a 16-year-old girl with Crohn disease of the vulva, without onset of intestinal symptoms. Crohn disease was diagnosed by histopathology. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and followed for 1 year. After the final diagnosis, cutaneous lesions responded rapidly to corticosteroid treatment, which was gradually stopped after 6 months. The disease was well controlled at the 1-year follow-up. Crohn disease of the vulva can develop alone without the onset of intestinal symptoms. Diagnosis relies on special pathologic findings. Corticosteroid treatment is effective for this condition. © 2014 Canadian Dermatology Association.

  9. Utility of high-resolution MR imaging in demonstrating transmural pathologic changes in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rakesh; Rajiah, Prabhakar; Murphy, Paul; Hawker, Peter; Sanders, Scott

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an imaging modality that can be used to help diagnose and evaluate Crohn disease of the small and large bowel. MR imaging has high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of Crohn disease, and high-resolution thin-section MR images can demonstrate transmural pathologic changes of Crohn disease from the level of the mucosa to that of the mesentery. High-resolution MR image data also may be used to construct high-quality multiplanar and endoluminal views that may provide additional diagnostic information. Knowledge of the MR imaging findings of Crohn disease and how they correlate with the pathologic features of the disease is important to facilitate accurate diagnosis and detect complications.

  10. [Long-term results of the surgical treatment of ileo-colonic Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Forni, E; Orlandoni, G; Voltolini, P; Zadra, F; Stradiotti, G; Bordoni, P; Spelzini, P

    1984-10-01

    18 patients with Crohn's disease primarily treated with excisional surgery were studied. The crude recurrence and reoperation rate were analyzed. The influence of sex, age and length of history prior to operation was in this respect also studied.

  11. A Diagnostic Accuracy Meta-analysis of CT and MRI for the Evaluation of Small Bowel Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhong; Liu, Jincai; Xiao, Wenlian; Luo, Guanghua

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in assessing small bowel (SB) Crohn disease (CD). We systematically searched PubMed, Elsevier, ScienceDirect, Karger, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, and Springer for studies in which CT or MRI were evaluated to assess SB CD. Bivariate random effect meta-analytic methods were used to estimate pooled sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) in a per-patient-based analysis were estimated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was also calculated to measure the diagnostic accuracy. Twenty-one studies involving 913 patients were included in this meta-analysis. There was no significant difference observed between modalities. The diagnostic performances (lnDOR) for CT and MRI also showed no significant difference. Subgroup analysis was performed for MR imaging (MR enteroclysis, MR enterography, and CT enterography). The diagnostic performances (lnDOR) for MR enteroclysis, MR enterography, and CT enterography did not show a significant difference among them. No significant difference was found between these techniques. Deeks funnel plot asymmetry test for publication bias showed that no significant publication bias was observed in this analysis. This meta-analysis suggests that both MRI and CT have high diagnostic accuracy in detecting SB CD. MRI has the potential to be the first-line radiation-free modality for SB CD imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. PubMed Informer: Monitoring MEDLINE/PubMed through E-mail Alerts, SMS, PDA downloads and RSS feeds

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Summary PubMed Informer is a Web-based monitoring tool for topics of interest from MEDLINE/PubMed primarily designed for healthcare professionals. Five tracking methods are available: Web access, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), PDA downloads and RSS feeds. PubMed Informer delivers focused search updates and specific information to users with varying information-seeking practices. PMID:16779344

  13. Familial Crohn's disease in multiple siblings: no linkage to the HLA system.

    PubMed

    Colombel, J F; Guillemot, F; Van Gossum, A; Dufossé, F; Cortot, A; Dupont, E; Paris, J C

    1989-01-01

    We report five families with 3 or more children having Crohn's disease. In one family, 6 out of 11 siblings were affected. HLA haplotype study in affected children showed that the probability of random segregation was only 38 percent, making improbable a linkage between the histocompatibility locus and the development of Crohn's disease. However similar clinical patterns in siblings could suggest a genetic factor not linked to the HLA system.

  14. Opioid use is associated with decreased quality of life in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sanford, David; Thornley, Patrick; Teriaky, Anouar; Chande, Nilesh; Gregor, James

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life is an important consideration in the management of patients with Crohn's disease. Previous studies suggest that Crohn's disease patients using opioids may have decreased quality of life and increased risk of mortality. Our aim was to determine the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and opioid use in patients with Crohn's disease while controlling for disease severity. We conducted a cross-sectional study recruiting Crohn's disease patients at our center. Disease activity was measured using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI), and HRQoL was measured using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). We enrolled 38 Crohn's disease patients using opioids and 62 patients not using opioids. Patients using opioids had an increased duration of disease (median 18.5 vs. 9 years, P = 0.005), increased surgeries related to Crohn's disease (median 3 vs. 0, P < 0.001), and increased prednisone use (29% vs. 11.3%, P = 0.03). Patients using opioids had increased disease activity (median HBI score 9.0 vs. 3.0, P < 0.001). Quality of life was lower in patients using opioids (mean IBDQ score 109.3 vs. 162.9, P < 0.001). This finding was significant when controlling for HBI scores, number of previous surgeries, and prednisone use (P = 0.003). Opioid use in Crohn's disease patients appears to be associated with disease activity and severity. HRQoL is markedly decreased in patients using opioids and this association is significant even when controlling for variables reflecting disease severity. Our findings suggest that Crohn's disease patients using opioids are likely to be significantly impacted by their disease.

  15. Opioid Use is Associated with Decreased Quality of Life in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, David; Thornley, Patrick; Teriaky, Anouar; Chande, Nilesh; Gregor, James

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Quality of life is an important consideration in the management of patients with Crohn's disease. Previous studies suggest that Crohn's disease patients using opioids may have decreased quality of life and increased risk of mortality. Our aim was to determine the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and opioid use in patients with Crohn's disease while controlling for disease severity. Patients and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study recruiting Crohn's disease patients at our center. Disease activity was measured using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI), and HRQoL was measured using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). Results: We enrolled 38 Crohn's disease patients using opioids and 62 patients not using opioids. Patients using opioids had an increased duration of disease (median 18.5 vs. 9 years, P = 0.005), increased surgeries related to Crohn's disease (median 3 vs. 0, P < 0.001), and increased prednisone use (29% vs. 11.3%, P = 0.03). Patients using opioids had increased disease activity (median HBI score 9.0 vs. 3.0, P < 0.001). Quality of life was lower in patients using opioids (mean IBDQ score 109.3 vs. 162.9, P < 0.001). This finding was significant when controlling for HBI scores, number of previous surgeries, and prednisone use (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Opioid use in Crohn's disease patients appears to be associated with disease activity and severity. HRQoL is markedly decreased in patients using opioids and this association is significant even when controlling for variables reflecting disease severity. Our findings suggest that Crohn's disease patients using opioids are likely to be significantly impacted by their disease. PMID:24976282

  16. A patient with Crohn's disease who presented with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Unverdi, Selman; Ceri, Mevlut; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Akbal, Erdem; Ensari, Arzu; Yılmaz, Rahmi; Kocak, Erdem; Inal, Salih; Koklu, Seyfettin; Duranay, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)/hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized with fever, purpura, anemia due to microangiopathic hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, kidney damage, and neurologic symptoms. The development of TTP/HUS during the course of inflammatory bowel diseases was rarely reported. However, coexistence of TTP/HUS and Crohn's disease in the same patient has not been reported previously. We herein present a case of TTP/HUS who presented with Crohn's disease. He responded to cyclosporine treatment.

  17. Value of computed tomography in the detection of complications of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gore, R M; Cohen, M I; Vogelzang, R L; Neiman, H L; Tsang, T K

    1985-08-01

    Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans were performed on 17 patients with suspected complications of Crohn's disease. CT was superior to conventional barium studies and colonoscopy in demonstrating mural, serosal, and mesenteric pathology such as bowel wall thickening (100%), abscess (59%) and phlegmon (6%) formation, and fibro-fatty proliferation of the mesentery (41%). While not advocated as the primary means of evaluating Crohn's disease, CT can provide information vital to the management of complications of this disease.

  18. Computed tomography evaluation of local and extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kerber, G W; Greenberg, M; Rubin, J M

    1984-01-01

    Complications of Crohn's disease were demonstrated by computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis in 7 patients. Four patients had developed abscesses, 2 located in the psoas region and 2 involving the retroperitoneum or the liver. Other abnormalities documented on CT included inflammatory masses, fistulae, carcinoma, mesenteric thickening, and extraintestinal complications such as gallstones, renal calculi, and sacroileitis. Computed tomography was found to be useful in the detection and follow-up of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease.

  19. A free terminal ileal perforation from active crohn disease in pregnancy: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Philip, Sunu; Kamyab, Armin; Orfanou, Paraskevi

    2015-03-01

    The surgical management of the complications of Crohn disease is often challenging. These difficulties are compounded in pregnancy by competing interests of the mother and the baby. In this report, we describe the presentation and surgical management of a patient in her second trimester with active Crohn disease who required emergent surgical intervention. She had presented with the uncommon complication of a free perforation in the presence of active untreated disease.

  20. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness and analysis of induced sputum cells in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bartholo, R M; Zaltman, C; Elia, C; Cardoso, A P; Flores, V; Lago, P; Cassabian, L; Dorileo, F Carvalho; Lapa-e-Silva, J R

    2005-02-01

    With the aim of investigating the presence of latent inflammatory process in the lungs of patients with Crohn's disease, 15 patients with Crohn's disease were evaluated by spirometry, the methacholine challenge test, induced sputum, and skin tests for inhaled antigens. Serum IgE, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hematocrit were also determined. The patients were compared with 20 healthy controls by the Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Their respiratory physical examination was normal. None had a personal or family history of clinical atopy. None had a previous history of pulmonary disease, smoking or toxic bronchopulmonary exposure. None had sinusitis, migraine, diabetes mellitus, or cardiac failure. Four (26.6%) of the patients with Crohn's disease had a positive methacholine challenge test whereas none of the 20 controls had a positive methacholine test (P = 0.026, Fisher exact test). Patients with Crohn's disease had a higher level of lymphocytes in induced sputum than controls (mean 14.59%, range 3.2-50 vs 5.46%, 0-26.92%, respectively; P = 0.011, Mann-Whitney test). Patients with Crohn's disease and a positive methacholine challenge test had an even higher percentage of lymphocytes in induced sputum compared with patients with Crohn's disease and a negative methacholine test (mean 24.88%, range 12.87-50 vs 10.48%, 3.2-21.69%; P = 0.047, Mann-Whitney test). The simultaneous findings of bronchopulmonary lymphocytosis and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in patients with Crohn's disease were not reported up to now. These results suggest that patients with Crohn's disease present a subclinical inflammatory process despite the absence of pulmonary symptoms.

  1. Can ultrasound be used as the primary imaging in children with suspected Crohn disease?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Timothy L; Marine, Megan B; Wanner, Matthew R; Cooper, Matthew L; Steiner, Steven J; Ouyang, Fangqian; Gregory Jennings, S; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2017-07-01

    There is growing literature on the use of ultrasound (US) for evaluation of Crohn disease in adults, but few studies have been conducted on children. Several studies demonstrated high accuracy of US in the diagnosis of Crohn disease. Using US as the primary screening imaging modality for Crohn disease can reduce health care costs, the need for sedation and ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of our study is to determine if US can be used for screening evaluation of pediatric Crohn disease. A prospective cohort study of pediatric patients undergoing MR enterography (MRE) for suspected or known history of Crohn disease was performed, with gray-scale and Doppler US of the terminal ileum done immediately before or after MRE. US images were interpreted by two radiologists (Reader 1 and Reader 2) not involved in image acquisition, in blinded and randomized fashion. US findings of Crohn disease including bowel wall thickening, wall stratification, increased vascularity on Doppler, lymphadenopathy, fat infiltration and extraintestinal complications were evaluated. MRE findings of terminal ileitis were considered the reference standard. Demographic data, body mass index (BMI), symptoms, and laboratory, endoscopic and histopathological data were obtained from electronic medical records. Forty-one patients (mean age: 13.7 years: 4.6-18.9 years) were evaluated. Mean BMI was 21.2 (range: 13-40.2); 10 patients (24.3%) were either overweight or obese. Final diagnoses were Crohn disease (n=24), ulcerative colitis (n=4) and normal/non-inflammatory bowel disease-related diagnoses (n=13). US demonstrated sensitivity of 67% and 78% and specificity of 78% and 83%, by Reader 1 and Reader 2, respectively. MRE sensitivity and specificity were 75% and 100%, respectively, compared to final clinicopathological diagnosis. Interobserver agreement between Reader 1 and Reader 2 was good (0.6< kappa <0.8). In screening for Crohn disease in children, US has limited sensitivity for detecting

  2. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  3. Adenocarcinoma in an ano-vaginal fistula in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Atinga, Angela; Mohsen, Yasser; Anthony, Andrew; Myers, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Fistulas are a relatively common occurrence in Crohn's disease (CD), and often present early in the disease process. Additionally, patients suffering from either CD or ulcerative colitis are shown to have an increased risk of colorectal malignancies compared with the general population. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of adenocarcinoma in an ano-vaginal fistula in a patient with longstanding CD. DISCUSSION Various pathogenic mechanisms for the development of carcinoma in fistulas have been suggested, but there is no consensus and indeed this risk may be cumulative. In this case report, we also discuss the pathogenesis of mucinous adenocarcinoma in fistulas secondary to CD. CONCLUSION Better detection of adenocarcinoma in patients presenting with persistent non-resolving fistulas in the presence of CD should be undertaken with regular biopsies following examinations under anaesthetic of the anorectum. PMID:23702362

  4. [Postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease, and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-05-23

    Crohn's disease is a chronic, progressive disabling condition ultimately leading to stricturing and/or penetrating complications. The need for surgery may be as high as 70% in patients with severe active disease or complications. However, relapse may develop in a significant proportion of the patients after surgery leading to frequent re-operations. Despite emerging data, postoperative prevention is still controversial. After careful evaluation of the individual risk a tailored therapy should be considered. In patients with small risk for relapse mesalazine or in selected cases no-treatment may be an option. In patients with a moderate-to-high risk azathioprine should be considered together with metronidazole in the three months. Follow-up ileocolonoscopy 6-12 months after the surgery is helpful in the determination of endoscopic severity and may assist in the optimization of the therapy. In most severe cases anti-TNF agents may be appropriate for postoperative prevention and therapy.

  5. [Magnetic resonance enterography: technique and indications. Findings in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, A; Pallardó, Y; Hinojosa, J; Insa, S; Molina, R

    2013-09-01

    Radiology with oral contrast, or enteroclysis, have traditionally been the techniques of choice in the examination of the small intestine, due to the excellent visualisation of the mucosal pattern. However, the absence of extra-luminal information and the use of ionising radiation have replaced these examinations with sectional techniques which enable the abdominal cavity to be viewed with good resolution. Magnetic resonance enterography is a simple technique, with no ionising radiation, provided quality images, distends the intestinal lumen well by the administration of non-reabsorbable oral substances, minimises peristalsis, and establishes a protocol which includes sequences with intravenous contrast. These properties can be used in patients with Crohn's disease, achieving good diagnostic precision in the assessment of activity and monitoring of treatment, in intestinal obstruction, in the suspicion of small intestine tumours, and in paediatric patients due to it being harmless. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Particular aspects of proctology for anoperineal lesions in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Atienza, P; Ksiaa, M

    2015-04-01

    All practitioners caring for patients with Crohn's disease (CD) must know all the various aspects of anoperineal lesions in this singular entity. Suppuration in CD does not follow the classic routes and spaces of diffusion and is often associated with endolumenal lesions that can evolve on their own. Abscesses and fistulas require specific medico-surgical management where seton drainage, staged operative and sphincter-sparing procedures have a dominant place. The variability of associated lesions and the particularly individualized efficacy of drugs call for case-by-case management, thus, making standardization and comparisons difficult. Recent therapeutic progress has led to modifications of the minimally invasive management policies practiced in the last decades.

  7. Active learning based segmentation of Crohns disease from abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Vos, Franciscus M; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel active learning (AL) framework, and combines it with semi supervised learning (SSL) for segmenting Crohns disease (CD) tissues from abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Robust fully supervised learning (FSL) based classifiers require lots of labeled data of different disease severities. Obtaining such data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise. SSL methods use a few labeled samples, and leverage the information from many unlabeled samples to train an accurate classifier. AL queries labels of most informative samples and maximizes gain from the labeling effort. Our primary contribution is in designing a query strategy that combines novel context information with classification uncertainty and feature similarity. Combining SSL and AL gives a robust segmentation method that: (1) optimally uses few labeled samples and many unlabeled samples; and (2) requires lower training time. Experimental results show our method achieves higher segmentation accuracy than FSL methods with fewer samples and reduced training effort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modern Treatments and Stem Cell Therapies for Perianal Crohn's Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Alghalya Khalid Sulaiman; Nguyen, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a complex disorder with important incidence in North America. Perianal fistulas occur in about 20% of patients with CD and are almost always classified as complex fistulas. Conventional treatment options have shown different success rates, yet there are data indicating that these approaches cannot achieve total cure and may not improve quality of life of these patients. Fibrin glue, fistula plug, topical tacrolimus, local injection of infliximab, and use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are newly suggested therapies with variable success rates. Here, we aim to review these novel therapies for the treatment of complex fistulizing CD. Although initial results are promising, randomized studies are needed to prove efficacy of these approaches in curing fistulizing perianal CD. PMID:28053967

  9. Granulomatous hepatitis in a patient with Crohn's disease and cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Patedakis Litvinov, Bogdan Ioannis; Pathak, Amit P

    2017-09-07

    We describe a case of a 23-year-old woman with a history of Crohn's disease (CD), who initially presented with sepsis-like symptoms, subsequently developed severe cholestasis and following extensive inpatient workup was found to have non-caseating granulomas on her liver biopsy. Infectious aetiologies were excluded and the patient was treated with oral corticosteroids, which ameliorated but did not completely reverse the cholestasis. We review the differential diagnosis of hepatic granulomas and discuss the potential difficulties in establishing their exact aetiology in patients with CD. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. An immunological link between Candida albicans colonization and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Romain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Poulain, Daniel; Jouault, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of Crohn's disease (CD), an autoimmune, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which affects approximately one million people in Europe, is still unclear. Nevertheless, it is widely accepted that CD could result from an inappropriate inflammatory response to intestinal microorganisms in a genetically susceptible host. Most studies to date have concerned the involvement of bacteria in disease progression. In addition to bacteria, there appears to be a possible link between the commensal yeast Candida albicans and disease development. In this review, in an attempt to link the gut colonization process and the development of CD, we describe the different pathways that are involved in the progression of CD and in the host response to C. albicans, making the yeast a possible initiator of the inflammatory process observed in this IBD.

  11. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  12. Crohn's disease management after intestinal resection: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    De Cruz, Peter; Kamm, Michael A; Hamilton, Amy L; Ritchie, Kathryn J; Krejany, Efrosinia O; Gorelik, Alexandra; Liew, Danny; Prideaux, Lani; Lawrance, Ian C; Andrews, Jane M; Bampton, Peter A; Gibson, Peter R; Sparrow, Miles; Leong, Rupert W; Florin, Timothy H; Gearry, Richard B; Radford-Smith, Graham; Macrae, Finlay A; Debinski, Henry; Selby, Warwick; Kronborg, Ian; Johnston, Michael J; Woods, Rodney; Elliott, P Ross; Bell, Sally J; Brown, Steven J; Connell, William R; Desmond, Paul V

    2015-04-11

    Most patients with Crohn's disease need an intestinal resection, but a majority will subsequently experience disease recurrence and require further surgery. This study aimed to identify the optimal strategy to prevent postoperative disease recurrence. In this randomised trial, consecutive patients from 17 centres in Australia and New Zealand undergoing intestinal resection of all macroscopic Crohn's disease, with an endoscopically accessible anastomosis, received 3 months of metronidazole therapy. Patients at high risk of recurrence also received a thiopurine, or adalimumab if they were intolerant to thiopurines. Patients were randomly assigned to parallel groups: colonoscopy at 6 months (active care) or no colonoscopy (standard care). We used computer-generated block randomisation to allocate patients in each centre to active or standard care in a 2:1 ratio. For endoscopic recurrence (Rutgeerts score ≥i2) at 6 months, patients stepped-up to thiopurine, fortnightly adalimumab with thiopurine, or weekly adalimumab. The primary endpoint was endoscopic recurrence at 18 months. Patients and treating physicians were aware of the patient's study group and treatment, but central reading of the endoscopic findings was undertaken blind to the study group and treatment. Analysis included all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00989560. Between Oct 13, 2009, and Sept 28, 2011, 174 (83% high risk across both active and standard care groups) patients were enrolled and received at least one dose of study drug. Of 122 patients in the active care group, 47 (39%) stepped-up treatment. At 18 months, endoscopic recurrence occurred in 60 (49%) patients in the active care group and 35 (67%) patients in the standard care group (p=0.03). Complete mucosal normality was maintained in 27 (22%) of 122 patients in the active care group versus four (8%) in the standard care group (p=0.03). In the active care arm

  13. Crohn disease: a current perspective on genetics, autophagy and immunity.

    PubMed

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Rioux, John D; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2011-04-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Prevalence in Western populations is 100-150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk.

  14. Treatment of peri-anal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia

    2014-10-07

    Anal fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-anal region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-anal fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence.

  15. Current role of capsule endoscopy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Sanchis-Artero, Laura; Larrey-Ruiz, Laura; Peño-Muñoz, Laura; Núñez-Martínez, Paola; Castillo-López, Génesis; González-González, Lara; Clemente, Carlos Boix; Albert Antequera, Cecilia; Durá-Ayet, Ana; Sempere-Garcia-Argüelles, Javier

    2016-09-16

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) currently plays an important role in Crohn's disease (CD). It is a noninvasive technique that has led to a breakthrough in the endoscopic diagnosis of diseases of the small intestine. Its superior diagnostic performance and excellent safety profile lead to its considerable acceptance on the part of the patient. This paper reviews current indications of CE in three stages of clinical practice: Suspected CD, unclassified colitis and its extensive role in diagnosed CD. The diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the results of CE on the monitoring of this disease is also reviewed. Knowledge of its applications, the interpretation of its results in an appropriate context and the existence of a validated endoscopic activity index could change the way in which these patients are managed. The definition of mucosal healing and postoperative recurrence by means of endoscopic scoring systems will endow CE with new applications in the management of CD in the near future.

  16. Treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitor oxpentifylline does not improve corticosteroid dependent chronic active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, J; Haemling, J; Ortner, M; Lochs, H; Raedler, A; Schreiber, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Crohn's disease, inflammation is presumably sustained by an increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL 1 beta). TNF alpha can induce a host of cellular effector events resulting in perpetuation of the inflammatory process. In vivo studies with anti-TNF alpha antibody treatment have led to impressive clinical results. AIMS: To investigate whether treatment with the TNF alpha inhibitor oxpentifylline results in clinical improvement in corticosteroid dependent chronic active Crohn's disease. METHODS: Sixteen Crohn's disease patients received oxpentifylline 400 mg four times a day in a four week open label study. RESULTS: Blockade of TNF alpha production in 16 patients with corticosteroid dependent Crohn's disease did not improve the clinical disease activity (CDAI mean (SEM) 188.75 (5.65) versus 185.13 (10.87) or the endoscopic degree of inflammation (CDEIS 14.9 (2.87) versus 14.8 (2.27) or laboratory parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, use of the TNF alpha inhibitor oxpentifylline does not improve inflammation in Crohn's disease. This finding suggests that there may be more key mediators than only TNF alpha in the inflammatory process in Crohn's disease. PMID:9176073

  17. Guillain-Barré syndrome and Crohn disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Hidehiko; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Izu, Akane; Wada, Norihisa; Sakata, Naoki; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-09-01

    Development of both Crohn disease and Guillain-Barré syndrome likely involves autoimmunity associated with excessive inflammatory cytokines. We treated a girl who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome during the course of Crohn disease. Although high-dose γ-globulin therapy administered initially for Guillain-Barré syndrome was ineffective, plasmapheresis ameliorated her acute neuropathic symptoms. Crohn disease was managed with Salazopyrin administration and enteral feeding. Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa caused by Crohn disease can allow presentation of microbial intestinal antigens normally hidden from the immune system. Such presentation could incite an extraintestinal immune response on the basis of molecular mimicry, leading to activation of systemic autoimmunity against the nervous system. Accordingly, concurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome and Crohn disease in our patient appeared to result from shared autoimmune mechanisms and systemic and local increases in cytokine concentrations. The patient also developed erythema nodosum and gall stones, relatively common complications of Crohn disease. However, Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare.

  18. What role do bacteria play in persisting fistula formation in idiopathic and Crohn's anal fistula?

    PubMed

    Tozer, P J; Rayment, N; Hart, A L; Daulatzai, N; Murugananthan, A U; Whelan, K; Phillips, R K S

    2015-03-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease-related anal fistula remains obscure. Microbiological, genetic and immunological factors are thought to play a role but are not well understood. The microbiota within anal fistula tracts has never been examined using molecular techniques. The present study aimed to characterize the microbiota in the tracts of patients with Crohn's and idiopathic anal fistula. Samples from the fistula tract and rectum of patients with Crohn's and idiopathic anal fistula were analysed using fluorescent in situ hybridization, Gram staining and scanning electron microscopy were performed to identify and quantify the bacteria present. Fifty-one patients, including 20 with Crohn's anal fistula, 18 with idiopathic anal fistula and 13 with luminal Crohn's disease and no anal fistula, were recruited. Bacteria were not found in close association with the luminal surface of any of the anal fistula tracts. Anal fistula tracts generally do not harbour high levels of mucosa-associated microbiota. Crohn's anal fistulas do not seem to harbour specific bacteria. Alternative explanations for the persistence of anal fistula are needed. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Tissue polymerase chain reaction in diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Amarapurkar, D N; Patel, N D; Amarapurkar, A D; Agal, S; Baigal, R; Gupte, P

    2004-11-01

    1) To evaluate the utility of PCR in differentiating intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. 2) To compare histological features of tuberculosis and Crohn's disease. A total of 60 cases of diagnosed intestinal tuberculosis and 20 Crohn's disease were included in the study. Clinical data, radiological and endoscopic findings and response to treatment were taken into consideration. Endoscopic biopsies from affected areas were subjected to histopathological examination and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Acid fast staining on tissue and culture was done whenever possible. Clinical symptoms, radiological and endoscopic findings were almost similar between intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease. PCR was positive in 21.6% cases of intestinal tuberculosis and 5% Crohn's disease. Nine out of 42 cases (21.4%) without granuloma were also positive by PCR. There was no statistical difference for PCR positivity between patients with intestinal tuberculosis with or without granuloma on histology and also between caseating and non-caseating granuloma. PCR assay showed high specificity (95%) for the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis hence may be valuable method to differentiate intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease.

  20. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis the common villain?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Ellen S

    2010-12-17

    Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic disease of the intestines in dairy cows and a wide range of other animals, including nonhuman primates, called Johne's ("Yo-knee's") disease. MAP has been consistently identified by a variety of techniques in humans with Crohn's disease. The research investigating the presence of MAP in patients with Crohn's disease has often identified MAP in the "negative" ulcerative colitis controls as well, suggesting that ulcerative colitis is also caused by MAP. Like other infectious diseases, dose, route of infection, age, sex and genes influence whether an individual infected with MAP develops ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The apparently opposite role of smoking, increasing the risk of Crohn's disease while decreasing the risk of ulcerative colitis, is explained by a more careful review of the literature that reveals smoking causes an increase in both diseases but switches the phenotype from ulcerative colitis to Crohn's disease. MAP as the sole etiologic agent of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease explains their common epidemiology, geographic distribution and familial and sporadic clusters, providing a unified hypothesis for the prevention and cure of the no longer "idiopathic" inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. Recent Advances in Characterizing the Gastrointestinal Microbiome in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Emily K.; Teo, Shu Mei; Inouye, Michael; Wagner, Josef; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. A reduction in the diversity of the intestinal microbiota as well as specific taxonomic and functional shifts have been reported in Crohn's disease and may play a central role in the inflammatory process. The aim was to systematically review recent developments in the structural and functional changes observed in the gastrointestinal microbiome in patients with Crohn's Disease. Results: Seventy-two abstracts were included in this review. The effects of host genetics, disease phenotype, and inflammatory bowel disease treatment on the gastrointestinal microbiome in Crohn's disease were reviewed, and taxonomic shifts in patients with early and established disease were described. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes is increased and Firmicutes decreased in Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls. Enterobacteriaceae, specifically Eschericia coli, is enriched in Crohn's disease. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is found at lower abundance in Crohn's disease and in those with postoperative recurrence. Observed functional changes include major shifts in oxidative stress pathways, a decrease in butanoate and propanoate metabolism gene expression, lower levels of butyrate, and other short-chain fatty acids, decreased carbohydrate metabolism, and decreased amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusions: Changes in microbial composition and function have been described, although a causative role remains to be established. Larger, prospective, and longitudinal studies are required with deep interrogation of the microbiome if causality is to be determined, and refined microbial manipulation is to emerge as a focused therapy. PMID:25844959

  2. Recent advances in clinical practice: a systematic review of isolated colonic Crohn's disease: the third IBD?

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sreedhar; Ekbom, Anders; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2017-02-01

    The genetics of isolated colonic Crohn's disease place it approximately midway between Crohn's disease with small intestinal involvement and UC, making a case for considering it as a separate condition. We have therefore systematically reviewed its epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment. Key findings include a higher incidence in females (65%) and older average age at presentation than Crohn's disease at other sites, a mucosa-associated microbiota between that found in ileal Crohn's disease and UC, no response to mesalazine, but possibly better response to antitumour necrosis factor than Crohn's disease at other sites. Diagnostic distinction from UC is often difficult and also needs to exclude other conditions including ischaemic colitis, segmental colitis associated with diverticular disease and tuberculosis. Future studies, particularly clinical trials, but also historical cohorts, should assess isolated colonic Crohn's disease separately. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. [Application of adaptive iterative dose reduction technique in CT enterography in diagnosing Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Lian, Yanbang; Cao, Wuteng; Zhu, Shanshan; Lin, Yanghao; Liu, Dechao; Wang, Xinhua; Qiu, Jianping; Zhou, Zhiyang

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the application of low-dose CT enterography with adaptive iterative dose reduction(AIDR) technique in diagnosing Crohn's disease. Retrospective analysis was performed on 26 patients diagnosed as Crohn's disease by the multidisciplinary team in our hospital. Low-dose CT enterography with 640-slice MDCT was performed on these 26 patients using adaptive iterative dose reduction(AIDR) technique. Characteristics of Crohn's disease in CT enterography images were independently analyzed by two radiologists who were experienced in Crohn's disease with calculating the total radiation dosage. The radiation dosage of 26 patients ranged from 5.58 to 12.90 [mean (9.00±2.00)] mSv, which was lower than conventional scan (around 15 mSv) known from the literatures. According to the images of CT enterography of 26 cases, bowel wall thickening with abnormal enhancement and lymphadenectasis were found in 25 cases with total 109 segmental bowel wall thickening. Among 25 thickening cases, enterostenosis was found in 16 cases, stratification enhancement in 12 cases and comb sign in 14 cases. Besides, it was found that 8 cases with hyperdense fat on the mesenteric side, 7 cases with intestinal fistula, 6 cases with abdominal cavity abscess, and 3 cases with anal fistula. CT enterography of Crohn's disease with adaptive iterative dose reduction technique is an effective method to evaluate Crohn's disease without compromising image quality with reduced radiation dosage.

  4. Personal view: food for thought--western lifestyle and susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The FODMAP hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P R; Shepherd, S J

    2005-06-15

    Susceptibility to the development of Crohn's disease involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The association of Crohn's disease with westernization has implicated lifestyle factors in pathogenesis. While diet is a likely candidate, evidence for specific changes in dietary habits and/or intake has been lacking. A new hypothesis is proposed, by which excessive delivery of highly fermentable but poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates and polyols (designated FODMAPs--Fermentable Oligo-, Di- and Mono-saccharides And Polyols) to the distal small intestinal and colonic lumen is a dietary factor underlying susceptibility to Crohn's disease. The subsequent rapid fermentation of FODMAPs in the distal small and proximal large intestine induces conditions in the bowel that lead to increased intestinal permeability, a predisposing factor to the development of Crohn's disease. Evidence supporting this hypothesis includes the increasing intake of FODMAPs in western societies, the association of increased intake of sugars in the development of Crohn's disease, and the previously documented effects of the ingestion of excessive FODMAPs on the bowel. This hypothesis provides potential for the design of preventive strategies and raises concern about current enthusiasm for putative health-promoting effects of FODMAPs. One of the greatest challenges in defining the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease is to identify predisposing environmental factors. Such an achievement might lead to the development of preventive strategies for, and the definition of, possible target for changing the natural history of this serious disease. The present paper describes a new hypothesis for one such environmental factor.

  5. Characterisation of a Swedish cohort with orofacial granulomatosis with or without Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gale, G; Östman, S; Rekabdar, E; Torinsson Naluai, Å; Högkil, K; Hasséus, B; Saalman, R; Jontell, M

    2015-01-01

    To compare oral manifestations in a Swedish cohort of patients with orofacial granulomatosis with or without Crohn's disease and to assess NOD2 polymorphisms in the two groups. Twenty-nine patients with orofacial granulomatosis were included. Demographics, disease history, clinical features and concurrent Crohn's disease were recorded. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs and examined for NOD2 variants Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg and Leu1007fsinsC, all previously linked to gastrointestinal Crohn's disease. Twelve of 29 patients were diagnosed with coexisting gastrointestinal Crohn's disease, and of whom 21 were males. Symptom duration was significantly longer for the orofacial granulomatosis group com-pared to the group with coexisting Crohn's disease (P < 0.0001). The orofacial granulomatosis patients also perceived their overall discomfort, aesthetic problems and social discomfort as more severe. No significant differences in the clinical presentation of oral lesions between the two groups were found. None of the patients with orofacial granulomatosis carried any of the NOD2 variations, whereas four of the 12 patients with coexisting Crohn's disease had a NOD2 variant (Arg702Trp). The two patient groups had similar phenotypic characteristics but seemed to have genotypic differences regarding NOD2. The Swedish cohort differed in their clinical characteristics from patients reported in other geographical regions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Reduced incidence of Crohn's disease in systemic sclerosis: a nationwide population study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chia-Chun; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Sung, Wan-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Chang, Shun-Jen

    2015-09-14

    To date, there has been no studies to evaluate the incidence of Crohn's disease in systemic sclerosis patients. The goals of this study were to evaluate the incidence of Crohn's disease and its relationship with sex and age in patients with systemic sclerosis. We enrolled patients with systemic sclerosis and controls from Taiwan's Registry of Catastrophic Illness Database and National Health Insurance Research Database. Every systemic sclerosis patient was matched to at most three controls by sex, age, month and year of initial diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of Crohn's disease in systemic sclerosis patients, and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Cox hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR). The study enrolled 2,829 patients with systemic sclerosis and 8,257 controls. Male and female patients with systemic sclerosis both had lower rates of incident Crohn's disease (SIR: 0.18, 95% CI = 0.05-0.62; SIR: 0.10, 95% CI = 0.05-0.21, respectively). The risk of incident Crohn's disease in systemic sclerosis was still lower than in controls when we stratified the patients according to their ages. In Cox hazard regression, the hazard rates of Crohn's disease were lower in systemic sclerosis patients after adjusting for genders and ages (HR: 0.12, 95% CI = 0.06-0.21, p < 0.001). Systemic sclerosis is associated with decreased incidence of, irrespective of sex and age of the patients.

  7. Efficacy of exclusive enteral nutrition in complicated Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingfan; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Huiping; Li, Miao; Wu, Xiaojian; Zhi, Min; Lan, Ping; Hu, Pinjin

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) in induction of remission in adult active Crohn's disease (CD) complicated with intestinal fistula/abdominal abscess or inflammatory intestinal stricture. Patients diagnosed with active CD with complications were recruited between July 2013 and July 2015. Patients were offered EEN for 12 weeks. Patients with abscess received antibiotic treatment with or without percutaneous drainage. Clinical variables were recorded (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02887287). Forty-one patients with CD and with intestinal fistula/abdominal abscess or inflammatory intestinal stricture aged 18-60 years, were included. Ten patients were accompanied with stenosis and 33 with intestinal fistula/abscess. After 12 weeks of EEN, the Crohn's disease activity index significantly decreased (223.43 ± 65.5 vs. 106.77 ± 42.73, p ≤ .001), and 80.5% of patients achieved full clinical remission totally. Fistula closure after EEN was observed in 75% of patients with entero-cutaneous fistula. In patients with stenosis, 20% had no response to EEN and were transferred for surgery. Partial remission and full remission were observed in 20% and 60% of patients after 12 weeks of EEN, respectively. Intra-abdominal abscess resolved in 76% of patients. Seventeen patients who had mucosal ulcers underwent colonoscopy before and after EEN, 47% achieved mucosal healing after the treatment. The inflammatory index of patients significantly decreased (p ≤ .01), nutritional parameters increased (p ≤ .01) and the European Nutritional Risk Screening (2002) decreased (p ≤ .01). EEN is effective in inducing early clinical remission, mucosal healing, promoting fistula closure and reducing the size of abscess in adult CD patients with complications.

  8. Quality of life in children with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rj; Lewindon, Pj; Muir, R; Grangé, I; Connor, Fl; Ee, Lc; Withers, Gd; Cleghorn, Gj; Davies, Psw

    2010-07-01

    : Quality of life (QOL) is reportedly poor in children with Crohn disease (CD) but improves with increasing disease duration. This article aims to detail QOL in a cohort of Australian children with CD in relation to disease duration, disease activity, and treatment. : QOL, assessed using the IMPACT-III questionnaire, and disease activity measures, assessed using the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI), were available in 41 children with CD. For this cohort, a total of 186 measurements of both parameters were available. : QOL was found to be significantly lower, and disease activity significantly higher (F = 31.1, P = 0.00), in patients within 6 months of their diagnosis compared with those up to 2.5 years, up to 5 years, and beyond 5 years since diagnosis. Higher disease activity was associated with poorer QOL (r = -0.51, P = 0.00). Total QOL was highest in children on nil medications and lowest in children on enteral nutrition. The PCDAI (t = -6.0, P = 0.00) was a significant predictor of QOL, with the clinical history (t = -6.9, P = 0.00) and examination (t = -2.9, P = 0.01) sections of the PCDAI significantly predicting QOL. Disease duration, age, or sex was neither related to nor significant predictors of QOL, but height z score and type of treatment approached significance. : Children with CD within 6 months of their diagnosis have impaired QOL compared with those diagnosed beyond 6 months. These patients, along with those with growth impairment, ongoing elevated disease activity with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and/or perirectal and extraintestinal complications, may benefit from regular assessments of QOL as part of their clinical treatment.

  9. Mucin gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Buisine, M; Desreumaux, P; Leteurtre, E; Copin, M; Colombel, J; Porchet, N; Aubert, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin. It is characterised by chronic mucosal ulcerations which affect any part of the intestine but most commonly are found in the ileum and proximal colon.
AIMS—Studies were undertaken to provide information regarding cell specific expression of mucin genes in the ileum of patients with CD.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Expression of mucin genes was analysed in the ileal mucosa of patients with CD and controls by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS—In healthy ileal mucosa, patients with CD showed a pattern identical to normal controls with main expression of MUC2 and MUC3, lesser expression of MUC1 and MUC4, and no expression of MUC5AC, MUC5B, MUC6, or MUC7. In the involved mucosa, the pattern was somewhat comparable although heterogeneous to that observed in healthy ileal mucosa. Importantly, a particular mucin gene expression pattern was observed in ileal mucosa close to the ulcer margins in ulcer associated cell lineage, with the appearance of MUC5AC and MUC6 mRNAs and peptides, which are normally restricted to the stomach (MUC5AC and MUC6) and duodenum (MUC6), and disappearance of MUC2.
CONCLUSIONS—Our results suggest that gel forming mucins (more particularly MUC5AC and MUC6) may have a role in epithelial wound healing after mucosal injury in inflammatory bowel diseases in addition to mucosal protection.


Keywords: mucins; MUC genes; Crohn's disease; ulcer associated cell lineage PMID:11559653

  10. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome: is it far away from Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ren, Jianan; Zhao, Yunzhao; Han, Gang; Hong, Zhiwu; Yan, Dongsheng; Chen, Jun; Gu, Guosheng; Wang, Gefei; Wang, Xinbo; Fan, Chaogang; Li, Jieshou

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical features of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) compared with euthyroid patients in Crohn's disease (CD), to explore the etiology of NTIS in CD, to evaluate the clinical outcomes of NTIS patients, and to inspect the correlation of clinical variables and NTIS, and their ability of differentiating NTIS from euthyroid patients. NTIS has been described for more than 30 years. However, only few studies focused on the relationship between NTIS and CD. The incidence, underlying pathogenesis, clinical outcomes, and correlation with other inflammatory disease severity and nutritional variables of NTIS in CD have not been completely established. Prospectively, 44 CD patients were enrolled. Medical records and various laboratory values (including thyroidal, nutritional, and inflammatory variables) were collected in all participants. The incidence of NTIS in CD was 36.4%. Albumin, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and Crohn's Disease Activity Index score in NTIS group were statistically different from those in euthyroid group. A decreased sum activity of deiodinases and a reduced ratio of TT4/FT4 were observed in NTIS group. Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer for NTIS patients than euthyroid patients. Albumin was confirmed as a protective factor of NTIS in CD. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated the differentiating capacity of albumin, suggesting 37.6 g/L as optimal cut-off value with sensitivity and specificity of 81.3% and 79.2%, respectively. NTIS was a common complication in CD. NTIS patients showed worse nutrition status and clinical outcome, and more critical disease activity and severity compared with euthyroid patients. A hypodeiodination condition and a potential thyroid-hormone-binding dysfunction may play a role in the etiology of NTIS in CD. Albumin was a meaningful protective and distinguishing marker of NTIS in CD.

  11. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-10-07

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using "pediatric inflammatory bowel disease", "pediatric Crohn's disease", "linear growth", "pubertal growth", "bone health", and "vitamin D" as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients' growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a "top-down" approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing remission and improving patients

  12. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  13. Crohn's Disease Is Associated With Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Leonard B.; Bosworth, Brian P.; Scherl, Ellen J.; Li, Ellen; Iroku, Ugonna; Munsell, Melissa A.; Mullen, Gerald E.; Walters, Arthur S.

    2013-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) have not previously included the central nervous system (CNS). Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a CNS disorder that is either idiopathic or secondary to a number of diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if RLS was associated with CD because both are associated with iron deficiency, inflammation, and bacterial overgrowth. Consecutive CD outpatients (N=272) were prospectively surveyed at 4 centers for criteria for RLS. Incidence (having RLS at any point in time), prevalence (having RLS at time of survey), clinical characteristics, risk factors, and potential qualitative relationship between RLS and gastrointestinal symptoms were queried. Incidence of RLS in patients with CD was 42.7%. Prevalence was 30.2% compared with 9% of spouses. Crohn's disease patients with and without RLS had a mean age of 46.8 vs 42.6 years, small intestine involvement in 77.9% vs 66.7%, colon involvement in 39.7% vs 63.2%, and prior iron deficiency anemia in 49.3% vs 33.1%. There was no difference between the CD groups with respect to current iron deficiency, RLS family history, or rare prevalence of concomitant RLS disorders. In 91.8% of patients with RLS and CD, RLS started during or after the onset of CD diagnosis. Among 73 patients with RLS, 67 (44.5%) stated there was a relationship between qualitative RLS symptom improvement with overall CD symptom improvement. These results demonstrate that RLS occurs frequently in CD and appears to be a possible extraintestinal manifestation. The potential relationship of RLS with CD activity warrants further investigation. PMID:19575360

  14. [NOD2 gene mutation in Moroccan patients with Crohn's disease: prevalence, genotypic study and correlation of NOD2 gene mutation with the phenotype of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Tamzaourte, Mouna; Errabih, Ikram; Krami, Hayat; Maha, Fadlouallah; Maria, Lahmiri; Benzzoubeir, Nadia; Ouazzani, Laaziza; Sefiani, Ahmed; Ouazzani, Houria

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations in a group of Moroccan patients with Crohn's disease and to study its correlation with genotype-phenotypic expression. We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study over a period of 16 months. 101 patients with Crohn's disease were enrolled between January 2012 and April 2013 as well as a control group of 107 patients. We performed a genetic analysis to identify 3 NOD2 gene variants: p.Arg702Trp, p.Gly908Arg and p.Leu1007fsins. Then we conducted a study of the correlation between genotype and phenotypic expression. The genetic analysis of patients with Crohn's disease highlighted the presence of NOD2 mutation in 14 patients (13.77%) versus 7 patients (6.53%) in the control group. The study of the frequency of different alleles showed p.Gly908Arg mutation in 6.43%, p.Leu1007fsins in 0.99% and p.Arg702Trp in 0.49% versus 2.80%, 0% and 0.46% in the control group respectively. The study of the correlation between genotype and phenotypic expression showed that CARD15 mutation is associated with ileocecal Crohn's disease, with fistulizing and stenosing behavior in Crohn's disease as well as with severe evolution and frequent recourse to surgery and immunosuppressants. The prevalence of NOD2/ CARD15 mutation in our case series is low. This mutation is correlated with severe Crohn's disease.

  15. The Swedish Crohn Trial: A Prematurely Terminated Randomized Controlled Trial of Thiopurines or Open Surgery for Primary Treatment of Ileocaecal Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gerdin, Linda; Eriksson, Anders S; Olaison, Gunnar; Sjödahl, Rune; Ström, Magnus; Söderholm, Johan D; Myrelid, Pär

    2016-01-01

    The importance of efficient and safe treatment of Crohn's disease is highlighted by its chronicity. Both medical and surgical treatments have shown good results in the symptomatic control of limited ileocaecal Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to compare medical treatment with surgical treatment of ileocaecal Crohn's disease. Thirty-six patients from seven hospitals with primary ileocaecal Crohn's disease were randomized to either medical or surgical treatment. The medical treatment was induction of remission with budesonide and thereafter maintenance treatment with azathioprine. The surgical treatment was open ileocaecal resection. Crohn's disease activity index over time, expressed as area under the curve at 1, 3 and 5 years, was the primary endpoint. Subjective health measured with the 36-item Short Form Survey Instrument (SF36) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were secondary endpoints. There were no differences between the treatment groups in Crohn's disease activity index over time. General health, measured as SF36 score, was higher in patients receiving surgical treatment than in those receiving medical treatment at 1 year, but there was no corresponding difference in VAS. Due to the slow inclusion rate and changes in clinical practice, the study was t=erminated prematurely. The study ended up being underpowered and should be interpreted with caution, but there was no clinically significant difference between the two treatment arms. Further studies are needed to address this important clinical question. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Bosnian and Herzegovinian medical scientists in PubMed database.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    In this paper it is shortly presented PubMed as one of the most important on-line databases of the scientific biomedical literature. Also, the author has analyzed the most cited authors, professors of the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from the published papers in the biomedical journals abstracted and indexed in PubMed.

  17. MedEdPORTAL: Educational Scholarship for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robby J.; Candler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    MedEdPORTAL is an online publication service provided at no charge by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The intent is to promote collaboration and educational scholarship by helping educators publish and share educational resources. With MedEdPORTAL, users can quickly locate high-quality, peer-reviewed teaching materials in both…

  18. 47 CFR 95.628 - MedRadio transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false MedRadio transmitters. 95.628 Section 95.628 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.628 MedRadio transmitters. (a) Frequency...

  19. 75 FR 39201 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Steamboat Springs, Colorado... Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the...

  20. MedEdPORTAL: Educational Scholarship for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robby J.; Candler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    MedEdPORTAL is an online publication service provided at no charge by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The intent is to promote collaboration and educational scholarship by helping educators publish and share educational resources. With MedEdPORTAL, users can quickly locate high-quality, peer-reviewed teaching materials in both…

  1. Crohn's-like complications in patients with ulcerative colitis after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, N S; Sanford, W W; Bodzin, J H

    1997-11-01

    Total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) has become an established surgical procedure for ulcerative colitis. Occasional patients who have undergone IPAA develop persistent or recurrent episodes of pouchitis (chronic pouchitis), from which a subset also develop gastrointestinal and systemic complications that are identical to those seen in Crohn's disease. These complications include enteric stenoses or fistulas in the pouch or pouch inlet segment, perianal fistulas or abscesses, pouch fistulas, arthritis, iridocyclitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum. The development of Crohn's-like gastrointestinal complications in a patient with chronic pouchitis frequently engenders concern that the pathologist misinterpreted the proctocolectomy specimen as ulcerative colitis instead of Crohn's disease. We describe eight patients who developed chronic pouchitis and Crohn's-like complications after IPAA and total proctocolectomy. In each case, concern was voiced about misinterpretation of the proctocolectomy specimen as ulcerative colitis instead of Crohn's disease after the development of the Crohn's-like complications. Preoperatively, all eight patients had characteristic clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of ulcerative colitis. Review of the pathology specimens indicated that all eight had ulcerative colitis. Crohn's-like complications are most likely related to chronic pouchitis, which probably is a form of recrudescent ulcerative colitis within the novel environment of the pouch. A diagnosis of Crohn's disease after IPAA surgery should only be made when reexamination of the original proctocolectomy specimen shows typical pathologic features of Crohn's disease, Crohn's disease arises in parts of the gastrointestinal tract distant from the pouch, pouch biopsies contain active enteritis with granulomas, or excised pouches show the characteristic features of Crohn's disease, including granulomas. There were no histologic differences in the total

  2. Analysis of the outcome of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J E; Fazio, V W; Remzi, F H; Lavery, I C; Church, J M; Strong, S A; Hull, T L; Senagore, A J; Delaney, C P

    2004-11-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has come to represent the procedure of choice for patients requiring surgery for mucosal ulcerative colitis. In contrast, a proven diagnosis of Crohn's disease is generally held to preclude ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. However, patients with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for apparent mucosal ulcerative colitis who are subsequently found to have Crohn's disease have a variable course. We reviewed our experience in this scenario to determine whether selected patients with Crohn's disease may be candidates for ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. A retrospective review of the prospectively maintained ileal pouch-anal anastomosis database was undertaken to identify patients with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Clinical outcome and quality-of-life data were obtained from the database and chart review. End points were the development of recrudescent Crohn's disease, pouch failure, and quality of life and functional outcome at the time of data collection. Differences between groups were calculated using the chi-squared test. Cumulative incidence of recrudescent Crohn's disease and pouch loss were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of development of recrudescent Crohn's disease and pouch loss were examined by univariate analysis. Sixty patients (32 females; median age, 33 (range, 15-74) years) who underwent ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for mucosal ulcerative colitis subsequently had that diagnosis revised to Crohn's disease. Median follow-up of all patients was 46 (range, 4-158) months at time of data collection by which time 21 patients (35 percent) had developed recrudescent Crohn's disease. No pre-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis factors examined were predictors of the development of recrudescent Crohn's disease on univariate analysis. Median follow-up of the latter group was 63 (range, 0-132) months from time of diagnosis, by which time six patients underwent pouch excision and another patient

  3. Penile and scrotal lymphedema as an unusual presentation of Crohn's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, W; Wiegman, M J; Damstra, R J

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory intestinal disease that primarily causes abdominal pain and diarrhea. We report a male patient who presented with penile and scrotal lymphedema and inguinal fistulas as the first manifestations of Crohn's disease. Extraintestinal or metastatic Crohn's disease initially presenting as genital lymphedema with fistula formation is rare. Skin lesions in extraintestinal Crohn's disease typically show non-caseating, sarcoidal granulomas with numerous foreign body- and Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells, which are separated from intestinal involvement by normal skin. Treatment options are limited and include multi-immunosuppressant medications.

  4. Maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease: current and emerging therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Matthew J; Green, Jonathon R B

    2004-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disorder with a relapsing and remitting course. Once remission is achieved, the main aim of the management of Crohn's disease is maintenance of that remission. Significant advances have been made into understanding the aetiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. With these advances in understanding come increasing numbers of new agents and therapies, aimed both at active disease and the subsequent maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. Current therapeutic strategies in maintaining remission in Crohn's disease include 5-aminosalicylates (e.g. sulfasalazine, mesalazine), thiopurines (e.g. azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine [mercaptopurine]), methotrexate and infliximab. The 5-aminosalicylates appear to have efficacy limited to either surgically induced remission and/or limited small bowel Crohn's disease. The immunomodulators now have an established role in Crohn's maintenance. Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine are effective in chronic active disease and corticosteroid-dependent Crohn's disease. Methotrexate has similar indications, although it appears to be an alternative in patients who are intolerant of, or resistant to, the thiopurines. The most recent breakthrough has been in the field of biological therapy for maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. Treatment of patients with the anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibody infliximab has been shown already to be effective in inducing remission. Recent studies have now confirmed a role for infliximab in delaying relapse and maintaining remission in patients responsive to infliximab induction therapy. However, results with soluble TNF alpha receptors have been disappointing. A number of other biological and nonbiological agents have shown potential, though trials of the 'newer' biological agents have thus far been disappointing, in the maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. The evidence for theses agents is currently limited, in many

  5. Do clinical characteristics of de novo pouch Crohn's disease after restorative proctocolectomy affect ileal pouch retention?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinyu; Stocchi, Luca; Kiran, Ravi P; Shen, Bo; Remzi, Feza H

    2014-01-01

    Data on the association between ileal pouch retention and clinical characteristics of pouch Crohn's disease developing after restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis are still limited. The aim of this study was to identify whether clinical features of pouch Crohn's disease are associated with pouch retention. The study was conducted in a tertiary referral center. All patients diagnosed with clinically active pouch Crohn's disease during follow-up after IPAA for ulcerative colitis or indeterminate colitis were identified from an ileal pouch registry. The definition of early vs late diagnosis was based on the median time interval to diagnosis of Crohn's disease after pouch creation. The associations between pouch retention and the clinical features and treatments of pouch Crohn's disease were analyzed. The long-term pouch retention rate was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze independent factors for pouch failure. From 1993 to 2009, a total of 65 (28 males) patients developed de novo pouch Crohn's disease during a mean 7.9 years of follow-up after pouch creation. The overall pouch retention rate was 57%. The median time from pouch creation to pouch Crohn's disease diagnosis was 3.6 years. Univariate analysis demonstrated that early diagnosis of pouch Crohn's disease, disease location, and clinical manifestations at the time of diagnosis were associated with pouch outcomes, whereas medical therapy or perianal surgery was not. Multivariate analysis showed that fistula at the time of diagnosis (OR = 17.5, p = 0.002) and early diagnosis (OR = 5.70, p = 0.011) were independent risk factors for pouch failure, whereas afferent limb disease was associated with pouch retention (OR = 0.07, p = 0.018). The retrospective nature of this study and referral bias were limitations. Disease characteristics of de novo pouch Crohn's disease heavily influence pouch retention. The interval from pouch construction

  6. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  7. Performance of a MedArray silicone hollow fiber oxygenator.

    PubMed

    LaFayette, Nathan G; Schewe, Rebecca E; Montoya, J Patrick; Cook, Keith E

    2009-01-01

    A silicone hollow fiber oxygenator was evaluated to characterize gas transfer and biocompatibility. The device's fiber bundle was composed of MedArray's silicone hollow fibers with a 320 microm outside diameter, a 50 microm wall thickness, a surface area of 0.45 m, and a 0.49 void fraction. An in vitro gas exchange study was performed comparing the MedArray device (n = 9) with the Medtronic 0600 oxygenator (n = 6) using Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation standards and blood flow rates of 0.5-1.75 L/min, and an oxygen to blood flow ratio of two. Biocompatibility and resistance studies were performed in vivo using a swine venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation model (MedArray n = 5, Medtronic n = 5). Average O(2) transfer at 1 L/min was 86 ml/min/m in the MedArray device and 101.1 ml/min/m in the Medtronic device. At 0.5 L/min the MedArray and Medtronic device average resistance was 15.5 and 148.5 mm Hg/(L/min), respectively. Both devices had similar platelet consumption and hemolysis. Results indicate that the MedArray device has lower O(2) transfer efficiency, similar biocompatibility, and lower resistance than the Medtronic 0600 oxygenator. Optimization of the MedArray fiber bundle and housing design is necessary to improve O(2) transfer efficiency while maintaining lower device resistance than the Medtronic oxygenator.

  8. Frequent MED12 mutations in phyllodes tumours of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, M; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Yoshida, H; Maeshima, A; Kanai, Y; Kinoshita, T; Ochiai, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial tumours of the breast, that include benign, borderline, and malignant lesions. Although the molecular basis of phyllodes tumours largely remains unknown, a recent exome study identified MED12 mutations as a sole recurrent genetic alteration in fibroadenoma, a common benign fibroepithelial tumour that shares some histological features with the phyllodes tumour. Methods: Forty-six phyllodes tumours and 58 fibroadenomas of the breast were analysed for MED12 mutations by using Sanger sequencing. Results: MED12 mutations were identified in 37 out of the 46 phyllodes tumours (80%). The prevalence of MED12 mutations was similar among benign (15/18, 83%), borderline (12/15, 80%), and malignant tumours (10/13, 77%). MED12 mutations were also identified in 36 of the 58 fibroadenomas (62%). The mutations were frequent among intracanalicular-type (24/32, 75%) and complex-type lesions (4/6, 67%), but were significantly less common among the pericanalicular-type lesions (8/20, 40%). A microdissection-based analysis showed that MED12 mutations were confined to the stromal components in both phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas. Conclusions: MED12 mutations were frequent among the phyllodes tumours of the breast, regardless of the tumour grade. Phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas share, at least in part, a common genetic background. PMID:25839987

  9. Frequent MED12 mutations in phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Yoshida, H; Maeshima, A; Kanai, Y; Kinoshita, T; Ochiai, A

    2015-05-12

    Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial tumours of the breast, that include benign, borderline, and malignant lesions. Although the molecular basis of phyllodes tumours largely remains unknown, a recent exome study identified MED12 mutations as a sole recurrent genetic alteration in fibroadenoma, a common benign fibroepithelial tumour that shares some histological features with the phyllodes tumour. Forty-six phyllodes tumours and 58 fibroadenomas of the breast were analysed for MED12 mutations by using Sanger sequencing. MED12 mutations were identified in 37 out of the 46 phyllodes tumours (80%). The prevalence of MED12 mutations was similar among benign (15/18, 83%), borderline (12/15, 80%), and malignant tumours (10/13, 77%). MED12 mutations were also identified in 36 of the 58 fibroadenomas (62%). The mutations were frequent among intracanalicular-type (24/32, 75%) and complex-type lesions (4/6, 67%), but were significantly less common among the pericanalicular-type lesions (8/20, 40%). A microdissection-based analysis showed that MED12 mutations were confined to the stromal components in both phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas. MED12 mutations were frequent among the phyllodes tumours of the breast, regardless of the tumour grade. Phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas share, at least in part, a common genetic background.

  10. Neurochemical coding in the small intestine of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Belai, A; Boulos, P B; Robson, T; Burnstock, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been conflicting results regarding the effect of Crohn's disease on the neurochemical composition of the enteric nervous system. AIMS: To examine the effect of Crohn's disease on the neurochemical composition of enteric nerve fibres and cell bodies using whole mount preparations of human ileum. METHODS: Whole wall ileum from seven normal subjects and nine patients with Crohn's disease was used to investigate the neurochemical composition of neurones and nerve fibres in the myenteric plexus, circular muscle, and serosa layer of ileum using immunohistochemical techniques. RESULTS: Increased tyrosine hydroxylase, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity was exclusively seen in the myenteric plexus. There was increased neurofilament immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus and nerve fibres of the circular muscle layer, and thick bundles of immunoreactive nerve fibres in the serosa layer. Increased vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, nitric oxide synthase, and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide immunoreactivity was seen in the myenteric plexus and nerve fibres of the circular muscle layer, and aggregates of inflammatory cells in the serosa layer of the afflicted segment of Crohn's ileum. In addition, there was a chaotic display of nerve fibres containing some of the neuroactive substances with a high frequency of enlarged varicosities in the myenteric ganglia and/or nerve fibres of the circular muscle layer of Crohn's ileum. CONCLUSION: Results show quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the neurochemical composition of enteric nerve fibres and nerve cell bodies of Crohn's ileum. These changes and the presence of nitric oxide synthase and peptides immunoreactive inflammatory cells in the serosa layer suggest that nerve-immune interactions may have a significant role in the process of the inflammatory changes seen in Crohn's ileitis. Images PMID:9245931

  11. Histopathological findings of extra-ileal manifestations at initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease-related ileitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian S; Miller, Gregory C; Bettington, Mark L; Rosty, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Our objective was to review the histological findings in index biopsies from the terminal ileum and other gastro-intestinal tract sites of Crohn's disease patients prior any treatment and to compare them with the findings from patients with non-specific ileitis. A total of 111 consecutive Crohn's disease cases (55 females, median age 27 years) with extra-ileal biopsies were retrospectively selected. Upper gastrointestinal inflammatory changes were found in 68 % of gastric biopsies, 60 % of oesophageal biopsies and 43 % of duodenal biopsies with no significant difference in frequency between paediatric and adult cases. Crohn's colitis was more common in paediatric cases than adult cases (85 % versus 57 %). Granuloma in at least one extra-ileal site was observed in 40 %, more frequently in paediatric cases than in adults (78 vs 27 %). Compared with Crohn's disease cases, the group of 151 non-specific ileitis cases (75 females, median age 52 years) were more likely to have normal upper and lower gastrointestinal biopsies and to show less frequent crypt architectural changes in the terminal ileum. In summary, Crohn's disease ileitis is often associated with inflammation elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract while non-specific ileitis was infrequently associated with inflammation elsewhere for both paediatric and adult patients. These findings support the role of systematic biopsies in multiple gastrointestinal sites to help distinguishing Crohn's ileitis from non-specific ileitis in paediatric and adult population.

  12. [Effectiveness of anti-TNF alpha antibodies in treatment of fistulizing Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Rozpondek, Piotr; Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Przybylska, Magdalena; Mach, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    About 35% of patients with Crohn's disease develop fistulae. Treatment of those changes is a complicated clinical problem. Anti-TNF alpha antibodies are currently the most effective therapy of fistulizing Crohn's disease. Aim of the study is to evaluate results of anti-TNF alpha treatment in patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease. We evaluated results of anti-TNF alpha treatment (both with adalimumab n=10 and infliximab n=19) in 29 patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease treated in years 2008 - 2011 in Gastroenterology and Hepatology Clinic of University Hospital in Krakow. Closure of over 50% of fistulas was achieved by 78,94% patients after induction therapy with infliximab and 50% with adalimumab. Long term remission, evaluated after 52 weeks of treatment, was observed in 46,15% patients treated with infliximab. Best results were observed in perianal fistulas treatment - remission was achieved in 88.2% of patients. Effectiveness of enterocutaneus fistalas therapy was lower, and their healing was observed in 28.57% of patients. We observed no correlation between duration of Crohn's disease, duration of fistulas history or previously used treatment and results of anti-TNF alpha treatment. Anti-TNF alpha treatment has high effectiveness both short and long term in fistulizing Crohn's disease. Tolerance of treatment is very good. We lack clinical data about treatment other fistulas than perianal, but we suspect that effectiveness of anti-TNF alpha in this cases is lower. It is indicated to treat patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease with anti-TNF alpha, because it gives them chance for long remission and improvement of quality of life.

  13. Atopic manifestations are more common in patients with Crohn disease than in the general population.

    PubMed

    Myrelid, P; Dufmats, M; Lilja, I; Grinn, C; Lannerstad, O; Sjödahl, R

    2004-08-01

    The role of TNF-alpha in Crohn disease is now well established and anti-TNF-alpha is frequently used as a second- or third-line treatment. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is traditionally associated with macrophages but has recently also been found in mast cells of the ileal wall in patients with Crohn disease. As it is well known that mast cells and TNF-alpha play important roles in atopic manifestations like asthma, allergic rhinitis; and eczema the aim of this study was to investigate whether these are seen more commonly in Crohn patients than in the general population. Patients with Crohn disease (n = 308), aged 18-50 years, living in the Linköping region in southeast Sweden, were asked to answer a questionnaire regarding the presence of any kind of atopic manifestations. The questionnaire was also sent to 930 controls collected from the Southeastern Region Population Registry. The controls were matched according to age, sex, and place of residence. The response rate among the Crohn patients was 91% (280/308) and among controls 84% (779/930). Eczema was a significantly more frequent manifestation, being almost twice as common in Crohn patients (27%) as in the general population (16%). Adjustment by logistic regression for place of residence, gender, age and coexistence of any other atopic manifestation did not change the odds ratios significantly. Atopic manifestations as a group, and eczema as a single manifestation, are significantly more frequent in Crohn patients than in the general population.

  14. Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) on the monitoring, prevention and treatment of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Domènech, Eugeni; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Nos, Pilar; Vera, Maribel; Chaparro, María; Esteve, María; Gisbert, Javier P; Mañosa, Míriam

    Despite the availability of new, powerful drugs for Crohn's disease, a significant proportion of patients will undergo an intestinal resection to control the disease as it develops. In the absence of an effective preventative treatment, the appearance of new intestinal lesions after surgery for Crohn's disease is the norm; this is known as post-operative recurrence and may appear very early on, even a few weeks after the surgical resection. Furthermore, the drugs that are currently available for the prevention of post-operative recurrence have a limited effect; up to 50% of cases present recurrent Crohn's disease activity despite the preventative treatment, which may require further surgery with the consequent loss of intestinal function, leading some patients to suffer from short bowel syndrome as an irreversible complication. The management of Crohn's disease patients who undergo an intestinal resection should thus be geared towards prevention, early detection and, in the worst case scenario, the treatment of post-operative recurrence. This article reviews the natural history, diagnostic measures, monitoring, prevention and treatment of post-operative recurrence, and proposes recommendations based on existing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. Low serum and bone vitamin K status in patients with longstanding Crohn's disease: another pathogenetic factor of osteoporosis in Crohn's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Schoon, E; Muller, M; Vermeer, C; Schurgers, L; Brummer, R; Stockbrugger, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A high prevalence of osteoporosis is reported in Crohn's disease. The pathogenesis is not completely understood but is probably multifactorial. Longstanding Crohn's disease is associated with a deficiency of fat soluble vitamins, among them vitamin K. Vitamin K is a cofactor in the carboxylation of osteocalcin, a protein essential for calcium binding to bone. A high level of circulating uncarboxylated osteocalcin is a sensitive marker of vitamin K deficiency.
AIMS—To determine serum and bone vitamin K status in patients with Crohn's disease and to elucidate its relationship with bone mineral density.
METHODS—Bone mineral density was measured in 32 patients with longstanding Crohn's disease and small bowel involvement, currently in remission, and receiving less than 5 mg of prednisolone daily. Serum levels of vitamins D and K, triglycerides, and total immunoreactive osteocalcin, as well as uncarboxylated osteocalcin ("free" osteocalcin) were determined. The hydroxyapatite binding capacity of osteocalcin was calculated. Data were compared with an age and sex matched control population.
RESULTS—Serum vitamin K levels of CD patients were significantly decreased compared with normal controls (p<0.01). "Free" osteocalcin was higher and hydroxyapatite binding capacity of circulating osteocalcin was lower than in matched controls (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively), indicating a low bone vitamin K status in Crohn's disease. In patients, an inverse correlation was found between "free" osteocalcin and lumbar spine bone mineral density (r=−0.375, p<0.05) and between "free" osteocalcin and the z score of the lumbar spine (r=−0.381, p<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that "free" osteocalcin was an independent risk factor for low bone mineral density of the lumbar spine whereas serum vitamin D was not.
CONCLUSIONS—The finding that a poor vitamin K status is associated with low bone mineral density in longstanding Crohn

  16. [DIETARY HABITS AND FEEDING BELIEFS OF PEOPLE WITH CROHN'S DISEASE].

    PubMed

    García-Sanjuán, Sofía; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Sanjuán-Quiles, Ángela; Richart-Martínez, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad de Crohn es una enfermedad crónica de etiopatogenia desconocida. Las consecuencias que esta enfermedad provoca a nivel nutricional dependen de varios factores. Sin embargo, poco se sabe sobre las prácticas nutricionales que adoptan estos pacientes una vez diagnosticados. Objetivo: explorar la experiencia de los afectados en relación con la ingesta alimentaria, con el objetivo futuro de comprender dichas experiencias y diseñar intervenciones eficaces y adecuadas. Metodología y sujetos: se empleó un diseño cualitativo basado en el enfoque etnográfico. Se realizaron 19 entrevistas semiestructuradas, hasta conseguir la saturación de la información, a afectados por la enfermedad de Crohn, en la provincia de Alicante y, posteriormente, se realizó el análisis temático. Resultados: cinco categorías con sus respectivas subcategorías de análisis fueron identificadas a partir de los datos sobre la experiencia de alimentación de las personas entrevistadas. 1) Creencias sobre nutrición y EC, 2) Modificación de los hábitos alimentarios, 3) Búsqueda de información sobre alimentación y EC, 4) El papel de los profesionales, 5) Autogestión. Conclusiones: el conocimiento de los hábitos dietéticos de la persona con EC en una población en la que su dieta se presupone que culturalmente es reconocida como saludable, nos puede dar pautas de abordaje o apoyo profesional tanto en materia de prevención, promoción y educación para la salud, así como sobre su nivel organizativo en las instituciones sanitarias, cosas que actualmente no se tienen en cuenta, puesto que el abordaje de la EC es meramente clínico y con enfoque patológico, pero no desde una perspectiva de salud, fomentando hábitos saludables desde la multidisciplinariedad.

  17. Wider Access to Meds Cuts Global AIDS Deaths in Half

    MedlinePlus

    ... 167323.html Wider Access to Meds Cuts Global AIDS Deaths in Half But eastern Europe and Middle ... 20, 2017 THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- AIDS-related deaths worldwide have been halved since 2005 ...

  18. Using PubMed effectively to access the orthopaedic literature.

    PubMed

    Clough, J F Myles; Hitchcock, Kristin; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    PubMed is the free public Internet interface to the US National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database of citations to medical scientific articles. Many orthopaedic surgeons use PubMed on a regular basis, but most orthopaedic surgeons have received little or no training in how to use PubMed effectively and express frustration with the experience. Typical problems encountered are data overload with very large numbers of returns to look through, failure to find a specific article, and a concern that a search has missed important papers. It is helpful to understand the system used to enter journal articles into the database and the classification of the common types of searches and to review suggestions for the best ways to use the PubMed interface and find sources for search teaching and assistance.

  19. Electric Brain Stimulation No Better Than Meds for Depression: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166920.html Electric Brain Stimulation No Better Than Meds For Depression: Study ... depression and can't find relief, stimulating the brain with electric impulses may help. But a new ...

  20. Popular Heartburn Meds Don't Raise Alzheimer's Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166931.html Popular Heartburn Meds Don't Raise Alzheimer's Risk: Study New research debunks other studies suggesting ... drugs may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in people aged 75 and older. PPIs ...

  1. Dozens of Potential Alzheimer's Meds in The Pipeline

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167277.html Dozens of Potential Alzheimer's Meds in the Pipeline Last new drug for ... 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly three dozen new Alzheimer's drugs may reach the market in the next ...

  2. Abnormal leukotriene C4 released by unaffected jejunal mucosa in patients with inactive Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Guarner, F; Antolín, M; Rodríguez, R; Salas, A; Malagelada, J R

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal release of inflammatory mediators is enhanced in active inflammatory bowel disease. This study examines whether leukotriene C4 production occurs in apparently unaffected segments of the gut. The intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 was determined by jejunal perfusion in seven healthy controls, in nine patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, and in 13 patients with Crohn's disease (six with ileal disease, and seven with only colonic). All patients were in clinical remission and none of them had evidence of jejunal involvement. Mild intraluminal irritation with a 2.5 mmol/l deoxycholic acid solution was induced to stimulate local inflammatory mechanisms. The release of DNA (a marker of mucosal desquamation) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was simultaneously measured. Jejunal release of DNA was higher in Crohn's disease patients than in ulcerative colitis or healthy controls. Basal release of PGE2 was similar in the three groups of patients. Basal release of leukotriene C4 was considerably enhanced, however, in Crohn's disease patients compared with healthy controls. In ulcerative colitis patients, basal leukotriene C4 release was non-significantly different from controls. Bile acid perfusion stimulated PGE2, leukotriene C4, and DNA release in all groups studied, but leukotriene C4 release was significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients. It is concluded that in inactive Crohn's disease there is an enhanced intraluminal release of leukotriene C4 in apparently unaffected segments of proximal small bowel, which may reflect fundamental changes in the function of the gut mucosal barrier. PMID:8174991

  3. [Hydro-MRT with fast sequences in Crohn's disease: a comparison with fractionated gastrointestinal passage].

    PubMed

    Schunk, K; Kern, A; Heussel, C P; Kalden, P; Orth, T; Wanitschke, R; Thelen, M

    1999-04-01

    To compare the value of hydro-MRI with that of barium studies in patients with Crohn's disease. After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences (T2W HASTE +/- FS, contrast-enhanced T1W FLASH FS) were acquired in 46 patients with Crohn's disease at 1.0 T. The findings of hydro-MRI were compared with those of barium studies. In the stomach and the small bowel, hydro-MRI and barium studies demonstrated similar numbers of Crohn's involvements (39 vs. 36); in the colon, hydro-MRI showed clearly more affections (23 vs. 10). Hydro-MRI showed 12.7 cm of inflamed bowel per patient, on average (barium studies: 10.4 cm; p = 0.004). There was a good agreement between the two methods regarding the assessment of the extent of Crohn's disease and the severity of bowel stenoses (r = 0.89 and 0.88, respectively). For the assessment of Crohn's disease, hydro-MRI is preferable to the barium study because of the superior imaging quality and the lack of radiation exposure.

  4. Serum agglutinins to Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus species in Crohn's and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Wensinck, F.; Van de Merwe, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Sera from patients suffering from Crohn's and other diseases and from healthy subjects were tested for agglutinins to anaerobic, gram-positive coccoid rods belonging to species of Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus. Four strains labelled Eubacterium contortum (two strains), Eubacterium rectale and Peptostreptococcus productus were agglutinated by a higher percentage of sera from patients with Crohn's disease than from healthy subjects and from patients with liver and intestinal diseases (including ulcerative colitis), ankylosing spondylitis, granulomatous diseases, diseases of immunity and malignancies. The agglutinins were of the IgG and IgM classes and strain-specific; the titres were low. The results obtained with sera from patients with Crohn's disease and healthy people were subjected to discriminant analysis to estimate the probability, based on the combined results with the four strains, that a patient suffers from Crohn's disease. When sera giving an a posteriori probability greater than or equal to 0.95 (a priori probability = 0.5) were considered positive, the test with four strains had a sensitivity of 54% and a specificity of nearly 100%. The results with sera submitted for diagnosis showed that positive reactions in patients with a diagnosis apparently incompatible with Crohn's disease were within acceptable limits. PMID:7019318

  5. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Design of a light delivery system for the photodynamic treatment of the Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrecht, Tanja; Borle, Francois; van den Bergh, Hubert; Michetti, Pierre; Ortner, Maria-Anna; Wagnières, Georges

    2007-07-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease originating from an overwhelming response of the mucosal immune system. Low dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) may modify the mucosal immune response and thus serve as a therapy for Crohn's disease. Most patients with Crohn's disease show inflammatory reactions in the terminal ileum or colon where PDT treatment is feasible by low-invasive endoscopic techniques. However, the tube like geometry of the colon, it's folding, and the presences of multiple foci of Crohn's lesions along the colon require the development of adequate light delivery techniques. We present a prototype light delivery system for endoscopic clinical PDT in patients with Crohn's disease. The system is based on a cylindrical light diffuser inserted into a diffusing balloon catheter. Homogenous irradiation is performed with a 4 W diode laser at 635 nm. Light dosimetry is performed using a calibrated integrating sphere. The system can be used with conventional colonoscopes and colonovideoscopes having a 3.8 mm diameter working channel. The feasibility of PDT in colon with our prototype was demonstrated in first clinical trials.

  7. Surgical treatment of Crohn's disease: indications, results and predictive factors of recurrence and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Hefaiedh, Rania; Sabbeh, Mariem; Miloudi, Nizar; Ennaifer, Rym; Romdhane, Hayfa; Belhadj, Najet; Gharbi, Lassad; Khalfallah, Tahar

    2015-06-01

    Crohn's disease management represents a major problem in gastroenterology and general surgery because it affects young subjects and has a major impact on their quality of life. The aims of our study were to identify the indications for surgery in Crohn's disease, the results and the complications of surgery in our series, and to identify possible predictive factors of recurrence and postoperative morbidity. A retrospective descriptive study including 38 cases of patients with Crohn's disease who underwent surgical treatment in the department of surgery in Mongi Slim Hospital, during the period between January 1992 and December 2011 was performed. The occurrence of stenosis was the most common indication for surgical treatment in Crohn's disease in our series, and ileocecal resection was the most performed surgery. Twenty six patients (58%) received maintenance therapy after surgery. Twenty two patients relapsed and 13 had surgical management for recurrence. In univariate analysis, predictive factors of post operative morbidity in our study were leukocytosis, penetrating phenotype and intraabdominal sepsis. Ileocecal location was the only factor that significantly improved the incidence of recurrence. In multivariate analysis, only penetrating phenotype was a predictive factor or post operative morbidity. Despite the development of medical treatment, surgical treatment keeps large indications for the management of complications of Crohn's disease. The surgery should be an alternative to immunosuppressive therapy. Currently, prevention postoperative recurrence is well codified, reducing the risk of complications.

  8. Ileal and colonic fatty acid profiles in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bühner, S; Nagel, E; Körber, J; Vogelsang, H; Linn, T; Pichlmayr, R

    1994-01-01

    In patients with active Crohn's disease and in a control group the fatty acid profiles in the whole lipid fraction of ileal and colonic mucosal biopsy specimens were determined by capillary gas chromatography. The biopsy specimens in Crohn's disease patients were taken from the inflamed terminal ileum as well as from the inflamed and macroscopically normal colon. Compared with controls the fatty acid distribution in the inflamed ileal mucosa was significantly characterised by (a) a decrease of 18:2 n6 and 18:3 n3 accompanied by a substantial increase of the highly polyunsaturated fatty acids 20:4 n6, 22:4 n6, and 22:6 n3 and (b) a higher unsaturation index of total fatty acids compared with controls. These changes were similar in the inflamed colon. Additionally, both the inflamed and the macroscopically normal colonic mucosa showed an increase of saturated (18:0) and a decrease of monounsaturated fatty acids (18:1 n9). Fatty acid profiles of ileum and colon showed side variations in controls, but not in the Crohn's disease group. These data suggest that in Crohn's disease changes in the distribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids seem to be the general feature of inflamed mucosa in small and large intestine. Results further suggest that colonic fatty acid metabolism in Crohn's disease is altered by degrees, showing changes in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids as an additional, primary event. PMID:7959199

  9. Possible association of cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease and chronic Crohn disease: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Salva, Katrin A; Stenstrom, Melissa; Breadon, Jonith Y; Odland, Paul Blair; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Wood, Gary S

    2014-02-01

    IMPORTANCE Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease (CRDD), a variant of Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin, has a wide range of clinical presentations. Rosai-Dorfman disease is believed to result from an aberrant response to antigens, caused by immunosuppressive macrophages. Macrophage-mediated immunosuppression is also implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease, linking these otherwise unrelated entities. To our knowledge, the coexistence of these disorders has been described in only 2 cases, 1 of them confined to the skin and soft tissue. OBSERVATIONS We present a series of 3 patients who developed purely CRDD in the context of long-standing Crohn disease. Statistical estimates suggested that the association of these 2 disorders is not due to chance (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our case series provides the clinical correlate to the pathogenetic parallels between CRDD and Crohn disease. Crohn disease is frequently complicated by various skin manifestations, which may be mimicked by CRDD. Therefore, it may be prudent for clinicians to include CRDD in the list of differential diagnoses when examining skin lesions in patients with Crohn disease.

  10. Possible Association of Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman Disease and Chronic Crohn Disease A Case Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Salva, Katrin A.; Stenstrom, Melissa; Breadon, Jonith Y.; Odland, Paul Blair; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease (CRDD), a variant of Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin, has a wide range of clinical presentations. Rosai-Dorfman disease is believed to result from an aberrant response to antigens, caused by immunosuppressive macrophages. Macrophage-mediated immunosuppression is also implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease, linking these otherwise unrelated entities. To our knowledge, the coexistence of these disorders has been described in only 2 cases, 1 of them confined to the skin and soft tissue. OBSERVATIONS We present a series of 3 patients who developed purely CRDD in the context of long-standing Crohn disease. Statistical estimates suggested that the association of these 2 disorders is not due to chance (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our case series provides the clinical correlate to the pathogenetic parallels between CRDD and Crohn disease. Crohn disease is frequently complicated by various skin manifestations, which may be mimicked by CRDD. Therefore, it may be prudent for clinicians to include CRDD in the list of differential diagnoses when examining skin lesions in patients with Crohn disease. PMID:24305684

  11. Multidisciplinary and evidence-based management of fistulizing perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sordo-Mejia, Ricardo; Gaertner, Wolfgang B

    2014-08-15

    Perianal symptoms are common in patients with Crohn's disease and cause considerable morbidity. The etiology of these symptoms include skin tags, ulcers, fissures, abscesses, fistulas or stenoses. Fistula is the most common perianal manifestation. Multiple treatment options exist although very few are evidence-based. The phases of treatment include: drainage of infection, assessment of Crohn's disease status and fistula tracts, medical therapy, and selective operative management. The impact of biological therapy on perianal Crohn's disease is uncertain given that outcomes are conflicting. Operative treatment to eradicate the fistula tract can be attempted once infection has resolved and Crohn's disease activity is controlled. The operative approach should be tailored according to the anatomy of the fistula tract. Definitive treatment is challenging with medical and operative treatment rarely leading to true healing with frequent complications and recurrence. Treatment success must be weighed against the risk of complications, specially anal sphincter injury. A full understanding of the etiology and all potential therapeutic options is critical for success. Multidisciplinary management of fistulizing perianal Crohn's disease is crucial to improve outcomes.

  12. Analysis of court criteria for awarding disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier; Motos, Jaime; Montserrat, Antònia; Gallardo, Olga; Vergara, Mercedes

    2009-12-01

    Chronic disability and its consequences for social life and employment are important but often neglected aspects of Crohn's disease. No specific scores have been developed to evaluate chronic disability in patients with Crohn's disease; the medical criteria used by government authorities to award disability benefits have not been analyzed. We aimed to determine the courts' criteria for awarding disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease in Spain. We systematically searched case law databases in Spain's regional Supreme Courts to identify sentences regarding awards of disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease. Selected decisions were reviewed to extract variables related to the awarding of benefits. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine which variables predicted the awarding of benefits. Two hundred eighty sentences were reviewed. The rate of judicial decisions in favor of the claimants varied considerably between the various tribunals. Multivariate analysis showed that adequate description of the disease (odds ratio, 8.6), fecal incontinence (odds ratio, 8.9), the number of associated diseases (odds ratio, 2.3), and the presence of an ostomy (odds ratio, not estimable) were independent predictors of the awarding of Social Security benefits. The amount of Social Security benefits awarded to patients with Crohn's disease varied depending on the tribunal. The most important predictors of a court's disability award were the adequate description of the patient's disease, fecal incontinence, associated diseases, and presence of an ostomy.

  13. Activity of Crohn's disease assessed by colour Doppler ultrasound analysis of the affected loops.

    PubMed

    Esteban, J M; Maldonado, L; Sanchiz, V; Minguez, M; Benages, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with colour Doppler ultrasound the vascular changes in the wall of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, and to establish whether these changes reflects clinical or biochemical activity of Crohn's disease. Seventy-nine patients with Crohn's disease (44 with active disease and 35 inactive patients) were studied with frequency- and amplitude-encoded duplex Doppler sonography. A group of 35 healthy volunteers were also included. The exam consisted of the search for colour signals in the walls of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, classifying the degree of vascularity with a simple scoring system into three groups: absence of colour signal (score of 0); weak or scattered colour signals (score of 1); and multiple colour signals or clear identification of vessels in the loops walls (score of 2). Doppler curves were obtained of the detected vessels with measurement of the resistive index (RI). There was a visible increase in the gut walls' vascularity in the active patients compared with those with inactive disease. The mean RI was statistically significantly lower in the gut wall vessels of the patients with active illness than that obtained in the inactive patients. Colour Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease.

  14. Evaluation of oral budesonide for treatment of mild and moderate exacerbations of Crohn's disease in children.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arie; Broide, Efrat; Stein, Michal; Bujanover, Yoram; Weizman, Zvi; Dinari, Gabriel; Pacht, Avi; Branski, David; Zahavi, Ilan

    2002-01-01

    Oral budesonide has been found to be efficacious for mild to moderate Crohn's disease in adults, with equal improvement rates for budesonide and prednisone. We report the results of a retrospective study of budesonide treatment in mild to moderate Crohn's disease in children. Charts of patients treated with budesonide (n = 62) with a pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index of 12.5 to 40 were compared with a cohort of 58 age-matched patients treated with prednisone. Among children treated with budesonide, 48% had remission compared with 77% of the children treated with prednisone (P =.001). Among patients who had failed previous medical therapy with mesalamine, 59% had remission with budesonide (9 mg/day). Remission with prednisone occurred in 73% of children who failed to achieve remission with budesonide. Patients responding to budesonide had significantly milder disease compared with nonresponders who had remission while taking prednisone. Budesonide is useful in mild to moderate Crohn's disease in children. It is more effective than mesalamine and antibiotics but less effective than prednisone. Budesonide should be considered for first-line therapy in mild to moderate Crohn's disease.

  15. [Frequency and characteristics of granulomas in 368 pediatric patients with Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Müller, Katalin Eszter; Lakatos, Péter László; Papp, Mária; Veres, Gábor

    2013-10-27

    Epitheloid granulomas are one of the best histological criteria for distinguishing Crohn's disease from other inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the role of granuloma in the pathogenesis and clinical characteristics of Crohn's disease is unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of granulomas and their association with clinical characteristics using the database of the Hungarian Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Registry. Three hundred and sixty-eight children with Crohn's disease were registered between January 1st, 2007 and December 31st, 2010. The frequency of granulomas was 31.4% (111/353) at diagnosis. Isolated granuloma in the upper gastrointestinal tract was detected in 2.5% of patients, while those in the terminal ileum was found in 5% of patients. There was no difference in location, behavior and disease activity indexes between patients with and without granulomas. Need for immunomodulators and biological therapy was similar in the two groups in the first year of diagnosis. The frequency of granulomas in this cohort was comparable to the frequency reported in other studies. Interestingly, granulomas in the terminal ileum or upper gastrointestinal tract contributed to the diagnosis of Crohn's disease in one of 13 children. These data indicate that multiple biopsies from multiple sites are essential for the diagnosis of pediatric Crohn's disease.

  16. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Crohn's Disease Identified by In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A.; Manuela, Mura; Francesco, Tanda; Amelia, Lissia; Antonello, Solinas; Giovanni, Fadda; Stefania, Zanetti

    2001-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. We report on the presence of cell wall-deficient Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 35 of 48 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 33 patients with Crohn's disease by in situ hybridization with IS900 as a probe. PMID:11724871

  17. PubMed searches: overview and strategies for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Wesley T; Olin, Bernie R

    2013-04-01

    PubMed is a biomedical and life sciences database maintained by a division of the National Library of Medicine known as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). It is a large resource with more than 5600 journals indexed and greater than 22 million total citations. Searches conducted in PubMed provide references that are more specific for the intended topic compared with other popular search engines. Effective PubMed searches allow the clinician to remain current on the latest clinical trials, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines. PubMed continues to evolve by allowing users to create a customized experience through the My NCBI portal, new arrangements and options in search filters, and supporting scholarly projects through exportation of citations to reference managing software. Prepackaged search options available in the Clinical Queries feature also allow users to efficiently search for clinical literature. PubMed also provides information regarding the source journals themselves through the Journals in NCBI Databases link. This article provides an overview of the PubMed database's structure and features as well as strategies for conducting an effective search.

  18. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-17

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is based on 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) that are the forefront of treatment of mild-to-moderate active disease and maintenance; steroids are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active disease; immunosuppressives and sometimes antibiotics in moderate-to-severe disease; maintenance and for the treatment of selected complications. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Based on evidence from new clinical studies and recent meta-analyses, the role of and indications for conventional therapy have been reassessed. The 5-ASAs are nowadays less frequently used in both active disease and maintenance therapy. Instead, budesonide has been introduced in the treatment of mild-to-moderate ileal disease. Besides the modest use of 5-ASAs, steroids are prescribed for active colonic disease. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, are more commonly used in moderate-to-severe disease as well as in maintenance. The preferred maintenance regimen following medically- and surgically-induced remission, in addition to relationship between medical and surgical therapies, has also changed. The recent introduction of new "biological" therapy represents a major, promising change in the therapy of resistant and penetrating disease.

  19. The operative management of children with complex perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Natashia M; King, Sebastian K; Elkadri, Abdul; Walters, Thomas; Fish, Joel; Langer, Jacob C

    2016-12-01

    Perianal Crohn's disease (PCD) can affect both quality of life and psychological wellbeing. A subset of pediatric patients with complex PCD require surgical intervention, although appropriate timing and treatment regimens remain unclear. This study aimed to describe a large pediatric cohort in a tertiary center to determine the range of surgical management in children with complex PCD. A retrospective review of children requiring operative intervention for PCD over 13 years (2002-2014) was performed. PCD was divided into simple and complex based on the type of surgical procedure, and the two groups were compared. The 57 children were divided into two groups: the simple group (N=43) underwent abscess drainage ± seton insertion alone, and the complex group (N=14) underwent loop ileostomy ± more extensive surgery. In the complex group, females were more predominant (57% of complex vs 30% of simple), and the average age at diagnosis was lower. Anti-TNF therapy was utilized in 79.1% of simple and 100% of complex PCD. All 14 complex patients underwent a defunctioning ileostomy, with 7 requiring further operations (subtotal colectomy=4, proctocolectomy ± anal sparing=5, plastic surgery reconstruction with perineal flap/graft=4). Complex PCD represents a small but challenging subset of patients in which major surgical intervention may be necessary to alleviate the symptoms of this debilitating condition. retrospective case study with no control group - level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral blood methylation profiling of female Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Li Yim, Andrew Y F; Duijvis, Nicolette W; Zhao, Jing; de Jonge, Wouter J; D'Haens, Geert R A M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Mul, Adri N P M; Te Velde, Anje A; Henneman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder belonging to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). CD affects distinct parts of the gastrointestinal tract, leading to symptoms including diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, weight loss, and anemia. The aim of this study was to assess whether the DNA methylome of peripheral blood cells can be associated with CD in women. Samples were obtained from 18 female patients with histologically confirmed ileal or ileocolic CD and 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls (mean age and standard deviation: 30.5 ± 6.5 years for both groups). Genome-wide DNA methylation was determined using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450k BeadChip. Our analysis implicated 4287 differentially methylated positions (DMPs; corrected p < 0.05) that are associated to 2715 unique genes. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed significant enrichment of our DMPs in immune response processes and inflammatory pathways. Of the 4287 DMPs, 32 DMPs were located on chromosome X with several hits for MIR223 and PABPC5. Comparison with previously performed (epi)genome-wide studies revealed that we replicated 33 IBD-associated genes. In addition to DMPs, we found eight differentially methylated regions (DMRs). CD patients display a characteristic DNA methylation landscape, with the differentially methylated genes being implicated in immune response. Additionally, DMPs were found on chromosome X suggesting X-linked manifestations of CD that could be associated with female-specific symptoms.

  1. Circulating immune complexes and disease activity in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fiasse, R; Lurhuma, A Z; Cambiaso, C L; Masson, P L; Dive, C

    1978-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes were determined in 59 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease and 100 blood donors by a double method based on the inhibition of the agglutinating activity of CIq and/or rheumatoid factor on the IgG-coated polystyrene particles. In patients, the incidence of positive immune complexes was 63% and 61% at first testing, 85% and 78% at subsequent determinations; there was a good correlation between the inhibition titres of CIq and those of rheumatoid factor (p less than 0.001). In blood donors, the incidence was 22% and 14% at low titre. The incidence of immune complexes was the lowest (36%) in the group of resected patients without signs of relapse; repeat determinations showed absence of immune complexes three months postoperatively. In patients medically treated for primary disease or relapse, rheumatoid factor titre higher than 1/1 was less frequent than in medically untreated patients with active disease (p less than 0.01). A significantly higher concentration of serum alpha-1-antitrypsin and orosomucoid, and a significantly lower level of serum iron were found in patients with an IC titre exceeding 1/1; longitudinal studies showed in most cases a concordance between the evolution of immune complex titres, inflammatory parameters and clinical status. PMID:308030

  2. Serum Cytokine Profiles in Children with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vasilyeva, Ekaterina; Abdulkhakov, Sayar; Cherepnev, Georgi; Mayanskaya, Irina; Valeeva, Alina; Abdulkhakov, Rustam; Safina, Dilyara

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that can be diagnosed at any age. There are two major patient groups based on diagnosis of this disease, before or after the age of 20 (juvenile/adolescent or adult), with disease progression in adults usually milder than in juvenile CD patients. Immune mechanisms have been suggested to play an important role in CD pathogenesis, with cytokines governing the development of the immune response. Upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in serum of juvenile and adult CD patients has been documented; still little is known about age-dependent differences in serum cytokine profiles of CD patients. We applied multiplex technology to analyze serum levels of 12 cytokines in juveniles and adults. We show that during the acute stage of the disease all CD patients have high serum levels of CXCL10, which remains upregulated during remission. Increased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 during the acute stage was characteristic of juvenile CD patients, whereas adult CD patients had upregulated levels of GM-CSF and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results demonstrate age-dependent differences in cytokine profiles, which may affect the pathogenesis of CD in patients at different ages of disease onset. PMID:28070144

  3. Misdiagnosis and Mistherapy of Crohn's Disease as Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Sen-Yang; Chen, Qiu-Yu; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) remains difficult as the clinical symptoms of the 2 digestive diseases are so similar. Here we report a case where a patient was initially misdiagnosed with ITB prior to the correct CD diagnosis. The 46-year-old male patient was hospitalized elsewhere for pain in the right lower abdomen and underwent an appendectomy. The pathological diagnosis was ITB and the patient was administered antituberculosis therapy for 1 year. Afterward, the patient was readmitted to the hospital for a right lower abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed intestinal gas, fistula, and abdominal mass. We performed a right hemicolectomy on the patient. Postoperatively, we diagnosed the patient with CD, based on patient history and pathological examination. According to the CD active index (CDAI), the patient was at high risk and began treatment with infliximab. The patient has remained in complete remission and made a good recovery after 8-months follow-up. We compared this case with the results of a literature review on the misdiagnosis between CD and ITB (26 previously reported cases) to determine the characteristics of misdiagnosed cases. We found that distinguishing between ITB and CD is difficult because of their varied clinical presentation, nonspecific investigative tools, and profound similarities even in pathological specimens. Although a CT scan to determine the morphology of the bowel wall is a key for correct diagnosis, each case still poses challenges for diagnosis and administrating the appropriate treatment. PMID:26735549

  4. [Crohn's disease with the onset resembling systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Nishinarita, S; Son, K; Tomita, Y; Yoshihiro; Matsukawa; Kitamura, N; Horie, T; Baba, M; Hiranuma, M

    1999-06-01

    We described a 37-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) resembling systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at his disease onset. He was admitted to the municiple Akiru Hospital in October 1986 by fever, aphtous oral ulcerations, sore throat and polyarthralgia. Hematologic examination showed leukocytopenia, lymphocytopenia, positive tests for antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and LE cell phenomenon. He has had episodes of convulsion and conciousness loss of unknown etiology when he was 17 years old. The diagnosis of SLE was made, and oral medication of prednisolone was started. Several weeks later, most of symptoms and autoantibodies disappeared, although the oral aphtous ulcerations and leukocytopenia remained. In May 1987, he admitted to the other hospital because of bloody vomiting. Endoscopic examination showed the esophagial ulceration, and histology of biopsied-specimen was nonspecific esophagitis. The combination of prednisolone and oral cyclophosphamide or methotrexate was employed thereafter. However, the leukocytopenia, oral aphtous ulceration and esophagial ulceration continued in spite of these treatments. All the immunosuppressive treatment was stopped at March 1992. In October 1995, he admitted to our hospital because of body weight loss and continuous diarrhea with occasional bloody stool. Barium enema and endoscopic examination of the colon revealed the findings compatible with CD. The patient responded favorably to methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral sulphasalazine. This case indicated that cases with inflammatory bowel diseases like CD could show similar clinical signs and symptoms to SLE, and in some cases of CD might satisfied the classification of criteria for SLE.

  5. The Interplay between Defensins and Microbiota in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coretti, Lorena; Natale, Alessandro; Cuomo, Mariella; Florio, Ermanno; Keller, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, characterized by periods of acute recurrence and remission. Depending on the specific region affected, CD is classified as ileal CD or colonic CD. It is largely accepted that the intestinal microbiota is involved in the onset of the pathology. Indeed, a reduced immune tolerance to components of the intestinal commensal microbiota and inflammation of the intestinal barrier typifies patients with CD. Several studies have shown defective expression of intestinal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in patients with CD compared to controls, particularly defensins. A reduction in α-defensins is observed in ileal CD, while β-defensins are increased in colonic CD. In addition to an immunological basis, the disease is frequently associated with genetic alterations including mutations of NOD2 gene. Several therapeutic strategies to circumvent the dysfunction observed in CD are currently under investigation. These include the use of delivery systems to administer endogenous AMPs and the engineering of peptidomimetics that could ameliorate the severity of CD. In this review, the role defensins play in CD and the strategies aimed at overcoming bacterial resistance will be discussed. PMID:28246439

  6. Autologous hematopoietic stem cells for refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    DiNicola, C A; Zand, A; Hommes, D W

    2017-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cells are gaining ground as an effective and safe treatment for treating severe refractory Crohn's disease (CD). Autologous hematopoietic stem cell therapy (AHSCT) induces resetting of the immune system by de novo regeneration of T-cell repertoire and repopulation of epithelial cells by bone-marrow derived cells to help patients achieve clinical and endoscopic remission. Areas covered: Herein, the authors discuss the use of AHSCT in treating patients with CD. Improvements in disease activity have been seen in patients with severe autoimmune disease and patients with severe CD who underwent AHSCT for a concomitant malignant hematological disease. Clinical and endoscopic remission has been achieved in patients treated with AHSCT for CD. The only randomized trial published to date, the ASTIC Trial, did not support further use of AHSCT to treat CD. Yet, critics of this trial have deemed AHSCT as a promising treatment for severe refractory CD. Expert opinion: Even with the promising evidence presented for HSCT for refractory CD, protocols need to be refined through the collaboration of GI and hemato-oncology professionals. The goal is to incorporate safe AHSCT and restore tolerance by delivering an effective immune 'cease fire' as a treatment option for severe refractory CD.

  7. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  8. Second Korean guidelines for the management of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Jun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jong Wook; Park, Dong Il; Yoon, Hyuk; Im, Jong Pil; Lee, Kang Moon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lee, Heeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with an uncertain etiopathogenesis. CD can involve any site of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus, and is associated with serious complications, such as bowel strictures, perforations, and fistula formation. The incidence and prevalence rates of CD in Korea are still lower compared with those in Western countries, but they have been rapidly increasing during the recent decades. Although there are no definitive curative modalities for CD, various medical and surgical therapies have been applied for the treatment of this disease. Concerning CD management, there have been substantial discrepancies among clinicians according to their personal experience and preference. To suggest recommendable approaches to the diverse problems of CD and to minimize the variations in treatment among physicians, guidelines for the management of CD were first published in 2012 by the IBD Study Group of the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. These are the revised guidelines based on updated evidence, accumulated since 2012. These guidelines were developed by using mainly adaptation methods, and encompass induction and maintenance treatment of CD, treatment based on disease location, treatment of CD complications, including stricture and fistula, surgical treatment, and prevention of postoperative recurrence. These are the second Korean guidelines for the management of CD and will be continuously revised as new evidence is collected. PMID:28239314

  9. Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Park, Jae Yong; Hong, Seung Wook; Lee, Joo Young; Kang, Jin Woo; Hwang, Seongjun; Ko, Sang-Bae; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2017-01-01

    Metronidazole is a widely used antibiotic for the treatment of anaerobic bacterial infections. Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy (MIEP) is a rare but potentially reversible disease. The mechanism of MIEP remains unclear, and differences in the neurotoxic effects of oral versus intravenous (IV) metronidazole administration have not yet been determined. We report the case of a Crohn's disease (CD) patient who experienced encephalopathy immediately after a single IV dose of metronidazole following long-term exposure to the oral form of the drug. The 64-year-old man with intractable CD experienced a sudden change in mental status, aphasia, and muscle weakness after IV administration of metronidazole. He had previously taken metronidazole orally for 13 years and received intermittent IV metronidazole treatments for CD exacerbation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high-intensity signals in the bilateral medial thalamus and the midbrain and pontine tegmentum on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. After discontinuation of metronidazole, the high-intensity brain MRI signals resolved and the patient's mental status dramatically improved; however, the patient exhibited mild cognitive dysfunction 2 months after the onset of encephalopathy. PMID:28239323

  10. Cost-effectiveness of Crohn's disease post-operative care.

    PubMed

    Wright, Emily K; Kamm, Michael A; Dr Cruz, Peter; Hamilton, Amy L; Ritchie, Kathryn J; Bell, Sally J; Brown, Steven J; Connell, William R; Desmond, Paul V; Liew, Danny

    2016-04-14

    To define the cost-effectiveness of strategies, including endoscopy and immunosuppression, to prevent endoscopic recurrence of Crohn's disease following intestinal resection. In the "POCER" study patients undergoing intestinal resection were treated with post-operative drug therapy. Two thirds were randomized to active care (6 mo colonoscopy and drug intensification for endoscopic recurrence) and one third to drug therapy without early endoscopy. Colonoscopy at 18 mo and faecal calprotectin (FC) measurement were used to assess disease recurrence. Administrative data, chart review and patient questionnaires were collected prospectively over 18 mo. Sixty patients (active care n = 43, standard care n = 17) were included from one health service. Median total health care cost was $6440 per patient. Active care cost $4824 more than standard care over 18 mo. Medication accounted for 78% of total cost, of which 90% was for adalimumab. Median health care cost was higher for those with endoscopic recurrence compared to those in remission [$26347 (IQR 25045-27485) vs $2729 (IQR 1182-5215), P < 0.001]. FC to select patients for colonoscopy could reduce cost by $1010 per patient over 18 mo. Active care was associated with 18% decreased endoscopic recurrence, costing $861 for each recurrence prevented. Post-operative management strategies are associated with high cost, primarily medication related. Calprotectin use reduces costs. The long term cost-benefit of these strategies remains to be evaluated.

  11. Gut Microbial Diversity Is Reduced in Smokers with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Jorrit L.; Plassais, Jonathan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Achouri, Emna; Pichaud, Matthieu; Siersema, Peter D.; Cervino, Alessandra C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking has a negative impact on Crohn's disease (CD), but the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. We compared the gut microbiota composition of smoking with nonsmoking patients with CD using a metagenomic approach. Methods: Stool samples and clinical data were collected from current smokers and nonsmokers with CD from France and the Netherlands, matched for country, gender, age, disease activity, and body mass index. Fecal DNA was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500. On average, 40 million paired-end reads were generated per sample. Gene richness and the Shannon index were computed to assess microbial diversity. Wilcoxon's signed-rank tests for paired samples were performed to detect differences between the 2 groups. Results: In total, 21 smoking and 21 nonsmoking patients with CD were included. Compared with nonsmoking patients, gut microbial gene richness (P = 0.01), genus diversity (P < 0.01), and species diversity (P = 0.01) were decreased in smoking patients. This was accompanied by a reduced relative abundance of the genera Collinsella (P = 0.02), Enterorhabdus (P = 0.02), and Gordonibacter (P = 0.02) in smokers. No statistically significant differences at the species level were observed, although smokers had lower proportions of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.10). Conclusions: Gut microbial diversity is reduced in smokers with CD compared with nonsmokers with CD. The microbial profile differs between these groups at the genus level. Future studies should evaluate whether intestinal microbes mediate the adverse effects of smoking in CD. PMID:27542127

  12. Mucormycosis in a Crohn's disease patient treated with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Leman, Bernard I

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of sinus mucormycosis in a patient receiving infliximab for Crohn's disease (CD). A 41-year-old white female with a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease, well-controlled diabetes, and ileocecal CD developed right-sided facial pain and high fevers, with computed tomography scan confirming sinusitis. She had been receiving both low-dose azathioprine and scheduled infliximab for her CD. A sinus biopsy was procured endoscopically which grew mucormycosis. All immunosuppressive agents were immediately discontinued, and the patient underwent multiple debridement procedures of the right sinuses. Amphotericin B lipid complex and posaconazole were administered to the patient. Repeat laboratory and imaging study demonstrated clearance of the infection approximately 30 days after diagnosis. The patient's CD did not flair during withdrawal of immunosuppressive medications, and the patient completed 6 months of posaconazole therapy. Clinicians should be aware of the possible development of this potentially catastrophic infection in patients receiving infliximab, especially if such patients have other risks for mucormycosis, such as diabetes. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Pfit Is a Structurally Novel Crohn's Disease-Associated Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, Matthew B.; Li, Zhong; Wei, Bo; Nandi, Bisweswar; Zhang, Jing; Ling, Hua; Winslow, Gary; Braun, Jonathan; Li, Hongmin

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses to enteric bacteria are important in inflammatory bowel disease. I2, encoded by the pfiT gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a T-cell superantigen associated with human Crohn's disease. Here we report the crystal structure of pfiT at 1.7Å resolution and provide a functional analysis of the interaction of pfiT and its homolog, PA2885, with human class II MHC. Both pfiT and PA2885 bound to mammalian cells and stimulated the proliferation of human lymphocytes. This binding was greatly inhibited by anti-class II MHC HLA-DR antibodies, and to a lesser extent, by anti HLA-DQ and DP antibodies, indicating that the binding was class II MHC-specific. GST-pfiT efficiently precipitated both endogenous and in vitro purified recombinant HLA-DR1 molecules, indicating that pfiT directly interacted with HLA-DR1. Competition studies revealed that pfiT and the superantigen Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM) competed for binding to HLA-DR, indicating that their binding sites overlap. Structural analyses established that pfiT belongs to the TetR-family of DNA-binding transcription regulators. The distinct structure of pfiT indicates that it represents a new family of T cell superantigens. PMID:24385909

  14. The Role of Laboratory Tests in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian

    2016-01-01

    In the past, laboratory tests were considered of limited value in Crohn's disease (CD). In the era of biologics, laboratory tests have become essential to evaluate the inflammatory burden of the disease (C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin) since symptoms-based scores are subjective, to predict the response to pharmacological options and the risk of relapse, to discriminate CD from ulcerative colitis, to select candidates to anti-tumor necrosis factors [screening tests looking for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus status and latent tuberculosis], to assess the risk of adverse events (testing for thiopurine metabolites and thiopurine-methyltransferase activity), and to personalize and optimize therapy (therapeutic drug monitoring). Pharmacogenetics, though presently confined to the assessment of thiopurineme methyltransferase polymorphisms and hematological toxicity associated with thiopurine treatment, is a promising field that will contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the variability in response to the drugs used in CD with the attempt to expand personalized care and precision medicine strategies.

  15. Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease: challenging differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia Yi; Tong, Jin Lu; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2016-03-01

    Along with epidemiological changes in tuberculosis (TB) and an increased incidence of Crohn's disease (CD), the differential diagnosis of intestinal TB (ITB) and CD is of vital importance and has become a clinical challenge because treatment based on misdiagnosis may lead to fatal outcomes. In this study, we reviewed the similarities and differences in clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological features of these two diseases. Concomitant pulmonary TB, ascites, night sweats, involvement of fewer than four segments of the bowel, patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, scars or pseudopolyps strongly indicate ITB. Bloody stools, perianal signs, chronic diarrhea, extraintestinal manifestations, anorectal lesions, longitudinal ulcers and a cobblestone appearance are all suggestive of CD. Significant differences in the size, number, location and patterns of granulomas in ITB and CD with regard to their histopathologic features have been noted. Immune stain of cell surface markers is also helpful. Interferon-γ release assay and polymerase chain reaction analysis have achieved satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of ITB. Computed tomography enterographic findings of segmental small bowel or left colon involvement, mural stratification, the comb sign and fibrofatty proliferation are significantly more common in CD, whereas mesenteric lymph node changes (calcification or central necrosis) and focal ileocecal lesions are more frequently seen in ITB. A diagnosis should be carefully established before the initiation of the therapy. In suspicious cases, short-term empirical anti-TB therapy is quite efficient to further confirm the diagnosis.

  16. Red cell folate concentrations in patients with Crohn's disease on parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, M.; Iida, M.; Aoyagi, K.; Kohrogi, N.; Matsui, T.; Fujishima, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine changes in the folate concentrations in red cell during relatively long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN), 10 Japanese patients with Crohn's disease (7 males), the mean Crohn's disease activity index on admission being 211, were given folic acid in a dose of 400 micrograms/day (AMA-FDA formulation) or 800 micrograms/day for 6-16 weeks (mean 10.5). The red cell folate concentrations were determined before TPN and once every week or 2-4 weeks thereafter. The folate concentrations were very low even after TPN with folic acid of 400 micrograms/day. In those given 800 micrograms of daily folic acid, the folate levels tended to increase, but did not reach the normal range. We propose that folic acid over 800 micrograms/day or a double dose of AMA-FDA formulation should be prescribed for Crohn's disease treated with long-term TPN. PMID:2515529

  17. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 17-year-old boy with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, Irene; Ferrazzi, Anna; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2015-07-10

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare, acquired, autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of the skin, characterised by blisters and erosions, especially in trauma-prone sites and extensor skin surface, scarring with formation of milia, skin fragility and nail dystrophy. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is extremely rare in childhood and it has been reported to be frequently associated with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autoantibodies against type VII collagen have been found in a large number of patients with Crohn's disease without epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy affected by Crohn's disease who presented with milia on infiltrated erythematous plaques over the back of the hands. The diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita was confirmed by histopathology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence analysis and ELISA. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Crohn's Disease With Ovarian Granuloma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rindos, Noah; Ecker, Amanda; Carter, Gloria; Mansuria, Suketu

    2015-01-01

    We present an interesting case of a 35-year-old nulligravida with Crohn's disease with ovarian involvement. This is a rare manifestation of Crohn's disease, felt to arise from fistulization between the ovary and the intestine, most commonly the ileum. Our review of the literature revealed 11 additional case reports published in English with a total of 15 cases. The mean age at time of presentation was 33.7 years, with a predominance of right-sided involvement. This series included 10 patients with affected right ovaries, 3 with affected left ovaries, and 2 with bilateral involvement. We conclude that ovarian involvement in Crohn's disease, although rare, can exist, and that the gynecologic surgeon should be aware of this relevant disease manifestation.

  19. Immunohistological findings in lip biopsy specimens from patients with Crohn's disease and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Crama-Bohbouth, G; Bosman, F T; Vermeer, B J; van der Wal, A M; Biemond, I; Weterman, I T; Peńa, A S

    1983-03-01

    Biopsies of apparently normal buccal mucosa were taken from 14 patients with Crohn's disease and 13 healthy controls who were matched for dental status. Most patients had an increased number of lymphocytes around vessels in the subepithelial tissue and two showed fibrosis with moderate atrophy of minor glands. Plasma cells which contained immunoglobulin, predominantly IgA, were only found around minor salivary glands in both patients and controls. Quantitative studies showed a significant increase in the number of cells containing IgA in patients compared with controls. No correlation was found between immunoglobulin pattern and disease activity, age, sex, or duration of Crohn's disease. A significant correlation was found between the activity of the disease, as defined by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index, and the number of plasma cells containing IgM.

  20. [A case of Crohn's disease accompanied by Peutz-Jeghers syndrome].

    PubMed

    Um, Yoo Jin; Kim, Sun Moon; Pyo, Jin Sil; Lee, Joo Ah; Koo, Hoon Sup; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2013-10-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous pigmentation. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome has an incidence of approximately 1 in 25,000 to 300,000 births. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that typically manifests as regional enteritis with its incidence ranging from 3.1 to 14.6 cases per 100,000 person-years in North America. Herein, we report a case of a 30-year-old male patient who had both Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Crohn's disease. We believe that this is the first case in Korea and the second report in the English literatures on Peutz-Jeghers syndrome coincidentally accompanied by Crohn's disease.

  1. Detecting Microbial Dysbiosis Associated with Pediatric Crohn Disease Despite the High Variability of the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Kaplan, Jess L; Gold, Benjamin D; Bhasin, Manoj K; Ward, Naomi L; Kellermayer, Richard; Kirschner, Barbara S; Heyman, Melvin B; Dowd, Scot E; Cox, Stephen B; Dogan, Haluk; Steven, Blaire; Ferry, George D; Cohen, Stanley A; Baldassano, Robert N; Moran, Christopher J; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Drake, Lauren; Otu, Hasan H; Mirny, Leonid A; Libermann, Towia A; Winter, Harland S; Korolev, Kirill S

    2016-02-02

    The relationship between the host and its microbiota is challenging to understand because both microbial communities and their environments are highly variable. We have developed a set of techniques based on population dynamics and information theory to address this challenge. These methods identify additional bacterial taxa associated with pediatric Crohn disease and can detect significant changes in microbial communities with fewer samples than previous statistical approaches required. We have also substantially improved the accuracy of the diagnosis based on the microbiota from stool samples, and we found that the ecological niche of a microbe predicts its role in Crohn disease. Bacteria typically residing in the lumen of healthy individuals decrease in disease, whereas bacteria typically residing on the mucosa of healthy individuals increase in disease. Our results also show that the associations with Crohn disease are evolutionarily conserved and provide a mutual information-based method to depict dysbiosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Normal villous architecture with increased intraepithelial lymphocytes: a duodenal manifestation of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Emily R; Shmidt, Eugenia; Oxentenko, Amy S; Enders, Felicity T; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    To assess a possible association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the histologic finding in duodenal biopsy specimens of increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) with normal villous architecture. We identified all patients with duodenal biopsy specimens obtained between 2000 and 2010 showing increased IELs and normal architecture. Among the 74 such patients who also had IBD, we characterized the clinical features of IBD and reviewed all available upper gastrointestinal biopsy specimens. Fifty-eight patients had Crohn disease, 13 had ulcerative colitis, and three had IBD, type unclassified. No duodenal sample with increased IELs had other histologic features of IBD. Among gastric biopsy specimens from 34 patients with Crohn disease, nearly half (16) had focal gastritis. We propose that Crohn disease be included in the differential diagnosis for increased IELs with normal villous architecture in duodenal biopsy specimens, particularly when gastric biopsy specimens show focal gastritis. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  3. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum in a Crohn's disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Ugo; De Simone, Matilde; Ferrero, Stefano; Ciulla, Michele M; Lemos, Alessandro; Avesani, Ettore Contessini

    2005-01-01

    Background Several malignancies have been described in association with inflammatory bowel diseases, the most common being adenocarcinoma. Carcinoid tumor and Crohn disease has also been previously reported, however the coexistence of both neoplasms is quite rare and the clinical diagnosis is very difficult. Here we report what we believe to be the fourth case of a mixed adenocarcinoid tumor coexisting with Crohn's disease. Case report The patient presented with clinical and radiological features of intestinal obstruction. Laparotomy showed a stricturing lesion in the last 6 cm of the terminal ileum with proximal dilation. Only the histology of the resected surgical specimen proved the presence of a mixed adenocarcinoid tumor involving the terminal ileum. Conclusion Carcinoid tumor should be suspected in elderly patients with Crohn's disease presenting with intestinal obstruction and laparotomy should be considered to exclude malignancy. PMID:16336666

  4. Inflammation, Antibiotics, and Diet as Environmental Stressors of the Gut Microbiome in Pediatric Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James D; Chen, Eric Z; Baldassano, Robert N; Otley, Anthony R; Griffiths, Anne M; Lee, Dale; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey; Friedman, Elliot S; Hoffmann, Christian; Albenberg, Lindsey; Sinha, Rohini; Compher, Charlene; Gilroy, Erin; Nessel, Lisa; Grant, Amy; Chehoud, Christel; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2015-10-14

    Abnormal composition of intestinal bacteria--"dysbiosis"-is characteristic of Crohn's disease. Disease treatments include dietary changes and immunosuppressive anti-TNFα antibodies as well as ancillary antibiotic therapy, but their effects on microbiota composition are undetermined. Using shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we analyzed fecal samples from a prospective cohort of pediatric Crohn's disease patients starting therapy with enteral nutrition or anti-TNFα antibodies and reveal the full complement and dynamics of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses during treatment. Bacterial community membership was associated independently with intestinal inflammation, antibiotic use, and therapy. Antibiotic exposure was associated with increased dysbiosis, whereas dysbiosis decreased with reduced intestinal inflammation. Fungal proportions increased with disease and antibiotic use. Dietary therapy had independent and rapid effects on microbiota composition distinct from other stressor-induced changes and effectively reduced inflammation. These findings reveal that dysbiosis results from independent effects of inflammation, diet, and antibiotics and shed light on Crohn disease treatments.

  5. Immunohistological findings in lip biopsy specimens from patients with Crohn's disease and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Crama-Bohbouth, G; Bosman, F T; Vermeer, B J; van der Wal, A M; Biemond, I; Weterman, I T; Peńa, A S

    1983-01-01

    Biopsies of apparently normal buccal mucosa were taken from 14 patients with Crohn's disease and 13 healthy controls who were matched for dental status. Most patients had an increased number of lymphocytes around vessels in the subepithelial tissue and two showed fibrosis with moderate atrophy of minor glands. Plasma cells which contained immunoglobulin, predominantly IgA, were only found around minor salivary glands in both patients and controls. Quantitative studies showed a significant increase in the number of cells containing IgA in patients compared with controls. No correlation was found between immunoglobulin pattern and disease activity, age, sex, or duration of Crohn's disease. A significant correlation was found between the activity of the disease, as defined by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index, and the number of plasma cells containing IgM. PMID:6826103

  6. A common genetic background could explain early-onset Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Magnolato, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Martellossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease, in which environmental, microbial and genetic factors play important roles. CD is characterized by a chronic granulomatous inflammation by necrotic scarring with aspects of full-thickness wall. In spite of affecting mainly young adults, sometimes, CD can be present in the first year of life (early onset Crohn disease, EOCD) showing an unpredictable course and being often more severe than at older ages. In this paper we propose the hypothesis that EOCD patients should be analyzed using a Mendelian approach with family studies aimed to identify new loci directly involved in the early onset Crohn's disease. So we will leave the classic association study approach used until now for the identification of genes responsible for susceptibility to CD and propose linkage family analysis as alternative and powerful tool for the identification of new genetic variants associated with familiar cases of EOCD.

  7. CAGI4 Crohn's exome challenge: Marker SNP versus exome variant models for assigning risk of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Pal, Lipika R; Kundu, Kunal; Yin, Yizhou; Moult, John

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the basis of complex trait disease is a fundamental problem in human genetics. The CAGI Crohn's Exome challenges are providing insight into the adequacy of current disease models by requiring participants to identify which of a set of individuals has been diagnosed with the disease, given exome data. For the CAGI4 round, we developed a method that used the genotypes from exome sequencing data only to impute the status of genome wide association studies marker SNPs. We then used the imputed genotypes as input to several machine learning methods that had been trained to predict disease status from marker SNP information. We achieved the best performance using Naïve Bayes and with a consensus machine learning method, obtaining an area under the curve of 0.72, larger than other methods used in CAGI4. We also developed a model that incorporated the contribution from rare missense variants in the exome data, but this performed less well. Future progress is expected to come from the use of whole genome data rather than exomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar literature searches.

    PubMed

    Anders, Michael E; Evans, Dennis P

    2010-05-01

    Literature searches are essential to evidence-based respiratory care. To conduct literature searches, respiratory therapists rely on search engines to retrieve information, but there is a dearth of literature on the comparative efficiencies of search engines for researching clinical questions in respiratory care. To compare PubMed and Google Scholar search results for clinical topics in respiratory care to that of a benchmark. We performed literature searches with PubMed and Google Scholar, on 3 clinical topics. In PubMed we used the Clinical Queries search filter. In Google Scholar we used the search filters in the Advanced Scholar Search option. We used the reference list of a related Cochrane Collaboration evidence-based systematic review as the benchmark for each of the search results. We calculated recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) with 2 x 2 contingency tables. We compared the results with the chi-square test of independence and Fisher's exact test. PubMed and Google Scholar had similar recall for both overall search results (71% vs 69%) and full-text results (43% vs 51%). PubMed had better precision than Google Scholar for both overall search results (13% vs 0.07%, P < .001) and full-text results (8% vs 0.05%, P < .001). Our results suggest that PubMed searches with the Clinical Queries filter are more precise than with the Advanced Scholar Search in Google Scholar for respiratory care topics. PubMed appears to be more practical to conduct efficient, valid searches for informing evidence-based patient-care protocols, for guiding the care of individual patients, and for educational purposes.

  9. Pathogenesis of aphthoid ulcers in Crohn's disease: correlative findings by magnifying colonoscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Y; Kamoi, R; Iida, M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The mechanism of ulceration in Crohn's disease remains unknown. AIMS--To clarify the role of the follicle associated epithelium (FAE) of colonic lymphoid nodules in the formation of ulcers in Crohn's disease. METHODS--After identification of colonic lymphoid nodules and aphthoid lesions by magnifying colonoscopy, 76 biopsy specimens were obtained from 10 patients with Crohn's disease and three patients with colonic lymphoid hyperplasia. This study correlated magnifying colonoscopic, electron microscopic, and immunohistochemical findings of biopsy specimens. RESULTS--In Crohn's disease, scanning electron microscopy of lymphoid nodules surrounded by a red halo without visible erosions by magnifying colonoscopy, showed surface erosions 150-200 microns in size. These lymphoid nodules with red halos had small erosions either light microscopically or electron microscopically in 18 of 21 specimens (86%). Correlation of scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed residues of FAE including M cells at the edges of the erosions. In immunohistochemical studies, HLA-DR antigen was limited in M cells of FAE in the patients with lymphoid hyperplasia without inflammatory bowel disease. In Crohn's disease patients in remission, however, HLA-DR antigen was strongly expressed over the entire FAE of lymphoid nodules with a red halo endoscopically, while the expression was weak and irregular in the mucosa surrounding the lymphoid nodules. HLA-DR was strongly expressed in the entire inflamed colonic mucosa in the active stage. CONCLUSION--The red halo appearance surrounding lymphoid follicles seems to precede visible aphthoid ulcers and suggests that ulcerations in Crohn's disease originate from FAE, possibly related to its physiological role as a portal of entry for potentially pathogenic agents. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8707119

  10. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of fructo-oligosaccharides in active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jane L; Hedin, Charlotte R H; Koutsoumpas, Andreas; Ng, Siew C; McCarthy, Neil E; Hart, Ailsa L; Kamm, Michael A; Sanderson, Jeremy D; Knight, Stella C; Forbes, Alastair; Stagg, Andrew J; Whelan, Kevin; Lindsay, James O

    2011-07-01

    The commensal intestinal microbiota drive the inflammation associated with Crohn's disease. However, bacteria such as bifidobacteria and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii appear to be immunoregulatory. In healthy subjects the intestinal microbiota are influenced by prebiotic carbohydrates such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Preliminary data suggest that FOS increase faecal bifidobacteria, induce immunoregulatory dendritic cell (DC) responses and reduce disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease. To assess the impact of FOS in patients with active Crohn's disease using an adequately powered randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial with predefined clinical, microbiological and immunological end points. Patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised to 15 g/day FOS or non-prebiotic placebo for 4 weeks. The primary end point was clinical response at week 4 (fall in Crohn's Disease Activity Index of ≥ 70 points) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. 103 patients were randomised to receive FOS (n = 54) or placebo (n = 49). More patients receiving FOS (14 (26%) vs 4 (8%); p = 0.018) withdrew before the 4-week end point. There was no significant difference in the number of patients achieving a clinical response between the FOS and placebo groups in the ITT analysis (12 (22%) vs 19 (39%), p = 0.067). Patients receiving FOS had reduced proportions of interleukin (IL)-6-positive lamina propria DC and increased DC staining of IL-10 (p < 0.05) but no change in IL-12p40 production. There were no significant differences in the faecal concentration of bifidobacteria and F prausnitzii between the groups at baseline or after the 4-week intervention. An adequately powered placebo-controlled trial of FOS showed no clinical benefit in patients with active Crohn's disease, despite impacting on DC function. ISRCTN50422530.

  11. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Adalimumab in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubinsky, Marla; Ruemmele, Frank M.; Escher, Johanna; Rosh, Joel; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Eichner, Samantha; Li, Yao; Reilly, Nattanan; Thakkar, Roopal B.; Robinson, Anne M.; Lazar, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background: IMAgINE 1 assessed 52-week efficacy and safety of adalimumab in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. Long-term efficacy and safety of adalimumab for patients who entered the IMAgINE 2 extension are reported. Methods: Patients who completed IMAgINE 1 could enroll in IMAgINE 2. Endpoints assessed from weeks 0 to 240 of IMAgINE 2 were Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index remission (Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index ≤ 10) and response (Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index decrease ≥15 from IMAgINE 1 baseline) using observed analysis and hybrid nonresponder imputation (hNRI). For hNRI, discontinued patients were imputed as failures unless they transitioned to commercial adalimumab (with study site closure) or adult care, where last observation was carried forward. Corticosteroid-free remission in patients receiving corticosteroids at IMAgINE 1 baseline, discontinuation of immunomodulators (IMMs) in patients receiving IMMs at IMAgINE 2 baseline, and linear growth improvement were reported as observed. Adverse events were assessed for patients receiving ≥1 adalimumab dose in IMAgINE 1 and 2 through January 2015. Results: Of 100 patients enrolled in IMAgINE 2, 41% and 48% achieved remission and response (hNRI) at IMAgINE 2 week 240. Remission rates were maintained by 45% (30/67, hNRI) of patients who entered IMAgINE 2 in remission. At IMAgINE 2 week 240, 63% (12/19) of patients receiving corticosteroids at IMAgINE 1 baseline achieved corticosteroid-free remission and 30% (6/20) of patients receiving IMMs at IMAgINE 2 baseline discontinued IMMs. Adalimumab treatment led to growth velocity normalization. No new safety signals were identified. Conclusions: Efficacy and safety profiles of prolonged adalimumab treatment in children with Crohn's disease were consistent with IMAgINE 1 and adult Crohn's disease adalimumab trials. PMID:28129288

  12. Clinical epidemiology and phenotypic characteristics of Crohn's disease in the central region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M; Alharbi, Othman R; Azzam, Nahla A; Almalki, Ahmed S; Alswat, Khalid A; Almadi, Majid A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the remarkable increase in the incidence of Crohn's disease among Saudis in recent years, data about Crohn's disease in Saudi Arabia are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical epidemiology and phenotypic characteristics of Crohn's disease in the central region of Saudi Arabia. A data registry, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Information System (IBDIS), was used to register Crohn's disease patients who presented to the gastroenterology clinics in four tertiary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between September 2009 and February 2013. Patients' characteristics, disease location, behavior, age at diagnosis according to the Montreal classification, course of the disease, and extraintestinal manifestation were recorded. Among 497 patients with Crohn's disease, 59% were males with a mean age at diagnosis of 25 years [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 24-26, range 5-75 years]. The mean duration from the time of complaint to the day of the diagnosis was 11 months, and the mean duration of the disease from diagnosis to the day of entry to the registry was 40 months. Seventy-seven percent of our patients were aged 17-40 years at diagnosis, 16.8% were ≤16 years of age, and 6.6% were >40 years of age. According to the Montreal classification of disease location, 48.8% of patients had ileocolonic involvement, 43.5% had limited disease to the terminal ileum or cecum, 7.7% had isolated colonic involvement, and 16% had an upper gastrointestinal involvement. Forty-two percent of our patients had a non-stricturing, non-penetrating behavior, while 32.8% had stricturing disease and 25.4% had penetrating disease. Crohn's disease is frequently encountered in Saudi Arabia. The majority of patients are young people with a predilection for males, while its behavior resembled that of western societies in terms of age of onset, location, and behavior.

  13. Comparison of RANTES expression in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: an aid in the differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Ansari, N; Abdulla, J; Zayyani, N; Brahmi, U; Taha, S; Satir, A A

    2006-10-01

    RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) expression is increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). RANTES is produced at higher levels in granulomatous conditions, so increased RANTES expression can be expected in Crohn's disease compared with ulcerative colitis. To compare RANTES expression between intestinal biopsy specimens of patients with Crohn's disease and those with ulcerative colitis. A prospective study of patients presenting with lower gastrointestinal symptoms at the Bahrain Specialist Hospital from July 2004 to April 2005 was carried out. Endoscopic colonic biopsy specimens were taken from every patient and subjected to (a) routine haematoxylin and eosin staining examination by light microscopy, (b) immunohistochemistry for examination of RANTES protein expression by light microscopy and (c) in situ hybridisation for examination of RANTES mRNA expression by light microscopy. RANTES expression was assessed and quantified. 58 patients were enrolled to the study. Of them, 40 had IBD (21 had Crohn's disease and 19 had ulcerative colitis), 15 were controls with normal colonic biopsy results or non-inflammatory lesions and 3 had colonic inflammatory lesions other than IBD. RANTES expression in lymphocytes or histiocytes was significantly higher (p = 0.04) in new patients with ulcerative colitis than in those with Crohn's disease analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). RANTES expression in lymphocytes or histiocytes is significantly higher in patients with ulcerative colitis than in those with Crohn's disease. Hence, RANTES IHC can be an effective method for distinguishing between biopsy specimens of patients with ulcerative colitis from those of patients with Crohn's disease, where routine histological features are indeterminate. RANTES IHC may prove to be a useful technique for identifying early or equivocal granulomas.

  14. Comparison of RANTES expression in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: an aid in the differential diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, N; Abdulla, J; Zayyani, N; Brahmi, U; Taha, S; Satir, A A

    2006-01-01

    Background RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) expression is increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). RANTES is produced at higher levels in granulomatous conditions, so increased RANTES expression can be expected in Crohn's disease compared with ulcerative colitis. Aim To compare RANTES expression between intestinal biopsy specimens of patients with Crohn's disease and those with ulcerative colitis. Materials and methods A prospective study of patients presenting with lower gastrointestinal symptoms at the Bahrain Specialist Hospital from July 2004 to April 2005 was carried out. Endoscopic colonic biopsy specimens were taken from every patient and subjected to (a) routine haematoxylin and eosin staining examination by light microscopy, (b) immunohistochemistry for examination of RANTES protein expression by light microscopy and (c) in situ hybridisation for examination of RANTES mRNA expression by light microscopy. RANTES expression was assessed and quantified. Results 58 patients were enrolled to the study. Of them, 40 had IBD (21 had Crohn's disease and 19 had ulcerative colitis), 15 were controls with normal colonic biopsy results or non‐inflammatory lesions and 3 had colonic inflammatory lesions other than IBD. RANTES expression in lymphocytes or histiocytes was significantly higher (p = 0.04) in new patients with ulcerative colitis than in those with Crohn's disease analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Conclusion RANTES expression in lymphocytes or histiocytes is significantly higher in patients with ulcerative colitis than in those with Crohn's disease. Hence, RANTES IHC can be an effective method for distinguishing between biopsy specimens of patients with ulcerative colitis from those of patients with Crohn's disease, where routine histological features are indeterminate. RANTES IHC may prove to be a useful technique for identifying early or equivocal granulomas. PMID:16565224

  15. 25 (OH) vitamin D level in Crohn's disease: association with sun exposure & disease activity.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A J; George, Biju; Pulimood, A B; Seshadri, M S; Chacko, Ashok

    2009-08-01

    Western studies show that up to 65 per cent of patients with Crohn's disease have low serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentrations, and 45 per cent of these patients have metabolic bone disease. No data are available from India or from any country with comparable climatic conditions or ethnicity. We carried out this study to measure the serum 25 (OH) vitamin D levels of Crohn's disease patients and compare with matched controls and to assess the consequences of low 25 (OH) vitamin D levels on bone and mineral metabolism in these patients. Adult patients with Crohn's disease were compared with age and sex matched patients diagnosed to have irritable bowel syndrome. Serum 25 (OH) vitamin D, the effect of disease characteristics, sunlight exposure and milk consumption on 25 (OH) vitamin D level, and the consequences of low 25 (OH) vitamin D level on bone and mineral metabolism were assessed. Thirty four patients with Crohn's disease (M:F, 24:10, age 39.2 +/- 12.9 yr) and 34 controls (M:F, 24:10, age 38.9 +/- 13.4 yr) were studied. 25 (OH) vitamin D levels were significantly lower in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to controls (Crohn's disease vs controls: 16.3 +/- 10.8 vs 22.8 +/- 11.9 ng/ml; P<0.05). The severity of disease activity as assessed by the Harvey Bradshaw score correlated negatively (Correlation coefficient -0.484, significance P<0.004), and the duration of sunlight exposure correlated positively (Correlation coefficient 0.327, significance P=0.007) with the serum 25 (OH) vitamin D level. Serum 25 (OH) vitamin D levels were significantly lower among patients with Crohn's disease as compared to age and sex matched controls. Further, 25 (OH) vitamin D levels in patients with Crohn's disease were lower in those with severe disease activity and less sun exposure. Further studies need to be done to correlate low 25 (OH) vitamin D level with bone density and assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation in these patients.

  16. The accordion sign at CT: report of a case of Crohn's disease with diffuse colonic involvement.

    PubMed

    Mountanos, G I; Manolakakis, I S

    2001-01-01

    The accordion sign is a finding that could be seen on CT scans of the abdomen in patients who have received oral contrast material. Initially, it was described as a sign specific of Clostridium difficile colitis, but it is also reported to represent a sign of diffuse colonic edema of several other etiologies. We report a case of a patient with Crohn's pancolitis whose abdominal CT scan presented the accordion sign throughout the entire large bowel together with signs of Crohn's disease of the small bowel.

  17. Maintenance of the remission stage of Crohn's disease with adalimumab therapy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanida, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Ebi, Masahide; Mori, Yoshinori; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old pregnant woman complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea. Total colonoscopy provided a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) of the large intestine (Crohn's colitis). Because the patient was allergic to mesalazine, adalimumab (ADA) was used as maintenance therapy during pregnancy, following prednisolone as remission induction therapy. Remission of the patient's CD was maintained with ADA, and the patient delivered a baby girl without any difficulties. Remission of the patient's CD continued to be maintained with the administration of ADA after childbirth. We believe that this is the first report of the use of ADA therapy in a pregnant CD patient in Japan.

  18. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Teresa P; Fróes, Renata S B; Esberard, Barbara C; Santos, Juliana C V C; Rapozo, Davy C. M.; Grinman, Ana B; Simão, Tatiana A; Neto, Pedro Nicolau; Luiz, Ronir R; Carneiro, Antonio José V; de Souza, Heitor S P; Ribeiro-Pinto, Luis Felipe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047). A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009), whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094). In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010). However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  19. [48-year-old female patient with Crohn's disease and new hematuria and proteinuria].

    PubMed

    Kündiger, T; Wirths, K; Wegjan, E; Zöpf, T

    2011-08-01

    We report on a 48-year-old patient with Crohn's disease and left abdominal pain, who presented with hematuria and proteinuria. As reason we found a left renal vein thrombosis. This diagnosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging and doppler ultrasound. The incidence of thrombembolic complications in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease is increased, however renal vein thrombosis is a very rare complication of Crohn's disease. We started a conservative treatment with phenprocoumon. Thereafter the patient remained asymptomatic and the thrombus dissipated during follow-up.

  20. Neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease.

    PubMed

    Busikova-Malenovska, P; Danis, D; Bencat, M; Galfiova, P; Kopani, M; Labajova, V; El Hassoun, O; Porubsky, J; Galatova, J

    2014-01-01

    The authors described the localization of neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease. We have used samples obtained by biopsy from the colon lining of five people affected by Crohn's disease for our examination. We have processed samples using the formol paraffin technique. From paraffin blocks, we have prepared histological sections approximately 5 μm thick. For immunohistochemic examinations, we have revitalised the sections by acquiring the heat-induced epitope. We detected NSE by monoclonal mouse antibodies against human neuron-specific enolase, clone BBS/NC/VI-H14 (DakoCytomation, Denmark) (Fig. 4, Ref. 7).

  1. Periodontal disease and anemias associated with Crohn's disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Swati; Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath L

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease with oral findings, including periodontal manifestations. Anemias, such as iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), are the most common hematologic complications of CD. Periodontitis has systemic effects, and may tend toward anemia, which can be explained by depressed erythropoiesis. In the report presented here, the authors review a case of Crohn's disease diagnosed 10 years previous to the patient presenting with a changing anemic profile and periodontal disease. A discussion of patient and disease management is included.

  2. A case of Turner syndrome (46XXp-/45X) complicated with Crohn's disease after hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Iida, Masahiro; Washio, Ema; Kai, Takahiro; Nitahata, Tomoki; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman, who had been receiving hormone replacement therapy for 13 months before the diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome (46XXp-/45X), developed Crohn's colitis and erythema nodosum of the lower legs. Colonoscopy revealed an anal fistula and the presence of deep longitudinal ulcers with cobblestoning in the colorectum. Therapy with prednisolone and adalimumab was effective for the intestinal and skin lesions. To date, all seven case reports of Turner syndrome in Japan have also developed Crohn's disease after hormone therapy, suggesting a possible association of sex hormones in the pathogenesis.

  3. MR enterography for assessment and management of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian C; Leyendecker, John R

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) utilization has increased for the evaluation of small bowel diseases over the last several years. In addition to performing similarly to computed tomography enterography (CTE) in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease, MRE lacks ionizing radiation, can image the small bowel dynamically, and provides excellent soft tissue contrast resolution. This article reviews imaging protocols for MRE, normal MR imaging appearance of small bowel, and the imaging findings of small bowel Crohn disease. The importance of imaging findings for directing management in patients with small bowel Crohn disease is emphasized throughout.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of perianal and perineal crohn disease in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Matthew R; Dillman, Jonathan R; Smith, Ethan A; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2013-11-01

    Noninvasive, nonionizing, multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis using a field strength of 3 T now provides a comprehensive assessment of perineal involvement in pediatric Crohn disease. MR imaging accurately evaluates inflammatory disease activity, and allows determination of the number and course of fistula tracts as well as their relationships to vital perianal structures, including the external anal sphincter, helping to guide surgical management and improve outcomes. This article provides an up-to-date review of perineal MR imaging findings of Crohn disease in the pediatric population, including fistulous disease, abscesses, and skin manifestations. Imaging technique is also discussed.

  5. Acute cryptosporidiosis as a cause of sudden recurrence of digestive symptoms in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Orianne; Rouen, Alexandre; Seksik, Philippe; Cosnes, Jacques; Beaugerie, Laurent; Sokol, Harry

    2010-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms occurring in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can be related to disease activity or to intercurrent infection. Absence of appropriate stool work-up can lead to misdiagnosis and wrong treatment. We report here two cases of acute cryptosporidiosis in patients with CD. This microorganism can trigger IBD flare or cause severe infections in immunocompromised host. Adding specific search for oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum using the Ziehl-Neelsen technique to the microbiologic work-up from stools in patients with Crohn's disease seeking medical intervention for sudden exacerbation of digestive symptoms seems to be recommended. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [Crohn disease. Medico-surgical experience. A 10-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Pérez Torres, E; Sobrino Cossío, S; García Guerrero, V A; Abdo Francis, M; Murguía Domínguez, D; Bernal Sahagún, F

    1992-01-01

    Crohn's disease is rare in Mexico. The regarding of this pathology at Gastrointestinal Unit of the General Hospital of Mexico city, between january 1980 and december 1989, is presented. There were six cases of Crohn's disease, two women (33%) and four men (66%). The definitive diagnosis was done preoperatively only in one case, the other were diagnosed postoperatively. In all, intestinal obstruction was the surgical indication. A patient died (16.6%), three cases were followed for 12 months, only two patients are still under surveillance after 15 months.

  7. Association between orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease in children: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, Marzia; Bramuzzo, Matteo; Ventura, Alessandro

    2014-06-21

    To review pediatric cases of orofacial granulomatosis (OFG), report disease characteristics, and explore the association between OFG and Crohn's disease. We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. We searched Medline, LILACS, Virtual Health Library, and Web of Knowledge in September 2013 for cases of OFG in the pediatric age range (< 18 years), with no language limitations. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. The manual search included references of retrieved articles. We extracted data on patients' characteristics, disease characteristics, association with other diseases, and treatment. We analyzed the data and reported the results in tables and text. We retrieved 173 reports of OFG in children. Mean age at onset was 11.1 ± 3.8 years (range: 2.0-18 years). Prevalence in males was significant higher than in females (P < 0.001), with a male:female ratio of 2:1. Gastrointestinal signs or symptoms were present in 26.0% of children at the time of OFG diagnosis. Overall, 70/173 (40.4%) children received a concomitant diagnosis of Crohn's disease. In about half (51.4%) of the cases the onset of OFG anticipated the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, with a mean time between the two diagnoses of 13.1 ± 11.6 mo (range: 3-36 mo). Overall, 21/173 (12.1%) of the children with OFG had perianal disease, while 11/173 (6.4%) had a family history of Crohn's disease. Both perianal disease and a family history of Crohn's disease were significantly associated with a higher risk of Crohn's disease diagnosis in children with OFG [relative risk (RR) = 3.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.46-3.90; RR = 2.74, 95%CI: 2.24-3.36, P < 0.0001 for both). Treatment of OFG included steroids (70.8% of children) and other immunosuppressive drugs (42.7%), such as azathioprine, thalidomide and infliximab. High prevalence of Crohn's disease in children with OFG suggests that OFG may be a subtype of Crohn's disease.

  8. Crohn's disease susceptibility genes are associated with leprosy in the Vietnamese population.

    PubMed

    Grant, Audrey V; Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcais, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    A genomewide association study in Chinese patients with leprosy detected association signals in 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) belonging to 6 loci, of which 4 are related to the NOD2 signaling pathway and are Crohn's disease susceptibility loci. Here, we studied these 16 SNPs as potential leprosy susceptibility factors in 474 Vietnamese leprosy simplex families. We replicated SNPs at HLA-DR-DQ, RIPK2, CCDC122-LACC1, and NOD2 as leprosy susceptibility factors in Vietnam. These results validated the striking overlap in the genetic control of Crohn's disease and leprosy.

  9. Efficacy and safety of autologous hematopoietic stem cell therapy for refractory Crohn's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao; Feng, Jue-Rong; Chen, Li-Ping; Liu, Shi; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Qiu

    2017-06-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been proposed for patients with refractory Crohn's disease (CD), but it is associated with mortality and adverse events; the balance between risks and benefits becomes significantly important in the therapy. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of autologous HSCT therapy for refractory CD. We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane library, and Web of Science from inception to February 2017. The pooled estimate rates for efficacy and safety of refractory CD was performed by meta-analysis and reported according to the standard Cochrane guidelines and the PRISMA statement. Four prospective uncontrolled cohort studies, 4 prospective case series, and 1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) were included. Autologous HSCT had a high rate of clinical and endoscopic remission in refractory CD [79.4%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.550-0.924; 81.9%, 95% CI: 0.603-0.931, respectively]. In the case of safety, it had a relatively high incidence rate of transplant-related mortality (6.4%, 95% CI: 0.028-0.140). A significant association was observed between autologous HSCT and the incidence of febrile neutropenia (83.2%, 95% CI: 0.632-0.934). About 18.5% (95% CI: 0.061-0.442) of patients with refractory CD reached clinical remission at mobilization phase. Besides, 82.1% (95% CI: 0.692-0.903) and 54.1% (95% CI: 0.261-0.797) patients with refractory CD could achieve immunosuppressive-free and steroid-free remission for at least 12 months after the therapy. Autologous HSCT could be a complicated treatment with relatively high mortality and significantly high efficacy for refractory CD, which should be used with caution. However, more RCTs of larger samples using refined and standardized protocols and longer period of follow-up time are needed to further assess the outcomes of autologous HSCT therapy.

  10. Safety profile of biologic drugs in the therapy of Crohn disease: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moćko, Paweł; Kawalec, Paweł; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease which occurs especially in developed countries of Western Europe and North America. The aim of the study was to compare the safety profile of biologic drugs in patients with CD. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, and CENTRAL databases, until April 27, 2016. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the safety of biologic drugs (infliximab, adalimumab, vedolizumab, certolizumab pegol, and ustekinumab) with one another or with placebo in patients with CD. The network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted for an induction phase (6-10 weeks) and maintenance phase (52-56 weeks) with a Bayesian hierarchical random effects model in the ADDIS(®) software. The PROSPERO registration number was CRD42016032606. Ten RCTs were included in the systematic review with NMA. In the case of the induction phase, the NMA could be conducted for the assessment of the relative safety profile of adalimumab, vedolizumab, certolizumab pegol, and ustekinumab, and in the case of the maintenance phase-of infliximab, adalimumab, and vedolizumab. There were no significant differences in the rate of adverse events in patients treated with biologics. Statistical analysis revealed that vedolizumab had the greatest probability of being the safest treatment in most endpoints in the induction phase and adalimumab-in the maintenance phase. No significant differences between the biologics in the relative safety profile analysis were observed. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings, including head-to-head comparisons between the analyzed biologics. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. [Cell adhesion molecules in evaluation of Crohn's disease therapy].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Boldyreva, O N; Parfenov, A I; Trubitsyna, I E; Shcherbakov, P L; Khomeriki, S G; Kniazev, O V; Sagynbaeva, V É

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is one of actual problems of modern gastroenterology and coloproctology. In recent years a great attention is paid to the molecules of adhesion. Adhesion proteins play a significant role in the development of inflammation in patients with IBD. They cause the migration of cells from the capillaries into the center of inflammation, i.e. do much to increase the inflammatory infiltration of the mucosa and homing of lymphocytes. Changes in the levels of adhesion factors under the influence of biological therapy have been insufficiently studied. So the aim of our study was to determine the diagnostic value of adhesion molecules--integrin-sVCAM-1 and selectins P-, E-, L- for the assessment of the effectiveness of therapy in patients with UC and CD and prognosis of the disease. 15 patients with IBD were examined (15 patients with Crohn's disease (CD)). 9 patients were treated using infliximab 5 mg/kg according to the standard scheme (0-2-6 and then every 8 weeks). 3 patients with IBD received anti-inflammatory therapy with the introduction of the culture of MSC in the number of 150 x 108 cells suspended in 200 ml of physiological solution with the addition of heparin (10 IU/ml). 3 patients received azathioprine (2 mg/kg) and glucocorticosteroids (GCS) 1 mg/kg. The clinical symptoms, the level of leukocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and also were analyzed before and after the treatment with infliximab and transplantation of MSC. The status of the colonic mucosa was evaluated using colonoscopy with biopsy. The concentration of adhesion molecules L-selectin, E-selectin, P-selectin, integrin-sVCAM-1 in blood serum was analyzed using immunoenzyme method twice before the beginning of treatment and after 2 months. It is established that after the standard therapy with the use of corticosteroids and azathioprine clinical and laboratory signs

  12. TwiMed: Twitter and PubMed Comparable Corpus of Drugs, Diseases, Symptoms, and Their Relations

    PubMed Central

    Miyao, Yusuke; Collier, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Background Work on pharmacovigilance systems using texts from PubMed and Twitter typically target at different elements and use different annotation guidelines resulting in a scenario where there is no comparable set of documents from both Twitter and PubMed annotated in the same manner. Objective This study aimed to provide a comparable corpus of texts from PubMed and Twitter that can be used to study drug reports from these two sources of information, allowing researchers in the area of pharmacovigilance using natural language processing (NLP) to perform experiments to better understand the similarities and differences between drug reports in Twitter and PubMed. Methods We produced a corpus comprising 1000 tweets and 1000 PubMed sentences selected using the same strategy and annotated at entity level by the same experts (pharmacists) using the same set of guidelines. Results The resulting corpus, annotated by two pharmacists, comprises semantically correct annotations for a set of drugs, diseases, and symptoms. This corpus contains the annotations for 3144 entities, 2749 relations, and 5003 attributes. Conclusions We present a corpus that is unique in its characteristics as this is the first corpus for pharmacovigilance curated from Twitter messages and PubMed sentences using the same data selection and annotation strategies. We believe this corpus will be of particular interest for researchers willing to compare results from pharmacovigilance systems (eg, classifiers and named entity recognition systems) when using data from Twitter and from PubMed. We hope that given the comprehensive set of drug names and the annotated entities and relations, this corpus becomes a standard resource to compare results from different pharmacovigilance studies in the area of NLP. PMID:28468748

  13. Diagnostic value of CTE in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ersin; Cakir, Ozcan; Mutlu, Hakan; Sonmez, Guner; Sildiroglu, H Onur; Basekim, C Cinar; Kizilkaya, Esref

    2007-01-01

    The goal of our study was to compare the accuracy of computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE) to that of biopsy in detecting bowel wall alterations of the terminal ileum in Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 43 patients with either diagnosed or suspected CD (16 females, 28 males) underwent CTE and ileoscopy. Ileoscopy diagnosed 35 patients with CD of the ileum, while 8 patients served as the control group. Computed tomography enteroclysis detected CD in 31 patients (88%) and in none of the control group. According to the criteria used for evaluation of small bowel loop distension, 31 cases were (72%) with optimal distension, nine cases (%21) with good distension, and three cases (7%) with poor distension. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed that mean ileal wall thickness in patients with CD was 6.8 mm (range, 9.5-4.1 mm) and 1.79 mm in patients in the control group (range, 2.20-1.38 mm). Mean postcontrast wall density in patients with CD was 81.9 HU (range, 111.6-52.2 HU) and 41.1 HU (range, 49.8-22.4 HU) in the control group. Mean postcontrast wall density in 17 patients with active CD was 97 HU (range, 67-123 HU) and 62 HU (range, 46-87 HU) in 18 CD patients in remission. We calculated that the overall sensitivity and specificity of CTE in detecting the severity of CD were 89% and 100%, respectively. Positive predictive value was 100%; negative predictive value was 89%. Our results indicate that CTE can reveal CD involvement of small bowel accurately and allow assessment of the degree of disease activity.

  14. Disappointing durable remission rates in complex Crohn's disease fistula.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Ilse; Nuij, Veerle J A A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke

    2014-11-01

    Despite potent drugs and surgical techniques, the treatment of perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease (CD) remains challenging. We assessed treatment strategies for perianal fistulizing CD and their effect on remission, response, and relapse. Patients with perianal fistulizing CD visiting the Erasmus MC between January 1, 1980 and January 1, 2000 were identified. Demographics, fistula characteristics, and received treatments aimed at the outcome of these strategies were noted. In total, 232 patients were identified (98 male; 42.2%). Median follow-up was 10.0 years (range, 0.5-37.5 yr). Complex fistulas were present in 78.0%. Medical treatment (antibiotics, steroids, immunosuppressants, and anti-tumor necrosis factor) commenced in 79.7% of the patients and in 53.2%, surgery (colectomy, fistulectomy, stoma, and rectum amputation) was performed. Simple fistulas healed more often than complex fistulas (88.2% versus 64.6%; P < 0.001). Rectum involvement was not associated with a lower remission rate, and anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy did not increase complete fistula healing rates in simple and complex fistula. Initially, healed fistulas recurred in 26.7% in case of simple fistulas and in 41.9% in case of complex fistulas (P = 0.051). Only 37.0% of the complex fistulas were in remission at the end of follow-up compared with 66.7% of the simple fistulas (P < 0.001). Only the minority of CD complex perianal fistulas were in remission after conventional treatment strategies after a median follow-up of 10 years. Simple fistulas were more likely to heal than complex fistulas, and less of these healed fistulas relapsed. However, more than 3 quarters of the patients had complex perianal fistulas.

  15. Stevens-Johnson syndrome complicating adalimumab therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Salama, Muna; Lawrance, Ian-Craig

    2009-09-21

    The anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha medications demonstrate efficacy in the induction of remission and its maintenance in numerous chronic inflammatory conditions. With the increasing number of patients receiving anti-TNFalpha agents, however, less common adverse reactions will occur. Cutaneous eruptions complicating treatment with an anti-TNFalpha agent are not uncommon, occurring in around 20% of patients. Adalimumab, a fully humanized antibody against TNFalpha, may be expected to cause minimal immune-mediated skin reactions compared to the chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab. We, however, report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome that required hospitalization and cessation of adalimumab in a patient with Crohn's disease (CD). In this case report, a 29-year-old male with colonic and perianal CD with associated erythema nodosum and large joint arthropathy developed severe mucositis, peripheral rash and desquamation, fevers and respiratory symptoms concomitant with a second dose of 40 mg adalimumab after a 2 mo break from adalimumab therapy. Skin biopsies of the abdominal wall confirmed erythema multiforme and the patient was on no other drugs and infective etiologies were excluded. The patient responded rapidly to IV hydrocortisone and was able to be commenced on infliximab without recurrence of the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Desquamating skin reactions have now been described in three of the TNFalpha antagonists (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab). These reactions can be serious and prescribers need to be aware of the potential mucocutaneous side effects of these agents, especially as Stevens-Johnson syndrome is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

  16. Surgery and postoperative recurrence in children with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars F; Jakobsen, Christian; Paerregaard, Anders; Qvist, Niels; Wewer, Vibeke

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe surgery rates, complications, and risk of disease recurrence after surgery in paediatric Crohn disease (CD). Children <18 years with a diagnosis of CD and a least 1 intestinal resection from the period January 1, 1978 to December 31, 2007 were identified using the Danish National Patient Registry. Patient charts were used to extract data. A total of 115 of 422 children with CD, who had surgery in 2 referral centres, were further studied. Disease extension according to the Montreal classification at the time of operation was available in 106/115 patients: B1, 39/106 (37%); B2, 59/106 (56%); and B3, 8/106 (7%). Before/after surgery 89%/36% of the patients received corticosteroids, 26%/61% azathioprine, and 15%/34% infliximab. Ileocoecal resection was performed in 54 (47%); 17 (15%) underwent ileal resection, 21 (18%) colectomy, 13 (11%) hemicolectomy, and 10 (9%) a combined colonic and ileal resection. Median time from diagnosis to surgery was 23 months (range 0-147). The median follow-up time after surgery was 121 months (16-226), and median time to disease recurrence was 12 months (3-160). The cumulative clinical recurrence rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 50%, 73%, and 77%, respectively. More than 1 bowel resection was needed in 39%. Postoperative azathioprine treatment did not affect rate of recurrence after surgery. In this large cohort of children with CD studied for >10 years postoperatively, we found a high postoperative recurrence rate of disease and a frequent need for >1 intestinal resection.

  17. Serum protein profiling of adults and children with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Gazouli, Maria; Papadopoulou, Aggeliki; Anagnostopoulos, Athanassios K; Karamanolis, George; Theodoropoulos, George E; M'Koma, Amosy; Tsangaris, George T

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), known collectively as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), are chronic immunoinflammatory pathologies of unknown aetiology. Despite the frequent use of biomarkers in medical practice, there is a relative lack of information regarding validated paediatric biomarkers for IBD. Furthermore, biomarkers proved to be efficacious in adults are frequently extrapolated to the paediatric clinical setting without considering that the pathogenesis of many diseases is distinctly different in children. In the present study, proteomics technology was used to monitor differences in protein expression among adult and young patients with CD, identify a panel of candidate protein biomarkers that may be used to improve prognostic-diagnostic accuracy, and advance paediatric medical care. Male and female serum samples from 12 adults and 12 children with active CD were subjected to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Following the relative quantitation of protein spots exhibiting a differential expression between the 2 groups by densitometry, the spots were further characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clusterin was found to be significantly overexpressed in adults with CD, whereas ceruloplasmin and apolipoprotein B-100 were found to be significantly overexpressed in children, indicating that the expression of these proteins may be implicated in the onset or progression of CD in these 2 subgroups of patients. Interestingly, we found a differential expression of several proteins in adults versus paediatric patients with CD. Undoubtedly, future experiments using a larger cohort of patients with CD are needed to evaluate the relevance of our preliminary findings.

  18. Endoscopic Skipping of the Terminal Ileum in Pediatric Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Mansuri, Ishrat; Fletcher, Joel G; Bruining, David H; Kolbe, Amy B; Fidler, Jeff L; Samuel, Sunil; Tung, Jeanne

    2017-06-01

    Pediatric small-bowel (SB) Crohn disease (CD) may be missed if the terminal ileum (TI) appears normal at endoscopy and SB imaging is not performed. We sought to estimate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of pediatric patients with CD and endoscopic skipping of the TI-that is, pediatric patients with active SB or upper gut inflammation and an endoscopically normal TI. This retrospective study included pediatric patients with CD who underwent both CT enterography (CTE) or MR enterography (MRE) and ileocolonoscopy within a 30-day period between July 2004 and April 2014. The physician global assessment was used as the reference standard for SB CD activity. Radiologists reviewed the CTE and MRE studies for inflammatory parameters; severity, length, and multifocality of SB inflammation; and the presence of penetrating complications. Of 170 patients who underwent ileal intubation, the TI was macroscopically normal or showed nonspecific inflammation in 73 patients (43%). Nearly half (36/73, 49%) of the patients with normal or nonspecific findings at ileocolonoscopy had radiologically active disease with a median length of SB involvement of 20 cm (range, 1 to > 100 cm). Seventeen (47%) of these patients had multifocal SB involvement and five (14%) had penetrating complications. Overall, endoscopic TI skipping was present in 43 (59%) patients with normal or nonspecific ileocolonoscopic findings: 20 with histologic inflammation (17 with positive imaging findings), 14 with inflammation at imaging only, and nine with proximal disease (upper gut, jejunum, or proximal ileum). There were no significant differences in the clinical parameters of the patients with and those without endoscopic TI skipping. Ileocolonoscopy may miss SB CD in pediatric patients that is due to isolated histologic, intramural, or proximal inflammation. Enterography is complementary to ileocolonoscopy in the evaluation of pediatric CD.

  19. Mucosal Barrier in Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorofeyev, A. E.; Vasilenko, I. V.; Rassokhina, O. A.; Kondratiuk, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal tract plays important role in host innate defense, regulation of secretion, and absorption processes, maintaining colonization resistance, which composes the integrity of protective mucus barrier in the large intestine. Investigations of mucin expression in the colon mucosa can improve the understanding of protective function of mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Materials and Methods. 77 patients with UC and CD were examined. Histological analysis of colon mucosa was done by standard method (haematoxylin-eosin, alcian blue at pH 1.0 and 2.5 to determine sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, and goblet cells). To characterize the mucus production the PAS-reaction was performed. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal mouse antibodies raised against MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, and TFF3 (USBiological, USA). Results. The moderate expression of MUC2 and MUC3 (50.0% and 32.1%, P = 0.03) and high expression of MUC4 and TFF3 in the colon mucosa were observed in all patients with CD. The intensive labeling of MUC4 and TFF3 occurred more often (42.9% and 57.1%, P = 0.03) in patients with CD. The level of expression of secretory MUC2 and transmembrane MUC3 and MUC4 in all patients with UC was low, up to its complete absence (59.2% and 53.1% cases, P = 0.05). TFF3 expression had high and medium staining intensity in patients with UC. Conclusions. Different types of mucins synthesis, secretion, and expression were found in patients with UC and CD. The expression of mucin MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, and TFF3 correlated with the activity of disease and the extent of the inflammatory process in the large intestine. The most pronounced alteration of mucins expression was observed in patients with severe UC and CD. PMID:23737764

  20. Enteral nutrition and microflora in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Paolo; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Ferrari, Susanna; Cavicchi, Maria Chiara; Pozzi, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition (EN) is an established primary therapy for pediatric Crohn's disease (CD). The mechanism of action of such treatment is still conjectural. The aim of the present study was to investigate if EN-induced remission is associated with modification of the fecal microflora in CD. Stool samples were collected from 5 healthy children and adolescents over a period of 3 months, and from 9 children and adolescents with active CD. To induce disease remission, children with CD received a course of exclusive EN for 8 weeks with a polymeric formula (Modulen IBD, Nestlè). At the end of the course of exclusive EN, children returned to a free diet but continued to take 40% of the daily caloric intake as polymeric formula. Fecal microflora was analyzed by 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) with direct visual comparison of band profiles of PCR products. In 8 of 9 children, the exclusive EN alone induced disease remission. In 1 child, it was necessary to add steroids to the exclusive EN course to achieve remission. In all children with CD, analysis of gel band distribution revealed profound modification of the fecal microflora after exclusive EN. Variations of band distribution corresponding to different bacterial species were observed also in children on partial EN and required time to achieve stability of the band profile. In contrast, control healthy children showed a host-specific and stable TGGE profile over time. These data suggest that a possible mechanism of action of EN in inducing disease remission in CD is the capacity of modification of gut microflora. Possible explanations of such capacity are both low residue and prebiotic properties of the polymeric liquid formula.

  1. Incidental adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing surgery for stricturing Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kristo, Ivan; Riss, Stefan; Argeny, Stanislaus; Maschke, Svenja; Chitsabesan, Praminthra; Stift, Anton

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate frequency and clinical course of incidental adenocarcinoma in patients with stricturing Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS In this study, consecutive patients, who were operated on for stricturing CD between 1997-2012, were included at an academic tertiary referral center. Demographic data and clinical course were obtained by an institutional database and individual chart review. Besides baseline characteristics, intraoperative findings and CD related history were also recorded. Colorectal cancer was classified and staged according to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC). RESULTS During the study period 484 patients underwent resections due to stricturing CD. Incidental adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in 6 (1.2%) patients (4 males, 2 females). Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer had a median age of 43 (27-66) years and a median history of CD of 16 (7-36) years. Malignant lesions were found in the rectum (n = 4, 66.7%), descending colon (n = 1, 16.7%) and ileocolon (n = 1, 16.7%). According to the UICC classification two patients were stages as I (33.3%), whereas the other patients were classified as stage IIA (16.7%), stage IIIB (16.7%), stage IIIC (16.7%) and stage IV (16.7%), respectively. After a median follow-up of 2 (0.03-8) years only 1 patient is still alive. CONCLUSION The frequency of incidental colorectal cancer in patients, who undergo surgery for stenotic CD, is low but associated with poor prognosis. However, surgeons need to be aware about the possibility of malignancy in stricturing CD, especially if localized in the rectum. PMID:28210083

  2. Bacterial protein signals are associated with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Juste, Catherine; Kreil, David P; Beauvallet, Christian; Guillot, Alain; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Mondot, Stanislas; Sykacek, Peter; Sokol, Harry; Blon, Florence; Lepercq, Pascale; Levenez, Florence; Valot, Benoît; Carré, Wilfrid; Loux, Valentin; Pons, Nicolas; David, Olivier; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Lepage, Patricia; Martin, Patrice; Monnet, Véronique; Seksik, Philippe; Beaugerie, Laurent; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Doré, Joël

    2014-10-01

    No Crohn's disease (CD) molecular maker has advanced to clinical use, and independent lines of evidence support a central role of the gut microbial community in CD. Here we explore the feasibility of extracting bacterial protein signals relevant to CD, by interrogating myriads of intestinal bacterial proteomes from a small number of patients and healthy controls. We first developed and validated a workflow-including extraction of microbial communities, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and LC-MS/MS-to discover protein signals from CD-associated gut microbial communities. Then we used selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to confirm a set of candidates. In parallel, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing for an integrated analysis of gut ecosystem structure and functions. Our 2D-DIGE-based discovery approach revealed an imbalance of intestinal bacterial functions in CD. Many proteins, largely derived from Bacteroides species, were over-represented, while under-represented proteins were mostly from Firmicutes and some Prevotella members. Most overabundant proteins could be confirmed using SRM. They correspond to functions allowing opportunistic pathogens to colonise the mucus layers, breach the host barriers and invade the mucosae, which could still be aggravated by decreased host-derived pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein GP2 in CD patients. Moreover, although the abundance of most protein groups reflected that of related bacterial populations, we found a specific independent regulation of bacteria-derived cell envelope proteins. This study provides the first evidence that quantifiable bacterial protein signals are associated with CD, which can have a profound impact on future molecular diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Is rifaximin effective in maintaining remission in Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Jigaranu, Anca Olivia; Nedelciuc, Otilia; Blaj, Andreea; Badea, Mircea; Mihai, Catalina; Diculescu, Mircea; Cijevschi-Prelipcean, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that persistent intestinal inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) might be caused by abnormal intestinal microbiota. This hypothesis may suggest a beneficial effect of antibiotics in CD therapy. So far, guidelines do not recommend antibiotics except in the treatment of complicated CD, and there are few studies on the effects of rifaximin in these patients. Between December 2011 and December 2012, we performed a blinded randomized trial in 168 patients with a previous history of moderately active CD concerning the efficacy of rifaximin. All the patients had previously achieved remission with standard therapy (prednisone/budesonide). Data from patients receiving 800 mg of rifaximin (83 patients) twice a day for 12 weeks were compared with those from patients who received placebo (83 patients). The primary endpoint was maintaining remission during the follow-up. All the patients (100%; 83/83) on 800 mg of rifaximin were in remission after 12 weeks of treatment in comparison with 84% (70/83) of the placebo group. This significant difference was also persistent at the 24-week follow-up [78% (65/83) vs. 41% (34/83), respectively]. The last evaluation performed at 48 weeks revealed disease activity in 45% (38/83) of the patients of the rifaximin group, i.e. a significant decrease compared with the placebo group [75% (63 of 83)]. Remission previously obtained with standard treatment can be sustained in patients with moderately active CD after the administration of 800 mg of rifaximin. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. [Isolated ileocecal tuberculosis simulating malignant neoplasia and Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Bromberg, S H; Faroud, S; de Castro, F F; Morrone, N; de Godoy, A C; França, L C

    2001-01-01

    Isolated ileocecal involvement by tuberculosis in the absence of pulmonar disease is rare in Brasil, therefore causes a diagnostic dilemma as it mimics colonic malignancy and Crohn's disease. Between 1969 and 1989, eight patients with isolated hypertrophic ileocecal tuberculosis were treated by surgery in the Gastroenterology Surgery Department of the HSPE-FMO. The most common complaint among them was abdominal pain (100%) with associated symptoms of weight loss (62.5%); nausea, vomiting, fever and general weekness appeared in half of the patients. A right iliac fossa mass was present in seven (87.5% ) of them. The mean duration of symptoms was 14.7 month (range 5-36 months). In all eight patients chest x-rays were negative for tuberculosis. Barium contrast studies showed abnormalities in all cases, but these could not be distinguished from carcinoma. Colonoscopy was helpful in establishing the diagnosis of suboclusive lesions of the ileocecal regions in three patients. Tuberculosis diagnosis was suspected in two of them because ofr the presence of granulomas in colonic biopsy material. Six patients were submitted to elective right hemicolectomy. The two remaining with suspect of tuberculosis were operated with signals of intestinal occlusion, and underwent a limited ileocaecal resection. The positive diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis was made in all the patients by identification of acid-fast bacilli and by the presence of caseating granulomas in intestinal or lymph node tissue on histological examination. The outcome in all of them was favorable. They received treatment with three antituberculosis drugs over a twelve month period. Hypertrophic ileocecal tuberculosis must still be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pathology localized in the right lower quadrant.

  5. Clinical Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Crohn Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ah; Chun, Peter; Hwang, Eun Ha; Mun, Sang Wook; Lee, Yeoun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of Crohn disease (CD) in Korean pediatric patients. Methods The medical records of 73 children diagnosed with CD were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, including CD phenotype at diagnosis based on the Montreal classification, and clinical features and course of EIMs were investigated. Results Fifty-two (71.2%) of the patients were males. The mean age of the patients was 12.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 3.4 years. The disease location was ileal in 3 (4.1%) of the patients, colonic in 13 (17.8%), ileocolonic in 56 (76.7%). The clinical behavior was inflammatory in 62 (84.9%) of the patients, stricturing in 8 (11.0%), and penetrating in 3 (4.1%). Perianal abscesses or fistulas were found in 37 (50.7%) of the patients. EIMs observed during the study period were anal skin tag in 25 patients (34.2%), hypertransaminasemia in 20 (27.4%), peripheral arthritis in 2 (2.7%), erythema nodosum in 2 (2.7%), vulvitis in 1 (1.4%), uveitis in 1 (1.4%), and pulmonary thromboembolism in 1 (1.4%). Conclusion Perianal diseases and manifestations were present in more than half of Korean pediatric CD patients at diagnosis. Inspection of the anus should be mandatory in Korean children with suspicious CD, as perianal fistulas, abscesses, and anal skin tags may be the first clue to the diagnosis of CD. PMID:28090468

  6. Perianal Crohn Disease in a Large Multicenter Pediatric Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jeremy; Dong, Shiming; Eder, Sally J; Dombkowski, Kevin J

    2017-05-01

    Although perianal complications of Crohn disease (CD) are commonly encountered in clinical practice, the epidemiology of perianal CD among populations of children is poorly understood. We sought to characterize the prevalence of perianal disease in a large and diverse population of pediatric patients with CD. We conducted retrospective analyses from a prospective observational cohort, the ImproveCareNow Network (May 2006-October 2014), a multicenter pediatric inflammatory bowel disease quality improvement collaborative. Clinicians prospectively documented physical examination and phenotype classification at outpatient visits. Perianal examination findings and concomitant phenotype change were used to corroborate time of new-onset perianal disease. Results were stratified by age, sex, and race and compared across groups with logistic regression. Cumulative incidence was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared between groups with Cox proportional hazard regression models. The registry included 7076 patients with CD (41% girls). Missing/conflicting entries resulted in 397 (6%) patient exclusions. Among the remaining 6679 cases, 1399 (21%) developed perianal disease. Perianal disease was more common among boys (22%) than girls (20%; P = 0.013) and developed sooner after diagnosis among those with later rather than early onset disease (P < 0.001). Perianal disease was also more common among blacks (26%) compared with whites (20%; P = 0.017). Asians with later onset CD developed perianal disease earlier in their disease course (P = 0.01). There was no association between disease location or nutritional status at diagnosis and later development of perianal disease. In this large multicenter collaborative, we found that perianal disease is more common among children with CD than previously recognized. Differences in the development of perianal disease were found across racial and other subgroups. Treatment strategies are needed to prevent

  7. Distinct phenotypes of children with perianal perforating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Short, Scott S; Dubinsky, Marla C; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Farrior, Sharmayne; Berel, Dror; Frykman, Philip K

    2013-06-01

    Perianal perforating disease (PF) has been reported in approximately 15% of children with Crohn's disease (CD). It is unknown whether children who present with PF at the time of diagnosis have a different course than those that develop PF while on therapy. From a prospective, single institution observational registry of children diagnosed with CD, we identified children with perianal perforating CD, defined as perianal abscesses and/or fistulae. Patients who presented with perianal perforating CD (PF-CD0) were compared to those who developed perianal perforating CD (PF-CD1) after initial diagnosis. Thirty-eight of 215 (18%) children with CD had PF-CD during a median follow up of 4.5 years. Patients with PF-CD0 (n=26) tended to be more likely male (81% vs. 50%, p=0.07) and younger (9.3 yrs vs. 12.5 yrs, p=0.02). PF-CD1 (n=12) patients were more likely to require diverting ileostomy (42% vs. 8%, p=0.02) and colectomy (33% vs. 4%, p=0.03). Multivariable analysis predicted increased rate of diverting ileostomy in the PF-CD1 group (p=0.007, OR 19.1, 95% CI 1.6-234.8). Pediatric CD patients who develop PF while on therapy for CD have a more severe phenotype and are more likely to require diverting ileostomy or colectomy compared to those who present with PF-CD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CyberMedVPS: visual programming for development of simulators.

    PubMed

    Morais, Aline M; Machado, Liliane S

    2011-01-01

    Computer applications based on Virtual Reality (VR) has been outstanding in training and teaching in the medical filed due to their ability to simulate realistic in which users can practice skills and decision making in different situations. But was realized in these frameworks a hard interaction of non-programmers users. Based on this problematic will be shown the CyberMedVPS, a graphical module which implement Visual Programming concepts to solve an interaction trouble. Frameworks to develop such simulators are available but their use demands knowledge of programming. Based on this problematic will be shown the CyberMedVPS, a graphical module for the CyberMed framework, which implements Visual Programming concepts to allow the development of simulators by non-programmers professionals of the medical field.

  9. Gaps in affiliation indexing in Scopus and PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Cynthia M.; Cox, Roxanne; Fial, Alissa V.; Hartman, Teresa L.; Magee, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The authors sought to determine whether unexpected gaps existed in Scopus's author affiliation indexing of publications written by the University of Nebraska Medical Center or Nebraska Medicine (UNMC/NM) authors during 2014. Methods First, we compared Scopus affiliation identifier search results to PubMed affiliation keyword search results. Then, we searched Scopus using affiliation keywords (UNMC, etc.) and compared the results to PubMed affiliation keyword and Scopus affiliation identifier searches. Results We found that Scopus's records for approximately 7% of UNMC/NM authors' publications lacked appropriate UNMC/NM author affiliation identifiers, and many journals' publishers were supplying incomplete author affiliation information to PubMed. Conclusions Institutions relying on Scopus to track their impact should determine whether Scopus's affiliation identifiers will, in fact, identify all articles published by their authors and investigators. PMID:27076801

  10. Gaps in affiliation indexing in Scopus and PubMed.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Cynthia M; Cox, Roxanne; Fial, Alissa V; Hartman, Teresa L; Magee, Martha L

    2016-04-01

    The authors sought to determine whether unexpected gaps existed in Scopus's author affiliation indexing of publications written by the University of Nebraska Medical Center or Nebraska Medicine (UNMC/NM) authors during 2014. First, we compared Scopus affiliation identifier search results to PubMed affiliation keyword search results. Then, we searched Scopus using affiliation keywords (UNMC, etc.) and compared the results to PubMed affiliation keyword and Scopus affiliation identifier searches. We found that Scopus's records for approximately 7% of UNMC/NM authors' publications lacked appropriate UNMC/NM author affiliation identifiers, and many journals' publishers were supplying incomplete author affiliation information to PubMed. Institutions relying on Scopus to track their impact should determine whether Scopus's affiliation identifiers will, in fact, identify all articles published by their authors and investigators.

  11. MedAustron: The Austrian ion therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael

    MedAustron is a synchrotron-based light-ion beam therapy center for cancer treatment as well as for clinical and non-clinical research in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. The center is designed for the treatment of up to 1200 patients per year and for non-clinical research in the areas of radiobiology and medical radiation physics, as well as in experimental physics. MedAustron is an interdisciplinary project, benefiting from close cooperation and knowledge transfer with medical, scientific and research institutes on the national and international level. Three medical irradiation rooms will allow quasi-permanent patient treatment during two shifts on working days. The remaining beam time will be used for non-clinical research applications in a dedicated fourth irradiation room. The expected start of operation of MedAustron is mid-2016...

  12. Death, dying and informatics: misrepresenting religion on MedLine

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez del Pozo, Pablo; Fins, Joseph J

    2005-01-01

    Background The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic religions. Methods We searched MedLine using PubMed in order to retrieve and thematically analyze full-length scholarly journal papers or case reports dealing with religious traditions and end-of-life care. Our search consisted of a string of words that included the most common denominations of the three religions, the standard heading terms used by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL), and the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used by the National Library of Medicine. Eligible articles were limited to English-language papers with an abstract. Results We found that while a bibliographic search in MedLine on this topic produced instant results and some valuable literature, the aggregate reflected a selection bias. American writers were over-represented given the global prevalence of these religious traditions. Denominationally affiliated authors predominated in representing the Christian traditions. The Islamic tradition was under-represented. Conclusion MedLine's capability to identify the most current, reliable and accurate information about purely scientific topics should not be assumed to be the same case when considering the interface of religion, culture and end-of-life care. PMID:15992401

  13. Death, dying and informatics: misrepresenting religion on MedLine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Del Pozo, Pablo; Fins, Joseph J

    2005-07-01

    The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic religions. We searched MedLine using PubMed in order to retrieve and thematically analyze full-length scholarly journal papers or case reports dealing with religious traditions and end-of-life care. Our search consisted of a string of words that included the most common denominations of the three religions, the standard heading terms used by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL), and the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used by the National Library of Medicine. Eligible articles were limited to English-language papers with an abstract. We found that while a bibliographic search in MedLine on this topic produced instant results and some valuable literature, the aggregate reflected a selection bias. American writers were over-represented given the global prevalence of these religious traditions. Denominationally affiliated authors predominated in representing the Christian traditions. The Islamic tradition was under-represented. MedLine's capability to identify the most current, reliable and accurate information about purely scientific topics should not be assumed to be the same case when considering the interface of religion, culture and end-of-life care.

  14. Grading Crohn disease activity with MRI: interobserver variability of MRI features, MRI scoring of severity, and correlation with Crohn disease endoscopic index of severity.

    PubMed

    Tielbeek, Jeroen A W; Makanyanga, Jesica C; Bipat, Shandra; Pendsé, Doug A; Nio, C Yung; Vos, Frans M; Taylor, Stuart A; Stoker, Jaap

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess the interobserver variability for scoring MRI features of Crohn disease activity and to correlate two MRI scoring systems to the Crohn disease endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS). Thirty-three consecutive patients with Crohn disease undergoing 3-T MRI examinations (T1-weighted with IV contrast medium administration and T2-weighted sequences) and ileocolonoscopy within 1 month were independently evaluated by four readers. Seventeen MRI features were recorded in 143 bowel segments and were used to calculate the MR index of activity and the Crohn disease MRI index (CDMI) score. Multirater analysis was performed for all features and scoring systems using intraclass correlation coefficient (icc) and kappa statistic. Scoring systems were compared with ileocolonoscopy with CDEIS using Spearman rank correlation. Thirty patients (median age, 32 years; 21 women and nine men) were included. MRI features showed fair-to-good interobserver variability (intraclass correlation coefficient or kappa varied from 0.30 to 0.69). Wall thickness in millimeters, presence of edema, enhancement pattern, and length of the disease in each segment showed a good interobserver variability between all readers (icc = 0.69, κ = 0.66, κ = 0.62, and κ = 0.62, respectively). The MR index of activity and CDMI scores showed good reproducibility (icc = 0.74 and icc = 0.78, respectively) and moderate CDEIS correlation (r = 0.51 and r = 0.59, respectively). The reproducibility of individual MRI features overall is fair to good, with good reproducibility for the most commonly used features. When combined into the MR index of activity and CDMI score, overall reproducibility is good. Both scores show moderate agreement with CDEIS.

  15. Twin studies reveal specific imbalances in the mucosa-associated microbiota of patients with ileal Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, B.; Halfvarson, J.; Dicksved, J.; Rosenquist, M.; Jarnerot, G.; Engstrand, L.; Tysk, C.; Jansson, J. K

    2008-08-15

    Large inter-individual variation in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between unrelated individuals has made it challenging to identify specific aspects of dysbiosis that lead to Crohn's disease. To reduce variations in exposure during establishment of the gut flora and influence of genotype, we studied the mucosaassociated microbiota of monozygotic twin pairs that were discordant (n=6) or concordant (n=4) for Crohn's disease. DNA was extracted from biopsies collected from 5 locations between the ileum and rectum. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified and community composition assessed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. The microbial compositions at all biopsy locations for each individual were similar, regardless of disease state, but there were differences between individuals. In particular, individuals with predominantly ileal Crohn's had a dramatically lower abundance (P<0.001) of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and increased abundance (P<0.03) of Escherichia coli compared to healthy co-twins and those with Crohn's localized in the colon. This dysbiosis was significantly correlated to the disease phenotype rather than genotype. The reduced abundance of F. prausnitzii and increased abundance of E. coli are indicative of an ileal Crohn's disease phenotype, distinct from colonic Crohn's disease and the relative abundances of these specific bacterial populations are promising biomarker candidates for differential diagnosis of Crohn's and eventually customized treatment.

  16. Identifying decreased peristalsis of abnormal small bowel segments in Crohn's disease using cine MR enterography: the frozen bowel sign.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; O'Kane, Patrick L; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Burach, Ilene; Burns, Aaron; Dulka, Susan; Parker, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether affected bowel in Crohn's disease patients can be identified by observing decreased peristalsis (frozen bowel sign) using cine balanced steady-state free precession (cine BSSFP) images. 5 radiologists independently reviewed cine BSSFP sequences from randomized MR Enterography (MRE) exams for 30 normal and 30 Crohn's disease patients, graded overall small bowel peristalsis from slowest to fastest, and graded peristalsis for the most abnormal small bowel segment. Sensitivity and specificity of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease were calculated. T tests of the peristalsis difference between abnormal segments and overall small bowel were conducted. For 5 readers, the sensitivity and specificity of cine BSSFP of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease ranged from 70% to 100% and 87% to 100%, respectively. There were significant differences in peristalsis between abnormal small bowel segments and the overall small bowel for Crohn's patients, but not in the overall small bowel between normal-MRE patients and Crohn's disease patients. Abnormal Crohn's small bowel segments have significantly decreased peristalsis compared to normal small bowel, which can be identified using cine BSSFP sequences as the frozen bowel sign.

  17. Pregnancy outcome for women with Crohn's disease: a follow-up study based on linkage between national registries.

    PubMed

    Fonager, K; Sørensen, H T; Olsen, J; Dahlerup, J F; Rasmussen, S N

    1998-12-01

    Crohn's disease, characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, is sometimes followed by malabsorption, which may interfere with embryogenesis and fetal growth. Therefore we examined birthweight, the frequency of preterm birth, and other reproductive outcomes in the offspring of women with Crohn's disease. We used a historical registry-based study, with linkage between the Danish National Registry of Patients and the Danish Medical Birth Registry. Included were 510 newborns to mothers with Crohn's disease and 3018 controls in the study period from 1982 to 1992. The average birthweight of newborns to mothers with Crohn's disease was 185 g, 134 g less than expected for primiparas and multiparas. After adjusting for potential confounders the differences were 142 g (95% confidence interval [CI95%] = 76, 208) and 105 g (CI95% = 37, 173), respectively. The risk of low birthweight was increased in Crohn patients (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4; CI95% = 1.6-3.7), as was the risk of preterm birth (OR = 1.6; CI95% = 1.1-2.3). We found a lower birthweight in newborns of patients with Crohn's disease, indicating that Crohn's disease or its treatment may influence fetal growth.

  18. Grateful Med on an institutional local area network.

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, D. R.; Sequeira, E. P.; Graeff, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    Grateful Med version 6.0 provides new features very desirable to network users. These include: a single copy of the application resident on a server providing access to many users; a new communications architecture which provides access to Medline via the Internet or local network modems; additional scripting capabilities allowing local customization. These new features reduce the overhead in installing and maintaining Grateful Med (GM), allow much quicker downloading of citations and abstracts from Medline, and remove the requirement of a local modem for each PC accessing Medline. PMID:1482923

  19. [E-med: illustration and vector of globalization in healthcare].

    PubMed

    Dixneuf, M

    2006-12-01

    Destined for healthcare professionals interested in public health policy in developing countries, E-med is one of the few francophone forums on essential medicines. Bringing together users with diverse backgrounds, discussion groups illustrate the effects of globalization on health policy: disappearance of distance, convergence of political and sanitary issues, enhanced cooperation between public and private sectors, coalitions of heterogeneous players and destruction of national and international barriers. Having benefited from the development of the Internet in recent years, as a secondary tool, E-med, must now evolve with this tool that is now ubiquitous in international health policy.

  20. Search for Mycobacterium paratuberculosis DNA in orofacial granulomatosis and oral Crohn's disease tissue by polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, M; Gibson, J; Lennon, A; Wray, D; MacDonald, D

    1997-01-01

    Background—Although intestinal Crohn's disease has long been suspected to have a mycobacterial cause, possible mycobacterial involvement in orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) and oral lesions of Crohn's disease has not yet been investigated.
Aims—As the slow growing Mycobacterium paratuberculosis has been implicated in the aetiology of intestinal Crohn's disease, the potential involvement of this mycobacterial species in OFG and oral lesions of Crohn's disease was investigated.
Patients—To attempt detection of the organism in OFG and oral Crohn's disease tissue samples, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used on archival formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded oral tissue sections from 30 patients with OFG, seven with Crohn's disease, and 12 normal controls.
Methods—The PCR assay used was based on primers targeting the 5' region of the multicopy IS900 DNA insertion element of the M paratuberculosis genome. In order to achieve maximum sensitivity, two rounds of PCR were carried out and amplicons confirmed by Southern blot hybridisation to a digoxigenin labelled IS900 DNA probe.
Results—None of the OFG and oral lesions of Crohn's disease samples were positive for M paratuberculosis and all normal controls were also negative. 
Conclusions—These results suggest that M paratuberculosis may not be a major aetiological agent in OFG or oral Crohn's disease lesions, although the use of paraffin wax embedded tissue as opposed to fresh tissue as a sample source could underestimate the true prevalence of the organism. 

 Keywords: oral Crohn's disease; Mycobacterium paratuberculosis; orofacial granulomatosis; polymerase chain reaction PMID:9414972