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Sample records for mori cadherin receptor

  1. Blocking binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa to Bombyx mori cadherin receptor results in only a minor reduction of toxicity

    PubMed Central

    You, Taek H; Lee, Mi K; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Alzate, Oscar; Dean, Donald H

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa insecticidal protein is the most active known B. thuringiensis toxin against the forest insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth), unfortunately it is also highly toxic against the non-target insect Bombyx mori (silk worm). Results Surface exposed hydrophobic residues over domains II and III were targeted for site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of a phenylalanine residue (F328) by alanine reduced binding to the Bombyx mori cadherin by 23-fold, reduced biological activity against B. mori by 4-fold, while retaining activity against Lymantria dispar. Conclusion The results identify a novel receptor-binding epitope and demonstrate that virtual elimination of binding to cadherin BR-175 does not completely remove toxicity in the case of B. mori. PMID:18218126

  2. Cytotoxic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins on mammalian cells transfected with cadherin-like Cry receptor gene of Bombyx mori (silkworm).

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Yoko; Nakatani, Fumiki; Hashimoto, Keiko; Ikawa, Satoshi; Matsuura, Chikako; Fukada, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Himeno, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Cry1Aa, an insecticidal protein produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, has been shown to bind to cadherin-like protein, BtR175, in Bombyx mori (silkworm) midgut. We previously reported three variant alleles of BtR175 (BtR175a, b and c). When transiently expressed in COS7 cells, all the three BtR175 variants bound to Cry1Aa. We stably expressed BtR175b in HEK293 cells. These BtR175b-expressing cells swelled and died in the presence of activated Cry1Aa in a dose- and time-dependent manner, showing that BtR175b itself can impart Cry1Aa-susceptibility to mammalian cells. These cells were more susceptible to Cry1Aa than to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Since dispersed B. mori midgut cells were reported to be highly susceptible to Cry1Ac, this result suggested that other Cry1Ac-specific receptor(s) were simultaneously working with BtR175 in the midgut cells. Advantages are also discussed of applying these transfected mammalian cells to toxicity assays of mutant Cry proteins. PMID:12403648

  3. Flamingo cadherin: a putative host receptor for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blau, Karin; Portnoi, Maxim; Shagan, Marilou; Kaganovich, Antonina; Rom, Slava; Kafka, Daniel; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Porgador, Angel; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Dagan, Ron; Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2007-06-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a cell wall-localized lectin. We demonstrate that recombinant (r) FBA and anti-rFBA antibodies inhibit encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 adherence to A549 type II lung carcinoma epithelial cells. A random combinatorial peptide library expressed by filamentous phage was screened with rFBA. Eleven of 30 rFBA-binding phages inhibited 90% of S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptide sequence of 9 of these phages matched the Flamingo cadherin receptor (FCR) when aligned against the human genome. A peptide comprising a putative FBA-binding region of FCR (FCRP) inhibited 2 genetically and capsularly unrelated pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains from binding to A549 cells. Moreover, FCRP inhibited S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal and lung colonization and, possibly, pneumonia development in the mouse intranasal inoculation model system. These data indicate that FBA is an S. pneumoniae adhesin and that FCR is its host receptor.

  4. Activation of the repulsive receptor Roundabout inhibits N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Mahfooz, Najmus S; Arregui, Carlos; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne; VanBerkum, Mark F A

    2002-10-01

    The formation of axon trajectories requires integration of local adhesive interactions with directional information from attractive and repulsive cues. Here, we show that these two types of information are functionally integrated; activation of the transmembrane receptor Roundabout (Robo) by its ligand, the secreted repulsive guidance cue Slit, inactivates N-cadherin-mediated adhesion. Loss of N-cadherin-mediated adhesion is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its loss from the N-cadherin complex, concomitant with the formation of a supramolecular complex containing Robo, Abelson (Abl) kinase and N-cadherin. Local formation of such a receptor complex is an ideal mechanism to steer the growth cone while still allowing adhesion and growth in other directions.

  5. Orthologs of Human Disease Associated Genes and RNAi Analysis of Silencing Insulin Receptor Gene in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zan; Teng, Xiaolu; Chen, Maohua; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., is an important economic insect that has been domesticated for thousands of years to produce silk. It is our great interest to investigate the possibility of developing the B. mori as human disease model. We searched the orthologs of human disease associated genes in the B. mori by bi-directional best hits of BLAST and confirmed by searching the OrthoDB. In total, 5006 genes corresponding to 1612 kinds of human diseases had orthologs in the B. mori, among which, there are 25 genes associated with diabetes mellitus. Of these, we selected the insulin receptor gene of the B. mori (Bm-INSR) to study its expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages and tissues. Quantitative PCR showed that Bm-INSR was highly expressed in the Malpighian tubules but expressed at low levels in the testis. It was highly expressed in the 3rd and 4th instar larvae, and adult. We knocked down Bm-INSR expression using RNA interference. The abundance of Bm-INSR transcripts were dramatically reduced to ~4% of the control level at 6 days after dsRNA injection and the RNAi-treated B. mori individuals showed apparent growth inhibition and malformation such as abnormal body color in black, which is the typical symptom of diabetic patients. Our results demonstrate that B. mori has potential use as an animal model for diabetic mellitus research. PMID:25302617

  6. Targeting N-cadherin through fibroblast growth factor receptor-4: distinct pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Shereen; Zheng, Lei; Winer, Daniel; Asa, Sylvia L

    2006-11-01

    Several molecular aberrations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors, but few have proven thus far to be of therapeutic value. Pituitary tumor-derived fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (ptd-FGFR4) is an alternatively transcribed cytoplasmic isoform lacking most of the extracellular domain. This oncogene recapitulates the morphological features of human pituitary tumors in transgenic mice. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting ptd-FGFR4, we examined the impact of FGFR4 tyrosine kinase inhibition in xenografted mice. GH4 pituitary cells expressing ptd-FGFR4 develop into invasive tumors. Systemic treatment of mice bearing ptd-FGFR4 tumors with the FGFR-selective inhibitor PD173074 resulted in recovery of membranous N-cadherin staining and a significant reduction in tumor volume with less invasive growth behavior. Mutation of tyrosine Y754F in ptd-FGFR4 abrogated the effect of PD173074-mediated inhibition. The pivotal role of N-cadherin as a mediator of this pituitary cell growth was demonstrated by small interfering RNA mediated down-regulation, which promoted invasive growth in xenografted mice. To validate this model in primary human pituitary tumors, we examined the expression of ptd-FGFR4, N-cadherin, and clinical behavior. Loss of membranous N-cadherin correlated with cytoplasmic FGFR4 expression and with tumor invasiveness in surgically resected human pituitary tumors. Primary human pituitary tumor cells treated with PD173074 showed restoration of N-cadherin to the membrane with dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. These data highlight the pathogenetic significance of N-cadherin misexpression and emphasize the importance of FGFR partnership in mediating its functions.

  7. GRIP1 interlinks N-cadherin and AMPA receptors at vesicles to promote combined cargo transport into dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, Frank F.; Lee, Han Kyu; Gromova, Kira V.; Pechmann, Yvonne; Schurek, Beate; Ruschkies, Laura; Schroeder, Markus; Schweizer, Michaela; Kneussel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The GluA2 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in neurons. In addition, the transsynaptic cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin controls excitatory synapse function and stabilizes dendritic spine structures. At postsynaptic membranes, GluA2 physically binds N-cadherin, underlying spine growth and synaptic modulation. We report that N-cadherin binds to PSD-95/SAP90/DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain 2 of the glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) through its intracellular C terminus. N-cadherin and GluA2-containing AMPARs are presorted to identical transport vesicles for dendrite delivery, and live imaging reveals cotransport of both proteins. The kinesin KIF5 powers GluA2/N-cadherin codelivery by using GRIP1 as a multilink interface. Notably, GluA2 and N-cadherin use different PDZ domains on GRIP1 to simultaneously bind the transport complex, and interference with either binding motif impairs the turnover of both synaptic cargoes. Depolymerization of microtubules, deletion of the KIF5 motor domain, or specific blockade of AMPAR exocytosis affects delivery of GluA2/N-cadherin vesicles. At the functional level, interference with this cotransport reduces the number of spine protrusions and excitatory synapses. Our data suggest the concept that the multi-PDZ-domain adaptor protein GRIP1 can act as a scaffold at trafficking vesicles in the combined delivery of AMPARs and N-cadherin into dendrites. PMID:24639525

  8. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori; Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru; Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Takeda, Shigeki; Park, Enoch Y.; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  9. Combinatory annotation of cell membrane receptors and signalling pathways of Bombyx mori prothoracic glands

    PubMed Central

    Moulos, Panagiotis; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Dedos, Skarlatos G.

    2016-01-01

    The cells of prothoracic glands (PG) are the main site of synthesis and secretion of ecdysteroids, the biochemical products of cholesterol conversion to steroids that shape the morphogenic development of insects. Despite the availability of genome sequences from several insect species and the extensive knowledge of certain signalling pathways that underpin ecdysteroidogenesis, the spectrum of signalling molecules and ecdysteroidogenic cascades is still not fully comprehensive. To fill this gap and obtain the complete list of cell membrane receptors expressed in PG cells, we used combinatory bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis and quantitative PCR to annotate and determine the expression profiles of genes identified as putative cell membrane receptors of the model insect species, Bombyx mori, and subsequently enrich the repertoire of signalling pathways that are present in its PG cells. The genome annotation dataset we report here highlights modules and pathways that may be directly involved in ecdysteroidogenesis and aims to disseminate data and assist other researchers in the discovery of the role of such receptors and their ligands. PMID:27576083

  10. Expression map of a complete set of gustatory receptor genes in chemosensory organs of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huizhen; Cheng, Tingcai; Chen, Zhiwei; Jiang, Liang; Guo, Youbing; Liu, Jianqiu; Li, Shenglong; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Wu, Jiaqi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Zhang, Huijie; Seth, Rakesh K; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Montagné, Nicolas; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2017-03-01

    Most lepidopteran species are herbivores, and interaction with host plants affects their gene expression and behavior as well as their genome evolution. Gustatory receptors (Grs) are expected to mediate host plant selection, feeding, oviposition and courtship behavior. However, due to their high diversity, sequence divergence and extremely low level of expression it has been difficult to identify precisely a complete set of Grs in Lepidoptera. By manual annotation and BAC sequencing, we improved annotation of 43 gene sequences compared with previously reported Grs in the most studied lepidopteran model, the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and identified 7 new tandem copies of BmGr30 on chromosome 7, bringing the total number of BmGrs to 76. Among these, we mapped 68 genes to chromosomes in a newly constructed chromosome distribution map and 8 genes to scaffolds; we also found new evidence for large clusters of BmGrs, especially from the bitter receptor family. RNA-seq analysis of diverse BmGr expression patterns in chemosensory organs of larvae and adults enabled us to draw a precise organ specific map of BmGr expression. Interestingly, most of the clustered genes were expressed in the same tissues and more than half of the genes were expressed in larval maxillae, larval thoracic legs and adult legs. For example, BmGr63 showed high expression levels in all organs in both larval and adult stages. By contrast, some genes showed expression limited to specific developmental stages or organs and tissues. BmGr19 was highly expressed in larval chemosensory organs (especially antennae and thoracic legs), the single exon genes BmGr53 and BmGr67 were expressed exclusively in larval tissues, the BmGr27-BmGr31 gene cluster on chr7 displayed a high expression level limited to adult legs and the candidate CO2 receptor BmGr2 was highly expressed in adult antennae, where few other Grs were expressed. Transcriptional analysis of the Grs in B. mori provides a valuable new reference for

  11. Understanding CELSRs - Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Dao-Lai; Xu, Zhi-Gang; Ma, Ming-Liang; Wang, Wen-Bo; Li, Lin-Lin; Han, Xiao-Lin; Huo, Yuqing; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptors (CELSRs) are a special subgroup of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are pivotal regulators of many biological processes such as neuronal/endocrine cell differentiation, vessel valve formation and the control of planar cell polarity during embryonic development. All three members of the CELSR family (CELSR1-3) have large ecto-domains that form homophilic interactions and encompass more than 2,000 amino acids. Mutations in the ecto-domain or other gene locations of CELSRs are associated with neural tube defects (NTDs) and other diseases in humans. Celsr knockout (KO) animals have many developmental defects. Therefore, specific agonists or antagonists of CELSR members may have therapeutic potential. Although significant progress has been made regarding the functions and biochemical properties of CELSRs, our knowledge of these receptors is still lacking, especially considering that they are broadly distributed but have few characterized functions in a limited number of tissues. The dynamic activation and inactivation of CELSRs and the presence of endogenous ligands beyond homophilic interactions remain elusive, as do the regulatory mechanisms and downstream signaling of these receptors. Given this motivation, future studies with more advanced cell biology or biochemical tools, such as conditional KO mice, may provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying CELSR function, laying the foundation for the design of new CELSR-targeted therapeutic reagents. PMID:25280249

  12. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  14. The gustatory receptor family in the silkworm moth Bombyx mori is characterized by a large expansion of a single lineage of putative bitter receptors.

    PubMed

    Wanner, K W; Robertson, H M

    2008-12-01

    The gustatory receptor (Gr) family of insect chemoreceptors includes receptors for sugars and bitter compounds, as well as cuticular hydrocarbons and odorants such as carbon dioxide. We have annotated a total of 65 Gr genes from the silkworm Bombyx mori genome. The Gr family in the silkworm moth includes putative carbon dioxide receptors and sugar receptors, as well as duplicated orthologues of the orphan DmGr43a receptor. Most prominent in this 65-gene family, however, is a single large expansion of 55 Grs that we propose are predominantly 'bitter' receptors involved in perception of the large variety of secondary plant chemicals that caterpillars and moths encounter. These Grs might therefore mediate food choice and avoidance as well as oviposition site preference.

  15. Down-regulation of E-cadherin in human bronchial epithelial cells leads to epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent Th2 cell-promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Irene H; Kies, P Marcel; Kauffman, Henk F; Postma, Dirkje S; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Vellenga, Edo

    2007-06-15

    Airway epithelial cells are well-known producers of thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), a Th2 cell-attracting chemokine that may play an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation. However, the mechanism responsible for up-regulation of TARC in allergy is still unknown. In the asthmatic airways, loss of expression of the cell-cell contact molecule E-cadherin and reduced epithelial barrier function has been observed, which may be the result of an inadequate repair response. Because E-cadherin also suppressed multiple signaling pathways, we studied whether disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell contact may contribute to increased proallergic activity of epithelial cells, e.g., production of the chemokine TARC. We down-regulated E-cadherin in bronchial epithelial cells by small interference RNA and studied effects on electrical resistance, signaling pathways, and TARC expression (by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, immunodetection, immunofluorescent staining, and real-time PCR). Small interference RNA silencing of E-cadherin resulted in loss of E-cadherin-mediated junctions, enhanced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and the downstream targets MEK/ERK-1/2 and p38 MAPK, finally resulting in up-regulation of TARC as well as thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression. The use of specific inhibitors revealed that the effect on TARC is mediated by EGFR-dependent activation of the MAPK pathways. In contrast to TARC, expression of the Th1/Treg cell-attracting chemokine RANTES was unaffected by E-cadherin down-regulation. In summary, we show that loss of E-cadherin-mediated epithelial cell-cell contact by damaging stimuli, e.g., allergens, may result in reduced suppression of EGFR-dependent signaling pathways and subsequent induction of Th2 cell-attracting molecule TARC. Thus, disruption of intercellular epithelial contacts may specifically promote Th2 cell recruitment in allergic asthma.

  16. Integrin beta and receptor for activated protein kinase C are involved in the cell entry of Bombyx mori cypovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiling; Cao, Guangli; Zhu, Liyuan; Chen, Fei; Zar, Mian Sahib; Wang, Simei; Hu, Xiaolong; Wei, Yuhong; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-02-07

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis using a β1 integrin-dependent internalization was considered as the primary mechanism for the initiation of mammalian reovirus infection. Bombyx mori cypovirus (BmCPV) is a member of Reoviridae family which mainly infects the midgut epithelium of silkworm; the cell entry of BmCPV is poorly explored. In this study, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA), and BmCPV-protein interaction on the polyvinylidene difluoride membrane (BmCPV-PI-PVDF) methods were employed to screen the interacting proteins of BmCPV, and several proteins including integrin beta and receptor for activated protein kinase C (RACK1) were identified as the candidate interacting proteins for establishing the infection of BmCPV. The infectivity of BmCPV was investigated in vivo and in vitro by RNA interference (RNAi) and antibody blocking methods, and the results showed that the infectivity of BmCPV was significantly reduced by either small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of integrin beta and RACK1 or antibody blocking of integrin beta and RACK1. The expression level of integrin beta or RACK1 is not the highest in the silkworm midgut which is a principal target tissue of BmCPV, suggesting that the molecules other than integrin beta or RACK1 might play a key role in determining the tissue tropism of BmCPV infection. The establishment of BmCPV infection depends on other factors, and these factors interacted with integrin beta and RACK1 to form receptor complex for the cell entry of BmCPV.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  18. Endothelial tyrosine kinase receptor B prevents VE-cadherin cleavage and protects against atherosclerotic lesion development in ApoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun; Li, Xian; Huang, Shanying; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) is a high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In addition to its nervous system functions, TrkB is also expressed in the aortic endothelium. However, the effects of endothelial TrkB signaling on atherosclerosis remained unknown. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that TrkB expression is downregulated in the endothelium of atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice compared with the atheroma-free aorta of WT mice. Endothelial TrkB knockdown led to increased lesion size, lipid deposition and inflammatory responses in the atherosclerotic lesions of the ApoE−/− mice compared with the control mice. Mechanistic studies showed that TrkB activation prevented VE-cadherin shedding by enhancing the interaction between vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase and VE-cadherin, maintaining VE-cadherin in a dephosphorylated state. Our data demonstrate that TrkB is an endothelial injury-response molecule in atherogenesis. Endothelial BDNF/TrkB signaling reduces VE-cadherin shedding and protects against atherosclerotic lesion development in ApoE−/− mice. PMID:26431274

  19. AgCad2 cadherin in Anopheles gambiae larvae is a putative receptor of Cry11Ba toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan.

    PubMed

    Hua, Gang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Rui; Abdullah, Amir M; Linser, Paul J; Adang, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to study the mode of action of Cry11Ba, we identified toxin binding proteins in Anopheles gambiae larval midgut and investigated their receptor roles. Previously, an aminopeptidase (AgAPN2) and an alkaline phosphatase (AgALP1) were identified as receptors for Cry11Ba toxin in A. gambiae. However, an A. gambiae cadherin (AgCad1) that bound Cry11Ba with low affinity (K(d) = 766 nM) did not support a receptor role of AgCad1 for Cry11Ba. Here, we studied a second A. gambiae cadherin (AgCad2) that shares 14% identity to AgCad1. Immunohistochemical study showed that the protein is localized on A. gambiae larval midgut apical membranes. Its cDNA was cloned and the protein was analyzed as a transmembrane protein containing 14 cadherin repeats. An Escherichia coli expressed CR14MPED fragment of AgCad2 bound Cry11Ba with high affinity (K(d) = 11.8 nM), blocked Cry11Ba binding to A. gambiae brush border vesicles and reduced Cry11Ba toxicity in bioassays. Its binding to Cry11Ba could be completely competed off by AgCad1, but only partially competed by AgALP1. The results are evidence that AgCad2 may function as a receptor for Cry11Ba in A. gambiae larvae.

  20. Tachykinin-Related Peptides Share a G Protein-Coupled Receptor with Ion Transport Peptide-Like in the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified an orphan Bombyx mori neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor (BNGR)-A24 as an ion transport peptide-like (ITPL) receptor. BNGR-A24 belongs to the same clade as BNGR-A32 and -A33, which were recently identified as natalisin receptors. Since these three BNGRs share high similarities with known receptors for tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs), we examined whether these BNGRs can function as physiological receptors for five endogenous B. mori TRPs (TK-1–5). In a heterologous expression system, BNGR-A24 acted as a receptor for all five TRPs. In contrast, BNGR-A32 responded only to TK-5, and BNGR-A33 did not respond to any of the TRPs. These findings are consistent with recent studies on the ligand preferences for B. mori natalisins. Furthermore, we evaluated whether the binding of ITPL and TRPs to BNGR-A24 is competitive by using a Ca2+ imaging assay. Concomitant addition of a TRP receptor antagonist, spantide I, reduced the responses of BNGR-A24 not only to TK-4 but also to ITPL. The results of a binding assay using fluorescent-labeled BNGR-A24 and ligands demonstrated that the binding of ITPL to BNGR-A24 was inhibited by TK-4 as well as by spantide I, and vice versa. In addition, the ITPL-induced increase in cGMP levels of BNGR-A24-expressing BmN cells was suppressed by the addition of excess TK-4 or spantide I. The intracellular levels of cAMP and cGMP, as second messenger candidates of the TRP signaling, were not altered by the five TRPs, suggesting that these peptides act via different signaling pathways from cAMP and cGMP signaling at least in BmN cells. Taken together, the present findings suggest that ITPL and TRPs are endogenous orthosteric ligands of BNGR-A24 that may activate discrete signaling pathways. This receptor, which shares orthosteric ligands, may constitute an important model for studying ligand-biased signaling. PMID:27248837

  1. ARF6-Regulated Endocytosis of Growth Factor Receptors Links Cadherin-Based Adhesion to Canonical Wnt Signaling in Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling. PMID:23716594

  2. ARF6-regulated endocytosis of growth factor receptors links cadherin-based adhesion to canonical Wnt signaling in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling.

  3. MicroRNA-281 regulates the expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) isoform B in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hundreds of Bombyx mori miRNAs had been identified in recent years, but their function in vivo remains poorly understood. The silkworm EcR gene (BmEcR) has three transcriptional isoforms, A, B1 and B2. Isoform sequences are different in the 3’UTR region of the gene, which is the case only in insects...

  4. Expression of a sugar clade gustatory receptor, BmGr6, in the oral sensory organs, midgut, and central nervous system of larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Nagata, Shinji; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-03-01

    Insects taste nonvolatile chemicals through gustatory receptors (Grs) and make choices for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, genome projects have identified 69 Gr genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; however, the expression sites of these Grs remain to be explored. In this study, we used reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to investigate expression of the B. mori Gr-6 (BmGr6) gene, a member of the putative sugar clade gene family in various tissues. BmGr6 is expressed in the midgut, central nervous system (CNS), and oral sensory organs. Moreover, immunohistochemistry using an anti-BmGr6 antiserum demonstrated that BmGr6 is expressed in cells by oral sensory organs, midgut and nervous system. Furthermore, double-immunohistochemistry indicated that BmGr6 is expressed in midgut enteroendocrine cells, also in CNS neurosecretory cells. In particular, a portion of BmGr6-expressing cells, in both midgut and CNS, secretes FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These results suggest that BmGr6 functions not only as a taste receptor, but also as a chemical sensor such as for the regulation of gut movement, physiological conditions, and feeding behavior of larvae.

  5. Recovery of cellular E-cadherin precedes replenishment of estrogen receptor and estrogen-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells rescued from a death stimulus.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Claudia; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2002-08-01

    Loss of estrogen-responsiveness and impaired E-cadherin expression/function has been linked to increased metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we report that proliferation of breast cancer cells can resume following removal of a toxic stimulus causing severe impairment of cell adhesion and estrogen responsiveness. This type of response was induced by okadaic acid (OA) in MCF-7 cells, and was accompanied by an almost complete block of DNA synthesis, loss of cell-cell contact and cell detachment from culture dishes, loss of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and E-cadherin, whereas only a weak, if any, inhibition of protein synthesis could be observed. These responses were detected in MCF-7 cells after a 1-day treatment with 50 nM OA, and could be reversed if OA-treated cells were recovered in a culture medium devoid of the toxin, so that rescued cells resumed growth 8-12 days after replating. By pulse-chase experiments, we found that protein synthesis was not significantly affected in rescued cells, whose DNA synthesis, instead, was almost completely blocked during the first days of MCF-7 cell rescue from OA treatment. We also analyzed E-cadherin, mitogen activated protein kinase isoforms ERK1 and ERK2, Bcl-2 and BAX proteins during the rescue of MCF-7 cells from OA-induced cell death, and found that their expression followed temporally defined patterns. Cellular levels of E-cadherin returned to control levels within the first days of the rescue, followed by ER, ERK1, and ERK2, and finally by Bcl-2 and BAX proteins. Under our experimental conditions, restoration of cell adhesion did not require a functional ER system, but recovery of a normal ER pool accompanied resumption of estrogen-dependent proliferation of OA-treated MCF-7 cells.

  6. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  7. Gamma-secretase-independent role for cadherin-11 in neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)) mediated glioblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Janina; Jaisimha, Anirudh Vinay; Duggan, Stephen; MacSharry, John; McCarthy, Justin V

    2015-11-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) undergoes γ-secretase-mediated regulated intramembrane proteolysis and is involved in glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. Consistent with previous reports, in this study we show that p75NTR increases U87-MG glioblastoma cell migration, which is reversed by inhibition of γ-secretase activity. However, we show that expression or stabilization of the γ-secretase-generated p75(NTR) intracellular domain (ICD) is not sufficient to induce U87-MG glioblastoma cell migration, and that exogenous expression of p75(NTR) ICD inhibits p75(NTR)-mediated glioblastoma cell (U87-MG and U373-MG) migration. To identify pathways and to determine how p75(NTR) mediates glioblastoma migration we utilized a microarray approach to assess differential gene expression profiles between parental U87-MG and cells stably expressing wild-type p75(NTR), a γ-secretase cleavage-resistant chimeric p75(NTR) mutant (p75FasTM) and the γ-secretase-generated p75(NTR)-ICD, which mimics constitutively cleaved p75(NTR) receptor. In our microarray data analysis we identified a subset of genes that were constitutively up-regulated in wild-type p75(NTR) cells, which were also repressed in p75(NTR) ICD expressing cells. Furthermore, our data revealed among the many differentially expressed genes, cadherin-11 (Cdh-11), matrix metalloproteinase 12 and relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 as constitutively up-regulated in wild-type p75(NTR) cells, independent of γ-secretase activity. Consistent with a role in glioblastoma migration, we found that U87-p75(NTR) cells express higher levels of Cdh-11 protein and that siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cdh-11 resulted in a significant decrease in p75(NTR)-mediated glioblastoma cell migration. Therefore, we hypothesize that p75(NTR) can impact U87-MG glioblastoma cell migration in a γ-secretase-independent manner through modulation of specific genes, including Cdh-11, and that both γ-secretase-independent and

  8. AM966, an Antagonist of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Increases Lung Microvascular Endothelial Permeability through Activation of Rho Signaling Pathway and Phosphorylation of VE-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Junting; Suber, Tomeka

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity is important for reducing severity of lung injury. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) regulates cell motility, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cell growth. Knockdown of LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) has been shown to mitigate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. AM966, an LPA1 antagonist exhibiting an antifibrotic property, has been considered to be a future antifibrotic medicine. Here, we report an unexpected effect of AM966, which increases lung endothelial barrier permeability. An electric cell-substrate sensing (ECIS) system was used to measure permeability in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). AM966 decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value immediately in a dose-dependent manner. VE-cadherin and f-actin double immunostaining reveals that AM966 increases stress fibers and gap formation between endothelial cells. AM966 induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) through activation of RhoA/Rho kinase pathway. Unlike LPA treatment, AM966 had no effect on phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk). Further, in LPA1 silencing cells, we observed that AM966-increased lung endothelial permeability as well as phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were attenuated. This study reveals that AM966 induces lung endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is regulated by LPA1-mediated activation of RhoA/MLC and phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. PMID:28348461

  9. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  10. Estrogen regulates Snail and Slug in the down-regulation of E-cadherin and induces metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells through estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Hyung; Cheung, Lydia W T; Wong, Alice S T; Leung, Peter C K

    2008-09-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multistep process involving dysregulated cell growth and metastasis. Considerable evidence implicates a mitogenic action of estrogen in early ovarian carcinogenesis. In contrast, its influence in the metastatic cascade of ovarian tumor cells remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that 17beta-estradiol (E2) increased the metastatic potential of human epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. E2 treatment led to clear morphological changes characteristic of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and an enhanced cell migratory propensity. These morphological and functional alterations were associated with changes in the abundance of EMT-related genes. Upon E2 stimulation, expression and promoter activity of the epithelial marker E-cadherin were strikingly suppressed, whereas EMT-associated transcription factors, Snail and Slug, were significantly up-regulated. This up-regulation was attributed to the increase in gene transcription activated by E2. Depletion of endogenous Snail or Slug using small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated E2-mediated decrease in E-cadherin. In addition, E2-induced cell migration was also neutralized by the siRNAs, suggesting that both transcription factors are indispensable for the prometastatic actions of E2. More importantly, by using selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists, forced expression, and siRNA approaches, we identified that E2 triggered the metastatic behaviors exclusively through an ERalpha-dependent pathway. We also showed that ERbeta had an opposing action on ERalpha because the presence of ERbeta completely inhibited the EMT and down-regulation of E-cadherin induced by ERalpha. Collectively, this study provides a compelling argument that estrogen can potentiate tumor progression by EMT induction and highlights the crucial role of ERalpha in ovarian tumorigenesis.

  11. Reggies/flotillins interact with Rab11a and SNX4 at the tubulovesicular recycling compartment and function in transferrin receptor and E-cadherin trafficking.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Radon, Yvonne; Katanaev, Vladimir L; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2013-09-01

    The lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and -2 (flotillins) are implicated in membrane protein trafficking but exactly how has been elusive. We find that reggie-1 and -2 associate with the Rab11a, SNX4, and EHD1-decorated tubulovesicular recycling compartment in HeLa cells and that reggie-1 directly interacts with Rab11a and SNX4. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of reggie-1 (and -2) in HeLa cells reduces association of Rab11a with tubular structures and impairs recycling of the transferrin-transferrin receptor (TfR) complex to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of constitutively active Rab11a rescues TfR recycling in reggie-deficient HeLa cells. Similarly, in a Ca(2+) switch assay in reggie-depleted A431 cells, internalized E-cadherin is not efficiently recycled to the plasma membrane upon Ca(2+) repletion. E-cadherin recycling is rescued, however, by overexpression of constitutively active Rab11a or SNX4 in reggie-deficient A431 cells. This suggests that the function of reggie-1 in sorting and recycling occurs in association with Rab11a and SNX4. Of interest, impaired recycling in reggie-deficient cells leads to de novo E-cadherin biosynthesis and cell contact reformation, showing that cells have ways to compensate the loss of reggies. Together our results identify reggie-1 as a regulator of the Rab11a/SNX4-controlled sorting and recycling pathway, which is, like reggies, evolutionarily conserved.

  12. Flamingo, a cadherin-type receptor involved in the Drosophila planar polarity pathway, can block signaling via the canonical wnt pathway in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard; El-Kadi, Ali-Morsi; Theokli, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    The Flamingo gene encodes a seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin super family and is one of a growing number of components identified as being necessary for the establishment of planar polarity in the Drosophila wing. Although vertebrate homologues of Flamingo have been identified in both man and mice, no function has as yet been ascribed to them. Here, we report the cloning of the Xenopus homologue of Flamingo (XFmi). XFmi is expressed in the dorsal ectoderm during gastrulation and in the forebrain and midbrain subsequently. We show that ectopic expression of the murine Flamingo gene can prevent the wnt mediated posteriorisation of the neural plate by interfering with the canonical wnt signalling pathway.

  13. Interaction of fibrin(ogen) with the endothelial cell receptor VE-cadherin: mapping of the receptor-binding site in the NH2-terminal portions of the fibrin beta chains.

    PubMed

    Gorlatov, Sergei; Medved, Leonid

    2002-03-26

    Interaction of fibrin with endothelial cells stimulates capillary tube formation thus promoting angiogenesis. This interaction occurs via endothelial cell receptor VE-cadherin and fibrin beta chain 15-42 regions [Bach, T. L., et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 30719-30728]. To clarify the mechanism of this interaction, we expressed in Escherichia coli a number of recombinant fibrin(ogen) fragments containing the beta15-42 region or the VE-cad(1-2) and VE-cad(1-4) fragments encompassing two and four extracellular NH2-terminal domains of VE-cadherin, respectively, and tested interaction between them by surface plasmon resonance and ELISA. Neither the recombinant Bbeta1-57 or Bbeta1-64 fragments, nor beta15-57 or beta15-64 prepared from the latter fragments by thrombin treatment to remove fibrinopeptides B, bound the recombinant VE-cadherin fragments. At the same time, a dimeric recombinant thrombin-treated (beta15-66)2 fragment, which had been disulfide-linked via Cys65 to mimic the dimeric arrangement of the beta chains in fibrin, bound VE-cad(1-4) well, but not VE-cad(1-2); no binding was observed with the untreated (Bbeta1-66)2 dimer. We next mutated several residues in the dimer, His16, Arg17, Pro18, and Asp20, and tested the interaction of the thrombin-treated mutants with VE-cad(1-4) by ligand blotting and surface plasmon resonance. No binding was observed with the H16A and R17Q single mutants and the H16P, P18V double mutant while the P18A and D20N single mutants bound VE-cad(1-4) with the same affinity as the thrombin-treated wild-type dimer. These results indicate that the VE-cadherin binding site in fibrin includes NH2-terminal regions of both fibrin beta-chains, that His16 and Arg17 are critical for the binding, and that the third and/or fourth extracellular domains of VE-cadherin are required for the binding to occur.

  14. Resistance of Trichoplusia ni to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac is independent of alteration of the cadherin-like receptor for Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Tiewsiri, Kasorn; Kain, Wendy; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of binding sites for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in insect midgut is the major mechanism of high-level resistance to Bt toxins in insects. The midgut cadherin is known to be a major binding protein for Bt Cry1A toxins and linkage of Bt-resistance to cadherin gene mutations has been identified in lepidopterans. The resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac evolved in greenhouse populations of Trichoplusia ni has been identified to be associated with the down-regulation of an aminopeptidase N (APN1) gene by a trans-regulatory mechanism and the resistance gene has been mapped to the locus of an ABC transporter (ABCC2) gene. However, whether cadherin is also involved with Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni requires to be understood. Here we report that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is independent of alteration of the cadherin. The T. ni cadherin cDNA was cloned and the cadherin sequence showed characteristic features known to cadherins from Lepidoptera. Various T. ni cadherin gene alleles were identified and genetic linkage analysis of the cadherin alleles with Cry1Ac-resistance showed no association of the cadherin gene with the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni. Analysis of cadherin transcripts showed no quantitative difference between the susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant T. ni larvae. Quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut BBMV proteins by iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS determined that there was no quantitative difference in cadherin content between the susceptible and the resistant larvae and the cadherin only accounted for 0.0014% (mol%) of the midgut BBMV proteins, which is 1/300 of APN1 in molar ratio. The cadherin from both the susceptible and resistant larvae showed as a 200-kDa Cry1Ac-binding protein by toxin overlay binding analysis, and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis of the 200-kDa cadherin determined that there is no quantitative difference between the susceptible and resistant larvae. Results from this study indicate that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is independent of cadherin

  15. Cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in invasive human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pohlodek, Kamil; Tan, Yen Y.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Loss of expression of cadherin-11 protein is correlated with a loss of epithelial phenotype and a gain in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. It has been hypothesized that cadherin-11 may be a molecular marker for a more aggressive subtype of breast cancer. The present study examined the expression of the mesenchymal gene/protein cadherin-11 in malignant, benign and healthy breast cancer samples. A paraffin-embedded tissue microarray of both malignant and benign/healthy breast tumor was used. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, grading, tumor size, hormone receptors and HER2 receptors status were obtained from patient medical records. Expression of cadherin-11 was analyzed using the monoclonal mouse anti cadherin-11 IgG2B clone. Total RNA was extracted from each breast cancer sample and subjected to semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis for cadherin-11. Cadherin-11 was detected in 80/82 malignant breast cancer samples and in 33/70 non-malignant tissue samples. Cadherin-11 expression was observed to be predominantly localized to the membrane of tumor cells. When compared to healthy breast tissue biopsies, both cadherin-11 mRNA and protein were demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in breast carcinoma (P=0.040 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within malignant tumors, however, protein expression was not identified to be associated with other clinicopathological parameters. Our results indicate that cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in malignant human breast cancer. PMID:28101202

  16. DDR1 promotes E-cadherin stability via inhibition of integrin-β1-Src activation-mediated E-cadherin endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Ru; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Wu, Yu-Ting; Lo, Fang-Yu; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2016-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase of collagen, is primarily expressed in epithelial cells. Activation of DDR1 stabilises E-cadherin located on the cell membrane; however, the detailed mechanism of DDR1-stabilised E-cadherin remains unclear. We performed DDR1 knockdown (Sh-DDR1) on Mardin-Darby canine kidney cells to investigate the mechanism of DDR1-stabilised E-cadherin. Sh-DDR1 decreased junctional localisation, increased endocytosis of E-cadherin, and increased physical interactions between E-cadherin and clathrin. Treatment of the dynamin inhibitor Dyngo 4a suppressed Sh-DDR1-induced E-cadherin endocytosis. In addition, the phosphorylation level of Src tyrosine 418 was increased in Sh-DDR1 cell junctions, and inhibition of Src activity decreased Sh-DDR1-induced E-cadherin endocytosis. To characterise the molecular mechanisms, blocking integrin β1 decreased Src activity and E-cadherin junctional localisation in Sh-DDR1 cells. Photoconversion results showed that inhibition of Src activity rescued E-cadherin membrane stability and that inhibition of integrin β1-Src signalling decreased stress fibres and rescued E-cadherin membrane stability in Sh-DDR1 cells. Taken together, DDR1 stabilised membrane localisation of E-cadherin by inhibiting the integrin β1-Src-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway. PMID:27824116

  17. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  18. The effect of the juvenile hormone analog, fenoxycarb, on ecdysone receptor B1 expression in the midgut of Bombyx mori during larval-pupal metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Goncu, Ebru; Parlak, Osman

    2012-04-24

    The Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) midgut undergoes remodeling during the larval-pupal metamorphosis. All metamorphic events in insects are controlled by mainly two hormones: 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). Fenoxycarb, O-ethyl N-(2-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)-ethyl) carbamate, has been shown to be one of the most potent juvenile hormone analogs against a variety of insect species. In this study, the effect of fenoxycarb on EcR-B1 protein expression in the midgut of Bombyx mori during the remodeling processwas investigated. Fenoxycarb was topically treated to the beginning of the fifth instar Bombyx larvae. Its application prolonged the last instar and prevented metamorphic events. Analyses were performed from day 6 of the fifth instar to 24 hr after pupation in controls and to day 14 of the fifth instar in the fenoxycarb treated group. According to our results, the presence of EcR-B1 in the midguts of the fenoxycarb treated group during the feeding period suggested that EcR-B1 was involved in the functioning of larval cells and during this period fenoxycarb did not affect EcR-B1 status. Immediately after termination of the feeding stage, the amount of EcR-B1 protein increased, which indicated that it may strengthen the ecdysone signal for commitment of remodeling process. In the fenoxycarb treated group, its upregulation was delayed, which may be related to the inhibition of ecdysone secretion from the prothoracic gland.

  19. A single type of cadherin is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity in Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Herrero, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    Cadherins have been described as one the main functional receptors for the toxins of the entomopathogenic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). With the availability of the whole genome of Plutella xylostella, different types of cadherins have been annotated. In this study we focused on determining those members of the cadherin-related proteins that potentially play a role in the mode of action of Bt toxins. For this, we mined the genome of P. xylostella to identify these putative cadherins. The genome screening revealed 52 genes that were annotated as cadherin or cadherin-like genes. Further analysis revealed that six of these putative cadherins had three motifs common to all Bt-related cadherins: a signal peptide, cadherin repeats and a transmembrane domain. From the six selected cadherins, only P. xylostella cadherin 1 (PxCad1) was expressed in the larval midgut and only the silencing of this gene by RNA interference (double-stranded RNA feeding) reduce toxicity and binding to the midgut of the Cry1Ac type toxin from Bt. These results indicate that from the whole set of cadherin-related genes identified in P. xylostella, only PxCad1 is associated with the Cry1Ac mode of action.

  20. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins.

  1. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈ 16.7 nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400 nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3 h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti. PMID:25064814

  2. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Bum; Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2015-06-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈16.7nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba, but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti.

  3. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  4. T-cadherin Is Essential for Adiponectin-mediated Revascularization*

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Duffen, Jennifer L.; Nakamura, Kazuto; Silver, Marcy; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tigges, Ulrich; Yoshida, Sumiko; Denzel, Martin S.; Ranscht, Barbara; Walsh, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue secretes protein factors that have systemic actions on cardiovascular tissues. Previous studies have shown that ablation of the adipocyte-secreted protein adiponectin leads to endothelial dysfunction, whereas its overexpression promotes wound healing. However, the receptor(s) mediating the protective effects of adiponectin on the vasculature is not known. Here we examined the role of membrane protein T-cadherin, which localizes adiponectin to the vascular endothelium, in the revascularization response to chronic ischemia. T-cadherin-deficient mice were analyzed in a model of hind limb ischemia where blood flow is surgically disrupted in one limb and recovery is monitored over 28 days by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. In this model, T-cadherin-deficient mice phenocopy adiponectin-deficient mice such that both strains display an impaired blood flow recovery compared with wild-type controls. Delivery of exogenous adiponectin rescued the impaired revascularization phenotype in adiponectin-deficient mice but not in T-cadherin-deficient mice. In cultured endothelial cells, T-cadherin deficiency by siRNA knockdown prevented the ability of adiponectin to promote cellular migration and proliferation. These data highlight a previously unrecognized role for T-cadherin in limb revascularization and show that it is essential for mediating the vascular actions of adiponectin. PMID:23824191

  5. A Spodoptera exigua cadherin serves as a putative receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin and shows differential enhancement of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang-Liang; Chen, Rui-Rui; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yan; Cui, Jin-Jie; Han, Zhao-Jun; Mu, Li-Li; Li, Guo-Qing

    2013-09-01

    Crystal toxin Cry1Ca from Bacillus thuringiensis has an insecticidal spectrum encompassing lepidopteran insects that are tolerant to current commercially used B. thuringiensis crops (Bt crops) expressing Cry1A toxins and may be useful as a potential bioinsecticide. The mode of action of Cry1A is fairly well understood. However, whether Cry1Ca interacts with the same receptor proteins as Cry1A remains unproven. In the present paper, we first cloned a cadherin-like gene, SeCad1b, from Spodoptera exigua (relatively susceptible to Cry1Ca). SeCad1b was highly expressed in the larval gut but scarcely detected in fat body, Malpighian tubules, and remaining carcass. Second, we bacterially expressed truncated cadherin rSeCad1bp and its interspecific homologue rHaBtRp from Helicoverpa armigera (more sensitive to Cry1Ac) containing the putative toxin-binding regions. Competitive binding assays showed that both Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac could bind to rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp, and they did not compete with each other. Third, Cry1Ca ingestion killed larvae and decreased the weight of surviving larvae. Dietary introduction of SeCad1b double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) reduced approximately 80% of the target mRNA and partially alleviated the negative effect of Cry1Ca on larval survival and growth. Lastly, rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp differentially enhanced the negative effects of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac on the larval mortalities and growth of S. exigua and H. armigera. Thus, we provide the first lines of evidence to suggest that SeCad1b from S. exigua is a functional receptor of Cry1Ca.

  6. Structure of artificial and natural VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Dubois, Mathilde; Le Bihan, Olivier; Trépout, Sylvain; Almagro, Sébastien; Hewat, Elizabeth; Durmort, Claire; Heyraud, Stéphanie; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Lambert, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    In vascular endothelium, adherens junctions between endothelial cells are composed of VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial cadherin), an adhesive receptor that is crucial for the proper assembly of vascular structures and the maintenance of vascular integrity. As a classical cadherin, VE-cadherin links endothelial cells together by homophilic interactions mediated by its extracellular part and associates intracellularly with the actin cytoskeleton via catenins. Although, from structural crystallographic data, a dimeric structure arranged in a trans orientation has emerged as a potential mechanism of cell-cell adhesion, the cadherin organization within adherens junctions remains controversial. Concerning VE-cadherin, its extracellular part possesses the capacity to self-associate in solution as hexamers consisting of three antiparallel cadherin dimers. VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions were reconstituted in vitro by assembly of a VE-cadherin EC (extracellular repeat) 1-EC4 hexamer at the surfaces of liposomes. The artificial adherens junctions revealed by cryoelectron microscopy appear as a two-dimensional self-assembly of hexameric structures. This cadherin organization is reminiscent of that found in native desmosomal junctions. Further structural studies performed on native VE-cadherin junctions would provide a better understanding of the cadherin organization within adherens junctions. Homophilic interactions between cadherins are strengthened intracellularly by connection to the actin cytoskeleton. Recently, we have discovered that annexin 2, an actin-binding protein connects the VE-cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. This novel link is labile and promotes the endothelial cell switch from a quiescent to an angiogenic state.

  7. Restoration of E-cadherin sensitizes human melanoma cells for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Thaçi, Diamant; Müller, Jutta; Guschel, Maike; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2006-10-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is considered to be important in the development and maintenance of organ tissue. The spatial association between melanocytes and keratinocytes within human epidermis is achieved by homophilic interaction of E-cadherin molecules located on adjacent cells. In contrast, downregulation of E-cadherin expression in melanoma cells is considered as a key event in metastasis. Besides the adhesive properties, E-cadherin serves as a signal receptor linking to the cadherin-catenin signaling complex. As cadherins act as negative regulators of beta-catenin, a contribution to tumor formation seems likely. In the present study, it was tested whether ectopic expression of E-cadherin triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cell lines (G-361, JPC-298, SK-Mel-13). It was found that restoration of E-cadherin caused sensitization against drug-induced apoptosis. Particularly, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c was increased in response to staurosporine. Moreover, activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8 was elevated. Similarly, DNA fragmentation, serving as a marker for advanced apoptosis, was amplified in cells transduced with E-cadherin. Interestingly, transduction with an E-cadherin construct lacking the extracellular domain showed no modified apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings suggest therapeutic strategies that enable expression of E-cadherin in order to sensitize human melanoma cells towards apoptosis.

  8. Estradiol-potentiated cadherin-11 in synovial membrane involves in temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Li, Chen-Shuang; Bi, Rui-Yun; Meng, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Estrogen is involved in inflammation/pain of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Cadherin-11 plays an essential role in synovial inflammation. This study examined whether estrogen could potentiate cadherin-11 in synoviocytes and contribute to TMJ inflammatory pain. Female rats were ovariectomized, treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 days, and injected intra-articularly with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce TMJ inflammation. The expression of cadherin-11 in synovial membrane was evaluated. TMJ pain was blocked with intra-articular injection of anti-cadherin-11 antibody and evaluated by head withdrawal threshold. Primary TMJ synoviocytes were treated with estradiol and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or blocked with anti-cadherin-11 antibody to assess the expression of cadherin-11, interleukin (IL)-6, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We observed that estradiol potentiated the inflammation-induced expression of cadherin-11 in the synoviocytes of synovial membrane from inflamed TMJ. Estradiol induced cadherin-11 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in primary synoviocytes and further potentiated the induction of cadherin-11 by TNF-α in synoviocytes. Furthermore, an estrogen receptor antagonist or a NF-κB inhibitor partially blocked the effects of estradiol on cadherin-11 induction in the synovial membrane. Blocking cadherin-11 partially reversed the TMJ inflammatory pain and estradiol-potentiated proliferation of synovial lining cells accompanied with iNOS expression. In addition, blocking cadherin-11 reversed TNF-α-induced and estradiol-potentiated transcription of IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS in primary synoviocytes. These results suggest that estrogen aggravated TMJ inflammatory pain partially through cadherin-11-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in the synoviocytes.

  9. Amphiregulin induces human ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    So, Wai-Kin; Fan, Qianlan; Lau, Man-Tat; Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C K

    2014-11-03

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. In this study, we report that the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG) stimulates cell invasion and down-regulates E-cadherin expression in two human ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and OVCAR5. In addition, AREG increases the expression of transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin including SNAIL, SLUG and ZEB1. siRNA targeting SNAIL or SLUG abolishes AREG-induced cell invasion. Moreover, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways are involved in AREG-induced E-cadherin down-regulation and cell invasion. Finally, we show that three EGFR ligands, AREG, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), exhibit comparable effects in down-regulating E-cadherin and promoting cell invasion. This study demonstrates that AREG induces ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

  10. A combination of biomolecules enhances expression of E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene leading to increased cell proliferation in primary human meniscal cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Mamatha M; Elakkiya, V; Gopinathan, J; Sabarinath, C; Shanthakumari, S; Sahanand, K Santosh; Dinakar Rai, B K; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Selvakumar, R

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates the impact of biomolecules (biotin, glucose, chondroitin sulphate, proline) as supplement, (individual and in combination) on primary human meniscus cell proliferation. Primary human meniscus cells isolated from patients undergoing meniscectomy were maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The isolated cells were treated with above mentioned biomolecules as individual (0-100 µg/ml) and in combinations, as a supplement to DMEM. Based on the individual biomolecule study, a unique combination of biomolecules (UCM) was finalized using one way ANOVA analysis. With the addition of UCM as supplement to DMEM, meniscal cells reached 100 % confluency within 4 days in 60 mm culture plate; whereas the cells in medium devoid of UCM, required 36 days for reaching confluency. The impact of UCM on cell viability, doubling time, histology, gene expression, biomarkers expression, extra cellular matrix synthesis, meniscus cell proliferation with respect to passages and donor's age were investigated. The gene expression studies for E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR∆) using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis for Ki67, CD34 and Vimentin confirmed that UCM has significant impact on cell proliferation. The extracellular collagen and glycosaminoglycan secretion in cells supplemented with UCM were found to increase by 31 and 37 fold respectively, when compared to control on the 4th day. The cell doubling time was reduced significantly when supplemented with UCM. The addition of UCM showed positive influence on different passages and age groups. Hence, this optimized UCM can be used as an effective supplement for meniscal tissue engineering.

  11. Sequential down-regulation of E-cadherin with squamous cell carcinoma progression: loss of E-cadherin via a prostaglandin E2-EP2 dependent posttranslational mechanism.

    PubMed

    Brouxhon, Sabine; Kyrkanides, Stephanos; O'Banion, M Kerry; Johnson, Renee; Pearce, David A; Centola, Gina M; Miller, Jen-nie H; McGrath, Kieran H; Erdle, Brandon; Scott, Glynis; Schneider, Sandra; VanBuskirk, JoAnne; Pentland, Alice P

    2007-08-15

    The incidence of skin cancer is on the rise, with over 1 million new cases yearly. Although it is known that squamous cell cancers (SCC) are caused by UV light, the mechanism(s) involved remains poorly understood. In vitro studies with epithelial cells or reports examining malignant skin lesions suggest that loss of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts may contribute to SCCs. Other studies show a pivotal role for cyclooxygenase-dependent prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in this process. Using chronically UV-irradiated SKH-1 mice, we show a sequential loss of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts as lesions progress from dysplasia to SCCs. This E-cadherin down-regulation was also evident after acute UV exposure in vivo. In both chronic and acute UV injury, E-cadherin levels declined at a time when epidermal PGE2 synthesis was enhanced. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by indomethacin in vitro, targeted deletion of EP2 in primary mouse keratinocyte (PMK) cultures or deletion of the EP2 receptor in vivo abrogated this UV-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. In contrast, addition of PGE2 or the EP2 receptor agonist butaprost to PMK produced a dose- and time-dependent decrease in E-cadherin. We also show that UV irradiation, via the PGE2-EP2 signaling pathway, may initiate tumorigenesis in keratinocytes by down-regulating E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts through its mobilization away from the cell membrane, internalization into the cytoplasm, and shuttling through the lysosome and proteasome degradation pathways. Further understanding of how UV-PGE2-EP2 down-regulates E-cadherin may lead to novel chemopreventative strategies for the treatment of skin and other epithelial cancers.

  12. Molecular interactions between desmosomal cadherins.

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Shabih-e-Hassnain; Trinnaman, Brian; Martin, Stephen; Major, Sarah; Hutchinson, Jon; Magee, Anthony I

    2002-01-01

    Desmocollins (Dscs) and desmogleins (Dsgs) are cell-adhesion molecules involved in the formation of desmosome cell-cell junctions and share structural similarities to classical cadherins such as E-cadherin. In order to identify and provide quantitative information on the types of protein-protein interactions displayed by the type 2 isoforms and investigate the role of Ca(2+) in this process, we have developed an Escherichia coli expression system to generate recombinant proteins containing the first two extracellular domains, namely Dsg2(1-2) and Dsc2(1-2). Analytical ultracentrifugation, chemical cross-linking, CD, fluorescence and BIAcore have been used to provide the first direct evidence of Ca(2+) binding to desmosomal cadherins. These studies suggest that Dsc2(1-2) not only exhibits homophilic interactions in solution, but can also form heterophilic interactions with Dsg2(1-2). The latter, on the other hand, shows much weaker homophilic association. Our results further demonstrate that heterophilic interactions are Ca(2+)-dependent, whereas the Ca(2+)-dependence of homophilic association is less clear. Our data indicate that the functional properties of Dsc2(1-2) are more similar to those of classical cadherins, consistent with the observation that Dsc shares a higher level of sequence homology with classical cadherins than does Dsg. In addition to corroborating the conclusions of previously reported transfection studies which suggest the formation of lateral heterodimers and homodimers, our results also provide direct quantitative information on the strength of these interactions which are essential for understanding the adhesion mechanism. PMID:11853539

  13. Structure and Binding Mechanism of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin: A Divergent Classical Cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brasch; O Harrison; G Ahlsen; S Carnally; R Henderson; B Honig; L Shapiro

    2011-12-31

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a divergent member of the type II classical cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins, mediates homophilic adhesion in the vascular endothelium. Previous investigations with a bacterially produced protein suggested that VE-cadherin forms cell surface trimers that bind between apposed cells to form hexamers. Here we report studies of mammalian-produced VE-cadherin ectodomains suggesting that, like other classical cadherins, VE-cadherin forms adhesive trans dimers between monomers located on opposing cell surfaces. Trimerization of the bacterially produced protein appears to be an artifact that arises from a lack of glycosylation. We also present the 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the VE-cadherin EC1-2 adhesive region, which reveals homodimerization via the strand-swap mechanism common to classical cadherins. In common with type II cadherins, strand-swap binding involves two tryptophan anchor residues, but the adhesive interface resembles type I cadherins in that VE-cadherin does not form a large nonswapped hydrophobic surface. Thus, VE-cadherin is an outlier among classical cadherins, with characteristics of both type I and type II subfamilies.

  14. Distinct roles of cadherin-6 and E-cadherin in tubulogenesis and lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liwei; Liu, Fengming; Hansen, Steen H; Ter Beest, Martin B A; Zegers, Mirjam M P

    2011-06-15

    Classic cadherins are important regulators of tissue morphogenesis. The predominant cadherin in epithelial cells, E-cadherin, has been extensively studied because of its critical role in normal epithelial development and carcinogenesis. Epithelial cells may also coexpress other cadherins, but their roles are less clear. The Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line has been a popular mammalian model to investigate the role of E-cadherin in epithelial polarization and tubulogenesis. However, MDCK cells also express relatively high levels of cadherin-6, and it is unclear whether the functions of this cadherin are redundant to those of E-cadherin. We investigate the specific roles of both cadherins using a knockdown approach. Although we find that both cadherins are able to form adherens junctions at the basolateral surface, we show that they have specific and mutually exclusive roles in epithelial morphogenesis. Specifically, we find that cadherin-6 functions as an inhibitor of tubulogenesis, whereas E-cadherin is required for lumen formation. Ablation of cadherin-6 leads to the spontaneous formation of tubules, which depends on increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. In contrast, loss of E-cadherin inhibits lumen formation by a mechanism independent of PI3K.

  15. The cadherin-binding specificities of B-cadherin and LCAM.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Erdosh, C; Yoshida, C K; Paradies, N; Reichardt, L F

    1995-06-01

    The cadherin family of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules plays an important part in the organization of cell adhesion and tissue segregation during development. The expression pattern and the binding specificity of each cadherin are of principal importance for its role in morphogenesis. B-Cadherin and LCAM, two chicken cadherins, have similar, but not identical, spatial and temporal patterns of expression. To examine the possibility that they might bind to one another in a heterophilic manner, we generated, by cDNA transfection, L-cell lines that express LCAM or B-cadherin. We then examined the abilities of these cells to coaggregate with each other and with other cadherin-expressing cells in short-term aggregation assays. The B-cadherin- and the LCAM-expressing cell lines segregate from P-, N-, or R-cadherin-expressing cells. B-cadherin- and LCAM-expressing cell lines, however, appear to be completely miscible, forming large mixed aggregates. Chick B-cadherin and murine E-cadherin also form mixed aggregates, indistinguishable from homophilic aggregates. Murine E-cadherin and chick LCAM coaggregate less completely, suggesting that the heterophilic interactions of these two cell lines are weak relative to homophilic interactions. These data suggest that heterophilic interactions between B-cadherin and LCAM are important during avian morphogenesis and help identify the amino acids in the binding domain that determine cadherin specificity.

  16. The cadherin-binding specificities of B-cadherin and LCAM

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cadherin family of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules plays an important part in the organization of cell adhesion and tissue segregation during development. The expression pattern and the binding specificity of each cadherin are of principal importance for its role in morphogenesis. B-Cadherin and LCAM, two chicken cadherins, have similar, but not identical, spatial and temporal patterns of expression. To examine the possibility that they might bind to one another in a heterophilic manner, we generated, by cDNA transfection, L- cell lines that express LCAM or B-cadherin. We then examined the abilities of these cells to coaggregate with each other and with other cadherin-expressing cells in short-term aggregation assays. The B- cadherin- and the LCAM-expressing cell lines segregate from P-, N-, or R-cadherin-expressing cells. B-cadherin- and LCAM-expressing cell lines, however, appear to be completely miscible, forming large mixed aggregates. Chick B-cadherin and murine E-cadherin also form mixed aggregates, indistinguishable from homophilic aggregates. Murine E- cadherin and chick LCAM coaggregate less completely, suggesting that the heterophilic interactions of these two cell lines are weak relative to homophilic interactions. These data suggest that heterophilic interactions between B-cadherin and LCAM are important during avian morphogenesis and help identify the amino acids in the binding domain that determine cadherin specificity. PMID:7775581

  17. Co-culturing human prostate carcinoma cells with hepatocytes leads to increased expression of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yates, C C; Shepard, C R; Stolz, D B; Wells, A

    2007-01-01

    Metastasis is a multi-step process wherein tumour cells detach from the primary mass, migrate through barrier matrices, gain access to conduits to disseminate, and subsequently survive and proliferate in an ectopic site. During the initial invasion stage, prostate carcinoma cells undergo epithelial–mesenchymal-like transition with gain of autocrine signalling and loss of E-cadherin, hallmarks that appear to enable invasion and dissemination. However, some metastases express E-cadherin, and we found close connections between prostate carcinoma cells and hepatocytes in a liver microtissue bioreactor. We hypothesise that phenotypic plasticity occurs late in prostate cancer progression at the site of ectopic seeding. Immunofluorescence staining for E-cadherin in co-cultures of hepatocytes and DU-145 prostate cancer cells revealed E-cadherin upregulation at peripheral sites of contact by day 2 of co-culture; E-cadherin expression also increased in PC-3 cells in co-culture. These carcinoma cells bound to hepatocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner. Although the signals by which the hepatocytes elicited E-cadherin expression remain undetermined, it appeared related to downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. Inhibition of autocrine EGFR signalling increased E-cadherin expression and cell–cell heterotypic adhesion; further, expression of a downregulation-resistant EGFR variant prevented E-cadherin upregulation. These findings were supported by finding E-cadherin and catenins but not activated EGFR in human prostate metastases to the liver. We conclude that the term epithelial–mesenchymal transition only summarises the transient downregulation of E-cadherin for invasion with re-expression of E-cadherin being a physiological consequence of metastatic seeding. PMID:17406365

  18. [Cadherins E and P expression in the molecular types of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ángel; Reigosa, Aldo; Caleiras, Eduardo; Saldivia, Felipe; Hardisson, David; Sanz, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a process by which tumor cells lose their epithelial markers and migrate to distant organs. This process involves several cell adhesion proteins such as E-cadherin and P-cadherin. The present study was performed in 354 pacients diagnosed with breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the Oncology Institute "Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno", Valencia, Venezuela. The expression of 22 molecules was analyzed by tissue micro-arrays and the results were compared with the molecular clases established by immunohistochemistry, according to the'expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and with the overall survival (OS). Based on the results of ER, PR and HER2 molecular classes according to the following per- centages were established: Luminal A 42.4%, Luminal B 20.3%, 9% HER2 and 28.2% triple negative (TN). E-cadherin expression was observed conserved in most of the tumors of this series, 92.5% of cases. TN phenotype tumors showed a high percentage (41.7%) with absent or reduced expression. The P-cadherin was expressed in 40.5% of cases, although expressed in all classes; the proportion was significantly higher in cases TN. No significant prognostic value was observed when analyzing the overall five-year survival of patients with tumors with absent or reduced expression of E-cadherin. The P-cadherin expression had a negative relationship with the OS.

  19. Establishment of cell-cell junctions depends on the oligomeric states of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Ayari, Hélène; Riveline, Daniel; Concord, Evelyne; Hermant, Bastien; Vernet, Thierry; Gulino-Debrac, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Specifically expressed at intercellular adherens junctions of endothelial cells, VE-cadherin is a receptor that exhibits particular self-association properties. Indeed, in vitro studies demonstrated that the extracellular part of VE-cadherin elaborates Ca++-dependent hexameric structures. We hypothesized that this assembly could be at the basis of a new cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion mechanism. To verify this assumption, we first demonstrated that VE-cadherin can elaborate hexamers at the cell surface of confluent endothelial cells. Second, mutations were introduced within the extracellular part of VE-cadherin to destabilize the hexamer. Following an in vitro screening, three mutants were selected, among which, one is able to elaborate only dimers. The selected mutations were expressed as C-terminal Green Fluorescent Protein fusions in CHO cells. Despite their capacity to elaborate nascent cell-cell contacts, the mutants seem to be rapidly degraded and or internalized. Altogether, our results suggest that the formation of VE-cadherin hexamers protects this receptor and might allow the elaboration of mature endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:18343874

  20. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA.

  1. Cadherin-6 Function in Zebrafish Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Londraville, Richard; Marrs, James A.; Wilson, Amy L.; Mbimba, Thomas; Murakami, Tohru; Kubota, Fumitaka; Zheng, Weiping; Fatkins, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play crucial roles in vertebrate development including the development of the visual system. Most studies have focused on examining functions of classical type I cadherins (e.g. cadherin-2) in visual system development. There is little information on the function of classical type II cadherins (e.g. cadherin-6) in the development of the vertebrate visual system. To gain insight into cadherin-6 role in the formation of the retina, we analyzed differentiation of retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors in zebrafish embryos injected with cadherin-6 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides. Differentiation of the retinal neurons in cadherin-6 knockdown embryos (cdh6 morphants) was analyzed using multiple markers. We found that expression of transcription factors important for retinal development was greatly reduced, and expression of Notch-Delta genes and proneural gene ath5 was altered in the cdh6 morphant retina. The retinal lamination was present in the morphants, although the morphant eyes were significantly smaller than control embryos due mainly to decreased cell proliferation. Differentiation of the retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors was severely disrupted in the cdh6 morphants due to a significant delay in neuronal differentiation. Our results suggest that cadherin-6 plays an important role in the normal formation of the zebrafish retina. PMID:18506771

  2. Desmosomal cadherins and signaling: lessons from autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2014-02-01

    Autoantibodies from patients suffering from the autoimmune blistering skin disease pemphigus can be applied as tools to study desmosomal adhesion. These autoantibodies targeting the desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and Dsg3 cause disruption of desmosomes and loss of intercellular cohesion. Although pemphigus autoantibodies were initially proposed to sterically hinder desmosomes, many groups have shown that they activate signaling pathways which cause disruption of desmosomes and loss of intercellular cohesion by uncoupling the desmosomal plaque from the intermediate filament cytoskeleton and/or by interfering with desmosome turnover. These studies demonstrate that desmogleins serve as receptor molecules to transmit outside-in signaling and demonstrate that desmosomal cadherins have functions in addition to their adhesive properties. Two central molecules regulating cytoskeletal anchorage and desmosome turnover are p38MAPK and PKC. As cytoskeletal uncoupling in turn enhances Dsg3 depletion from desmosomes, both mechanisms reinforce one another in a vicious cycle that compromise the integrity and number of desmosomes.

  3. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  4. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S.; Patil, Shekhar B.; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A.; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    N-cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function. PMID:24753442

  5. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S; Patil, Shekhar B; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L; Benson, Deanna L; Huntley, George W

    2014-08-01

    N-Cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function.

  6. α-Catenin and Vinculin Cooperate to Promote High E-cadherin-based Adhesion Strength*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, William A.; Boscher, Cécile; Chu, Yeh-Shiu; Cuvelier, Damien; Martinez-Rico, Clara; Seddiki, Rima; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mege, René-Marc; Dufour, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining cell cohesiveness within tissues requires that intercellular adhesions develop sufficient strength to support traction forces applied by myosin motors and by neighboring cells. Cadherins are transmembrane receptors that mediate intercellular adhesion. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain recruits several partners, including catenins and vinculin, at sites of cell-cell adhesion. Our study used force measurements to address the role of αE-catenin and vinculin in the regulation of the strength of E-cadherin-based adhesion. αE-catenin-deficient cells display only weak aggregation and fail to strengthen intercellular adhesion over time, a process rescued by the expression of αE-catenin or chimeric E-cadherin·αE-catenins, including a chimera lacking the αE-catenin dimerization domain. Interestingly, an αE-catenin mutant lacking the modulation and actin-binding domains restores cadherin-dependent cell-cell contacts but cannot strengthen intercellular adhesion. The expression of αE-catenin mutated in its vinculin-binding site is defective in its ability to rescue cadherin-based adhesion strength in cells lacking αE-catenin. Vinculin depletion or the overexpression of the αE-catenin modulation domain strongly decreases E-cadherin-mediated adhesion strength. This supports the notion that both molecules are required for intercellular contact maturation. Furthermore, stretching of cell doublets increases vinculin recruitment and α18 anti-αE-catenin conformational epitope immunostaining at cell-cell contacts. Taken together, our results indicate that αE-catenin and vinculin cooperatively support intercellular adhesion strengthening, probably via a mechanoresponsive link between the E-cadherin·β-catenin complexes and the underlying actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23266828

  7. Anti-inflammatory action of ethanolic extract of Ramulus mori on the BLT2-linked cascade

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry tree twigs (Ramulus mori) contain large amounts of oxyresveratrols and have traditionally been used as herbal medicines because of their anti-inflammatory properties. However, the signaling mechanism by which R. mori exerts its anti-inflammatory action remains to be elucidated. In this study, we observed that R. mori ethanol extracts (RME) exerted an inhibitory effect on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Additionally, RME inhibited IL-6 production by blocking the leukotriene B4 receptor-2 (BLT2)-dependent-NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascade, leading to anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, RME suppressed the production of the BLT2 ligands LTB4 and 12(S)-HETE by inhibiting the p38 kinase-cytosolic phospholipase A2-5-/12-lipoxygenase cascade in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. Overall, our results suggest that RME inhibits the ‘BLT2 ligand-BLT2’-linked autocrine inflammatory axis, and that this BLT2-linked cascade is one of the targets of the anti-inflammatory action of R. mori. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 232-237] PMID:26879317

  8. Homophilic interaction and deformation of E-cadherin and cadherin 7 probed by single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Kumar, Prashant; Lu, Chen; El Marjou, Ahmed; Qiu, Wu; Lim, Chwee Teck; Thiery, Jean Paul; Liu, Ruchuan

    2015-12-01

    Cadherin-mediated adhesion plays a crucial role in multicellular organisms. Dysfunction within this adhesion system has major consequences in many pathologies, including cancer invasion and metastasis. However, mechanisms controlling cadherin recognition and adhesive strengthening are only partially understood. Here, we investigated the homophilic interactions and mechanical stability of the extracellular (EC) domains of E-cadherin and cadherin 7 using atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers. Besides exhibiting stronger interactions, E-cadherin also showed more efficient force-induced self-strengthening of interactions than cadherin 7. In addition, the distributions of the unbinding forces for both cadherins partially overlap with those of the unfolding forces, indicating that partial unfolding/deformation of the cadherin EC domains may take place during their homophilic interactions. These conformational changes may be involved in cadherins physiology function and contribute to the significant differences in adhesive strength mediated by type I and type II cadherins.

  9. E-cadherin roles in animal biology: A perspective on thyroid hormone-influence.

    PubMed

    Izaguirre, María Fernanda; Casco, Victor Hugo

    2016-11-04

    The establishment, remodeling and maintenance of tissular architecture during animal development, and even across juvenile to adult life, are deeply regulated by a delicate interplay of extracellular signals, cell membrane receptors and intracellular signal messengers. It is well known that cell adhesion molecules (cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix) play a critical role in these processes. Particularly, adherens junctions (AJs) mediated by E-cadherin and catenins determine cell-cell contact survival and epithelia function. Consequently, this review seeks to encompass the complex and prolific knowledge about E-cadherin roles during physiological and pathological states, particularly focusing on the influence exerted by the thyroid hormone (TH).

  10. Cadherin-Based Transsynaptic Networks in Establishing and Modifying Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lauren G.; Benson, Deanna L.; Huntley, George W.

    2015-01-01

    It is tacitly understood that cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are critically important for the development of cells, circuits, and synapses in the brain. What is less clear is what CAMs continue to contribute to brain structure and function after the early period of development. Here, we focus on the cadherin family of CAMs to first briefly recap their multidimensional roles in neural development and then to highlight emerging data showing that with maturity, cadherins become largely dispensible for maintaining neuronal and synaptic structure, instead displaying new and narrower roles at mature synapses where they critically regulate dynamic aspects of synaptic signaling, structural plasticity, and cognitive function. At mature synapses, cadherins are an integral component of multiprotein networks, modifying synaptic signaling, morphology, and plasticity through collaborative interactions with other CAM family members as well as a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, scaffolding proteins, and other effector molecules. Such recognition of the ever-evolving functions of synaptic cadherins may yield insight into the pathophysiology of brain disorders in which cadherins have been implicated and that manifest at different times of life. PMID:25733148

  11. Rab coupling protein mediated endosomal recycling of N-cadherin influences cell motility.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2016-07-09

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a Rab GTPase effector that functions in endosomal recycling. The RCP gene is frequently amplified in breast cancer, leading to increased cancer aggressiveness. Furthermore, RCP enhances the motility of ovarian cancer cells by coordinating the recycling of α5β1 integrin and EGF receptor to the leading edge of migrating cells. Here we report that RCP also influences the motility of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Knockdown of RCP inhibits the motility of A549 cells in 2D and 3D migration assays, while its overexpression enhances migration in these assays. Depletion of RCP leads to a reduction in N-cadherin protein levels, which could be restored with lysosomal inhibitors. Trafficking assays revealed that RCP knockdown inhibits the return of endocytosed N-cadherin to the cell surface. We propose that RCP regulates the endosomal recycling of N-cadherin, and in its absence N-cadherin is diverted to the degradative pathway. The increased aggressiveness of tumour cells that overexpress RCP may be due to biased recycling of N-cadherin in metastatic cancer cells.

  12. Cadherin-11 Promotes Invasive Behavior of Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Hans P.; Niederreiter, Birgit; Lee, David M.; Jimenez-Boj, Esther; Smolen, Josef S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To define the expression pattern of cadherin-11 in destructive pannus tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to determine if cadherin-11 expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes controls their invasive capacity. Methods Cadherin-11 expression in rheumatoid synovial tissue was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. To examine the role of cadherin-11 in regulating the invasive behavior of fibroblast-like synoviocytes, we generated L-cell clones expressing wild-type cadherin-11, mutant cadherin-11, and empty vector transfected controls. The invasive capacity of L-cell transfectants and cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes treated with a blocking cadherin-11-Fc protein or control immunoglobulin was determined in Matrigel invasion assays. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that cadherin-11 is abundantly expressed in cells at the cartilage-pannus junction in rheumatoid synovitis. Invasion assays demonstrate a twofold increased invasive capacity of cadherin-11 transfected L-cells compared to L-cells transfected with E-cadherin or control vector. The invasive behavior of the L-cells stably transfected with a cadherin-11 construct that lacked the juxta-membrane cytoplasmic domain (cadherin-11 ΔJMD) was diminished to the level of vector control L-cells. Further, treatment with the cadherin-11-Fc fusion protein diminished the invasive capacity of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Conclusion These in vitro studies implicate a role for cadherin-11 in promoting cell invasion and contribute insight into the invasive nature of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in chronic synovitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19404963

  13. Cadherin2 (N-cadherin) plays an essential role in zebrafish cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Bagatto, Brian; Francl, Jessie; Liu, Bei; Liu, Qin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cadherins are cell surface adhesion molecules that play important roles in development of vertebrate tissues and organs. We studied cadherin2 expression in developing zebrafish heart using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical methods, and we found that cadherin2 was strongly expressed by the myocardium of the embryonic zebrafish. To gain insight into cadherin2 role in the formation and function of the heart, we analyzed cardiac differentiation and performance in a cadherin2 mutant, glass onion (glo). Results We found that the cadherin2 mutant had enlarged pericardial cavity, disorganized atrium and ventricle, and reduced expression of a ventricular specific marker vmhc. Individual myocardiocytes in the glo mutant embryos became round shaped and loosely aggregated. In vivo measurements of cardiac performance revealed that the mutant heart had significantly reduced heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output compared to control embryos. Formation of the embryonic vascular system in the glo mutants was also affected. Conclusion Our results suggest that cadherin2 plays an essential role in zebrafish cardiovascular development. Although the exact mechanisms remain unknown as to the formation of the enlarged pericardium and reduced peripheral blood flow, it is clear that myocardiocyte differentiation and physiological cardiovascular performance is impaired when cadherin2 function is disrupted. PMID:16719917

  14. N-cadherin relocalization during cardiac trabeculation

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Anoop V.; Fukuda, Ryuichi; Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2016-01-01

    During cardiac trabeculation, cardiomyocytes delaminate from the outermost (compact) layer to form complex muscular structures known as trabeculae. As these cardiomyocytes delaminate, the remodeling of adhesion junctions must be tightly coordinated so cells can extrude from the compact layer while remaining in tight contact with their neighbors. In this study, we examined the distribution of N-cadherin (Cdh2) during cardiac trabeculation in zebrafish. By analyzing the localization of a Cdh2-EGFP fusion protein expressed under the control of the zebrafish cdh2 promoter, we initially observed Cdh2-EGFP expression along the lateral sides of embryonic cardiomyocytes, in an evenly distributed pattern, and with the occasional appearance of punctae. Within a few hours, Cdh2-EGFP distribution on the lateral sides of cardiomyocytes evolves into a clear punctate pattern as Cdh2-EGFP molecules outside the punctae cluster to increase the size of these aggregates. In addition, Cdh2-EGFP molecules also appear on the basal side of cardiomyocytes that remain in the compact layer. Delaminating cardiomyocytes accumulate Cdh2-EGFP on the surface facing the basal side of compact layer cardiomyocytes, thereby allowing tight adhesion between these layers. Importantly, we find that blood flow/cardiac contractility is required for the transition from an even distribution of Cdh2-EGFP to the formation of punctae. Furthermore, using time-lapse imaging of beating hearts in conjunction with a Cdh2 tandem fluorescent protein timer transgenic line, we observed that Cdh2-EGFP molecules appear to move from the lateral to the basal side of cardiomyocytes along the cell membrane, and that Erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Erbb2) function is required for this relocalization. PMID:27339140

  15. Materials Fabrication from Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Danielle N.; Preda, Rucsanda C.; Yücel, Tuna; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lovett, Michael L.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Silk fibroin, derived from Bombyx mori cocoons, is a widely used and studied protein polymer for biomaterial applications. Silk fibroin has remarkable mechanical properties when formed into different materials, demonstrates biocompatibility, has controllable degradation rates from hours to years, and it can be chemically modified to alter surface properties or to immobilize growth factors. A variety of aqueous or organic solvent processing methods can be used to generate silk biomaterials for a range of applications. In this protocol we include methods to extract silk from B. mori cocoons in order to fabricate hydrogels, tubes, sponges, composites, fibers, microspheres and thin films. These materials can be used directly as biomaterials for implants, as scaffolding in tissue engineering and in vitro disease models, and for drug delivery. PMID:21959241

  16. BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Yang; Cui, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-02-15

    Axon guidance is critical for proper wiring of the nervous system. During the neural development, the axon guidance molecules play a key role and direct axons to choose the correct way to reach the target. Robo, as the receptor of axon guidance molecule Slit, is evolutionarily conserved from planarians to humans. However, the function of Robo in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, remained unknown. In this study, we cloned robo2/3 from B. mori (Bmrobo2/3), a homologue of robo2/3 in Tribolium castaneum. Moreover, BmRobo2/3 was localized in the neuropil, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Bmrobo2/3 resulted in the longitudinal connectives forming closer to the midline. These data demonstrate that BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm.

  17. Estradiol promotes M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Li, Chen-Shuang; He, Dan-Qing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Hao, Ting; Meng, Zhen; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-03-15

    Macrophages play a major role in joint inflammation. Estrogen is involved in rheumatoid arthritis and temporomandibular disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study was done to verify and test how estrogen affects M1/M2-like macrophage polarization and then contributes to joint inflammation. Female rats were ovariectomized and treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 d and then intra-articularly injected with CFA to induce temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. The polarization of macrophages and expression of cadherin-11 was evaluated at 24 h after the induction of TMJ inflammation and after blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors. NR8383 macrophages were treated with estradiol and TNF-α, with or without blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors, to evaluate the expression of the M1/M2-like macrophage-associated genes. We found that estradiol increased the infiltration of macrophages with a proinflammatory M1-like predominant profile in the synovium of inflamed TMJ. In addition, estradiol dose-dependently upregulated the expressions of the M1-associated proinflammatory factor inducible NO synthase (iNOS) but repressed the expressions of the M2-associated genes IL-10 and arginase in NR8383 macrophages. Furthermore, estradiol mainly promoted cadherin-11 expression in M1-like macrophages of inflamed TMJ. By contrast, blockage of cadherin-11 concurrently reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and TMJ inflammation, as well as reversed TNF-α-induced induction of inducible NO synthase and NO in NR8383 macrophages. The blocking of estrogen receptors reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and cadherin-11 expression. These results suggested that estradiol could promote M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate the acute inflammation of TMJs.

  18. Loss of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-2 suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation through EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kamekura, R; Kolegraff, KN; Nava, P; Hilgarth, RS; Feng, M; Parkos, CA; Nusrat, A

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomal cadherins mediate cell–cell adhesion in epithelial tissues and have been known to be altered in cancer. We have previously shown that one of the two intestinal epithelial desmosomal cadherins, desmocollin-2 (Dsc2) loss promotes colonic epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation and tumor formation. In this study we show that loss of the other intestinal desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein-2 (Dsg2) that pairs with Dsc2, results in decreased epithelial cell proliferation and suppressed xenograft tumor growth in mice. Dsg2-deficient cells demonstrated a compensatory increase in Dsc2 expression, and small interfering RNA-mediated loss of Dsc2 restored proliferation in Dsg2-deficient cells. Dsg2 downregulation inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and cell proliferation through altered phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in parallel with inhibited EGFR receptor internalization. Additionally, we demonstrated a central role of Dsc2 in controlling EGFR signaling and cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial cells. Consistent with these findings, analyses of human colon cancers demonstrated increased Dsg2 protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate that partner desmosomal cadherins Dsg2 and Dsc2 play opposing roles in controlling colonic carcinoma cell proliferation through differential effects on EGFR signaling. PMID:24166502

  19. E-cadherin can be expressed by a small population of rat undifferentiated spermatogonia in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Su, Huimin; Luo, Fenhua; Wu, Sachula; Liu, Linhong; Liu, Taodi; Yu, Boyang; Wu, Yingji

    2011-09-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) maintain gamete production in the testes throughout adult life by balancing self-renewal and differentiation. In vitro culture of SSCs is a crucial technique for gene manipulation of SSCs to generate transgenic animals, for transplantation of SSCs to restore male fertility for infertile man, and for generation of pluripotent stem cells from SSCs to differentiate into various cell lineages. Isolation of highly purified SSCs is an all-important component for development of these techniques. However, definitive markers for SSCs, which purify SSCs (100% enrichment), are unknown. SSCs of many species can colonize the mouse testis; thus, we reasoned that same molecules of SSCs are conserved between species. In mouse, undifferentiated spermatogonia express the surface marker E-cadherin. The hypothesis tested in this work was that E-cadherin (also known as CDH1) can be expressed by undifferentiated spermatogonia of rat testes. In this paper, cross-section immunohistochemistry and whole-mount immunohistochemistry of rat seminiferous tubules were conducted to show that E-cadherin-positive cells were small in number and there are single, paired, and aligned spermatogonia attached along the basement membrane. During in vitro culture period, the undifferentiated rat spermatogonial colonies co-expressed E-cadherin and glial-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha-1 or E-cadherin and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger. Data collected during the study demonstrate that E-cadherin is expressed by a small population of rat undifferentiated spermatogonia both in vivo and during in vitro culture period.

  20. Hydrogels that mimic developmentally relevant matrix and N-cadherin interactions enhance MSC chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liming; Guvendiren, Murat; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels provide a backbone polymer with which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can interact through several cell surface receptors that are expressed by MSCs, including CD44 and CD168. Previous studies showed that this 3D hydrogel environment supports the chondrogenesis of MSCs, and here we demonstrate through functional blockade that these specific cell–material interactions play a role in this process. Beyond matrix interactions, cadherin molecules, a family of transmembrane glycoproteins, play a critical role in tissue development during embryogenesis, and N-cadherin is a key factor in mediating cell–cell interactions during mesenchymal condensation and chondrogenesis. In this study, we functionalized HA hydrogels with N-cadherin mimetic peptides and evaluated their role in regulating chondrogenesis and cartilage matrix deposition by encapsulated MSCs. Our results show that conjugation of cadherin peptides onto HA hydrogels promotes both early chondrogenesis of MSCs and cartilage-specific matrix production with culture, compared with unmodified controls or those with inclusion of a scrambled peptide domain. This enhanced chondrogenesis was abolished via treatment with N-cadherin–specific antibodies, confirming the contribution of these N-cadherin peptides to chondrogenesis. Subcutaneous implantation of MSC-seeded constructs also showed superior neocartilage formation in implants functionalized with N-cadherin mimetic peptides compared with controls. This study demonstrates the inherent biologic activity of HA-based hydrogels, as well as the promise of biofunctionalizing HA hydrogels to emulate the complexity of the natural cell microenvironment during embryogenesis, particularly in stem cell-based cartilage regeneration. PMID:23733927

  1. Furin processing dictates ectodomain shedding of human FAT1 cadherin.

    PubMed

    Sadeqzadeh, Elham; de Bock, Charles E; Wojtalewicz, Natalie; Holt, Janet E; Smith, Nathan D; Dun, Matthew D; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Thorne, Rick F

    2014-04-15

    Fat1 is a single pass transmembrane protein and the largest member of the cadherin superfamily. Mouse knockout models and in vitro studies have suggested that Fat1 influences cell polarity and motility. Fat1 is also an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway, at least in lower vertebrates, and hence may play a role in growth control. In previous work we have established that FAT1 cadherin is initially cleaved by proprotein convertases to form a noncovalently linked heterodimer prior to expression on the cell surface. Such processing was not a requirement for cell surface expression, since melanoma cells expressed both unprocessed FAT1 and the heterodimer on the cell surface. Here we further establish that the site 1 (S1) cleavage step to promote FAT1 heterodimerisation is catalysed by furin and we identify the cleavage site utilised. For a number of other transmembrane receptors that undergo heterodimerisation the S1 processing step is thought to occur constitutively but the functional significance of heterodimerisation has been controversial. It has also been generally unclear as to the significance of receptor heterodimerisation with respect to subsequent post-translational proteolysis that often occurs in transmembrane proteins. Exploiting the partial deficiency of FAT1 processing in melanoma cells together with furin-deficient LoVo cells, we manipulated furin expression to demonstrate that only the heterodimer form of FAT1 is subject to cleavage and subsequent release of the extracellular domain. This work establishes S1-processing as a clear functional prerequisite for ectodomain shedding of FAT1 with general implications for the shedding of other transmembrane receptors.

  2. Ankyrin-G Inhibits Endocytosis of Cadherin Dimers.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Chantel M; Jenkins, Paul M; Bennett, Vann; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-08

    Dynamic regulation of endothelial cell adhesion is central to vascular development and maintenance. Furthermore, altered endothelial adhesion is implicated in numerous diseases. Therefore, normal vascular patterning and maintenance require tight regulation of endothelial cell adhesion dynamics. However, the mechanisms that control junctional plasticity are not fully understood. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) is an adhesive protein found in adherens junctions of endothelial cells. VE-cadherin mediates adhesion through trans interactions formed by its extracellular domain. Trans binding is followed by cis interactions that laterally cluster the cadherin in junctions. VE-cadherin is linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic interactions with β- and α-catenin, which serve to increase adhesive strength. Furthermore, p120-catenin binds to the cytoplasmic tail of cadherin and stabilizes it at the plasma membrane. Here we report that induced cis dimerization of VE-cadherin inhibits endocytosis independent of both p120 binding and trans interactions. However, we find that ankyrin-G, a protein that links membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton, associates with VE-cadherin and inhibits its endocytosis. Ankyrin-G inhibits VE-cadherin endocytosis independent of p120 binding. We propose a model in which ankyrin-G associates with and inhibits the endocytosis of VE-cadherin cis dimers. Our findings support a novel mechanism for regulation of VE-cadherin endocytosis through ankyrin association with cadherin engaged in lateral interactions.

  3. Ankyrin-G Inhibits Endocytosis of Cadherin Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Cadwell, Chantel M.; Jenkins, Paul M.; Bennett, Vann; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of endothelial cell adhesion is central to vascular development and maintenance. Furthermore, altered endothelial adhesion is implicated in numerous diseases. Therefore, normal vascular patterning and maintenance require tight regulation of endothelial cell adhesion dynamics. However, the mechanisms that control junctional plasticity are not fully understood. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) is an adhesive protein found in adherens junctions of endothelial cells. VE-cadherin mediates adhesion through trans interactions formed by its extracellular domain. Trans binding is followed by cis interactions that laterally cluster the cadherin in junctions. VE-cadherin is linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic interactions with β- and α-catenin, which serve to increase adhesive strength. Furthermore, p120-catenin binds to the cytoplasmic tail of cadherin and stabilizes it at the plasma membrane. Here we report that induced cis dimerization of VE-cadherin inhibits endocytosis independent of both p120 binding and trans interactions. However, we find that ankyrin-G, a protein that links membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton, associates with VE-cadherin and inhibits its endocytosis. Ankyrin-G inhibits VE-cadherin endocytosis independent of p120 binding. We propose a model in which ankyrin-G associates with and inhibits the endocytosis of VE-cadherin cis dimers. Our findings support a novel mechanism for regulation of VE-cadherin endocytosis through ankyrin association with cadherin engaged in lateral interactions. PMID:26574545

  4. N-cadherin modulates voltage activated calcium influx via RhoA, p120-catenin, and myosinactin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Glen S.; Theisen, Christopher S.; Brusés, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    N-cadherin is a transmembrane adhesion receptor that contributes to neuronal development and synapse formation through homophilic interactions that provide structural-adhesive support to contacts between cell membranes. In addition, N-cadherin homotypic binding may initiate cell signaling that regulates neuronal physiology. In this study, we investigated signaling capabilities of N-cadherin that control voltage activated calcium influx. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recording of isolated inward calcium currents in freshly isolated chick ciliary ganglion neurons we show that the juxtamembrane region of N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain regulates high-threshold voltage activated calcium currents by interacting with p120-catenin and activating RhoA. This regulatory mechanism requires myosin interaction with actin. Furthermore, N-cadherin homophilic binding enhanced voltage activated calcium current amplitude in dissociated neurons that have already developed mature synaptic contacts in vivo. The increase in calcium current amplitude was not affected by brefeldin A suggesting that the effect is caused via direct channel modulation and not by increasing channel expression. In contrast, homotypic N-cadherin interaction failed to regulate calcium influx in freshly isolated immature neurons. However, RhoA inhibitors enhanced calcium current amplitude in these immature neurons, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of RhoA on calcium entry is regulated during neuronal development and synapse maturation. These results indicate that N-cadherin modulates voltage activated calcium entry by a mechanism that involves RhoA activity and its downstream effects on the cytoskeleton, and suggest that N-cadherin provides support for synaptic maturation and sustained synaptic activity by facilitating voltage activated calcium influx. PMID:19162191

  5. The classic cadherins in synaptic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Raunak; Taylor, Matthew R; Williams, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    During brain development, billions of neurons organize into highly specific circuits. To form specific circuits, neurons must build the appropriate types of synapses with appropriate types of synaptic partners while avoiding incorrect partners in a dense cellular environment. Defining the cellular and molecular rules that govern specific circuit formation has significant scientific and clinical relevance because fine scale connectivity defects are thought to underlie many cognitive and psychiatric disorders. Organizing specific neural circuits is an enormously complicated developmental process that requires the concerted action of many molecules, neural activity, and temporal events. This review focuses on one class of molecules postulated to play an important role in target selection and specific synapse formation: the classic cadherins. Cadherins have a well-established role in epithelial cell adhesion, and although it has long been appreciated that most cadherins are expressed in the brain, their role in synaptic specificity is just beginning to be unraveled. Here, we review past and present studies implicating cadherins as active participants in the formation, function, and dysfunction of specific neural circuits and pose some of the major remaining questions. PMID:25837840

  6. Specific Activation of the G Protein-coupled Receptor BNGR-A21 by the Neuropeptide Corazonin from the Silkworm, Bombyx mori, Dually Couples to the Gq and Gs Signaling Cascades*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Huang, Haishan; Yang, Huipeng; He, Xiaobai; Jiang, Xue; Shi, Ying; Alatangaole, Damirin; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2013-01-01

    Corazonin, an undecapeptide neurohormone sharing a highly conserved amino acid sequence across Insecta, plays different physiological roles in the regulation of heart contraction rates, silk spinning rates, the induction of dark color and morphometric phase changes, and ecdysis. Corazonin receptors have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, Manduca sexta, and Musca domestica. However, detailed information on the signaling and major physiological functions of corazonin and its receptor is largely unknown. In the current study, using both the mammalian cell line HEK293 and insect cell lines BmN and Sf21, we paired the Bombyx corazonin neuropeptide as a specific endogenous ligand for the Bombyx neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor A21 (BNGR-A21), and we therefore designated this receptor as BmCrzR. Further characterization indicated that synthetic BmCrz demonstrated a high affinity for and activated BmCrzR, resulting in intracellular cAMP accumulation, Ca2+ mobilization, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation via the Gq- and Gs-coupled signaling pathways. The direct interaction of BmCrzR with BmCrz was confirmed by a rhodamine-labeled BmCrz peptide. Moreover, experiments with double-stranded RNA and synthetic peptide injection suggested a possible role of BmCrz/BmCrzR in the regulation of larval growth and spinning rate. Our present results provide the first in-depth information on BmCrzR-mediated signaling for further elucidation of the BmCrz/BmCrzR system in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes. PMID:23457297

  7. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  8. Connexins and Cadherin Crosstalk in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    recombinant retrovirus containing E-cadherinΔβ-catenin (E-cadΔβ- cat )(Johnson). c) Prepare recombinant retrovirus containing E-cadherinΔp120-catenin...E-cadΔp120- cat )(Johnson). The preparation of the constructs E-cad-W156A, E-cadherinΔβ- cat (E-cadΔβ- cat ) and E-cadherinΔp120 (E-cadΔp120- cat ) in...harboring E-cadherinΔp120-catenin (E-cadΔp120- cat ) has not been produced (task 1c). 2) Generate stable polyclonal cultures of several human prostate

  9. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J.; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Cadherins embody a superfamily of cell-surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich EC (extracellular cadherin) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate “classical” cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a “strand-swapped” conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the “X-dimer”. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor which drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside of the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms which are just now beginning to be understood. PMID:22555008

  10. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Cadherins are a superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich extracellular cadherin (EC) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate 'classical' cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a 'strand-swapped' conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the 'X-dimer'. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor that drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms that are only now beginning to be understood.

  11. N-cadherin and β1-integrins cooperate during the development of the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Carlier, Camille; Radice, Glenn L; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-04-15

    Cell adhesion controls various embryonic morphogenetic processes, including the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Ablation of β1-integrin (β1-/-) expression in enteric neural crest cells (ENCC) in mice leads to major alterations in the ENS structure caused by reduced migration and increased aggregation properties of ENCC during gut colonization, which gives rise to a Hirschsprung's disease-like phenotype. In the present study, we examined the role of N-cadherin in ENS development and the interplay with β1 integrins during this process. The Ht-PA-Cre mouse model was used to target gene disruption of N-cadherin and β1 integrin in migratory NCC and to produce single- and double-conditional mutants for these two types of adhesion receptors. Double mutation of N-cadherin and β1 integrin led to embryonic lethality with severe defects in ENS development. N-cadherin-null (Ncad-/-) ENCC exhibited a delayed colonization in the developing gut at E12.5, although this was to a lesser extent than in β1-/- mutants. This delay of Ncad-/- ENCC migration was recovered at later stages of development. The double Ncad-/-; β1-/- mutant ENCC failed to colonize the distal part of the gut and there was more severe aganglionosis in the proximal hindgut than in the single mutants for N-cadherin or β1-integrin. This was due to an altered speed of locomotion and directionality in the gut wall. The abnormal aggregation defect of ENCC and the disorganized ganglia network in the β1-/- mutant was not observed in the double mutant. This indicates that N-cadherin enhances the effect of the β1-integrin mutation and demonstrates cooperation between these two adhesion receptors during ENS ontogenesis. In conclusion, our data reveal that N-cadherin is not essential for ENS development but it does modulate the modes of ENCC migration and acts in concert with β1-integrin to control the proper development of the ENS.

  12. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  13. Gastrulation EMT Is Independent of P-Cadherin Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Moly, Pricila K; Cooley, James R; Zeltzer, Sebastian L; Yatskievych, Tatiana A; Antin, Parker B

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionarily conserved process during which cells lose epithelial characteristics and gain a migratory phenotype. Although downregulation of epithelial cadherins by Snail and other transcriptional repressors is generally considered a prerequisite for EMT, recent studies have challenged this view. Here we investigate the relationship between E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression and localization, Snail function and EMT during gastrulation in chicken embryos. Expression analyses show that while E-cadherin transcripts are detected in the epiblast but not in the primitive streak or mesoderm, P-cadherin mRNA and protein are present in the epiblast, primitive and mesoderm. Antibodies that specifically recognize E-cadherin are not presently available. During EMT, P-cadherin relocalizes from the lateral surfaces of epithelial epiblast cells to a circumferential distribution in emerging mesodermal cells. Cells electroporated with an E-cadherin expression construct undergo EMT and migrate into the mesoderm. An examination of Snail function showed that reduction of Slug (SNAI2) protein levels using a morpholino fails to inhibit EMT, and expression of human or chicken Snail in epiblast cells fails to induce EMT. In contrast, cells expressing the Rho inhibitor peptide C3 rapidly exit the epiblast without activating Slug or the mesoderm marker N-cadherin. Together, these experiments show that epiblast cells undergo EMT while retaining P-cadherin, and raise questions about the mechanisms of EMT regulation during avian gastrulation.

  14. Genome-wide identification, characterization of sugar transporter genes in the silkworm Bombyx mori and role in Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Lekha; Gupta, Tania; Esvaran, Vijaya Gowri; Awasthi, Arvind Kumar; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M

    2016-04-01

    Sugar transporters play an essential role in controlling carbohydrate transport and are responsible for mediating the movement of sugars into cells. These genes exist as large multigene families within the insect genome. In insects, sugar transporters not only have a role in sugar transport, but may also act as receptors for virus entry. Genome-wide annotation of silkworm Bombyx mori (B. mori) revealed 100 putative sugar transporter (BmST) genes exists as a large multigene family and were classified into 11 sub families, through phylogenetic analysis. Chromosomes 27, 26 and 20 were found to possess the highest number of BmST paralogous genes, harboring 22, 7 and 6 genes, respectively. These genes occurred in clusters exhibiting the phenomenon of tandem gene duplication. The ovary, silk gland, hemocytes, midgut and malphigian tubules were the different tissues/cells enriched with BmST gene expression. The BmST gene BGIBMGA001498 had maximum EST transcripts of 134 and expressed exclusively in the malphigian tubule. The expression of EST transcripts of the BmST clustered genes on chromosome 27 was distributed in various tissues like testis, ovary, silk gland, malphigian tubule, maxillary galea, prothoracic gland, epidermis, fat body and midgut. Three sugar transporter genes (BmST) were constitutively expressed in the susceptible race and were down regulated upon BmNPV infection at 12h post infection (hpi). The expression pattern of these three genes was validated through real-time PCR in the midgut tissues at different time intervals from 0 to 30hpi. In the susceptible B. mori race, expression of sugar transporter genes was constitutively expressed making the host succumb to viral infection.

  15. The expression profile and promoter analysis of ultraspiracle gene in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-xia; Du, Jie; Su, Bao-jin; Zhao, Guo-dong; Shen, Wei-de; Wei, Zheng-guo

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear receptor, ultraspiracle protein (USP), is a transcription factor and an essential component of a heterodimeric receptor complex with ecdysone receptor. However, the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of USP in silkworm are unknown. In this study, using dual-spike-in qPCR method, we examined the expression of Bombyx ultraspiracle gene (BmUSP) in various tissues of silkworm as well as expression changes after stimulation with ecdysone. The results showed that the expression levels of BmUSP gene varied in different tissues and were increased 2 h after exposure to ecdysone. To identify the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of USP gene expression in silkworm Bombyx mori, promoter truncation analyses were performed using the luciferase reporter assay and Bac-to-Bac expression system in several tissues of B. mori. BmUSP gene promoter with 5' end serial deletions showed different levels of activity in various tissues, higher in fat body and Malpighian tubule. Deletion of the region from -485 to -445 and -307 to -281 upstream of BmUSP gene abolished and increased its promoter activity, respectively. This region contains AP-1, Dfd transcription factor binding sites. These results indicate that BmUSP are expressed at different levels in different tissues of the silkworm, but all are subjected to the regulation by ecdysone. This study would provide an important foundation for investigating the mechanism underlying the transcriptional regulation of BmUSP in the silkworm.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of the brain of the silkworm Bombyx mori infected with Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus: A new insight into the molecular mechanism of enhanced locomotor activity induced by viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Zhang, Jianjia; Shen, Yunwang; Zheng, Qin; Feng, Min; Xiang, Xingwei; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2015-06-01

    Baculoviruses have been known to induce hyperactive behavior in their lepidopteran hosts for over a century. As a typical lepidopteran insect, the silkworm Bombyx mori displays enhanced locomotor activity (ELA) following infection with B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). Some investigations have focused on the molecular mechanisms underlying this abnormal hyperactive wandering behavior due to the virus; however, there are currently no reports about B. mori. Based on previous studies that have revealed that behavior is controlled by the central nervous system, the transcriptome profiles of the brains of BmNPV-infected and non-infected silkworm larvae were analyzed with the RNA-Seq technique to reveal the changes in the BmNPV-infected brain on the transcriptional level and to provide new clues regarding the molecular mechanisms that underlies BmNPV-induced ELA. Compared with the controls, a total of 742 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 218 up-regulated and 524 down-regulated candidates, were identified, of which 499, 117 and 144 DEGs could be classified into GO categories, KEGG pathways and COG annotations by GO, KEGG and COG analyses, respectively. We focused our attention on the DEGs that are involved in circadian rhythms, synaptic transmission and the serotonin receptor signaling pathway of B. mori. Our analyses suggested that these genes were related to the locomotor activity of B. mori via their essential roles in the regulations of a variety of behaviors and the down-regulation of their expressions following BmNPV infection. These results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of BmNPV-induced ELA.

  17. Potential dual molecular interaction of the Drosophila 7-pass transmembrane cadherin Flamingo in dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Usui, Tadao; Tsubouchi, Asako; Uemura, Tadashi

    2006-03-15

    Seven-pass transmembrane cadherins (7-TM cadherins) play pleiotropic roles in epithelial planar cell polarity, shaping dendritic arbors and in axonal outgrowth. In contrast to their role in planar polarity, how 7-TM cadherins control dendritic and axonal outgrowth at the molecular level is largely unknown. Therefore, we performed extensive structure-function analysis of the Drosophila 7-TM cadherin Flamingo (Fmi) and investigated the activities of individual mutant forms mostly in dendritogenesis of dendritic arborization (da) neurons. One of the fmi-mutant phenotypes was overgrowth of branches in the early stage of dendrite development. In da neurons but not in their adjacent non-neuronal cells, expression of a truncated form (deltaN) that lacks the entire cadherin repeat sequence, rescues flies--at least partially--from this phenotype. Another phenotype is observed at a later stage, when dendritic terminals outgrowing from the contralateral sides meet and then avoid each other. In the fmi mutant, by contrast, those branches overlapped. Overexpression of the deltaN form on the wild-type background phenocopied the overlap phenotype in the mutant, and analysis in heterologous systems supported the possibility that this effect might be because the Fmi-Fmi homophilic interaction is inhibited by deltaN. We propose that a dual molecular function of Fmi play pivotal roles in dendrite morphogenesis. In the initial growing phase, Fmi might function as a receptor for a sofar-unidentified ligand and this hypothetical heterophilic interaction would be responsible for limiting branch elongation. At a later stage, homophilic Fmi-binding at dendro-dendritic interfaces would elicit avoidance between dendritic terminals.

  18. E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and fusion of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-09

    Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is essential for skeletal muscle formation during muscle development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be elucidated about the molecular mechanism of myoblast fusion although cadherins, which are Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecules, are thought to play a critical role in this process. Mouse myoblasts lacking either N-cadherin or M-cadherin can still fuse to form myotubes, indicating that they have no specific function in this process and may be functionally replaced by either M-cadherin or N-cadherin, respectively. In this study, we show that expressing the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain ectopically in C2C12 myoblasts inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous M-cadherin and N-cadherin, as well as cell-cell fusion. This domain, however, does not inhibit myoblast differentiation according to microarray-based gene expression analysis. In contrast, expressing a dominant-negative β-catenin mutant ectopically, which suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling, did not inhibit cell-cell fusion. Therefore, the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell-cell fusion by inhibiting cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and not by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  19. Cadherins and catenins in dendrite and synapse morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized specialized cells. Neuronal integrity and functional roles are critically dependent on dendritic architecture and synaptic structure, function and plasticity. The cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that form cell adhesion complexes in various tissues. They are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, the catenins. While the functional roles of the complex have been extensively investigates in non-neuronal cells, it is becoming increasingly clear that components of the complex have critical roles in regulating dendritic and synaptic architecture, function and plasticity in neurons. Consistent with these functional roles, aberrations in components of the complex have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we discuss the roles of the classical cadherins and catenins in various aspects of dendrite and synapse architecture and function and their relevance to human neurological disorders. Cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that were initially identified as Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion molecules. They are present on plasma membrane of a variety of cell types from primitive metazoans to humans. In the past several years, it has become clear that in addition to providing mechanical adhesion between cells, cadherins play integral roles in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The cadherin family is composed of more than 100 members and classified into several subfamilies, including classical cadherins and protocadherins. Several of these cadherin family members have been implicated in various aspects of neuronal development and function.1-3 The classical cadherins are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, collectively called the catenins. While the functional roles of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex have been extensively investigated in epithelial cells, it is now clear that components of the complex are well expressed in central neurons at different

  20. Slit-2 facilitates interaction of P-cadherin with Robo-3 and inhibits cell migration in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karin; Dowejko, Albert; Bosserhoff, A-K; Reichert, T E; Bauer, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that act as molecular guidance cues in cellular migration. Recently, several studies demonstrated that Slit-2 can operate as candidate tumour suppressor protein in various tissues. In this study, we show Slit-2 expression in basal cell layers of normal oral mucosa colocalized with P-cadherin expression. In contrast, there is a loss of Slit-2 and P-cadherin expression in mucosa of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our in vitro investigations reveal a correlation of P-cadherin and Slit-2 expression: OSCC cells with induced P-cadherin expression (PCI52_PC) display an increased Slit-2 expression. However, abrogating P-cadherin function with a function-blocking antibody decreases Slit-2 secretion confirming a direct link between P-cadherin and Slit-2. Moreover, experiments with OSCC cells show that Slit-2 interferes with a Wnt related signalling pathway, which in turn affects Slit-2 expression in a feedback loop. Functionally, transwell migration assays demonstrate a Slit-2 dose-dependent decrease of PCI52_PC cell migration. However, there is no influence on migration in mock control cells. Responsible for this migration block might be an interaction of P-cadherin with Roundabout (Robo)-3, a high affinity receptor of Slit-2. Indeed, proximity ligation assays exhibit P-cadherin/Robo-3 interactions on PCI52_PC cells. Additionally, we detect a modulation of this interaction by addition of recombinant Slit-2. Down-regulation of Robo-3 expression via small interfering RNA neutralizes Slit-2 induced migration block in PCI52_PC cells. In summary, our experiments show antitumorigenic effects of Slit-2 on P-cadherin expressing OSCC cells supposedly via modulation of Robo-3 interaction.

  1. Transforming growth factor-α induces human ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin in a Snail-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Klausen, Christian; Fan, Qianlan; Chang, Hsun-Ming; So, Wai-Kin; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-05-22

    Transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), like epidermal growth factor (EGF) and amphiregulin (AREG) binds exclusively to EGF receptor (EGFR). We have previously demonstrated that EGF, AREG and TGF-α down-regulate E-cadherin and induce ovarian cancer cell invasion, though whether these ligands use the same molecular mediators remains unknown. We now show that, like EGF, TGF-α- and AREG-induced E-cadherin down-regulation involves both EGFR and HER2. However, in contrast to EGF and AREG, the transcription factor Snail is not required for TGF-α-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. This study shows that TGF-α uses common and divergent molecular mediators to regulate E-cadherin expression and cell invasion.

  2. N-cadherin restrains PTH repressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTH1R interaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Dong, Jinbo; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Zhong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Feng

    2016-12-01

    Sclerostin/SOST is a robust negative regulator of bone formation. Loss-of-function mutations of the sclerostin gene (SOST) cause sclerosteosis and Van Buchem disease characterized by bone overgrowth. Mediated by myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors, parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses SOST expression through formation of complexes of parathyroid hormone-parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor 1 (PTH1R) and lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). N-cadherin has been shown to negatively regulate Wnt/β-catenin and PTH induced, protein kinase-dependent β-catenin signaling. Here, we investigated whether N-cadherin mediates the inhibitory effects of PTH on sclerostin/SOST. In vitro, overexpression of N-cadherin resulted in blunted PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST expression, as detected by immunoblot and qPCR analysis; PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2A, C, and D was impaired by N-cadherin; and N-cadherin reduced LRP6-PTHR1 interaction and endocytosis in response to PTH. In vivo, intermittent PTH (iPTH)-induced suppression of sclerostin/SOST was accentuated in Dmp1-cre; Cdh2(f/f) (Cdh2(ΔDmp1) ) mice, compared with Cdh2(f/f) mice. Additionally, iPTH had greater bone anabolic effects in Cdh2(ΔDmp1) mice compared to Cdh2(f/f) mice. These data indicate that N-cadherin negatively mediates PTH suppressive effects on sclerostin/SOST by regulating LRP6-PTHR1 interaction, ultimately influencing PTH anabolic effects on bone.

  3. Roles for E-cadherin cell surface regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Yuliya I.; Schecterson, Leslayann; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression in association with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, metastases often retain E-cadherin expression, an EMT is not required for metastasis, and metastases can arise from clusters of tumor cells. We demonstrate that the regulation of the adhesive activity of E-cadherin present at the cell surface by an inside-out signaling mechanism is important in cancer. First, we find that the metastasis of an E-cadherin–expressing mammary cell line from the mammary gland to the lung depends on reduced E-cadherin adhesive function. An activating monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin that induces a high adhesive state significantly reduced the number of cells metastasized to the lung without affecting the growth in size of the primary tumor in the mammary gland. Second, we find that many cancer-associated germline missense mutations in the E-cadherin gene in patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer selectively affect the mechanism of inside-out cell surface regulation without inhibiting basic E-cadherin adhesion function. This suggests that genetic deficits in E-cadherin cell surface regulation contribute to cancer progression. Analysis of these mutations also provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin regulation at the cell surface. PMID:27582386

  4. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  5. Crystal Structure of Human E-Cadherin-EC1EC2 in Complex with a Peptidomimetic Competitive Inhibitor of Cadherin Homophilic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Valentina; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Dalle Vedove, Andrea; Fanelli, Roberto; Tomassetti, Antonella; Belvisi, Laura; Civera, Monica; Parisini, Emilio

    2016-05-26

    Cadherins are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins whose aberrant expression often correlates with cancer development and proliferation. We report the crystal structure of an E-cadherin extracellular fragment in complex with a peptidomimetic compound that was previously shown to partially inhibit cadherin homophilic adhesion. The structure reveals an unexpected binding mode and allows the identification of a druggable cadherin interface, thus paving the way to a future structure-guided design of cell adhesion inhibitors against cadherin-expressing solid tumors.

  6. Structural Determinants of Cadherin-23 Function in Hearing and Deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2010-06-21

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects are unknown. We present crystal structures of the first and second extracellular cadherin repeats of cadherin-23. Overall, structures show typical cadherin folds, but reveal an elongated N terminus that precludes classical cadherin interactions and contributes to an N-terminal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. The deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca{sup 2+} affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that cadherin-23 repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca{sup 2+} or mutating Ca{sup 2+}-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures define an uncharacterized cadherin family and, with simulations, suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with itself and with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  7. ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells through upregulation of E-cadherin in a Id1-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Ming, Jia; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin in breast cancer cell. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. - Abstract: ERβ1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. It plays an important role in regulating the progression of breast cancer. However, the mechanisms of ERβ1 in tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis are still not fully clear. In this study, we showed that the expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we also found that ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and upregulated E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. Taken together, our study provides further understanding of the molecular mechanism of ERβ1 in tumor metastasis and suggests the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches to target Id1 to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

  8. Activin B promotes endometrial cancer cell migration by down-regulating E-cadherin via SMAD-independent MEK-ERK1/2-SNAIL signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2016-01-01

    High-risk type II endometrial cancers account for ~30% of cases but ~75% of deaths due, in part, to their tendency to metastasize. Histopathological studies of type II endometrial cancers (non-endometrioid, mostly serous) suggest overproduction of activin B and down-regulation of E-cadherin, both of which are associated with reduced survival. Our previous studies have shown that activin B increases the migration of type II endometrial cancer cell lines. However, little is known about the relationship between activin B signaling and E-cadherin in endometrial cancer. We now demonstrate that activin B treatment significantly decreases E-cadherin expression in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner in KLE and HEC-50 cell lines. Interestingly, these effects were not inhibited by knockdown of SMAD2, SMAD3 or SMAD4. Rather, the suppressive effects of activin B on E-cadherin were mediated by MEK-ERK1/2-induced production of the transcription factor SNAIL. Importantly, activin B-induced cell migration was inhibited by forced-expression of E-cadherin or pre-treatment with the activin/TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 or the MEK inhibitor U0126. We have identified a novel SMAD-independent pathway linking enhanced activin B signaling to reduced E-cadherin expression and increased migration in type II endometrial cancer. PMID:27223076

  9. HER2 mediates epidermal growth factor-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Qiu, Xin; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Leung, Peter C K

    2013-04-26

    Overexpression of HER2 is correlated with a poor prognosis in many types of human cancers. Due to the interaction between HER2 and other ErbB receptors, HER2 is implicated in the EGF family of ligands-regulated tumor progression. In ovarian cancer, although the relationships between HER2 amplification and patient prognosis remain controversial, the underlying molecular mechanisms of HER2-mediated tumor progression are not fully understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that EGF induces ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression through the up-regulation of its transcriptional repressors, Snail and Slug. It has been shown that overexpression of HER2 down-regulates E-cadherin expression in human mammary epithelial cells. However, whether HER2 mediates EGF-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin remains unknown. In this study, we examined the potential role of HER2 in EGF-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and increased cell invasion. We show that EGF treatment induces the interaction of EGFR with HER2 and increases the activation of HER2 in human ovarian cancer cells; we also show that these effects are diminished by knockdown of EGFR. Importantly, treatment with HER2-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG825, and HER2 siRNA diminished the up-regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the down-regulation of E-cadherin by EGF. Finally, we also show that EGF-induced cell invasion was attenuated by treatment with HER2 siRNA. This study demonstrates an important role for HER2 in mediating the effects of EGF on Snail, Slug and E-cadherin expression as well as invasiveness in human ovarian cancer cells.

  10. Characterization of Argonaute family members in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gen-Hong; Jiang, Liang; Zhu, Li; Cheng, Ting-Cai; Niu, Wei-Huan; Yan, Ya-Fei; Xia, Qing-You

    2013-02-01

    The Argonaute protein family is a highly conserved group of proteins, which have been implicated in RNA silencing in both plants and animals. Here, four members of the Argonaute family were systemically identified based on the genome sequence of Bombyx mori. Based on their sequence similarity, BmAgo1 and BmAgo2 belong to the Ago subfamily, while BmAgo3 and BmPiwi are in the Piwi subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that silkworm Argonaute family members are conserved in insects. Conserved amino acid residues involved in recognition of the 5' end of the small RNA guide strand and of the conserved (aspartate, aspartate and histidine [DDH]) motif present in their PIWI domains suggest that these four Argonaute family members may have conserved slicer activities. The results of microarray expression analysis show that there is a low expression level for B. mori Argonaute family members in different tissues and different developmental stages, except for BmPiwi. All four B. mori Argonaute family members are upregulated upon infection with B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus. The complete coding sequence of BmPiwi, the homolog of Drosophila piwi, was cloned and its expression occurred mainly in the area where spermatogonia and spermatocytes appear. Our results provide an overview of the B. mori Argonaute family members and suggest that they may have multiple roles. In addition, this is also the first report, to our knowledge, of the response of RNA silencing machinery to DNA virus infection in insects.

  11. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  12. Hydrogen peroxide mediates EGF-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression via p38 MAPK and snail in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K

    2010-08-01

    In ovarian cancer, it has been shown that E-cadherin is down-regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) activation, and that cells with low E-cadherin expression are particularly invasive. Although it is generally believed that reactive oxygen species play important roles in intracellular signal transduction, the role of reactive oxygen species in EGF-mediated reductions in E-cadherin remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that EGF treatment down-regulated E-cadherin by up-regulating its transcriptional repressors, Snail and Slug, in human ovarian cancer cells. Using 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester staining, we found that intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production was increased in EGF-treated cells and could be inhibited by treatment with an EGFR inhibitor, AG1478, or an H(2)O(2) scavenger, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase. In addition, PEG-catalase diminished EGF-induced p38 MAPK, but not ERK1/2 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase, phosphorylation. PEG-catalase and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 abolished EGF-induced Snail, but not Slug, expression and E-cadherin down-regulation. Furthermore, the involvement of p38 MAPK in the down-regulation of E-cadherin was confirmed using specific p38alpha MAPK small interfering RNA. Finally, we also show that EGF-induced cell invasion was abolished by treatment with PEG-catalase and SB203580, as well as p38alpha MAPK small interfering RNA, and that forced expression of E-cadherin diminished intrinsic invasiveness as well as EGF-induced cell invasion. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism in which EGF down-regulates E-cadherin expression through production of H(2)O(2), activation of p38 MAPK, and up-regulation of Snail in human ovarian cancer cells.

  13. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  14. Cdon promotes neural crest migration by regulating N-cadherin localization.

    PubMed

    Powell, Davalyn R; Williams, Jason S; Hernandez-Lagunas, Laura; Salcedo, Ernesto; O'Brien, Jenean H; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2015-11-15

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are essential embryonic progenitor cells that are unique to vertebrates and form a remarkably complex and coordinated system of highly motile cells. Migration of NCCs occurs along specific pathways within the embryo in response to both environmental cues and cell-cell interactions within the neural crest population. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for the putative Sonic hedgehog (Shh) receptor and cell adhesion regulator, cdon, in zebrafish neural crest migration. cdon is expressed in developing premigratory NCCs but is downregulated once the cells become migratory. Knockdown of cdon results in aberrant migration of trunk NCCs: crestin positive cells can emigrate out of the neural tube but stall shortly after the initiation of migration. Live cell imaging analysis demonstrates reduced directedness of migration, increased velocity and mispositioned cell protrusions. In addition, transplantation analysis suggests that cdon is required cell-autonomously for directed NCC migration in the trunk. Interestingly, N-cadherin is mislocalized following cdon knockdown suggesting that the role of cdon in NCCs is to regulate N-cadherin localization. Our results reveal a novel role for cdon in zebrafish neural crest migration, and suggest a mechanism by which Cdon is required to localize N-cadherin to the cell membrane in migratory NCCs for directed migration.

  15. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  16. Differential expression of photoreceptor-specific genes in the retina of a zebrafish cadherin2 mutant glass onion and zebrafish cadherin4 morphants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Frey, R A; Babb-Clendenon, S G; Liu, B; Francl, J; Wilson, A L; Marrs, J A; Stenkamp, D L

    2007-01-01

    Cadherins are Ca2+ -dependent transmembrane molecules that mediate cell-cell adhesion through homophilic interactions. Cadherin2 (also called N-cadherin) and cadherin4 (also called R-cadherin), members of the classic cadherin subfamily, have been shown to be involved in development of a variety of tissues and organs including the visual system. To gain insight into cadherin2 and cadherin4 function in differentiation of zebrafish photoreceptors, we have analyzed expression patterns of several photoreceptor-specific genes (crx, gnat1, gnat2, irbp, otx5, rod opsin, rx1, and uv opsin) and/or a cone photoreceptor marker (zpr-1) in the retina of a zebrafish cadherin2 mutant, glass onion (glo) and in zebrafish embryos injected with a cadherin4 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (cdh4MO). We find that expression of all these genes, and of zpr-1, is greatly reduced in the retina of both the glo and cadherin4 morphants. Moreover, in these embryos, expression of some genes (e.g. gnat1, gnat2 and irbp) is more affected than others (e.g. rod opsin and uv opsin). In embryos with both cadherins functions blocked (glo embryos injected with the cdh4MO), the eye initially formed, but became severely and progressively disintegrated and expressed little or no crx and otx5 as development proceeded. Our results suggest that cadherin2 and cadherin4 play important roles in the differentiation of zebrafish retinal photoreceptors.

  17. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  18. P-Cadherin Expression in Feline Mammary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Ana Catarina; Teodósio, Ana Sofia; Carvalheira, Júlio; Lacerda, Manuela; de Matos, Augusto; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n = 4), hyperplastic (n = 12), and neoplastic (n = 45) feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n = 25) of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P = 0.0001). In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P = 0.0132). Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted. PMID:23091776

  19. Chondroitinase from baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus and chondroitin sulfate from silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Nobuo; Ikeda, Motoko; Shioiri, Tatsumasa; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Watanabe, Hideto

    2013-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a linear polysaccharide composed of repeating disaccharide units of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc) with sulfate groups at various positions. Baculovirus is an insect-pathogenic virus that infects Lepidoptera larvae. Recently, we found that the occlusion-derived virus envelope protein 66 (ODV-E66) from Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) exhibits chondroitin (CH)-digesting activity with distinct substrate specificity. Here, we demonstrate that the ODV-E66 protein from Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) exhibits 92% homology to the amino acid sequence and 83% of the CH lyase activity of ODV-E66 from AcMNPV. ODV-E66 cleaves glycosyl bonds at nonreducing sides of disaccharide units consisting of nonsulfated and 6-O-sulfated GalNAc residues. We then investigated CS in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, which is the host of BmNPV. CS was present in insect tissues such as the midgut, peritrophic membrane, silk gland and skin. The polysaccharide consisted of a nonsulfated disaccharide unit, mono-sulfated disaccharide at Position 4 of the GalNAc residue and mono-sulfated disaccharide at Position 6 of the GalNAc residue. With regard to immunohistochemical analysis, the staining patterns of the silkworm tissues were different among anti-CS antibodies. Chondroitn sulfate that is digestible by ODV-E66 exists sufficiently in the peritrophic membrane protecting the midgut epithelium from ingested pathogens. Our results suggest that ODV-E66 facilitates the primary infection of the virus by digestion of CS in the peritrophic membrane.

  20. Re-evaluation of the PBAN receptor molecule: characterization of PBANR variants expressed in the pheromone glands of moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is initiated following pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) activation. PBANR was initially cloned from pheromone glands (PGs) of Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori. The B. mori PBANR is characterized by a relatively long C-terminus that...

  1. Cadherin-mediated adhesion regulates posterior body formation

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Michael J; Hong, Elim; Fasanmi, Oluwafoyinsa; Brewster, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background The anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate embryo undergoes a dramatic elongation during early development. Convergence and extension of the mesoderm, occurring during gastrulation, initiates the narrowing and lengthening of the embryo. However the lengthening of the axis continues during post-gastrula stages in the tailbud region, and is thought to involve convergent extension movements as well as other cell behaviors specific to posterior regions. Results We demonstrate here, using a semi-dominant N-cadherin allele, that members of the classical cadherin subfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules are required for tailbud elongation in the zebrafish. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors suggests that the extension of posterior axial mesodermal cells is impaired in embryos that carry the semi-dominant N-cadherin allele. This defect most likely results from a general loss of cell-cell adhesion in the tailbud region. Consistent with these observations, N-cadherin is expressed throughout the tailbud during post-gastrulation stages. In addition, we show that N-cadherin interacts synergistically with vang-like 2, a member of the non-canonical Wnt signaling/planar cell polarity pathway, to mediate tail morphogenesis. Conclusion We provide the first evidence here that N-cadherin and other members of the classical cadherin subfamily function in parallel with the planar cell polarity pathway to shape the posterior axis during post-gastrulation stages. These findings further highlight the central role that adhesion molecules play in the cellular rearrangements that drive morphogenesis in vertebrates and identify classical cadherins as major contributors to tail development. PMID:18045497

  2. Expression of Inappropriate Cadherins in Human Breast Carcinomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    1997. Cross-talk between adherens junctions and desmosomes depends on plakoglobin. J. Cell Biol. 136:919-934. Li, Z., W.J. Gallin, G. Lauzon, and M...in breast cancer cells, and likely plays a direct role of E-cadherin correlates with metastatic disease and poor in promoting motility; forced...and M. Takeichl. 1999. p120(ctn) acts Wheelock. 1997. Cross-talk between adherens junctions and desmosomes as an inhibitory regulator of cadherin

  3. Embryonic thermosensitive TRPA1 determines transgenerational diapause phenotype of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sato, Azusa; Sokabe, Takaaki; Kashio, Makiko; Yasukochi, Yuji; Tominaga, Makoto; Shiomi, Kunihiro

    2014-04-01

    In the bivoltine strain of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, embryonic diapause is induced transgenerationally as a maternal effect. Progeny diapause is determined by the environmental temperature during embryonic development of the mother; however, its molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show that the Bombyx TRPA1 ortholog (BmTrpA1) acts as a thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channel that is activated at temperatures above ∼ 21 °C and affects the induction of diapause in progeny. In addition, we show that embryonic RNAi of BmTrpA1 affects diapause hormone release during pupal-adult development. This study identifying a thermosensitive TRP channel that acts as a molecular switch for a relatively long-term predictive adaptive response by inducing an alternative phenotype to seasonal polyphenism is unique.

  4. N-cadherin promotes recruitment and migration of neural progenitor cells from the SVZ neural stem cell niche into demyelinated lesions.

    PubMed

    Klingener, Michael; Chavali, Manideep; Singh, Jagdeep; McMillan, Nadia; Coomes, Alexandra; Dempsey, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-07-16

    Discrete cellular microenvironments regulate stem cell pools and their development, as well as function in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Although the signaling elements modulating neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) niche are fairly well understood, the pathways activated following injury and the resulting outcomes, are less clear. In the present study, we used mouse models of demyelination and proteomics analysis to identify molecular cues present in the adult SVZ niche during injury, and analyzed their role on NPCs in the context of promoting myelin repair. Proteomic analysis of SVZ tissue from mice with experimental demyelination identified several proteins that are known to play roles in NPC proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Among the proteins found to be upregulated were members of the N-cadherin signaling pathway. During the onset of demyelination in the subcortical white matter (SCWM), activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in SVZ NPCs stimulates the interaction between N-cadherin and ADAM10. Upon cleavage and activation of N-cadherin signaling by ADAM10, NPCs undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement and polarization, leading to enhanced migration out of the SVZ into demyelinated lesions of the SCWM. Genetically disrupting either EGFR signaling or ADAM10 inhibits this pathway, preventing N-cadherin regulated NPC polarization and migration. Additionally, in vivo experiments using N-cadherin gain- and loss-of-function approaches demonstrated that N-cadherin enhances the recruitment of SVZ NPCs into demyelinated lesions. Our data revealed that EGFR-dependent N-cadherin signaling physically initiated by ADAM10 cleavage is the response of the SVZ niche to promote repair of the injured brain.

  5. Downregulation of E-cadherin is an essential event in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and expression of its target genes in Pdcd4 knockdown cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Sun, Z-X; Allgayer, H; Yang, H-S

    2010-01-07

    We reported earlier that knockdown of tumor suppressor Pdcd4 (programed cell death 4) downregulates E-cadherin expression and activates beta-catenin/Tcf (T-cell factor)-dependent transcription in colon tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of these observations remains unknown. In this study, we showed that knockdown of Pdcd4 downregulates E-cadherin expression through elevated protein level of Snail. Over-expression of Pdcd4 upregulates E-cadherin expression and inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. We then showed that knockdown of E-cadherin activates beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. Conversely, over-expression of E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. In addition, Pdcd4 knockdown stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and c-Myc expression, whereas u-PAR and c-Myc expression can be reversed by over-expressing E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that beta-catenin/Tcf4 directly binds to the promoters of u-PAR and c-myc in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Futhermore, knockdown of u-PAR or c-Myc inhibits invasion in Pdcd4 knockdown cells, suggesting that both u-PAR and c-Myc contribute to invasion induced by Pdcd4 knockdown. Taken together, our data showed that elevated Snail expression by Pdcd4 knockdown leads to downregulation of E-cadherin resulting in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and stimulating the expression of c-Myc and u-PAR, thus providing molecular explanation of how Pdcd4 suppresses tumor invasion.

  6. Egr-1 mediates epidermal growth factor-induced downregulation of E-cadherin expression via Slug in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J-C; Chang, H-M; Leung, P C K

    2013-02-21

    Loss of the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin increases the invasive capability of ovarian cancer cells. We have previously shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) downregulates E-cadherin and induces ovarian cancer cell invasion through the H(2)O(2)/p38 MAPK-mediated upregulation of the E-cadherin transcriptional repressor Snail. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the EGF-induced downregulation of E-cadherin are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrated that treatment of two ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and OVCAR5, with EGF induced the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1, and this induction was abolished by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of the EGF receptor. EGF-induced Egr-1 expression required the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and was unrelated to EGF-induced H(2)O(2) production and activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Moreover, depletion of Egr-1 with siRNA abolished the EGF-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and increased cell invasion. Interestingly, siRNA depletion of Egr-1 attenuated the EGF-induced expression of Slug, but not that of Snail. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that Slug is a target gene of Egr-1. These results provide evidence that Egr-1 is a mediator that is involved in the EGF-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and increased cell invasion. Our results also demonstrate that EGF activates two independent signaling pathways, which are the H(2)O(2)/p38 MAPK-mediated upregulation of Snail expression and the Egr-1-mediated upregulation of Slug expression. These two signaling pathways contribute to the EGF-induced downregulation of E-cadherin, which subsequently increases the invasive capability of ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha mediates epidermal growth factor-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression and cell invasion in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K

    2013-02-28

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) regulates the transcription of a number of genes under hypoxia and other extracellular stimulations. It has been shown that E-cadherin is down-regulated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF) stimulation, and that cells with low E-cadherin expression are more invasive. Our recent study demonstrated a novel mechanism by which EGF down-regulates E-cadherin expression through production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the activation of p38 MAPK in human ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we were interested in examining the potential role of HIF-1α in cell invasion under normoxic conditions, specifically when cells are treated with EGF, which is known to down-regulate E-cadherin and increase invasiveness. We show that EGF treatment induces HIF-1α expression in two human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3 and OVCAR5), and that this effect is diminished by treatment with a membrane-permeable H(2)O(2) scavenger, PEG-catalase. However, the induction of HIF-1α by EGF did not require the activation of p38 MAPK. Treatment with siRNA targeting HIF-1α reduces both basal and EGF-induced HIF-1α levels. Importantly, treatment with HIF-1α siRNA diminishes the up-regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the down-regulation of E-cadherin by EGF. The involvement of HIF-1α in the down-regulation of E-cadherin was confirmed with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)), a hypoxia-mimetic reagent. Finally, we also show that EGF-induced cell invasion is attenuated by treatment with HIF-1α siRNA. This study demonstrates an important role for HIF-1α in mediating the effects of EGF on Snail, Slug and E-cadherin expression as well as invasiveness in human ovarian cancer cells.

  8. Notch signaling-mediated cell-to-cell interaction is dependent on E-cadherin adhesion in adult rat anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Azuma, Morio; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rat anterior pituitary is composed of hormone-producing cells, non-hormone-producing cells (referred to as folliculostellate cells) and marginal layer cells. In the adult rat, progenitor cells of hormone-producing cells have recently been reported to be maintained within this non-hormone-producing cell population. In tissue, non-hormone-producing cells construct homophilic cell aggregates by the differential expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. We have previously shown that Notch signaling, a known regulator of progenitor cells in a number of organs, is activated in the cell aggregates. We now investigate the relationship between Notch signaling and E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in the pituitary gland. Immunohistochemically, Notch signaling receptor Notch2 and the ligand Jagged1 were localized within E-cadherin-positive cells in the marginal cell layer and in the main part of the anterior lobe, whereas Notch1 was localized in E-cadherin-positive and -negative cells. Activation of Notch signaling within E-cadherin-positive cells was confirmed by immunostaining of the Notch target HES1. Notch2 and Jagged1 were always co-localized within the same cells suggesting that homologous cells have reciprocal effects in activating Notch signaling. When the E-cadherin function was inhibited by exposure to a monoclonal antibody (DECMA-1) in primary monolayer cell culture, the percentage of HES1-positive cells among Notch2-positive cells was less than half that of the control. The present results suggest that E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment is necessary for the activation of Notch signaling in the anterior pituitary gland but not for the expression of the Notch2 molecule.

  9. Transforming Growth Factor β Induces Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration via Noncanonical Signals and N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Dubon, Maria Jose; Yu, Jinyeong; Choi, Sanghyuk; Park, Ki-Sook

    2017-02-18

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) induces the migration and mobilization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to maintain bone homeostasis during bone remodeling and facilitate the repair of peripheral tissues. Although many studies have reported the mechanisms through which TGF-β mediates the migration of various types of cells, including cancer cells, the intrinsic cellular mechanisms underlying cellular migration and mobilization of BM-MSCs mediated by TGF-β are unclear. In this study, we showed that TGF-β activated noncanonical signaling molecules, such as Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and p38, via TGF-β type I receptor in human BM-MSCs and murine BM-MSC-like ST2 cells. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 and Src by PP2 resulted in impaired TGF-β-mediated migration. These results suggested that the Smad-independent, noncanonical signals activated by TGF-β were necessary for migration. We also showed that N-cadherin-dependent intercellular interactions were required for TGF-β-mediated migration using functional inhibition of N-cadherin with EDTA treatment and a neutralizing antibody (GC-4 antibody) or siRNA-mediated knockdown of N-cadherin. However, N-cadherin knockdown did not affect the global activation of noncanonical signals in response to TGF-β. Therefore, these results suggested that the migration of BM-MSCs in response to TGF-β was mediated through N-cadherin and noncanonical TGF-β signals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Force via integrins but not E-cadherin decreases Oct3/4 expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Yuhei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C.; Tanaka, Tetsuya S.; Sato, Masaaki; Wang, Ning

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins or cadherins induces similar cell stiffening responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces cell spreading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical factors play a critical role in fate decisions of stem cells. Recently we have demonstrated that a local force applied via Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides coated magnetic beads to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells increases cell spreading and cell stiffness and decreases Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) gene expression. However, it is not clear whether the effects of the applied stress on these functions of ES cells can be extended to natural extracellular matrix proteins or cell-cell adhesion molecules. Here we show that a local cyclic shear force applied via fibronectin or laminin to integrin receptors increased cell spreading and stiffness, downregulated Oct3/4 gene expression, and decreased cell proliferation rate. In contrast, the same cyclic force applied via cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (Cdh1) had no effects on cell spreading, Oct3/4 gene expression, and the self-renewal of mouse ES cells, but induced significant cell stiffening. Our findings demonstrate that biological responses of ES cells to force applied via integrins are different from those to force via E-cadherin, suggesting that mechanical forces might play different roles in different force transduction pathways to shape early embryogenesis.

  11. CRH suppressed TGFβ1-induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via induction of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lai; Chen, Jiandong; Li, Li; Li, Chuanhua; Chen, Cheng; Li, Shengnan

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in biopsies from breast cancer patients, the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on carcinoma progression is still unclear. Transforming growth factorβ1 (TGFβ1) promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and induces Snail1 and Twist1 expressions. Loss of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mainly repressed by Snail1 and Twist1, has been considered as hallmark of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were used to investigate the effect of CRH on TGFβ1-induced EMT by transwell chamber. And HEK293 cells were transiently transfected with CRHR1 or CRHR2 to explore the definite effects of CRH receptor. We reported that CRH inhibited migration of human breast cancer cells through downregulation of Snail1 and Twist1, and subsequent upregulation of E-cadherin. CRH inhibited TGFβ1-mediated migration of MCF-7 via both CRHR1 and CRHR2 while this inhibition in MDA-MB-231 was mainly via CRHR2. Ectopic re-expression of CRHR1 or CRHR2 respectively in HEK293 cells increased E-cadherin expression after CRH stimulation. Furthermore, CRH repressed expression of mesenchymal marker, N-cadherin and induced expression of Occludin, inhibiting EMT in MCF-7 & MDA-MB-231. Our results suggest that CRH may function as a tumor suppressor, at least partly by regulating TGFβ1-mediated EMT. These results may contribute to uncovering the effect of CRH in breast tumorigenesis and progression.

  12. Expression of inappropriate cadherins by epithelial tumor cells promotes endocytosis and degradation of E-cadherin via competition for p120(ctn).

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Johnson, E; Mandal, S H; Lawson, K R; Keim, S A; Svoboda, R A; Caplan, S; Wahl, J K; Wheelock, M J; Johnson, K R

    2006-08-03

    Cadherin cell-cell adhesion proteins play an important role in modulating the behavior of tumor cells. E-cadherin serves as a suppressor of tumor cell invasion, and when tumor cells turn on the expression of a non-epithelial cadherin, they often express less E-cadherin, enhancing the tumorigenic phenotype of the cells. Here, we show that when A431 cells are forced to express R-cadherin, they dramatically downregulate the expression of endogenous E- and P-cadherin. In addition, we show that this downregulation is owing to increased turnover of the endogenous cadherins via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. p120(ctn) binds to the juxtamembrane domain of classical cadherins and has been proposed to regulate cadherin adhesive activity. One way p120(ctn) may accomplish this is to serve as a rheostat to regulate the levels of cadherin. Here, we show that the degradation of E-cadherin in response to expression of R-cadherin is owing to competition for p120(ctn).

  13. Role of E-cadherin in the induction of apoptosis of HPV16-positive CaSki cervical cancer cells during multicellular tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Haga, Takeshi; Uchide, Noboru; Tugizov, Sharof; Palefsky, Joel M

    2008-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are three dimensional cell culture systems induced by suspension culture. MCTS are widely used in cancer research because of their similarity to solid tumors. CaSki cells are derived from a metastatic cervical cancer containing human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16). Cell death of CaSki cells in MCTS has been previously reported, and our model is used to better characterize the mechanisms of cell death of HPV16-positive keratinocytes. In this study, we found that apoptosis of CaSki cells was induced by suspension culture along with the formation of MCTS after 24 h of incubation. In suspended CaSki cells, monoclonal antibodies blocking E-cadherin function inhibited MCTS formation and suppressed suspension-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot for E-cadherin detected upregulation of the authentic 120 kDa band from MCTS of CaSki cells as well as a shorter 100 kDa band. Addition of EGF, whose receptor is known to form a complex with E-cadherin, abrogated apoptosis of suspended CaSki cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell contact, directly or indirectly, mediates the signal to undergo apoptosis of CaSki cells during MCTS formation, and thus provides new information on the role of E-cadherin in cervical cancer cell apoptosis.

  14. Induction of the LRP16 gene by estrogen promotes the invasive growth of Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yuan Guang; Han, Wei Dong; Zhao, Ya Li; Huang, Ke; Si, Yi Ling; Wu, Zhi Qiang; Mu, Yi Ming

    2007-10-01

    LRP16 was previously identified as an estrogen-induced gene in breast cancer cells. The responsiveness of LRP16 to estrogen and its functional effects in endometrial cancer (EC) cells are still unclear. Here, we show that the mRNA level and promoter activity of the LRP16 gene were significantly increased by 17beta-estradiol (E2) in estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-positive Ishikawa human EC cells. Although the growth rate of Ishikawa cells was not obviously affected by ectopic expression of LRP16, the results of a Transwell assay showed an approximate one-third increase of the invasive capacity of LRP16-overexpressing cells. As a result of molecular screening, we observed that the expression of E-cadherin, an essential adhesion molecule associated with tumor metastasis, was repressed by LRP16. Further promoter analyses demonstrated that LRP16 inhibited E-cadherin transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibition was abolished by estrogen deprivation, indicating that the downregulation of E-cadherin transcription by LRP16 requires ER alpha mediation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the binding of ER alpha to the E-cadherin promoter was antagonized by LRP16, suggesting that LRP16 could interfere with ER alpha-mediated transcription. These results suggest that the upregulation of LRP16 by estrogen could be involved in invasive growth by downregulating E-cadherin in human ECs.

  15. Combining Cadherin Expression with Molecular Markers Discriminates Invasiveness in Growth Hormone and Prolactin Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, N; Romanò, N; Meunier, A-C; Galibert, E; Fontanaud, P; Mathieu, M-N; Osterstock, G; Osterstock, P; Baccino, E; Rigau, V; Loiseau, H; Bouillot-Eimer, S; Barlier, A; Mollard, P; Coutry, N

    2016-02-01

    Although growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas are considered benign, in many patients, tumour growth and/or invasion constitute a particular challenge. In other tumours, progression relies in part on dysfunction of intercellular adhesion mediated by the large family of cadherins. In the present study, we have explored the contribution of cadherins in GH and PRL adenoma pathogenesis, and evaluated whether this class of adherence molecules was related to tumour invasiveness. We have first established, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, the expression profile of classical cadherins in the normal human pituitary gland. We show that the cadherin repertoire is restricted and cell-type specific. Somatotrophs and lactotrophs express mainly E-cadherin and cadherin 18, whereas N-cadherin is present in the other endocrine cell types. This repertoire undergoes major differential modification in GH and PRL tumours: E-cadherin is significantly reduced in invasive GH adenomas, and this loss is associated with a cytoplasmic relocalisation of cadherin 18 and catenins. In invasive prolactinomas, E-cadherin distribution is altered and is accompanied by a mislocalisation of cadherin 18, β-catenin and p120 catenin. Strikingly, de novo expression of N-cadherin is present in a subset of adenomas and cells exhibit a mesenchymal phenotype exclusively in invasive tumours. Binary tree analysis, performed by combining the cadherin repertoire with the expression of a subset of known molecular markers, shows that cadherin/catenin complexes play a significant role in discrimination of tumour invasion.

  16. Cadherin-11 endocytosis through binding to clathrin promotes cadherin-11-mediated migration in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Bilen, Mehmet A; Li, Xiaoxia; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ortiz, Angelica; Kowalczyk, Andrew P; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-12-15

    Cadherin-11 (Cad11) cell adhesion molecule plays a role in prostate cancer cell migration. Because disassembly of adhesion complexes through endocytosis of adhesion proteins has been shown to play a role in cell migration, we examined whether Cad11 endocytosis plays a role in Cad11-mediated migration. The mechanism by which Cad11 is internalized is unknown. Using a GST pulldown assay, we found that clathrin binds to the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain but not to that of E-cadherin. Using deletion analysis, we identified a unique sequence motif, VFEEE, in the Cad11 membrane proximal region (amino acid residues 11-15) that binds to clathrin. Endocytosis assays using K(+)-depletion buffer showed that Cad11 internalization is clathrin dependent. Proximity ligation assays showed that Cad11 colocalizes with clathrin, and immunofluorescence assays showed that Cad11 localizes in vesicles that stain for the early endosomal marker Rab5. Deletion of the VFEEE sequence from the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain (Cad11-cla-Δ5) leads to inhibition of Cad11 internalization and reduces Cad11-mediated cell migration in C4-2B and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells. These observations suggest that clathrin-mediated internalization of Cad11 regulates surface trafficking of Cad11 and that dynamic turnover of Cad11 regulates the migratory function of Cad11 in prostate cancer cells.

  17. Effect of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on the Silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Yue, Yang; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-09-24

    The silkworm Bombyx mori L. (B. mori) has a significant impact on the economy by producing more than 80% of the globally produced raw silk. The exposure of silkworm to pesticides may cause adverse effects on B. mori, such as a reduction in the production and quality of silk. This study aims to assay the effect of venom from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on growth, cuticle and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the silkworm B. mori by the leaf dipping method. The experimental results revealed that the four samples caused neither antifeeding nor a lethal effect on B. mori. The sample SFV inhibited B. mori growth after 6 days of treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The samples SFV, DSFV and Fr-1 inhibited the precipitation and synthesis of chitin in the cuticle after 12 and 14 days of treatment. In the case of the four samples, the AChE was significantly improved after 14 days of treatment.

  18. Effect of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on the Silkworm Bombyx mori L

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Yue, Yang; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori L. (B. mori) has a significant impact on the economy by producing more than 80% of the globally produced raw silk. The exposure of silkworm to pesticides may cause adverse effects on B. mori, such as a reduction in the production and quality of silk. This study aims to assay the effect of venom from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on growth, cuticle and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the silkworm B. mori by the leaf dipping method. The experimental results revealed that the four samples caused neither antifeeding nor a lethal effect on B. mori. The sample SFV inhibited B. mori growth after 6 days of treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The samples SFV, DSFV and Fr-1 inhibited the precipitation and synthesis of chitin in the cuticle after 12 and 14 days of treatment. In the case of the four samples, the AChE was significantly improved after 14 days of treatment. PMID:26404374

  19. T-Cadherin Expression in the Epidermis and Adnexal Structures of Normal Skin

    PubMed Central

    Buechner, Stanislaw; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J.

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cadherin is an atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the cadherin superfamily of adhesion molecules. The role of T-cadherin in biology of the skin is poorly understood. Expression of T-cadherin in basal keratinocytes and dermal blood vessels of the healthy epidermis has been demonstrated, but studies on expression in skin appendages are rare. Methods We conducted an immunohistochemical analysis of T-cadherin expression in the epidermis and adnexal structures of normal skin. Results T-cadherin expression is restricted to basal keratinocytes of the epidermis. The basal cell layer of sebaceous glands was T-cadherin positive, whereas sebocytes were negative. Within apocrine glands, only myoepithelial cells were T-cadherin positive. In contrast, both the secretory coils and excretory ducts of eccrine glands were T-cadherin positive. In terminal hair follicles, the outer root sheath layers strongly expressed T-cadherin throughout different regions of the follicle, with the strongest immunoreactivity at the bulge and suprabulbar regions. T-cadherin and CK15 stem cell marker similarly localized within the bulge and suprabulbar region. T-cadherin and CD34 stem cell marker similarly localized at the suprabulbar level. Conclusion The specific patterns of T-cadherin expression in the epidermis and adnexal structures suggest an important guardian role in skin homeostasis. PMID:27904857

  20. Aligning the proteome and genome of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaozhou; Xia, Qingyou; Xu, Jie; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Wenping; Chen, Jianqing; Zheng, Qingliang; Chen, Qing; Kong, Lingying; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Jiang; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Liu, Lili; Sheng, Qing; Jin, Yongfeng; Wu, Xiangfu

    2009-11-01

    A technology of mass spectrometry (MS) was used in this study for the large-scale proteomic identification and verification of protein-encoding genes present in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) genome. Peptide sequences identified by MS were compared with those from an open reading frame (ORF) library of the B. mori genome and a cDNA library, to validate the coding attributes of ORFs. Two databases were created. The first was based on a 9x draft sequence of the silkworm genome and contained 14,632 putative proteins. The second was based on a B. mori pupal cDNA library containing 3,187 putative proteins of at least 30 amino acid residues in length. A total of 81,000 peptide sequences with a threshold score of 60% were generated by the MS/MS analysis, and 55,400 of these were chosen for a sequence alignment. By searching these two databases, 6,649 and 250 proteins were matched, which accounted for approximately 45.4% and 7.8% of the peptide sequences and putative proteins, respectively. Further analyses carried out by several bioinformatic tools suggested that the matches included proteins with predicted transmembrane domains (1,393) and preproteins with a signal peptide (976). These results provide a fundamental understanding of the expression and function of silkworm proteins.

  1. Metabonomic analysis of Bombyx mori (Heterocera: Bombysidae) treated with acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yin, W M; Xu, X; He, Y; Wei, G B; Sima, Y H; Shi-Qing, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using Bombyx mori as model animal is attracting more attention. Whether the effect of drugs on the metabolite profiling was consistent with those in mammals was an aspect to evaluate the feasibility of B. mori as model animal. In this study, we used acetaminophen to treat Dazao fifth-instar B. mori, and its metabolites in hemolymph were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The corresponding data were processed and analyzed by total model analysis, principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and finally, the difference metabolites between acetaminophen group and control group were selected and identified by our reference material database and the National Institute of Standard and Technology database. The results showed that acetaminophen administration induced elevation of metabolites related to energy source, the intermediate of cholesterol synthesis, and the metabolites related to melanization and also induced the decrease of metabolites in pathway of Krebs cycle, the cholesterol, and sitosterol, which suggested that acetaminophen administration inhibited energy metabolism and promoted the expenditure and imbalance of hormone and melanization.

  2. Can the silkworm (Bombyx mori) be used as a human disease model?

    PubMed

    Tabunoki, Hiroko; Bono, Hidemasa; Ito, Katsuhiko; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Bombyx mori (silkworm) is the most famous lepidopteran in Japan. B. mori has long been used in the silk industry and also as a model insect for agricultural research. In recent years, B. mori has attracted interest in its potential for use in pathological analysis of model animals. For example, the human macular carotenoid transporter was discovered using information of B. mori carotenoid transporter derived from yellow-cocoon strain. The B. mori carotenoid transport system is useful in human studies. To develop a human disease model, we characterized the human homologs of B. mori, and by constructing KAIKO functional annotation pipeline, and to analyze gene expression profile of a unique B. mori mutant strain using microarray analysis. As a result, we identified a novel molecular network involved in Parkinson's disease. Here we describe the potential use of a spontaneous mutant silkworm strain as a human disease model. We also summarize recent progress in the application of genomic information for annotation of human homologs in B. mori. The B. mori mutant will provide a clue to pathological mechanisms, and the findings will be helpful for the development of therapies and for medical drug discovery.

  3. JAK/STAT signaling pathway-mediated immune response in silkworm (Bombyx mori) challenged by Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Lv, Ding-Ding; Huang, Yu-Xia; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Qin, Guang-Xing; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2016-12-20

    Innate immunity was critical in insects defensive system and able to be induced by Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription cascade transduction (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. Currently, it had been identified many JAK/STAT signaling pathway-related genes in silkworm, but little function was known on insect innate immunity. To explore the roles of JAK/STAT pathway in antifungal immune response in silkworm (Bombyx mori) against Beauveria bassiana infection, the expression patterns of B. mori C-type lectin 5 (BmCTL5) and genes encoding 6 components of JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm challenged by B. bassiana were analyzed using quantitative real time PCR. Meanwhile the activation of JAK/STAT signaling pathway by various pathogenic micro-organisms and the affect of JAK/STAT signaling pathway inhibitors on antifungal activity in silkworm hemolymph was also detected. Moreover, RNAi assay of BmCTL5 and the affect on expression levels of signaling factors were also analyzed. We found that JAK/STAT pathway could be obviously activated in silkworm challenged with B. bassiana and had no response to bacteria and B. mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV). However, the temporal expression patterns of JAK/STAT signaling pathway related genes were significantly different. B. mori downstream receptor kinase (BmDRK) might be a positive regulator of JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm against B. bassiana infection. Moreover, antifungal activity assay showed that the suppression of JAK/STAT signaling pathway by inhibitors could significantly inhibit the antifungal activity in hemolymph and resulted in increased sensitivity of silkworm to B. bassiana infection, indicating that JAK/STAT signaling pathway might be involved in the synthesis and secretion of antifungal substances. The results of RNAi assays suggested that BmCTL5 might be one pattern recognition receptors for JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm. These findings yield insights for better

  4. A mechanically active heterotypic E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion enables fibroblasts to drive cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Kato, Takuya; Brugués, Agustí; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Derzsi, Stefanie; Arwert, Esther; Weston, Anne; González-Tarragó, Victor; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Alcaraz, Jordi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Sahai, Erik; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumour invasion and metastasis. We show that CAFs exert a physical force on cancer cells that enables their collective invasion. Force transmission is mediated by a heterophilic adhesion involving N-cadherin at the CAF membrane and E-cadherin at the cancer cell membrane. This adhesion is mechanically active; when subjected to force it triggers β-catenin recruitment and adhesion reinforcement dependent on α-catenin/vinculin interaction. Impairment of E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion abrogates the ability of CAFs to guide collective cell migration and blocks cancer cell invasion. N-cadherin also mediates repolarization of the CAFs away from the cancer cells. In parallel, nectins and afadin are recruited to the cancer cell/CAF interface and CAF repolarization is afadin dependent. Heterotypic junctions between CAFs and cancer cells are observed in patient-derived material. Together, our findings show that a mechanically active heterophilic adhesion between CAFs and cancer cells enables cooperative tumour invasion.

  5. Resolving the molecular mechanism of cadherin catch bond formation

    SciTech Connect

    Manibog, Kristine; Li, Hui; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2014-06-02

    Classical cadherin Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins play key roles in embryogenesis and in maintaining tissue integrity. Cadherins mediate robust adhesion by binding in multiple conformations. One of these adhesive states, called an X-dimer, forms catch bonds that strengthen and become longer lived in the presence of mechanical force. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope along with molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations to resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying catch bond formation and the role of Ca(2+) ions in this process. Our data suggest that tensile force bends the cadherin extracellular region such that they form long-lived, force-induced hydrogen bonds that lock X-dimers into tighter contact. When Ca(2+) concentration is decreased, fewer de novo hydrogen bonds are formed and catch bond formation is eliminated

  6. E-cadherin downregulation in cancer: fuel on the fire?

    PubMed

    Guilford, P

    1999-04-01

    The development, maintenance and repair of tissue requires an exquisite balance between cell proliferation, cell adhesion and cell motility. Equally, tumour initiation and progression are characterized by not only the abnormal expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and survival but also by genes responsible for the control of cell adhesion and cell motility. Central to the process of cell-cell adhesion in epithelial tissues is E-cadherin. Loss of E-cadherin function in tumours results in the rapid progression of relatively benign adenomas to invasive, metastatic carcinomas. Germline mutation of the E-cadherin gene predisposes to diffuse, poorly differentiated gastric cancer, and its downregulation in sporadic tumours is associated with poor clinical prognosis.

  7. Tuning molecular weights of Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk sericin to modify its assembly structures and materials formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingying; Shuai, Yajun; Zhou, Guanshan; Mandal, Namita; Zhu, Liangjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-27

    Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk sericin is a protein with features desirable as a biomaterial, such as increased hydrophilicity and biodegradation, as well as resistance to oxidation, bacteria, and ultraviolet light. In contrast to other widely studied B. mori silk proteins such as fibroin, sericin is still unexplored as a building block for fabricating biomaterial, and thus a facile technique of processing it into a material is needed. Here, electrospinning technology was used to fabricate it into biomaterials from two forms of B. mori silk sericin with different molecular weights, one is a low (12.0 kDa) molecular sericin (LS) form and another is a high (66.0 kDa) molecular weight sericin (HS) form. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that LS in hexafluoroacetone (HFA) solvent adopted a predominantly random coil conformation, whereas HS tended to form a β-sheet structure along with a large content of random coils. In addition, LS and HS in HFA solvent were found to form cylinder-like smaller nanoparticles and larger irregular aggregates before electrospinning, respectively. As a result, biomaterials based on microparticles and nanofibers were successfully fabricated by electrospinning of LS and HS dissolved in HFA, respectively. The cell viability and differentiation assay indicated that nanofibers and microparticles improved cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation, proving that the scaffolds electrospun from sericin are biocompatible regardless of its molecular weight. The microparticles, not common in electrospinning of silk proteins reported previously, were found to promote the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in comparison to the nanofibers. This study suggested that molecular weight of sericin mediates its secondary structure and assembly structure, which in turn leads to a control of final morphology of the electrospun materials. The microparticles and nanofibers of sericin can be potentially used as building blocks for fabricating

  8. Tuning Molecular Weights of Bombyx mori (B. mori) Silk Sericin to Modify Its Assembly Structures and Materials Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk sericin is a protein with features desirable as a biomaterial, such as increased hydrophilicity and biodegradation, as well as resistance to oxidation, bacteria, and ultraviolet light. In contrast to other widely studied B. mori silk proteins such as fibroin, sericin is still unexplored as a building block for fabricating biomaterial, and thus a facile technique of processing it into a material is needed. Here, electrospinning technology was used to fabricate it into biomaterials from two forms of B. mori silk sericin with different molecular weights, one is a low (12.0 kDa) molecular sericin (LS) form and another is a high (66.0 kDa) molecular weight sericin (HS) form. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that LS in hexafluoroacetone (HFA) solvent adopted a predominantly random coil conformation, whereas HS tended to form a β-sheet structure along with a large content of random coils. In addition, LS and HS in HFA solvent were found to form cylinder-like smaller nanoparticles and larger irregular aggregates before electrospinning, respectively. As a result, biomaterials based on microparticles and nanofibers were successfully fabricated by electrospinning of LS and HS dissolved in HFA, respectively. The cell viability and differentiation assay indicated that nanofibers and microparticles improved cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation, proving that the scaffolds electrospun from sericin are biocompatible regardless of its molecular weight. The microparticles, not common in electrospinning of silk proteins reported previously, were found to promote the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in comparison to the nanofibers. This study suggested that molecular weight of sericin mediates its secondary structure and assembly structure, which in turn leads to a control of final morphology of the electrospun materials. The microparticles and nanofibers of sericin can be potentially used as building blocks for fabricating

  9. Guidance of Signaling Activations by Cadherins and Integrins in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roggiani, Francesca; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Rea, Katia; Tomassetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest tumor among gynecological cancer in the industrialized countries. The EOC incidence and mortality have remained unchanged over the last 30 years, despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment. In order to develop novel and more effective therapeutic approaches, the molecular mechanisms involved in EOC progression have been thoroughly investigated in the last few decades. At the late stage, peritoneal metastases originate from the attachment of small clusters of cancer cells that shed from the primary site and carried by the ascites adhere to the abdominal peritoneum or omentum. This behavior suggests that cell–cell or cell–matrix adhesion mechanisms regulate EOC growth and dissemination. Complex downstream signalings, which might be influenced by functional cross-talk between adhesion molecules and co-expressed and activated signaling proteins, can affect the proliferation/survival and the migration/invasion of EOC cells. This review aimed to define the impact of the mechanisms of cell–cell, through cadherins, and cell–extracellular matrix adhesion, through integrins, on the signaling cascades induced by membrane receptors and cytoplasmic proteins known to have a role in the proliferation, migration and invasion of EOC cells. Finally, some novel approaches using peptidomimetic ligands to cadherin and integrins are summarized. PMID:27563880

  10. A Single Point Mutation Resulting in Cadherin Mislocalization Underpins Resistance against Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Cotton Bollworm.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yutao; Dai, Qing; Hu, Ruqin; Pacheco, Sabino; Yang, Yongbo; Liang, Gemei; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Kaiyu; Wu, Kongming

    2017-02-17

    Transgenic plants that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) toxins are cultivated worldwide to control insect pests. Resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins threatens this technology, and although different resistance mechanisms have been identified, some have not been completely elucidated. To gain new insights into these mechanisms, we performed multiple back-crossing from a 3000-fold Cry1Ac-resistant BtR strain from cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), isolating a 516-fold Cry1Ac-resistant strain (96CAD). Cry1Ac resistance in 96CAD was tightly linked to a mutant cadherin allele (mHaCad) that contained 35 amino acid substitutions compared with HaCad from a susceptible strain (96S). We observed significantly reduced levels of the mHaCad protein on the surface of the midgut epithelium in 96CAD as compared with 96S. Expression of both cadherin alleles from 96CAD and 96S in insect cells and immunofluorescence localization in insect midgut tissue sections showed that the HaCAD protein from 96S localizes on the cell membrane, whereas the mutant 96CAD-mHaCad was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mapping of the mutations identified a D172G substitution mainly responsible for cadherin mislocalization. Our finding of a mutation affecting membrane receptor trafficking represents an unusual and previously unrecognized B. thuringiensis resistance mechanism.

  11. Molecular and neural mechanisms of sex pheromone reception and processing in the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    Male moths locate their mates using species-specific sex pheromones emitted by conspecific females. One striking feature of sex pheromone recognition in males is the high degree of specificity and sensitivity at all levels, from the primary sensory processes to behavior. The silkmoth Bombyx mori is an excellent model insect in which to decipher the underlying mechanisms of sex pheromone recognition due to its simple sex pheromone communication system, where a single pheromone component, bombykol, elicits the full sexual behavior of male moths. Various technical advancements that cover all levels of analysis from molecular to behavioral also allow the systematic analysis of pheromone recognition mechanisms. Sex pheromone signals are detected by pheromone receptors expressed in olfactory receptor neurons in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea on male antennae. The signals are transmitted to the first olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), and then are processed further in the higher centers (mushroom body and lateral protocerebrum) to elicit orientation behavior toward females. In recent years, significant progress has been made elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of sex pheromones. In addition, extensive studies of the AL and higher centers have provided insights into the neural basis of pheromone processing in the silkmoth brain. This review describes these latest advances, and discusses what these advances have revealed about the mechanisms underlying the specific and sensitive recognition of sex pheromones in the silkmoth. PMID:24744736

  12. Surface display and bioactivity of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase on Pichia pastoris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To construct the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) cell surface display system of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase (BmAChE), the gene for the anchor protein (AGa1) was obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was fused with the modified Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase gene (bmace) and transformed int...

  13. Amplification of Type II Cadherins in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    specimens using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) spanning the amplified region. We previously assembled a complete contig of BAC clones...tumors samples, including stomach, esophagus, lung, colon, thyroid, kidney, breast, liver, urinary bladder, ovary and pancreas . These data indicate...derived from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing 18q22.1 genomic sequences. This narrowed region was 680 kilobases and included the cadherin 7

  14. M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions activate satellite cell division.

    PubMed

    Marti, Merce; Montserrat, Núria; Pardo, Cristina; Mulero, Lola; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Andrés Vaquero, José; Kuebler, Bernd; Morera, Cristina; Barrero, María José; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-15

    Adult muscle stem cells and their committed myogenic precursors, commonly referred to as the satellite cell population, are involved in both muscle growth after birth and regeneration after damage. It has been previously proposed that, under these circumstances, satellite cells first become activated, divide and differentiate, and only later fuse to the existing myofiber through M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions. Our data show that satellite cells fuse with the myofiber concomitantly to cell division, and only when the nuclei of the daughter cells are inside the myofiber, do they complete the process of differentiation. Here we demonstrate that M-cadherin plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition and fusion, and is crucial for cell division activation. Treatment of satellite cells with M-cadherin in vitro stimulates cell division, whereas addition of anti-M-cadherin antibodies reduces the cell division rate. Our results suggest an alternative model for the contribution of satellite cells to muscle development, which might be useful in understanding muscle regeneration, as well as muscle-related dystrophies.

  15. E-cadherin endocytosis regulates the activity of Rap1: a traffic light GTPase at the crossroads between cadherin and integrin function.

    PubMed

    Balzac, Fiorella; Avolio, Maria; Degani, Simona; Kaverina, Irina; Torti, Mauro; Silengo, Lorenzo; Small, J Victor; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2005-10-15

    The coordinate modulation of cadherin and integrin functions plays an essential role in fundamental physiological and pathological processes, including morphogenesis and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional crosstalk between cadherins and integrins are still elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the small GTPase Rap1, a crucial regulator of the inside-out activation of integrins, is a target for E-cadherin-mediated outside-in signaling. In particular, we show that a strong activation of Rap1 occurs upon adherens junction disassembly that is triggered by E-cadherin internalization and trafficking along the endocytic pathway. By contrast, Rap1 activity is not influenced by integrin outside-in signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the E-cadherin endocytosis-dependent activation of Rap1 is associated with and controlled by an increased Src kinase activity, and is paralleled by the colocalization of Rap1 and E-cadherin at the perinuclear Rab11-positive recycling endosome compartment, and the association of Rap1 with a subset of E-cadherin-catenin complexes that does not contain p120ctn. Conversely, Rap1 activity is suppressed by the formation of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell junctions as well as by agents that inhibit either Src activity or E-cadherin internalization and intracellular trafficking. Finally, we demonstrate that the E-cadherin endocytosis-dependent activation of Rap1 is associated with and is required for the formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Our findings provide the first evidence of an E-cadherin-modulated endosomal signaling pathway involving Rap1, and suggest that cadherins may have a novel modulatory role in integrin adhesive functions by fine-tuning Rap1 activation.

  16. Survey and Analysis of Microsatellites in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M. Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M.; Madhu, M.; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K.; Nagaraju, J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of ≥15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and ≥5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2–14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  17. Dragon (repulsive guidance molecule RGMb) inhibits E-cadherin expression and induces apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Li, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yueshui; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wan, Chao; Yang, Baoxue; Lan, Hui-Yao; Lin, Herbert Y; Xia, Yin

    2013-11-01

    Dragon is one of the three members of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family, i.e. RGMa, RGMb (Dragon), and RGMc (hemojuvelin). We previously identified the RGM members as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptors that enhance BMP signaling. Our previous studies found that Dragon is highly expressed in the tubular epithelial cells of mouse kidneys. However, the roles of Dragon in renal epithelial cells are yet to be defined. We now show that overexpression of Dragon increased cell death induced by hypoxia in association with increased cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and cleaved caspase-3 levels in mouse inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD3) cells. Dragon also inhibited E-cadherin expression but did not affect epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-β in IMCD3 cells. Previous studies suggest that the three RGM members can function as ligands for the receptor neogenin. Interestingly, our present study demonstrates that the Dragon actions on apoptosis and E-cadherin expression in IMCD3 cells were mediated by the neogenin receptor but not through the BMP pathway. Dragon expression in the kidney was up-regulated by unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice. Compared with wild-type mice, heterozygous Dragon knock-out mice exhibited 45-66% reduction in Dragon mRNA expression, decreased epithelial apoptosis, and increased tubular E-cadherin expression and had attenuated tubular injury after unilateral ureteral obstruction. Our results suggest that Dragon may impair tubular epithelial integrity and induce epithelial apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. BmRobo1a and BmRobo1b control axon repulsion in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Yang; Cui, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-02-15

    The development of the nervous system is based on the growth and connection of axons, and axon guidance molecules are the dominant regulators during this course. Robo, as the receptor of axon guidance molecule Slit, plays a key role as a conserved repellent cue for axon guidance during the development of the central nervous system. However, the function of Robo in the silkworm Bombyx mori is unknown. In this study, we cloned two novel robo genes in B. mori (Bmrobo1a and Bmrobo1b). BmRobo1a and BmRobo1b lack an Ig and a FNIII domain in the extracellular region and the CC0 and CC2 motifs in the intracellular region. BmRobo1a and BmRobo1b were colocalized with BmSlit in the neuropil. Knock-down of Bmrobo1a and Bmrobo1b by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in abnormal development of axons. Our results suggest that BmRobo1a and BmRobo1b have repulsive function in axon guidance, even though their structures are different from Robo1 of other species.

  19. Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity under the control of Frizzled.

    PubMed

    Usui, T; Shima, Y; Shimada, Y; Hirano, S; Burgess, R W; Schwarz, T L; Takeichi, M; Uemura, T

    1999-09-03

    We identified a seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily, designated Flamingo (Fmi), localized at cell-cell boundaries in the Drosophila wing. In the absence of Fmi, planar polarity was distorted. Before morphological polarization of wing cells along the proximal-distal (P-D) axis, Fmi was redistributed predominantly to proximal and distal cell edges. This biased localization of Fmi appears to be driven by an imbalance of the activity of Frizzled (Fz) across the proximal/distal cell boundary. These results, together with phenotypes caused by ectopic expression of fz and fmi, suggest that cells acquire the P-D polarity by way of the Fz-dependent boundary localization of Fmi.

  20. N-cadherin expression level distinguishes reserved versus primed states of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haug, Jeffrey S; He, Xi C; Grindley, Justin C; Wunderlich, Joshua P; Gaudenz, Karin; Ross, Jason T; Paulson, Ariel; Wagner, Kathryn P; Xie, Yucai; Zhu, Ruihong; Yin, Tong; Perry, John M; Hembree, Mark J; Redenbaugh, Erin P; Radice, Glenn L; Seidel, Christopher; Li, Linheng

    2008-04-10

    Osteoblasts expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule N-cadherin form a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. Therefore, we examined how N-cadherin expression in HSCs relates to their function. We found that bone marrow (BM) cells highly expressing N-cadherin (N-cadherin(hi)) are not stem cells, being largely devoid of a Lineage(-)Sca1(+)cKit(+) population and unable to reconstitute hematopoietic lineages in irradiated recipient mice. Instead, long-term HSCs form distinct populations expressing N-cadherin at intermediate (N-cadherin(int)) or low (N-cadherin(lo)) levels. The minority N-cadherin(lo) population can robustly reconstitute the hematopoietic system, express genes that may prime them to mobilize, and predominate among HSCs mobilized from BM to spleen. The larger N-cadherin(int) population performs poorly in reconstitution assays when freshly isolated but improves in response to overnight in vitro culture. Their expression profile and lower cell-cycle entry rate suggest N-cadherin(int) cells are being held in reserve. Thus, differential N-cadherin expression reflects functional distinctions between two HSC subpopulations.

  1. Complementary and dynamic type II cadherin expression associated with development of the primate visual system.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    The middle temporal visual area (MT, also known as V5) is a visual association area that is particularly evolved in the primate brain. The MT receives input from the primary visual area (V1), constitutes part of the dorsal visual pathway, and plays an essential role in processing motion. Connections between the MT and V1 in the primate brain are formed after birth, and are related to the maturation of visual system. However, it remains to be determined what molecular mechanisms control the formation and maturation of the visual system. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins, originally isolated as cell adhesion molecules, which have multiple roles in synapse formation and function. To investigate potential involvement of cadherins in development of the primate visual system, we examined type II cadherin expression (cadherin-6, -8, -12) in cortical and thalamic visual areas of pre- and postnatal brains of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). In the prenatal brain, cadherin-6 was dominantly expressed in the pulvino-MT pathway whereas cadherin-8 was dominant in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)-V1 pathway. During postnatal development, there was a downregulation of cadherin-6 and upregulation of cadherin-8 expression in the MT. The timing of this cadherin exchange preceded the development of V1-MT connections. Our results suggest the possibility that changes in cadherin expression are involved in the development of the primate visual system, and that a switch in cadherin expression may be a general mechanism to control neural plasticity of highly cognitive abilities.

  2. Drosophila N-cadherin mediates an attractive interaction between photoreceptor axons and their targets

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Saurabh; Caldwell, Jason C; Eberl, Daniel F; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    Classical cadherins have been proposed to mediate interactions between pre- and postsynaptic cells that are necessary for synapse formation. We provide the first direct, genetic evidence in favor of this model by examining the role of N-cadherin in controlling the pattern of synaptic connections made by photoreceptor axons in Drosophila. N-cadherin is required in both individual photoreceptors and their target neurons for photoreceptor axon extension. Cell-by-cell reconstruction of wild-type photoreceptor axons extending within mosaic patches of mutant target cells shows that N-cadherin mediates attractive interactions between photoreceptors and their targets. This interaction is not limited to those cells that will become the synaptic partners of photoreceptors. Multiple N-cadherin isoforms are produced, but single isoforms can substitute for endogenous N-cadherin activity. We propose that N-cadherin mediates a homophilic, attractive interaction between photoreceptor growth cones and their targets that precedes synaptic partner choice. PMID:15735641

  3. Co-expression and clinical utility of Snail and N-cadherin in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiangshan; Shi, Ranran; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma is one of the most common subtypes of thyroid cancer and portends a good prognosis. N-cadherin (neural cadherin) is a member of the classical cadherin family and is often overexpressed in many types of cancers. Snail, a kind of zinc finger protein, is a transcriptional repressor which has been intensively studied in mammals. We investigate the immunohistochemical expression of Snail and N-cadherin in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues and cells and then discuss the clinical value of Snail and N-cadherin expression. Immunohistochemical technique was performed to detect Snail and N-cadherin in 60 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma and analyzed the relationship between the expression of Snail, N-cadherin, and clinicopathological indicators. Western blot was used to investigate the constitutive and inducible expression of Snail and N-cadherin. In our study, the expression rate of Snail and N-cadherin was 85.0 % (51/60) and 78.3 % (47/60), respectively, in papillary thyroid carcinoma. The expression rate of Snail and N-cadherin in thyroid papillary carcinoma with metastatic lymph nodes was 93.3 and 86.7 %, respectively, while in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissue without lymph node metastasis, the expression rate was 60.0 and 53.3 %, respectively. The positive correlation of Snail and N-cadherin was observed (r = 0.721, p < 0.01). In addition, Western blot further identified the constitutive and inducible expression of Snail and N-cadherin in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues and cell lines. In conclusion, Snail and N-cadherin are constitutively and inducibly expressed in papillary thyroid carcinoma and may play important roles in the development and metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Snail and N-cadherin may be used as an effective indicator.

  4. Retrotransposon "Qian" mediated segmental duplication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunmin; Jiang, Ning; Zou, Ziliang; Tu, Zhijian; Chen, Anli; Zhao, Qiaoling; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2014-03-01

    Transposable elements constitute a large fraction of the eukaryotic genomes. They have the potential to alter genome structure and play a major role in genome evolution. Here, we report a segmental duplication mediated by a novel long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon as the cause of an egg-shell recessive lethal mutant (l-em mutant) in silkworm (Bombyx mori). The segmental duplication resulted in the duplication of six genes and the disruption of two genes. Disruption of BmEP80 (B. mori egg protein 80), a gene encoding a major egg-shell structure protein, is likely responsible for the lethal water-loss phenotype in the l-em/l-em mutant. Our data revealed that BmEP80 is present in the inner egg-shell layer and plays important roles in resistance to water efflux form eggs. A novel LTR retrotransposon (named as "Qian") was identified and the model for the Qian-mediated chromosomal segmental duplication was proposed. Detail biochemical and genomic analyses on the l-em mutant offer an opportunity to demonstrate that an LTR retrotransposon could trigger duplication of a chromosomal segment (∼96.3 kb) and confer novel phenotype.

  5. Diapause prevention effect of Bombyx mori by dimethyl sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takayuki; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    HCl treatment has been, for about 80 years, the primary method for the prevention of entry into embryonic diapauses of Bombyx mori. This is because no method is as effective as the HCl treatment. In this study, we discovered that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) prevented entry into the diapause of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The effect of diapause prevention was 78% as a result of treatment with 100% DMSO concentration, and the effect was comparable to that of the HCl treatment. In contrast, in the case of non-diapause eggs, hatchability was decreased by DMSO in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of DMSO was restricted within 24 hours after oviposition of diapause eggs, and the critical period was slightly shorter than the effective period of the HCl treatment. DMSO analogs, such as dimethyl formamide (DMF) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), did little preventive effect against the diapause. Furthermore, we also investigated the permeation effects of chemical compounds by DMSO. When treated with an inhibitor of protein kinase CK2 (CK2) dissolved in DMSO, the prevention rate of the diapause was less than 40%. This means that the inhibition effect by the CK2 inhibitor was the inhibition of embryonic development after diapause prevention by DMSO. These data suggest that DMSO has the effects of preventing from entering into the diapause and permeation of chemicals into diapause eggs.

  6. Cadherin is involved in the action of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Hou, Leilei; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Li, Bo; Deng, Pan; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Chen, Lizhen; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to "pyramid" two or more Bt proteins that bind to distinct receptor proteins within the insect midgut. The most common Bt pyramid in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employs Cry1Ac with Cry2Ab to target several key lepidopteran pests, including the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), which is a serious migratory pest of many vegetable crops and is increasingly important in cotton in China. While cadherin and aminopeptidase-N are key receptors of Cry1 toxins in many lepidopterans including S. exigua, the receptor for Cry2A toxins remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a heterologous expressed peptide corresponding to cadherin repeat 7 to the membrane proximal extracellular domain (CR7-MPED) in the S. exigua cadherin 1b (SeCad1b) binds Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. Moreover, SeCad1b transcription was suppressed in S. exigua larvae by oral RNA interference and susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa was significantly reduced. These results indicate that SeCad1b plays important functional roles of both Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, having major implications for resistance management for S. exigua in Bt crops.

  7. Vitamin D regulates tyrosine hydroxylase expression: N-cadherin a possible mediator.

    PubMed

    Cui, X; Pertile, R; Liu, P; Eyles, D W

    2015-09-24

    Vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid. Its genomic actions are mediated via the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The VDR emerges in the rat mesencephalon at embryonic day 12, representing the peak period of dopaminergic cell birth. Our prior studies reveal that developmental vitamin D (DVD)-deficiency alters the ontogeny of dopaminergic neurons in the developing mesencephalon. There is also consistent evidence from others that 1,25(OH)2D3 promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in models of dopaminergic toxicity. In both developmental and toxicological studies it has been proposed that 1,25(OH)2D3 may modulate the differentiation and maturation of dopaminergic neurons; however, to date there is lack of direct evidence. The aim of the current study is to investigate this both in vitro using a human SH-SY5Y cell line transfected with rodent VDR and in vivo using a DVD-deficient model. Here we show that in VDR-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly increased production of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. This effect was dose- and time-dependent, but was not due to an increase in TH-positive cell number, nor was it due to the production of trophic survival factors for dopamine neurons such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In accordance with 1,25(OH)2D3's anti-proliferative actions in the brain, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced the percentage of dividing cells from approximately 15-10%. Given the recently reported role of N-cadherin in the direct differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, we examined here whether it may be elevated by 1,25(OH)2D3. We confirmed this in vitro and more importantly, we showed DVD-deficiency decreases N-cadherin expression in the embryonic mesencephalon. In summary, in our in vitro model we have shown 1,25(OH)2D3 increases TH expression, decreases proliferation and elevates N-cadherin, a potential factor that mediates these processes

  8. Novel Macula-Like Virus Identified in Bombyx mori Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsuma, Susumu; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Omuro, Naoko; Takabuchi, Lisa; Daimon, Takaaki; Imanishi, Shigeo; Yamashita, Shuichi; Iwanaga, Masashi; Mita, Kazuei; Maeda, Susumu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimada, Toru

    2005-01-01

    We identified a novel, 6,513-bp-long RNA, termed Bombyx mori macula-like latent virus (BmMLV) RNA, which abundantly expressed in B. mori cultured BmN cells. BmMLV RNA potentially encodes two proteins, putative RNA replicase and coat protein, which share structural features and sequence similarities with those of a plant RNA virus, the genus Maculavirus. Northern blot analysis showed that two transcripts were expressed in BmN cells: a 6.5-kb-long RNA, which contains both putative RNA replicase and coat protein genes, and a 1.2-kb-long RNA, which contains only a coat protein gene. Southern blot analysis showed that BmMLV RNA is not carried by the B. mori genome. RT-PCR analysis also revealed the presence of BmMLV RNA in several B. mori cell lines other than BmN cells, suggesting that BmMLV RNA latently exists in B. mori cultured cells. Infection studies showed that BmMLV virions were able to infect BmMLV-negative Spodoptera frugiperda Sf-9 cells and B. mori larvae. Electron microscopy and Northern blot analysis of a purified BmMLV revealed that isometric virions appear to be 28 to 30 nm in diameter and contain a 6.5-kb genomic RNA. These results showed that BmMLV is a novel macula-like virus infectious to and replicable in B. mori-derived cells. PMID:15827172

  9. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  10. Molecular determinants of cadherin ideal bond formation: Conformation-dependent unbinding on a multidimensional landscape

    PubMed Central

    Manibog, Kristine; Sankar, Kannan; Kim, Sun-Ae; Zhang, Yunxiang; Jernigan, Robert L.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2016-01-01

    Classical cadherin cell–cell adhesion proteins are essential for the formation and maintenance of tissue structures; their primary function is to physically couple neighboring cells and withstand mechanical force. Cadherins from opposing cells bind in two distinct trans conformations: strand-swap dimers and X-dimers. As cadherins convert between these conformations, they form ideal bonds (i.e., adhesive interactions that are insensitive to force). However, the biophysical mechanism for ideal bond formation is unknown. Here, we integrate single-molecule force measurements with coarse-grained and atomistic simulations to resolve the mechanistic basis for cadherin ideal bond formation. Using simulations, we predict the energy landscape for cadherin adhesion, the transition pathways for interconversion between X-dimers and strand-swap dimers, and the cadherin structures that form ideal bonds. Based on these predictions, we engineer cadherin mutants that promote or inhibit ideal bond formation and measure their force-dependent kinetics using single-molecule force-clamp measurements with an atomic force microscope. Our data establish that cadherins adopt an intermediate conformation as they shuttle between X-dimers and strand-swap dimers; pulling on this conformation induces a torsional motion perpendicular to the pulling direction that unbinds the proteins and forms force-independent ideal bonds. Torsional motion is blocked when cadherins associate laterally in a cis orientation, suggesting that ideal bonds may play a role in mechanically regulating cadherin clustering on cell surfaces. PMID:27621473

  11. Cis and Trans Cooperativity of E-Cadherin Mediates Adhesion in Biomimetic Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Jorjadze, Ivane; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of cell-cell adhesion is important in cell motility, tissue growth, and for the mechanical integrity of tissues. Although the role of active cytoskeleton dynamics in regulating cadherin interactions is crucial in vivo, here we present a biomimetic emulsion system to characterize the passive E-cadherin-mediated adhesion between droplets. The visualization of a three-dimensional assembly of lipid droplets, functionalized with extracellular E-cadherin domains, reveals a hierarchy of homophilic interactions. First, the high interfacial tension of droplets facilitates trans cadherin-cadherin adhesion, which is strong enough to stabilize looser than random close packing configurations. Second, fluorescence enhancement shows that adding clustering agents, such as calcium or chelating ligands, favor the lateral cis adhesion of the already bound cadherin pairs over the clustering of monomer cadherin on the surface. Finally, above a threshold cadherin and calcium concentration, the cis and trans protein interactions become strong enough to trigger and promote droplet fusion. While E-cadherin is not known to participate in cellular fusion, this mechanism is general because replacing calcium with cholesterol to cluster the cadherin-carrying lipids also promotes fusion. These results suggest that passive clustering, via calcium-induced dimerization or membrane ordering, may contribute to the reinforcement of cell-cell contacts. Alternatively, a molecular switch for fusion offers a route to mixing droplet contents and controlling their size in situ. PMID:26789762

  12. The formation of ordered nanoclusters controls cadherin anchoring to actin and cell–cell contact fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Duchesne, Laurence; Peyret, Grégoire; Montel, Lorraine; Nguyen, Thao; Png, Evelyn; Tampé, Robert; Troyanovsky, Sergey; Hénon, Sylvie; Ladoux, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Oligomerization of cadherins could provide the stability to ensure tissue cohesion. Cadherins mediate cell–cell adhesion by forming trans-interactions. They form cis-interactions whose role could be essential to stabilize intercellular junctions by shifting cadherin clusters from a fluid to an ordered phase. However, no evidence has been provided so far for cadherin oligomerization in cellulo and for its impact on cell–cell contact stability. Visualizing single cadherins within cell membrane at a nanometric resolution, we show that E-cadherins arrange in ordered clusters, providing the first demonstration of the existence of oligomeric cadherins at cell–cell contacts. Studying the consequences of the disruption of the cis-interface, we show that it is not essential for adherens junction formation. Its disruption, however, increased the mobility of junctional E-cadherin. This destabilization strongly affected E-cadherin anchoring to actin and cell–cell rearrangement during collective cell migration, indicating that the formation of oligomeric clusters controls the anchoring of cadherin to actin and cell–cell contact fluidity. PMID:26195669

  13. p120-catenin binding masks an endocytic signal conserved in classical cadherins

    PubMed Central

    Nanes, Benjamin A.; Chiasson-MacKenzie, Christine; Lowery, Anthony M.; Ishiyama, Noboru; Faundez, Victor; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Vincent, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    p120-catenin (p120) binds to the cytoplasmic tails of classical cadherins and inhibits cadherin endocytosis. Although p120 regulation of cadherin internalization is thought to be important for adhesive junction dynamics, the mechanism by which p120 modulates cadherin endocytosis is unknown. In this paper, we identify a dual-function motif in classical cadherins consisting of three highly conserved acidic residues that alternately serve as a p120-binding interface and an endocytic signal. Mutation of this motif resulted in a cadherin variant that was both p120 uncoupled and resistant to endocytosis. In endothelial cells, in which dynamic changes in adhesion are important components of angiogenesis and inflammation, a vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) mutant defective in endocytosis assembled normally into cell–cell junctions but potently suppressed cell migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor. These results reveal the mechanistic basis by which p120 stabilizes cadherins and demonstrate that VE-cadherin endocytosis is crucial for endothelial cell migration in response to an angiogenic growth factor. PMID:23071156

  14. Calcium-dependent dynamics of cadherin interactions at cell–cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sally A.; Tai, Chin-Yin; Mok, Lee-Peng; Mosser, Eric A.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Cadherins play a key role in the dynamics of cell–cell contact formation and remodeling of junctions and tissues. Cadherin–cadherin interactions are gated by extracellular Ca2+, which serves to rigidify the cadherin extracellular domains and promote trans junctional interactions. Here we describe the direct visualization and quantification of spatiotemporal dynamics of N-cadherin interactions across intercellular junctions in living cells using a genetically encodable FRET reporter system. Direct measurements of transjunctional cadherin interactions revealed a sudden, but partial, loss of homophilic interactions (τ = 1.17 ± 0.06 s−1) upon chelation of extracellular Ca2+. A cadherin mutant with reduced adhesive activity (W2A) exhibited a faster, more substantial loss of homophilic interactions (τ = 0.86 ± 0.02 s−1), suggesting two types of native cadherin interactions—one that is rapidly modulated by changes in extracellular Ca2+ and another with relatively stable adhesive activity that is Ca2+ independent. The Ca2+-sensitive dynamics of cadherin interactions were transmitted to the cell interior where β-catenin translocated to N-cadherin at the junction in both cells. These data indicate that cadherins can rapidly convey dynamic information about the extracellular environment to both cells that comprise a junction. PMID:21613566

  15. Evidence for a role of E-cadherin in suppressing liver carcinogenesis in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R; Hiltwein, Felix; Grill, Jessica; Blum, Helmut; Krebs, Stefan; Klanner, Andrea; Bauersachs, Stefan; Bruns, Christiane; Longerich, Thomas; Horst, David; Brandl, Lydia; de Toni, Enrico; Herbst, Andreas; Kolligs, Frank T

    2014-08-01

    The cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has critical functions in development and carcinogenesis. Impaired expression of E-cadherin has been associated with disrupted tissue homeostasis, progression of cancer and a worse patient prognosis. So far, the role of E-cadherin in homeostasis and carcinogenesis of the liver is not well understood. By use of a mouse model with liver-specific deletion of E-cadherin and administration of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine, we demonstrate that loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes results in acceleration of the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In contrast, liver regeneration is not disturbed in mice lacking E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes. In human HCC, we observed four different expression patterns of E-cadherin. Notably, atypical cytosolic expression of E-cadherin was positively correlated with a poorer patient prognosis. The median overall survival of patients with HCC expressing E-cadherin on the membrane only was 221 weeks (95% confidence interval: 51-391) compared with 131 weeks in patients with cytosolic expression (95% confidence interval: 71-191 weeks; P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate that impaired expression of E-cadherin promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis and is associated with a worse prognosis in humans.

  16. Epigenetic inactivation of E-cadherin by promoter hypermethylation in oral carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Genta; Chiba, Tadashige; Aoba, Takaaki; Imai, Kazushi

    2007-07-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression by epigenetic aberrations, including promoter hypermethylation and transcription repressor binding, plays a key role in the initiation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which leads to the progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas. However, mutual actions and roles of the epigenetic pathways remain to be elucidated. In this study, we determined the methylation status of cytosine within CpG islands of the E-cadherin promoter region in relation to the expression level of SIP1, a major E-cadherin repressor in oral carcinoma cells. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses showed that the expression of E-cadherin was downregulated in parallel with promoter hypermethylation. The use of a bisulfite-modified sequence further validated that methylation was observed in 22.6 +/- 38.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) of cytosines in carcinoma cells negligibly expressing E-cadherin, in contrast to 7.5 +/- 1.8% in E-cadherin-expressing cells. Treatment with a demethylating reagent, 5-azacytidine, induced upregulation of E-cadherin in some E-cadherin-expressing carcinoma cell lines but not in others. The finding that the unresponsive cell lines retained high expression of SIP1 supports the repressive effect of SIP1 on E-cadherin expression regardless of promoter hypermethylation. Collectively, the overall results suggest the dynamic but differential regulation of E-cadherin by epigenetic aberrations in the pathology of oral carcinomas.

  17. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauβ, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT. PMID:26451610

  18. Mori Folium and Mori Fructus Mixture Attenuates High-Fat Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Uk; Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hocheol; Lim, Yunsook; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a global health problem, contributing to various diseases including diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and dementia. Increasing evidence suggests that obesity can also cause neuronal damage, long-term memory loss, and cognitive impairment. The leaves and the fruits of Morus alba L., containing active phytochemicals, have been shown to possess antiobesity and hypolipidemic properties. Thus, in the present study, we assessed their effects on cognitive functioning in mice fed a high-fat diet by performing immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against c-Fos, synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density protein 95 and a behavioral test. C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet for 21 weeks exhibited increased body weight, but mice coadministered an optimized Mori Folium and Mori Fructus extract mixture (2 : 1; MFE) for the final 12 weeks exhibited significant body weight loss. Additionally, obese mice exhibited not only reduced neural activity, but also decreased presynaptic and postsynaptic activities, while MFE-treated mice exhibited recovery of these activities. Finally, cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet were recovered by cotreatment with MFE in the novel object recognition test. Our findings suggest that the antiobesity effects of MFE resulted in recovery of the cognitive deficits induced by the high-fat diet by regulation of neural and synaptic activities. PMID:25945108

  19. Functional characterization of E- and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Alterations in the cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes are involved in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. However, the functional implication of distinct cadherin types in breast cancer biology is still poorly understood. Methods To compare the functional role of E-cadherin and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer, we stably transfected these molecules into the MDA-MB-231 cell line, and investigated their effects on motility, invasion and gene expression regulation. Results Expression of either E- and P-cadherin significantly increased cell aggregation and induced a switch from fibroblastic to epithelial morphology. Although expression of these cadherins did not completely reverse the mesenchymal phenotype of MDA-MB-231 cells, both E- and P-cadherin decreased fibroblast-like migration and invasion through extracellular matrix in a similar way. Moreover, microarray gene expression analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells after expression of E- and P-cadherins revealed that these molecules can activate signaling pathways leading to significant changes in gene expression. Although the expression patterns induced by E- and P-cadherin showed more similarities than differences, 40 genes were differentially modified by the expression of either cadherin type. Conclusion E- and P-cadherin have similar functional consequences on the phenotype and invasive behavior of MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that these cadherins can induce both common and specific gene expression programs on invasive breast cancer cells. Importantly, these identified genes are potential targets for future studies on the functional consequences of altered cadherin expression in human breast cancer. PMID:19257890

  20. DE-Cadherin Is Required for Intercellular Motility during Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomska, Paulina; Godt, Dorothea; Tepass, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Cadherins are involved in a variety of morphogenetic movements during animal development. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the precise function of cadherins in morphogenetic processes due to the multifunctional nature of cadherin requirement. The data presented here indicate that homophilic adhesion promoted by Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) mediates two cell migration events during Drosophila oogenesis. In Drosophila follicles, two groups of follicle cells, the border cells and the centripetal cells migrate on the surface of germline cells. We show that the border cells migrate as an epithelial patch in which two centrally located cells retain epithelial polarity and peripheral cells are partially depolarized. Both follicle cells and germline cells express DE-cadherin, and border cells and centripetal cells strongly upregulate the expression of DE-cadherin shortly before and during their migration. Removing DE-cadherin from either the follicle cells or the germline cells blocks migration of border cells and centripetal cells on the surface of germline cells. The function of DE-cadherin in border cells appears to be specific for migration as the formation of the border cell cluster and the adhesion between border cells are not disrupted in the absence of DE-cadherin. The speed of migration depends on the level of DE-cadherin expression, as border cells migrate more slowly when DE-cadherin activity is reduced. Finally, we show that the upregulation of DE-cadherin expression in border cells depends on the activity of the Drosophila C/EBP transcription factor that is essential for border cell migration. PMID:9971747

  1. Insulin-like growth factor I activates the invasion suppressor function of E-cadherin in MCF-7 human mammary carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, M. E.; Vyncke, B. M.; Bruyneel, E. A.; Vermeulen, S. J.; De Bruyne, G. K.; Van Larebeke, N. A.; Vleminckx, K.; Van Roy, F. M.; Mareel, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been shown to counteract invasion of epithelial neoplastic cells. Using three monoclonal antibodies, we have demonstrated the presence of E-cadherin at the surface of human MCF-7/6 mammary carcinoma cells by indirect immunofluorescence coupled to flow cytometry and by immunocytochemistry. Nevertheless, MCF-7/6 cells failed to aggregate in a medium containing 1.25 mM CaCl2, and they were invasive after confrontation with embryonic chick heart fragments in organ culture. Treatment of MCF-7/6 cells with 0.5 microgram ml-1 insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) led to homotypic aggregation within 5 to 10 min and inhibited invasion in vitro during at least 8 days. The effect of IGF-I on cellular aggregation was insensitive to cycloheximide. However, monoclonal antibodies that interfered with the function of either the IGF-I receptor (alpha IR3) or E-cadherin (HECD-1, MB2) blocked the effect of IGF-I on aggregation. The effects of IGF-I on aggregation and on invasion could be mimicked by 1 microgram ml-1 insulin, but not by 0.5 microgram ml-1 IGF-II. The insulin effects were presumably not mediated by the IGF-I receptor, since they could not be blocked by an antibody against this receptor (alpha IR3). Our results indicate that IGF-I activates the invasion suppressor role of E-cadherin in MCF-7/6 cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:8347483

  2. Characterization of a dual-CRD galectin in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiang-Jun; Wu, Peng; Shahzad, Toufeeq; Liu, Su; Chen, Ling; Yang, Yun-Fan; Shi, Qiao; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Galectins (S-type lectins) are an ancient family of lectins with the β-galactoside binding activity. In mammals, galectins play essential roles in many biological processes, such as development, immune homeostasis and tumor progression. However, few studies have been devoted to their functions in insects. Here, we characterized the only dual-CRD galectin in the silkworm Bombyx mori (BmGalectin-4). BmGalectin-4 cDNA possesses an open reading frame of 1089 bp, which encodes a putative galectin of 363 amino acids containing tandem carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). BmGalectin-4 was expressed in various tissues but the protein was most abundant in fertilized eggs. Its transcript level in fertilized eggs was upregulated upon bacterial challenge. Recombinant BmGalectin-4 purified from Escherichia coli bound to bacterial cell wall components and bacterial cells. In addition, the recombinant protein induced bacterial agglutination, but did not have antibacterial activity against selected microorganisms. Taken together, our results suggest that BmGalectin-4 may function as a pattern recognition receptor primarily in silkworm fertilized eggs.

  3. Renoprotective effect of ramulus mori polysaccharides on renal injury in STZ-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Liang, Tao; He, Qiaoling; Wei, Pingyuan; Zheng, Ni; Xu, Lingyuan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, increasing evidences have suggested that inflammatory stress is markedly occurred in the impaired tissue. Thus, the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were used to investigate the potential renoprotective effect of ramulus mori polysaccharides (RMP) and to discuss the underlying mechanism. The results from the present study showed that RMP significantly lowered the blood glucose and serum levels of glycosylated protein, cholesterol, urea nitrogen (Urea-N), creatinine (Cr) and 24-hour urine protein, while the albumin content was elevated. Meanwhile, the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in renal tissue of STZ-lesioned mice were reduced by RMP treatment. Similarly, pathological examination indicated that STZ-induced renal injury was effectively mitigated. In addition, the protein levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) in renal tissue were notably decreased. Moreover, the endogenous expressions of phosphorylated-IκB (p-IκB) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were down-regulated, respectively. Together, these findings revealed that RMP treatment effectively attenuated STZ-induced cytotoxicity in renal tissue, in which RMP-exerted renoprotection was associated with intrarenally debilitating inflammation reaction through blocking the IL-1/NF-κB pathway, thereby maintaining the renal homeostasis.

  4. Expression of RYamide in the nervous and endocrine system of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Roller, Ladislav; Čižmár, Daniel; Bednár, Branislav; Žitňan, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    RYamides are neuropeptides encoded by a gene whose precise expression and function have not yet been determined. We identified the RYamide gene transcript (fmgV1g15f, SilkBase database) and predicted two candidates for G-protein coupled RYamide receptors (A19-BAG68418 and A22-BAG68421) in the silkworm Bombyx mori. We cloned the RYamide transcript and described its spatial expression using in situ hybridisation. In the larval central nervous system (CNS) expression of RYamide was restricted to 12-14 small neurons in the brain and two posterior neurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion. During metamorphosis their number decreased to eight protocerebral neurons in the adults. Multiple staining, using various insect neuropeptide antibodies, revealed that neurons expressing RYamide are different from other peptidergic cells in the CNS. We also found RYamide expression in the enteroendocrine cells (EC) of the anterior midgut of larvae, pupae and adults. Two minor subpopulations of these EC were also immunoreactive to antibodies against tachykinin and myosupressin. This expression pattern suggests RYamides may play a role in the regulation of feeding and digestion.

  5. EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin immuno-histochemistry and EGFR point mutations analyses in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Moroccan women.

    PubMed

    El Hamdani, W; Amrani, M; Attaleb, M; Laantri, N; Ennaji, M M; Khyatti, M; El Mzibri, M

    2010-09-11

    The involvement of human papillomavirus in the development of cervical cancer has been firmly established. However, better management of cervical cancer rests on good diagnosis and an effective therapy. In this study we evaluated the frequency of point mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for future use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in clinical treatment and to assess the use of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin as biomarkers in cervical cancer diagnosis with immunohistochemistry. Fifty-three patient specimens of cervical cancer were analysed for HPV infection, for EGFR mutations in exons 18 through 21, and for expression of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin by immunostaining. Results showed that 79.24% of the cases (42/53) are HPV positive and the HPV types more closely associated with risk are HPV 16 and 18. In all 53 analysed specimens, any mutation affecting the EGFR kinase domain in exons 18 through 21 was observed. Expressions of EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin were detected in 88,67% (47/53), 92,45% (49/53) and 79,24% (42/53) of analysed specimens respectively. Thus, EGFR, p16INK4a and E-cadherin would be excellent tools for IHC analysis during the cervical cancer development. EGFR and p16INK4a can be used for early diagnosis and E-cadherin for cancer progression and cell migration. However, treatment of cervical cancer with TKIs may not be effective and the identification of other EGFR inhibitors is needed.

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans flamingo cadherin fmi-1 regulates GABAergic neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Najarro, Elvis Huarcaya; Wong, Lianna; Zhen, Mei; Carpio, Edgar Pinedo; Goncharov, Alexandr; Garriga, Gian; Lundquist, Erik A; Jin, Yishi; Ackley, Brian D

    2012-03-21

    In a genetic screen for regulators of synaptic morphology, we identified the single Caenorhabditis elegans flamingo-like cadherin fmi-1. The fmi-1 mutants exhibit defective axon pathfinding, reduced synapse number, aberrant synapse size and morphology, as well as an abnormal accumulation of synaptic vesicles at nonsynaptic regions. Although FMI-1 is primarily expressed in the nervous system, it is not expressed in the ventral D-type (VD) GABAergic motorneurons, which are defective in fmi-1 mutants. The axon and synaptic defects of VD neurons could be rescued when fmi-1 was expressed exclusively in non-VD neighboring neurons, suggesting a cell nonautonomous action of FMI-1. FMI-1 protein that lacked its intracellular domain still retained its ability to rescue the vesicle accumulation defects of GABAergic motorneurons, indicating that the extracellular domain was sufficient for this function of FMI-1 in GABAergic neuromuscular junction development. Mutations in cdh-4, a Fat-like cadherin, cause similar defects in GABAergic motorneurons. The cdh-4 is expressed by the VD neurons and seems to function in the same genetic pathway as fmi-1 to regulate GABAergic neuron development. Thus, fmi-1 and cdh-4 cadherins might act together to regulate synapse development and axon pathfinding.

  7. Role of Receptors in Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Toxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, Craig R.; Ellar, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces crystalline protein inclusions with insecticidal or nematocidal properties. These crystal (Cry) proteins determine a particular strain's toxicity profile. Transgenic crops expressing one or more recombinant Cry toxins have become agriculturally important. Individual Cry toxins are usually toxic to only a few species within an order, and receptors on midgut epithelial cells have been shown to be critical determinants of Cry specificity. The best characterized of these receptors have been identified for lepidopterans, and two major receptor classes have emerged: the aminopeptidase N (APN) receptors and the cadherin-like receptors. Currently, 38 different APNs have been reported for 12 different lepidopterans. Each APN belongs to one of five groups that have unique structural features and Cry-binding properties. While 17 different APNs have been reported to bind to Cry toxins, only 2 have been shown to mediate toxin susceptibly in vivo. In contrast, several cadherin-like proteins bind to Cry toxins and confer toxin susceptibility in vitro, and disruption of the cadherin gene has been associated with toxin resistance. Nonetheless, only a small subset of the lepidopteran-specific Cry toxins has been shown to interact with cadherin-like proteins. This review analyzes the interactions between Cry toxins and their receptors, focusing on the identification and validation of receptors, the molecular basis for receptor recognition, the role of the receptor in resistant insects, and proposed models to explain the sequence of events at the cell surface by which receptor binding leads to cell death. PMID:17554045

  8. VE-Cadherin Disassembly and Cell Contractility in the Endothelium are Necessary for Barrier Disruption Induced by Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aragon-Sanabria, Virginia; Pohler, Steven E.; Eswar, Vikram J.; Bierowski, Matthew; Gomez, Esther W.; Dong, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, breakdown of the endothelial barrier is critical for tumor cell extravasation through blood vessel walls and is mediated by a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions. However, a complete mechanism governing tumor cell transendothelial migration remains unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of tumor-associated signals in regulating endothelial cell contractility and adherens junction disassembly leading to endothelial barrier breakdown. We show that Src mediates VE-cadherin disassembly in response to metastatic melanoma cells. Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of cytoskeletal contractility we find that endothelial cell contractility is responsive to interactions with metastatic cancer cells and that reducing endothelial cell contractility abrogates migration of melanoma cells across endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, we find that a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions mediate activation of Src within endothelial cells that is necessary for phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and for breakdown of the endothelial barrier. Together, these results provide insight into how tumor cell signals act in concert to modulate cytoskeletal contractility and adherens junctions disassembly during extravasation and may aid in identification of therapeutic targets to block metastasis. PMID:28393886

  9. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  10. IgG Autoantibody Response Against Keratinocyte Cadherins in Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem)

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Gustavo; Culton, Donna A.; Prisayanh, Phillip; Qaqish, Bahjat F.; James, Kirk; Maldonado, Mike; Aoki, Valeria; Hans-Filho, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that autoantibodies against desmoglein 3 and desmoglein 1 are relevant in the pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, including its endemic form, Fogo Selvagem (FS). Isolated reports have shown that in certain patients with these diseases, autoantibodies against other desmosomal cadherins and E-cadherin may also be present. The goal of this investigation was to determine if FS patients and normal individuals living in endemic areas possess autoantibodies against other desmosomal cadherins and E-cadherin. Testing a large number of FS and endemic control sera by ELISA we find a consistent and specific autoantibody response against desmoglein 1 and other keratinocyte cadherins in these individuals, which is quite different from US controls. Overall, the highest correlations among the autoantibody responses tested are in the endemic controls, followed by FS patients, and lowest in the US controls. These findings suggest that multiple, perhaps cross reactive, keratinocyte cadherins are recognized by FS patients and endemic controls. PMID:22810308

  11. Investigation of Natural Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Proteins Using INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Christopher; Strange, Nicholas; Larese, J. Z.

    The mechanical properties of many protein comprised biomaterials are a direct reflection of non-covalent (i.e. weak) interacting ions such as F-actin in muscles, tubulin in the cytoskeleton of cells, viral capsids, and silk. Porter and Vollrath underscored the two main factors that are critical for understanding the high mechanical strength of silks: the nanoscale semi-crystalline folding structure, which gives it exceptional toughness and strength, and the degree of hydration of the disordered fraction, which acts to modify these properties. Understanding and controlling these two principal factors are the key to the functionality of protein elastomers, and render silk an ideal model protein for (bio)material design. We will describe our investigation of electrospun silk of the Bombyx mori (silk worm), using Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). These techniques were used to investigate the microscopic dynamics of the dry and hydrated protein.

  12. Numerical simulation of the Mori geothermal field, JP

    SciTech Connect

    Yukihiro Sakagawa; Masahiro Takahashi; Mineyuki Hanano; Tsuneo Ishido; Nobuhiro Demboya

    1994-01-20

    A numerical study of the Mori geothermal field which consisted of a series of three-dimensional natural state modeling and history matching was carried out with porous models. Finally satisfactory fits both on temperature and pressure of the natural state and on pressure history caused by exploitation were obtained. The results indicate that the deep hot water ascends mainly through the fractures near the caldera wall and the fractures confined to some lithofaces, and some of the ascending hot water flows to the west from the caldera. A sketch of the geological structure, the way of making up the initial numerical model, the way of concluding free parameters, and results of calculations of natural state modeling and history matching for the best numerical model are presented.

  13. E-Cadherin As A Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanism On Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    chemotherapy. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Publications 1. Chao Y, Wu Q, Shepard C, and Wells A. “Hepatocyte induced re-expression of E-cadherin in breast...Microenvironment (Appendix 2) 3. Chao Y*, Shepard CR*, Wells A (2010). Breast carcinoma cells re-express E-cadherin during mesenchymal to epithelial...Metastases.” Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists. Redondo Beach, PA. June 2009. 2. Chao Y, Shepard CR, Wells, A. “E-cadherin

  14. N-cadherin coordinates AMP kinase-mediated lung vascular repair.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yanping; Li, Qian; Wolkowicz, Paul; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Creighton, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the pulmonary circulation compromises endothelial barrier function and increases lung edema. Resolution of lung damage involves restoring barrier integrity, a process requiring reestablishment of endothelial cell-cell adhesions. However, mechanisms underlying repair in lung endothelium are poorly understood. In pulmonary microvascular endothelium, AMP kinase α1 (AMPKα1) stimulation enhances recovery of the endothelial barrier after LPS-induced vascular damage. AMPKα1 colocalizes to a discrete membrane compartment with the adhesion protein neuronal cadherin (N-cadherin). This study sought to determine N-cadherin's role in the repair process. Short-hairpin RNA against full-length N-cadherin or a C-terminally truncated N-cadherin, designed to disrupt the cadherin's interactions with intracellular proteins, were expressed in lung endothelium. Disruption of N-cadherin's intracellular domain caused translocation of AMPK away from the membrane and attenuated AMPK-mediated restoration of barrier function in LPS-treated endothelium. AMPK activity measurements indicated that lower basal AMPK activity in cells expressing the truncated N-cadherin compared with controls. Moreover, the AMPK stimulator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) failed to increase AMPK activity in cells expressing the modified N-cadherin, indicating uncoupling of a functional association between AMPK and the cadherin. Isolated lung studies confirmed a physiologic role for this pathway in vivo. AMPK activation reversed LPS-induced increase in permeability, whereas N-cadherin inhibition hindered AMPK-mediated repair. Thus N-cadherin coordinates the vascular protective actions of AMPK through a functional link with the kinase. This study provides insight into intrinsic repair mechanisms in the lung and supports AMPK stimulation as a modality for treating vascular disease.

  15. Protein N-glycosylation in oral cancer: dysregulated cellular networks among DPAGT1, E-cadherin adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Bouchie, Meghan P; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-07-01

    N-Linked glycosylation (N-glycosylation) of proteins has long been associated with oncogenesis, but not until recently have the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship begun to be unraveled. Here, we review studies describing how dysregulation of the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1, drives oral cancer. DPAGT1 encodes the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor in the endoplasmic reticulum and thus mediates N-glycosylation of many cancer-related proteins. DPAGT1 controls N-glycosylation of E-cadherin, the major epithelial cell-cell adhesion receptor and a tumor suppressor, thereby affecting intercellular adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics. DPAGT1 also regulates and is regulated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, impacting the balance between proliferation and adhesion in homeostatic tissues. Thus, aberrant induction of DPAGT1 promotes a positive feedback network with Wnt/β-catenin that represses E-cadherin-based adhesion and drives tumorigenic phenotypes. Further, modification of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) with N-glycans is known to control their surface presentation via the galectin lattice, and thus increased DPAGT1 expression likely contributes to abnormal activation of RTKs in oral cancer. Collectively, these studies suggest that dysregulation of the DPAGT1/Wnt/E-cadherin network underlies the etiology and pathogenesis of oral cancer.

  16. Characterization and affinity purification of juvenile hormone esterase from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, T; Bonning, B C; Hirai, M; Kikuchi, K; Hammock, B D

    2000-08-01

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) from hemolymph of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori was characterized for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. B. mori JHE hydrolyzed the juvenile hormone surrogate substrate methyl n-heptylthioacetothioate (HEPTAT) more efficiently than p-nitrophenyl acetate and 1-naphthyl acetate substrates widely used to assay total carboxylesterase activity. B. mori JHE was sensitive to 3-octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanone (OTFP), which was developed as a selective inhibitor for lepidopteran JHE, and relatively insensitive to diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), an inhibitor of serine esterases but not of all JHEs. Affinity purification with a trifluoromethyl ketone ligand was more efficient for purification of B. mori JHE than DEAE ion exchange chromatography.

  17. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  18. E-Cadherin Mediates MMP Down-Regulation in Highly Invasive Bronchial Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nawrocki-Raby, Béatrice; Gilles, Christine; Polette, Myriam; Martinella-Catusse, Corinne; Bonnet, Noël; Puchelle, Edith; Foidart, Jean-Michel; van Roy, Frans; Birembaut, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    The disorganization of E-cadherin/catenin complexes and the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are frequently involved in the capacity of epithelial cells to acquire an invasive phenotype. The functional link between E-cadherin and MMPs was studied by transfecting invasive bronchial BZR tumor cells with human E-cadherin cDNA. Using different in vitro (cell dispersion, modified Boyden chamber) and in vivo assays (human airway epithelial xenograft), we showed that E-cadherin-positive clones displayed a decrease of invasive abilities. As shown by immunoprecipitation, the re-expressed E-cadherin was able to sequestrate one part of free cytoplasmic β-catenin in BZR cells. The decrease of β-catenin transcriptional activity in E-cadherin-transfected clones was demonstrated using the TOP-FLASH reporter construct. Finally, we observed a decrease of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP, both at the mRNA and at the protein levels, in E-cadherin-positive clones whereas no changes in MMP-2, TIMP-1, or TIMP-2 were observed when compared with control clones. Moreover, zymography analysis revealed a loss of MMP-2 activation ability in E-cadherin-positive clones treated with the concanavalin A lectin. These data demonstrate a direct role of E-cadherin/catenin complex organization in the regulation of MMPs and suggest an implication of this regulation in the expression of an invasive phenotype by bronchial tumor cells. PMID:12875984

  19. E-cadherin is required for centrosome and spindle orientation in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Mayu; Yuan, Hebao; Salzmann, Viktoria; Fuller, Margaret T; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-08-31

    Many adult stem cells reside in a special microenvironment known as the niche, where they receive essential signals that specify stem cell identity. Cell-cell adhesion mediated by cadherin and integrin plays a crucial role in maintaining stem cells within the niche. In Drosophila melanogaster, male germline stem cells (GSCs) are attached to niche component cells (i.e., the hub) via adherens junctions. The GSC centrosomes and spindle are oriented toward the hub-GSC junction, where E-cadherin-based adherens junctions are highly concentrated. For this reason, adherens junctions are thought to provide a polarity cue for GSCs to enable proper orientation of centrosomes and spindles, a critical step toward asymmetric stem cell division. However, understanding the role of E-cadherin in GSC polarity has been challenging, since GSCs carrying E-cadherin mutations are not maintained in the niche. Here, we tested whether E-cadherin is required for GSC polarity by expressing a dominant-negative form of E-cadherin. We found that E-cadherin is indeed required for polarizing GSCs toward the hub cells, an effect that may be mediated by Apc2. We also demonstrated that E-cadherin is required for the GSC centrosome orientation checkpoint, which prevents mitosis when centrosomes are not correctly oriented. We propose that E-cadherin orchestrates multiple aspects of stem cell behavior, including polarization of stem cells toward the stem cell-niche interface and adhesion of stem cells to the niche supporting cells.

  20. Rac1 functions as a reversible tension modulator to stabilize VE-cadherin trans-interaction

    PubMed Central

    Daneshjou, Nazila; Sieracki, Nathan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.; Conway, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the RhoGTPase Rac1 in stabilizing mature endothelial adherens junctions (AJs) is not well understood. In this paper, using a photoactivatable probe to control Rac1 activity at AJs, we addressed the relationship between Rac1 and the dynamics of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We demonstrated that Rac1 activation reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation, leading to increased density of VE-cadherin at AJs. This response was coupled to a reduction in actomyosin-dependent tension across VE-cadherin adhesion sites. We observed that inhibiting myosin II directly or through photo-release of the caged Rho kinase inhibitor also reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation. Thus, Rac1 functions by stabilizing VE-cadherin trans-dimers in mature AJs by counteracting the actomyosin tension. The results suggest a new model of VE-cadherin adhesive interaction mediated by Rac1-induced reduction of mechanical tension at AJs, resulting in the stabilization of VE-cadherin adhesions. PMID:25559184

  1. Proteomics analysis of E-cadherin knockdown in epithelial breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Daniele; Simeone, Pasquale; Latorre, Dominga; Cascione, Francesca; Leporatti, Stefano; Trerotola, Marco; Giudetti, Anna Maria; Capobianco, Loredana; Lunetti, Paola; Rizzello, Antonia; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Alberti, Saverio; Maffia, Michele

    2015-05-20

    E-cadherin is the core protein of the epithelial adherens junction. Through its cytoplasmic domain, E-cadherin interacts with several signaling proteins; among them, α- and β-catenins mediate the link of E-cadherin to the actin cytoskeleton. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a crucial step of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is involved in cancer invasion and metastatization. In human tumors, down-regulation of E-cadherin is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Despite the critical role of E-cadherin in cancer progression, little is known about proteome alterations linked with its down-regulation. To address this point, we investigated proteomics, biophysical and functional changes of epithelial breast cancer cell lines upon shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of E-cadherin expression (shEcad). shEcad cells showed a distinct proteomic signature including altered expression of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamic and migration. Moreover, these results suggest that, besides their role in mechanical adhesion, loss of E-cadherin expression may contribute to cancer progression by modifying a complex network of pathways that tightly regulate fundamental processes as oxidative stress, immune evasion and cell metabolism. Altogether, these results extend our knowledge on the cellular modifications associated with E-cadherin down-regulation in breast cancer cells.

  2. E-cadherin dis-engagement activates the Rap1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Asuri, Sirisha; Yan, Jingliang; Paranavitana, Nivanka C.; Quilliam, Lawrence A.

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin based adherens junctions are finely regulated by multiple cellular signaling events. Here we show that the Ras-related Rap1 GTPase is enriched in regions of nascent cell-cell contacts and strengthens E-cadherin junctions: constitutively active Rap1 expressing MDCK cells exhibit increased junctional contact and resisted calcium depletion-induced cell-cell junction disruption. E-cadherin disengagement activated Rap1 and this correlated with E-cadherin association with the Rap GEFs, C3G and PDZ-GEF I. PDZ-GEF I associated with E-cadherin and β-catenin whereas C3G interaction with E-cadherin did not involve β-catenin. Knockdown of PDZ-GEF I in MDCK cells decreased Rap1 activity following E-cadherin junction disruption. We hereby show that Rap1 plays a role in the maintenance and repair of E-cadherin junctions and is activated via an “outside-in” signaling pathway initiated by E-cadherin and mediated at least in part by PDZ-GEF I. PMID:18767072

  3. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrendt, Diana P.; Carmona, Fernando; González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Martínez, Juan M. Lázaro; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4) had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF), an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface. PMID:27254316

  4. Reduced E-cadherin facilitates renal cell carcinoma progression by WNT/β-catenin signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinqi; Yang, Mingxi; Shi, Hua; Hu, Jianxin; Wang, Yuanlin; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Shuxiong

    2017-02-15

    Reduced expression of E-cadherin was observed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, its potential clinical value and correlation with WNT/β-catenin signaling in RCC progression was still unclear. Immunohistochemical staining was performed in RCC tissue microarray to examine the expression status and prognosis value of E-cadherin and β-catenin. The potential role of E-cadherin in β-catenin translocation was analyzed with immunobloting assays. A significant negative correlation was observed between E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in RCC tissues. E-cadherin inhibits β-catenin translocation from membrane to cytoplasm in RCC tissues, which was an important step for WNT/β-catenin signaling. Reduced E-cadherin expression was associated with poor prognosis. More importantly, E-cadherin-/β-catenin+ was an independent detrimental factor for survival estimation of RCC patients. Reduced E-cadherin expression in RCC promoted cancer progression via WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway activation. E-cadherin/β-catenin provides a valuable prognosis marker for RCC, which may be an effective target for RCC therapy.

  5. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin involving regulators of Hippo pathway due to HIF-1α stabilization/nuclear translocation in bone metastasis from breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Drago, Lorenzo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2015-01-15

    The present study deals with the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of E-cadherin expression under hypoxia, because the adjustment of the amount of E-cadherin due to physical stimuli of the microenvironment might influence the colonization of metastasis to skeleton. We analyzed the effect of 1% oxygen tension, that is similar to that encountered in the bone marrow by metastatic cells spreading from breast carcinoma. The purpose was to evaluate the hypoxia-orchestrated control of E-cadherin transactivation via hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and the involvement of Hippo pathway members, as regulators of transcription factors. To give a translational significance to the study, we took into consideration human pair-matched ductal breast carcinoma and bone metastasis: E-cadherin and Wwox were expressed in bone metastasis but not in breast carcinoma, while HIF-1α and TAZ seemed localized principally in nuclei of metastasis and were found in all cell compartments of breast carcinoma. A close examination of the regulatory mechanisms underlying E-cadherin expression in bone metastasis was done in 1833 clone derived from MDA-MB231 cells. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin only in 1833 clone, but not in parental cells, through HIF-1 and PPARγ activities, while Wwox decreased. Since Wwox was highly expressed in bone metastasis, the effect of ectopic Wwox was evaluated, and we showed E-cadherin transactivation and enhanced invasiveness in WWOX transfected 1833 cells. Also, hypoxia was additive with ectopic Wwox remarkably enhancing HIF-1α nuclear shuttle and accumulation due to the lengthening of the half-life of HIF-1α protein; under this experimental condition HIF-1α appeared as a slower migrated band compared with control, in agreement with the phosphorylation state. The in vitro data strongly supported the almost exclusive presence of HIF-1α in nuclei of human-bone metastasis. Thus, we identified

  6. Loss of Sprouty2 in human high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas promotes EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation and cell invasion.

    PubMed

    So, Wai-Kin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Fan, Qianlan; Wong, Alice S T; Huntsman, David G; Gilks, C Blake; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-01-30

    Sprouty (SPRY) proteins are well-characterized factors that inhibit receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Our Human Exonic Evidence-Based Oligonucleotide (HEEBO) microarray results showed that the mRNA levels of SPRY2, but not of SPRY1 or SPRY4, are down-regulated in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC) tissues and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell lines. Molecular inversion probe (MIP) copy number analysis showed the deletion of the SPRY2 locus in HGSC. Overexpression of SPRY2 reduced EGF-induced cell invasion by attenuating EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, a positive correlation between SPRY2 and E-cadherin protein levels was observed in HGSC tissues. This study reveals the loss of SPRY2 in HGSC and indicates an important tumor-suppressive role for SPRY2 in mediating the stimulatory effect of EGF on human EOC progression.

  7. Advanced technologies for genetically manipulating the silkworm Bombyx mori, a model Lepidopteran insect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hanfu; O'Brochta, David A

    2015-07-07

    Genetic technologies based on transposon-mediated transgenesis along with several recently developed genome-editing technologies have become the preferred methods of choice for genetically manipulating many organisms. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a Lepidopteran insect of great economic importance because of its use in silk production and because it is a valuable model insect that has greatly enhanced our understanding of the biology of insects, including many agricultural pests. In the past 10 years, great advances have been achieved in the development of genetic technologies in B. mori, including transposon-based technologies that rely on piggyBac-mediated transgenesis and genome-editing technologies that rely on protein- or RNA-guided modification of chromosomes. The successful development and application of these technologies has not only facilitated a better understanding of B. mori and its use as a silk production system, but also provided valuable experiences that have contributed to the development of similar technologies in non-model insects. This review summarizes the technologies currently available for use in B. mori, their application to the study of gene function and their use in genetically modifying B. mori for biotechnology applications. The challenges, solutions and future prospects associated with the development and application of genetic technologies in B. mori are also discussed.

  8. An integrated CRISPR Bombyx mori genome editing system with improved efficiency and expanded target sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sanyuan; Liu, Yue; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chang, Jiasong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xiaogang; Shi, Run; Lu, Wei; Xia, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-09

    Genome editing enabled unprecedented new opportunities for targeted genomic engineering of a wide variety of organisms ranging from microbes, plants, animals and even human embryos. The serial establishing and rapid applications of genome editing tools significantly accelerated Bombyx mori (B. mori) research during the past years. However, the only CRISPR system in B. mori was the commonly used SpCas9, which only recognize target sites containing NGG PAM sequence. In the present study, we first improve the efficiency of our previous established SpCas9 system by 3.5 folds. The improved high efficiency was also observed at several loci in both BmNs cells and B. mori embryos. Then to expand the target sites, we showed that two newly discovered CRISPR system, SaCas9 and AsCpf1, could also induce highly efficient site-specific genome editing in BmNs cells, and constructed an integrated CRISPR system. Genome-wide analysis of targetable sites was further conducted and showed that the integrated system cover 69,144,399 sites in B. mori genome, and one site could be found in every 6.5 bp. The efficiency and resolution of this CRISPR platform will probably accelerate both fundamental researches and applicable studies in B. mori, and perhaps other insects.

  9. Advanced technologies for genetically manipulating the silkworm Bombyx mori, a model Lepidopteran insect

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanfu; O'Brochta, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic technologies based on transposon-mediated transgenesis along with several recently developed genome-editing technologies have become the preferred methods of choice for genetically manipulating many organisms. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a Lepidopteran insect of great economic importance because of its use in silk production and because it is a valuable model insect that has greatly enhanced our understanding of the biology of insects, including many agricultural pests. In the past 10 years, great advances have been achieved in the development of genetic technologies in B. mori, including transposon-based technologies that rely on piggyBac-mediated transgenesis and genome-editing technologies that rely on protein- or RNA-guided modification of chromosomes. The successful development and application of these technologies has not only facilitated a better understanding of B. mori and its use as a silk production system, but also provided valuable experiences that have contributed to the development of similar technologies in non-model insects. This review summarizes the technologies currently available for use in B. mori, their application to the study of gene function and their use in genetically modifying B. mori for biotechnology applications. The challenges, solutions and future prospects associated with the development and application of genetic technologies in B. mori are also discussed. PMID:26108630

  10. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, cooperates with Netrin/Frazzled in Drosophila midline guidance.

    PubMed

    Organisti, Cristina; Hein, Irina; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    During central nervous system development, several guidance cues and receptors, as well as cell adhesion molecules, are required for guiding axons across the midline and along the anterior-posterior axis. In Drosophila, commissural axons sense the midline attractants Netrin A and B (Net) through Frazzled (Fra) receptors. Despite their importance, lack of Net or fra affects only some commissures, suggesting that additional molecules can fulfill this function. Recently, planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins have been implicated in midline axon guidance in both vertebrate and invertebrate systems. Here, we report that the atypical cadherin and PCP molecule Flamingo/Starry night (Fmi/Stan) acts jointly with Net/Fra signaling during midline development. Additional removal of fmi strongly increases the guidance defects in Net/fra mutants. Rescue and domain deletion experiments suggest that Fmi signaling facilitates commissural pathfinding potentially by mediating axonal fasciculation in a partly homophilic manner. Altogether, our results indicate that contact-mediated cell adhesion via Fmi acts in addition to the Net/Fra guidance system during axon pathfinding across the midline, underlining the importance of PCP molecules during vertebrates and invertebrates midline development.

  12. A novel amphioxus cadherin that localizes to epithelial adherens junctions has an unusual domain organization with implications for chordate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Kunifumi; Akiyama-Oda, Yasuko; Satoh, Nori; Humphreys, Tom; Zhang, Shicui; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2002-01-01

    Although data are available from only vertebrates, urochordates, and three nonchordate animals, there are definite differences in the structures of classic cadherins between vertebrates plus urochordates and nonchordates. In this study we examined structural diversity of classic cadherins among bilaterian animals by obtaining new data from an amphioxus (Cephalochordata, Chordata), an acorn worm (Hemichordata), a sea star (Echinodermata), and an oyster (Mollusca). The structures of newly identified nonchordate cadherins are grouped together with those of the known sea urchin and Drosophila cadherins, whereas the structure of an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) cadherin, designated BbC, is differently categorized from those of other known chordate cadherins. BbC is identified as a cadherin by its cytoplasmic domain whose sequence is highly related to the cytoplasmic sequences of all known classic cadherins, but it lacks all of the five repeats constituting the extracellular homophilic-binding domain of other chordate cadherins. The ectodomains of BbC match the ectodomains found in nonchordate cadherins but not present in other chordate cadherins. We show that the BbC functions as a cell-cell adhesion molecule when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and localizes to adherens junctions in the ectodermal epithelia in amphioxus embryos. We argue that BbC is the amphioxus homologue of the classic cadherins involved in the formation of epithelial adherens junctions. The structural relationships of the cadherin molecules allow us to propose a possibility that cephalochordates might be basal to the sister-groups vertebrates and urochordates.

  13. E-cadherin and Src associate with extradesmosomal Dsg3 and modulate desmosome assembly and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Vera; Hartlieb, Eva; Vielmuth, Franziska; Gliem, Martin; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Desmosomes provide strong intercellular cohesion essential for the integrity of cells and tissues exposed to continuous mechanical stress. For desmosome assembly, constitutively synthesized desmosomal cadherins translocate to the cell-cell border, cluster and mature in the presence of Ca(2+) to stable cell contacts. As adherens junctions precede the formation of desmosomes, we investigated in this study the relationship between the classical cadherin E-cadherin and the desmosomal cadherin Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the latter of which is indispensable for cell-cell adhesion in keratinocytes. By using autoantibodies from patients with the blistering skin disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), we showed in loss of function studies that E-cadherin compensates for effects of desmosomal disassembly. Overexpression of E-cadherin reduced the loss of cell cohesion induced by PV autoantibodies and attenuated activation of p38 MAPK. Silencing of E-cadherin abolished the localization of Dsg3 at the membrane and resulted in a shift of Dsg3 from the cytoskeletal to the non-cytoskeletal protein pool which conforms to the notion that E-cadherin regulates desmosome assembly. Mechanistically, we identified a complex consisting of extradesmosomal Dsg3, E-cadherin, β-catenin and Src and that the stability of this complex is regulated by Src. Moreover, Dsg3 and E-cadherin are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in a Src-dependent manner and Src activity is required for recruiting Dsg3 to the cytoskeletal pool as well as for desmosome maturation towards a Ca(2+)-insensitive state. Our data provide new insights into the role of E-cadherin and the contribution of Src signaling for formation and maintenance of desmosomal junctions.

  14. Expression of cadherin-8 mRNA in the developing mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Korematsu, K; Redies, C

    1997-10-20

    The expression of cadherin-8 was mapped by in situ hybridization in the embryonic and postnatal mouse central nervous system (CNS). From embryonic day 18 (E18) to postnatal day 6 (P6), cadherin-8 expression is restricted to a subset of developing brain nuclei and cortical areas in all major subdivisions of the CNS. The anlagen of some of the cadherin-8-positive structures also express this molecule at earlier developmental stages (E12.5-E16). The cadherin-8-positive neuroanatomical structures are parts of several functional systems in the brain. In the limbic system, cadherin-8-positive regions are found in the septal region, habenular nuclei, amygdala, interpeduncular nucleus, raphe nuclei, and hippocampus. Cerebral cortex shows expression in several limbic areas at P6. In the basal ganglia and related nuclei, cadherin-8 is expressed by parts of the striatum, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, and pedunculopontine nuclei. A third group of cadherin-8-positive gray matter structures has functional connections with the cerebellum (superior colliculus, anterior pretectal nucleus, red nucleus, nucleus of posterior commissure, inferior olive, pontine, pontine reticular, and vestibular nuclei). The cerebellum itself shows parasagittal stripes of cadherin-8 expression in the Purkinje cell layer. In the hindbrain, cadherin-8 is expressed by several cranial nerve nuclei. Results from this study show that cadherin-8 expression in the embryonic and postnatal mouse brain is restricted to specific developing gray matter structures. These data support the idea that cadherins are a family of molecules whose expression provides a molecular code for the regionalization of the developing vertebrate brain.

  15. Investigation of N-cadherin/β-catenin expression in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Beatrice; Regazzo, Daniela; Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat, Carla; Citton, Marilisa; Iacobone, Maurizio; Scaroni, Carla; Betterle, Corrado; Mantero, Franco; Fassina, Ambrogio; Pezzani, Raffaele; Boscaro, Marco

    2016-10-01

    β-catenin is a multifunctional protein; it is a key component of the Wnt signaling, and it plays a central role in cadherin-based adhesions. Cadherin loss promotes tumorigenesis by releasing membrane-bound β-catenin, hence stimulating Wnt signaling. Cadherins seem to be involved in tumor development, but these findings are limited in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs). The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations in key components of cadherin/catenin adhesion system and of Wnt pathway. This study included eight normal adrenal samples (NA) and 95 ACT: 24 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) and 71 adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs). β-catenin mutations were evaluated by sequencing, and β-catenin and cadherin (E-cadherin and N-cadherin) expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We identified 18 genetic alterations in β-catenin gene. qRT-PCR showed overexpression of β-catenin in 50 % of ACC (12/24) and in 48 % of ACA (21/44). IHC data were in accordance with qRT-PCR results: 47 % of ACC (7/15) and 33 % of ACA (11/33) showed increased cytoplasmic or nuclear β-catenin accumulation. N-cadherin downregulation has been found in 83 % of ACC (20/24) and in 59 % of ACA (26/44). Similar results were obtained by IHC: N-cadherin downregulation was observed in 100 % (15/15) of ACC and in 55 % (18/33) of ACA. β-catenin overexpression together with the aberrant expression of N-cadherin may play important role in ACT tumorigenesis. The study of differentially expressed genes (such as N-cadherin and β-catenin) may enhance our understanding of the biology of ACT and may contribute to the discovery of new diagnostic and prognostic tools.

  16. Connexins and Cadherin Crosstalk in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    elevated mitogen-activated protein kinase (p44/Erk1, p42/Erk2) activation. Carcinogenesis, 25, 669-680. 9. King,T.J. and Bertram ,J.S. (2005) Connexins...induction of E-cadherin and the inhibition of beta-catenin signaling. J Cell Biol 154: 369–387. 34. Bertram J (1999) Carotenoids and Gene Regulation. Nutr...Rev 57: 182–191. 35. King TJ, Bertram JS (2005) Connexins as targets for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA

  17. Connexins and Cadherin Crosstalk in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    containing E-cadherinW156A (E-cad-W156A)(Johnson). b) Prepare recombinant retrovirus containing E-cadherin-catenin (E-cad- cat )(Johnson). c...Prepare recombinant retrovirus containing E-cadherinp120-catenin (E-cadp120- cat )(Johnson). The preparation of the constructs E-cad-W156A, E...cadherin- cat (E-cad- cat ) and E-cadherinp120 (E-cadp120- cat ) in retroviral vectors as well as production of recombinant viruses was described in the

  18. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-20

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4-64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis.

  19. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  20. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4–64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis. PMID:28106089

  1. Cadherin engagement improves insulin secretion of single human β-cells.

    PubMed

    Parnaud, Geraldine; Lavallard, Vanessa; Bedat, Benoît; Matthey-Doret, David; Morel, Philippe; Berney, Thierry; Bosco, Domenico

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether cadherin-mediated adhesion of human islet cells was affected by insulin secretagogues and explore the role of cadherins in the secretory activity of β-cells. Experiments were carried out with single islet cells adherent to chimeric proteins made of functional E-, N-, or P-cadherin ectodomains fused to the Fc fragment of immunoglobulin (E-cad/Fc, N-cad/Fc, and P-cad/Fc) and immobilized on an inert substrate. We observed that cadherin expression in islet cells was not affected by insulin secretagogues. Adhesion tests showed that islet cells attached to N-cad/Fc and E-cad/Fc acquired, in a time- and secretagogue-dependent manner, a spreading form that was inhibited by blocking cadherin antibodies. By reverse hemolytic plaque assay, we showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of single β-cells was increased by N-cad/Fc and E-cad/Fc adhesion compared with control. In the presence of E-cad/Fc and after glucose stimulation, we showed that total insulin secretion was six times higher in spreading β-cells compared with round β-cells. Furthermore, cadherin-mediated adhesion induced an asymmetric distribution of cortical actin in β-cells. Our results demonstrate that adhesion of β-cells to E- and N-cadherins is regulated by insulin secretagogues and that E- and N-cadherin engagement promotes stimulated insulin secretion.

  2. Reduction in E-cadherin expression fosters migration of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Baronsky, Thilo; Dzementsei, Aliaksandr; Oelkers, Marieelen; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-03-14

    The transition from passive to active migration of primordial germ cells in Xenopus embryos correlates with a reduction in overall adhesion to surrounding endodermal cells as well as with reduced E-cadherin expression. Single cell force spectroscopy, in which cells are brought into brief contact with a gold surface functionalized with E-cadherin constructs, allows for a quantitative estimate of functional E-cadherin molecules on the cell surface. The adhesion force between migratory PGCs and the cadherin-coated surface was almost identical to cells where E-cadherin was knocked down by morpholino oligonucleotides (180 pN). In contrast, non-migratory PGCs display significantly higher adhesion forces (270 pN) on E-cadherin functionalised surfaces. On the basis of these observations, we propose that migration of PGCs in Xenopus embryos is regulated via modulation of E-cadherin expression levels, allowing these cells to move more freely if the level of E-cadherin is reduced.

  3. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  4. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  5. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F.; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell–cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3. PMID:27466317

  6. Cadherin Gene Expression and Effects of Bt Resistance on Sperm Transfer in Pink Bollworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cadherin proteins bind Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in lepidopteran midguts but their inherent function remains unclear. In pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella, three recessive mutations in a cadherin gene (BtR) are tightly linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac. Here we examined patt...

  7. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  8. Hyaluronan and layilin mediate loss of airway epithelial barrier function induced by cigarette smoke by decreasing E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S Marina; Falcon, Nieves S; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E

    2012-12-07

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS.

  9. Hyaluronan and Layilin Mediate Loss of Airway Epithelial Barrier Function Induced by Cigarette Smoke by Decreasing E-cadherin*

    PubMed Central

    Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Falcon, Nieves S.; Valencia Gattas, Monica; Monzon, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CigS) exposure is associated with increased bronchial epithelial permeability and impaired barrier function. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to CigS exhibit decreased E-cadherin expression and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These effects were mediated by hyaluronan (HA) because inhibition of its synthesis with 4-methylumbelliferone prevented these effects, and exposure to HA fragments of <70 kDa mimicked these effects. We show that the HA receptor layilin is expressed apically in human airway epithelium and that cells infected with lentivirus expressing layilin siRNAs were protected against increased permeability triggered by both CigS and HA. We identified RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) as the signaling effectors downstream layilin. We conclude that HA fragments generated by CigS bind to layilin and signal through Rho/ROCK to inhibit the E-cadherin gene and protein expression, leading to a loss of epithelial cell-cell contact. These studies suggest that HA functions as a master switch protecting or disrupting the epithelial barrier in its high versus low molecular weight form and that its depolymerization is a first and necessary step triggering the inflammatory response to CigS. PMID:23048036

  10. Molecular Design Principles Underlying beta-strand Swapping in the Adhesive Dimerization of Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    J Vendome; S Posy; X Jin; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; L Shapiro; B Honig

    2011-12-31

    Cell adhesion by classical cadherins is mediated by dimerization of their EC1 domains through the 'swapping' of N-terminal {beta}-strands. We use molecular simulations, measurements of binding affinities and X-ray crystallography to provide a detailed picture of the structural and energetic factors that control the adhesive dimerization of cadherins. We show that strand swapping in EC1 is driven by conformational strain in cadherin monomers that arises from the anchoring of their short N-terminal strand at one end by the conserved Trp2 and at the other by ligation to Ca{sup 2+} ions. We also demonstrate that a conserved proline-proline motif functions to avoid the formation of an overly tight interface where affinity differences between different cadherins, crucial at the cellular level, are lost. We use these findings to design site-directed mutations that transform a monomeric EC2-EC3 domain cadherin construct into a strand-swapped dimer.

  11. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2003-01-01

    E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper. PMID:14613514

  12. History and progression of Fat cadherins in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Jiang; Hong, Junjie; Li, Libo; He, Qiang; Cai, Xiujun

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesions are vital hubs for signaling pathways during multicellular development and animal morphogenesis. In eukaryotes, under aberrant intracellular conditions, cadherins are abnormally regulated, which can result in cellular pathologies such as carcinoma, kidney disease, and autoimmune diseases. As a member of the Ca2+-dependent adhesion super-family, Fat proteins were first described in the 1920s as an inheritable lethal mutant phenotype in Drosophila, consisting of four member proteins, FAT1, FAT2, FAT3, and FAT4, all of which are highly conserved in structure. Functionally, FAT1 was found to regulate cell migration and growth control through specific protein–protein interactions of its cytoplasmic tail. FAT2 and FAT3 are relatively less studied and are thought to participate in the development of human cancer through a pathway similar to that of the Ena/VASP proteins. In contrast, FAT4 has been widely studied in the context of biological functions and tumor mechanisms and has been shown to regulate the planar cell polarity pathway, the Hippo signaling pathway, the canonical Wnt signaling cascade, and the expression of YAP1. Overall, Fat cadherins may be useful as emerging disease biomarkers and as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27942226

  13. Cadherin Cytoplasmic Domains Inhibit the Cell Surface Localization of Endogenous E-Cadherin, Blocking Desmosome and Tight Junction Formation and Inducing Cell Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Wakako

    2014-01-01

    The downregulation of E-cadherin function has fundamental consequences with respect to cancer progression, and occurs as part of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we show that the expression of the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed)-tagged cadherin cytoplasmic domain in cells inhibited the cell surface localization of endogenous E-cadherin, leading to morphological changes, the inhibition of junctional assembly and cell dissociation. These changes were associated with increased cell migration, but were not accompanied by the down-regulation of epithelial markers and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Thus, these changes cannot be classified as EMT. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain interacted with β-catenin or plakoglobin, reducing the levels of β-catenin or plakoglobin associated with E-cadherin, and raising the possibility that β-catenin and plakoglobin sequestration by these constructs induced E-cadherin intracellular localization. Accordingly, a cytoplasmic domain construct bearing mutations that weakened the interactions with β-catenin or plakoglobin did not impair junction formation and adhesion, indicating that the interaction with β-catenin or plakoglobin was essential to the potential of the constructs. E-cadherin–α-catenin chimeras that did not require β-catenin or plakoglobin for their cell surface transport restored cell–cell adhesion and junction formation. PMID:25121615

  14. N-cadherin deficiency impairs pericyte recruitment, and not endothelial differentiation or sprouting, in embryonic stem cell-derived angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tillet, Emmanuelle . E-mail: emmanuelle.tillet@cea.fr; Vittet, Daniel; Feraud, Olivier; Moore, Robert; Kemler, Rolf; Huber, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    Endothelial cells express two classical cadherins, VE-cadherin and N-cadherin. VE-cadherin is absolutely required for vascular morphogenesis, but N-cadherin is thought to participate in vessel stabilization by interacting with periendothelial cells during vessel formation. However, recent data suggest a more critical role for N-cadherin in endothelium that would regulate angiogenesis, in part by controlling VE-cadherin expression. In this study, we have assessed N-cadherin function in vascular development using an in vitro model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. We show that pluripotent ES cells genetically null for N-cadherin can differentiate normally into endothelial cells. In addition, sprouting angiogenesis was unaltered, suggesting that N-cadherin is not essential for the early events of angiogenesis. However, the lack of N-cadherin led to an impairment in pericyte covering of endothelial outgrowths. We conclude that N-cadherin is necessary neither for vasculogenesis nor proliferation and migration of endothelial cells but is required for the subsequent maturation of endothelial sprouts by interacting with pericytes.

  15. VE-cadherin RGD motifs promote metastasis and constitute a potential therapeutic target in melanoma and breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomé, Rubén A.; Torres, Sofía; de Val, Soledad Isern; Escudero-Paniagua, Beatriz; Calviño, Eva; Teixidó, Joaquín; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the role of vascular-endothelial (VE)-cadherin in melanoma and breast cancer metastasis. We found that VE-cadherin is expressed in highly aggressive melanoma and breast cancer cell lines. Remarkably, inactivation of VE-cadherin triggered a significant loss of malignant traits (proliferation, adhesion, invasion and transendothelial migration) in melanoma and breast cancer cells. These effects, except transendothelial migration, were induced by the VE-cadherin RGD motifs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated an interaction between VE-cadherin and α2β1 integrin, with the RGD motifs found to directly affect β1 integrin activation. VE-cadherin-mediated integrin signaling occurred through specific activation of SRC, ERK and JNK, including AKT in melanoma. Knocking down VE-cadherin suppressed lung colonization capacity of melanoma or breast cancer cells inoculated in mice, while pre-incubation with VE-cadherin RGD peptides promoted lung metastasis for both cancer types. Finally, an in silico study revealed the association of high VE-cadherin expression with poor survival in a subset of melanoma patients and breast cancer patients showing low CD34 expression. These findings support a general role for VE-cadherin and other RGD cadherins as critical regulators of lung and liver metastasis in multiple solid tumours. These results pave the way for cadherin-specific RGD targeted therapies to control disseminated metastasis in multiple cancers. PMID:27966446

  16. Genome engineering and parthenocloning in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zabelina, Valeriya; Klymenko, Vyacheslav; Tamura, Toshiki; Doroshenko, Karina; Liang, Haoyuan; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sehnal, František

    2015-09-01

    Genetic engineering of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, opens door to the production of new kinds of silk and to the use of silkworms as proteosynthetic bioreactors. The insertion of foreign genes into silkworm genome and the control of their expression by diverse promoters have become possible but are not yet efficient enough for commercial use. Several methods of gene targeting are being developed to minimize position effect on transgene expression and facilitate cloning. Parthenocloning can be exploited to conserve genetic traits and improve selection and amplification of clones containing genes of interest. Some silkworm clones have been bred for decades as genetically stable female stocks whose unfertilized eggs are induced to develop by heat-shock treatment. Any exclusively female generation contains exact copies of the maternal clone-founder genome. Ovaries transplanted in either direction between the standard and the parthenogenetic genotypes yield eggs capable of parthenocloning. In addition, use ofmale larvae as ovary recipients eliminates diapause in eggs produced in the implants. Unfertilized eggs of some silkworm clones respond also to the cold-shock treatment by producing homozygous fertile sons; cloned females can be crossed with their parthenogenetic sons to obtain progeny homozygous for the transgene in both sexes. Rational exploitation of available parthenozygous pools and the use of parthenocloning methods enable rapid fixation and maintenance of the desired genotypes.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  18. A characterization of structural proteins expressed by Bombyx mori bidensovirus.

    PubMed

    Lü, Peng; Xing, Yali; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Yanhua; Pan, Ye; Chen, Kangmin; Zhu, Feifei; Zhou, Yajing; Chen, Keping; Yao, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Bombyx mori bidensiovirus (BmBDV) is a species of Bidensovirus that has been was placed into a new genus within the new family Bidnaviridae by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. BmBDV causes fatal flacherie disease in silkworms, which causes large losses to the sericulture industry. BmBDV contains two sets of complementary linear single-stranded DNAs of approximately 6.5kb (viral DNA 1, VD1) and 6.0kb (viral DNA 2, VD2). VD1 and VD2 are encapsidated in separate icosahedral non-enveloped capsids, which are similar in size and shape. However, the strategies used to express BmBDV structural proteins remains unclear. In this work, a total of six structural proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and shown to be encoded by the BmBDV VP gene via mass spectrometry. The transmission electron microscopy results showed that co-expression of the BmBDV VP and SP structural proteins in Spodoptera frugiperda sf9 cells resulted in the formation of 22-24nm virus-like particles. Furthermore, a mutation of the major structural protein-encoding VP gene, in which the second in-frame ATG codon was mutated to GCG, abrogated the production of several structural proteins, indicating that this strategy of expressing BmBDV VP is dependent on a leaky scanning translation mechanism.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minchul; Ryou, Hee-Joo; Yun, Eun-Young; Goo, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)) from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF) of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26556347

  20. Accumulation of 1-deoxynojirimycin in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Shi, Xin-qin; Sun, Bo; Ye, Jing-jing; Duan, Zu-an; Zhou, Xiao-ling; Cui, Wei-zheng; Wu, Xiao-feng

    2010-01-01

    1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) contents in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, at different developmental stages and tissues were investigated by using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 1-DNJ contents of silkworm larvae change significantly with their developmental stages. The male larvae showed higher accumulation efficiency of 1-DNJ than the females and also a significant variation was observed among the silkworm strains. The present results show that tissue distribution of 1-DNJ was significantly higher in blood, digestive juice, and alimentary canal, but no 1-DNJ was observed in the silkgland. Moreover, 1-DNJ was not found in silkworms fed with artificial diet that does not contain mulberry leaf powder. This proves that silkworms obtain 1-DNJ from mulberry leaves; they could not synthesize 1-DNJ by themselves. The accumulation and excretion of 1-DNJ change periodically during the larval stage. There was no 1-DNJ in the newly-hatched larvae and 1-DNJ was mainly accumulated during the early and middle stages of every instar, while excreted at later stages of larval development. Further, it is possible to extract 1-DNJ from the larval feces and it is optimal to develop the 1-DNJ related products for diabetic auxiliary therapy. PMID:20349525

  1. Ultrathin Free-Standing Bombyx mori Silk Nanofibril Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shengjie; Jin, Kai; Kaplan, David L; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-06-08

    We report a new ultrathin filtration membrane prepared from silk nanofibrils (SNFs), directly exfoliated from natural Bombyx mori silk fibers to retain structure and physical properties. These membranes can be prepared with a thickness down to 40 nm with a narrow distribution of pore sizes ranging from 8 to 12 nm. Typically, 40 nm thick membranes prepared from SNFs have pure water fluxes of 13 000 L h(-1) m(-2) bar(-1), more than 1000 times higher than most commercial ultrathin filtration membranes and comparable with the highest water flux reported previously. The commercial membranes are commonly prepared from polysulfone, poly(ether sulfone), and polyamide. The SNF-based ultrathin membranes exhibit efficient separation for dyes, proteins, and colloids of nanoparticles with at least a 64% rejection of Rhodamine B. This broad-spectrum filtration membrane would have potential utility in applications such as wastewater treatment, nanotechnology, food industry, and life sciences in part due to the protein-based membrane polymer (silk), combined with the robust mechanical and separation performance features.

  2. Grhl3 induces human epithelial tumor cell migration and invasion via downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Guo, Sijia; Tu, Zhenzhen; Di, Lijun; Zha, Xiaojun; Zhou, Haisheng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Grainyhead genes are involved in wound healing and developmental neural tube closure. Metastasis is a multistep process during which cancer cells disseminate from the site of primary tumors and establish secondary tumors in distant organs. The adhesion protein E-cadherin plays an essential role in metastasis. In light of the high degree of similarity between the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurring in wound-healing processes and the EMT occurring during the acquisition of invasiveness in skin or breast cancer, we investigated the role of the Grainyhead genes in cancer invasion. Here, we show that there is an inverse relationship between Grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) and E-cadherin expression in some epithelial tumor cell lines. Overexpression of Grhl3 in the E-cadherin-positive epithelial tumor cell line, characterized by less invasiveness, generated a transcriptional blockage of the E-cadherin gene and promoted cell migration and cell invasion. Conversely, Grhl3 depletion inhibited cell migration and cell invasion and was associated with a gain of E-cadherin expression. To further explore the mechanism by which Grhl3 regulated E-cadherin expression, an E-cadherin promoter report analysis was performed and results showed that Grhl3 repressed E-cadherin gene expression by directly or indirectly binding to the E-boxes present in the proximal E-cadherin promoter. Taken together, our findings define a major role for Grhl3 in the induction of migration and invasion by the downregulation of E-cadherin in cancer cells.

  3. Genetic and biochemical dissection of protein linkages in the cadherin-catenin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jou, T S; Stewart, D B; Stappert, J; Nelson, W J; Marrs, J A

    1995-01-01

    The cadherin-catenin complex is important for mediating homotypic, calcium-dependent cell-cell interactions in diverse tissue types. Although proteins of this complex have been identified, little is known about their interactions. Using a genetic assay in yeast and an in vitro protein-binding assay, we demonstrate that beta-catenin is the linker protein between E-cadherin and alpha-catenin and that E-cadherin does not bind directly to alpha-catenin. We show that a 25-amino acid sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin and the amino-terminal domain of alpha-catenin are independent binding sites for beta-catenin. In addition to beta-catenin and plakoglobin, another member of the armadillo family, p120 binds to E-cadherin. However, unlike beta-catenin, p120 does not bind alpha-catenin in vitro, although a complex of p120 and endogenous alpha-catenin could be immunoprecipitated from cell extracts. In vitro protein-binding assays using recombinant E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain and alpha-catenin revealed two catenin pools in cell lysates: an approximately 1000- to approximately 2000-kDa complex bound to E-cadherin and an approximately 220-kDa pool that did not contain E-cadherin. Only beta-catenin in the approximately 220-kDa pool bound exogenous E-cadherin. Delineation of these molecular linkages and the demonstration of separate pools of catenins in different cell lines provide a foundation for examining regulatory mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the cadherin-catenin complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7761449

  4. A complex of α6 integrin and E-cadherin drives liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells through hepatic angiopoietin-like 6

    PubMed Central

    Marchiò, Serena; Soster, Marco; Cardaci, Sabrina; Muratore, Andrea; Bartolini, Alice; Barone, Vanessa; Ribero, Dario; Monti, Maria; Bovino, Paola; Sun, Jessica; Giavazzi, Raffaella; Asioli, Sofia; Cassoni, Paola; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Pucci, Piero; Bugatti, Antonella; Rusnati, Marco; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Bussolino, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Homing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to the liver is a non-random process driven by a crosstalk between tumour cells and components of the host tissue. Here we report the isolation of a liver metastasis-specific peptide ligand (CGIYRLRSC) that binds a complex of E-cadherin and α6 integrin on the surface of CRC cells. We identify angiopoietin-like 6 protein as a peptide-mimicked natural ligand enriched in hepatic blood vessels of CRC patients. We demonstrate that an interaction between hepatic angiopoietin-like 6 and tumoural α6 integrin/E-cadherin drives liver homing and colonization by CRC cells, and that CGIYRLRSC inhibits liver metastasis through interference with this ligand/receptor system. Our results indicate a mechanism for metastasis whereby a soluble factor accumulated in normal vessels functions as a specific ligand for circulating cancer cells. Consistently, we show that high amounts of coexpressed α6 integrin and E-cadherin in primary tumours represent a poor prognostic factor for patients with advanced CRC. PMID:23070965

  5. A coleopteran cadherin fragment synergizes toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca against lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Hua, Gang; Taylor, Milton D; Adang, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus, is a serious cosmopolitan pest of commercial poultry facilities because of its involvement in structural damage to poultry houses, reduction in feed conversion efficiency, and transfer of avian and human pathogens. Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca insecticidal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis are used to control coleopteran larvae. Cadherins localized in the midgut epithelium function as receptors for Cry toxins in lepidopteran, coleopteran, and dipteran insects. Previously, we demonstrated that the truncated cadherin (DvCad1) from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, which consists of the C-terminal cadherin repeats (CR) 8-10 and expressed in Escherichia coli, enhanced Cry3Aa and Cry3Bb toxicity against several coleopteran species. Here we report that the DvCad1-CR8-10 enhances Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca toxicity to lesser mealworm. Previously, by an enzyme linked immunosorbent microplate assay, we demonstrated that the DvCad1-CR8-10 binds activated-Cry3Aa (11.8 nM), -Cry3Bb (1.4nM), and now report that CR8-10 binds activated-Cry8Ca (5.7 nM) toxin. The extent of Cry toxins enhancement by DvCad1-CR8-10, which ranged from 3.30- to 5.93-fold, may have practical application for lesser mealworm control in preventing avian and human pathogen transfer in poultry facilities.

  6. Identification of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin domain II loop 1 as the binding site of Tenebrio molitor cadherin repeat CR12.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Amaro, Itzel; Ortíz, Ernesto; Becerril, Baltazar; Ibarra, Jorge E; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins exert their toxic effect by specific recognition of larval midgut proteins leading to oligomerization of the toxin, membrane insertion and pore formation. The exposed domain II loop regions of Cry toxins have been shown to be involved in receptor binding. Insect cadherins have shown to be functionally involved in toxin binding facilitating toxin oligomerization. Here, we isolated a VHH (VHHA5) antibody by phage display that binds Cry3Aa loop 1 and competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to Tenebrio molitor brush border membranes. VHHA5 also competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to a cadherin fragment (CR12) that was previously shown to be involved in binding and toxicity of Cry3Aa, indicating that Cry3Aa binds CR12 through domain II loop 1. Moreover, we show that a loop 1 mutant, previously characterized to have increased toxicity to T. molitor, displayed a correlative enhanced binding affinity to T. molitor CR12 and to VHHA5. These results show that Cry3Aa domain II loop 1 is a binding site of CR12 T. molitor cadherin.

  7. Biotransformation effect of Bombyx Mori L. may play an important role in treating diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, La; Li, Yin; Guo, Xin-Feng; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Compared with herbal drugs, medicine processed from animals (animal medicine) was thought to have more bioactive substances and higher activities. Biotransformation effect often plays an important role in their effect. However, researches about effect of animal medicine on diabetic nephropathy and applying animal medicine as natural bio-transformer were seldom reported. The purpose of this paper was to reveal the use of Bombyx Mori L. on diabetic nephropathy from ancient to modern times. The classical literature indicated that Saosi Decoction (), which contains Bombyx Mori L. or silkworm cocoon, was applied to treat disorders congruent with modern disease diabetic nephropathy from the Ming to Qing Dynasty in ancient China. Modern studies showed that Bombyx Mori L. contains four main active constituents. Among these, 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) and quercetin showed promising potential to be new agents in diabetic nephropathy treatment. The concentrations of 1-DNJ and the activities of quercetin in Bombyx Mori L. are higher than in mulberry leaves, because of the biotransformation in the Bombyx Mori L. body. However, these specifific components need further human and mechanistic studies to determine their therapeutic potential for this challenging condition.

  8. Effects of Ag Nanoparticles on Growth and Fat Body Proteins in Silkworms (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Meng, Xu; Abdlli, Nouara; Wang, Niannian; Lü, Peng; Nie, Zhichao; Dong, Xin; Lu, Shuang; Chen, Keping

    2017-03-30

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs), a widely used non-antibiotic, antibacterial material, have shown toxic and other potentially harmful effects in mammals. However, the deleterious effects of AgNPs on insects are still unknown. Here, we studied the effects of AgNPs on the model invertebrate organism Bombyx mori. After feeding silkworm larvae different concentrations of AgNPs, we evaluated the changes of B. mori body weights, survival rates, and proteomic differences. The results showed that low concentrations (<400 mg/L) of AgNPs promoted the growth and cocoon weights of B. mori. Although high concentrations (≥800 mg/L) of AgNPs also improved B. mori growth, they resulted in silkworm death. An analysis of fat body proteomic differences revealed 13 significant differences in fat body protein spots, nine of which exhibited significantly downregulated expression, while four showed significantly upregulated expression. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed that at an AgNP concentration of 1600 mg/L, the expression levels of seven proteins were similar to the transcription levels of their corresponding genes. Our results suggest that AgNPs lowered the resistance to oxidative stress, affected cell apoptosis, and induced cell necrosis by regulating related protein metabolism and metabolic pathways in B. mori.

  9. N-Cadherin Mediates Neuronal Cell Survival through Bim Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Boscher, Cécile; Wolff, Emeline; Mège, René-Marc; Birbes, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    N-cadherin is a major adhesion molecule involved in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion regulates neuroepithelial cell polarity, neuronal precursor migration, growth cone migration and synaptic plasticity. In vitro, it has been involved in signaling events regulating processes such as cell mobility, proliferation and differentiation. N-cadherin has also been implicated in adhesion-dependent protection against apoptosis in non-neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated if the engagement of N-cadherin participates to the control of neuronal cells survival/death balance. We observed that plating either primary mouse spinal cord neurons or primary rat hippocampal neurons on N-cadherin recombinant substrate greatly enhances their survival compared to non-specific adhesion on poly-L-lysine. We show that N-cadherin engagement, in the absence of other survival factors (cell-matrix interactions and serum), protects GT1-7 neuronal cells against apoptosis. Using this cell line, we then searched for the signaling pathways involved in the survival effect of N-cadherin engagement. The PI3-kinase/Akt survival pathway and its downstream effector Bad are not involved, as no phosphorylation of Akt or Bad proteins in response to N-cadherin engagement was observed. In contrast, N-cadherin engagement activated the Erk1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Moreover, N-cadherin ligation mediated a 2-fold decrease in the level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim-EL whereas the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was unchanged. Inhibition of Mek1/2 kinases with U0126, and the resulting inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation, induced the increase of both the level of Bim-EL and apoptosis of cells seeded on the N-cadherin substrate, suggesting that Erk phosphorylation is necessary for cell survival. Finally, the overexpression of a phosphorylation defective form of Bim-EL prevented N-cadherin-engagement induced cell survival. In conclusion, our

  10. DNA methylation-induced E-cadherin silencing is correlated with the clinicopathological features of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Catalano, Teresa; Biondo, Carmelo; Beninati, Concetta; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    E-cadherin, a calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule, has an important role in epithelial cell function, maintenance of tissue architecture and cancer suppression. Loss of E-cadherin promotes tumor metastatic dissemination and predicts poor prognosis. The present study investigated the clinicopathological significance of E-cadherin expression in cutaneous, mucosal and uveal melanoma related to epigenetic mechanisms that may contribute to E-cadherin silencing. E-cadherin expression was reduced in 55/130 cutaneous (42.3%), 49/82 mucosal (59.7%) and 36/64 uveal (56.2%) melanoma samples as compared to normal skin controls and was inversely associated with promoter methylation. Of the 10 different CpG sites studied (nt 863, 865, 873, 879, 887, 892, 901, 918, 920 and 940), two sites (nt 892 and 940) were 90-100% methylated in all the melanoma specimens examined and the other ones were partially methylated (range, 53-86%). In contrast, the methylation rate of the E-cadherin gene was low in normal tissues (range, 5-24%). In all the three types of melanoma studied, a significant correlation was found between reduced levels of E-cadherin and reduced survival, high mitotic index and metastasis, accounting for the predilection of lymph nodal localization. In cutaneous and mucosal melanoma, low E-cadherin expression was positively correlated also with head/neck localization and ulceration. A high frequency of reduced E-cadherin levels occurred in choroid melanomas. In vitro experiments showed that E-cadherin transcription was restored following 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment or DNMT1 silencing and was negatively correlated with the invasive potential of melanoma cells. The significant relationship between E-cadherin silencing and several poor prognostic factors indicates that this adhesion molecule may play an important role in melanomagenesis. Therefore, the inverse association of E-cadherin expression with promoter methylation raises the intriguing

  11. Clinicopathological significance of N-cadherin and VEGF in advanced gastric cancer brain metastasis and the effects of metformin in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hoon; Jung, Ji-Han; Choi, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Young Il; Chin, Hyung-Min; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although brain metastasis is a rare complication of gastric cancer, no standard therapy for gastric cancer brain metastasis has been established. We attempted to identify biological markers that predict brain metastasis, and investigated how to modulate such markers. A case-control study of patients newly diagnosed with gastric cancer who had developed brain metastasis during follow-up, was conducted. These patients were compared with patients who had advanced gastric cancer but no evidence of brain metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MSS1, claudin-3, claudin-4, Glut1, clusterin, ITGB4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p53. The expression of VEGF tended to be higher in the case group (33.3 vs. 0%, p=0.055). Median survival was significantly correlated with vascular invasion (12 vs. 33 months, p=0.008) and N-cadherin expression (36 vs. 12 months, p=0.027). We also investigated the effects of metformin in tumor-bearing mouse models. VEGF expression was decreased and E-cadherin increased in the metformin‑treated group when compared with the control group. The expression of the mesenchymal marker MMP9 was decreased in the metformin-treated group. Brain metastasis of advanced gastric cancer was associated with the expression of VEGF. Metformin treatment may be useful for modulating the metastatic capacity by reducing VEGF expression and blocking epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  12. Overexpression of the microRNA hsa-miR-200c leads to reduced expression of transcription factor 8 and increased expression of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hurteau, Gregory J; Carlson, J Andrew; Spivack, Simon D; Brock, Graham J

    2007-09-01

    MicroRNAs are approximately 22-nucleotide sequences thought to interact with multiple mRNAs resulting in either translational repression or degradation. We previously reported that several microRNAs had variable expression in mammalian cell lines, and we examined one, miR-200c, in more detail. A combination of bioinformatics and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to identify potential targets and revealed that the zinc finger transcription factor transcription factor 8 (TCF8; also termed ZEB1, deltaEF1, Nil-2-alpha) had inversely proportional expression levels to miR-200c. Knockout experiments using anti-microRNA oligonucleotides increased TCF8 levels but with nonspecific effects. Therefore, to investigate target predictions, we overexpressed miR-200c in select cells lines. Ordinarily, the expression level of miR-200c in non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells is low in contrast to normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Stable overexpression of miR-200c in A549 cells results in a loss of TCF8, an increase in expression of its regulatory target, E-cadherin, and altered cell morphology. In MCF7 (estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer) cells, there is endogenous expression of miR-200c and E-cadherin but TCF8 is absent. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) cells lack detectable miR-200c and E-cadherin (the latter reportedly due to promoter region methylation) but express TCF8. The ectopic expression of miR-200c in this cell line also reduced levels of TCF8, restored E-cadherin expression, and altered cell morphology. Because the down-regulation of E-cadherin is a crucial event in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, loss of miR-200c expression could play a significant role in the initiation of an invasive phenotype, and, equally, miR-200c overexpression holds potential for its reversal.

  13. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in breast medullary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Charpin, C; Bonnier, P; Garcia, S; Andrac, L; Crebassa, B; Dorel, M; Lavaut, M N; Allasia, C

    1999-08-01

    The initial step of cancer invasion and metastasis is the escape of tumour cells from the primary site, involving disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion and E-cadherin (E-cad) and beta-catenin (beta-cat) down-regulation, as shown in various types of human malignancies including breast carcinomas. Medullary carcinomas are high grade and poorly differentiated tumours with syncytial typical pattern, and prognosis unexpectedly better than that in high grade breast carcinomas. In a series of 55 breast typical medullary carcinomas diagnosed according to the strict use of Ridolfi et al (Cancer 40: 1365-1385, 1977) criteria, E-cad and beta-cat were investigated using quantitative (SAMBA 2005 system) immunocytochemical assays on frozen sections. Results were compared to that obtained on paraffin sections and in a series (n=55) of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. It was shown that medullary carcinomas significantly (p<0.001) expressed more E-cad and beta-cat than grade 3 ductal carcinomas. E-cad and beta-cat correlated with high expression of P53, of c-erbB, and of Ki-67 antigens, and with lack of hormone receptors antigenic sites (p<0.001). It was concluded that favourable prognosis and syncytial pattern of typical breast medullary carcinomas likely results, at least partly, from a particular expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, significantly limiting tumour growth and efficiently mastering the tumour cell dissemination, opposing to high proliferative activity (grade 3).

  14. The atypical cadherin flamingo regulates synaptogenesis and helps prevent axonal and synaptic degeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hong; Berlanga, Monica L; Xue, Mingshan; Hapip, Sara M; Daniels, Richard W; Mendenhall, John M; Alcantara, Adriana A; Zhang, Bing

    2007-04-01

    The formation of synaptic connections with target cells and maintenance of axons are highly regulated and crucial for neuronal function. The atypical cadherin and G-protein-coupled receptor Flamingo and its orthologs in amphibians and mammals have been shown to regulate cell polarity, dendritic and axonal growth, and neural tube closure. However, the role of Flamingo in synapse formation and function and in axonal health remains poorly understood. Here we show that fmi mutations cause a significant increase in the number of ectopic synapses on muscles and result in the formation of novel en passant synapses along axons, and unique presynaptic varicosities, including active zones, within axons. The fmi mutations also cause defective synaptic responses in a small subset of muscles, an age-dependent loss of muscle innervation and a drastic degeneration of axons in 3rd instar larvae without an apparent loss of neurons. Neuronal expression of Flamingo rescues all of these synaptic and axonal defects and larval lethality. Based on these observations, we propose that Flamingo is required in neurons for synaptic target selection, synaptogenesis, the survival of axons and synapses, and adult viability. These findings shed new light on a possible role for Flamingo in progressive neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Asymmetric colocalization of Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, and Dishevelled in planar cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Y; Usui, T; Yanagawa, S; Takeichi, M; Uemura, T

    2001-06-05

    The Drosophila wing provides an appropriate model system for studying genetic programming of planar cell polarity (PCP) [1-4]. Each wing cell respects the proximodistal (PD) axis; i.e., it localizes an assembly of actin bundles to its distalmost vertex and produces a single prehair. This PD polarization requires the redistribution of Flamingo (Fmi), a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, to proximal/distal cell boundaries; otherwise, the cell mislocalizes the prehair [5]. Achievement of the biased Fmi pattern depends on two upstream components in the PCP signaling pathway: Frizzled (Fz), a receptor for a hypothetical polarity signal, and an intracellular protein, Dishevelled (Dsh) [6-8]. Here, we visualized endogenous Dsh in the developing wing. A portion of Dsh colocalized with Fmi, and the distributions of both proteins were interdependent. Furthermore, Fz controlled the association of Dsh with cell boundaries, which association was correlated with the presence of hyperphosphorylated forms of Dsh. Our results, together with a recent study on Fz distribution [9], support the possibility that Fz, Dsh, and Fmi constitute a signaling complex and that its restricted localization directs cytoskeletal reorganization only at the distal cell edge.

  16. Distinctive localization of N- and E-cadherins in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yatabe, Megumi; Fujiwara, Ken; Takigami, Shu; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Soji, Tsuyoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    In the rat anterior pituitary gland, folliculo-stellate cells aggregate preferably to form pseudofollicles, and each type of hormone-producing cell shows adhesive affinity with particular types of heterologous hormone-producing cells. Distribution of cadherin types in the rat anterior pituitary was examined immunohistochemically to clarify the unique cell arrangements caused by homologous and heterologous affinities among cells. N- and E-cadherins were detected continuously along cell membranes, while P-cadherin was not. N- and E-cadherins showed distinct isolation in localization, with N-cadherins localized in hormone-producing cells of distal and intermediate lobes in various amounts, and E-cadherins limited to folliculo-stellate cells and marginal layer cells facing the residual lumen of Rathke's pouch. A similar distribution of cadherins was observed in cell clusters of primary cultured anterior pituitary cells. These findings suggest that differential expression of cell adhesion molecules may be partially responsible for localization of hormone-producing cells and folliculo-stellate cells.

  17. Should I stay or should I go? Cadherin function and regulation in the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Schiffmacher, Andrew T

    2017-03-02

    Our increasing comprehension of neural crest cell development has reciprocally advanced our understanding of cadherin expression, regulation, and function. As a transient population of multipotent stem cells that significantly contribute to the vertebrate body plan, neural crest cells undergo a variety of transformative processes and exhibit many cellular behaviors, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), motility, collective cell migration, and differentiation. Multiple studies have elucidated regulatory and mechanistic details of specific cadherins during neural crest cell development in a highly contextual manner. Collectively, these results reveal that gradual changes within neural crest cells are accompanied by often times subtle, yet important, alterations in cadherin expression and function. The primary focus of this review is to coalesce recent data on cadherins in neural crest cells, from their specification to their emergence as motile cells soon after EMT, and to highlight the complexities of cadherin expression beyond our current perceptions, including the hypothesis that the neural crest EMT is a transition involving a predominantly singular cadherin switch. Further advancements in genetic approaches and molecular techniques will provide greater opportunities to integrate data from various model systems in order to distinguish unique or overlapping functions of cadherins expressed at any point throughout the ontogeny of the neural crest.

  18. E-cadherin downregulation and Twist overexpression since early stages of oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Pinto Júnior, Décio dos Santos

    2014-02-01

    There is some evidence of Twist participation in oral carcinogenesis; however, little is known about its interaction with E-cadherin in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) development. This experimental study included an immunohistochemical analysis of Twist and E-cadherin proteins in paraffin-embedded specimens of oral leukoplakia (OL), OSCC, and normal oral mucosa. In addition, it was also performed a Western blot and double-immunofluorescence analysis of Twist and E-cadherin expression in OSCC cell lines. Significant differences in Twist and E-cadherin immunoexpression were observed between normal oral mucosa and OL, with an inverse relation since the earliest stages of oral dysplasia (r = -0,512; P < 0.001). Western blot and double-immunofluorescence analysis showed differences in Twist and E-cadherin expression among human oral keratinocytes and OSCC cell lines suggesting that downregulation of E-cadherin occurs in a dependent manner of Twist in OSCC. Our results showed a possible value of Twist and E-cadherin in the prediction of risk of oral epithelium malignant transformation.

  19. A cadherin-based code for the divisions of the mouse basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Nicole; Krishna-K; Nuernberger, Monique; Redies, Christoph

    2008-06-01

    The expression of 12 different classic cadherins and delta-protocadherins was mapped in consecutive series of sections through the basal ganglia of the postnatal and adult mouse by in situ hybridization. A particular focus was the caudoputamen, which consists of patches (striosomes) and a surrounding matrix that is histologically uniform. The different areas within the caudoputamen are connected specifically to other parts of the basal ganglia and to other brain regions, for example, the substantia nigra. The molecules regulating the morphogenesis and functional connectivity of the basal ganglia are largely unknown. Previous studies suggested that cadherins, a large family of adhesion molecules, are involved in basal ganglia development. In the present work, we study the expression of 12 cadherins and show that the patch and matrix compartments of the caudoputamen express the cadherins differentially, although partial overlap is observed. Moreover, the cadherins are expressed in multiple and diverse gradients within the caudoputamen and other parts of the basal ganglia. The persistence of the expression patterns in the adult basal ganglia suggests the possibility that cadherins also play a role at adult stages. Our results suggest that cadherins provide a code of potentially adhesive cues that specify not only patch and matrix compartments but also multiple molecular gradients within the basal ganglia. This code may relate to patterns of connectivity.

  20. Arf6 regulates EGF-induced internalization of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Zheng, Jianchao; Cui, Jie; Dong, Jing; Du, Jun

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin internalization facilitates dissolution of adherens junctions and promotes tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration. Our previous results have shown that Arf6 exerts pro-migratory action in breast cancer cells after EGF stimulation. Despite the fact that EGF signaling stimulates EMT of breast cancer cells, the effect of Arf6 on internalization of E-cadherin of breast cancer cells under EGF treatment remains to be determined. Here, we showed that EGF dose-dependently stimulated E-cadherin internalization by MCF-7 cells with the maximal effect at 50 ng/ml. Meanwhile, EGF treatment markedly increased Arf6 activation. Arf6 was involved in complexes of E-cadherin, and more E-cadherin was pulled down with Arf6 when the activity of the latter was increased. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays showed that transfection breast cancer cells with Arf6-T27N or Arf6 siRNA suppressed EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization. Taken together, our study demonstrated that Arf6 activation plays a potential role in EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization, providing new mechanism underlying the effect of Arf6 on promoting breast cancer cell metastasis.

  1. Interactions between fibroin and sericin proteins from Antheraea pernyi and Bombyx mori silk fibers.

    PubMed

    Du, Shan; Zhang, Jin; Zhou, Wei T; Li, Quan X; Greene, George W; Zhu, Hai J; Li, Jing L; Wang, Xun G

    2016-09-15

    Silkworm silk fibers are core-shell composites of fibroin and sericin proteins. Studying the interactions between fibroin and sericin is essential for understanding the properties of these composites. It is observed that compared to the domestic silk cocoon Bombyx mori (B. mori), the adhesion between fibroin and sericin from the wild silk cocoon, Antheraea pernyi (A. pernyi), is significantly stronger with a higher degree of heterogeneity. The adsorption of A. pernyi sericin on its fibroin is almost twice the value for B. mori sericin on fibroin, both showing a monolayer Langmuir adsorption. (1)H NMR and FTIR studies demonstrate on a molecular level the stronger interactions and the more intensive complex formation between A. pernyi fibroin and sericin, facilitated by the hydrogen bonding between glycine and serine. The findings of this study may help the design of composites with superior interfacial adhesion between different components.

  2. Advances in silkworm studies accelerated by the genome sequencing of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingyou; Li, Sheng; Feng, Qili

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in silkworm (Bombyx mori) research since the last review on this insect was published in this journal in 2005. In this article, we review the new and exciting progress and discoveries that have been made in B. mori during the past 10 years, which include the construction of a fine genome sequence and a genetic variation map, the evolution of genomes, the advent of functional genomics, the genetic basis of silk production, metamorphic development, immune response, and the advances in genetic manipulation. These advances, which were accelerated by the genome sequencing project, have promoted B. mori as a model organism not only for lepidopterans but also for general biology.

  3. ADAM-10-Mediated N-cadherin Cleavage is Protein Kinase C-α–Dependent and Promotes Glioblastoma Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kohutek, Zachary A.; diPierro, Charles G.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the related ‘a disintegrin and metalloproteinases’ (ADAMs) promote tumorigenesis by cleaving extracellular matrix and protein substrates, including N-cadherin. While N-cadherin is thought to regulate cell adhesion, migration and invasion, its role has not been characterized in glioblastomas (GBMs). In this study, we investigated the expression and function of post-translational N-cadherin cleavage in GBM cells as well as its regulation by protein kinase C (PKC). N-cadherin cleavage occurred at a higher level in glioblastoma cells than in non-neoplastic astrocytes. Treatment with the PKC-activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased N-cadherin cleavage, which was reduced by pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA specific for ADAM-10 or PKC-α. Furthermore, treatment of GBM cells with PMA induced the translocation of ADAM-10 to the cell membrane, the site where N-cadherin was cleaved, and this translocation was significantly reduced by the PKC-α inhibitor Gö6976 or PKC-α shRNA. In functional studies, N-cadherin cleavage was required for GBM cell migration, as depletion of N-cadherin cleavage by N-cadherin siRNA, ADAM-10 siRNA, or a cleavage-site mutant N-cadherin, decreased GBM cell migration. Taken together, these results suggest that N-cadherin cleavage is regulated by a PKC-α-ADAM-10 cascade in GBM cells and may be involved in mediating GBM cell migration. PMID:19357285

  4. N-cadherin promotes thyroid tumorigenesis through modulating major signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Da, Chenxing; Wu, Kexia; Yue, Chenli; Bai, Peisong; Wang, Rong; Wang, Guanjie; Zhao, Man; Lv, Yanyan; Hou, Peng

    2017-01-31

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial step in disease progression, plays a key role in tumor metastasis. N-cadherin, a well-known EMT marker, acts as a major oncogene in diverse cancers, whereas its functions in thyroid cancer remains largely unclear. This study was designed to explore the biological roles and related molecular mechanism of N-cadherin in thyroid tumorigenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry assays were used to evaluate N-cadherin expression. A series of in vitro studies such as cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of N-cadherin on malignant behavior of thyroid cancer cells. Our results showed that N-cadherin was significantly upregulated in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) as compared with non-cancerous thyroid tissues. N-cadherin knockdown markedly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. On the other hand, ectopic expression of N-cadherin promoted thyroid cancer cell growth and invasiveness. Mechanically, our data demonstrated that tumor-promoting role of N-cadherin in thyroid cancer was closely related to the activities of the MAPK/Erk, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and p16/Rb signaling pathways in addition to affecting the EMT process. Altogether, our findings suggest that N-cadherin promotes thyroid tumorigenesis by modulating the activities of major signaling pathways and EMT process, and may represent a potential therapeutic target for this cancer.

  5. E-Cadherin Destabilization Accounts for the Pathogenicity of Missense Mutations in Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simões-Correia, Joana; Figueiredo, Joana; Lopes, Rui; Stricher, François; Oliveira, Carla; Serrano, Luis; Seruca, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    E-cadherin is critical for the maintenance of tissue architecture due to its role in cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin mutations are the genetic cause of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) and missense mutations represent a clinical burden, due to the uncertainty of their pathogenic role. In vitro and in vivo, most mutations lead to loss-of-function, although the causal factor is unknown for the majority. We hypothesized that destabilization could account for the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense mutations in HDGC, and tested our hypothesis using in silico and in vitro tools. FoldX algorithm was used to calculate the impact of each mutation in E-cadherin native-state stability, and the analysis was complemented with evolutionary conservation, by SIFT. Interestingly, HDGC patients harbouring germline E-cadherin destabilizing mutants present a younger age at diagnosis or death, suggesting that the loss of native-state stability of E-cadherin accounts for the disease phenotype. To elucidate the biological relevance of E-cadherin destabilization in HDGC, we investigated a group of newly identified HDGC-associated mutations (E185V, S232C and L583R), of which L583R is predicted to be destabilizing. We show that this mutation is not functional in vitro, exhibits shorter half-life and is unable to mature, due to premature proteasome-dependent degradation, a phenotype reverted by stabilization with the artificial mutation L583I (structurally tolerated). Herein we report E-cadherin structural models suitable to predict the impact of the majority of cancer-associated missense mutations and we show that E-cadherin destabilization leads to loss-of-function in vitro and increased pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:22470475

  6. Contactin-1 reduces E-cadherin expression via activating AKT in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Wong, Nicholas; Hung, Claudia; Chen, Wendy Xin-Yi; Tang, Damu

    2013-01-01

    Contactin-1 has been shown to promote cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We report here that knockdown of contactin-1 in A549 lung cancer cells reduced A549 cell invasion and the cell's ability to grow in soft agar without affecting cell proliferation. Reduction of contactin-1 resulted in upregulation of E-cadherin, consistent with E-cadherin being inhibitive of cancer cell invasion. In an effort to investigate the mechanisms whereby contactin-1 reduces E-cadherin expression, we observed that contactin-1 plays a role in AKT activation, as knockdown of contactin-1 attenuated AKT activation. Additionally, inhibition of AKT activation significantly enhanced E-cadherin expression, an observation that mimics the situation observed in contactin-1 knockdown, suggesting that activation of AKT plays a role in contactin-1-mediated downregulation of E-cadherin. In addition, we were able to show that knockdown of contactin-1 did not further reduce A549 cell's invasion ability, when AKT activation was inhibited by an AKT inhibitor. To further support our findings, we overexpressed CNTN-1 in two CNTN-1 null breast cancer cell lines expressing E-cadherin. Upon overexpression, CNTN-1 reduced E-cadherin levels in one cell line and increased AKT activation in the other. Furthermore, in our study of 63 primary lung cancers, we observed 65% of primary lung cancers being contactin-1 positive and in these carcinomas, 61% were E-cadherin negative. Collectively, we provide evidence that contactin-1 plays a role in the downregulation of E-cadherin in lung cancer and that AKT activation contributes to this process. In a study of mechanisms responsible for contactin-1 to activate AKT, we demonstrated that knockdown of CNTN-1 in A549 cells did not enhance PTEN expression but upregulated PHLPP2, a phosphatase that dephosphorylates AKT. These observations thus suggest that contactin-1 enhances AKT activation in part by preventing PHLPP2-mediated AKT

  7. Knockdown of LI-cadherin alters expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiongfang; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Huangyan; Dong, Weiguo; Gao, Dian

    2016-05-01

    Liver-intestine cadherin (LI-cadherin), a novel member of the cadherin family, has been associated with the ability of a tumor to acquire an aggressive phenotype in several types of cancer. However, the exact function of LI-cadherin in the process of tumor invasion and metastasis remains predominantly unknown. To explore the effect of LI-cadherin on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and galectin-3 in LoVo human colorectal cancer cells, a RNA interference technique was applied to suppress the expression of LI‑cadherin. Subsequently, the mRNA levels and activities of MMP-2 and -9 were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and gelatin zymography, respectively. Additionally, the protein expression level of galectin-3 was determined by western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-silencing of LI-cadherin significantly increased the mRNA levels and activities of MMP‑2 and ‑9, and significantly reduced the protein levels of galectin‑3 in LoVo cells compared with control shRNA (P<0.05). These data indicate that knockdown of LI‑cadherin facilitates the invasion of cancer cells by degrading extracellular matrix components via activation of MMP‑2 and ‑9, and increases cancer cell adhesion and migration via altered expression of galectin‑3. This suggests that LI‑cadherin serves an important role in the invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and may be used as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  9. N-cadherin{sup +} HSCs in fetal liver exhibit higher long-term bone marrow reconstitution activity than N-cadherin{sup -} HSCs

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Hirofumi; Arai, Fumio; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Ikushima, Yoshiko Matsumoto; Suda, Toshio

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High N-cad expression was detected in E12.5 mouse FL LT-HSCs (EPCR{sup +} LSK cells). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immunohistochemically, N-cad{sup +} HSCs co-localized with sinusoidal ECs (Lyve-1{sup +} cells) in E12.5 FL, but these gradually detached in E15.5 and E18.5 FL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-cad{sup +} LSK cells in E12.5 FL exhibited higher LTR activity versus N-cad{sup -} LSK cells, which decreased in E15.5 and E18.5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-cad expression may confer high LTR activity to HSCs by facilitating interactions with the perisinusoidal niche in FL. -- Abstract: Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a microenvironment known as the stem cell niche. The regulation of HSCs in fetal liver (FL) and their niche, however, remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of N-cadherin (N-cad) in the maintenance of HSCs during FL hematopoiesis. By using anti-N-cad antibodies (Abs) produced by our laboratory, we detected high N-cad expression in embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) mouse FL HSCs, but not in E15.5 and E18.5 FL. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that N-cad{sup +}c-Kit{sup +} and N-cad{sup +} endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR){sup +} HSCs co-localized with Lyve-1{sup +} sinusoidal endothelial cells (ECs) in E12.5 FL and that some of these cells also expressed N-cad. However, N-cad{sup +} HSCs were also observed to detach from the perisinusoidal niche at E15.5 and E18.5, concomitant with a down-regulation of N-cad and an up-regulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) in hepatic cells. Moreover, EPCR{sup +} long-term (LT)-HSCs were enriched in the N-cad{sup +}Lin{sup -}Sca-1{sup +}c-Kit{sup +} (LSK) fraction in E12.5 FL, but not in E15.5 or E18.5 FL. In a long-term reconstitution (LTR) activity assay, higher engraftment associated with N-cad{sup +} LSK cells versus N-cad{sup -} LSK cells in E12.5 FL when transplanted into lethally irradiated recipient mice. However, the

  10. P-cadherin expression in skin peeled with phenol or trichloroacetic acid (TCA).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Ohtani, Toshio; Wakita, Hisashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2003-12-01

    P-cadherin expression patterns were studied in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) or phenol treated skin. The expression was absent or very weak on the basal cell surfaces by day 2. Seven days after peeling, P-cadherin was clearly distributed in a continuous granular pattern over the cell surface of the entire epidermis of the 40% TCA treated skin, in a weak granular pattern on a few suprabasal cells and basal cells of the phenol treated skin, and very weakly expressed on the lateral surfaces and in the cytoplasm of basal cells of the 60% TCA treated skin. Based on the present results and previous reports, it is likely that there are distinct patterns of P cadherin expression. Furthermore, a specific type of P cadherin expression might be involved in wound healing in general, which could provide new insights into tissue repair mechanisms after chemical peeling.

  11. Hakai, an E3-ligase for E-cadherin, stabilizes δ-catenin through Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Hridaya; Ryu, Taeyong; Seo, Young-Woo; Park, So-Yeon; He, Yongfeng; Dai, Weiye; Park, Eunsook; Simkhada, Shishli; Kim, Hangun; Lee, Keesook; Kim, Kwonseop

    2017-02-01

    Hakai ubiquitinates and induces endocytosis of the E-cadherin complex; thus, modulating cell adhesion and regulating development of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of metastasis. Our previous published data show that δ-catenin promotes E-cadherin processing and thereby activates β-catenin-mediated oncogenic signals. Although several published data show the interactions between δ-catenin and E-cadherin and between Hakai and E-cadherin separately, we found no published report on the relationship between δ-catenin and Hakai. In this report, we show Hakai stabilizes δ-catenin regardless of its E3 ligase activity. We show that Hakai and Src increase the stability of δ-catenin synergistically. Hakai stabilizes Src and Src, which in turn, inhibits binding between glycogen synthase kinase-3β and δ-catenin, resulting in less proteosomal degradation of δ-catenin. These results suggest that stabilization of δ-catenin by Hakai is dependent on Src.

  12. Levels of soluble E-cadherin in breast, gastric, and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; De Paoli, Paolo; De Re, Valli; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Soluble E-cadherin is a 80 kDa protein fragment coming from the proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain of the full length epithelial cadherin, a molecule involved in cell adhesion/polarity and tissue morphogenesis. In comparison with normal epithelia, cancer cells show a decreased cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion, and sE-cad levels normally increase in body fluids (blood and urine). This review focuses on soluble E-cadherin in sera of patients affected by three solid cancers (breast, gastric, and colorectal cancers) and how its levels correlate or not with some cancer parameters (e.g., dimension, progression, and localisation). We will describe the main proteomics approaches adopted to measure sE-cad both in vivo and in vitro and the most important findings about its behaviour in cancer dynamics.

  13. E-cadherin immunohistochemical expression in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate E-cadherin expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures and archival samples. All together 21 adenomas, 32 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 13 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. E-cadherin expression was higher in adenomas as compared with carcinomas but lower in solid carcinomas as compared with simple and complex carcinomas. More over, the expression of E-cadherin decreased with the increase in the neoplasm malignancy and proliferative activity (value of the mitotic index and number of cells showing Ki67). The study has shown that the expression of E-cadherin can be used as a prognostic factor.

  14. Cloning and characterization of the human invasion suppressor gene E-cadherin (CDH1)

    SciTech Connect

    Berx, G.; Staes, K.; Hengel, J. van

    1995-03-20

    E-cadherin is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule. Downregulation of E-cadherin expression often correlates with strong invasive potential and poor prognosis of human carcinomas. By using recombinant {lambda} phage, cosmid, and P1 phage clones, we isolated the full-length human E-cadherin gene (CDH1). The gene spans a region of approximately 100 kb, and its location on chromosome 16q22.1 was confirmed by FISH analysis. Detailed restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis of the gene allowed us to identify 16 exons and a 65-kb-long intron 2. The intron-exon boundaries are highly conserved in comparison with other {open_quotes}classical cadherins.{close_quotes} In intron 1 we identified a high-density CpG island that may be implicated in transcription regulation during embryogenesis and malignancy. 52 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Rap1: a turnabout for the crosstalk between cadherins and integrins.

    PubMed

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Balzac, Fiorella; Avolio, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The coordinate modulation of the cellular functions of cadherins and integrins plays an essential role in fundamental physiological and pathological processes, including morphogenesis, tissue differentiation and renewal, wound healing, immune surveillance, inflammatory response, tumour progression, and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the fine-balanced relationship between cadherin and integrin functions are still elusive. This review focuses on recent findings on the involvement of the small GTPase Rap1 in the regulation of cadherin- and integrin-dependent cell adhesion and signal transduction. In particular, it highlights some of the novel results recently obtained that raise the possibility of a pivotal role for Rap1 in the functional crosstalk between cadherins and integrins, suggesting interesting new regulatory mechanisms.

  16. Once upon a time there was beta-catenin in cadherin-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Gavard, Julie; Mège, René-Marc

    2005-12-01

    beta-Catenin was initially characterized as a protein interacting with the cadherin cytoplasmic tail and regulating cell-cell contacts and actin cytoskeleton interactions. Moreover, the gene coding for the Drosophila orthologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, was independently identified downstream of wingless in the segment-polarity signalling pathway. In fact, beta-catenin/Armadillo turned out to be key mediators of the Wnt/Wingless pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates. beta-Catenin participates in both adhesion and signalling functions in a mutually exclusive manner; bound to cadherins at the plasma membrane or 'unbound' in cytosolic or nuclear complexes. This model had placed beta-catenin at the crossroads between cadherin and Wnt signalling, leading to the dogma of inhibition of beta-catenin signalling by cadherins.

  17. S-nitrosylation regulates VE-cadherin phosphorylation and internalization in microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Guequén, Anita; Carrasco, Rodrigo; Zamorano, Patricia; Rebolledo, Lorena; Burboa, Pia; Sarmiento, José; Boric, Mauricio P; Korayem, Adam; Durán, Walter N; Sánchez, Fabiola A

    2016-04-15

    The adherens junction complex, composed mainly of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, β-catenin, p120, and γ-catenin, is the main element of the endothelial barrier in postcapillary venules.S-nitrosylation of β-catenin and p120 is an important step in proinflammatory agents-induced hyperpermeability. We investigated in vitro and in vivo whether or not VE-cadherin isS-nitrosylated using platelet-activating factor (PAF) as agonist. We report that PAF-stimulates S-nitrosylation of VE-cadherin, which disrupts its association with β-catenin. In addition, based on inhibition of nitric oxide production, our results strongly suggest that S-nitrosylation is required for VE-cadherin phosphorylation on tyrosine and for its internalization. Our results unveil an important mechanism to regulate phosphorylation of junctional proteins in association with S-nitrosylation.

  18. E-Cadherin as a Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanism on Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Shepard CR*, Wells A (2010). Breast carcinoma cells re-express E-cadherin during mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition. Mol Cancer. Jul;9(1...Physicians and Scientists. Redondo Beach, PA. June 2009. 2. Chao Y, Shepard CR, Wells, A. “E-cadherin expression as a survival mechanism for breast...mechanism in metastatic breast cancer.” American Society for Clinical Investigation. Chicago , IL. April 2010. (Appendix 2) 2. Chao Y and Wells A. “E

  19. TLE1 promotes EMT in A549 lung cancer cells through suppression of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Ireland, Shubha Kale; Pham, Tri; Temple, Brandi; Chen, Renwei; Raj, Madhwa H G; Biliran, Hector

    2014-12-12

    The Groucho transcriptional corepressor TLE1 protein has recently been shown to be a putative lung specific oncogene, but its underlying oncogenic activity in lung cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this report, we investigated whether TLE1 regulates lung cancer aggressiveness using the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 as a model system. Through a combination of genetic approaches, we found that TLE1 potentiates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells in part through suppression of the tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin. Exogenous expression of TLE1 in A549 cells resulted in heightened EMT phenotypes (enhanced fibroblastoid morphology and increased cell migratory potential) and in molecular alterations characteristic of EMT (downregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and upregulation of the mesenchymal marker Vimentin). Conversely, downregulation of endogenous TLE1 expression in these cells resulted in reversal of basal EMT characterized by a cuboidal-like epithelial cell phenotype, reduced cell motility, and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that TLE1 suppresses E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level in part by recruiting histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity to the E-cadherin promoter. Consistently, the HDAC inhibitor TSA partially reversed the TLE1-induced E-cadherin downregulation and cell migration, suggesting a role for HDACs in TLE1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin and EMT function. These findings uncover a novel role of TLE1 in regulating EMT in A549 cells through its repressive effect on E-cadherin and provide a mechanism for TLE1 oncogenic activity in lung cancer.

  20. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axons growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Brusés, Juan L

    2013-01-01

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2hi3644Tg) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ~40% of the somitic hemisegments, and an ~150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point which abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to abnormally stall at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin depleted embryos the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. PMID:21452216

  1. μ2-Dependent endocytosis of N-cadherin is regulated by β-catenin to facilitate neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Chin-Yin

    2017-02-22

    Circuit formation in the brain requires neurite outgrowth throughout development to establish synaptic contacts with target cells. Active endocytosis of several adhesion molecules facilitates the dynamic exchange of these molecules at the surface and promotes neurite outgrowth in developing neurons. The endocytosis of N-cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule, has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we identified that a fraction of N-cadherin internalizes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Two tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin recognized by the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor complex are responsible for CME of N-cadherin. Moreover, β-catenin, a core component of the N-cadherin adhesion complex, inhibits N-cadherin endocytosis by masking the 2 tyrosine-based motifs. Removal of β-catenin facilitates μ2 binding to N-cadherin, thereby increasing clathrin-mediated N-cadherin endocytosis and neurite outgrowth without affecting the steady-state level of surface N-cadherin. These results identify and characterize the mechanism controlling N-cadherin endocytosis through β-catenin-regulated μ2 binding to modulate neurite outgrowth.

  2. Snail2 and Zeb2 repress P-cadherin to define embryonic territories in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Acloque, Hervé; Ocaña, Oscar H; Abad, Diana; Stern, Claudio D; Nieto, M Angela

    2017-02-15

    Snail and Zeb transcription factors induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in embryonic and adult tissues by direct repression of E-cadherin transcription. The repression of E-cadherin transcription by the EMT inducers Snail1 and Zeb2 plays a fundamental role in defining embryonic territories in the mouse, as E-cadherin needs to be downregulated in the primitive streak and in the epiblast, concomitant with the formation of mesendodermal precursors and the neural plate, respectively. Here, we show that in the chick embryo, E-cadherin is weakly expressed in the epiblast at pre-primitive streak stages where it is substituted for by P-cadherin We also show that Snail2 and Zeb2 repress P-cadherin transcription in the primitive streak and the neural plate, respectively. This indicates that E- and P-cadherin expression patterns evolved differently between chick and mouse. As such, the Snail1/E-cadherin axis described in the early mouse embryo corresponds to Snail2/P-cadherin in the chick, but both Snail factors and Zeb2 fulfil a similar role in chick and mouse in directly repressing ectodermal cadherin genes to contribute to the delamination of mesendodermal precursors at gastrulation and the proper specification of the neural ectoderm during neural induction.

  3. Anopheles gambiae Cadherin AgCad1 Binds the Cry4Ba Toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and a Fragment of AgCad1 Synergizes Toxicity†

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Gang; Zhang, Rui; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Adang, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    A midgut cadherin AgCad1 cDNA was cloned from Anopheles gambiae larvae and analyzed for its possible role as a receptor for the Cry4Ba toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis strain israelensis. The AgCad1 cadherin encodes a putative 1735-residue protein organized into an extracellular region of 11 cadherin repeats (CR) and a membrane-proximal extracellular domain (MPED). AgCad1 mRNA was detected in midgut of larvae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The AgCad1 protein was localized, by immunochemistry of sectioned larvae, predominately to the microvilli in posterior midgut. The localization of Cry4Ba binding was determined by the same technique, and toxin bound microvilli in posterior midgut. The AgCad1 protein was present in brush border membrane fractions prepared from larvae, and Cry4Ba toxin bound the same-sized protein on blots of those fractions. The AgCad1 protein was expressed transiently in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. 125I-Cry4Ba toxin bound AgCad1 from S2 cells in a competitive manner. Cry4Ba bound to beads extracted 200 kDa AgCad1 and a 29 kDa fragment of AgCad1 from S2 cells. A peptide containing the AgCad1 region proximal to the cell (CR11-MPED) was expressed in Escherichia coli. Although Cry4Ba showed limited binding to CR11-MPED, the peptide synergized the toxicity of Cry4Ba to larvae. AgCad1 in the larval brush border is a binding protein for Cry4Ba toxin. On the basis of binding results and CR11-MPED synergism of Cry4Ba toxicity, AgCad1 is probably a Cry4Ba receptor. PMID:18407662

  4. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  5. Effect of fortification of Mulberry leaves with homeopathic drug Nux vomica on Bombyx mori. L.

    PubMed

    Hiware, C J

    2006-07-01

    Silk worm (Bombyx mori L.) larvae were fed on Mulberry leaves treated with Nux vomica mother tincture. The impact on larval, cocoon, shell and pupal weight, silk ratio, average filament length and denier, and number of breakages during reeling were investigated. The results were positive in all parameters under study except cocoon weight, pupal weight, and the average denier of the filament.

  6. Enhancement of larval RNAi efficiency by over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F M; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general.

  7. Functional characterization of the vitellogenin promoter in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, Y Q; Li, Z Q; Ling, L; Zeng, B S; You, L; Chen, Y Z; Aslam, A F M; Huang, Y P; Tan, A J

    2014-10-01

    Genetic transformation and genome editing technologies have been successfully established in the lepidopteran insect model, the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, providing great potential for functional genomics and practical applications. However, the current lack of cis-regulatory elements in B. mori gene manipulation research limits further exploitation in functional gene analysis. In the present study, we characterized a B. mori endogenous promoter, Bmvgp, which is a 798-bp DNA sequence adjacent to the 5'-end of the vitellogenin gene (Bmvg). PiggyBac-based transgenic analysis shows that Bmvgp precisely directs expression of a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), in a sex-, tissue- and stage-specific manner. In transgenic animals, EGFP expression can be detected in the female fat body from larval-pupal ecdysis to the following pupal and adult stage. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that EGFP expression can be activated by 20-hydroxyecdysone, which is consistent with endogenous Bmvg expression. These data indicate that Bmvgp is an effective endogenous cis-regulatory element in B. mori.

  8. Anatomical and functional analysis of domestication effects on the olfactory system of the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Bisch-Knaden, Sonja; Daimon, Takaaki; Shimada, Toru; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The silkmoth Bombyx mori is the main producer of silk worldwide and has furthermore become a model organism in biological research, especially concerning chemical communication. However, the impact domestication might have had on the silkmoth's olfactory sense has not yet been investigated. Here, we show that the pheromone detection system in B. mori males when compared with their wild ancestors Bombyx mandarina seems to have been preserved, while the perception of environmental odorants in both sexes of domesticated silkmoths has been degraded. In females, this physiological impairment was mirrored by a clear reduction in olfactory sensillum numbers. Neurophysiological experiments with hybrids between wild and domesticated silkmoths suggest that the female W sex chromosome, so far known to have the sole function of determining femaleness, might be involved in the detection of environmental odorants. Moreover, the coding of odorants in the brain, which is usually similar among closely related moths, differs strikingly between B. mori and B. mandarina females. These results indicate that domestication has had a strong impact on odour detection and processing in the olfactory model species B. mori. PMID:24258720

  9. Tumor-specific downregulation and methylation of the CDH13 (H-cadherin) and CDH1 (E-cadherin) genes correlate with aggressiveness of human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi Rong; Sano, Toshiaki; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Asa, Sylvia L; Yamada, Shozo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Kudo, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    The gene products of CDH13 and CDH1, H-cadherin and E-cadherin, respectively, play a key role in cell-cell adhesion. Inactivation of the cadherin-mediated cell adhesion system caused by aberrant methylation is a common finding in human cancers, indicating that the CDH13 and CDH1 function as tumor suppressor and invasion suppressor genes. In this study, we analyzed the expression of H-cadherin mRNA and E-cadherin protein in 5 normal pituitary tissues and 69 primary pituitary adenomas including all major types by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Reduced expression of H-cadherin was detected in 54% (28/52) of pituitary tumors and was significantly associated with tumor aggressiveness (P<0.05). E-cadherin expression was lost in 30% (21 of 69) and significantly reduced in 32% (22 of 69) of tumors. E-cadherin expression was significantly lower in grade II, III, and IV than in grade I adenomas (P=0.015, P=0.029, and P=0.01, respectively). Using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), promoter hypermethylation of CDH13 and CDH1 was detected in 30 and 36% of 69 adenomas, respectively, but not in 5 normal pituitary tissues. Methylation of CDH13 was observed more frequently in invasive adenomas (42%) than in non-invasive adenomas (19%) (P<0.05) and methylation of CDH1 was more frequent in grade IV adenomas compared with grade I adenomas (P<0.05). Methylation of either CDH13 or CDH1 was identified in 35 cases (51%) and was more frequent in grade IV invasive adenomas than in grade I non-invasive adenomas (P<0.05 and P<0.05, respectively). Downregulation of expression was correlated with promoter hypermethylation in CDH13 and CDH1. In conclusion, the tumor-specific downregulation of expression and methylation of CDH13 and CDH1, alone or in combination, may be involved in the development and invasive growth of pituitary adenomas.

  10. E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion prevents invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The ability of carcinomas to invade and to metastasize largely depends on the degree of epithelial differentiation within the tumors, i.e., poorly differentiated being more invasive than well-differentiated carcinomas. Here we confirmed this correlation by examining various human cell lines derived from bladder, breast, lung, and pancreas carcinomas. We found that carcinoma cell lines with an epithelioid phenotype were noninvasive and expressed the epithelium-specific cell- cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (also known as Arc-1, uvomorulin, and cell-CAM 120/80), as visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western and Northern blotting, whereas carcinoma cell lines with a fibroblastoid phenotype were invasive and had lost E-cadherin expression. Invasiveness of these latter cells could be prevented by transfection with E-cadherin cDNA and was again induced by treatment of the transfected cells with anti-E-cadherin mAbs. These findings indicate that the selective loss of E-cadherin expression can generate dedifferentiation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells, and they suggest further that E-cadherin acts as an invasion suppressor. PMID:2007622

  11. Cadherin-11 Induces Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes to Form Lining Layers in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Hans P.; Lee, David M.; Agarwal, Sandeep K.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    The synovial lining of diarthrodial joints is composed of a condensed network of synoviocytes that form an intact layer via cell-to-cell contacts with significant intercellular matrix spaces. However, the molecular basis for synovial lining formation and its structural integrity has not been previously defined. In this study, using a three-dimensional fibroblast-like synoviocyte in vitro organ culture system, we provide evidence that cadherin-11 expressed in fibroblast-like synoviocytes plays a determining role in establishing the synovial lining layer. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes that were grown in three-dimensional matrices demonstrated formation of a lining structure at the interface between the matrix and the fluid phase. Treatment of fibroblast-like synoviocyte organ cultures with a cadherin-11-Fc fusion protein efficiently abrogated lining layer organization. Moreover, because E-cadherin-expressing fibroblasts failed to organize a lining layer structure at the tissue boundary, this effect appears to be a distinct characteristic of fibroblasts expressing cadherin-11. We found that cadherin-11 mediated fibroblast-like synoviocyte cell-to-cell adhesion via formation of adherens junctions that were linked to and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton. Together, these studies implicate cadherin-11 in synovial tissue and lining layer formation and provide an in vitro system to model fibroblast-like synoviocyte behavior and function in organizing the synovial tissue. PMID:16651616

  12. Diffuse growth pattern affects E-cadherin expression in invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Ulrich; Jacobs, Susanne; Neuss, Michael; Tory, Kalman; Rath, Werner; Kulle, Bettina; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the correlations between growth patterns and E-cadherin expression by immunohistochemistry and the presence of mutations of exons 6-10 of the E-cadherin gene by PCR-SSCP, in 79 cases of invasive lobular and ductal breast cancer. E-cadherin expression showed a tendency to be lower in lobular than in ductal carcinomas (p=0.064). In 60% of lobular carcinomas the diffuse growth pattern and in 72% of ductal carcinomas the compact growth pattern predominated. E-cadherin expression was significantly lower in diffuse than in compact tumor area (p<0.001) and not related to carcinoma type when it was considered in tumor areas with either diffuse (p=0.278) or compact (p=0.128) growth pattern. No mutations were detected. In conclusion, loss of E-cadherin expression is related to an increase of diffuse growth pattern in both lobular and ductal types of breast cancer, and the differential proportions of growth patterns in both tumor types cause the tendency for lower E-cadherin expression in the lobular type.

  13. Discovery and Characterization of Cadherin Domains in Saccharophagus degradans 2-40▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 is a prominent member of newly discovered group of marine and estuarine bacteria that recycle complex polysaccharides. The S. degradans 2-40 genome codes for 15 extraordinary long polypeptides, ranging from 274 to 1,600 kDa. Five of these contain at least 52 cadherin (CA) and cadherin-like (CADG) domains, the types of which were reported to bind calcium ions and mediate protein/protein interactions in metazoan systems. In order to evaluate adhesive features of these domains, recombinant CA doublet domains (two neighboring domains) from CabC (Sde_3323) and recombinant CADG doublet domains from CabD (Sde_0798) were examined qualitatively and quantitatively for homophilic and heterophilic interactions. In addition, CA and CADG doublet domains were tested for adhesion to the surface of S. degradans 2-40. Results showed obvious homophilic and heterophilic, calcium ion-dependent interactions between CA and CADG doublet domains. Likewise, CA and CADG doublet domains adhered to the S. degradans 2-40 surface of cells that were grown on xylan from birch wood or pectin, respectively, as a sole carbon source. This research shows for the first time that bacterial cadherin homophilic and heterophilic interactions may be similar in their nature to cadherin domains from metazoan lineages. We hypothesize that S. degradans 2-40 cadherin and cadherin-like multiple domains contribute to protein-protein interactions that may mediate cell-cell contact in the marine environment. PMID:20023015

  14. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation. PMID:26112597

  15. Metastasis-associated protein 1 promotes tumor invasion by downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wenhao; Yin, Jiayi; Zhang, Yue; Qiu, Jin; Wang, Xinghe

    2014-03-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors. Upregulation of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) has been reported to contribute to the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the objective of our study was to identify the molecular mechanisms of MTA1 underlying the invasion and metastasis of ESCC. We overexpressed MTA1 in ESCC cells to examine the role of MTA1 in the regulation of the cell invasion. In addition, using luciferase reporter assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we evaluated the binding of MTA1 to the promoter of E-cadherin. We found that MTA1 overexpression promotes invasiveness of the human esophageal carcinoma cell line EC-9706. This effect was accompanied by downregulation of the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin and upregulation of vimentin and MMP-9 luciferase reporter assays showed that MTA1 inhibited the promoter activity of E-cadherin and that this was dependent on Snail, Slug and HDAC1. We also found that Snail and Slug bound the E-boxes in the promoter of E-cadherin and recruited MTA1 and HDAC1 to suppress E-cadherin expression, as confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. MTA1 promotes tumor invasion by downregulation of E-cadherin. These results demonstrate a novel role for MTA1 in the regulation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma invasion and provide insight into the mechanisms involved in this process.

  16. Cadherin-based intercellular adhesions organize epithelial cell–matrix traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Aaron F.; Che, Yonglu; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill M.; Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Revilla, Stephen F.; Niessen, Carien M.; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R.; Horsley, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of cross talk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell–cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is sufficient to recreate the spatial rearrangement of traction forces observed experimentally with varying strength of cadherin-based adhesions. This work defines the importance of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions in coordinating mechanical activity of epithelial cells and has implications for the mechanical regulation of epithelial tissues during development, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:23277553

  17. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guansong

    2015-12-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation.

  18. p120-catenin and β-catenin differentially regulate cadherin adhesive function.

    PubMed

    Oas, Rebecca G; Nanes, Benjamin A; Esimai, Chimdimnma C; Vincent, Peter A; García, Andrés J; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, the major adherens junction adhesion molecule in endothelial cells, interacts with p120-catenin and β-catenin through its cytoplasmic tail. However, the specific functional contributions of the catenins to the establishment of strong adhesion are not fully understood. Here we use bioengineering approaches to identify the roles of cadherin-catenin interactions in promoting strong cellular adhesion and the ability of the cells to spread on an adhesive surface. Our results demonstrate that the domain of VE-cadherin that binds to β-catenin is required for the establishment of strong steady-state adhesion strength. Surprisingly, p120 binding to the cadherin tail had no effect on the strength of adhesion when the available adhesive area was limited. Instead, the binding of VE-cadherin to p120 regulates adhesive contact area in a Rac1-dependent manner. These findings reveal that p120 and β-catenin have distinct but complementary roles in strengthening cadherin-mediated adhesion.

  19. Effect of crude extract of Bombyx mori coccoons in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mir Mahdi; Arumugam, Sarasa Bharati A

    2011-04-01

    The silkworm is the larva or caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori and being a primary producer of silk is an economically important insect. These days the silk is emerging as a resource for solving a broad range of biological problems. The silk (Abresham) is popularly known as Abresham muqriz (muqriz means cut) in Unani medicine. Its cocoons are extensively used as an ingredient of various Unani formulations like Khameer-E- Abresham Sada, Khameere Abresham Hakeem Arshad Wala, Khameere Abresham Ood Mastagi Wala etc. and are used to treat many cardiac and nervous disorders. The hypolipidemic activity of this drug, along with Nepata Hindostana (Badranjboya) and Terminalia Arjuna (Arjan) has been documented. But action of extract of Bombyx mori cocoons as a single drug is not documented. That's why; it was decided to study its effect on hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The Male New Zealand White rabbits all of 1.5kgs were selected for the study. After stabilization period (2 weeks) the rabbits were divided into 3 groups (Group I - Control, Group II Lesion Control and Group III treated with extract of Bombyx mori silk cocoon). Hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis were induced with 1% cholesterol diet. After induction of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis for twelve weeks, Group III rabbits were treated with Bombyx mori for 6 weeks (45 days). A significant decrease in hyperlipidemia was seen within 4 weeks of treatment. Histopathologically, the atherosclerotic plaques showed reduction in size. The third group showed a significant increase in the body weight and also an increase in the HDL cholesterol levels. The study concludes that extract of Bombyx mori cocoons has a significant effect on hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis probably because of its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect.

  20. Sprouty4 mediates amphiregulin-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and cell invasion in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    So, Wai-Kin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Liu, Yingtao; Xu, Congjian; Zhao, Jianfang; Chang, Vincent T W; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-07-01

    Sprouty (SPRY) proteins are well-characterized factors that inhibit receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated activation of cellular signaling pathways. The down-regulation of SPRY4 expression has been reported in human ovarian cancer. However, the specific roles and mechanisms by which SPRY4 affects ovarian cancer progression are completely unknown. Amphiregulin (AREG) binds exclusively to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and has been considered to be a dominant autocrine/paracrine EGFR ligand in ovarian cancer. In the present study, we first examined the effects of AREG on SPRY4 expression and the possible underlying molecular mechanisms involved in this process in two human ovarian cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrated that treatment with AREG up-regulated SPRY4 expression by activating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. In addition, we showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SPRY4 attenuated the AREG-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin by inhibiting the expression of SNAIL but not SLUG. In contrast, overexpression of SPRY4 enhanced AREG-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin by increasing the expression of SNAIL. Moreover, SPRY4 knockdown attenuated AREG-induced cell migration and invasion. Overexpression of SPRY4 enhanced AREG-induced cell invasion. This study reveals that SPRY4 is involved in EGFR-mediated human ovarian cancer progression.

  1. E-cadherin expression in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, A.; Benito, N.; Navarro, P.; Palacios, J.; Cano, A.; Quintanilla, M.; Contreras, F.; Gamallo, C.

    1994-01-01

    E-cadherin (E-CD) is a calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule which is expressed in almost all epithelial tissues. E-CD expression is involved in epidermal morphogenesis and is reduced during tumour progression of mouse epidermal carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that E-CD could play a role as an invasion-suppressor molecule. In the present work we have studied the E-CD expression in 31 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) using an immunohistochemical technique with a monoclonal antibody (HECD-1) specific for human E-CD. E-CD expression was preserved in all specimens of superficial and nodular BCC, and was reduced in 10 of 15 infiltrative BCCs. A heterogeneous distribution of cells with different immunostaining intensity was more frequently observed in specimens of infiltrative BCC. These results suggest that E-CD might be related to the growth pattern and the local aggressive behaviour of BCC, and support the idea that E-CD might play a role as an invasion-suppressor molecule in vivo. Images Figure 1 PMID:8286199

  2. Extracellular cleavage of E-cadherin promotes epithelial cell extrusion.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Adam G; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion and subsequent apoptosis is a key mechanism to prevent the accumulation of excess cells. By contrast, when driven by oncogene expression, apical cell extrusion is followed by proliferation and represents an initial step of tumorigenesis. E-cadherin (E-cad), the main component of adherens junctions, has been shown to be essential for epithelial cell extrusion, but its mechanistic contribution remains unclear. Here, we provide clear evidence that cell extrusion can be driven by the cleavage of E-cad, both in a wild-type and an oncogenic environment. We first show that CDC42 activation in a single epithelial cell results in its efficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive extrusion through MEK signalling activation and this is supported by E-cad cleavage. Second, using an engineered cleavable form of E-cad, we demonstrate that, by itself, truncation of extracellular E-cad at the plasma membrane promotes apical extrusion. We propose that extracellular cleavage of E-cad generates a rapid change in cell-cell adhesion that is sufficient to drive apical cell extrusion. Whereas in normal epithelia, extrusion is followed by apoptosis, when combined with active oncogenic signalling, it is coupled to cell proliferation.

  3. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1−/− embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1−/− microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1−/− epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis. PMID:26657766

  4. Up-regulation of gastric cancer cell invasion by Twist is accompanied by N-cadherin and fibronectin expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gang, Haiju; Li, Xiaojun; Li, Zumao; Wang, Tao; Han, Juan; Luo, Ting; Wen, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaoting

    2007-07-06

    Twist, a newly found EMT-inducer, has been reported to be up-regulated in those of diffuse-type gastric carcinomas with high N-cadherin level. We show here MKN45, a cell line derived from undifferentiated carcinomas cells, expresses high levels of Twist. Down-regulation of Twist, using an antisense Twist vector in MKN45 cells, inhibits cell migration and invasion, companied with a morphologic changes associated with MET. Suppression of Twist also decreases the expressions of N-cadherin and fibronectin, but not of E-cadherin in MKN45. In contrast, overexpression of Twist in MKN28, a cell line derived from moderate differentiated carcinomas, results in up-regulation of N-cadherin and fibronectin, companied with down-regulation of E-cadherin. Taken together, our results suggest that Twist regulates cell motility and invasion in gastric cancer cell lines, probably through the N-cadherin and fibronectin production.

  5. Soluble-E-cadherin activates HER and IAP family members in HER2+ and TNBC human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Brouxhon, Sabine M; Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Teng, Xiaofei; O'Banion, M Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Byers, Stephen; Ma, Li

    2014-11-01

    Recent literature suggests that sEcad exerts pro-oncogenic effects, possibly acting as a ligand for the human epidermal growth factor family. Here we show that sEcad is a novel candidate protein for drug targeting since it is increased in human and mouse HER2-positive (HER2+) breast tumors, MMTV-PyMT bodily fluids and human cell culture systems. Mechanistically, we show that endogenous sEcad, and to a lesser extent membrane-bound E-cadherin, associates with HER1, HER2, and HER3 in human and MMTV-PyMT mouse HER2+ tumors and with HER1 in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) specimens. Furthermore, addition of exogenous recombinant human E-cadherin/Fc chimeric protein (rhEcad/Fc; sEcad) to HER2+ MCF-7, SKBR3, and HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 TNBC cells, resulted in sEcad-HER receptor family interactions, activation of HER1-4 and downstream pro-survival signaling, including the MAPK-PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways and IAP family members. Lastly, we demonstrate that sEcad exerts pro-oncogenic effects via HER signaling, and acts additively with the HER ligand EGF to promote HER2+ breast cancer proliferation and migration, as well as TNBC invasion. Because sEcad associates and activates many of the oncogenic pathways that tumors utilize for growth and survival and serum levels in patients correlates with clinical response, suggests that targeted therapy against sEcad in combination with other therapies may potentially offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of breast cancers.

  6. N- and E-cadherins in Xenopus are specifically required in the neural and non-neural ectoderm, respectively, for F-actin assembly and morphogenetic movements

    PubMed Central

    Nandadasa, Sumeda; Tao, Qinghua; Menon, Nikhil R.; Heasman, Janet; Wylie, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transmembrane cadherins are calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion molecules. Recently, they have also been shown to be sites of actin assembly during adhesive contact formation. However, the roles of actin assembly on transmembrane cadherins during development are not fully understood. We show here, using the developing ectoderm of the Xenopus embryo as a model, that F-actin assembly is a primary function of both N-cadherin in the neural ectoderm and E-cadherin in the non-neural (epidermal) ectoderm, and that each cadherin is essential for the characteristic morphogenetic movements of these two tissues. However, depletion of N-cadherin and E-cadherin did not cause dissociation in these tissues at the neurula stage, probably owing to the expression of C-cadherin in each tissue. Depletion of each of these cadherins is not rescued by the other, nor by the expression of C-cadherin, which is expressed in both tissues. One possible reason for this is that each cadherin is expressed in a different domain of the cell membrane. These data indicate the combinatorial nature of cadherin function, the fact that N- and E-cadherin play primary roles in F-actin assembly in addition to roles in cell adhesion, and that this function is specific to individual cadherins. They also show how cell adhesion and motility can be combined in morphogenetic tissue movements that generate the form and shape of the embryonic organs. PMID:19279134

  7. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  8. Cadherins mediate sequential roles through a hierarchy of mechanisms in the developing mammillary body

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Nora-Emöke; Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Zhou, Xunlei; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Expression of intricate combinations of cadherins (a family of adhesive membrane proteins) is common in the developing central nervous system. On this basis, a combinatorial cadherin code has long been proposed to underlie neuronal sorting and to be ultimately responsible for the layers, columns and nuclei of the brain. However, experimental proof of this particular function of cadherins has proven difficult to obtain and the question is still not clear. Alternatively, non-specific, non-combinatorial, purely quantitative adhesive differentials have been proposed to explain neuronal sorting in the brain. Do cadherin combinations underlie brain cytoarchitecture? We approached this question using as model a well-defined forebrain nucleus, the mammillary body (MBO), which shows strong, homogeneous expression of one single cadherin (Cdh11) and patterned, combinatorial expression of Cdh6, −8 and −10. We found that, besides the known combinatorial Cdh pattern, MBO cells are organized into a second, non-overlapping pattern grouping neurons with the same date of neurogenesis. We report that, in the Foxb1 mouse mutant, Cdh11 expression fails to be maintained during MBO development. This disrupted the combination-based as well as the birthdate-based sorting in the mutant MBO. In utero RNA interference (RNAi) experiments knocking down Cdh11 in MBO-fated migrating neurons at one specific age showed that Cdh11 expression is required for chronological entrance in the MBO. Our results suggest that neuronal sorting in the developing MBO is caused by adhesion-based, non-combinatorial mechanisms that keep neurons sorted according to birthdate information (possibly matching them to target neurons chronologically sorted in the same manner). Non-specific adhesion mechanisms would also prevent cadherin combinations from altering the birthdate-based sorting. Cadherin combinations would presumably act later to support specific synaptogenesis through specific axonal fasciculation and

  9. Plakoglobin Rescues Adhesive Defects Induced by Ectodomain Truncation of the Desmosomal Cadherin Desmoglein 1

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Cory L.; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Cooper-Whitehair, Victoria; Getsios, Spiro; Green, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    Desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) is a desmosomal cadherin that is essential to epidermal integrity. In the blistering diseases bullous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome, pathogenesis depends on cleavage of Dsg1 by a bacterial protease, exfoliative toxin A, which removes residues 1 to 381 of the Dsg1 ectodomain. However, the cellular responses to Dsg1 cleavage that precipitate keratinocyte separation to induce blister formation are unknown. Here, we show that ectodomain-deleted Dsg1 (Δ381-Dsg1) mimics the toxin-cleaved cadherin, disrupts desmosomes, and reduces the mechanical integrity of keratinocyte sheets. In addition, we demonstrate that truncated Dsg1 remains associated with its catenin partner, plakoglobin, and causes a reduction in the levels of endogenous desmosomal cadherins in a dose-dependent manner, leading us to hypothesize that plakoglobin sequestration by truncated Dsg1 destabilizes other cadherins. Accordingly, a triple-point mutant of the ectodomain-deleted cadherin, which is uncoupled from plakoglobin, does not impair adhesion, indicating that this interaction is essential to the pathogenic potential of truncated Dsg1. Moreover, we demonstrate that increasing plakoglobin levels rescues cadherin expression, desmosome organization, and functional adhesion in cells expressing Δ381-Dsg1 or treated with exfoliative toxin A. Finally, we report that histone deacetylase inhibition up-regulates desmosomal cadherins and prevents the loss of adhesion induced by Dsg1 truncation. These findings further our understanding of the mechanism of exfoliative toxin-induced pathology and suggest novel strategies to suppress blistering in bulbous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome. PMID:21075858

  10. Adhesive interactions of N-cadherin limit the recruitment of microtubules to cell-cell contacts through organization of actomyosin.

    PubMed

    Plestant, Charlotte; Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Seddiki, Rima; Nguyen, Emmanuelle; Ladoux, Benoit; Mège, René-Marc

    2014-04-15

    Adhesive interactions of cadherins induce crosstalk between adhesion complexes and the actin cytoskeleton, allowing strengthening of adhesions and cytoskeletal organization. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, and microtubules (MTs) might be involved, as for integrin-mediated cell-extracellular-matrix adhesions. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between N-cadherin and MTs by analyzing the influence of N-cadherin engagement on MT distribution and dynamics. MTs progressed less, with a lower elongation rate, towards cadherin adhesions than towards focal adhesions. Increased actin treadmilling and the presence of an actomyosin contractile belt, suggested that actin relays inhibitory signals from cadherin adhesions to MTs. The reduced rate of MT elongation, associated with reduced recruitment of end-binding (EB) proteins to plus ends, was alleviated by expression of truncated N-cadherin, but was only moderately affected when actomyosin was disrupted. By contrast, destabilizing actomyosin fibers allowed MTs to enter the adhesion area, suggesting that tangential actin bundles impede MT growth independently of MT dynamics. Blocking MT penetration into the adhesion area strengthened cadherin adhesions. Taken together, these results establish a crosstalk between N-cadherin, F-actin and MTs. The opposing effects of cadherin and integrin engagement on actin organization and MT distribution might induce bias of the MT network during cell polarization.

  11. Establishment of Sf9 transformants constitutively expressing PBAN receptor variants: application to functional evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate further evaluation of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) functionality and regulation, we generated cultured insect cell lines stably expressing a number of fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BommoPBANR) and Pseudaletia separata PBANR (PsesePBANR) variants incl...

  12. Highly efficient multiplex targeted mutagenesis and genomic structure variation in Bombyx mori cells using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Sanyuan; Wang, Xiaogang; Chang, Jiasong; Gao, Jie; Shi, Run; Zhang, Jianduo; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-06-01

    Bombyx mori is an economically important insect and a model organism for studying lepidopteran and arthropod biology. Using a highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9 system, we showed that this system could mediate highly efficient targeted genome editing of a single gene locus, large chromosomal deletion or inversion, and also multiplex genome editing of 6 genes simultaneously in BmNs cell line derived from B. mori. The simplicity and high efficiency of our system provide unprecedented possibilities for researchers to implement precise and sophisticated manipulation of a chosen B. mori gene in BmNs cells easily in a limited time course, and perhaps new opportunities for functional genomics of B. mori and other lepidopteran insects.

  13. Bombyx mori E26 transformation-specific 2 (BmEts2), an Ets family protein, represses Bombyx mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sagisaka, A; Suzuki, N; Yamakawa, M

    2016-10-01

    E26 transformation-specific (Ets) family transcription factors are known to play roles in various biological phenomena, including immunity, in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms by which Ets proteins contribute to immunity in invertebrates remain poorly understood. In this study, we identified a cDNA encoding BmEts2, which is a putative orthologue of Drosophila Yan and human translocation-ets-leukemia/Ets-variant gene 6, from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Expression of the BmEts2 gene was significantly increased in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae in response to injection with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. BmEts2 overexpression dramatically repressed B. mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in silkworm cells. Conversely, gene knockdown of BmEts2 significantly enhanced BmRels activity. In addition, two κB sites located on the 5' upstream region of cecropin B1 were found to be involved in the repression of BmRels-mediated promoter activation. Protein-competition analysis further demonstrated that BmEts2 competitively inhibited binding of BmRels to κB sites. Overall, BmEts2 acts as a repressor of BmRels-mediated transactivation of antimicrobial protein genes by inhibiting the binding of BmRels to κB sites.

  14. Thymosin From Bombyx mori Is Down-Regulated in Expression by BmNPV Exhibiting Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yongdi; Fang, Qiang; Xu, Minlin; Lv, Mengyuan; Liao, Jinxu; Li, Si; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Thymosins have been highly conserved during evolution. These hormones exist in many animal species and play an essential role in many biological events. However, little is known regarding the physiological function of silkworm Bombyx mori thymosin (BmTHY). In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of BmTHY in a Bombyx mori larval ovarian cell line (BmN) challenged with Bombyx mori nuclear polyhydrosis virus (BmNPV) and the antiviral effect of recombinant BmTHY (rBmTHY) for Bombyx mori against BmNPV. Western-blot assay and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the level of BmTHY protein expression and transcription decreased over time when BmN cells were infected by BmNPV. Treatment with endotoxin-free rBmTHY led to a significant reduction in viral titer in the supernatant of BmN cells challenged with BmNPV. The results from antiviral tests performed in vitro and in vivo showed that endotoxin-free rBmTHY improved the survival rate of Bombyx mori infected with BmNPV. These findings suggest that BmTHY exerts immunomodulatory effects on Bombyx mori, rendering them resistant to viral infection. PMID:27432352

  15. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells.

  16. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  17. E-cadherin Controls Bronchiolar Progenitor Cells and Onset of Preneoplastic Lesions in Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Ceteci, Fatih; Ceteci, Semra; Zanucco, Emanuele; Thakur, Chitra; Becker, Matthias; El-Nikhely, Nefertiti; Fink, Ludger; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Rapp, Ulf R

    2012-01-01

    Although progenitor cells of the conducting airway have been spatially localized and some insights have been gained regarding their molecular phenotype, relatively little is known about the mechanisms regulating their maintenance, activation, and differentiation. This study investigates the potential roles of E-cadherin in mouse Clara cells, as these cells were shown to represent the progenitor/stem cells of the conducting airways and have been implicated as the cell of origin of human non-small cell lung cancer. Postnatal inactivation of E-cadherin affected Clara cell differentiation and compromised airway regeneration under injury conditions. In steady-state adult lung, overexpression of the dominant negative E-cadherin led to an expansion of the bronchiolar stem cells and decreased differentiation concomitant with canonical Wnt signaling activation. Expansion of the bronchiolar stem cell pool was associated with an incessant proliferation of neuroepithelial body.associated Clara cells that ultimately gave rise to bronchiolar hyperplasia. Despite progressive hyperplasia, only a minority of the mice developed pulmonary solid tumors, suggesting that the loss of E-cadherin function leads to tumor formation when additional mutations are sustained. The present study reveals that E-cadherin plays a critical role in the regulation of proliferation and homeostasis of the epithelial cells lining the conducting airways. PMID:23308049

  18. E–N-cadherin heterodimers define novel adherens junctions connecting endoderm-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Beate K.; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Iken, Marcus; Ott, Michael; Schirmacher, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular junctions play a pivotal role in tissue development and function and also in tumorigenesis. In epithelial cells, decrease or loss of E-cadherin, the hallmark molecule of adherens junctions (AJs), and increase of N-cadherin are widely thought to promote carcinoma progression and metastasis. In this paper, we show that this “cadherin switch” hypothesis does not hold for diverse endoderm-derived cells and cells of tumors derived from them. We show that the cadherins in a major portion of AJs in these cells can be chemically cross-linked in E–N heterodimers. We also show that cells possessing E–N heterodimer AJs can form semistable hemihomotypic AJs with purely N-cadherin–based AJs of mesenchymally derived cells, including stroma cells. We conclude that these heterodimers are the major AJ constituents of several endoderm-derived tissues and tumors and that the prevailing concept of antagonistic roles of these two cadherins in developmental and tumor biology has to be reconsidered. PMID:22105347

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of cadherin7 in the central nervous system of the embryonic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Joel Duff, R; Londraville, Richard L; Marrs, J A; Liu, Qin

    2007-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules exhibit unique expression patterns during development of the vertebrate central nervous system. In this study, we obtained a full-length cDNA of a novel zebrafish cadherin using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid sequence of this molecule is most similar to the published amino acid sequences of chicken and mammalian cadherin7 (Cdh7), a member of the type II cadherin subfamily. cadherin7 message (cdh7) expression in embryonic zebrafish was studied using in situ hybridization and RT-PCR methods. cdh7 expression begins at about 12h postfertilization (hpf) in a small patch in the anterior neural keel, and along the midline of the posterior neural keel. By 24 hpf, cdh7 expression in the brain shows a distinct segmental pattern that reflects the neuromeric organization of the brain, while its expression domain in the spinal cord is continuous, but confined to the middle region of the spinal cord. As development proceeds, cdh7 expression is detected in more regions of the brain, including the major visual structures in the fore- and midbrains, while its expression domain in the hindbrain becomes more restricted, and its expression in the spinal cord becomes undetectable. cdh7 expression becomes reduced in 3-day old embryos. Our results show that cdh7 expression in the zebrafish developing central nervous system is both spatially and temporally regulated.

  20. Surface engineered magnetic nanoparticles for specific immunotargeting of cadherin expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Delhaes, Flavien; Puertas, Sara; Saez, Berta; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Grazú, Valeria; Feracci, Helene

    2016-02-01

    In spite of historic advances in cancer biology and recent development of sophisticated chemotherapeutics, the outlook for patients with advanced cancer is still grim. In this sense nanoparticles (NPs), through their unique physical properties, enable the development of new approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus far the most used active targeting scheme involves NPs functionalization with antibodies specific to molecules overexpressed on cancer cell’s surface. Therefore, such active targeting relies on differences in NPs uptake kinetics rates between tumor and healthy cells. Many cancers of epithelial origin are associated with the inappropriate expression of non-epithelial cadherins (e.g. N-, P-, -11) with concomitant loss of E-cadherin. Such phenomenon named cadherin switching favors tumor development and metastasis via interactions of tumor cells with stromal components. That is why we optimized the oriented functionalization of fluorescently labelled magnetic NPs with a novel antibody specific for the extracellular domain of cadherin-11. The obtained Ab-NPs exhibited high specificity when incubated with two cell lines used as models of tumor and healthy cells. Thus, cadherin switching offers a great opportunity for the development of active targeting strategies aimed to improve the early detection and treatment of cancer.

  1. Molecular basis for disruption of E-cadherin adhesion by botulinum neurotoxin A complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangkook; Zhong, Xiaofen; Gu, Shenyan; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Dorner, Martin B.; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-01-01

    How botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cross the host intestinal epithelial barrier in foodborne botulism is poorly understood. Here, we present the crystal structure of a clostridial hemagglutinin (HA) complex of serotype BoNT/A bound to the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin at 2.4 Ångströms. The HA complex recognizes E-cadherin with high specificity involving extensive intermolecular interactions and also binds to carbohydrates on the cell surface. Binding of HA complex sequesters E-cadherin in the monomeric state thereby compromising the E-cadherin-mediated intercellular barrier and facilitating paracellular absorption of BoNT/A. We reconstituted the complete 14-subunit BoNT/A complex using recombinantly-produced components and demonstrated that abolishing either E-cadherin- or carbohydrate-binding of HA complex drastically reduces oral toxicity of BoNT/A complex in vivo. Together, these studies establish the molecular mechanism of how HAs contribute to the oral toxicity of BoNT/A. PMID:24948737

  2. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  3. Activity-dependent regulation of {beta}-catenin via {epsilon}-cleavage of N-cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kuzuya, Akira; Okawa, Katsuya; Nishimoto, Takaaki; Bito, Haruhiko; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Kinoshita, Ayae . E-mail: akinoshita@hs.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shimohama, Shun

    2006-07-07

    N-cadherin is essential for excitatory synaptic contact in the hippocampus. Presenilin 1 (PS1) is located at sites of synaptic contact, forming a complex with N-cadherin and {beta}-catenin. Here, we report that human N-cadherin is cleaved by PS1/{gamma}-secretase in response to physiological concentration of glutamate (Glu) stimulation, yielding a fragment Ncad/CTF2. The expression of Ncad/CTF2 in neuronal cells led to its translocation to the nucleus, and caused a prominent enhancement of cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in a cell-cell contact dependent manner, via following mechanisms: 1, inhibition of {beta}-catenin phosphorylation; 2, transactivation of {beta}-catenin; and 3, inhibition of N-cadherin transcription, and finally enhanced {beta}-catenin nuclear signaling. Since the regulation of cellular {beta}-catenin level is essential for synaptic function, disruption in the cleavage of N-cadherin may be causally linked to the synaptic dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)

  4. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

  5. Actomyosin contractility provokes contact inhibition in E-cadherin-ligated keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Samsonov, Mikhail; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2017-04-13

    Confluence-dependent inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation, termed contact inhibition, is crucial for epithelial homeostasis and organ size control. Here we report that among epithelial cells, keratinocytes, which compose the stratified epithelium in the skin, possess a unique, actomyosin-dependent mechanism for contact inhibition. We have observed that under actomyosin-inhibited conditions, cell-cell contact itself through E-cadherin promotes proliferation of keratinocytes. Actomyosin activity in confluent keratinocytes, however, inhibits nuclear localization of β-catenin and YAP, and causes attenuation of β-catenin- and YAP-driven cell proliferation. Confluent keratinocytes develop E-cadherin-mediated punctate adhesion complexes, to which radial actin cables are connected. Eliminating the actin-to-E-cadherin linkage by depleting α-catenin increases proliferation of confluent keratinocytes. By contrast, enforced activation of RhoA-regulated actomyosin or external application of pulling force to ligated E-cadherin attenuates their proliferation, suggesting that tensile stress at E-cadherin-mediated adhesion complexes inhibits proliferation of confluent keratinocytes. Our results highlight actomyosin contractility as a crucial factor that provokes confluence-dependent inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation.

  6. Expression and significance of E-cadherin and β-catenins in pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaiyu; Jin, Hanghuang; Luo, Yongkang

    2013-08-01

    This study used immunohistochemical methods for detecting the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in pituitary adenoma. Specimens were collected from 91 cases. EnVision was used for immunohistochemical staining. The results were graded depending on the staining intensity and range. Associations between E-cadherin and β-catenin expression and tumor subtype, invasiveness, and postoperative recurrence were investigated. There was a significant downregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin in growth hormone (GH)-type tumors when compared with prolactin-type tumors (u(c) = 2.693 and 2.109, respectively; P < .05). E-cadherin and β-catenin were downregulated in invasive pituitary adenomas (u(c) = 3.563 and 4.166, respectively; P < .05) and in clinically recurring pituitary adenomas (u(c) = 2.871 and 3.866, respectively; P < .05). There was no difference in the percentage of invasive prolactin and GH secreting tumors (28.57% and 22.86%, respectively; P > .05). The expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in pituitary adenoma was significantly downregulated and related to subtype, invasiveness, and postoperative recurrence.

  7. BS-cadherin in the colonial urochordate Botryllus schlosseri: one protein, many functions.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Amalia; Rabinowitz, Claudette; Moiseeva, Elizabeth; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2007-04-15

    Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate composed of coexisting modules of three asexually derived generations, the zooids and two cohorts of buds, each at disparate developmental stage. Functional zooids are replaced weekly by the older generation of buds through a highly synchronized developmental cycle called blastogenesis (which is, in turn, divided into four major stages, A to D). In this study, we examined the mode of expression of BS-cadherin, a 130-kDa transmembrane protein isolated from this species, during blastogenesis. BS-Cadherin is expressed extensively in internal organs of developing buds, embryos, ampullae and, briefly, in the digestive system of zooids at early blastogenic stage D (in contrast to low mRNA expression at this stage). In vitro trypsin assays on single-cell suspensions prepared from blastogenic stage D zooids, confirmed that BS-cadherin protein is expressed on cell surfaces and is, therefore, functional. BS-Cadherin expression is also upregulated in response to various stress conditions, such as oxidative stress, injury and allorecognition. It plays an important role in colony morphogenesis, because siRNA knockdown during D/A blastogenic transition causes chaotic colonial structures and disrupts oocytes homing onto their bud niches. These results reveal that BS-cadherin protein functions are exerted through a specific spatiotemporal pattern and fluctuating expression levels, in both development/regular homeostasis and in response to various stress conditions.

  8. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; ...

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  9. Cadherin-catenin complexes during zebrafish oogenesis: heterotypic junctions between oocytes and follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Reidenbach, S; Prätzel, S; Franke, W W

    1999-09-01

    During vertebrate oogenesis, the germ cells and associated somatic cells remain connected by a variety of adhering junctional complexes. However, the molecular composition of these cellular structures is largely unknown. To identify the proteins forming the heterotypic adherens junctions between oocytes and follicle cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), the cDNAs encoding alphaE-catenin and plakoglobin were isolated. Using these cDNAs, in combination with the previously isolated beta-catenin cDNA, and antibodies specific for alpha- and beta-catenin, plakoglobin, and N- and E-cadherin, we found differences in catenin and plakoglobin gene expression during oogenesis. The immunolocalization of these plaque proteins, as well as of cadherins, in the ovarian follicle indicated an enrichment of alpha- and beta-catenin and of E-cadherin-like protein(s) in the oocyte cortex, notably at sites of oocyte-follicle cell contacts, suggesting the presence of hitherto unknown heterotypic adherens junctions between these cells. By contrast, plakoglobin and N-cadherin localization was restricted to cell-cell contacts in the follicle cell layer. During oocyte maturation, mRNAs for alphaE- and beta-catenin and plakoglobin accumulated, and all three plaque-forming proteins were stored in unfertilized eggs, either in complexed forms with cadherins or as free cytoplasmic pools. These findings suggest possible roles of these junctional proteins during early embryogenesis.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinases and E-cadherin immunoreactivity in different basal cell carcinoma histological types.

    PubMed

    Vanjaka-Rogošić, Lucija; Puizina-Ivić, Neira; Mirić, Lina; Rogošić, Veljko; Kuzmić-Prusac, Ivana; Babić, Mirna Saraga; Vuković, Dubravka; Mardešić, Snježana

    2014-06-01

    The immunohistochemical staining of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and E-cadherin in tumor epithelial and stromal cells was analyzed in a group of solid, superficial spreading and cystic tumors and in a group of morpheaform and recurrent basal cell carcinomas (BCC) in order to determine whether any of these factors possibly contribute to tumor therapy resistance. Tumor tissues of 64 patients were obtained by complete excisional or curettage biopsy of BCC and these were immunohistochemically stained for MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13 and E-cadherin. In the morpheaform and recurrent BCC, MMP-9 expression significantly increased in the stroma, while E-cadherin expression was negative in epithelial cells. Odds ratio for development of morpheaform and recurrent BCC was 6.2 for positive MMP-1 immunostaining in epithelial tumor cells, 5.8 for positive MMP-9 immunostaining in tumor stroma, 3.2 for positive MMP-13 immunostaining in tumor stroma, and 4.5 for negative E-cadherin in epithelial tumor cells. Our results suggest that MMP-1 immunostaining in tumor cells, MMP-9 expression in stromal cells, and absence of E-cadherin expression are associated with morpheaform and recurrent BCC.

  11. Adhesion in Mammary Development: Novel Roles for E-Cadherin in Individual and Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are essential for barrier function, secretion, and regulation of fluid transport. Their function requires cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion, mediated through intercellular junctions. Conversely, disruption of adhesion and polarity is thought to drive cancer progression. The mammary gland is an important model for cell adhesion due to its postnatal hormonally regulated development; ducts undergo branching morphogenesis in response to steroid hormones during puberty. These hormonal signals induce a transition from simple to stratified architecture, initiated by asymmetric luminal cell divisions. Ductal elongation is accomplished by this multilayered, low-polarity epithelium, and polarity is reestablished as elongation ceases. The requirement for cell adhesion has been tested in 3D culture and in vivo, using gene deletion, knockdown, and misexpression in both developmental and homeostatic contexts. Attention has focused on E-cadherin, the major classical cadherin in luminal epithelial cells. Classic studies revealed a requirement for E-cadherin during lactation, and E-cadherin loss is widely posited to promote metastasis. However, recent findings demonstrated a broader requirement for E-cadherin during branching morphogenesis and homeostasis and also, surprisingly, in epithelial dissemination. These studies suggest that longstanding models of the role of adhesion in epithelial biology need to be revisited. Advances in inducible gene expression and knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and fluorescent labeling of genetically modified cells offer the opportunity to test the roles of diverse adhesion systems and to develop a mechanistic understanding of how cell adhesion regulates development and cancer. PMID:25733146

  12. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  13. Liver-intestine cadherin: molecular cloning and characterization of a novel Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule expressed in liver and intestine

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A novel member of the cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has been characterized by cloning from rat liver, sequencing of the corresponding cDNA, and functional analysis after heterologous expression in nonadhesive S2 cells. cDNA clones were isolated using a polyclonal antibody inhibiting Ca(2+)-dependent intercellular adhesion of hepatoma cells. As inferred from the deduced amino acid sequence, the novel molecule has homologies with E-, P-, and N-cadherins, but differs from these classical cadherins in four characteristics. Its extracellular domain is composed of five homologous repeated domains instead of four characteristic for the classical cadherins. Four of the five domains are characterized by the sequence motifs DXNDN and DXD or modifications thereof representing putative Ca(2+)-binding sites of classical cadherins. In its NH2-terminal region, this cadherin lacks both the precursor segment and the endogenous protease cleavage site RXKR found in classical cadherins. In the extracellular EC1 domain, the novel cadherin contains an AAL sequence in place of the HAV sequence motif representing the common cell adhesion recognition sequence of E-, P-, and N-cadherin. In contrast to the conserved cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins with a length of 150-160 amino acid residues, that of the novel cadherin has only 18 amino acids. Examination of transfected S2 cells showed that despite these structural differences, this cadherin mediates intercellular adhesion in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The novel cadherin is solely expressed in liver and intestine and was, hence, assigned the name LI-cadherin. In these tissues, LI- cadherin is localized to the basolateral domain of hepatocytes and enterocytes. These results suggest that LI-cadherin represents a new cadherin subtype and may have a role in the morphological organization of liver and intestine. PMID:8207063

  14. p120-catenin regulates VE-cadherin endocytosis and degradation induced by the Kaposi sarcoma–associated ubiquitin ligase K5

    PubMed Central

    Nanes, Benjamin A.; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M.; Cadwell, Chantel M.; Robinson, Brian S.; Lowery, Anthony M.; Vincent, Peter A.; Mosunjac, Marina; Früh, Klaus; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin undergoes constitutive internalization driven by a unique endocytic motif that also serves as a p120-catenin (p120) binding site. p120 binding masks the motif, stabilizing the cadherin at cell junctions. This mechanism allows constitutive VE-cadherin endocytosis and recycling to contribute to adherens junction dynamics without resulting in junction disassembly. Here we identify an additional motif that drives VE-cadherin endocytosis and pathological junction disassembly associated with the endothelial-derived tumor Kaposi sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8, which causes Kaposi sarcoma, expresses the MARCH family ubiquitin ligase K5. We report that K5 targets two membrane-proximal VE-cadherin lysine residues for ubiquitination, driving endocytosis and down-regulation of the cadherin. K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis does not require the constitutive endocytic motif. However, K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis is associated with displacement of p120 from the cadherin, and p120 protects VE-cadherin from K5. Thus multiple context-dependent signals drive VE-cadherin endocytosis, but p120 binding to the cadherin juxtamembrane domain acts as a master regulator guarding cadherin stability. PMID:27798235

  15. p120-catenin regulates VE-cadherin endocytosis and degradation induced by the Kaposi sarcoma-associated ubiquitin ligase K5.

    PubMed

    Nanes, Benjamin A; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M; Cadwell, Chantel M; Robinson, Brian S; Lowery, Anthony M; Vincent, Peter A; Mosunjac, Marina; Früh, Klaus; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin undergoes constitutive internalization driven by a unique endocytic motif that also serves as a p120-catenin (p120) binding site. p120 binding masks the motif, stabilizing the cadherin at cell junctions. This mechanism allows constitutive VE-cadherin endocytosis and recycling to contribute to adherens junction dynamics without resulting in junction disassembly. Here we identify an additional motif that drives VE-cadherin endocytosis and pathological junction disassembly associated with the endothelial-derived tumor Kaposi sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8, which causes Kaposi sarcoma, expresses the MARCH family ubiquitin ligase K5. We report that K5 targets two membrane-proximal VE-cadherin lysine residues for ubiquitination, driving endocytosis and down-regulation of the cadherin. K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis does not require the constitutive endocytic motif. However, K5-induced VE-cadherin endocytosis is associated with displacement of p120 from the cadherin, and p120 protects VE-cadherin from K5. Thus multiple context-dependent signals drive VE-cadherin endocytosis, but p120 binding to the cadherin juxtamembrane domain acts as a master regulator guarding cadherin stability.

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of murine vascular endothelial-cadherin in early stage development of cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Breier, G; Breviario, F; Caveda, L; Berthier, R; Schnürch, H; Gotsch, U; Vestweber, D; Risau, W; Dejana, E

    1996-01-15

    An early step in the formation of the extraembryonic and intraembryonic vasculature is endothelial cell differentiation and organization in blood islands and vascular structures. This involves the expression and function of specific adhesive molecules at cell-to-cell junctions. Previous work showed that endothelial cells express a cell-specific cadherin (vascular endothelial [VE]-cadherin, or 7B4/cadherin-5) that is organized at cell-to-cell contacts in cultured cells and is able to promote intercellular adhesion. In this study, we investigated whether VE-cadherin could be involved in early cardiovascular development in the mouse embryo. We first cloned and sequenced the mouse VE-cadherin cDNA. At the protein level, murine VE-cadherin presented 75% identity (90%, considering conservative amino acid substitutions) with the human homologue. Transfection of murine VE-cadherin cDNA in L cells induced Ca(++)-dependent cell-to-cell aggregation and reduced cell detachment from monolayers. In situ hybridization of adult tissues showed that the murine molecule is specifically expressed by endothelial cells. In mouse embryos, VE-cadherin transcripts were detected at the very earliest stages of vascular development (E7.5) in mesodermal cells of the yolk sac mesenchyme. At E9.5, expression of VE-cadherin was restricted to the peripheral cell layer of blood islands that gives rise to endothelial cells. Hematopoietic cells in the center of blood islands were not labeled. At later embryonic stages, VE-cadherin transcripts were detected in vascular structures of all organs examined, eg, in the ventricle of the heart, the inner cell lining of the atrium and the dorsal aorta, in intersomitic vessels, and in the capillaries of the developing brain. A comparison with flk-1 expression during brain angiogenesis revealed that brain capillaries expressed relatively low amounts of VE-cadherin. In the adult brain, the level of VE-cadherin transcript was further reduced. By

  17. Basic residue at position 14 is not required for fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in neural cadherin.

    PubMed

    Vunnam, Nagamani; Hammer, Nathan I; Pedigo, Susan

    2015-01-27

    In spite of their structural similarities, epithelial (E-) and neural (N-) cadherin are expressed at different types of synapses and differ significantly in their dimerization kinetics. Recent studies proposed a transient intermediate in E-cadherin as the key requirement for rapid disassembly kinetics of the adhesive dimer. This E-cadherin intermediate comprises four intermolecular ionic and H-bonding interactions between adhesive partners. These interactions are not preserved in N-cadherin except for a basic residue at the 14th position, which could stabilize the intermediate through either H-bonding or ionic interactions with the partner protomer. To investigate the origin of the rapid dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin in the presence of calcium, studies reported here systematically test the role of ionic and H-bonding interactions in dimerization kinetics using R14S, R14A, and R14E mutants of N-cadherin. Analytical size-exclusion chromatographic and bead aggregation studies showed two primary results. First, N-cadherin/R14S and N-cadherin/R14A mutants showed fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in the calcium-saturated state similar to that of wild-type N-cadherin. These results indicate that the fast disassembly of the calcium-saturated dimer of N-cadherin does not require a basic residue at the 14th position. Second, the dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin/R14E were slow in the calcium-saturated state, indicating that negative charge destabilizes the intermediate state. Taken together, these results indicate that the basic residue at the 14th position does not promote rapid dimerization kinetics but that an acidic amino acid in that position significantly impairs dimerization kinetics.

  18. Expression and potential correlation among Forkhead box protein M1, Caveolin-1 and E-cadherin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Kundong; Zhou, Lisheng; Wu, Weidong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Huang, Kejian; Qiu, Zhengjun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and functions of Forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1), Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and E-cadherin in colorectal cancer (CRC), and to determine the correlations among these proteins in CRC development and progression. The protein expression of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-cadherin was identified using a human CRC and normal tissue microarray. A standard immunohistochemistry assay was performed employing anti-FoxM1, anti-Cav-1 and anti-E-cadherin antibodies. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-cadherin in CRC was determined, and correlations were investigated between FoxM1 and Cav-1, FoxM1 and E-cadherin, Cav-1 and E-cadherin, respectively. The level of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-Cadherin protein expression in CRC was found to be associated with pathological grade, tumor clinical stages and the presence of metastasis, respectively. Elevated expression of FoxM1 and Cav-1 was observed in the CRC tissues, and a significant correlation was found between the two proteins in CRC. However, it was also observed that FoxM1 was overexpressed while E-cadherin expression was low, indicating that there was a negative correlation between FoxM1 expression and E-cadherin expression. Moreover, there was also a negative correlation between Cav-1 and E-cadherin expression. Overall, the elevated expression of FoxM1 and Cav-1 in a human CRC microarray provided novel clinical evidence to elucidate the fact that they may play a critical role in the development and progression of CRC by negatively regulating E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, the positive correlation between FoxM1 and Cav-1 suggested that the proteins may constitute a novel signaling pathway in human CRC. PMID:27698803

  19. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Synthesis of Fibroin in Silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Ni, Min; Li, FanChi; Tian, JiangHai; Hu, JingSheng; Zhang, Hua; Xu, KaiZun; Wang, BinBin; Li, YangYang; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically important insect, and its silk production capacity largely depends on its ability to synthesize fibroin. While breeding of B. mori varieties has been a key strategy to improve silk production, little improvement of B. mori silk production has been achieved to date. As a result, the development of sericulture economy has not progressed well, pointing to the need of new ways for improvement of B. mori silk production. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), a food additive widely used for livestock, have been shown to promote animal growth and increase the protein synthesis in animals. However, no studies on effect of TiO2 NPs on fibroin synthesis in B. mori have been available. In this study, the differential expression profiles of genes and proteins in the silk gland of B. mori fed without or with TiO2 NPs (5 μg ml(-1)) were analyzed and compared using digital gene expression (DGE), reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), semi-qPCR, and Western blot analysis. The effects of TiO2 NPs feeding on the activity of proteases in the midgut and the synthesis and transportation of amino acids in hemolymph were also investigated. DGE analyses showed that among a total of 4,741 genes detected, 306 genes were differentially expressed after the TiO2 NPs feeding, of which 137 genes were upregulated whereas 169 genes were downregulated. 106 genes were shown to be involved in fibroin synthesis, of which 97 genes, including those encoding cuticular protein glycine-rich 10, serine protease inhibitor 28, aspartate aminotransferase, lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and splicing factor arginine/serine-rich 6, and silk gland factor-1 (SGF-1), were upregulated with the maximum induction of 8.52-folds, whereas nine genes, including those encoding aspartylglucosaminidase, the cathepsin L in Tribolium castaneum, and similar to SPRY domain-containing SOCS box protein 3, were downregulated with the maximum reduction of 8

  20. Characterization of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus non-structural protein NS1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Sun, Chen; Zhang, Junhong; He, Yuanqing; Chen, Huiqing; Kong, Jie; Huang, Guoping; Chen, Keping; Yao, Qin

    2009-12-01

    NS1 gene of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China Zhenjiang isolate, BmDNV-Z) codes a predicted 316-amino acid protein, but its function remains unknown. Results of the current study showed that purified recombinant 6 x His-NS1 protein possesses ATP binding, ATPase, DNA binding, and helicase activities. Only one protein was captured in infected Bombyx mori midgut cells against NS1 target protein by employing co-immunoprecipitation, which was identified to be a viral protein by mass spectrometry. The NS1-interacting protein is encoded by BmDNV-Z ORF4 and its molecular is about 100 kD. Analysis of His pull-down confirmed that binding of identified viral protein to purified recombinant 6 x His-NS1 protein in vitro. Taken together, our results indicated that BmDNV-Z NS1 was a multifunctional protein, which may be involved with virus replication.

  1. Bom m 9 from Bombyx mori is a novel protein related to asthma.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jianhong; Lei, Mingsheng; Yang, Rui; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    The silkworm (Bombyx mori) can cause severe IgE-mediated allergic disease, however, the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanism by which silkworms induce allergy. Whole silkworm pupa proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 2-D PAGE. Then, IgE-binding proteins were detected by immunoblotting with sera of patients having an allergy to Bombyx mori. After tryptic digestion, the peptides of IgE-binding proteins were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry. Database searches were used to identify allergens in silkworm pupa, after which Bom m 9 was to construct an asthma model. Thus, in the current study, a mouse asthma model was constructed with Bom m 9.

  2. Silvernanotherapy on the viral borne disease of silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, K.; Tamilselvan, S.; Kiruthiga, V.; Singaravelu, G.

    2011-12-01

    Antiviral assays of chemically and biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles were made against BmNPV ( Bombyx mori Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus). Reduction of silver ions by sodium citrate and Spirulina platensis led to the formation of spherical silver nanoparticles of 40-60 and 7-16 nm size. Single cell protein ( Spirulina platensis)-synthesized silver nanoparticles showed the strongest antiviral activity. Immunological studies made on the silkworm Bombyx mori disclosed that a significant increase in the total hemocyte count and differential hemocyte count due to S. platensis-synthesized silver nanoparticles supplementation. Improvement in the defense mechanism was noticed from the strengthened peritrophic membrane of the digestive tract and the increased total protein. Overall, the results presented illustrate that single cell protein-synthesized silver nanoparticles supplementation is effective in controlling viral-borne diseases of the silkworm.

  3. Introns and their flanking sequences of Bombyx mori rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, H; Ogura, T; Takada, N; Miyajima, N; Ishikawa, H; Maekawa, H

    1984-01-01

    We obtained two different clones (16 kb and 13 kb) of B. mori rDNA with intron sequence within the 28S-rRNA coding region. The sequence surrounding the intron was found to be highly conserved as indicated in several eukaryotes (Tetrahymena, Drosophila and Xenopus). The 28S rRNA-coding sequence of 16 kb and 13 kb clone was interrupted at precisely the same sites as those where the D. melanogaster rDNA interrupted by the type I and type II intron, respectively. The intron sequences of B. mori were different from those of D. melanogaster. In 16 kb clone, the intron was flanked by 14 bp duplication of the junction sequence, which was also present once within the 28S rRNA-coding region of rDNA without intron. This 14 bp sequence was identical with those surrounding the introns of Dipteran rDNAs. PMID:6091041

  4. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  5. Identification and purification of a Bombyx mori homologue of FTZ-F1.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, H; Hirose, S

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from embryos and from posterior and middle silk glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori contain a sequence specific DNA binding factor termed BmFTZ-F1. The factor binds to the recognition site of FTZ-F1, a positive regulator of the fushi tarazu gene in Drosophila melanogaster. BmFTZ-F1 and FTZ-F1 share the same methylation interference patterns, the same chromatographic behaviors and similar protease digestion profiles. Anti-FTZ-F1 cross reacts with BmFTZ-F1. These results indicate that BmFTZ-F1 is a B. mori homologue of FTZ-F1. The mobility of the factor-DNA complex formed in the silk gland extract changes depending on the developmental stages. Purification of BmFTZF1 to an almost homogeneous state reveals that the factor is a 73 kd protein. Images PMID:2124348

  6. Effect of Wheat Flour Noodles with Bombyx mori Powder on Glycemic Response in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Wanhee; Kim, JiEun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2016-01-01

    Recent trial results suggest that the consumption of a low glycemic index (GI) diet is beneficial in the prevention of high blood glucose levels. Identifying active hypoglycemic substances in ordinary foods could be a significant benefit to the management of blood glucose. It has been hypothesized that noodles with Bombyx mori powder are a low GI food. We evaluated GI and changes in postprandial glucose levels following consumption of those noodles and compared them with those following consumption of plain wheat flour noodles (control) and glucose (reference) in healthy subjects. Thirteen males (age: 34.2±4.5 years, body mass index: 23.2±1.1 kg/m2) consumed 75 g carbohydrate portions of glucose and the 2 kinds of noodle after an overnight fast. Capillary blood was measured at time 0 (fasting), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min from the start of each food intake. The GI values were calculated by taking the ratio of the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) for the noodles and glucose. There was a significant difference in postprandial glucose concentrations at 30 and 45 min between the control noodles and the noodles with Bombyx mori powder: the IAUC and GI for the noodles with Bombyx mori powder were significantly lower than those for glucose and plain wheat flour noodles. The wheat flour noodles with Bombyx mori powder could help prevent an increase in postprandial glucose response and possibly provide an alternative to other carbohydrate staple foods for glycemic management. PMID:27752491

  7. A diversity of U1 small nuclear RNAs in the silk moth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Montes, J M; Pereira-Simon, S; Freund, A V; Ruiz, L M; Szmulewicz, M N; Herrera, R J

    2003-01-01

    Variants of U1 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) have been previously detected in a permanent cell line (BmN) of the silk moth Bombyx mori. In this study, the existence of U1 snRNA isoforms in the silk gland (SG) of the organism is investigated. The polyploidy (approximately 200,000X the 2N somatic value) state of the B. mori silk gland cells represents a unique system to explore the potential presence and differential expression of multiple U1 variants in a normal tissue. B. mori U1-specific RT-PCR libraries from the silk gland were generated and five U1 isoforms were isolated and characterized. Nucleotide differences, structural alterations, as well as protein and RNA interaction sites were examined in these variants and compared to the previously reported isoforms from the transformed BmN cell line. In all these SG U1 variants, variant sites and inter-species differences are located in moderately conserved regions. Substitutional or compensatory changes were found in the double stranded areas and clustered in moderately conserved regions. Some of the changes generate stronger base pairing. Calculated free energy (DeltaG) values for the entire U1 snRNA secondary structures and for the individual stem/loops (I, II, III and IV) domains of the isoforms were generated and compared to determine their structural stability. Using phylogenetic analysis, an evolutionary parallelism is observed between the polymorphic sites in B. mori and variant locations found among animal and plant species.

  8. Chitin in the silk gland ducts of the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gwilym J G; Knight, David P; Vollrath, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori. Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems. We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts.

  9. E-cadherin and APC compete for the interaction with beta-catenin and the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    beta-Catenin is involved in the formation of adherens junctions of mammalian epithelia. It interacts with the cell adhesion molecule E- cadherin and also with the tumor suppressor gene product APC, and the Drosophila homologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, mediates morphogenetic signals. We demonstrate here that E-cadherin and APC directly compete for binding to the internal, armadillo-like repeats of beta-catenin; the NH2-terminal domain of beta-catenin mediates the interaction of the alternative E-cadherin and APC complexes to the cytoskeleton by binding to alpha-catenin. Plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), which is structurally related to beta-catenin, mediates identical interactions. We thus show that the APC tumor suppressor gene product forms strikingly similar associations as found in cell junctions and suggest that beta-catenin and plakoglobin are central regulators of cell adhesion, cytoskeletal interaction, and tumor suppression. PMID:7806582

  10. In search of the hair-cell gating spring elastic properties of ankyrin and cadherin repeats.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Corey, David P; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    Mechanotransduction in vertebrate hair cells involves a biophysically defined elastic element (the "gating spring") that pulls on the transduction channels. The tip link, a fine filament made of cadherin 23 linking adjacent stereocilia in hair-cell bundles, has been suggested to be the gating spring. However, TRP channels that mediate mechanotransduction in Drosophila, zebrafish, and mice often have cytoplasmic domains containing a large number of ankyrin repeats that are also candidates for the gating spring. We have explored the elastic properties of cadherin and ankyrin repeats through molecular dynamics simulations using crystallographic structures of proteins with one cadherin repeat or 4 and 12 ankyrin repeats, and using models of 17 and 24 ankyrin repeats. The extension and stiffness of large ankyrin-repeat structures were found to match those predicted by the gating-spring model. Our results suggest that ankyrin repeats of TRPA1 and TRPN1 channels serve as the gating spring for mechanotransduction.

  11. The progress and future of enhancing antiviral capacity by transgenic technology in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-05-01

    Bombyx mori is a common lepidopteran model and an important economic insect for silk production. B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a typical pathogenic baculovirus that causes serious economic losses in sericulture. B. mori and BmNPV are a model of insect host and pathogen interaction including invasion of the host by the pathogen, host response, and enhancement of host resistance. The antiviral capacity of silkworms can be improved by transgenic technology such as overexpression of an endogenous or exogenous antiviral gene, RNA interference of the BmNPV gene, or regulation of the immune pathway to inhibit BmNPV at different stages of infection. Antiviral capacity could be further increased by combining different methods. We discuss the future of an antiviral strategy in silkworm, including possible improvement of anti-BmNPV, the feasibility of constructing transgenic silkworms with resistance to multiple viruses, and the safety of transgenic silkworms. The silkworm model could provide a reference for disease control in other organisms.

  12. Identification of the key stages for sex determination in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Aoki, Fugaku; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2014-03-01

    In general, the master switch gene for sex determination is expressed for a limited period during the early embryonic stage. To increase our understanding of the sex determination mechanism in Bombyx mori, it is important to understand when sex determination takes place. To examine the key stages for sex determination in this insect, we focused on the expression patterns of Bmdsx (a double-switch gene in the sex determination cascade of B. mori) and BmIMP (a gene expressed specifically in males involved in male-specific splicing of Bmdsx). Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that male-type Bmdsx expression was observed in females at 27 and 29 h after oviposition (hao), and finally disappeared at 32 hao. Moreover, BmIMP mRNA was also expressed in these females, and its expression level was comparable to that of the male-type Bmdsx mRNA. These results demonstrated that female embryos before 32 hao can show male-type expression of Bmdsx and BmIMP, suggesting that sex determination occurs between 29 and 32 hao, which correspond to the developmental stages from the head lobe differentiation to spoon-shaped embryo stages. This also suggests that the master switch gene for sex determination of B. mori is expressed in females during this period and represses the male-specific mode of expression in sex-determining genes.

  13. Location of the Bombyx mori specificity domain on a Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, A Z; Shivarova, N I; Dean, D H

    1989-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces different types of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) or delta-endotoxins. In an effort to identify the insect specificity of ICP toxins, two icp genes were cloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pKK223-3, and bioassays were performed with purified crystals. The type A protein [from an icpA1, or 4.5-kilobase (kb) gene, from B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1] was found to be 400 times more active against Bombyx mori than type C protein (from an icpC73, or 6.6-kb gene, from B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-244). The type C protein was 9 times more active against Trichoplusia ni than the type A protein, while both have similar activity against Manduca sexta. To locate the specificity domain of the type A protein for B. mori, site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce or remove restriction enzyme sites, facilitating the exchange of regions of the two genes. The hybrid genes were overexpressed, and purified ICP was used in bioassays. The B. mori specificity domain for the ICP A toxin is located in the amino-terminal portion of the hypervariable region between amino acids 332 and 450. PMID:2542961

  14. Identification, genomic organization and expression pattern of glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Quanyou; Lu, Cheng; Li, Bin; Fang, Shoumin; Zuo, Weidong; Dai, Fangyin; Zhang, Ze; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2008-12-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multifunctional supergene family and some play an important role in insecticide resistance. We have identified 23 putative cytosolic GSTs by searching the new assembly of the Bombyx mori genome sequence. Phylogenetic analyses on the amino acid sequences reveal that 21 of the B. mori GSTs fall into six classes represented in other insects, the other two being unclassified. The majority of the silkworm GSTs belong to the Delta, Epsilon, and Omega classes. Most members of each class are tandemly arranged in the genome, except for the Epsilon GSTs. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) corresponding to 19 of the 23 GSTs were found in available databases. Furthermore RT-PCR experiments detected expression of all the GSTs in multiple tissues on day 3 of fifth instar larvae. Surprisingly, we found little or no expression of most Delta and Epsilon GSTs in the fat body, which is thought to be the main detoxification organ. This may explain the sensitivity of the silkworm to certain insecticides. Our data provide some insights into the evolution of the B. mori GST family and the functions of individual GST enzymes.

  15. In silico identification of novel chitinase-like proteins in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, genome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ye; Lü, Peng; Wang, Yong; Yin, Lijing; Ma, Hexiang; Ma, Guohong; Chen, Keping; He, Yuanqing

    2012-01-01

    In insects, chitinases participate in the periodic shedding of old exoskeletons and the turnover of peritrophic membranes. Chitinase family members have been identified in dozens of species, including Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila melanogaster, and Anopheles gambiae. In this study, nine chitinases and three hypothetical chitinases have been identified in Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) through genome-wide searching. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that seven of them belong to the seven chitinase groups, respectively. BmCht25 and BmCht26 could not be grouped into the known chitinase groups, and might belong to two new groups of the chitinase family. BmCht10, BmCht25, and BmIDGF have glutamate amino acid substitutions in the active catalytic domain. Only BmCht5 and BmCht10 contain CBD domain and PEST sequences (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine). BmCht5 and BmCht26 are located on chromosome 7, and others (BmCht6, BmCht7, BmCht10, BmCht11, BmCht20, BmIDGF) are located on separate chromosomes of Bombyx mori, respectively. The present study provides important background information for future studies using Bombyx mori as a model organism for insect development and virus and host interaction.

  16. Nonvirus encoded proteins could be embedded into Bombyx mori cypovirus polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Ling; Xue, Ren-Yu; Cao, Guang-Li; Meng, Xiang-Kun; Zhu, Yue-Xiong; Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gong, Cheng-Liang

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether the nonvirus encoded protein could be embedded into Bombyx mori cypovirus (BmCPV) polyhedra. The stable transformants of BmN cells expressing a polyhedrin (Polh) gene of BmCPV were constructed by transfection with a non-transposon derived vector containing a polh gene. The polyhedra were purified from the midguts of BmCPV-infected silkworms and the transformed BmN cells, respectively. The proteins embedded into polyhedra were determined by mass spectrometry analysis. Host derived proteins were detected in the purified polyhedra. Analysis of structure and hydrophilicity of embedded proteins indicated that the hydrophilic proteins, in structure, were similar to the left-handed structure of polyhedrin or the N-terminal domain of BmCPV structural protein VP3, which were easily embedded into the BmCPV polyhedra. The lysate of polyhedra purified from the infected transformation of BmN cells with modified B. mori baculovirus BmPAK6 could infect BmN cells, indicating that B. mori baculovirus could be embedded into BmCPV polyhedra. Both the purified polyhedra and its lysate could be coloured by X-gal, indicating that the β-galactosidase expressed by BmPAK6 could be incorporated into BmCPV polyhedra. These results suggested that some heterologous proteins and baculovirus could be embedded into polyhedra in an unknown manner.

  17. Electroporation, an alternative to biolistics for transfection of Bombyx mori embryos and larval tissues

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean-luc

    2003-01-01

    There are few powerful techniques available to transfect insect tissues. We previously used biolistics to transfect Bombyx mori embryos, and larval and pupal tissues (Thomas J-L et al. 2001. Journal of Insect Science 1/9, Kravariti L et al. 2001. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 31: 473–479). As the main limitation was the irregularity in results we explored electroporation as an alternative technique by adapting techniques used for chicken embryos to B. mori embryos. By injecting the DNA solution into the hemocoel of late embryos that were finishing organogenesis, we expressed marker genes in numerous tissues following electroporation. With some adaptation of the method this was also achieved for early embryos lacking a hemocoel. Some larval tissues were also transfected. During these technical studies we found that optimizing parameters such as electrical voltage, number of pulses and their frequency, and conductivity of the buffer was important. These results confirmed that electroporation is a reliable technique for transfecting B. mori tissues. Abbreviation: GFP Green Fluorescent Protein CCD Charged Coupled Device PMID:15841233

  18. Metabolic allometry during development and metamorphosis of the silkworm Bombyx mori: analyses, patterns, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blossman-Myer, Bonnie L; Burggren, Warren W

    2010-01-01

    Intraspecific allometric (scaling) relationships for metabolism, which have received little examination compared to interspecific relationships, reflect a complex interplay of organogenesis, growth, and shifting physiologies. In this study of the silkworm Bombyx mori, we hypothesized that allometric relationships for metabolism both across all developmental stages and within each stage would not reflect conventional scaling coefficients (e.g., b not equal to 0.75). Histology, gross morphology, body surface and cross-sectional area, total lipid content, and cytochrome c oxidase activity levels (as evidence of the total metabolic potential of mitochondria) were determined across development. Also measured were oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and the respiratory exchange ratio. The overall slope, b, in the allometric equation relating to body mass across all developmental stages was 0.82, not greatly different from the value of 0.75 typical of interspecific data. However, within larval instars II-V and in prepupae, b varied between 0.99 and 1.49, far higher than hypothesized. Thus, in B. mori, an analytical approach that lumps all developmental stages hides interinstar variability. Morphological and biochemical data suggest that observed scaling patterns in B. mori are likely correlated with changes in overall mitochondrial density rather than with specific changes in body proportion of tissues with higher intrinsic metabolic intensity.

  19. E-cadherin's role in development, tissue homeostasis and disease: Insights from mouse models: Tissue-specific inactivation of the adhesion protein E-cadherin in mice reveals its functions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R; Kolligs, Frank T

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies uncovered critical roles of the adhesion protein E-cadherin in health and disease. Global inactivation of Cdh1, the gene encoding E-cadherin in mice, results in early embryonic lethality due to an inability to form the trophectodermal epithelium. To unravel E-cadherin's functions beyond development, numerous mouse lines with tissue-specific disruption of Cdh1 have been generated. The consequences of E-cadherin loss showed great variability depending on the tissue in question, ranging from nearly undetectable changes to a complete loss of tissue structure and function. This review focuses on these studies and discusses how they provided important insights into E-cadherin's role in cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, and its consequences for biological processes as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, vascularization, and carcinogenesis. Lastly, we present some perspectives and possible approaches for future research.

  20. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification

    PubMed Central

    Haenebalcke, Lieven; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Huylebroeck, Danny; Stemmler, Marc P.; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J.; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  1. Polycystin-1 and Gα12 regulate the cleavage of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jen X; Lu, Tzong-Shi; Li, Suyan; Wu, Yong; Ding, Lai; Denker, Bradley M; Bonventre, Joseph V; Kong, Tianqing

    2015-02-01

    Interaction of polycystin-1 (PC1) and Gα12 is important for development of kidney cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The integrity of cell polarity and cell-cell adhesions (mainly E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction) is altered in the renal epithelial cells of ADPKD. However, the key signaling pathway for this alteration is not fully understood. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells maintain the normal integrity of epithelial cell polarity and adherens junctions. Here, we found that deletion of Pkd1 increased activation of Gα12, which then promoted the cystogenesis of MDCK cells. The morphology of these cells was altered after the activation of Gα12. By using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found several proteins that could be related this change in the extracellular milieu. E-cadherin was one of the most abundant peptides after active Gα12 was induced. Gα12 activation or Pkd1 deletion increased the shedding of E-cadherin, which was mediated via increased ADAM10 activity. The increased shedding of E-cadherin was blocked by knockdown of ADAM10 or specific ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X. Pkd1 deletion or Gα12 activation also changed the distribution of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells and caused β-catenin to shift from cell membrane to nucleus. Finally, ADAM10 inhibitor, GI254023X, blocked the cystogenesis induced by PC1 knockdown or Gα12 activation in renal epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that the E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling pathway is regulated by PC1 and Gα12 via ADAM10. Specific inhibition of this pathway, especially ADAM10 activity, could be a novel therapeutic regimen for ADPKD.

  2. Polycystin-1 and Gα12 regulate the cleavage of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jen X.; Lu, Tzong-Shi; Li, Suyan; Wu, Yong; Ding, Lai; Denker, Bradley M.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of polycystin-1 (PC1) and Gα12 is important for development of kidney cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The integrity of cell polarity and cell-cell adhesions (mainly E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction) is altered in the renal epithelial cells of ADPKD. However, the key signaling pathway for this alteration is not fully understood. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells maintain the normal integrity of epithelial cell polarity and adherens junctions. Here, we found that deletion of Pkd1 increased activation of Gα12, which then promoted the cystogenesis of MDCK cells. The morphology of these cells was altered after the activation of Gα12. By using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found several proteins that could be related this change in the extracellular milieu. E-cadherin was one of the most abundant peptides after active Gα12 was induced. Gα12 activation or Pkd1 deletion increased the shedding of E-cadherin, which was mediated via increased ADAM10 activity. The increased shedding of E-cadherin was blocked by knockdown of ADAM10 or specific ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X. Pkd1 deletion or Gα12 activation also changed the distribution of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells and caused β-catenin to shift from cell membrane to nucleus. Finally, ADAM10 inhibitor, GI254023X, blocked the cystogenesis induced by PC1 knockdown or Gα12 activation in renal epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that the E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling pathway is regulated by PC1 and Gα12 via ADAM10. Specific inhibition of this pathway, especially ADAM10 activity, could be a novel therapeutic regimen for ADPKD. PMID:25492927

  3. Reelin transiently promotes N-cadherin-dependent neuronal adhesion during mouse cortical development.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuki; Noda, Mariko; Murakawa, Hideki; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Nagasaka, Arata; Inoue, Seika; Miyata, Takaki; Miura, Takashi; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2017-02-21

    Reelin is an essential glycoprotein for the establishment of the highly organized six-layered structure of neurons of the mammalian neocortex. Although the role of Reelin in the control of neuronal migration has been extensively studied at the molecular level, the mechanisms underlying Reelin-dependent neuronal layer organization are not yet fully understood. In this study, we directly showed that Reelin promotes adhesion among dissociated neocortical neurons in culture. The Reelin-mediated neuronal aggregation occurs in an N-cadherin-dependent manner, both in vivo and in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, in a rotation culture of dissociated neocortical cells that gradually reaggregated over time, we found that it was the neural progenitor cells [radial glial cells (RGCs)], rather than the neurons, that tended to form clusters in the presence of Reelin. Mathematical modeling suggested that this clustering of RGCs could be recapitulated if the Reelin-dependent promotion of neuronal adhesion were to occur only transiently. Thus, we directly measured the adhesive force between neurons and N-cadherin by atomic force microscopy, and found that Reelin indeed enhanced the adhesiveness of neurons to N-cadherin; this enhanced adhesiveness began to be observed at 30 min after Reelin stimulation, but declined by 3 h. These results suggest that Reelin transiently (and not persistently) promotes N-cadherin-mediated neuronal aggregation. When N-cadherin and stabilized β-catenin were overexpressed in the migrating neurons, the transfected neurons were abnormally distributed in the superficial region of the neocortex, suggesting that appropriate regulation of N-cadherin-mediated adhesion is important for correct positioning of the neurons during neocortical development.

  4. Dysregulated expression of Snail and E-cadherin correlates with gastrointestinal stromal tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Liao, Guoqing; Ding, Jie; Ye, Ke; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Liang; Chen, Senlin

    2014-09-01

    Snail, a zinc finger structure transcription inhibitory factor, has been reported to play an important role in the metastatic progression of several types of cancer. The aim of the study was to identify potential biomarkers for metastasis in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by examining the expression levels of Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin in GISTs and investigate their clinical significance. The protein expression of Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin in 74 GIST specimens was detected by immunohistochemical analysis, and the correlation between expression levels and clinicopathological data was analyzed. Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin were positively expressed in 51.4% (38/74), 32.4% (24/74), and 68.9% (51/74) of GIST tissue samples, respectively. Snail protein expression was significantly higher in GISTs with distant metastasis compared with GISTs without distant metastasis (P<0.05). E-cadherin expression level was significantly lower in cases of GIST with distant metastasis compared with those without distant metastasis (P<0.05), whereas the expression level of Vimentin did not significantly change according to clinical and pathological characteristics (all P>0.05). Snail expression was significantly negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (r's=-0.276, P=0.017) but not with Vimentin expression (r's=0.041, P=0.728) in GISTs. High Snail expression and low E-cadherin expression were significantly correlated with metastasis in GISTs, and Snail, because of positive correlation, is potentially a biomarker of GIST with distant metastasis.

  5. p120, a p120-related protein (p100), and the cadherin/catenin complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cadherins and catenins play an important role in cell-cell adhesion. Two of the catenins, beta and gamma, are members of a group of proteins that contains a repeating amino acid motif originally described for the Drosophila segment polarity gene armadillo. Another member of this group is a 120-kD protein termed p120, originally identified as a substrate of the tyrosine kinase pp60src. In this paper, we show that endothelial and epithelial cells express p120 and p100, a 100-kD, p120- related protein. Peptide sequencing of p100 establishes it as highly related to p120. p120 and p100 both appear associated with the cadherin/catenin complex, but independent p120/catenin and p100/catenin complexes can be isolated. This association is shown by coimmunoprecipitation of cadherins and catenins with an anti-p120/p100 antibody, and of p120/p100 with cadherin or catenin antibodies. Immunocytochemical analysis with a p120-specific antibody reveals junctional colocalization of p120 and beta-catenin in epithelial cells. Catenins and p120/p100 also colocalize in endothelial and epithelial cells in culture and in tissue sections. The cellular content of p120/p100 and beta-catenin is similar in MDCK cells, but only approximately 20% of the p120/p100 pool associates with the cadherin/catenin complex. Our data provide further evidence for interactions among the different arm proteins and suggest that p120/p100 may participate in regulating the function of cadherins and, thereby, other processes influenced by cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7615637

  6. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  7. Cadherin domains in the polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 are carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A; Weiner, Ronald M; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium.

  8. PRL-3 and E-cadherin show mutual interactions and participate in lymph node metastasis formation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pryczynicz, Anna; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Niewiarowska, Katarzyna; Cepowicz, Dariusz; Kemona, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    E-cadherin, a transmembrane adhesion molecule, and phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) protein, a member of the family of tyrosine phosphatases, seem to be responsible for cancer cell migration. Therefore, the study objective was to determine a correlation between PRL-3 and E-cadherin, to assess their expression in neoplastic tissue and normal mucosa of the stomach, to analyze their effect on cancer advancement, and to evaluate their potential as prognostic markers in gastric cancer. The expressions of PRL-3 and E-cadherin were assessed immunohistochemically in 71 patients with gastric cancer. Positive expression of PRL-3 was observed in 42.2 % of gastric cancer cases, whereas E-cadherin expression was abnormal in 38 % of cases. The study revealed that the positive PRL-3 expression and abnormal E-cadherin expression were associated with mucinous gastric carcinoma and lymph node involvement. The former was also related to the infiltrating type of tumor and abnormal E-cadherin expression. The expression of PRL-3, but not of E-cadherin, was associated with shorter survival of patients. PRL-3 and E-cadherin exhibit interactions in gastric cancer and are involved in the formation of lymph node metastases. The PRL-3 protein can be an independent predictive factor of overall survival in gastric cancer patients.

  9. Construction and characteristics of an E-cadherin-related three-dimensional suspension growth model of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Yang, Ya'nan; Dong, Lingling; Qiu, Wenlong; Yang, Lu; Wang, Xiuwen; Liu, Lian

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic malignancies. Metastatic ovarian cancer cells exist mainly in the form of multi-cellular spheroids (MCSs) in the ascites of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. We hypothesized that E-cadherin, as an important cell-adhesion molecule, might play an important role in the formation and survival of MCSs. Therefore, we established a three-dimensional suspension culture model of ovarian cancer cells that express high levels of E-cadherin to investigate their growth, proliferation, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs by CCK-8 assays. Compared to the cell suspension masses formed by cells with low or absent E-cadherin expression, the MCSs of high E-cadherin SKOV-3 cells had larger volumes, tighter cellular connections, and longer survival times. Although the suspension cell masses of all three cell lines were proliferatively stagnant, possibly due to cell cycle arrest at G1/S, cell mortality at 72 h after cisplatin treatment was significantly decreased in the high E-cadherin SKOV-3 cells compared to SKOV-3 cells without E-cadherin expression and to OVCAR-3 cells with low E-cadherin expression. We conclude, therefore, E-cadherin plays a vital role in MCS formation, maintenance, and drug resistance in ovarian cancer and could be a potential target for late-stage ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25008268

  10. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Perna, Anna M.; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T.; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-03-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions.

  11. Novel peptides for deciphering structural and signalling functions of E-cadherin in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Joe M.; Ward, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that E-cadherin regulates the naive pluripotent state of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) by enabling LIF-dependent STAT3 phosphorylation, with E-cadherin null mESCs exhibiting over 3000 gene transcript alterations and a switch to Activin/Nodal-dependent pluripotency. However, elucidation of the exact mechanisms associated with E-cadherin function in mESCs is compounded by the difficulty in delineating the structural and signalling functions of this protein. Here we show that mESCs treated with the E-cadherin neutralising antibody DECMA-1 or the E-cadherin binding peptide H-SWELYYPLRANL-NH2 (Epep) exhibit discrete profiles for pluripotent transcripts and NANOG protein expression, demonstrating that the type of E-cadherin inhibitor employed dictates the cellular phenotype of mESCs. Alanine scanning mutation of Epep revealed residues critical for Tbx3, Klf4 and Esrrb transcript repression, cell-cell contact abrogation, cell survival in suspension, STAT3 phosphorylation and water solubility. STAT3 phosphorylation was found to be independent of loss of cell-cell contact and Activin/Nodal-dependent pluripotency and a peptide is described that enhances STAT3 phosphorylation and Nanog transcript and protein expression in mESCs. These peptides represent a useful resource for deciphering the structural and signalling functions of E-cadherin and demonstrate that complete absence of E-cadherin protein is likely required for hierarchical signalling pathway alterations in mESCs. PMID:28169326

  12. Flotillins control zebrafish epiboly through their role in cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eduardo A Rios; Bodin, Stéphane; Delaval, Bénédicte; Comunale, Franck; Georget, Virginie; Costa, Manoel L; Lutfalla, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2017-02-22

    Zebrafish gastrulation and particularly epiboly that involves coordinated movements of several cell layers is a dynamic process for which regulators remain to be identified. We show here that Flotillin 1 and 2, ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins, are required for epiboly. Flotillins knockdown compromised embryo survival, strongly delayed epiboly and impaired deep cell radial intercalation and directed collective migration without affecting enveloping layer cell movement. At the molecular level, we identified that Flotillins are required for the formation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that Flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions to allow epiboly progression.

  13. Inhibition of IGF-1 signaling by genistein: modulation of E-cadherin expression and downregulation of β-catenin signaling in hormone refractory PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ju, Jihyeung; Park, Seyeon; Hong, Sung Joon; Yoon, Sun

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are associated with an increased risk of several different cancers, including prostate cancer. Inhibition of IGF-1 and the downstream signaling pathways mediated by the activation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) may be involved in inhibiting prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated whether genistein downregulated the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling pathway and inhibited cell growth in hormone refractory PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Genistein treatment caused a significant inhibition of IGF-1-stimulated cell growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that genistein significantly decreased the number of IGF-1-stimulated cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In IGF-1-treated cells, genistein effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of IGF-1R and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets, such as Src, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSk-3β). IGF-1 treatment decreased the levels of E-cadherin but increased the levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. However, genistein treatment greatly attenuated IGF-1-induced β-catenin signaling that correlated with increasing the levels of E-cadherin and decreasing cyclin D1 levels in PC-3 cells. In addition, genistein inhibited T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF)-dependent transcriptional activity. These results showed that genistein effectively inhibited cell growth in IGF-1-stimulated PC-3 cells, possibly by inhibiting downstream of IGF-1R activation.

  14. RUNX2 and TAZ-dependent signaling pathways regulate soluble E-Cadherin levels and tumorsphere formation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Brusgard, Jessica L.; Choe, Moran; Chumsri, Saranya; Renoud, Keli; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Sudol, Marius; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity and treatment resistance drive breast cancer (BC) metastasis and recurrence. The RUNX2 transcription factor is upregulated in early stage luminal BC. However, the precise mechanism by which RUNX2 regulates an oncogenic phenotype in luminal BCs remains an enigma. We show that RUNX2 is predictive of poor overall survival in BC patients. RUNX2 associated with the TAZ transcriptional co-activator to promote a tumorigenic phenotype that was inhibited by knockdown of TAZ. RUNX2 increased endogenous TAZ translocation to the nucleus, which was prevented by inhibiting RUNX2. RUNX2/TAZ interaction was associated with ectodomain shedding of an oncogenic soluble E-Cadherin fragment (sE-Cad), which is known to cooperate with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/ErbB2) to increase BC growth. Neutralizing E-Cadherin antibodies or TAZ knockdown reduced the levels of sE-Cad in RUNX2-expressing BC cells and inhibited tumorsphere formation. RUNX2 expression also increased HER2-mediated tumorsphere size, which was reduced after treatment with the HER2-targeting agents Herceptin and lapatinib. These data support a novel role for RUNX2 in promoting an oncogenic phenotype in luminal BC in the context of TAZ, sE-Cad, and HER2. Using this signaling pathway to monitor BC cell oncogenic activity will accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic modalities to treat BC patients. PMID:26320173

  15. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A.

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. {beta}-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced {beta}-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  16. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. beta-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced beta-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  17. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  18. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 in aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, Alison G; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Jia, Angela J; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Christiano, Angela M; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Reduced expression of both classical and desmosomal cadherins has been associated with different types of carcinomas, including prostate cancer. This study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the role and regulation of cell-cell adhesion in prostate cancer aggressiveness by examining the functional implications of both E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 (DSG2). E-cadherin expression was first examined using immunofluorescence in 50 normal prostate tissues and in a cohort of 414 prostate cancer patients. Correlation and survival analyses were performed to assess its clinical significance. In primary prostate cancer patients, reduced expression of both E-cadherin and DSG2 is significantly associated with an earlier biochemical recurrence. Transgenic DU145 E-cadherin knockdown and constitutively active AKT overexpression lines were generated. Functional implications of such genetic alterations were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the latter by using tumorigenesis as well as extravasation and metastatic tumor formation assays. We observed that loss of E-cadherin leads to impaired primary and metastatic tumor formation in vivo, suggesting a tumor promoter role for E-cadherin in addition to its known role as a tumor suppressor. Activation of AKT leads to a significant reduction in E-cadherin expression and nuclear localization of Snail, suggesting a role for the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the transient repression of E-cadherin. This reduced expression may be regulated by separate mechanisms as neither the loss of E-cadherin nor activation of AKT significantly affected DSG2 expression. In conclusion, these findings illustrate the critical role of cell-cell adhesion in the progression to aggressive prostate cancer, through regulation by the PI3K pathway.

  19. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut in silkworm infected with Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Shang, Meng-Ke; Qin, Guang-Xing; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2017-01-30

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) specifically infects the epithelial cells in the midgut of silkworm and causes them to death, which negatively affects the sericulture industry. In order to determine the midgut response at the protein levels to the virus infection, differential proteomes of the silkworm midgut responsive to BmCPV infection were identified with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). 193, 408, 189 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were reliably quantified by iTRAQ analysis in the midgut of BmCPV-infected and control larvae at 24, 48, 72h post infection (hpi) respectively. KEGG enrichment analysis showed that Oxidative phosphorylation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, steroid hormone biosynthesis were the significant pathways (Q value≤0.05) both at 24 and 48hpi. qRT-PCR was used to further verify gene transcription of 30 DEPs from iTRAQ, showing that the regulations of 24 genes at the transcript level were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Moreover, the cluster analysis of the three time groups showed that there were seven co-regulated DEPs including BGIBMGA002620-PA, which was a putative p62/sequestosome-1 protein in silkworm. It was upregulated at both the mRNA level and the proteomic level and may play an important role in regulating the autophagy and apoptosis (especially apoptosis) induced by BmCPV infection. This was the first report using an iTRAQ approach to analyze proteomes of the silkworm midgut against BmCPV infection, which contributes to understanding the defense mechanisms of silkworm midgut to virus infection.

  20. A genome-wide survey for host response of silkworm, Bombyx mori during pathogen Bacillus bombyseptieus infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulin; Cheng, Tingcai; Xu, Pingzhen; Cheng, Daojun; Fang, Ting; Xia, Qingyou

    2009-12-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are complex relationships, and a central challenge is to reveal the interactions between pathogens and their hosts. Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb) which can produces spores and parasporal crystals was firstly separated from the corpses of the infected silkworms (Bombyx mori). Bb naturally infects the silkworm can cause an acute fuliginosa septicaemia and kill the silkworm larvae generally within one day in the hot and humid season. Bb pathogen of the silkworm can be used for investigating the host responses after the infection. Gene expression profiling during four time-points of silkworm whole larvae after Bb infection was performed to gain insight into the mechanism of Bb-associated host whole body effect. Genome-wide survey of the host genes demonstrated many genes and pathways modulated after the infection. GO analysis of the induced genes indicated that their functions could be divided into 14 categories. KEGG pathway analysis identified that six types of basal metabolic pathway were regulated, including genetic information processing and transcription, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, metabolism of cofactors and vitamins, and xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism. Similar to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Bb can also induce a silkworm poisoning-related response. In this process, genes encoding midgut peritrophic membrane proteins, aminopeptidase N receptors and sodium/calcium exchange protein showed modulation. For the first time, we found that Bb induced a lot of genes involved in juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism pathway upregulated. Bb also triggered the host immune responses, including cellular immune response and serine protease cascade melanization response. Real time PCR analysis showed that Bb can induce the silkworm systemic immune response, mainly by the Toll pathway. Anti-microorganism peptides (AMPs), including of Attacin, Lebocin, Enbocin, Gloverin and Moricin

  1. IR study on the binding mode of metal cations to chemically modified Bombyx mori and Tussah silk fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Monti, Patrizia; Freddi, Giuliano; Arai, Takayuki; Tsukada, Masuhiro

    2003-06-01

    Bombyx mori ( B. mori) and Tussah ( Antheraea pernyi) silk fibres were modified by treatment with tannic acid (TA) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) dianhydride, subsequently treated with Cu 2+ and Co 2+ solutions, at alkaline pH, and analysed by attenuated total reflectance/infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the changes induced in their structure by metal binding. The spectral changes were correlated to metal binding results obtained by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Upon Co 2+ complexation, the spectra of all the B. mori and Tussah silk samples showed a decrease in intensity of the Amide I band with a trend related to the metal uptake. The most relevant changes in the whole spectra were observed for the EDTA- and TA-modified samples in the case of B. mori and Tussah silks, respectively. Upon Cu 2+ complexation, the decrease in intensity of the Amide I band follows the trend of the metal uptake only in the case of Tussah silk. Moreover, the most relevant changes with respect to the untreated sample were observed for the TA-modified B. mori silk sample. The spectral changes were explained by considering the different affinities of the fibres for the modifying reagent, the amount of the metal bound and the relative stability of the complexes formed.

  2. Molecular characterization of DnaJ 5 homologs in silkworm Bombyx mori and its expression during egg diapause.

    PubMed

    Sirigineedi, Sasibhushan; Vijayagowri, Esvaran; Murthy, Geetha N; Rao, Guruprasada; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M

    2014-12-01

    A comparison of the cDNA sequences (1 056 bp) of Bombyx mori DnaJ 5 homolog with B. mori genome revealed that unlike in other Hsps, it has an intron of 234 bp. The DnaJ 5 homolog contains 351 amino acids, of which 70 contain the conserved DnaJ domain at the N-terminal end. This homolog of B. mori has all desirable functional domains similar to other insects, and the 13 different DnaJ homologs identified in B. mori genome were distributed on different chromosomes. The expressed sequence tag database analysis of Hsp40 gene expression revealed higher expression in wing disc followed by diapause-induced eggs. Microarray analysis revealed higher expression of DnaJ 5 homolog at 18th h after oviposition in diapause-induced eggs. Further validation of DnaJ 5 expression through qPCR in diapause-induced and nondiapause eggs at different time intervals revealed higher expression in diapause eggs at 18 and 24 h after oviposition, which coincided with the expression of Hsp70 as the Hsp 40 is its co-chaperone. This study thus provides an outline of the genome organization of Hsp40 gene, and its role in egg diapause induction in B. mori.

  3. Twist1-induced dissemination preserves epithelial identity and requires E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Eliah R.; Pappalardo, Elisa; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Coutinho, Kester; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Aziz, Khaled; Auer, Manfred; Tran, Phuoc T.; Bader, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of epithelial cells is a critical step in metastatic spread. Molecular models of dissemination focus on loss of E-cadherin or repression of cell adhesion through an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). We sought to define the minimum molecular events necessary to induce dissemination of cells out of primary murine mammary epithelium. Deletion of E-cadherin disrupted epithelial architecture and morphogenesis but only rarely resulted in dissemination. In contrast, expression of the EMT transcription factor Twist1 induced rapid dissemination of cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells. Twist1 induced dramatic transcriptional changes in extracellular compartment and cell–matrix adhesion genes but not in cell–cell adhesion genes. Surprisingly, we observed disseminating cells with membrane-localized E-cadherin and β-catenin, and E-cadherin knockdown strongly inhibited Twist1-induced single cell dissemination. Dissemination can therefore occur with retention of epithelial cell identity. The spread of cancer cells during metastasis could similarly involve activation of an epithelial motility program without requiring a transition from epithelial to mesenchymal character. PMID:24590176

  4. Cadherin-9 Regulates Synapse-Specific Differentiation in the Developing Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Megan E.; Wilke, Scott A.; Daggett, Anthony; Davis, Elizabeth; Otto, Stefanie; Ravi, Deepak; Ripley, Beth; Bushong, Eric A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Klein, Gerd; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Our understanding of mechanisms that regulate the differentiation of specific classes of synapses is limited. Here, we investigate the formation of synapses between hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and their target CA3 neurons and find that DG neurons preferentially form synapses with CA3 rather than DG or CA1 neurons in culture, suggesting that specific interactions between DG and CA3 neurons drive synapse formation. Cadherin-9 is expressed selectively in DG and CA3 neurons, and downregulation of cadherin-9 in CA3 neurons leads to a selective decrease in the number and size of DG synapses onto CA3 neurons. In addition, loss of cadherin-9 from DG or CA3 neurons in vivo leads to striking defects in the formation and differentiation of the DG-CA3 mossy fiber synapse. These observations indicate that cadherin-9 bidirectionally regulates DG-CA3 synapse development and highlight the critical role of differentially expressed molecular cues in establishing specific connections in the mammalian brain. PMID:21867881

  5. Expression of Cadherin-17 Promotes Metastasis in a Highly Bone Marrow Metastatic Murine Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2017-01-01

    We previously established 4T1E/M3 highly bone marrow metastatic mouse breast cancer cells through in vivo selection of 4T1 cells. But while the incidence of bone marrow metastasis of 4T1E/M3 cells was high (~80%) when injected intravenously to mice, it was rather low (~20%) when injected subcutaneously. Therefore, using 4T1E/M3 cells, we carried out further in vitro and in vivo selection steps to establish FP10SC2 cells, which show a very high incidence of metastasis to lungs (100%) and spines (85%) after subcutaneous injection into mice. qRT-PCR and western bolt analysis revealed that cadherin-17 gene and protein expression were higher in FP10SC2 cells than in parental 4T1E/M3 cells. In addition, immunostaining revealed the presence of cadherin-17 at sites of bone marrow and lung metastasis after subcutaneous injection of FP10SC2 cells into mice. Suppressing cadherin-17 expression in FP10SC2 cells using RNAi dramatically decreased the cells' anchorage-independent growth and migration in vitro and their metastasis to lung and bone marrow in vivo. These findings suggest that cadherin-17 plays a crucial role in mediating breast cancer metastasis to bone marrow. PMID:28197418

  6. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Miranda V; Lee, Donghoon M; Harris, Tony J C; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2015-08-31

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

  7. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Miranda V.; Lee, Donghoon M.; Harris, Tony J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair. PMID:26304727

  8. Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure Causes Redistribution of Endothelial Tube VE-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Kozlosky, John; Po, Iris P.; Strickland, Pamela Ohman; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.; Cooper, Keith; Laumbach, Robert; Gordon, Marion K.

    2010-01-01

    Whether diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) potentially have a direct effect on capillary endothelia was examined by following the adherens junction component, vascular endothelial cell cadherin (VE-cadherin). This molecule is incorporated into endothelial adherens junctions at the cell surface, where it forms homodimeric associations with adjacent cells and contributes to the barrier function of the vasculature (Dejana et al., 2008; Venkiteswaran et al., 2002; Villasante et al., 2007). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were pre-formed into capillary-like tube networks in vitro were exposed to DEPs for 24 hr. After exposure, the integrity of VE-cadherin in adherens junctions was assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and demonstrated that increasing concentrations of DEPs caused increasing redistribution of VE-cadherin away from the cell-cell junctions toward intracellular locations. Since HUVEC tube networks are three-dimensional structures, whether particles entered the endothelial cells or tubular lumens was also examined. The data indicate that translocation of the particles does occur. The results, obtained in a setting that removes the confounding effects of inflammatory cells or blood components, suggest that if DEPs encounter alveolar capillaries in vivo, they may be able to directly affect the endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:20887764

  9. Resolving the controversy about N-cadherin and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pulin; Zon, Leonard I

    2010-03-05

    Discrepancies in published results about the role of N-cadherin in hematopoietic stem cells have led to confusion in the field. Attempting to settle the disagreements and reach a consensus, we undertook a collective discussion approach. This process clarified a number of issues but left some questions still unresolved.

  10. N-cadherin negatively regulates collective Drosophila glial migration through actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Gupta, Tripti; Berzsenyi, Sara; Giangrande, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is an essential and highly regulated process. During development, glia cells and neurons migrate over long distances - in most cases collectively - to reach their final destination and build the sophisticated architecture of the nervous system, the most complex tissue of the body. Collective migration is highly stereotyped and efficient, defects in the process leading to severe human diseases that include mental retardation. This dynamic process entails extensive cell communication and coordination, hence, the real challenge is to analyze it in the entire organism and at cellular resolution. We here investigate the impact of the N-cadherin adhesion molecule on collective glial migration, by using the Drosophila developing wing and cell-type specific manipulation of gene expression. We show that N-cadherin timely accumulates in glial cells and that its levels affect migration efficiency. N-cadherin works as a molecular brake in a dosage-dependent manner, by negatively controlling actin nucleation and cytoskeleton remodeling through α/β catenins. This is the first in vivo evidence for N-cadherin negatively and cell autonomously controlling collective migration.

  11. Cadherin-2 Is Required Cell Autonomously for Collective Migration of Facial Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rebman, Jane K.; Kirchoff, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration depends on cell-cell interactions between neighbors that contribute to their overall directionality, yet the mechanisms that control the coordinated migration of neurons remains to be elucidated. During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) undergo a stereotypic tangential caudal migration from their place of birth in rhombomere (r)4 to their final location in r6/7. FBMNs engage in collective cell migration that depends on neuron-to-neuron interactions to facilitate caudal directionality. Here, we demonstrate that Cadherin-2-mediated neuron-to-neuron adhesion is necessary for directional and collective migration of FBMNs. We generated stable transgenic zebrafish expressing dominant-negative Cadherin-2 (Cdh2ΔEC) driven by the islet1 promoter. Cell-autonomous inactivation of Cadherin-2 function led to non-directional migration of FBMNs and a defect in caudal tangential migration. Additionally, mosaic analysis revealed that Cdh2ΔEC-expressing FBMNs are not influenced to migrate caudally by neighboring wild-type FBMNs due to a defect in collective cell migration. Taken together, our data suggest that Cadherin-2 plays an essential cell-autonomous role in mediating the collective migration of FBMNs. PMID:27716840

  12. Local BMP receptor activation at adherens junctions in the Drosophila germline stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marcus; Raabe, Isabel; Kupinski, Adam P; Pérez-Palencia, Raquel; Bökel, Christian

    2011-08-02

    According to the stem cell niche synapse hypothesis postulated for the mammalian haematopoietic system, spatial specificity of niche signals is maximized by subcellularly restricting signalling to cadherin-based adherens junctions between individual niche and stem cells. However, such a synapse has never been observed directly, in part, because tools to detect active growth factor receptors with subcellular resolution were not available. Here we describe a novel fluorescence-based reporter that directly visualizes bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor activation and show that in the Drosophila testis a BMP niche signal is transmitted preferentially at adherens junctions between hub and germline stem cells, resembling the proposed synapse organization. Ligand secretion involves the exocyst complex and the Rap activator Gef26, both of which are also required for Cadherin trafficking towards adherens junctions. We, therefore, propose that local generation of the BMP signal is achieved through shared use of the Cadherin transport machinery.

  13. Different contributions of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of vascular endothelial cadherin to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Shijin; Tan, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common pathogenic process in cases of severe trauma and sepsis. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) is a key regulatory molecule involved in this process, although the detailed mechanism through which this molecule acts remains unclear. We assessed the role of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad in LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability in the human vascular endothelial cell line CRL-2922 and determined that vascular permeability and VE-cad localization at the plasma membrane were negatively correlated after LPS treatment. Additionally, the loss of VE-cad at the plasma membrane was caused by both clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was dominant early after LPS treatment, and caveolae-mediated endocytosis was dominant hours after LPS treatment. The caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad was activated through the LPS-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-Src signaling pathway. Structural changes in the actin cytoskeleton, specifically from polymerization to depolymerization, were important reasons for the switching of the VE-cad endocytosis pathway from clathrin-mediated to caveolae-mediated. Our findings suggest that clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad contribute to LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability, although they contribute via different mechanism. The predominant means of endocytosis depends on the time since LPS treatment.

  14. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker “E-caderin” and mesenchymal marker “vimetin” were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways. PMID:26932781

  15. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-03-02

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker "E-caderin" and mesenchymal marker "vimetin" were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways.

  16. Repulsion by Slit and Roundabout prevents Shotgun/E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion during Drosophila heart tube lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, Edgardo; Soplop, Nadine H; Patel, Rajesh; Kramer, Sunita G

    2008-07-28

    During Drosophila melanogaster heart development, a lumen forms between apical surfaces of contralateral cardioblasts (CBs). We show that Slit and its receptor Roundabout (Robo) are required at CB apical domains for lumen formation. Mislocalization of Slit outside the apical domain causes ectopic lumen formation and the mislocalization of cell junction proteins, E-cadherin (E-Cad) and Enabled, without disrupting overall CB cell polarity. Ectopic lumen formation is suppressed in robo mutants, which indicates robo's requirement for this process. Genetic evidence suggests that Robo and Shotgun (Shg)/E-Cad function together in modulating CB adhesion. robo and shg/E-Cad transheterozygotes have lumen defects. In robo loss-of-function or shg/E-Cad gain-of-function embryos, lumen formation is blocked because of inappropriate CB adhesion and an accumulation of E-Cad at the apical membrane. In contrast, shg/E-Cad loss-of-function or robo gain-of-function blocks lumen formation due to a loss of CB adhesion. Our data show that Slit and Robo pathways function in lumen formation as a repulsive signal to antagonize E-Cad-mediated cell adhesion.

  17. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors.

  18. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors. PMID:27620558

  19. Liver protects metastatic prostate cancer from induced death by activating E-cadherin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Wheeler, Sarah E; Clark, Amanda M; Whaley, Diana L; Yang, Min; Wells, Alan

    2016-11-01

    Liver is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis. Once disseminated, the prognosis is poor as these tumors often display generalized chemoresistance, particularly for carcinomas that derive not from the aerodigestive tract. When these cancers seed the liver, the aggressive cells usually undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition that both aids colonization and renders the tumor cells chemoresistant. In vitro studies demonstrate that hepatocytes drive this phenotypic shift. However, the in vivo evidence and the molecular signals that protect these cells from induced death are yet to be defined. Herein, we report that membrane surface E-cadherin-expressing prostate cancer cells were resistant to cell death by chemotherapeutic drugs but E-cadherin null cells or those expressing E-cadherin only in the cytoplasm were sensitive to death signals and chemotherapies both in vitro and in vivo. While cell-cell E-cadherin ligandation reduced mitogenesis, this chemoprotection was proliferation-independent as killing of both 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive (or Ki67(+) ) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-negative (Ki67(-) ) cells was inversely related to membrane-bound E-cadherin. Inhibiting the canonical survival kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases, protein kinase B, and Janus kinase, which are activated by chemotherapeutics in epithelial cell-transitioned prostate cancer, abrogated the chemoresistance both in cell culture and in animal models of metastatic cancer. For disseminated tumors, protein kinase B disruption in itself had no effect on tumor survival but was synergistic with chemotherapy, leading to increased killing.

  20. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  1. Acute and chronic cadmium exposure promotes E-cadherin degradation in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Esmeralda; Louie, Maggie C; Sevigny, Mary B

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is an environmental carcinogen that usually enters the body at minute concentrations through diet or cigarette smoke and bioaccumulates in soft tissues. In past studies, cadmium has been shown to contribute to the development of more aggressive cancer phenotypes including increased cell migration and invasion. This study aims to determine if cadmium exposure-both acute and chronic-contributes to breast cancer progression by interfering with the normal functional relationship between E-cadherin and β-catenin. An MCF7 breast cancer cell line (MCF7-Cd) chronically exposed to 10(-7)  M CdCl2 was previously developed and used as a model system to study chronic exposures, whereas parental MCF7 cells exposed to 10(-6)  M CdCl2 for short periods of time were used to study acute exposures. Cadmium exposure of MCF7 cells led to the degradation of the E-cadherin protein via the ubiquitination pathway. This resulted in fewer E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and the relocation of active β-catenin to the nucleus, where it interacted with transcription factor TCF-4 to modulate gene expression. Interestingly, only cells chronically exposed to cadmium showed a significant decrease in the localization of β-catenin to the plasma membrane and an increased distance between cells. Our data suggest that cadmium exposure promotes breast cancer progression by (1) down-regulating E-cadherin, thus decreasing the number of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complexes, and (2) enhancing the nuclear translocation of β-catenin to increase expression of cancer-promoting proteins (i.e., c-Jun and cyclin D1).

  2. Precursor N-cadherin mediates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-promoted human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ye; Liu, Liyun; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Baole; Qin, Yuxia; Yao, Ruiqin; Zhou, Hao; Gao, Dian Shuai

    2017-02-12

    As the most prevalent primary brain tumor, gliomas are highly metastatic, invasive and are characteristic of high levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is an important factor for invasive glioma cell growth; however, the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we affirm a significantly higher expression of the precursor of N-cadherin (proN-cadherin) in most gliomas compared with normal brain tissues. Our findings reveal that GDNF interacts with the extracellular domain of proN-cadherin, which suggests that proN-cadherin mediates GDNF-induced glioma cell migration and invasion. We hypothesize that proN-cadherin might cause homotypic adhesion loss within neighboring cells and at the same time promote heterotypic adhesion within the extracellular matrix (ECM) through a certain mechanism. This study also demonstrates that the interaction between GDNF and proN-cadherin activates specific intracellular signaling pathways; furthermore, GDNF promoted the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the ECM via proN-cadherin. To reach the future goal of developing novel therapies of glioma, this study, reveals a unique mechanism of glioma cell migration and invasion.

  3. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, TA; Dias, AM; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, JM; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, CA; Pinho, SS

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell–cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  4. Inappropriate cadherin switching in the mouse epiblast compromises proper signaling between the epiblast and the extraembryonic ectoderm during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Basilicata, M. Felicia; Frank, Marcus; Solter, Davor; Brabletz, Thomas; Stemmler, Marc P.

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin switching from E-cadherin (E-cad) to N-cadherin (N-cad) is a key step of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes that occurs during gastrulation and cancer progression. We investigate whether cadherins actively participate in progression of EMT by crosstalk to signaling pathways. We apply ectopic cadherin switching before the onset of mouse gastrulation. Mutants with an induced E-cad to N-cad switch (Ncadki) die around E8.5. Severe morphological changes including a small epiblast, a rounded shape, an enlarged extra-embryonic compartment and lack of the amnion, combined with a massive cell detachment from the ectodermal layer are detected. In contrast to epiblast-specific E-cad depletion, gastrulation is initiated in Ncadki embryos, but patterning of the germ-layers is abnormal. An overall reduction in BMP signaling, expansion of Nodal and Eomes domains, combined with reduced Wnt3a expression at the primitive streak is observed. Our results show that in addition to cadherin-dependent adhesion, proper embryonic development requires E-cad mediated signaling function to facilitate a feedback loop that stabilizes Bmp4 and Bmp2 expression in the extraembryonic ectoderm and sustained downstream activity in the epiblast. Moreover, for proper morphogenesis a fine-tuned spatio-temporal control of cadherin switching is required during EMT at gastrulation to avoid premature cell detachment and migration. PMID:27217206

  5. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  6. A histochemical study of the posterior silk glands of Bombyx mori during metamorphosis from larvae to pupae using frozen sections.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, K; Kawamoto, T; Shiba, H; Hosono, K

    2014-02-01

    The fine structures of the whole bodies and the posterior silk glands of Bombyx mori during metamorphosis from larvae to pupae in the cocoon were preserved virtually without damage when frozen sections were prepared using an adhesive plastic film. We used frozen sections for histochemical and enzyme histochemistry to characterize the metamorphosis of the posterior silk glands. Frozen sections were stained with DAPI to observe nuclear changes, examined using the TUNEL method to detect DNA fragments, and investigated using in situ hybridization to detect B. mori caspase expression. Both DNA fragments and expression of B. mori caspase increased with progressing metamorphosis. The degeneration of the posterior silk gland during metamorphosis appears to be an apoptotic event.

  7. Transgenic characterization of two testis-specific promoters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Bi, H; Chen, R; Aslam, A F M; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; Huang, Y; Tan, A

    2015-04-01

    Sex-specific regulatory elements are key components for developing insect genetic sexing systems. The current insect genetic sexing system mainly uses a female-specific modification system whereas little success was reported on male-specific genetic modification. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, a lepidopteran model insect with economic importance, a transgene-based, female-specific lethality system has been established based on sex-specific alternative splicing factors and a female-specific promoter BmVgp (vitellogenin promoter) has been identified. However, no male-specific regulatory elements have yet been identified. Here we report the transgenic identification of two promoters that drive reporter gene expression in a testis-specific manner in B. mori. Putative promoter sequences from the B. mori Radial spoke head 1 gene (BmR1) and beta-tubulin 4 gene (Bmβ4) were introduced using piggybac-based germline transformation. In transgenic silkworms, expression of the reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) directed by either BmR1 promoter (BmR1p) or Bmβ4p showed precisely testis-specific manners from the larval to adult stage. Furthermore, EGFP expression of these two transgenic lines showed different localization in the testis, indicating that BmR1p or Bmβ4p might be used as distinct regulatory elements in directing testis-specific gene expression. Identification of these testis-specific promoters not only contributes to a better understanding of testis-specific gene function in insects, but also has potential applications in sterile insect techniques for pest management.

  8. Effects of BmCPV Infection on Silkworm Bombyx mori Intestinal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenli; Lu, Yahong; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Dhiraj; Liu, Bo; Gong, Yongchang; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Liyuan; Liang, Zi; Kuang, Sulan; Chen, Fei; Hu, Xiaolong; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has a crucial role in the growth, development and environmental adaptation in the host insect. The objective of our work was to investigate the microbiota of the healthy silkworm Bombyx mori gut and changes after the infection of B. mori cypovirus (BmCPV). Intestinal contents of the infected and healthy larvae of B. mori of fifth instar were collected at 24, 72 and 144 h post infection with BmCPV. The gut bacteria were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. 147(135) and 113(103) genera were found in the gut content of the healthy control female (male) larvae and BmCPV-infected female (male) larvae, respectively. In general, the microbial communities in the gut content of healthy larvae were dominated by Enterococcus, Delftia, Pelomonas, Ralstonia and Staphylococcus, however the abundance change of each genus was depended on the developmental stage and gender. Microbial diversity reached minimum at 144 h of fifth instar larvae. The abundance of Enterococcus in the females was substantially lower and the abundance of Delftia, Aurantimonas and Staphylococcus was substantially higher compared to the males. Bacterial diversity in the intestinal contents decreased after post infection with BmCPV, whereas the abundance of both Enterococcus and Staphylococcus which belongs to Gram-positive were increased. Therefore, our findings suggested that observed changes in relative abundance was related to the immune response of silkworm to BmCPV infection. Relevance analysis of plenty of the predominant genera showed the abundance of the Enterococcus genus was in negative correlation with the abundance of the most predominant genera. These results provided insight into the relationship between the gut microbiota and development of the BmCPV-infected silkworm.

  9. Genome-wide transcriptional response of silkworm (Bombyx mori) to infection by the microsporidian Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengang; Li, Chunfeng; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Zhihong; Han, Bing; Xu, Jinshan; Lan, Xiqian; Chen, Jie; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Quanmei; Sang, Qi; Ji, Xiaocun; Li, Tian; Long, Mengxian; Zhou, Zeyang

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidia have attracted much attention because they infect a variety of species ranging from protists to mammals, including immunocompromised patients with AIDS or cancer. Aside from the study on Nosema ceranae, few works have focused on elucidating the mechanism in host response to microsporidia infection. Nosema bombycis is a pathogen of silkworm pébrine that causes great economic losses to the silkworm industry. Detailed understanding of the host (Bombyx mori) response to infection by N. bombycis is helpful for prevention of this disease. A genome-wide survey of the gene expression profile at 2, 4, 6 and 8 days post-infection by N. bombycis was performed and results showed that 64, 244, 1,328, 1,887 genes were induced, respectively. Up to 124 genes, which are involved in basal metabolism pathways, were modulated. Notably, B. mori genes that play a role in juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism pathways were induced, suggesting that the host may accumulate JH as a response to infection. Interestingly, N. bombycis can inhibit the silkworm serine protease cascade melanization pathway in hemolymph, which may be due to the secretion of serpins in the microsporidia. N. bombycis also induced up-regulation of several cellular immune factors, in which CTL11 has been suggested to be involved in both spore recognition and immune signal transduction. Microarray and real-time PCR analysis indicated the activation of silkworm Toll and JAK/STAT pathways. The notable up-regulation of antimicrobial peptides, including gloverins, lebocins and moricins, strongly indicated that antimicrobial peptide defense mechanisms were triggered to resist the invasive microsporidia. An analysis of N. bombycis-specific response factors suggested their important roles in anti-microsporidia defense. Overall, this study primarily provides insight into the potential molecular mechanisms for the host-parasite interaction between B. mori and N. bombycis and may provide a foundation for

  10. Bombyx mori cecropin A has a high antifungal activity to entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dingding; Geng, Tao; Hou, Chengxiang; Huang, Yuxia; Qin, Guangxing; Guo, Xijie

    2016-05-25

    A cDNA encoding cecropin A (CecA) was cloned from the larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori, using RT-PCR. It encodes a protein of 63 amino acids, containing a 22 amino acid signal peptide and a 37 amino acid mat peptide of functional domain. The CecA secondary structure contains two typical amphiphilic α-helices. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that CecA was expressed in all the tissues tested, including cuticle, fat body, hemocytes, Malpighian tubule, midgut and silk gland in the silkworm larvae with the highest expression in the fat body and hemocytes. The gene expression of B. mori CecA was rapidly induced by Beauveria bassiana challenge and reached maximum levels at 36h after inoculation in third instar larvae. In the fifth instar larvae infected with B. bassiana, the relative expression level of CecA was upregulated in fat body and hemocytes, but not in cuticle, Malpighian tubule, midgut and silk gland. The cDNA segment of the CecA was inserted into the expression plasmid pET-30a(+) to construct a recombinant expression plasmid. Western blot results revealed that his-tagged fusion protein was successfully expressed and purified. Then the mat peptide of CecA was chemically synthesized with C-terminus amidation for in vivo antifungal assay and purity achieved 93.7%. Mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE showed its molecular weight to be 4046.95Da. Antifungal assays indicated that the B. mori CecA had a high antifungal activity to entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana both in vitro and in vivo in the silkworm larvae. This is the first report that the CecA is effective to inhibit B. bassiana inside the body of silkworm.

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Silkworm (Bombyx mori) to Infection by the Microsporidian Nosema bombycis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guoqing; Li, Zhihong; Han, Bing; Xu, Jinshan; Lan, Xiqian; Chen, Jie; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Quanmei; Sang, Qi; Ji, Xiaocun; Li, Tian; Long, Mengxian; Zhou, Zeyang

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidia have attracted much attention because they infect a variety of species ranging from protists to mammals, including immunocompromised patients with AIDS or cancer. Aside from the study on Nosema ceranae, few works have focused on elucidating the mechanism in host response to microsporidia infection. Nosema bombycis is a pathogen of silkworm pébrine that causes great economic losses to the silkworm industry. Detailed understanding of the host (Bombyx mori) response to infection by N. bombycis is helpful for prevention of this disease. A genome-wide survey of the gene expression profile at 2, 4, 6 and 8 days post-infection by N. bombycis was performed and results showed that 64, 244, 1,328, 1,887 genes were induced, respectively. Up to 124 genes, which are involved in basal metabolism pathways, were modulated. Notably, B. mori genes that play a role in juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism pathways were induced, suggesting that the host may accumulate JH as a response to infection. Interestingly, N. bombycis can inhibit the silkworm serine protease cascade melanization pathway in hemolymph, which may be due to the secretion of serpins in the microsporidia. N. bombycis also induced up-regulation of several cellular immune factors, in which CTL11 has been suggested to be involved in both spore recognition and immune signal transduction. Microarray and real-time PCR analysis indicated the activation of silkworm Toll and JAK/STAT pathways. The notable up-regulation of antimicrobial peptides, including gloverins, lebocins and moricins, strongly indicated that antimicrobial peptide defense mechanisms were triggered to resist the invasive microsporidia. An analysis of N. bombycis-specific response factors suggested their important roles in anti-microsporidia defense. Overall, this study primarily provides insight into the potential molecular mechanisms for the host-parasite interaction between B. mori and N. bombycis and may provide a foundation for

  12. A Hypothetical Model of Crossing Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus through Its Host Midgut Physical Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Wang, Xue-Yang; Hu, Hao; Killiny, Nabil; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a primary pathogen of silkworm (B. mori) that causes severe economic losses each year. However, the molecular mechanisms of silkworm-BmNPV interactions, especially the silkworm proteins that can interact with the virus, are still largely unknown. In this study, the total and membrane proteins of silkworm midguts were displayed using one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. A virus overlay assay was used to detect B. mori proteins that specifically bind to BmNPV particles. Twelve proteins were located and identified using mass spectrometry, and the different expression of the corresponding genes in BmNPV susceptible and resistant silkworm strains also indicated their involvement in BmNPV infection. The 12 proteins are grouped based on their potential roles in viral infection, for example, endocytosis, intracellular transportation, and host responses. Based on these results, we hypothesize the following: I) vacuolar ATP synthase catalytic subunit A and subunit B may be implicated in the process of the membrane fusion of virus and the release of the nucleocapsid into cytoplasm; II) actin, enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase are cytoskeleton associated proteins and may play an important role in BmNPV intracellular transportation; III) mitochondrial prohibitin complex protein 2, ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein, calreticulin, regucalcin-like isoform X1 and 60 kDa heat shock protein are involved in cell apoptosis regulation during BmNPV infection in larvae midguts; IV) ribosomal P0 may be associated with BmNPV infection by regulating gene expression of BmNPV; V) arginine kinase has a role in the antiviral activities against BmNPV. Our work should prove informative by providing multiple protein targets and a novel direction to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between silkworms and BmNPV. PMID:25502928

  13. Comparative Evaluation of β-Catenin and E-Cadherin Expression in Liquid Aspiration Biopsy Specimens of Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, A V; Zima, A P; Saprina, T V; Kasoyan, K T; Popov, O S; Brynova, O V; Berezkina, I S; Vasil'eva, O A; Ryazantseva, N V; Shabalova, I P; Litvinova, L S; Pak, Yu D; Novitskii, V V

    2016-06-01

    We compared the results of gene molecular and immunocytochemical studies of β-catenin and E-cadherin in different variants of nodular thyroid disease (nodular colloid goiter, follicular thyroid adenocarcinoma, papillary thyroid cancer) and revealed changes of the function of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex leading to switching from adhesion function of β-catenin in nodular colloid goiter to predominantly transcriptional activity in papillary carcinoma. The results confirm the important role of disturbances in E-cadherin-β-catenin interactions in the mechanisms of malignant transformation of follicular epithelium.

  14. Structural and thermal properties of γ – irradiated Bombyx mori silk fibroin films

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukumar, R.; Asha, S.; Rao, B. Lakshmeesha; Shivananda, C. S.; Harish, K. V.; Sangappa; Sarojini, B. K.; Somashekar, R.

    2015-06-24

    The gamma radiation-induced change in structural and thermal properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films were investigated and have been correlated with the applied radiation doses. Irradiation of samples were carried out in dry air at room temperature using Co-60 source, and radiation doses are in the range of 0 - 300 kGy. Structural and thermal properties of the irradiated silk films were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and compared with unirradiated sample. Interesting results are discussed in this report.

  15. Entry of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus into BmN cells by cholesterol-dependent macropinocytic endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinshan; Hao, Bifang; Cheng, Chen; Liang, Fei; Shen, Xingjia; Cheng, Xiaowen

    2014-10-10

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a serious viral pathogen of silkworm, and no drug or specific protection against BmNPV infection is available at present time. Although functions of most BmNPV genes were depicted in recent years, knowledge on the mechanism of BmNPV entry into insect cells is still limited. Here BmNPV cell entry mechanism is investigated by different endocytic inhibitor application and subcellular analysis. Results indicated that BmNPV enters BmN cells by clathrin-independent macropinocytic endocytosis, which is mediated by cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner, and cholesterol replenishment rescued the BmNPV infection partially.

  16. The chemical structure and the crystalline structures of Bombyx mori silk fibroin.

    PubMed

    Lotz, B; Colonna Cesari, F

    1979-01-01

    Some recent data (i.e. published in the last ten years) on the chemical and crystalline structures of B. mori silk are reviewed. The main emphasis is put on the crystallizable portion of silk fibroin, including its chemical constitution and its molecular conformation (at the crystallographic unit-cell level) in the two crystalline modifications : the beta pleated sheet and the silk I structures. The structural aspects are based on a discussion of X-ray and electron diffraction data, and on conformational energy analyses of a model (Ala-Gly)n polypeptide of silk fibroin.

  17. From genome to proteome: great progress in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhonghua; Yang, Huijuan; Zhong, Boxiong

    2008-07-01

    As the only truly domesticated insect, the silkworm not only has great economic value, but it also has value as a model for genetics and molecular biology research. Genomics and proteomics have recently shown vast potential to be essential tools in domesticated silkworm research, especially after the completion of the Bombyx mori genome sequence. This paper reviews the progress of the domesticated silkworm genome, particularly focusing on its genetic map, physical map and functional genome. This review also presents proteomics, the proteomic technique and its application in silkworm research.

  18. Zwanzig-Mori projection operators and EEG dynamics: deriving a simple equation of motion

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David; Hsu, Murielle

    2009-01-01

    We present a macroscopic theory of electroencephalogram (EEG) dynamics based on the laws of motion that govern atomic and molecular motion. The theory is an application of Zwanzig-Mori projection operators. The result is a simple equation of motion that has the form of a generalized Langevin equation (GLE), which requires knowledge only of macroscopic properties. The macroscopic properties can be extracted from experimental data by one of two possible variational principles. These variational principles are our principal contribution to the formalism. Potential applications are discussed, including applications to the theory of critical phenomena in the brain, Granger causality and Kalman filters. PACS code: 87.19.lj PMID:19594920

  19. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  20. Aquaporin 3 and E-Cadherin Expression in Perilesional Vitiligo Skin

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Magda Mostafa; Kandil, Mona Abd El Halim; Shehata, Wafaa Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vitiligo is a common dermatologic disorder with debated aetiology. Most studies focused on role of melanocytes and few investigated the role of keratinocytes in pathogenesis of the disease. Aim To investigate the keratinocyte adhesion in perilesional vitiligo skin through the immunolocalization of Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) and E-cadherin. Setting and Design Sixty five subjects were selected. These included 40 cases with vitiligo and 25 age and gender-matched healthy subjects as a control group. Materials and Methods Skin biopsies were taken from perilesional skin of cases and from site-matched areas of control subjects. The expression of AQP3 and E-cadherin was evaluated by immunohistochemical techniques. Statistical Analysis Results were statistically analysed using IBM personal computer and the statistical package SPSS version 11. Fisher-exact and Chi-square tests were used to study the association between two qualitative variables. Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison between quantitative variables not normally distributed. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to assess correlation between two quantitative variables. The p≤0.05 was considered significant. Results Regarding AQP3 expression, strong intensity, diffuse distribution, higher percent of expression and higher H-score (p<0.001 for all) were significantly associated with control skin compared with perilesional skin in follicular and inter-follicular epidermis. Regarding E-cadherin expression, moderate intensity, higher percent of expression and higher H- score (p<0.001 for all) were significantly associated with control skin compared with perilesional skin in follicular and inter-follicular epidermis. No significant association was found between E-cadherin and AQP3 H-scores or percent of expression and clinical data of selected cases. No significant correlation was detected between E-cadherin and AQP3 H-scores or percent of expression and age of cases, disease duration or Vitiligo

  1. Isozymic variations in specific and nonspecific esterase and its thermostability in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Biswas, Tapati Datta; Nayak, Sandeepta Kumar; Saha, A K; Majumdar, M K

    2012-09-01

    Esterase isozymic variations were documented in the haemolymph of developed multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm breeds during unfavorable seed crop seasons of May - September using á- and â- napthylacetate separately to identify specific and nonspecific esterase having thermotolerant potentiality. Variations existed in the isozyme pattern with three bands (Est-2, 3 and 4) in pure Nistari race and other developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds. Est-2 and Est-3 were non-specific esterases as they were observed when both á- and â-napthylacetate was used as substrates separately. Est-4 band was observed only with á-napthylacetate as substrate and was therefore confirmed to be specific á-esterase band in the haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Zymograms showed that the non-specific esterase band (Est-3) with R1 of 0.43 and specific á-esterase band (Est-4) with R(f) of 0.32 predominately withstood a temperature of 70 +/- 2 degrees C for a duration of 10 min and were confirmed as thermostable esterases in haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. This also categorized the presence of thermostable esterases in developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds of silkworm, even though the qualitative activity was more in the former than the latter. The qualitative presence of thermostable esterases and their activity could be adopted as an indicative biochemical marker in relation to thermotolerance in silkworm.

  2. Vertebrate estrogen regulates the development of female characteristics in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanwang; Lin, Ying; Yang, Congwen; Xing, Runmiao; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Enxiang; Han, Chaoshan; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Weiwei; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate estrogens include 17-β-estradiol (E2), which has an analog in silkworm ovaries. In this study, the Bombyx mori vitellogenin gene (BmVg) was used as a biomarker to analyze the function of the E2 in silkworm. In most oviparous animals, Vg has female-specific expression. However, BmVg expression was also detected in B. mori males. Stage specific fluctuation of BmVg expression was similar in males and females, but expression levels in males were lower than in females. E2 treatment by injection or feeding of male larvae in the final instar stage induced and stimulated male BmVg transcription and protein synthesis. When silkworm ovary primordia were transplanted into males, BmVg was induced in male fat bodies. Transplanted ovaries primordia were also able to develop into ovaries and produce mature eggs. When females were treated with E2 promoted BmVg/BmVn protein accumulation in hemolymph, ovaries and eggs. However, BmVg transcription was decreased in female fat bodies. An E2 analog was identified in the hemolymph of day 3 wandering silkworms using high-performance liquid chromatography. Estradiol titers from fifth late-instar larvae to pupal stage were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results suggested that silkworms synthesized a vertebrate E2 analog. This study found that E2 promoted the synthesis of BmVg, a female typical protein in silkworms.

  3. Identification and Analysis of the SET-Domain Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailong; Zheng, Chunqin; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    As an important economic insect, Bombyx mori is also a useful model organism for lepidopteran insect. SET-domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET-domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various nonhistone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. To explore their diverse functions of SET-domain superfamily in insect, we identified, cloned, and analyzed the SET-domains proteins in silkworm, Bombyx mori. Firstly, 24 genes containing SET domain from silkworm genome were characterized and 17 of them belonged to six subfamilies of SUV39, SET1, SET2, SUV4-20, EZ, and SMYD. Secondly, SET domains of silkworm SET-domain family were intraspecifically and interspecifically conserved, especially for the catalytic core "NHSC" motif, substrate binding site, and catalytic site in the SET domain. Lastly, further analyses indicated that silkworm SET-domain gene BmSu(var)3-9 owned different characterization and expression profiles compared to other invertebrates. Overall, our results provide a new insight into the functional and evolutionary features of SET-domain family.

  4. New insight into the mechanism underlying fibroin secretion in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Qing; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of different parts of the fibroin heavy chain (H-chain) in the secretion of fibroin in the silk gland of the silkworm (Bombyx mori) in vivo, two enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)/H-chain fusion genes with deduced protein sequences containing an identical N-terminal region and different C-terminal regions of the H-chain were introduced into the B. mori genome using a piggyBac-mediated germline transformation. EGFP fluorescence and molecular analysis showed the products of two different EGFP/H-chain fusion proteins were secreted into the posterior silk gland lumen and aggregated in the middle silk gland and spun into cocoons. The results revealed that only the non-repetitive N terminus of the H-chain is essential for secretion of the H-chain into the posterior silk gland lumen. In addition, our results also indicated that the most likely post-translational modification of the H-chain is at the C-terminal domain. Here, our results not only provide a theoretical basis for the genetic modification of silk fiber as a functional biomaterial but also are of great significance to establishing a new silk gland bioreactor to mass-produce exogenous proteins in an active form.

  5. Identification and characterization of a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate phosphatase in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Han, CaiYun; Ma, ZhenQiao; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B6 comprises six interconvertible pyridine compounds, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. PLP is also a very reactive aldehyde. The most well established mechanism for maintaining low levels of free PLP is its dephosphorylation by phosphatases. A human PLP-specific phosphatase has been identified and characterized. However, very little is known about the phosphatase in other living organisms. In this study, a cDNA clone of putative PLP phosphatase was identified from B. mori and characterized. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 343 amino acid residues, and the recombinant enzyme purified from E. coli exhibited properties similar to that of human PLP phosphatase. B. mori has a single copy of the PLPP gene, which is located on 11th chromosome, spans a 5.7kb region and contains five exons and four introns. PLP phosphatase transcript was detected in every larva tissue except hemolymph, and was most highly represented in Malpighian tube. We further down-regulated the gene expression of the PLP phosphatase in 5th instar larvae with the RNA interference. However, no significant changes in the gene expression of PLP biosynthetic enzymes and composition of B6 vitamers were detected as compared with the control.

  6. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR Bmsage PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN SILK GLAND GENERATION IN SILKWORM, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hu-hu; Zhang, Deng-pan; Chen, Rui-ting; Cai, Zi-zheng; Lu, Yan; Liang, Shuang; Miao, Yun-gen

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland secretion is altered in Drosophila embryos with loss of function of the sage gene. Saliva has a reduced volume and an increased electron density according to transmission electron microscopy, resulting in regions of tube dilation and constriction with intermittent tube closure. However, the precise functions of Bmsage in silkworm (Bombyx mori) are unknown, although its sequence had been deposited in SilkDB. From this, Bmsage is inferred to be a transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of silk fibroin and interacts with another silk gland-specific transcription factor, namely, silk gland factor-1. In this study, we introduced a germline mutation of Bmsage using the Cas9/sgRNA system, a genome-editing technology, resulting in deletion of Bmsage from the genome of B. mori. Of the 15 tested samples, seven displayed alterations at the target site. The mutagenesis efficiency was about 46.7% and there were no obvious off-target effects. In the screened homozygous mutants, silk glands developed poorly and the middle and posterior silk glands (MSG and PSG) were absent, which was significantly different from the wild type. The offspring of G0 mosaic silkworms had indel mutations causing 2- or 9-bp deletions at the target site, but exhibited the same abnormal silk gland structure. Mutant larvae containing different open-reading frames of Bmsage had the same silk gland phenotype. This illustrated that the mutant phenotype was due to Bmsage knockout. We conclude that Bmsage participates in embryonic development of the silk gland.

  7. Identification and Molecular Characterization of a Chitin Deacetylase from Bombyx mori Peritrophic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Huan; Tan, Xiang; Xia, Qing-You; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Zhao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The insect midgut epithelium is generally lined with a unique chitin and protein structure, the peritrophic membrane (PM), which facilitates food digestion and protects the gut epithelium. PM proteins are important determinants for PM structure and formation. In this study, the silkworm Bombyx mori midgut PM protein BmCDA7 was identified by proteomic tools. The full-length BmCDA7 cDNA is 1357 bp; the deduced protein is composed of 379 amino acid residues and includes a 16 amino acid residue signal peptide, a putative polysaccharide deacetylase-like domain and 15 cysteine residues present in three clusters. The heterologously expressed proteins of the BmCDA7 gene in yeast displayed chitin deacetylase activity. Expression of B. mori BmCDA7 was detected in the midgut at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The BmCDA7 gene was expressed by the newly hatched silkworm larvae until day seven of the fifth instar and was expressed at a high level in the newly exuviated larvae of different instars. The functions and regulatory mechanism of BmCDA7, however, need further investigation. PMID:24473143

  8. Peptidomic Analysis of the Brain and Corpora Cardiaca-Corpora Allata Complex in the Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Ning, Xia; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Wenfeng; Zhao, Zhangwu; Zhang, Qingwen

    2012-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is an important economic insect for silk production. However, many of the mature peptides relevant to its various life stages remain unknown. Using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, and previously identified peptides from B. mori and other insects in the transcriptome database, we created peptide profiles showing a total of 6 ion masses that could be assigned to peptides in eggs, including one previously unidentified peptide. A further 49 peptides were assigned to larval brains. 17 new mature peptides were identified in isolated masses. 39 peptides were found in pupal brains with 8 unidentified peptides. 48 were found in adult brains with 12 unidentified peptides. These new unidentified peptides showed highly significant matches in all MS analysis. These matches were then searched against the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database to provide new annotations for these mature peptides. In total, 59 mature peptides in 19 categories were found in the brains of silkworms at the larval, pupal, and adult stages. These results demonstrate that peptidomic variation across different developmental stages can be dramatic. Moreover, the corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (CC-CA) complex was examined during the fifth larval instar. A total of 41 ion masses were assigned to peptides. PMID:23316247

  9. High-level expression of canine parvovirus VP2 using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Woo, S D; Lee, H K; Hong, H K; Je, Y H; Park, J H; Song, J Y; An, S H; Kang, S K

    2000-01-01

    For the potential use as recombinant vaccine, canine parvovirus (CPV) major capsid protein VP2 was expressed using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) vector. CPV VP2 gene was introduced into polyhedrin-based BmNPV transfer vector pBmKSK3, and recombinant virus BmK1-Parvo was prepared. When anti-CPV.VP2 monoclonal antibody was employed in immunofluorescence staining, an intense signal was observed within BmK1-Parvo-infected Bm5 cells but not within uninfected cells or cells infected with a wild-type BmNPV-K1. In hemagglutination assay, the expression level of VP2 were 3.2 x 10(3) HA units/ml from infected Bm5 cells, 2.1x 10(5) HA units/larvae from infected larval fat body, and 1.6x 10(6) HA units/ml from infected larval hemolymph. These results suggested that BmNPV vector system using B. mori larva as host could be applied to efficient mass-production of recombinant vaccines.

  10. Transcriptional analysis of the DNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Jie; Chen, Ke-Ping; Yao, Qin; Han, Xu

    2007-04-01

    The Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate) DNA polymerase (BmDNV-3 dnapol) gene has been tentatively identified based on the presence of conserved motifs. In the present study, we perform a transcriptional analysis of the BmDNV-3 dnapol gene using the total RNA isolated from BmDNV-3 infected silkworm at different times. Northern blot analysis with a BmDNV-3 dnapol-specific riboprobe showed a major transcript of 3.3 kb. 5'-RACE revealed that the major transcription start point was located 20 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box. In a temporal expression analysis using differential RT-PCR, BmDNV-3 dnapol transcript was detected at low levels at 6 h.p.i., increased from 6 to 36 h.p.i., and remained fairly constant thereafter. Analysis of the predicted DNA polymerase sequence using neighborjoining and protein parsimony algorithms indicated that the predicted 1115-residue polypeptide contained five motifs associated with DNA polymerases synthetic activities and three additional motifs associated with polymerases possessing 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. The molecular phylogenetic analysis of this gene supported the placement of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus in a separate virus family.

  11. Rectal sac distention is induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone in the pupa of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takumi; Sakurai, Sho; Iwami, Masafumi

    2009-03-01

    Holometabolous insects do not excrete but store metabolic wastes during the pupal period. The waste is called meconium and is purged after adult emergence. Although the contents of meconium are well-studied, the developmental and physiological regulation of meconium accumulation is poorly understood. In Bombyx mori, meconium is accumulated in the rectal sac; thereby, the rectal sac distends at the late pupal stage. Here, we show that rectal sac distention occurs between 4 and 5 days after pupation. The distention is halted by brain-removal just after larval-pupal ecdysis but not by brain-removal 1 day after pupation. In the pupae, brain-removal just after ecdysis kept the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer low during early and mid-pupal stages. An injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) evoked the distention that was halted by brain-removal in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, brain-removal caused the lack of ecdysteroid, and rectal sac distention did not appear in the brain-removed pupae because of the lack of ecdysteroid. We conclude that rectal sac distention is one of the developmental events regulated by 20E during the pupal period in B. mori.

  12. Thiol peroxiredoxin, a novel allergen from Bombyx mori, modulates functions of macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Hu, Wei; Liang, Zhiling; zeng, Lu; Li, Jianjie; Yan, Hao; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Lianglu

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori (B.mori, also known as silkworm) plays a role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. However, its allergens are to be characterized. The aim of this paper is to identify new silkworm allergens. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry were employed to separate and identify potential allergens from silkworm pupa. Six potential allergens were identified in this study. Thiol peroxiredoxin (TP), one of the 6 allergens, reacted to serum IgE from patients sensitized to silkworm. By sensitizing with TP allergic asthma like symptoms were induced in mice, including elevation of the levels of serum IgE, IL-4 from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and culture supernatant of spleen cells. In vitro experiments showed that TP significantly induced RAW264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) apoptosis via modulating the BCL2 and Caspase9 pathways. The levels of CD80, CD40, CD83 and TNF-α in DC2.4 cells (a dendritic cell line) were increased in the culture after exposure to TP. In summary, TP is an allergic component of silkworm. It induces allergic asthma, and modulates the functions of macrophages and dendritic cells. PMID:28078005

  13. Production of Bombyx mori silk fibroin incorporated with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Katsura

    2014-07-14

    Silk fibroin incorporated with unnatural amino acids was produced by in vivo feeding of p-chloro-, p-bromo-, and p-azido-substituted analogues of L-phenylalanine (Phe) to transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori) that expressed a mutant of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase with expanded substrate recognition capabilities in silk glands. Cutting down the content of Phe in the diet was effective for increasing the incorporation of Phe analogues but simultaneously caused a decrease of fibroin production. The azide groups incorporated in fibroin were active as chemical handles for click chemistry in both the solubilized and the solid (fibrous) states. The azides survived degumming in the boiling alkaline solution that is required for complete removal of the sericin layer, demonstrating that AzPhe-incorporated silk fibroin could be a versatile platform to produce "clickable" silk materials in various forms. This study indicates the huge potential of UAA mutagenesis as a novel methodology to alter the characteristics of B. mori silk.

  14. Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2013-07-14

    Fruits rich in phytochemicals have been shown to improve memory by protecting or enhancing neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), in the hippocampus. Mori Fructus (Morus alba L., Moraceae), also called mulberry, is used as a food, dietary supplement and an anti-ageing agent in traditional Oriental medicine. It is also known to contain abundant flavonoid compounds and to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus extract (ME) in mice, with a focus on NGF regulation. ME (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg per d for 7 d, per os) dose-dependently promoted NGF release in the mouse hippocampus, leading to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. ME significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation, acetylcholine synthesisation, neuronal cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, ME significantly increased latency time in the passive avoidance task (P< 0·001) and recognition time of novel objects in the object recognition test (P< 0·05), indicating improvements in learning and memory. Taken together, these data suggest that ME exhibits a memory-enhancing effect via up-regulation of NGF.

  15. Comparing the microstructure and mechanical properties of Bombyx mori and Antheraea pernyi cocoon composites.

    PubMed

    Guan, Juan; Zhu, Wenshu; Liu, Binghe; Yang, Kang; Vollrath, Fritz; Xu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Silkworm cocoon material is a natural composite consisting of silk fibres and sericin glues. Both domestic and wild silkworms produce cocoons but with different functionality - one selected by man for textile manufacture whereas the other selected by Nature to provide damage-tolerant housing. To understand the structure--property relationship of cocoons, we evaluated and compared the microstructure and mechanical properties of two representative cocoon walls. It appears that a "brittle and weak" composite is produced by domestic Bombyx mori (B. mori) while a "tough and strong" composite is made by wild Antheraea pernyi (A. pernyi). The superior mechanical performance of A. pernyi cocoons can be attributed to both the material properties and the fibre network microstructures. Failure mechanisms and different failure modes for cocoon fibre composites were also proposed. A finite element model revealed qualitatively the effect of fibre properties and inter-fibre bonding strength on the mechanical properties of the fibre network. It emerged that both good mechanical properties of fibres and robust inter-fibre bonding were required for tough and strong fibre composites. The new insights could inspire new designs of synthetic fibre composites with enhanced mechanical properties.

  16. Vibrational infrared conformational studies of model peptides representing the semicrystalline domains of Bombyx mori silk fibroin.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Paola; Monti, Patrizia

    2005-08-05

    The structural organization of Bombyx mori silk fibroin was investigated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. To this aim, (AG)15 and other model peptides of varying chain length, containing tyrosine (Y), valine (V), and serine (S) in the basic (AG)n sequence were synthesized by the solid phase method and their spectroscopic properties were determined. Both the position and the relative content of Y, V, and S residues in the (AG)n model system appeared critical in determining the preferred conformation, i.e., silk I, silk II, and unordered structures. Curve fitting analysis in the amide I range showed that the model peptides with prevailing silk II structure displayed different beta-sheet content, which was dependent on the degree of interruption of the (AG)n sequence. In this regard, the bands at about 1000 and 980 cm(-1), specifically assigned to the AG sequence of the B. mori silk fibroin chain, were identified as marker of the degree of interruption of the (AG)n sequence.A stable silk I structure was observed only when the Y residue was located near the chain terminus, while a silk I --> silk II conformational transition occurred when it was positioned in the central region of the peptide. Analysis of the second-derivative spectra in the amide I range allowed us to identify a band at 1639 cm(-1) (4 --> 1 hydrogen-bonded type II beta-turns), which is characteristic of the silk I conformation.

  17. Heritable genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xin, Huhu; Roy, Bhaskar; Dai, Junbiao; Miao, Yungen; Gao, Guanjun

    2014-01-01

    We report the establishment of an efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis method in the silkworm Bombyx mori using modified type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with an associated protein (Cas9) system. Using four loci Bm-ok, BmKMO, BmTH, and Bmtan as candidates, we proved that genome alterations at specific sites could be induced by direct microinjection of specific guide RNA and Cas9-mRNA into silkworm embryos. Mutation frequencies of 16.7-35.0% were observed in the injected generation, and DNA fragments deletions were also noted. Bm-ok mosaic mutants were used to test for mutant heritability due to the easily determined translucent epidermal phenotype of Bm-ok-disrupted cells. Two crossing strategies were used. In the first, injected Bm-ok moths were crossed with wild-type moths, and a 28.6% frequency of germline mutation transmission was observed. In the second strategy, two Bm-ok mosaic mutant moths were crossed with each other, and 93.6% of the offsprings appeared mutations in both alleles of Bm-ok gene (compound heterozygous). In summary, the CRISPR/Cas9 system can act as a highly specific and heritable gene-editing tool in Bombyx mori.

  18. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Multi-Layer Cocoon of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhaoming; Wang, Dandan; Guo, Pengchao; Guo, Xiaomeng; Song, Qianru; Zhang, Weiwei; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori cocoon has a multi-layer structure that provides optimal protection for silkworm pupa. Research on the mechanical properties of the multi-layer structure revealed structure-property relationships of the cocoon. Here, we investigated the protein components of the B. mori cocoon in terms of its multi-layer structure. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 286 proteins from the multiple cocoon layers. In addition to fibroins and sericins, we identified abundant protease inhibitors, seroins and proteins of unknown function. By comparing protein abundance across layers, we found that the outermost layer contained more sericin1 and protease inhibitors and the innermost layer had more seroin1. As many as 36 protease inhibitors were identified in cocoons, showing efficient inhibitory activities against a fungal protease. Thus, we propose that more abundant protease inhibitors in the outer cocoon layers may provide better protection for the cocoon. This study increases our understanding of the multi-layer mechanism of cocoons, and helps clarify the biological characteristics of cocoons. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001469. PMID:25860555

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of a chitin deacetylase from Bombyx mori peritrophic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Huan; Tan, Xiang; Xia, Qing-You; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Zhao, Ping

    2014-01-27

    The insect midgut epithelium is generally lined with a unique chitin and protein structure, the peritrophic membrane (PM), which facilitates food digestion and protects the gut epithelium. PM proteins are important determinants for PM structure and formation. In this study, the silkworm Bombyx mori midgut PM protein BmCDA7 was identified by proteomic tools. The full-length BmCDA7 cDNA is 1357 bp; the deduced protein is composed of 379 amino acid residues and includes a 16 amino acid residue signal peptide, a putative polysaccharide deacetylase-like domain and 15 cysteine residues present in three clusters. The heterologously expressed proteins of the BmCDA7 gene in yeast displayed chitin deacetylase activity. Expression of B. mori BmCDA7 was detected in the midgut at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The BmCDA7 gene was expressed by the newly hatched silkworm larvae until day seven of the fifth instar and was expressed at a high level in the newly exuviated larvae of different instars. The functions and regulatory mechanism of BmCDA7, however, need further investigation.

  20. Fine Mapping of a Degenerated Abdominal Legs Mutant (Edl) in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meijing; Hu, Hai; Li, Zhiquan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Dai, Fangyin; Lu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In insects, abdominal appendages, also called prolegs, vary due to adaptive evolution. Mutations on prolegs within species provide insights to better understand the mechanisms underlying appendage development and diversity. In silkworm Bombyx mori, extra-crescents and degenerated abdominal legs (Edl) mutant, belonging to the E pseudoallele group, is a spontaneous mutation that adds crescents and degenerates prolegs on the third abdominal segment (A3). This mutation may be a homeotic transformation of A3 to A2. In this study, the Edl locus was mapped within approximately a 211 Kb region that is 10 Kb upstream of Bmabdominal-A (Bmabd-A). RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and Western blot analysis of Bmabd-A expression showed a slight but significant decrease, while the expression of BmUltrabithorax (BmUbx) was up-regulated in the Edl mutant compared to wildtype (Dazao). Moreover, we also found that BmDistal-less (BmDll), which regulated the development of distal proleg structures, was missing at the tips of the A3 prolegs in the Edl mutant compared to BmDll expression in normally developed prolegs in both the wildtype and mutant. Collectively, we identified approximately a 211 Kb region in the Edl locus that regulates BmUbx and Bmabd-A expression and found that changes in BmUbx and Bmabd-A expression may lead to the loss of distal proleg structures in B. mori. PMID:28081147

  1. Disintegrin Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 Regulates Endothelial Permeability and T Cell Transmigration by Proteolysis of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Beate; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Maretzky, Thorsten; Ludwig, Andreas; Blobel, Carl P.; Saftig, Paul; Reiss, Karina

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is the major adhesion molecule of endothelial adherens junctions. It plays an essential role in controlling endothelial permeability, vascular integrity, leukocyte transmigration, and angiogenesis. Elevated levels of soluble VE-cadherin are associated with diseases like coronary atherosclerosis. Previous data showed that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin is released by an unknown metalloprotease activity during apoptosis. In this study, we used gain of function analyses, inhibitor studies and RNA interference experiments to analyze the proteolytic release of VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that VE-cadherin is specifically cleaved by the disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM10 in its ectodomain releasing a soluble fragment and generating a carboxyterminal membrane bound stub, which is a substrate for a subsequent γ-secretase cleavage. This ADAM10-mediated proteolysis could be induced by Ca2+-influx and staurosporine treatment, indicating that ADAM10-mediated VE-cadherin cleavage contributes to the dissolution of adherens junctions during endothelial cell activation and apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, protein kinase C activation or inhibition did not modulate VE-cadherin processing. Increased ADAM10 expression was functionally associated with an increase in endothelial permeability. Remarkably, our data indicate that ADAM10 activity also contributes to the thrombin-induced decrease of endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Moreover, knockdown of ADAM10 in HUVECs as well as in T cells by small interfering RNA impaired T cell transmigration. Taken together our data identify ADAM10 as a novel regulator of vascular permeability and demonstrate a hitherto unknown function of ADAM10 in the regulation of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial cell functions and leukocyte transendothelial migration. PMID:18420943

  2. VE-cadherin trans-interactions modulate Rac activation and enhancement of lung endothelial barrier by iloprost.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Tian, Yufeng; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Zebda, Noureddine; Sarich, Nicolene; Tian, Xinyong; Wang, Yingxiao; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2012-10-01

    Small GTPase Rac is important regulator of endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement by prostacyclin characterized by increased peripheral actin cytoskeleton and increased interactions between VE-cadherin and other adherens junction (AJ) proteins. This study utilized complementary approaches including siRNA knockdown, culturing in Ca(2+) -free medium, and VE-cadherin blocking antibody to alter VE-cadherin extracellular interactions to investigate the role of VE-cadherin outside-in signaling in modulation of Rac activation and EC barrier regulation by prostacyclin analog iloprost. Spatial analysis of Rac activation in pulmonary EC by FRET revealed additional spike in iloprost-induced Rac activity at the sites of newly formed cell-cell junctions. In contrast, disruption of VE-cadherin extracellular trans-interactions suppressed iloprost-activated Rac signaling and attenuated EC barrier enhancement and cytoskeletal remodeling. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased membrane accumulation and activation of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Tiam1 and Vav2. Conversely, plating of pulmonary EC on surfaces coated with extracellular VE-cadherin domain further promoted iloprost-induced Rac signaling. In the model of thrombin-induced EC barrier recovery, blocking of VE-cadherin trans-interactions attenuated activation of Rac pathway during recovery phase and delayed suppression of Rho signaling and restoration of EC barrier properties. These results suggest that VE-cadherin outside-in signaling controls locally Rac activity stimulated by barrier protective agonists. This control is essential for maximal EC barrier enhancement and accelerated barrier recovery.

  3. Plakoglobin Reduces the in vitro Growth, Migration and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing N-Cadherin and Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, Mahsa; Danesh, Ghazal; Pasdar, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cadherins and catenins plays pivotal roles in ovarian cancer development and progression. Plakoglobin (PG, γ-catenin) is a paralog of β-catenin with dual adhesive and signaling functions. While β-catenin has known oncogenic function, PG generally acts as a tumor/metastasis suppressor. We recently showed that PG interacted with p53 and that its growth/metastasis inhibitory function may be mediated by this interaction. Very little is known about the role of PG in ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the in vitro tumor/metastasis suppressor effects of PG in ovarian cancer cell lines with mutant p53 expression and different cadherin profiles. We showed that the N-cadherin expressing and E-cadherin and PG deficient ES-2 cells were highly migratory and invasive, whereas OV-90 cells that express E-cadherin, PG and very little/no N-cadherin were not. Exogenous expression of PG or E-cadherin or N-cadherin knockdown in ES-2 cells (ES-2-E-cad, ES-2-PG and ES-2-shN-cad) significantly reduced their migration and invasion. Also, PG expression or N-cadherin knockdown significantly decreased ES-2 cells growth. Furthermore, PG interacted with both cadherins and with wild type and mutant p53 in normal ovarian and ES-2-PG cell lines, respectively. PMID:27144941

  4. N-cadherin regulates beta-catenin signal and its misexpression perturbs commissural axon projection in the developing chicken spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ciqing; Li, Xiaoying; Wang, Congrui; Fu, Sulei; Li, Han; Guo, Zhikun; Zhao, Shanting; Lin, Juntang

    2016-12-01

    N-cadherin is a calcium-sensitive cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in the formation of the neural circuit and the development of the nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the function of N-cadherin in cell-cell connection in vitro with HEK293T cells, and in commissural axon projections in the developing chicken spinal cord using in ovo electroporation. Cell-cell connections increased with N-cadherin overexpression in HEK293T cells, while cell contacts disappeared after co-transfection with an N-cadherin-shRNA plasmid. The knockdown of N-cadherin caused the accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus, supporting the notion that N-cadherin regulates β-catenin signaling in vitro. Furthermore, N-cadherin misexpression perturbed commissural axon projections in the spinal cord. The overexpression of N-cadherin reduced the number of axons that projected alongside the contralateral margin of the floor plate, and formed intermediate longitudinal commissural axons. In contrast, the knockdown of N-cadherin perturbed commissural axon projections significantly, affecting the projections alongside the contralateral margin of the floor plate, but did not affect intermediate longitudinal commissural axons. Taken together, these findings suggest that N-cadherin regulates commissural axon projections in the developing chicken spinal cord.

  5. Modulation of N-cadherin junctions and their role as epicenters of differentiation-specific actin regulation in the developing lens.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michelle; Zhang, Liping; Zhai, Ni; Cader, Ahmad; Chan, Yim; Nowak, Roberta B; Fowler, Velia M; Menko, A Sue

    2011-01-15

    Extensive elongation of lens fiber cells is a central feature of lens morphogenesis. Our study investigates the role of N-cadherin junctions in this process in vivo. We investigate both the molecular players involved in N-cadherin junctional maturation and the subsequent function of these junctions as epicenters for the assembly of an actin cytoskeleton that drives morphogenesis. We present the first evidence of nascent cadherin junctions in vivo, and show that they are a prominent feature along lateral interfaces of undifferentiated lens epithelial cells. Maturation of these N-cadherin junctions, required for lens cell differentiation, preceded organization of a cortical actin cytoskeleton along the cells' lateral borders, but was linked to recruitment of α-catenin and dephosphorylation of N-cadherin-linked β-catenin. Biochemical analysis revealed differentiation-specific recruitment of actin regulators cortactin and Arp3 to maturing N-cadherin junctions of differentiating cells, linking N-cadherin junctional maturation with actin cytoskeletal assembly during fiber cell elongation. Blocking formation of mature N-cadherin junctions led to reduced association of α-catenin with N-cadherin, prevented organization of actin along lateral borders of differentiating lens fiber cells and blocked their elongation. These studies provide a molecular link between N-cadherin junctions and the organization of an actin cytoskeleton that governs lens fiber cell morphogenesis in vivo.

  6. An aberrant nuclear localization of E-cadherin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin-elicited promotion of the cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y-J; Chang, Y-W; Lin, W-H; Liang, C-L; Lee, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that Wnt signaling contributes to reprogramming and maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC) states activated by loss of membranous E-cadherin expression. However, E-cadherin's exact role in Wnt/β-catenin-mediated promotion of the CSC phenotype remains unclear. Recently, a significant positive correlation has been observed between the expression of nuclear (an aberrant nuclear localization) E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric and colorectal carcinomas. Here we conducted a series of in-vitro and in-vivo studies to show that the β-catenin/TCF4 interaction was abolished by E-cadherin and was correlated with its nuclear localization, and consequently decreased β-catenin/TCF4 transcriptional activity. Nuclear E-cadherin was a negative regulator of Wnt/β-Catenin-elicited promotion of the CSC phenotype. Using immunohistochemistry on lung cancer tissue microarrays, we found that changes in subcellular location of E-cadherin may be described by tumor grade and stage, suggesting cellular redistribution during lung tumorigenesis. Furthermore, nuclear E-cadherin expression was more significantly inversely correlated with CD133 (a lung CSC marker) expression (P<0.005) than total E-cadherin expression (P<0.05), suggesting that lung cancer as defined by nuclear E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High biomarkers has superior prognostic value over total E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High. PMID:26075748

  7. Activated macrophages down-regulate expression of E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via NF-κB/Slug pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianteng; Wang, Hao; Li, Guosheng; Song, Yonghong; Wang, Shurong; Zhu, Faliang; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2014-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas are an aggressive malignancy mainly due to metastasis or postsurgical recurrence. Expression of E-cadherin is strongly reduced in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and its downregulation is connected to invasiveness and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinomas. The previous study showed that the supernatant from activated macrophages can downregulate the expression of E-cadherin in HCC cells. The partial known molecular mechanism is that tyrosine kinases c-Src- and EGFR phosphorylate β-catenin and E-cadherin leading to destabilization of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex. The aim of this study is to clarify other mechanism by which activated macrophages downregulate the expression of E-cadherin. We detect the expression of E-cadherin and macrophage infiltration in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues by double-staining immunohistochemistry and evaluate the relationship between macrophages and E-cadherin expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro experiments. We found that reduced expression of E-cadherin was associated with macrophage infiltration along the border between the tumor nest and stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Besides, protein expression of E-cadherin was significantly decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma cells co-cultured with macrophages derived from THP-1 cells. Consistently, mRNA expression of E-cadherin was also decreased in cancer cells co-cultured with THP-1-differentiated macrophages. Moreover, the downregulation of E-cadherin expression was companied by upregulation of Slug expression in cancer cells with conditional medium from THP-1-differentiated macrophage culture. The change in expression of E-cadherin and Slug was abrogated when NF-κB signaling pathway was blocked. All the findings suggested that macrophages contributed to the decreased expression of E-cadherin by NF-κB/Slug pathway in hepatocellular carcinomas.

  8. Cadherin-integrated liposomes with potential application in a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koki; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2011-12-01

    N-cadherin (CDH2) proteins were reconstituted with liposomes using a baculovirus expression-liposome fusion method. CDH2 budded viruses were fused with giant liposomes containing dioleoylphophogycerol/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPG/DOPC) at pH 4.5 and the localization of CDH2 on the liposome membrane was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. CDH2 liposomes showed Ca(2+)-dependent association. CDH2-mediated association/dissociation in CDH2 liposomes was specific to Ca(2+) and reversible. CDH2-expressing LN-229 cells (human glioblastoma cell) adhered to CDH2 liposomes and small CDH2 liposomes (diameter approximately 150 nm), in particular, were internalized by endocytosis and partly escaped endosomes. Cadherin-containing liposomes show high potential as a new cell-specific proteoliposome. The baculovirus expression-liposome fusion method is useful as a new enabling technology for biomedical applications of functional proteoliposomes.

  9. Asymmetric homotypic interactions of the atypical cadherin flamingo mediate intercellular polarity signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Antic, Dragana; Matis, Maja; Logan, Catriona Y; Povelones, Michael; Anderson, Graham A; Nusse, Roel; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-13

    Acquisition of planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelia involves intercellular communication, during which cells align their polarity with that of their neighbors. The transmembrane proteins Frizzled (Fz) and Van Gogh (Vang) are essential components of the intercellular communication mechanism, as loss of either strongly perturbs the polarity of neighboring cells. How Fz and Vang communicate polarity information between neighboring cells is poorly understood. The atypical cadherin, Flamingo (Fmi), is implicated in this process, yet whether Fmi acts permissively as a scaffold or instructively as a signal is unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Fmi functions instructively to mediate Fz-Vang intercellular signal relay, recruiting Fz and Vang to opposite sides of cell boundaries. We propose that two functional forms of Fmi, one of which is induced by and physically interacts with Fz, bind each other to create cadherin homodimers that signal bidirectionally and asymmetrically, instructing unequal responses in adjacent cell membranes to establish molecular asymmetry.

  10. The cadherin Flamingo mediates level-dependent interactions that guide photoreceptor target choice in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Ling; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2008-04-10

    Quantitative differences in cadherin activity have been proposed to play important roles in patterning connections between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. However, no examples of such a function have yet been described, and the mechanisms that would allow such differences to direct growth cones to specific synaptic targets are unknown. In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptors are genetically programmed to make a complex, stereotypic set of synaptic connections. Here we show that the atypical cadherin Flamingo functions as a short-range, homophilic signal, passing between specific R cell growth cones to influence their choice of postsynaptic partners. We find that individual growth cones are sensitive to differences in Flamingo activity through opposing interactions between neighboring cells and require these interactions to be balanced in order to extend along the appropriate trajectory.

  11. Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A.; Schumacher, Michael A.; Schilling, Neal; Tokhunts, Robert A.; Orr-Asman, Melissa A.; Miller, Marian L.; Robbins, David J.; Hollande, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5Ski) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/ShhKO) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5Ski cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/ShhKO mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1. PMID:20847300

  12. Establishment of an ovarian metastasis model and possible involvement of E-cadherin down-regulation in the metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshiko; Yamada, Taketo; Yamazaki, Ken; Du, Wen-Lin; Banno, Kouji; Aoki, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2008-10-01

    Clinical observations of cases of ovarian metastasis suggest that there may be a unique mechanism underlying ovarian-specific metastasis. This study was undertaken to establish an in vivo model of metastasis to the ovary, and to investigate the mechanism of ovarian-specific metastasis. We examined the capacity for ovarian metastasis in eight different human carcinoma cell lines by implantation in female NOD/SCID mice transvenously and intraperitoneally. By transvenous inoculation, only RERF-LC-AI, a poorly differentiated carcinoma cell line, frequently demonstrated ovarian metastasis. By intraperitoneal inoculation, four of the eight cell lines (HGC27, MKN-45, KATO-III, and RERF-LC-AI) metastasized to the ovary. We compared E-cadherin expression among ovarian metastatic cell lines and others. All of these four ovarian metastatic cell lines and HSKTC, a Krukenberg tumor cell line, showed E-cadherin down-regulation and others did not. E-cadherin was then forcibly expressed in RERF-LC-AI, and inhibited ovarian metastasis completely. The capacity for metastasizing to the other organs was not affected by E-cadherin expression. We also performed histological investigation of clinical ovarian-metastatic tumor cases. About half of all ovarian-metastatic tumor cases showed loss or reduction of E-cadherin expression. These data suggest that E-cadherin down-regulation may be involved in ovarian-specific metastasis.

  13. Two-tiered coupling between flowing actin and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mikael; Leduc, Cécile; Lagardère, Matthieu; Argento, Amélie; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones move forward by dynamically connecting actin-based motility to substrate adhesion, but the mechanisms at the individual molecular level remain unclear. We cultured primary neurons on N-cadherin–coated micropatterned substrates, and imaged adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins at the ventral surface of growth cones using single particle tracking combined to photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM). We demonstrate transient interactions in the second time scale between flowing actin filaments and immobilized N-cadherin/catenin complexes, translating into a local reduction of the actin retrograde flow. Normal actin flow on micropatterns was rescued by expression of a dominant negative N-cadherin construct competing for the coupling between actin and endogenous N-cadherin. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments confirmed the differential kinetics of actin and N-cadherin, and further revealed a 20% actin population confined at N-cadherin micropatterns, contributing to local actin accumulation. Computer simulations with relevant kinetic parameters modeled N-cadherin and actin turnover well, validating this mechanism. Such a combination of short- and long-lived interactions between the motile actin network and spatially restricted adhesive complexes represents a two-tiered clutch mechanism likely to sustain dynamic environment sensing and provide the force necessary for growth cone migration. PMID:26038554

  14. Transcriptional down-regulation of Brca1 and E-cadherin by CtBP1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Deng, Hui; Liu, Jing; Han, Gangwen; Malkoski, Stephen; Liu, Bolin; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Qinghong

    2012-06-01

    Carboxyl-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) is a transcriptional co-repressor with oncogenic potential. Immunohistochemistry staining using human breast cancer tissue arrays revealed that 92% of invasive ductal breast cancer cases have CtBP1-positive staining compared to 4% CtBP1-positive in normal breast tissue. To explore the functional impact of CtBP1 in breast cancer, we examined CtBP1's transcriptional regulation of known tumor suppressors, breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (Brca1), and E-cadherin. We found CtBP1 was recruited to the promoter regions of Brca1 and E-cadherin genes in breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, Brca1 loss was detected in 57% and E-cadherin loss was detected in 76% of human invasive ductal breast cancers, and correlated with CtBP1 nuclear staining in these lesions. Importantly, siRNA knock down of CtBP1 restored Brca1 and E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines, implying CtBP1 down-regulates Brca1 and E-cadherin genes in human breast cancer. This study provides evidence that although genetic loss of Brca1 and E-cadherin are infrequent in breast cancer, they are down-regulated at the transcriptional level by CtBP1 expression. Thus, CtBP1 activation could be a potential biomarker for breast cancer development.

  15. Correlation of E-cadherin and CD44v6 expression with clinical pathology in esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei-Dong; Ji, Yong; Liu, Peng-Fei; Xiang, Bin; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Bin; Wu, Song

    2012-03-01

    Cell adhesion, important for maintaining tissue architecture, plays a role in numerous cancers and particularly in tumor progression. In the present study, we investigated perturbations in the expression of two important adhesion proteins, epithelial (E)-cadherin and CD44v6, in esophageal carcinoma (EC). EC specimens were obtained from 42 patients undergoing resection of EC; both cancer and adjacent normal tissue were collected. Expression of E-cadherin and CD44v6 was detected by immunohistochemistry and the correlation between the expression of these two proteins and their individual relationships with pathology were determined. E-cadherin expression in EC tissue was significantly less common than in adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, absence of E-cadherin expression was correlated with infiltration depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastases and TNM stage (P<0.05), but not with gender, age, differentiation or tumor size. By contrast, CD44v6 expression in EC was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal tissue and was correlated with differentiation, distant metastases and TNM stage (P<0.05), but not with other clinicopathological parameters. Additionally, we observed a negative correlation between E-cadherin and CD44v6 expression in EC (P<0.05). Based on their correlations with pathology, we suggest that the expression of E-cadherin and CD44v6 is important roles in promoting the infiltration and metastasis of EC.

  16. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is critical for the closing of the mouse optic fissure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewis, Brandy; Moran, Andrea; Xie, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Coloboma is a congenital disease that contributes significantly to childhood blindness. It results from the failure in closing the optic fissure, a transient opening on the ventral side of the developing eye. Although human and mouse genetic studies have identified a number of genes associated with coloboma, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying the optic fissure closure and coloboma formation remain largely undefined. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion has been shown to be important for the optic fissure closure in zebrafish, but it remains to be determined experimentally how cell-cell adhesions are involved in the mammalian optic fissure closing process. α-Catenin is required for cell adhesion mediated by all of the classic cadherin molecules, including N-cadherin. In this study, we used the Cre-mediated conditional knockout technique to specifically delete α-catenin from the developing mouse eye to show that it is required for the successful closing of the optic fissure. In α-catenin conditional mutant optic cups, the major cell fates, including the optic fissure margin, neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, are specified normally, and the retinal progenitor cells proliferate normally. However, adherens junctions components, including N-cadherin, β-catenin and filamentous actin, fail to accumulate on the apical side of α-catenin mutant retinal progenitor cells, where adherens junctions are normally abundant, and the organization of the neural retina and the optic fissure margin is disrupted. Finally, the α-catenin mutant retina gradually degenerates in the adult mouse eye. Therefore, our results show that α-catenin-mediated cell adhesion and cell organization are important for the fissure closure in mice, and further suggest that genes that regulate cell adhesion may underlie certain coloboma cases in humans.

  17. Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Qi; Zhang, Wu; Lui, Eric L H; Zhu, Yongqiang; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiaoming; Sun, Jisan; Yang, Sitian; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2012-08-01

    Notch signaling, a critical pathway for tissue development, also contributes to tumorigenesis in many cancers, but its pathological function in liver cancer is not well defined. In our study, Notch1 expression and its clinicopathological parameters were evaluated in 82 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Plasmid-based siNotch1 shRNA was transiently or stably transfected into metastatic HCC cells and subsequently evaluated for the effects on orthotopic liver tumor metastasis in a mouse model as well as the effects on downstream pathways. Aberrant high expression of Notch1 was significantly associated with metastatic disease parameters in HCC patients, such as tumor-node-metastasis Stages III-IV and tumor venous invasion. Knocking-down Notch1 reduced cell motility in vitro and orthotopic tumor metastasis from the liver to the lung in vivo in a mouse model. In metastatic HCC cells, abnormal expression of Notch1 was associated with increased expression of Snail1 and repressed expression of E-cadherin; the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin association can also be found in HCC patient tumors. Inhibition of Notch1 by shRNA abolished Snail1 expression, which further resulted in the re-establishment of repressed E-cadherin in metastatic HCC cells. Thus, abnormal Notch1 expression was strongly associated with HCC metastatic disease, which might be mediated through the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway. Knock-down of Notch1 reversed HCC tumor metastasis in a mouse model. Therefore, these data suggest that effective targeting of Notch signaling might also inhibit tumor metastasis.

  18. Evaluation of myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a cancer of increasing incidence and mortality. Currently, there are no immunohistochemical prognostic markers for RCCs in routine use. The aim of this study was to examine for the first time the immunostaining of myosin VI in RCCs as well as its association with E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining and the prognostic significance of these markers in RCCs. Methods Our study population consisted of 152 patients who underwent surgery for RCCs between 1990 and 1999. The tumours were examined with three immunohistochemical markers: myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Results The immunostaining for cytoplasmic myosin VI was common (72%). One-third of the tumours were immunopositive for nuclear myosin VI. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades (p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively), but not stages. There was no significant association between myosin VI immunostaining and the histological subtype of RCC. Nuclear myosin VI was associated with the nuclear expression of beta-catenin. A direct association could also be proven between membranous E-cadherin and cytoplasmic beta-catenin. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was a marker of poorer prognosis in multivariate Cox regression model adjusted with stage and Fuhrman grade with hazard ratio 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 5.0 with p = 0.024). Conclusions Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades, and there was a strong positive relationship between E-cadherin immunostaining and beta-catenin immunostaining in RCCs. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was associated with poorer prognosis in RCCs. PMID:20074327

  19. Interleukin-32α induces migration of human melanoma cells through downregulation of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju Han; Houh, Younkyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Yang, Yoolhee; Bang, Sa Ik; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32α, the shortest isoform of proinflammatory cytokine IL-32, is associated with various inflammatory diseases and cancers. However, its involvement in human melanoma is not understood. To determine the effect of IL-32α in melanoma, IL-32α levels were examined in human melanoma cell lines that exhibit different migratory abilities. IL-32α levels were higher in human melanoma cell lines with more migratory ability. An IL-32α-overexpressing G361 human melanoma cell line was generated to investigate the effect of IL-32α on melanoma migration. IL-32α-overexpressing G361 cells (G361-IL-32α) exhibit an increased migratory ability compared to vector control cells (G361-vector). To identify factors involved in IL-32α-induced migration, we compared expression of E-cadherin in G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells. We observed decreased levels of E-cadherin in G361-IL-32α cells, resulting in F-actin polymerization. To further investigate signaling pathways related to IL-32α-induced migration, we treated G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells with PD98059, a selective MEK inhibitor. Inhibition of Erk1/2 by PD98059 restored E-cadherin expression and decreased IL-32α-induced migration. In addition, cell invasiveness of G361-IL-32α cells was tested using an in vivo lung metastasis model. As results, lung metastasis was significantly increased by IL-32α overexpression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-32α induced human melanoma migration via Erk1/2 activation, which repressed E-cadherin expression. Our findings suggest that IL-32α is a novel regulator of migration in melanoma. PMID:27589563

  20. The Characteristics and Prognostic Effect of E-Cadherin Expression in Colorectal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjie; Ma, Xiaoji; Li, Yaqi; He, Yiping; Huang, Dan; Cai, Sanjun; Peng, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is rare. The aim of this study is to understand the clinicopathological features and identify the possible prognostic factors in colorectal SRCC. Methods Patients with SRCC who underwent primary lesion resection at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from September 2008 to July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient’s gender, age, tumor location, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression were studied with prognosis, and the correlation between E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed. All clinicopathological and molecular factors were put into multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model for detecting independent prognostic factors. Results 59 patients accounting for 0.89% of total colorectal cancer patients met the criteria and were enrolled in the study. The median survival time is 28.9 months, and the 3-year survival rate is 62.7%. SRCC were seen more common in young male patients. Advanced stage was more common in SRCC, 58 (98.3%) patients had T3/T4 lesions, 52 (88.1%) patients had lymph node metastasis, and 14 (23.7%) patients had distant metastasis. Distant metastases were seen more common in peritoneal cavity. Distant metastasis (HR = 4.194, 95% CI: 1.297–13.567), lymphovascular invasion (HR = 2.888, 95% CI: 1.115–7.483), and E-cadherin expression (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.096–0.768) were independent predictors for survival. Conclusions SRCC is a rare subtype of colorectal cancer with poor prognosis. Distant metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression can predict prognosis of colorectal SRCCs independently. More precise therapy and more close surveillance are needed for these patients. PMID:27509205

  1. Interleukin-32α induces migration of human melanoma cells through downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Ju Han; Houh, Younkyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Yang, Yoolhee; Bang, Sa Ik; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-10-04

    Interleukin (IL)-32α, the shortest isoform of proinflammatory cytokine IL-32, is associated with various inflammatory diseases and cancers. However, its involvement in human melanoma is not understood. To determine the effect of IL-32α in melanoma, IL-32α levels were examined in human melanoma cell lines that exhibit different migratory abilities. IL-32α levels were higher in human melanoma cell lines with more migratory ability. An IL-32α-overexpressing G361 human melanoma cell line was generated to investigate the effect of IL-32α on melanoma migration. IL-32α-overexpressing G361 cells (G361-IL-32α) exhibit an increased migratory ability compared to vector control cells (G361-vector). To identify factors involved in IL-32α-induced migration, we compared expression of E-cadherin in G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells. We observed decreased levels of E-cadherin in G361-IL-32α cells, resulting in F-actin polymerization. To further investigate signaling pathways related to IL-32α-induced migration, we treated G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells with PD98059, a selective MEK inhibitor. Inhibition of Erk1/2 by PD98059 restored E-cadherin expression and decreased IL-32α-induced migration. In addition, cell invasiveness of G361-IL-32α cells was tested using an in vivo lung metastasis model. As results, lung metastasis was significantly increased by IL-32α overexpression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-32α induced human melanoma migration via Erk1/2 activation, which repressed E-cadherin expression. Our findings suggest that IL-32α is a novel regulator of migration in melanoma.

  2. α-Catulin downregulates E-cadherin and promotes melanoma progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kreiseder, Birgit; Orel, Lukas; Bujnow, Constantin; Buschek, Stefan; Pflueger, Maren; Schuett, Wolfgang; Hundsberger, Harald; de Martin, Rainer; Wiesner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis for melanoma responsible for about 90% of skin cancer-related mortality. To metastasize, melanoma cells must escape keratinocyte control, invade across the basement membrane and survive in the dermis by resisting apoptosis before they can intravasate into the circulation. α-Catulin (CTNNAL1) is a cytoplasmic molecule that integrates the crosstalk between nuclear factor-kappa B and Rho signaling pathways, binds to β-catenin and increases the level of both α-catenin and β-catenin and therefore has potential effects on inflammation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we show that α-catulin is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Expression of α-catulin promoted melanoma progression and occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of expression of mesenchymal genes such as N-cadherin, Snail/Slug and the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Knockdown of α-catulin promoted adhesion to and inhibited migration away from keratinocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner and decreased the transmigration through a keratinocyte monolayer, as well as in Transwell assays using collagens, laminin and fibronectin coating. Moreover, knockdown promoted homotypic spheroid formation and concomitantly increased E-cadherin expression along with downregulation of transcription factors implicated in its repression (Snail/Slug, Twist and ZEB). Consistent with the molecular changes, α-catulin provoked invasion of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional culture assay by the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and the activation of ROCK/Rho. As such, α-catulin may represent a key driver of the metastatic process, implicating potential for therapeutic interference.

  3. Female sex pheromone and male behavioral responses of the bombycid moth Trilocha varians: comparison with those of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Takaaki; Fujii, Takeshi; Yago, Masaya; Hsu, Yu-Feng; Nakajima, Yumiko; Fujii, Tsuguru; Katsuma, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shimada, Toru

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of female sex pheromone components and subsequent field trap experiments demonstrated that the bombycid moth Trilocha varians uses a mixture of ( E, Z)-10,12-hexadecadienal (bombykal) and ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienyl acetate (bombykyl acetate) as a sex pheromone. Both of these components are derivatives of ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol), the sex pheromone of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori. This finding prompted us to compare the antennal and behavioral responses of T. varians and B. mori to bombykol, bombykal, and bombykyl acetate in detail. The antennae of T. varians males responded to bombykal and bombykyl acetate but not to bombykol, and males were attracted only when lures contained both bombykal and bombykyl acetate. In contrast, the antennae of B. mori males responded to all the three components. Behavioral analysis showed that B. mori males responded to neither bombykal nor bombykyl acetate. Meanwhile, the wing fluttering response of B. mori males to bombykol was strongly inhibited by bombykal and bombykyl acetate, thereby indicating that bombykal and bombykyl acetate act as behavioral antagonists for B. mori males. T. varians would serve as a reference species for B. mori in future investigations into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of sex pheromone communication systems in bombycid moths.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase during early embryonic development in silkworm Bombyx mori: Gene expression, enzyme activity, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Ryo; Kuwamoto, Marina; Yamahama, Yumi; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for embryonic diapause or the breakdown of diapause in Bombyx mori, we biochemically analyzed nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the embryogenesis of B. mori. The gene expression and enzyme activity of B. mori NOS (BmNOS) were examined in diapause, non-diapause, and HCl-treated diapause eggs. In the case of HCl-treated diapause eggs, the gene expression and enzyme activity of BmNOS were induced by HCl treatment. However, in the case of diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryogenesis, changes in the BmNOS activity and gene expressions did not coincide except 48-60 h after oviposition in diapause eggs. The results imply that changes in BmNOS activity during the embryogenesis of diapause and non-diapause eggs are regulated not only at the level of transcription but also post-transcription. The distribution and localization of BmNOS were also investigated with an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against the universal NOS; the localization of BmNOS was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of yolk cells in diapause eggs and HCl-treated diapause eggs. These data suggest that BmNOS has an important role in the early embryonic development of the B. mori.

  5. BmDredd is an initiator caspase and participates in Emodin-induced apoptosis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, La; Song, Juan; Bao, Xi-Yan; Chen, Peng; Yi, Hua-Shan; Pan, Min-Hui; Lu, Cheng

    2016-10-15

    The identification and analysis of the caspases is essential to research into apoptosis in lepidoptera insects. The domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, is the model system for lepidopterans. In this study, we cloned and characterized a B. mori Dredd gene, BmDredd, the proposed insect homologue of human caspase-8, which encoded a polypeptide of 543 amino acids. BmDredd possesses a long N-terminal prodomain, a p20 domain, and a p10 domain. When transiently expressed in Escherichia coli cells, BmDredd underwent spontaneous cleavage and exhibited high proteolytic activity for caspase-8 substrate but relatively low for caspase-3 or -9 substrate. In addition, BmDredd induced apoptosis when transiently expressed in BmN-SWU1 cells, an ovarian cell line of B. mori. Moreover, after the treatment of Emodin, a novel apoptosis inducer, endogenous BmDredd expression level, the caspase-8 activity and the apoptotic rate increased notably in BmN-SWU1 cells. When BmDredd was subjected to interference in BmN-SWU1 cells and Emodin treatment, BmDredd expression levels decreased and the apoptotic rate also decreased significantly. These results suggest BmDredd is the homologue of human caspase-8 and plays a role in Emodin-induced apoptosis in BmN-SWU1 cells of B. mori.

  6. BmICE-2 is a novel pro-apoptotic caspase involved in apoptosis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hua-Shan; Pan, Cai-Xia; Pan, Chun; Song, Juan; Hu, Yan-Fen; Wang, La; Pan, Min-Hui; Lu, Cheng

    2014-02-28

    In this study we identified a potential pro-apoptotic caspase gene, Bombyx mori(B. mori)ICE-2 (BmICE-2) which encoded a polypeptide of 284 amino acid residues, including a (169)QACRG(173) sequence which surrounded the catalytic site and contained a p20 and a p10 domain. BmICE-2 expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exhibited high proteolytic activity for the synthetic human initiator caspase-9 substrates Ac-LEHD-pNA, but little activity towards the effector caspase-3 substrates Ac-DEVD-pNA. When BmICE-2 was transiently expressed in BmN-SWU1 silkworm B. mori cells, we found that the high proteolytic activity for Ac-LEHD-pNA triggered caspase-3-like protease activity resulting in spontaneous cleavage and apoptosis in these cells. This effect was not replicated in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells. In addition, spontaneous cleavage of endogenous BmICE-2 in BmN-SWU1 cells could be induced by actinomycin D. These results suggest that BmICE-2 may be a novel pro-apoptotic gene with caspase-9 activity which is involved apoptotic processes in BmN-SWU1 silkworm B. mori cells.

  7. Phoxim-induced damages of Bombyx mori larval midgut and titanium dioxide nanoparticles protective role under phoxim-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Su, Junju; Li, Bing; Cheng, Shen; Zhu, Zhou; Sang, Xuezi; Gui, Suxin; Xie, Yi; Sun, Qingqing; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Rengping; Shen, Weide; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping; Hong, Fashui

    2014-12-01

    Phoxim (O,O-diethyl O-(alpha-cyanobenzylideneamino) phosphorothioate) is a powerful organophosphorus pesticide with high potential for Bombyx mori larvae of silkworm exposure. However, it is possible that during the phoxim metabolism, there is generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phoxim may produce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in an intoxicated silkworm. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) pretreatment has been demonstrated to increase antioxidant capacity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in organisms. This study was, therefore, undertaken to determine phoxim-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity to determine whether phoxim intoxication alters the antioxidant system and AChE activity in the B. mori larval midgut, and to determine whether TiO2 NPs pretreatment attenuates phoxim-induced toxicity. The findings suggested that phoxim exposure decreased survival of B. mori larvae, increased malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl and 8-OHdG levels, and ROS accumulation in the midgut. Furthermore, phoxim significantly decreased the activities of AChE, superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and levels of ascorbic acid (AsA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and thiol in the midgut. TiO2 pretreatment, however, could increase AChE activity, and remove ROS via activating SOD, CAT, APX, GR, and GST, and accelerating AsA-GSH cycle, thus attenuated lipid, protein, and DNA peroxidation and improve B. mori larval survival under phoxim-induced toxicity. Moreover, this experimental system would help nanomaterials to be applied in the sericulture.

  8. Mapping and recombination analysis of two moth colour mutations, Black moth and Wild wing spot, in the silkworm Bombyx mori