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Sample records for morroa aquifer colombia

  1. Hydraulic characterization of the heterogeneity of the "Valle del Cauca" Aquifer (Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado, L. D.; Gomez-Español, A.

    2012-04-01

    This research consists of a regional study in which is analyzed and defined in detail the response of a large alluvial aquifer to external imposed stresses of varying magnitude at multiple points within its area. On the other hand, this work evaluates and establishes the spatial correlation structure of the transmissivity and specific capacity values and provides a spatial stochastic prediction model. The later acceptably synthesizes the field properties of each of these parameters. The prediction model was developed from the cross correlation between 852 series values of specific capacity and 316 from transmissivity. This model lead us to demonstrate from the geological perspective that exits a relation among geomorphology and recharge areas so that, higher transmissivity values are presented in the lowlands of the valley through which rivers flow localized in recharge areas generated by geological folds. Since 1950, began an intensive development of this aquifer (Colombia). Despite the country has a positive water balance (IDEAM, 2003), this aquifer is the most productive one in Colombia, has an extension of 3,300 km2. Approximately 1,500 wells supply about 92,540 L/s used for agricultural and industrial purposes. This research uses about 1,000 pumping tests carried out since 1970 by the regional environmental agency (CVC). We interpreted those pumping tests using the diagnostic plot method (Rennard, 2008) to determine aquifer transmissivity and specific capacity. The model figures out a significant geological heterogeneity in the apparently homogeneous alluvial aquifer that leads us to use several interpretation methods for different boundary and well conditions. This brings into question the validity of the regional scale research using a single method of interpretation. Similarly, the results permit us to review the current conceptual model of a three layers aquifer (unconfined - aquitard - confined aquifers) with a defined thickness to a heterogeneous model

  2. Colombia.

    PubMed

    1986-10-01

    This report of background notes for Colombia concentrates on political history, but also summarizes geography, people, economy, defense and foreign relations. Colombia, linking Panama to the northwest tip of South America, has 26.5 million people, growing at 1.3% per year, expected to be the third most populous nationon the continent soon. Infant mortality rate is 65/1000 and life expectancy is 62 years. Literacy is reported at 80% although less than 40% of children complete 2.5 years of school. Geographically, Colombia has flat coastal areas, several mountain ranges, highlands and hot eastern plains. 70% of the population live in cities. There are 2 major political parties, in existence since the early 19th century. Recently there have been violent inter-party differences, punctuated by even more contentious guerrilla attacks. Colombia possesses resources of oil, gas coal, nickel, gold, emeralds, platinum, iron. Agricultural products are dominated by coffee, but also include a wide variety of tropical and temperate grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy and meat products, timber and flowers.

  3. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  4. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  5. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  6. Trinity Gas to explore for gas in Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Trinity Gas Corp. officials signed an agreement on May 20, 1997, with the Cauca Valley Corp. (CVC) allowing Trinity to use CVC data to explore for natural gas in the Cauca Valley of Colombia. CVC, Colombia`s Valle del Cauca water resources and environmental division, is evaluating Colombia`s underground water reserves to protect, control and preserve fresh water aquifers, some of which contain natural gas pockets that cause blowouts in farmers` water wells. Preparations now are underway for drilling Trinity`s first well at the Palmira 1 site on the San Jose Hacienda, the largest privately owned sugar cane plantation in the valley. Trinity also entered into an agreement with the Cauca Valley Natural Gas and Electricity Project to furnish natural gas, generated electricity and energy fuel for the industrial district in the region. According to this contract, many valley residents will have electric service for the first time.

  7. Aquifer-nomenclature guidelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Davidson, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines and recommendations for naming aquifers are presented to assist authors of geohydrological reports in the United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. The hierarchy of terms that is used for water- yielding rocks from largest to smallest is aquifer system, aquifer, and zone. If aquifers are named, the names should be derived from lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units, or geographic names. The following items are not recommended as sources of aquifer names: time-stratigraphic names, relative position, alphanumeric designations, depositional environment, depth of occurrence, acronyms, and hydrologic conditions. Confining units should not be named unless doing so clearly promotes understanding of a particular aquifer system. Sources of names for confining units are similar to those for aquifer names, i.e. lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units or geographic names. Examples of comparison charts and tables that are used to define the geohydrologic framework are included. Aquifers are defined in 11 hypothetical examples that characterize geohydrologic settings throughout the country. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-09

    proyectos/justicia_y_paz.htm] on August 30, 2006; “Presidencia de la República de Colombia, “Listado de Privados de Libertad de las AUC Remitidos a...operate in Colombia and Peru, and the Triborder Area of Argentina , Brazil and Paraguay is thought to be a regional hub for Hizbollah and Hamas

  9. Education in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Richard R.

    As one of the more traditional Latin American societies, Colombia's educational policies have been affected by long-standing cultural beliefs including class values and social stratification. This paper examines the educational history of Colombia, provides a thorough background on its educational achievements and difficulties, and discusses…

  10. Biscayne aquifer, southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Howard; Hull, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Peak daily pumpage from the highly permeable, unconfined Biscayne aquifer for public water-supply systems in southeast Florida in 1975 was about 500 million gallons. Another 165 million gallons was withdrawn daily for irrigation. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily by local rainfall. Discharge is by evapotranspiration, canal drainage, coastal seepage, and pumping. Pollutants can enter the aquifer by direct infiltration from land surface or controlled canals, septic-tank and other drainfields, drainage wells, and solid-waste dumps. Most of the pollutants are concentrated in the upper 20 to 30 feet of the aquifer; public supply wells generally range in depth from about 75 to 150 feet. Dilution, dispersion, and adsorption tend to reduce the concentrations. Seasonal heavy rainfall and canal discharge accelerate ground-water circulation, thereby tending to dilute and flush upper zones of the aquifer. The ultimate fate of pollutants in the aquifer is the ocean, although some may be adsorbed by the aquifer materials en route to the ocean, and some are diverted to pumping wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Identifying aquifer type in fractured rock aquifers using harmonic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Khayyun A; Halihan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Determining aquifer type, unconfined, semi-confined, or confined, by drilling or performing pumping tests has inherent problems (i.e., cost and complex field issues) while sometimes yielding inconclusive results. An improved method to cost-effectively determine aquifer type would be beneficial for hydraulic mapping of complex aquifer systems like fractured rock aquifers. Earth tides are known to influence water levels in wells penetrating confined aquifers or unconfined thick, low-porosity aquifers. Water-level fluctuations in wells tapping confined and unconfined aquifers are also influenced by changes in barometric pressure. Harmonic analyses of water-level fluctuations of a thick (~1000 m) carbonate aquifer located in south-central Oklahoma (Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer) were utilized in nine wells to identify aquifer type by evaluating the influence of earth tides and barometric-pressure variations using signal identification. On the basis of the results, portions of the aquifer responded hydraulically as each type of aquifer even though there was no significant variation in lithostratigraphy. The aquifer type was depth dependent with confined conditions becoming more prevalent with depth. The results demonstrate that harmonic analysis is an accurate and low-cost method to determine aquifer type.

  12. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  13. Internal displacement in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for “victims of armed conflict,” with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia’s unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement. PMID:28228997

  14. Terrorism in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Paredes Zapata, Gabriel Darío

    2003-01-01

    Colombia is a poor country that has been plagued by ongoing violence for more than 120 years. During the 1940s, subversive terrorist groups emerged in rural areas of the country when criminal groups came under the influence of Communism, and were later transformed into contemporary groups, such as the Ejercito de Liberacion Nacional (ELN) or National Liberation Army and Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionares de Colombia (FARC) or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia). Paramilitary terrorist groups emerged in response to subversive groups and were later transformed into contemporary groups, such as the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (AUC) or United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia. Terrorism has placed an enormous burden on modern Colombia. From 1995 to 2002, 9,435 people were killed by terrorism-related events, of which 5,864 were killed by subversive terrorist activities and 3,571 were killed by paramilitary terrorist activities. In 2002, at least nineteen attacks produced 10 or more casualties, of which 18 were bombings. In 2002, terrorists killed at least 12 mayors, 71 legislators, and internally displaced 300,000 persons from their homes. Since terrorist groups in Colombia are typically supported by drug manufacturing and trafficking, it has been difficult at times to distinguish violence due to terrorism from violence due to illicit drug trafficking. Terrorism has also had a major adverse effect on the economy, with restricted travel, loss of economic resources, and lack of economic investment. In addition to political, military, and commercial targets, terrorists have specifically targeted healthcare infrastructure and personnel. At the national and local levels, much emergency planning and preparedness has taken place for terrorism-related events. The Centro Regulador de Urgencias (CRU) or Emergency Regulation Center in Bogota plays a major role in coordinating local prehospital and hospital emergency response in the capital city and the national level where

  15. 40 CFR 147.2908 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2908 Section...-Class II Wells § 147.2908 Aquifer exemptions. (a) After notice and opportunity for a public hearing, the Administrator may designate any aquifer or part of an aquifer as an exempted aquifer. (b) An aquifer or...

  16. 40 CFR 147.2908 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2908 Section...-Class II Wells § 147.2908 Aquifer exemptions. (a) After notice and opportunity for a public hearing, the Administrator may designate any aquifer or part of an aquifer as an exempted aquifer. (b) An aquifer or...

  17. 40 CFR 147.2908 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2908 Section...-Class II Wells § 147.2908 Aquifer exemptions. (a) After notice and opportunity for a public hearing, the Administrator may designate any aquifer or part of an aquifer as an exempted aquifer. (b) An aquifer or...

  18. Aquifer stability investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

    1981-09-01

    The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

  19. Yaws in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Uribe, W R

    1985-01-01

    By the beginning of this century, yaws was a well-known endemic disease in Colombia. Colombian authorities estimated that by early 1930 there were 70,000 active cases of yaws, most of which were located in the Pacific coastal regions. With the advent of penicillin therapy, Colombia organized an anti-yaws campaign, which began in 1950. The campaign relied on the use of penicillin and house-to-house case finding. From 1950 to 1953 more than 111,000 persons with active cases of yaws and 125,000 of their contacts were treated with penicillin. The reported incidence of yaws declined dramatically, and by 1973 only 573 cases were reported in the endemic areas. By 1983 this number had fallen to 31. Because of the persistence of small foci of yaws activity, the anti-yaws campaign has been reorganized to provide a firm basis for the final eradication of the disease in Colombia.

  20. Inquiry and Aquifers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

    2001-01-01

    Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.…

  1. Inquiry and Aquifers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

    2001-01-01

    Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.…

  2. Boise Geothermal Aquifer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report is the final product of a detailed review and quantitative evaluation of existing data for the Boise Front Geothermal Aquifer. Upon review of the many publications, and raw data for the Boise geothermal aquifer, it became clear that adequate data only exists for analysis of current and proposed development within a limited area. This region extends approximately 1.5 miles southeast of the State Capitol to 0.5 mile northwest. Though there are geothermal wells located along the Boise Front outside of this area, the lack of production and water level data preclude any detailed discussions and analysis of their relationship to the central resource. As a result, discussion will concentrate on major users such as the Capitol Mall (CM) Boise Geothermal LTD. (BGL), Veterans Administration (VA) and Boise Warm Springs Water District (BWSWD). The objectives of this study are: Define the inter-relationship of the existing wells and/or portions of the geothermal aquifer; evaluate the effects of current and proposed development on the geothermal aquifer; estimate longevity of the geothermal resource; and make recommendations for an on-going monitoring program. 44 refs., 40 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Astronomy in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera-G., Mario A.

    2017-07-01

    More than two centuries ago, José Celestino Mutis and Francisco José de Caldas initiated the Colombian Astronomical Expedition. Today, Colombia has a community of over 50 scientists, linked to six institutions nationwide, and more than 250 students and researchers (PhDs and Postdocs), having high-impact astronomical research around the world.

  4. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-12

    glyphosate , does not pose unreasonable health or safety risks to humans or the environment. In consultation for the certification, the U.S. Environmental...Protection Agency confirmed that application rates of the aerial spray program in Colombia are within the parameters listed on U.S. glyphosate labels

  5. English in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintanilla, Victor

    English language education in Colombia has been improved because the teachers have organized professional associations and have received assistance and support from the Colombian and United States governments to improve teaching methods, teacher preparation, and teaching materials. With the help of the University of California at Los Angeles, the…

  6. Aquifers In Nirgal Vallis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, D.; Jaumann, R.

    The topographic information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter has been used in combination with the Mars Observer Camera imagery to estimate the topo- graphic position of sapping pits and gully heads on the rim of Nirgal Vallis. Hence Nirgal Vallis is understood to be formed by groundwater sapping (1, 2, 3, 4) an aquifer is proposed as water supply. Gullies in the northern rim of Nirgal Vallis as discovered in Mars Observer Camera (MOC) images (5, 6) proof the existence of such an aquifer. Further evidence for sapping in Nirgal Vallis is demonstrated by short hanging tribu- taries with amphitheater-like heads. The basis of these sapping pits defines the con- tact of aquifer to aquiclude during the valley formation. The gully heads are much deeper under the local surface and the correlation of their topographic position with the valley depth indicate the subsidence of the groundwater level following the ver- tical erosion of the valley. This implies the existence of different groundwater tables over time confined by impermeable layers, whereas the gully head level is the most recent groundwater table which still may be erosional active under the conditions of increasing water pressure and ice barrier failure (5). The occurrence of more than one tilted sapping level at different topographic positions which are time-correlated with the erosional notching of the valley, either indicates different aquifers with litholog- ical aquicludes or a climate controlled subsidence of the permafrost layer acting as confining layer. References: (1) Baker et al., 1992, In: Mars, Univ. of Arizona Press. (2) Carr, 1995, JGR 100, 7479. (3) Malin and Carr, 1999, Icarus, 397, 589. (4) Jaumann and Reiss, 2002, LPSC. (5) Malin and Edgett, 2000, Science, 288, 2330. (6) Malin and Edgett, 2001, JGR 106, 23429.

  7. Integrating borehole logs and aquifer tests in aquifer characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Reese, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the surficial aquifer system in and around Big Cypress National Preserve in eastern Collier County, Florida. Borehole flowmeter tests provide qualitative permeability profiles in most of 26 boreholes drilled in the Study area. Flow logs indicate the depth of transmissive units, which are correlated across the study area. Comparison to published studies in adjacent areas indicates that the main limestone aquifer of the 000000Tamiami Formation in the study area corresponds with the gray limestone aquifer in western Dade County and the water table and lower Tamiami Aquifer in western Collier County. Four strategically located, multiwell aquifer tests are used to quantify the qualitative permeability profiles provided by the flowmeter log analysis. The hydrostratigraphic model based on these results defines the main aquifer in the central part of the study area as unconfined to semiconfined with a transmissivity as high as 30,000 m2/day. The aquifer decreases in transmissivity to less than 10,000 m2/day in some parts of western Collier County, and becomes confined to the east and northeast of the study area, where transmissivity decreases to below 5000 m2/day.Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the

  8. Colombia Country Analysis Brief

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Colombia is South America's largest coal producer, and the region's third-largest oil producer after Venezuela and Brazil. In 2015, Colombia was the world's fifth-largest coal exporter. The country is also a significant oil exporter, ranking as the fifth-largest crude oil exporter to the United States in 2015. A series of regulatory reforms enacted in 2003 makes the oil and natural gas sector more attractive to foreign investors led to an increase in Colombian oil and natural gas production. The Colombian government implemented a partial privatization of state oil company Ecopetrol (formerly known as Empresa Colombiana de Petróleos S.A.) in an attempt to revive its upstream oil industry.

  9. Takayasu arteritis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cañas, C A; Jimenez, C A; Ramirez, L A; Uribe, O; Tobón, I; Torrenegra, A; Cortina, A; Muñoz, M; Gutierrez, O; Restrepo, J F; Peña, M; Iglesias, A

    1998-10-01

    Takayasu arteritis has been recognized in Colombia just recently, and so far we do not have any report concerning its presentation here. In this first report, some issues related to the presentation of the disease are indicated and compared with those found in the medical literature. No differences were found in age and sex. Most of the cases were diagnosed during an inactive phase of the disease with advanced manifestations due to vascular lesion which suggests the existence of some genetic factor influencing such a presentation, or may be the consequence of a delay in diagnosing the disease during initial and active stages due to not suspecting it. Comparing the vessels which are affected among other races and countries, we can find both differences and similarities. With the purpose of discovering the demographic, clinical, angiographic and laboratorial characteristics of Takayasu arteritis in Colombia, the present study was carried out by studying 35 clinical cases in different medical centers of the country.

  10. AIDS in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Boshell, J; Gacharná, M G; García, M; Jaramillo, L S; Márquez, G; Fergusson, M M; González, S; Prada, E Y; de Rangel, R; de Cabas, R

    1989-01-01

    Between January 1984 and December 1987 a total of 178 AIDS cases were reported to the Colombian Ministry of Health. The location of these cases suggests that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is widely distributed in Colombia. Most of those afflicted (97%) have been adult males. HIV seroprevalence studies of selected population groups revealed the highest antibody prevalence (5.65% in females, 22.5% in males) among individuals involved in high-risk behaviors who participated in a free AIDS testing program. High prevalences (from 0.6% to 3.9% in females, and 14.6% to 15.9% in males) were also found in patients (primarily female prostitutes and male homosexuals) attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in several urban areas. The number of AIDS cases in Colombia has doubled or tripled annually since reporting began in 1984, a pattern similar to that observed worldwide.

  11. Counterterrorism Policy in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    93 Fundación Seguridad y Democracia has recently published a number of statistics on violence in Colombia.94 Between 2001 and 2006 the homicide rate...Últimos Tres Períodos Presidenciales 1994-2006," Fundación Seguridad y Democracia http://www.seguridadydemocracia.org, (accessed March 21, 2007). 95...David. Counterinsurgency Warfare: Theory and Practice. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1964. Fundación Seguridad y Democracia . "La Seguridad en los

  12. Colombia on the Brink

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    during which nearly 200,000 people were killed by indiscriminate violence, is known as La Violencia .10 In 1957, following the second coup of the...brought to a close the La Violencia .11 However, it did nothing to alter the underlying conditions that had given rise to the La Violencia in the first...Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC), was formed from the peasant leaders who had emerged from the Liberal uprising during the La Violencia .13 Since

  13. Persistent Engagement in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    David P. Oakley Countering the al-Shabaab Insurgency in Somalia: Lessons for U.S. Special Operations Forces, February 2014, Graham Turbiville, Josh...November 2013 Piracy: The Best Business Model Available, November 2013, John Alexander The Terrorist Trafficking Nexus: Scourge of the World or So...Colombia funds paid for 18 Bell UH-1N Twin Hueys that had previously belonged to the Canadian armed forces. Built in the 1970s, these Hueys were not

  14. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-19

    Bogotá: Mayor Luis Eduardo Garzon will Complicate Uribe’s Agenda,” Newsweek International, January 26, 2004; Andrew Selsky, “Leftist’s Win in Bogotá...In total, 25 candidates were killed and 160 withdrew their names from the balloting.16 In the elections, Luis Eduardo Garzon, known as Lucho, from...Brief,” July 2004. 54 Ibid. 55 U.S. Department of State Report to Congress, Colombia: Cano Limon Pipeline, January 2003. rightist paramilitaries, has

  15. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-18

    Summary President Juan Manuel Santos took office in August 2010 in Colombia after winning 69% of the vote in a runoff election held in June 2010. Santos...continuing into the election of President Juan Manuel Santos and his first months in office. The report then provides background on the long- standing... Manuel Santos extended a state of emergency originally declared in early December 2010 to cope with severe flooding that killed more than 300

  16. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  17. Education for a New Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Richard R.

    This study, one of a series of publications on education in other countries, describes all major levels and types of education in Colombia against a background of the relevant economic, cultural, and social features of that country. The first two chapters depict features of Colombia essential to understanding the context within which its…

  18. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  19. Child health in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Nieto, G Arias; Mutis, F Suescun; Mercer, R; Bonati, M; Choonara, I

    2009-11-01

    Colombia is a country with major problems, mainly a high degree of inequality and an unacceptably high level of violence (both armed military conflict and crime related). There are unacceptably high variations in health and health provision. Despite these difficulties, there are important steps being taken by both the government and independent organisations to try and improve child health and to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in relation to poverty, hunger and health issues. The participation of different sectors and stakeholders (including government, non-governmental organisations and other organisations of civil society) is essential to overcome Colombian history and to promote a better place for children.

  20. 40 CFR 147.1952 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1952 Section....1952 Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in... future exempt other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying...

  1. 40 CFR 147.3003 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.3003 Section..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3003 Aquifer exemptions. (a) Aquifer... described in appendix A are hereby exempted. The exempted aquifers are defined by a one-quarter mile...

  2. 40 CFR 147.3003 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.3003 Section..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3003 Aquifer exemptions. (a) Aquifer... described in appendix A are hereby exempted. The exempted aquifers are defined by a one-quarter mile...

  3. 40 CFR 147.2554 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2554 Section... Aquifer exemptions. In accordance with §§ 144.7(b) and 146.4 of this chapter, those portions of aquifers... injection activity. This exemption applies only to the aquifers tabulated below, and includes those...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1652 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1652 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifer or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  5. 40 CFR 147.302 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.302 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers of their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions according to applicable procedures without codifying such exemptions in...

  6. 40 CFR 147.102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.102 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1952 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1952 Section....1952 Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in... future exempt other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying...

  8. 40 CFR 147.3003 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.3003 Section..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3003 Aquifer exemptions. (a) Aquifer... described in appendix A are hereby exempted. The exempted aquifers are defined by a one-quarter mile...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1952 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1952 Section....1952 Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in... future exempt other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2554 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2554 Section... Aquifer exemptions. In accordance with §§ 144.7(b) and 146.4 of this chapter, those portions of aquifers... injection activity. This exemption applies only to the aquifers tabulated below, and includes those...

  11. 40 CFR 147.3003 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.3003 Section..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3003 Aquifer exemptions. (a) Aquifer... described in appendix A are hereby exempted. The exempted aquifers are defined by a one-quarter mile...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1652 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1652 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifer or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1652 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1652 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifer or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1652 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1652 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifer or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  15. 40 CFR 147.102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.102 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  16. 40 CFR 147.2554 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2554 Section... Aquifer exemptions. In accordance with §§ 144.7(b) and 146.4 of this chapter, those portions of aquifers... injection activity. This exemption applies only to the aquifers tabulated below, and includes those...

  17. 40 CFR 147.102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.102 Section... Aquifer exemptions. (a) This section identifies any aquifers or their portions exempted in accordance with... other aquifers or portions, according to applicable procedures, without codifying such exemptions...

  18. 40 CFR 147.2554 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2554 Section... Aquifer exemptions. In accordance with §§ 144.7(b) and 146.4 of this chapter, those portions of aquifers... injection activity. This exemption applies only to the aquifers tabulated below, and includes those...

  19. 40 CFR 147.3003 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.3003 Section..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3003 Aquifer exemptions. (a) Aquifer... described in appendix A are hereby exempted. The exempted aquifers are defined by a one-quarter mile radius...

  20. Astronomy in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Peña, W. E.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy in Colombia has been done since the beginning of the nineteen century when in 1803 was built one of the oldest or maybe the older astronomical Observatory of America. This is a very beautiful, historical and ancient building. A small dome with a small telescope is also inside the university campus . The Observatory leads since then the development of astronomy in Colombia as a professional science. At the present time a Master Program and a Specialization Program are successfully carried out with a good number of smart young students. The Observatory has a staff of eleven professors all with a master degree in sciences; two of them are PhD and in a couple of years five staff members will be PhD in Physics. With some international collaboration they will shoulder in few years a doctoral astronomical program. There are several research lines mainly in the fields of Astrometry, Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy, Cosmology, Astrostatistic and Astrobiology. Three research groups have got recognition from the governmental institution that supports the research in sciences COLCIENCIAS. Several papers have been published in national and international journals. Besides the professional line in astronomy, the Observatory sponsors several non professional Colombian astronomical groups that work enthusiastically in the field of astronomy.

  1. Colombia`s new light, sweet Cusiana crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-12-11

    If plans continue as scheduled, production of Colombia`s Cusiana crude will reach nearly 200,000 b/d by year-end 1995, and 500,000 b/d by year-end 1997, following expansion of Colombia`s Central Pipeline System (OGJ, Nov. 20, P. 27). Cusiana was discovered in 1991. The field covers an area roughly 16 miles x 4 miles in the foothills of the Eastern Andes. Combined with a neighboring field, reserves of the 36{degree} API, 0.25 wt% sulfur crude are estimated to be 2 billion bbl. Cusiana`s refining characteristics include: low concentrations of sulfur, nitrogen, and metals; low acidity; and low residual yields. The crude also has excellent characteristics for producing feeds for reforming, fluid catalytic cracking, and coking, say the partners. Table 1 shows Cusiana`s true boiling point data. Table 2 lists properties of relatively narrow heavy distillate fractions.

  2. Contrasting definitions for the term `karst aquifer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Stephen R. H.; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Alexander, E. Calvin; Davies, Gareth J.; Schindel, Geary M.

    2017-08-01

    It is generally considered that karst aquifers have distinctly different properties from other bedrock aquifers. A search of the literature found five definitions that have been proposed to differentiate karst aquifers from non-karstic aquifers. The five definitions are based upon the presence of solution channel networks, hydraulic conductivities >10-6 m/s, karst landscapes, channels with turbulent flow, and caves. The percentage of unconfined carbonate aquifers that would classify as `karst' ranges from <1 to >50%.

  3. Statistical analysis of aquifer-test results for nine regional aquifers in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Angel; Early, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This report, prepared as part of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project, presents a compilation, summarization, and statistical analysis of aquifer-test results for nine regional aquifers in Louisiana. These are from youngest to oldest: The alluvial, Pleistocene, Evangeline, Jasper, Catahoula, Cockfield, Sparta, Carrizo, and Wilcox aquifers. Approximately 1,500 aquifer tests in U.S. Geological Survey files in Louisiana were examined and 1,001 were input to a computer file. Analysis of the aquifer test results and plots that describe aquifer hydraulic characteristics were made for each regional aquifer. Results indicate that, on the average, permeability (hydraulic conductivity) generally tends to decrease from the youngest aquifers to the oldest. The most permeable aquifers in Louisiana are the alluvial and Pleistocene aquifers; whereas, the least permeable are the Carrizo and Wilcox aquifers. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Catalogue of Tephritidae of Colombia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present Catalogue includes 93 species and 23 genera of Tephritidae that have been recorded in Colombia. Four subfamilies (Blepharoneurinae, Dacinae, Trypetinae and Tephritinae), and eight tribes (Acrotaeniini, Carpomyini, Dacini, Eutretini, Myopitini, Noeetini, Tephritini, and Toxotrypanini) are...

  5. Aquifer thermal energy storage program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Demonstration Program is to stimulate the interest of industry by demonstrating the feasibility of using a geological formation for seasonal thermal energy storage, thereby, reducing crude oil consumption, minimizing thermal pollution, and significantly reducing utility capital investments required to account for peak power requirements. This purpose will be served if several diverse projects can be operated which will demonstrate the technical, economic, environmental, and institutional feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage systems.

  6. In Brief: Assessing carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    An assessment of water quality in 12 carbonate aquifers, mostly in the eastern and central United States, found that while water quality in the aquifers was highly variable, most of the samples met drinking water standards. The study, “Factors affecting water quality in selected carbonate aquifers in the United States, 1993-2005,” was released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on 26 June. According to the study, carbonate aquifers provide about 20% of the groundwater used as drinking water in the United States. The study, which included sample results for 151 chemical constituents or physical properties in 1042 wells and springs across 20 states, found that contaminants “were most often detected at concentrations less than human-health benchmarks except for nitrate.” The study also indicated that “the occurrence of anthropogenic contaminants was related to contaminant sources but also was affected by degree of aquifer confinement, ground-water age, and redox status. Areas with higher amounts of agricultural or urban land in unconfined aquifers were the most likely to have elevated concentrations of anthropogenic contaminants.”

  7. Epidemiology of rosacea in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Lili J; Motta, Adriana; Pabón, Juan G; Barona, Maria I; Meléndez, Esperanza; Orozco, Beatriz; Rojas, Ricardo F

    2017-05-01

    Prevalence of rosacea has been estimated around the world in the range of 0-22%. In Colombia, the prevalence of rosacea remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rosacea and the frequencies of its subtypes in Colombia. This cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted in six outpatient dermatology clinics across Colombia. A total of 33 dermatologists conducted a comprehensive medical history and physical examination for all rosacea patients seen at their offices over the course of 2 months. All patients who accepted to participate were encouraged to answer a survey about the history of their illness. Of 10,204 outpatients evaluated for rosacea between July and August 2014, 291 rosacea patients were included in this study. The prevalence of rosacea subtypes in this cohort was: 45.3% erythematotelangiectatic (ETR) (n = 132), 48.7% papulopustular (PPR) (n = 142), 4.8% phymatous (n = 14), and 1% ocular (n = 3). Overall, the prevalence in Colombia was 2.85%. Our data represent an important first step to understanding the current state of rosacea in Colombia. The prevalence of rosacea in Colombia is the highest in Latin America among a few reports published, which might be explained by geographic features. However, contrary to our expectations, the prevalence is lower than that in some European countries. We postulate that this finding may be due to methodological differences. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Space Radar Image of Ruiz Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This spaceborne radar image shows the Ruiz-Tolima volcanic region in central Colombia, about 150 kilometers 93 miles west of Bogata. The town of Manizales, Colombia, is the pinkish area in the upper right of the image.

  9. Characterising aquifer treatment for pathogens in managed aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Page, D; Dillon, P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S

    2010-01-01

    In this study the value of subsurface treatment of urban stormwater during Aquifer Storage Transfer Recovery (ASTR) is characterised using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) methodology. The ASTR project utilizes a multi-barrier treatment train to treat urban stormwater but to date the role of the aquifer has not been quantified. In this study it was estimated that the aquifer barrier provided 1.4, 2.6, >6.0 log(10) removals for rotavirus, Cryptosporidium and Campylobacter respectively based on pathogen diffusion chamber results. The aquifer treatment barrier was found to vary in importance vis-à-vis the pre-treatment via a constructed wetland and potential post-treatment options of UV-disinfection and chlorination for the reference pathogens. The risk assessment demonstrated that the human health risk associated with potable reuse of stormwater can be mitigated (disability adjusted life years, DALYs <1 × 10(-6)) if the aquifer is integrated with suitable post treatment options into a treatment train to attenuate pathogens and protect human health.

  10. Sea water in coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Hilton Hammond

    1964-01-01

    Investigations in the coastal part of the Biscayne aquifer, a highly productive aquifer of limestone and sand in the Miami area, Florida, show that the salt-water front is dynamically stable as much as 8 miles seaward of the position computed according to the Ghyben-Herzberg principle. This discrepancy results, at least in part, from the fact that the salt water in the Biscayne aquifer is not static, as explanations of the dynamic balance commonly assume. Cross sections showing lines of equal fresh-water potential indicate that during periods of heavy recharge, the fresh-water head is high enough to cause the fresh water, the salt water, and the zone of diffusion between them to move seaward. When the fresh-water head is low, salt water in the lower part of the aquifer intrudes inland, but some of the diluted sea water in the zone of diffusion continues to flow seaward. Thus, salt water circulates inland from the floor of the sea through the lower part of the aquifer becoming progressively diluted with fresh water to a line along which there is no horizontal component of flow, after which it moves upward and returns to the sea. This cyclic flow is demonstrated by a flow net which is constructed by the use of horizontal gradients determined from the low-head equipotential diagram. The flow net shows that about seven-eights of the total discharge at the shoreline originates as fresh water in inland parts of the aquifer. The remaining one-eighth represents a return of sea water entering the aquifer through the floor of the sea.

  11. Sequencing: Targeting Insurgents and Drugs in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    examines the overall effectiveness of two distinctly different strategies for dealing with the dual threat of drugs and terrorism in Colombia: President...Drug Trade, Coca, Counter-narcotics, FARC, FARC-EP, Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, Government of Colombia, Insurgency, Terrorism , Plan...threat of drugs and terrorism in Colombia: President Pastrana’s “drugs first” strategy and President Uribe’s unified campaign against both guerrillas

  12. Land Reform and Social Change in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Albert O.; And Others

    This conference report focuses on three major areas of interest: (1) land reform in Colombia, (2) social change in Popayan, and (3) implications for research in agrarian structure in Colombia. A case study dealing with Colombia's sequence of moves toward land reform over the last 40 years is reviewed. The impact of political factors and social…

  13. Land Reform and Social Change in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Albert O.; And Others

    This conference report focuses on three major areas of interest: (1) land reform in Colombia, (2) social change in Popayan, and (3) implications for research in agrarian structure in Colombia. A case study dealing with Colombia's sequence of moves toward land reform over the last 40 years is reviewed. The impact of political factors and social…

  14. The Colombia Seismological Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Chia, J. F.; Poveda, E.; Pedraza, P.

    2013-05-01

    The latest seismological equipment and data processing instrumentation installed at the Colombia Seismological Network (RSNC) are described. System configuration, network operation, and data management are discussed. The data quality and the new seismological products are analyzed. The main purpose of the network is to monitor local seismicity with a special emphasis on seismic activity surrounding the Colombian Pacific and Caribbean oceans, for early warning in case a Tsunami is produced by an earthquake. The Colombian territory is located at the South America northwestern corner, here three tectonic plates converge: Nazca, Caribbean and the South American. The dynamics of these plates, when resulting in earthquakes, is continuously monitored by the network. In 2012, the RSNC registered in 2012 an average of 67 events per day; from this number, a mean of 36 earthquakes were possible to be located well. In 2010 the network was also able to register an average of 67 events, but it was only possible to locate a mean of 28 earthquakes daily. This difference is due to the expansion of the network. The network is made up of 84 stations equipped with different kind of broadband 40s, 120s seismometers, accelerometers and short period 1s sensors. The signal is transmitted continuously in real-time to the Central Recording Center located at Bogotá, using satellite, telemetry, and Internet. Moreover, there are some other stations which are required to collect the information in situ. Data is recorded and processed digitally using two different systems, EARTHWORM and SEISAN, which are able to process and share the information between them. The RSNC has designed and implemented a web system to share the seismological data. This innovative system uses tools like Java Script, Oracle and programming languages like PHP to allow the users to access the seismicity registered by the network almost in real time as well as to download the waveform and technical details. The coverage

  15. Burden of epilepsy in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Ayala, Alejandro; Nariño, Daniel; Rosselli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy lays an important burden on healthcare systems and society in general. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) have been developed to compare the burden of this disease both between conditions and between geographical boundaries. With improving data on disease incidence and prevalence in Colombia, we can refine our DALYs-based estimates. Using different strategies, including the official healthcare provision database and death certificates, as well as extrapolation from published neuroepidemiologic studies, we estimated the incidence and prevalence by age groups, disease duration and attributable mortality. With this information we calculated DALYs for the year 2012. Overall, it was found that epilepsy was responsible for 0.88% of all deaths in Colombia. A total of 5.25 DALYs per 1,000 person-years are lost due to epilepsy in Colombia, 75% of which (3.91 DALYs) are due to premature mortality, with a higher burden in men (6.12 DALYs) than in women (4.41 DALYs). We reported new estimations on epilepsy incidence and prevalence by age groups in Colombia and conclude that DALYs lost due to epilepsy in Colombia are almost double the previous figure, mostly because of the underestimation of attributable mortality. With this figure, epilepsy ranks 12th instead of 19th in the list of the most important causes of DALYs lost. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Discoveries, financial strength lift Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-07-15

    Colombia plans to play a growing role in international oil markets while expanding and privatizing its domestic gas and electricity industries. Officials intend to curb the government`s spending on energy development while increasing its energy revenues. Their plans imply growing participation in energy projects by private companies. Also certain to help attract investment capital is the country`s new standing as a world-class oil and gas province. Discovery of Cusiana oil field in 1989 and of Cupiagua oil field in 1992 added 2 billion bbl of oil and 3 tcf of gas reserves, effectively doubling Colombia`s totals. Exploration near the giant Cusiana-Cupiagua complex, in the eastern foothills of the Andes about 100 miles northeast of Bogota, has turned up an estimated 10 tcf of gas and 1 billion bbl of oil in Volcanera field and two discoveries overlying it, Florena and Pauto Sur. Colombia`s critics say that, despite its laudable economic stability and improving oil and gas prospectivity, political impediments could interfere with progress toward its lofty energy goals. The paper discusses the heightened political risks, unequal pace of reform, gas pipeline construction, gas regulations, tying gas to power, reform in the oil sector, achieving sustainable change, and the appeal to investors.

  17. Suggested Operating Procedures for Aquifer Pumping Tests

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is intended as a primer, describing the process for the design and performance of an “aquifer test” (how to obtain reliable data from a pumping test) to obtain accurate estimates of aquifer parameters.

  18. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  19. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  20. Hydrogeological Characterization of the Middle Magdalena Valley - Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Maria Cristina; Riva, Monica; Donado, Leonardo David; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    We provide a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the complex aquifer system of the Middle Magdalena Valley, Colombia. The latter is comprised by 3 sub-basins within which 7 blocks have been identified for active exploration and potential production of oil and gas. As such, there is a critical need to establish modern water resources management practices in the area to accommodate the variety of social, environmental and industrial needs. We do so by starting from a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the system and focus on: (a) a detailed hydrogeological reconnaissance of the area leading to the definition of the main hydrogeological units; (b) the collection, organization and analysis of daily climatic data from 39 stations available in the region; and (c) the assessment of the groundwater flow circulation through the formulation of a conceptual and a mathematical model of the subsurface system. Groundwater flow is simulated in the SAM 1.1 aquifer located in the Middle Magdalena Valley with the objective of showing and evaluating alternative conceptual hydrogeological modeling alternatives. We focus here on modeling results at system equilibrium (i.e., under steady-state conditions) and assess the value of available information in the context of the candidate modeling strategies we consider. Results of our modeling effort are conducive to the characterization of the distributed hydrogeological budget and the assessment of critical areas as a function of the conceptualization of the system functioning and data avilability.

  1. The Citronelle aquifers in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    The Citronelle aquifers consist of sand and gravel of Pliocene age that forms a discontinuous outcrop area of about 6,000 square miles in southern Mississippi. The beds dip to the south at an average rate of about 6 feet per mile. The unconfined aquifers are used mostly for domestic and farm use but also supply water to several municipalities and industries. The average saturated thickness of the aquifers is about 45 feet. This physically limits drawdown space and, although specific capacities are high, yields generally do not exceed a few hundred gallons per minute. Water levels have not declined significantly because withdrawals are small. Water quality is generally good although in some places there are objectionally high concentrations iron and in some the water is acidic.

  2. Confined aquifers as viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Seymour, Justin R; Fitch, Alison J; Simons, Keryn L; Speck, Peter G; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about viral diversity and abundance in deep groundwater reserves is limited. We found that the viral community inhabiting a deep confined aquifer in South Australia was more similar to reclaimed water communities than to the viral communities in the overlying unconfined aquifer community. This similarity was driven by high relative occurrence of the single-stranded DNA viral groups Circoviridae, Geminiviridae and Microviridae, which include many known plant and animal pathogens. These groups were present in a 1500-year-old water situated 80 m below the surface, which suggests the potential for long-term survival and spread of potentially pathogenic viruses in deep, confined groundwater. Obtaining a broader understanding of potentially pathogenic viral communities within aquifers is particularly important given the ability of viruses to spread within groundwater ecosystems.

  3. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  4. Mantidflies of Colombia (Neuroptera, Mantispidae).

    PubMed

    Ardila-Camacho, Adrian; García, Alexander

    2015-03-26

    This study revises the Mantispidae of Colombia. 151 adult specimens of 12 entomological museums of Colombia were examined and identified. On the basis of the specimens studied and a comprehensive literature search, it is determined that 20 nominal species (including two doubtful records) plus four proposed as new to science, in ten genera (Anchieta, Plega, Trichoscelia, Gerstaeckerella, Buyda, Climaciella, Dicromantispa, Entanoneura, Leptomantispa, and Zeugomantispa) and, three subfamilies (Symphrasinae, Drepanicinae, and Mantispinae) occur in Colombia. In addition, A. eurydella (Westwood), C. amapaensis Penny and P. fasciatella (Westwood) are redescribed, providing complementary information to the original descriptions. A list of Colombian Mantispidae, distribution maps and taxonomic keys to subfamilies, genera and species are included. Illustrations of the external morphology and male genitalia are provided for selected species. The taxonomic status of P. hagenella (Westwood) is discussed, and its diagnostic characters are redefined. Anchieta remipes (Gerstaecker) is newly transferred to this genus from Trichoscelia.

  5. 40 CFR 147.1352 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1352 Section 147.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. Those portions of aquifers within one-quarter mile of existing Class II wells...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1352 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1352 Section 147.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. Those portions of aquifers within one-quarter mile of existing Class II wells...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1352 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1352 Section 147.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. Those portions of aquifers within one-quarter mile of existing Class II wells...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1352 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1352 Section 147.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. Those portions of aquifers within one-quarter mile of existing Class II wells...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1352 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1352 Section 147.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. Those portions of aquifers within one-quarter mile of existing Class II wells are...

  10. Late Devonian acanthodians from Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrow, Carole J.; Janvier, Philippe; Villarroel, Carlos

    2003-06-01

    Acanthodian remains occur in micaceous siltstone lenses (presumed to have been deposited during a marine incursion) in the Cuche Formation (?Frasnian) of northeast Colombia. The acanthodians are represented by patches of scales from climatiidid Nostolepis sp. cf. N. gaujensis and a fin spine and scales from a new diplacanthid. Type material of N. gaujensis is from the Frasnian Sventoji regional stage in the Baltic, and Nostolepis sp. cf. N. gaujensis has been recorded in the Frasnian of Iran, as well as from Colombia. The new diplacanthid taxon shows affinity to Baltic and Antarctic diplacanthids. The fauna thus shows possible links to both Gondwanan and Euramerican acanthodian assemblages.

  11. Hydrogeologic atlas of aquifers in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Bobay, K.E.; Greeman, T.K.; Hoover, M.E.; Cohen, D.A.; Fowler, K.K.; Woodfield, M.C.; and Durbin, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifers in 12 water-management basins of Indiana are identified in a series of 104 hydrogeologic sections and 12 maps that show the thickness and configuration of aquifers. The vertical distribution of water-bearing units and a generalized potentiometric profile are shown along 3,500 miles of section lines that were constructed from drillers' logs of more than 4,200 wells. The horizontal scale of the sections is 1:125,000. Maps of aquifers showing the areal distribution of each aquifer type were drawn at a scale of 1:500,000. Unconsolidated aquifers are the most widely used aquifers in Indiana and include surficial, buried, and discontinuous layers of sand and gravel. Most of the surficial sand and gravel is in large outwash plains in northern Indiana and along the major rivers. Buried sand and gravel aquifers are interbedded with till deposits in much of the northern two-thirds of Indiana. Discontinuous sand and gravel deposits are present as isolated lenses, primarily in glaciated areas. The bedrock aquifers generally have lower yields than most of the sand and gravel aquifers; however, bedrock aquifers are areally widespread and are an important source of water. Bedrock aquifer types consist of carbonates; sandstones; complexly interbedded sandstones, siltstones, shales, limestones, and coals; and an upper weathered zone in low permeability rock. Carbonate aquifers underlie about one-half of Indiana and are the most productive of the bedrock aquifers. The other principal bedrock aquifer type, sandstone, underlies large areas in the southwestern one-fifth of Indiana. No aquifer is known to be present in the southeastern corner of Indiana.

  12. Biblored, Colombia's Innovative Library Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballero, Maria Cristina

    This report describes Biblored, the library network in Bogota, Colombia, that received the 2002 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Access to Learning Award. Biblored is a network of 19 libraries that attract about 200,000 users per month and serve some of the poorest neighborhoods in Bogota. The network's success in making information and…

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  14. Colombia. America = Las Americas [Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; Doran, Sandra

    Written for teachers to use with migrant children in elementary grades to highlight the many Americas, this bilingual English/Spanish social studies resource booklet provides historical and cultural background information on Colombia and features biographies of Colombian leaders and artists. A table of contents indicates the language--Spanish or…

  15. Bogota--Colombia's thriving capital.

    PubMed

    Hakkert, R

    1987-05-01

    Like most of its Latin American counterparts, Colombia is rapidly urbanizing. Home to 20% of Colombia's urban population and the largest industrial agglomeration in the nation, Bogota shares its dominance with several other large Colombian cities. Projections compiled from the 1973 census--the latest census available-- project the 1980 population of Bogota at 4 to 5.1 million. Government estimates peg Bogota's 1990 population at 8.5 million people. Most of Bogota's best neighborhoods now lie to the north of the city. On the whole, housing contrasts in Bogota are not as stark as in some other Latin American cities, although the estimated 1980 housing deficit of 210,000 units led to significant self-help construction. Women have made dramatic in-roads into equalizing educational attainment with men. Among the city's most important problems is unemployment. Completed family size in Bogota has plummeted since the inception of family planning programs in the early 1960s. Between 1956 and 1973, Colombia's per capita income increased by about 45%, but the increase was more rapid in Bogota, where per capita incomes in 1970 were about 60% higher than the national average. Much of the current in-depth data on Bogota comes from the World Bank research project known as the City Study. Much of the data in this profile of Bogota came from the analysis of this survey data, presented in World Bank Research publications. Rather than from Colombia's last census of 1973.

  16. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P.; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David

    2007-01-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that >21% of the serum samples had antibodies against spotted fever group rickettsiae. PMID:18214179

  17. Solving Colombia’s Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-07

    parties for political control during the period from 1948 to 1953.15 “During this period, referred to as ‘La Violencia ,’ groups of armed men paid by...surprise to those familiar with the Colombia government history of mishandling foreign aid in the war against drugs and in their parallel inability to

  18. Colombia. America = Las Americas [Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; Doran, Sandra

    Written for teachers to use with migrant children in elementary grades to highlight the many Americas, this bilingual English/Spanish social studies resource booklet provides historical and cultural background information on Colombia and features biographies of Colombian leaders and artists. A table of contents indicates the language--Spanish or…

  19. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.; Coble, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of ten aquifers separated by nine confining units. From top to bottom the aquifers are: the surficial aquifer, Yorktown aquifer, Pungo River aquifer, Castle Hayne aquifer, Beaufort aquifer, Peedee aquifer, Black Creek aquifer, upper Cape Fear aquifer, lower Cape Fear aquifer, and the Lower Cretaceous aquifer. The uppermost aquifer (the surficial aquifer in most places) is a water-table aquifer and the bottom of the system is underlain by crystalline bedrock. The sedimentary deposits forming the aquifers are of Holocene to Cretaceous age and are composed mostly of sand with lesser amounts of gravel and limestone. Confining units between aquifers are composed primarily of clay and silt. The thickness of the aquifers ranges from zero along the Fall Line to more than 10,000 feet at Cape Hatteras. Prominent structural features are the increasing easterly homoclinal dip of the sediments and the Cape Fear arch, the axis of which trends in a southeast direction. The stratigraphic continuity is determined from correlations of 161 geophysical logs along with data from drillers' and geologists' logs. Aquifers were defined by means of these logs plus water-level and water-quality data and evidence of the continuity of pumping effects. Eighteen hydrogeologic sections depict the correlation of these aquifers throughout the Coastal Plain.

  20. Republic of Colombia. Country Profile.

    PubMed

    Canak, W L

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of Colombia covers population growth, age distribution, regions and cities, households and families, housing and construction, ethnicity and religion, labor force and income, education, communications and transportation, and sources of information. Colombia's 1985 population is estimated at 28.7 million, making it the largest country in South America after Brazil. Colombia's growth in the last 5 years has averaged 2% annually, compared with an average of 2.3% a year for Latin America as a region. Colombia's moderate growth has been accompanied by shifts in population distribution and composition. In particular a massive internal migration has increased the urban population from roughly 1/3 in th 1950s to 2/3 at this time. Improved housing, education, and access to public health facilities have accompanied this rural to urban migration. At this time Colombia is holding its own economically and anticipates economic growth based on recovery in the US and Europe as well as on its own coal exports. Colombia's fertility rate, at 3.9 children/women in 1980-81, is the lowest in tropical South America but higher than the total fertility rate in the more temperate South American countries. Compared with other South American nations, Colombia's crude birthrate of 29-31 births/1000 population is low. Reflecting the impact of urban migration and the widescale effectiveness of family planning programs initiated in the 1960s and 1970s, median age has increased from 17 years in 1970 to almost 21 years in 1985. About 37% of the population is aged 14 or under at this time. The population aged 65 and older is only 3.8% and by 2000 will constitute only 4.5% of the population. From 1951-82 the urban population grew at 4.4% annually, exceeding the national average of 2.6% and the rural growth rate of less than 1%. Since 1982 the urban growth rate has been about 3% annually. In 1964 the average completed family size was 6.8 children. By 1980 it was 3.9 children. A steady

  1. 40 CFR 149.3 - Critical Aquifer Protection Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. 149... (CONTINUED) SOLE SOURCE AQUIFERS Criteria for Identifying Critical Aquifer Protection Areas § 149.3 Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. A Critical Aquifer Protection Area is either: (a) All or part of an area...

  2. 40 CFR 149.3 - Critical Aquifer Protection Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. 149... (CONTINUED) SOLE SOURCE AQUIFERS Criteria for Identifying Critical Aquifer Protection Areas § 149.3 Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. A Critical Aquifer Protection Area is either: (a) All or part of an area...

  3. 40 CFR 149.3 - Critical Aquifer Protection Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. 149... (CONTINUED) SOLE SOURCE AQUIFERS Criteria for Identifying Critical Aquifer Protection Areas § 149.3 Critical Aquifer Protection Areas. A Critical Aquifer Protection Area is either: (a) All or part of an area...

  4. Aquifer Salinization by Storm Overwash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. P.; Evans, D. G.

    2001-12-01

    Overwash processes not only affect the morphology of barrier islands, they also introduce saltwater to surficial coastal aquifers by infiltration (saltwater intrusion from the top). Hatteras Island, North Carolina, USA is particularly susceptible to saltwater overwash because of its geography and the frequency with which tropical and extra-tropical storms strike the area. Hurricane Emily inundated the island in 1993 with saline water from Pamlico Sound. The floodwaters from overwash reached as far as 1000 meters into the interior of the island and recharged the shallow Buxton Woods Aquifer, raising salinity levels from approximately 40 mg/L prior to flooding to nearly 280 mg/L within several weeks of flooding. By 1997, chloride levels still had not returned to pre-storm levels. We use one-dimensional analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation to simulate chloride transport within the aquifer utilizing a pulse source with linear superposition. We calibrate this model using chloride breakthrough curves observed from water wells on the island. Initial simulations show that a pulse duration of five days provides the best fit to the data. Simulation of chloride breakthrough at two locations demonstrates that higher gradients advect chloride further into the aquifer, causing higher chloride concentrations and increasing the duration of contamination. The Cape Hatteras region historically is susceptible to several hurricanes in a single season. In order to analyze the effect of multiple overwash events on water quality, we use predictive simulations to show the effect of two overwash events separated by different time lags. Simulations indicate that higher gradients and short time lags between overwash events result in chloride MCL violations that persist for more than four months.

  5. Arsenic, microbes and contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.

    2005-01-01

    The health of tens of millions of people world-wide is at risk from drinking arsenic-contaminated well water. In most cases this arsenic occurs naturally within the sub-surface aquifers, rather than being derived from identifiable point sources of pollution. The mobilization of arsenic into the aqueous phase is the first crucial step in a process that eventually leads to human arsenicosis. Increasing evidence suggests that this is a microbiological phenomenon.

  6. Aquifer storage capacity and maximum annual yield from long-term aquifer fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2008-03-01

    Long-term time series data of aquifer recharge, groundwater extraction, and discharge are used to estimate aquifer storage capacity and maximum annual yield. Aquifer storage capacity is defined as the maximum volume of water that can be stored in an aquifer. It is estimated using a transient water-balance approach. The maximum annual yield is defined as the maximum combined groundwater extraction plus discharge that can be sustained in an aquifer judged by the historical record of recharge. It is determined according to a graphical mass-curve method. These two quantities are useful in aquifer characterization and groundwater management, the apportionment of groundwater rights and aquifer storage and recovery operations being two frequent applications. Time series data from the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA, illustrate the application of the methods presented.

  7. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  8. The Sparta aquifer system in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcome, Roy

    1976-01-01

    A large amount of information is available on the aquifers of Mississippi.  Reports resulting from various areal studies have described the ground-water resources of the areas concerned, but no reports dealing specifically with the entire Mississippi occurrence of individual aquifer systems have previously been prepared.  A series of "aquifer atlases" was deemed the most effective way to describe the character, the potential, and the extent of development of the aquifers and thereby provide water managers with data needed for efficient utilization of available resources.  This report on the Sparta aquifer system is the third in the series.  Information on the aquifers was obtained in the cooperative programs of the U.S. Geological Survey with the Mississippi Board of Water Commissioners and other State and Federal agencies.

  9. Aquifer thermal-energy-storage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzle, W. J.; Lecroy, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    A model aquifer was constructed to simulate the operation of a full size aquifer. Instrumentation to evaluate the water flow and thermal energy storage was installed in the system. Numerous runs injecting warm water into a preconditioned uniform aquifer were made. Energy recoveries were evaluated and agree with comparisons of other limited available data. The model aquifer is simulated in a swimming pool, 18 ft by 4 ft, which was filled with sand. Temperature probes were installed in the system. A 2 ft thick aquifer is confined by two layers of polyethylene. Both the aquifer and overburden are sand. Four well configurations are available. The system description and original tests, including energy recovery, are described.

  10. PLAN COLOMBIA: Some Differing Perspectives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    units to their frontier with Colombia. Peru, while President Fujimori was in charge, showed a willingness even to confront the guerrillas militarily...contrast to the position of former President Fujimori of Peru, President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela has shown evident sympathy for the Colombian...could be temporary, as well as an early end to acts of personal terrorism . These agreements would be effective tests of whether both sides in the

  11. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Studies of Mosquitoes of the Genus Haemagogus in Colombia (Diptera, Culicidae). Am. J. Hyg., 43: 13-28. Lane, J. 1953. Neotropical Culicidae...malariae and P. ovale). Female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the exclusive vectors of human malaria. During feeding, the mosquito ingests...birds are implicated reservoirs. The biting midge, Culicoides paraensis, is a proven vector. Culex quinquefasciatus is also capable of transmission

  12. Cerrejon puts Colombia in spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, P.C.

    1983-11-01

    The Cerrejon project in Colombia is described. Production will commence within 2 years and the operation is likely to become one of the largest bituminous coal mines in the world, scheduled to produce 15 million t/y by opencast working. The geology of the site is indicated. Of the 55 seams, 40 will be worked during the lifetime of the mine. All the coal is destined for export.

  13. A Critique of Plan Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-17

    U.S . Department of State A paper submitted to the faculty of the Naval...Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S . Department of State . March 2005. <http://www.state.gov/g/inl/rls/nrcpt/2005/vol1/html/42363.htm> [26 April 2005...www.lawg.org/Misc/Publications.htm> [15 May 2005]. “Support for Plan Colombia.” U.S . Department of State .

  14. An evaluation of aquifer intercommunication between the unconfined and Rattlesnake Ridge aquifers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.

    1987-10-01

    During 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study of a portion of the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer (confined aquifer) that lies beneath the B Pond - Gable Mountain Pond area of the Hanford Site. The purpose was to determine the extent of intercommunication between the unconfined aquifer and the uppermost regionally extensive confined aquifer, referred to as the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer. Hydraulic head data and chemical data were collected from the ground water in the study area during December 1986. The hydraulic head data were used to determine the effects caused by water discharged to the ground from B Pond on both the water table of the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric surface of the confined aquifer. The chemical data were collected to determine the extent of chemical constituents migrating from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Analysis of chemical constituents in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer demonstrated that communication between the unconfined and confined aquifers had occurred. However, the levels of contaminants found in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer during this study were below the DOE Derived Concentration Guides.

  15. [Violence and health in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Franco Agudelo, S

    1997-02-01

    In Colombia, violence seems uncontrollable. Along with massacres and group killings of astonishing cruelty, there are also kidnappings and disappearances, abuse of children and the elderly, and rape of young adolescents. Every day, without respite, Columbians are witnesses or victims of street crimes as well as racial, sexual, and socioeconomic discrimination. Unwillingly, they become agents of aggression in public transport, at home, at school, and at work. Colombia has the highest rates of mortality from homicide in the world. Apart from the enormous institutional burden that violence imposes on the health services and forensic medicine, it now constitutes the principal public health problem in the country. To confront it, the health sector must develop policies and finance actions, develop innovative ways to train personnel, implement public education processes, and devote more effort and greater creativity to research, which up to now has provided some, but not enough, important answers. Violence, which is the substitution of force for any type of dialogue, must be considered within the context of life and health. This it not merely an attempt to rationalize violence, much less to substitute words or reflection for action, but rather an attempt to understand it in depth in order to search for alternatives. With that goal, this article analyzes the subject of violence in Colombia, principally from the perspective of its effect on the health of the citizens and its implications for the health sector. The author fully recognizes the subjectivity and limitations of the views he expresses herein.

  16. Prevention of School Desertion in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Colombia has been ravaged for over 40-years by escalating civil conflict and more than half of its population of 42 million live below the poverty line. As a result, many children and young people are excluded from school and drop out rates of those who gain places are high. It is in Bogota, the capital of Colombia, where many displaced families…

  17. Barriers to Combating Human Trafficking in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    developing 107 La Republica de Colombia Decreto 1974 de 1996, 1974, vol. 42.912, 1996, http://www.icbf.gov.co/cargues/avance/docs/decreto_1974_1996.htm...x=37. La Republica de Colombia Decreto 1974 de 1996. 1974. Vol. 42.912, 1996. http://www.icbf.gov.co/cargues/avance/docs/decreto_1974_1996.htm

  18. Prevention of School Desertion in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Colombia has been ravaged for over 40-years by escalating civil conflict and more than half of its population of 42 million live below the poverty line. As a result, many children and young people are excluded from school and drop out rates of those who gain places are high. It is in Bogota, the capital of Colombia, where many displaced families…

  19. Discoveries, high potential spur interest in Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart-Gordon, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    Colombia's Llanos basin offers the chance of discovering giant stratigraphic fields. Small to medium structural fields are also attractive thanks to the terms of Colombia's association contracts. This work reviews Llanos geology and recent discoveries, and outlines Ecopetrol's drilling and completion practices.

  20. How Military Actions Affected Citizen Security During Plan Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Paper No. 700, Banco de la Republica , Bogotá, Colombia, 2012), 3. 35 Colombia in a positive light. USAID provides a typical example, declaring, “Plan...First Version of the Democratic Security Policy in Colombia.” Working Paper No. 700, Banco de la Republica , Bogotá, Colombia, 2012. ———. “Plan

  1. Internal displacement in Colombia: Fifteen distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for "victims of armed conflict," with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia's unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement.

  2. Selected aquifer-test information for the coastal plain aquifers of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, W.R.; Newcome, Roy

    1986-01-01

    Aquifer and well hydraulic characteristics were determined from more than 100 multiple-well and single-well aquifer tests in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina and tabulated by county. Multiple-well aquifer tests were analyzed by the This method for nonleaky aquifers and the Hantush-Jacob method for leaky aquifers. Single-well tests were analyzed by straight line solution techniques for drawdown and recovery tests. Specific-capacity data are presented for many areas where aquifer-test information is sparse. The characteristics determined are based largely on well performance tests conducted by well drillers and consulting engineers. Although use of this information has many limitations, it has value in establishing transmissivity and storage coefficient values for the Coastal Plain aquifers. (Peters-PTT)

  3. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  4. Geohydrology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez R, J.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer is summarized, with special emphasis on the initial production zone where the wells completed in the Alpha aquifer are located. These wells produce steam for power plant units 1 and 2. Brief comments also are made on the Beta aquifer, which underlies the Alpha aquifer in the Cerro Prieto I area and which extends to the east to what is known as the Cerro Prieto II and Cerro Prieto III areas. The location of the area studied is shown. The Alpha and Beta aquifers differ in their mineralogy and cementing mineral composition, temperatures, and piezometric levels. The difference in piezometric levels indicates that there is no local communication between the two aquifers. This situation has been verified by a well interference test, using well E-1 as a producer in the Beta aquifer and well M-46 as the observation well in the Alpha aquifer. No interference between them was observed. Information on the geology, geohydrology, and geochemistry of Cerro Prieto is presented.

  5. Overview of the Ogallala Aquifer Program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irrigation increased markedly on the Southern High Plains during the second half of the 20th century, drawing water primarily from the Ogallala Aquifer. During this time, irrigation sustained regional farm incomes and rural economies. Withdrawals from the aquifer, however, have exceeded recharge, re...

  6. Induced infiltration in aquifers with ambient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John L.

    1993-10-01

    Well water quality depends on the relative amounts of water drawn from the pumped aquifer and nearby surface water bodies, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands. Although a surface water body may normally gain water from the aquifer, pumping can reverse gradients, causing it to lose water near the well. Surface water then enters the well by induced infiltration. Two-dimensional vertically integrated models of induced infiltration are developed for various combinations of aquifer geometry and sources of recharge. The models, which have applications in wellhead protection, aquifer pollution characterization, and aquifer remediation, are presented graphically. They show that the propensity for and rate of induced infiltration are enhanced by higher pumping rates, proximity of the well to the stream, and the presence of nearby barrier boundaries. The propensity and rate are reduced by the presence of other surface water bodies. Ambient groundwater discharge rate to the surface water body also plays a role, but not its source, whether it is from local vertical recharge, lateral inflow, or both. The results are also largely indifferent to whether the aquifer transmissivity is assumed to be a constant, or a function of water table elevation. Finally, if the well is close enough to the surface water body, say, less than 5% of the aquifer width, then the aquifer acts as if it were semi-infinite.

  7. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  8. The Sparta Aquifer: A Sustainable Water Resource?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Paul W.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Sparta aquifer is an aquifer of regional importance within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. It consists of varying amounts of unconsolidated sand, inter-stratified with silt and clay lenses within the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group. It extends from south Texas, north into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and eastward into Mississippi and Alabama (fig. 1). On both the west and east sides of the Mississippi embayment, the Sparta aquifer is exposed at the surface (outcrops) and is locally unconfined; it becomes confined as it dips toward the axis of the embayment, (generally corresponding with the Mississippi River) and southward toward the Gulf of Mexico where it is deeply buried in the subsurface (Hosman, 1968). Generalized ground-water flow in the Sparta aquifer is from the outcrop areas to the axis (center) of the embayment (fig. 2). In Arkansas, the Sparta aquifer outcrops parallel to the Fall Line at the western extreme of the Mississippi embayment (the Fall Line is a line dividing the mountainous highlands of Arkansas from the lowland area); and the formation dips from its outcrop area to the southeast. The Sparta aquifer supplies water for municipalities, industries such as paper production, and to a lesser degree, irrigation of agricultural crops (fig. 3). This report highlights hydrologic conditions of the aquifer in Arkansas County as an example of how water use is affecting water levels.

  9. 40 CFR 147.2908 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2908 Section 147.2908 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...-Class II Wells § 147.2908 Aquifer exemptions. (a) After notice and opportunity for a public hearing,...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2908 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2908 Section 147.2908 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...-Class II Wells § 147.2908 Aquifer exemptions. (a) After notice and opportunity for a public hearing,...

  11. Geochemistry of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.; Osborn, Noel I.

    2009-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma provides water for public supply, farms, mining, wildlife conservation, recreation, and the scenic beauty of springs, streams, and waterfalls. A new understanding of the aquifer flow system was developed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study, done in 2003 through 2008 as a collaborative research project between the State of Oklahoma and the Federal government. The U.S. Geological Survey collected 36 water samples from 32 wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in 2004 through 2006 for geochemical analyses of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and dating tracers. The geochemical analyses were used to characterize the water quality in the aquifer, to describe the origin and movement of ground water from recharge areas to discharge at wells and springs, and to determine the age of water in the aquifer.

  12. Aquifer Vulnerability maps and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela

    2017-04-01

    The aquifer vulnerability maps to contamination are used worldwide by environmental agencies and water-resource managers with the aim of preserving the water resources and of evaluating the most suitable areas where to locate new settlements. In the parametric methods, more used to assess the groundwater contamination vulnerability, e.g. the DRASTIC and the AVI methods, an important role is played by the protective capacity of cover layers to the introduction and transport of contaminants into the aquifer. Therefore, these methods point out the importance of the "Depth to water" parameter, which represents, where the aquifer is unconfined, the depth of the piezometric level and, where the aquifer is confined, the top of the aquifer. This parameter is rarely variable in confined aquifers and in deep unconfined aquifers, as karst aquifers, where the piezometric oscillations are low, compared with the depth of the water table. On the contrary, in shallow aquifers of flat areas, where in addition a large number of human activities are practiced and the contamination risk is high, the piezometric level varies suddenly with the rainfall, and it is very sensitive to drought periods and climatic changes. This affects noticeably the "Depth to water" parameter and consequently the vulnerability maps (e.g. 3 m of piezometric lowering can produce a change in the DRASTIC index from 10 to 7…). To validate this hypothesis, the DRASTC and AVI methods have been applied on a shallow aquifer located in a flat area in Campania (Italy,) considering data corresponding to an average rainfall period and to a drought period.

  13. Protistan communities in aquifers: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novarino, G.; Warren, A.; Butler, H.; Lambourne, G.; Boxshall, A.; Bateman, J.; Kinner, N.E.; Harvey, R.W.; Mosse, R.A.; Teltsch, B.

    1997-01-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms (protists) are a very important component of microbial communities inhabiting groundwater aquifers This is not unexpected when one considers that many protists feed heterotrophically, by means of either phagotrophy (bacterivory) or osmotrophy. Protistan numbers are usually low (<102 per g dw of aquifer material) in pristine, uncontaminated aquifers but may increase by several orders of magnitude in aquifers subject to organic pout on Stoa flagellates (typically 2-3(5) ??m in size in situ) are by far the dominant protists in aquifers although amoebae and occasionally ciliates may also be present much lower numbers. A though a wealth of new taxonomic information is waiting to be brought to light, interest in the identity of aquifer protists is not exclusively academic If verified, the following hypotheses may prove to be important towards our understanding of the functioning of microbial communities in aquifers: (1) Differences in swimming behavior between species of flagellates lead to feeding heterogeneity and niche differentiation, implying that bacterivorous flagellates graze on different subsets of the bacterial community, and therefore play different roles in controlling bacterial densities. (2) Bacterivorous flagellates grazing on bacteria capable of degrading Organic compounds have an indirect effect on the overall rates of biodegradation.

  14. The Winona-Tallahatta Aquifer in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiers, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    This aquifer atlas describing the Winona-Tallahatta aquifer is the seventh in a series prepared in cooperation with the Mississippi Board of Water Commissioners. The atlas summarizes the large amount of unpublished data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and it describes the extent, character, and present utilization of the aquifer and its potential for additional development. The Winona-Tallahatta aquifer, which contains freshwater having less than 1,000 mg/liter of dissolved solids in about 25 percent of the State occurs in northwestern and central Mississippi. The water-bearing zones extend into Tennessee and become part of the Memphis aquifer. In Arkansas and Louisiana the aquifer is in the Cane River Formation. The Tallahatta Formation which is the basal unit of the Claiborne Group includes, in ascending order, the Meridian Sand, Basic City Shale, and Neshoba Sand Members. The Winona-Tallahatta aquifer is the source of water for only a few large water users, but is the source of water for hundreds of small-yield domestic and stock wells less than 200 feet deep. Total water use in the State in 1977 from the Winona-Tallahatta is estimated to be about 3 mdg. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Colombia staying the course on oil policies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Colombia plans to stay the course on oil policies that turned it into a significant crude exporter in the 1980s. Colombia's Minister of Mines and Energy Luis Fernando Vergara Munarriz said the new administration of President Cesar Gaviria Trujillo, elected May 27, 1990, essentially will maintain the previous administration's policies covering oil, gas, and petrochemical sectors. A strong exploration and development program pushed by state oil company Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos (Ecopetrol) separately and in concert with foreign operating companies have made energy the mainspring of Colombia's economic growth the past few years, broadening its economic base significantly.

  16. Transient slab flattening beneath Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Ramírez-Hoyos, L. F.; Monsalve, G.; Cardona, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-07-01

    Subduction of the Nazca and Caribbean Plates beneath northwestern Colombia is seen in two distinct Wadati Benioff Zones, one associated with a flat slab to the north and one associated with normal subduction south of 5.5°N. The normal subduction region is characterized by an active arc, whereas the flat slab region has no known Holocene volcanism. We analyze volcanic patterns over the past 14 Ma to show that in the mid-Miocene a continuous arc extended up to 7°N, indicating normal subduction of the Nazca Plate all along Colombia's Pacific margin. However, by 6 Ma, we find a complete cessation of this arc north of 3°N, indicating the presence of a far more laterally extensive flat slab than at present. Volcanism did not resume between 3°N and 6°N until after 4 Ma, consistent with lateral tearing and resteepening of the southern portion of the Colombian flat slab at that time.

  17. Road traffic injuries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deysi Yasmin; Fernández, Francisco José; Acero Velásquez, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are a leading public health problem in Colombia. Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, especially in the main urban centers of Bogotá, Medellin and Cali. Data analyzed in this report include official statistics from the National Police and the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences for 1996-2000, and results of a study conducted at the National University of Colombia in 2000. Methods from the Highway Capacity Manual were used for determining physical and technical variables, and a Geographical Information System tool was used for the location and spatial analysis of the road traffic crashes. Pedestrians accounted for close to 32% of injuries and 40% of the deaths from road traffic crashes. The problem of road traffic crashes existed predominately in urban areas. In the main urban centers, pedestrians constituted nearly 68% of road traffic crash victims. The high level of risky road use behaviors demonstrated by pedestrians and drivers, and inadequate infrastructure for safe mobility of pedestrians in some sections of the road network were the main contributing factors. Major improvements were achieved in Bogotá following enhancements to the municipal transport system and other policies introduced since 1995. In conclusion, policies and programs for improving road safety, in particular pedestrian safety, and strengthening urban planning are top priority.

  18. Pediatric Uveitis: Experience in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lonngi, Marcela; Aguilar, María Camila; Ríos, Hernán Andrés; Aristizábal-Duque, Cristhian H; Rodríguez, Francisco José; de-la-Torre, Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    To describe the clinical features of uveitis in children treated at two ophthalmologic centers in Bogotá, Colombia, in a 13 year-period. Retrospective observational clinical record review of pediatric children with diagnosis of uveitis. In total, 310 children were evaluated, 51.9% were female, mean age of 10.1 years. Posterior uveitis was the most common location (58.7%), of insidious onset (87.4%) and chronic course (78.1%). The most common etiology was infection (58.4%) caused by toxoplasmosis (76.8%). There was a statistically significant difference in visual acuity between anterior (20/68) and intermediate uveitis (20/70), compared with posterior uveitis (20/434) (p<0.05). This is the first study to report the clinical features of pediatric uveitis in Colombia, where infectious etiologies are the leading cause. It will improve awareness and knowledge of pediatric uveitis in developing countries, and contribute to the development of public health policies of pediatric visual health. Received 12 September 2015; revised 23 February 2016; accepted 25 February 2016; published online 18 May 2016.

  19. Colombia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that despite the usual violent interference from drug lords and the guerilla group ELN (National Liberation Army), Colombia's upstream sector continues to chug along. Production was up again last year, foreign operators are still signing exploration contracts, and a new pipeline complex connecting smaller producing oil fields with terminal facilities should bring another 80,000 bpd of capacity onstream by the end of this year. Officials intend to keep this pace of development moving along if they can, but they acknowledge that the rate that reserves are replaced must increase if Colombia is to avoid becoming a net importer by 1996. Operators added only 140 MMbbl from 1988 through 1990 versus a government target of 400 MMbbl. Exploration and development must be expanded, but Ecopetrol is hamstrung to do much more on its own. With the government draining revenue for domestic needs, Ecopetrol actually may have to slow down from current funding levels. So an increase in foreign operators' activity is needed.

  20. Hydrology of the Claiborne aquifer and interconnection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Gonthier, Gerard

    2017-04-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study, in cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, to define the hydrologic properties of the Claiborne aquifer and evaluate its connection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia. The effort involved collecting and compiling hydrologic data from the aquifer in subarea 4 of southwestern Georgia. Data collected for this study include borehole geophysical logs in 7 wells, and two 72-hour aquifer tests to determine aquifer properties.The top of the Claiborne aquifer extends from an altitude of about 200 feet above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) in Terrell County to 402 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County, Georgia. The base of the aquifer extends from an altitude of about 60 feet above NAVD 88 in eastern Sumter County to about 750 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County. Aquifer thickness ranges from about 70 feet in eastern Early County to 400 feet in Decatur County.The transmissivity of the Claiborne aquifer, determined from two 72-hour aquifer tests, was estimated to be 1,500 and 700 feet squared per day in Mitchell and Early Counties, respectively. The storage coefficient was estimated to be 0.0006 and 0.0004 for the same sites, respectively. Aquifer test data from Mitchell County indicate a small amount of leakage occurred during the test. Groundwater-flow models suggest that the source of the leakage was the underlying Clayton aquifer, which produced about 2.5 feet of drawdown in response to pumping in the Claiborne aquifer. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining unit between the Claiborne and Clayton aquifers was simulated to be about 0.02 foot per day.Results from the 72-hour aquifer tests run for this study indicated no interconnection between the Claiborne and overlying Upper Floridan aquifers at the two test sites. Additional data are needed to monitor the effects that increased withdrawals from the Claiborne aquifer may have on future water resources.

  1. Analysis of aquifer mineralization by paleodrainage channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Mineralization of groundwater resources is a problem in south-central Kansas, due to the penetration of saline water from Permian bedrock formations into the overlying alluvial aquifer. One of the mechanisms involved in the mineralization involves small bedrock features of high permeability located in places occupied by streams and rivers in past geological eras. These geological features are termed 'paleodrainage channels'. The permeability of the overlying aquifer can be significantly smaller than that of the channel fill material. The comparatively fast migration of saline water through these channels of high permeability is associated with the transfer of minerals into the overlying freshwater aquifer. This study applies a set of boundary layer approaches to quantify the process of mineral transfer from the channels into the aquifer. The methods used in the present study provide quick estimation and evaluation of the dilution of the channel flow, as well as mineral concentration profile changes in the mineralized zone created in the overlying aquifer. More generally, the method can also be useful for the analysis and evaluation of various types of groundwater contamination in heterogeneous aquifers. The application of the method is exemplified by a complete set of calculations characterizing the possible mineralization process at a specific channel in south central Kansas. Sensitivity analyses are performed and provide information about the importance of the various parameters that affect the mineralization process. Some possible scenarios for the aquifer mineralization phenomena are described and evaluated. It is shown that the channel mineralization may create either several stream tubes of the aquifer with high mineral concentration, or many stream tubes mineralized to a lesser extent. Characteristics of these two patterns of aquifer mineralization are quantified and discussed. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Aquifer properties determined from two analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Ayers, J.F.

    1998-09-01

    Many ground water flow and contaminant transport studies involve unconfined aquifers. Determination of reliable hydraulic properties of unconfined aquifers is therefore important. In the analysis of pumping test data, the quality of the determined aquifer parameters can be greatly improved by using a proper model of the aquifer system. Moench (1995) provided an analytical solution for flow to a well partially penetrating an unconfined aquifer. His solution, in contrast to the Neuman solution (1974), accounts for the noninstantaneous decline of the water table (delayed yield). Consequently, the calculated drawdown in these two solutions is different under certain circumstances, and this difference may therefore affect the computation of aquifer properties from pumping test data. This paper uses an inverse computational method to calculate four aquifer parameters as well as a delayed yield parameter, {alpha}{sub 1}, from pumping test data using both the Neuman (1974) and Moench (1995) solutions. Time-drawdown data sets from a pumping test in an unconfined alluvial aquifer near Grand Island, Nebraska, were analyzed. In single-well analyses, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values derived from the Moench solution are lower, but vertical hydraulic conductivity values are higher than those calculated from the Neuman solution. However, the hydraulic conductivity values in composite-well analyses from both solutions become very close. Furthermore, the Neuman solution produces similar hydraulic conductivity values in the single-well and composite-well analyses, but the Moench solution does not. While variable {alpha}{sub 1} seems to play a role in affecting the computation of aquifer parameters in the single-well analysis, a much smaller effect was observed in the composite-well analysis.

  3. Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, M.P.; Katz, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrochemistry of the surficial and intermediate aquifer systems in Florida reflects the lithology and mineralogy of units within each aquifer and sources of water to each aquifer. The surficial aquifer system consists of sand, sandstone, clay, limestone, and shell units that are recharged primarily by precipitation. Calcium bicarbonate was the major-ion water type for 53 percent of the surficial aquifer determinations; a mixed water type (no dominant ions) accounted for 37 percent of the determinations. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the surficial aquifer system was 341 milligrams per liter. The intermediate aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, sand, and sandstone, and sources of water include downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system and, in some areas, upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In northeastern and panhandle areas of Florida, water from the intermediate aquifer system had major-ion and dissolved-solids concentrations similar to water from the surficial aquifer system. In southwestern Florida, the water type in 67 percent of analyses was mixed, and the median dissolved-solids concentration was 642 milligrams per liter. In a northern area of southwestern Florida, hydrochemistry in the limestone aquifer of the intermediate aquifer system is similar to downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system. In a southern area, downward leakage from the surficial aquifer system has calcium and bicarbonate concentrations five times higher than in the northern area, and upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer contains sodium chloride type water from mixing with seawater. In southern southwest Florida, both the limestone aquifer and the overlying sandstone aquifer within the intermediate aquifer system had higher calcium, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations than the limestone aquifer in northern southwest Florida.

  4. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace aquifer covers approximately 82 square miles and supplies water for irrigation, domestic, municipal, and industrial use for the City of Enid and western Garfield County. The Quaternary-age Enid isolated terrace aquifer is composed of terrace deposits that consist of discontinuous layers of clay, sandy clay, sand, and gravel. The aquifer is unconfined and is bounded by the underlying Permian-age Hennessey Group on the east and the Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation of the Permian-age El Reno Group on the west. The Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation fills a channel beneath the thickest section of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in the midwestern part of the aquifer. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:62,500. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

  5. Solute changes during aquifer storage recovery testing in a limestone/clastic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirecki, J.E.; Campbell, B.G.; Conlon, K.J.; Petkewich, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Aquifer storage recovery (ASR) was tested in the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer near Charleston, South Carolina, to assess the feasibility for subsurface storage of treated drinking water. Water quality data obtained during two representative ASR tests were interpreted to show three things: (1) recovery efficiency of ASR in this geological setting; (2) possible changes in physical characteristics of the aquifer during ASR testing; and (3) water quality changes and potability of recovered water during short (one- and six-day) storage durations in the predominantly carbonate aquifer. Recovery efficiency for both ASR tests reported here was 54%. Successive ASR tests increased aquifer permeability of the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer. It is likely that aquifer permeability increased during short storage periods due to dissolution of carbonate minerals and amorphous silica in aquifer material by treated drinking water. Dissolution resulted in an estimated 0.3% increase in pore volume of the permeable zones. Ground water composition generally evolved from a sodium-calcium bicarbonate water to a sodium chloride water during storage and recovery. After short duration, stored water can exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) for chloride (250 mg/L). However, sulfate, fluoride, and trihalomethane concentrations remained below MCLs during storage and recovery.Aquifer storage recovery (ASR) was tested in the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer near Charleston, South Carolina, to assess the feasibility for subsurface storage of treated drinking water. Water quality data obtained during two representative ASR tests were interpreted to show three things: (1) recovery efficiency of ASR in this geological setting; (2) possible changes in physical characteristics of the aquifer during ASR testing; and (3) water quality changes and potability of recovered water during short (one- and six-day) storage durations in the predominantly

  6. Comparison of aquifer characteristics derived from local and regional aquifer tests.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randolph, R.B.; Krause, R.E.; Maslia, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the aquifer parameter values obtained through the analysis of a local and a regional aquifer test involving the same area in southeast Georgia is made in order to evaluate the validity of extrapolating local aquifer-test results for use in large-scale flow simulations. Time-drawdown and time-recovery data were analyzed by using both graphical and least-squares fitting of the data to the Theis curve. Additionally, directional transmissivity, transmissivity tensor, and angle of anisotropy were computed for both tests. -from Authors Georgia drawdown transmissivity regional aquifer tests

  7. Energy and natural resource policies in Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPedraja, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Despite being richly endowed with mineral, metal, and water resources, Colombia has enjoyed neither economic prosperity nor abundant energy. This book explores the history and development of Colombia's petroleum, natural gas, electric, coal, and atomic energy industries. The author surveys the political and economic factors - both domestic and international - that have shaped the nation's energy and resource policies during the last fifty years. The book revolves around two central issues: Why has the role of the Colombian state in energy matters grown so vastly while private sector involvement has diminished drastically Why has the state consistently followed policies that have hindered rather than helped the development of Colombia's energy resources The author concludes that the defense of class interests in Colombia has been the real motivation behind the nation's energy policies.

  8. El Cerrejon moves into the market. [Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.

    1985-10-01

    The article describes Colombia's El Cerrejon North Block coal project, a $3.2 billion undertaking that will establish the largest coal mine in South America and one of the biggest surface mines in the world. The first shipments from Colombia's new mine have begun, and it is projected that by 1989 the surface mine will invade the export market of three continents with 15 million mtpy.

  9. Colombia - A Case Study in Smart Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    the case of Colombia : (1) alliances, partnerships, and institutions; (2) global development; (3) public diplomacy; (4) economic integration; and...proved crucial to expanding presence and influence, and later in the decade even included a number of public - private partnerships. As to war ownership...Office, 3. 96Ibid. 97Beittel, 33. 98U.S. Department of State, Colombia U.S. Foreign Assistance Performance Publication FY 2009, http

  10. Area Handbook Series: Colombia: A Country Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Units of Constant Purchasing Power ( Unidades de Poder Adquisitivo Constante-UPAC), a system by which an investment not only accrued interest but also was...Colombia joined the Latin American Economic Sys- tem ( Sistema Econ6mica Latinoamericana-SELA), which was created in 1975 to promote regional cooperation on...Bernardo, ii Celam), 116 351 Colombia: A Country Study Latin American Economic System L6pez Michelsen, Alfonso, 44, 46, 53-54, ( Sistema Econ6mica

  11. Effects on the shallow artesian aquifer of withdrawing water from the deep artesian aquifer near Sugarville, Millard County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mower, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    Ground water occurs in a shallow (unconfined) aquifer and in at least two artesian (confined) aquifers in the unconsolidated alluvial material composing the valley fill near Sugarville, Utah. No wells are known to withdraw water from the unconfined aquifer, and this report is limited to a discussion of the effects of pumping a well tapping one artesian aquifer on the piezometric surfaces of the water in both artesian aquifers.

  12. Simulation of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.L.; Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Abriola, L.M.

    1994-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) can be modeled in two and three dimensions using a finite-difference simulator and incorporating realistic heterogenieties in aquifer properties and complex surfactant chemistry based upon a multicomponent, multiphase compositional description of the experimental chemistry. The presented simulations provide significant new insights into the SEAR process. The effectiveness of SEAR is sensitive to many variables including the initial infiltration rate of DNAPL, the natural hydraulic gradient, well locations, well pumping and injection rates, aquifer heterogenieties, and properties such as cappillary pressure, relative permeability, and surfactant chemistry. In this paper a comprehensive model for SEAR is presented and applied to explore the potential performance of this technology on an aquifer scale. This study illustrates the value of modeling in SEAR design, how this modeling can be accomplished, what information is necessary, and what kinds of results modeling can be expected to produce.

  13. Steam Injection For Soil And Aquifer Remediation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this Issue Paper is to provide to those involved in assessing remediation technologies for specific sites basic technical information on the use of steam injection for the remediation of soils and aquifers that are contaminated by...

  14. Vulnerability of unconfined aquifers to virus contamination.

    PubMed

    Schijven, J F; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2010-02-01

    An empirical formula was developed for determining the vulnerability of unconfined sandy aquifers to virus contamination, expressed as a dimensionless setback distance r(s)(*). The formula can be used to calculate the setback distance required for the protection of drinking water production wells against virus contamination. This empirical formula takes into account the intrinsic properties of the virus and the unconfined sandy aquifer. Virus removal is described by a rate coefficient that accounts for virus inactivation and attachment to sand grains. The formula also includes pumping rate, saturated thickness of the aquifer, depth of the screen of the pumping well, and anisotropy of the aquifer. This means that it accounts also for dilution effects as well as horizontal and vertical virus transport. Because the empirical model includes virus source concentration it can be used as an integral part of a quantitative viral risk assessment.

  15. The allocation of aquifer resources in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, N. S.

    1987-02-01

    The traditional role of aquifers for groundwater supply may not be appropriate in some areas of Scotland where high rainfall, low evapotranspiration, and abundant upland catchments and storage areas yield more than adequate surface water supplies. Some groundwater will always be required to satisfy specific needs but much aquifer potential will remain untapped. It is suggested that some of this potential could usefully be allocated to the disposal of wastes including oiled beach material, or the storage of heat or fluids, any of which could contaminate the aquifer. Care will be required to ensure that surface waters and other amenities are not put at risk. Resolution of conflicts between water supply and waste disposal usage of an aquifer requires guidelines; suggestions are made for their formulation and the need for legislative and planning controls is outlined.

  16. Estimated Withdrawals from Stream-Valley Aquifers and Refined Estimated Withdrawals from Selected Aquifers in the United States, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B. Pierre; Maupin, Molly A.; Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Information Program compiles estimates of fresh ground-water withdrawals in the United States on a 5-year interval. In the year-2000 compilation, withdrawals were reported from principal aquifers and aquifer systems including two general aquifers - Alluvial and Other aquifers. Withdrawals from a widespread aquifer group - stream-valley aquifers - were not specifically identified in the year-2000 compilation, but they are important sources of ground water. Stream-valley aquifers are alluvial aquifers located in the valley of major streams and rivers. Stream-valley aquifers are long but narrow aquifers that are in direct hydraulic connection with associated streams and limited in extent compared to most principal aquifers. Based in large part on information published in U.S. Geological Survey reports, preliminary analysis of withdrawal data and hydrogeologic and surface-water information indicated areas in the United States where possible stream-valley aquifers were located. Further assessment focused on 24 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Withdrawals reported from Alluvial aquifers in 16 states and withdrawals reported from Other aquifers in 6 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico were investigated. Two additional States - Arkansas and New Jersey - were investigated because withdrawals reported from other principal aquifers in these two States may be from stream-valley aquifers. Withdrawals from stream-valley aquifers were identified in 20 States and were about 1,560 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), a rate comparable to withdrawals from the 10 most productive principal aquifers in the United States. Of the 1,560 Mgal/d of withdrawals attributed to stream-valley aquifers, 1,240 Mgal/d were disaggregated from Alluvial aquifers, 150 Mgal/d from glacial sand and gravel aquifers, 116 Mgal/d from Other aquifers, 28.1 Mgal/d from Pennsylvanian aquifers, and 24.9 Mgal/d from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial

  17. OXIDATION-REDUCTION CAPACITIES OF AQUIFER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the oxidation (i.e., of aqueous Cr2+) and reduction (i.e., of aqueous Cr2O72- and H202) capacities of aquifer solids and groundwater have been made on samples from a sand-and-gravel aquifer. The gro...

  18. An Energy Overview of Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2003-10-20

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site--each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Colombia. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

  19. El Espanol Hablado en Pamplona (Colombia) (Spanish Spoken in Pamplona, Colombia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabeza Barrios, Jorge Enrique

    1974-01-01

    Using two informants and the questionnaires of the "Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Colombia," a linguistic corpus of Pamplona, Colombia, was derived. Regional speech characteristics are discussed here, including use of vowels and consonants, reversing sound position, elision, and lexical anomalies. (Text is in Spanish.) (CK)

  20. Aquifers of the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topper, R.

    2004-01-01

    Development of the Denver Basin for water supply has been ongoing since the late 1800s. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of the water-yielding strata of Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within four overlying formations. The four statutory aquifers contained in these formations are named the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills. For water rights administrative purposes, the outcrop/subcrop of the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer defines the margins of the Basin. Initial estimates of the total recoverable groundwater reserves in storage, under this 6700-mi2 area, were 295 million acre-ft. Recent geologic evidence indicates that the aquifers are very heterogeneous and their composition varies significantly with distance from the source area of the sediments. As a result, available recoverable reserves may be one-third less than previously estimated. There is no legal protection for pressure levels in the aquifer, and water managers are becoming increasingly concerned about the rapid water level declines (30 ft/yr). Approximately 33,700 wells of record have been completed in the sedimentary rock aquifers of the Denver Basin for municipal, industrial, agricultural, and domestic uses.

  1. Aquifer test results, Green Swamp area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbals, C.H.; Grubb, Hayes F.

    1982-01-01

    An aquifer test conducted in the Green Swamp area December 15-16 , 1975 was designed to stress the uppermost part of the Floridan aquifer so that the leakage characteristics of the overlying confining bed could be determined. A well tapping the upper part of the Floridan aquifer was pumped at a rate of about 1,040 gallons per minute for 35 hours; drawdown was measured in the Floridan aquifer and in two horizons in the confining bed. Analysis of the data indicates that the transmissivity of the uppper 160 feet of the Floridan is 13,000 square feet per day, the storage coefficient is about 0.0002.5, and the overlying confining bed leakance coefficient is about 0.02 to 0.025 per day. The vertical hydraulic diffusivity of the confining bed ranged from 610 square feet per day to 16,000 square feet per day. Results of the test indicate that, in the area of the test site, a Floridan aquifer well field would induce additional recharge to the Floridan. As a result of that increased recharge , water levels in the surficial aquifer would tend to stand lower, runoff from the area would tend to be less, and, perhaps, evapotranspiration would be less than normal.(USGS)

  2. Estimating aquifer thickness using multiple pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Dewandel, Benoit

    2010-12-01

    A method to estimate aquifer thickness and hydraulic conductivity has been developed, consisting of multiple pumping tests. The method requires short-duration pumping cycles on an unconfined aquifer with significant seasonal water-table fluctuations. The interpretation of several pumping tests at a site in India under various initial conditions provides information on the change in hydrodynamic parameters in relation to the initial water-table level. The transmissivity linearly decreases compared with the initial water level, suggesting a homogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth. The hydraulic conductivity is estimated from the slope of this linear relationship. The extrapolation of the relationship between transmissivity and water level provides an estimate of the aquifer thickness that is in good agreement with geophysical investigations. The hydraulically active part of the aquifer is located in both the shallow weathered and the underlying densely fractured zones of the crystalline basement. However, no significant relationship is found between the aquifer storage coefficient and initial water level. This new method contributes to filling the methodological gap between single pumping tests and hydraulic tomography, in providing information on the variation of the global transmissivity according to depth. It can be applied to any unconfined aquifer experiencing large seasonal water-table fluctuations and short pumping cycles.

  3. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  4. Aquifer Heterogeneity and Solute-Transport Modeling in the Floridan Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) is one of the most prolific aquifers in the world and is widely used for public and irrigation water supply. The FAS is also increasingly being used as a storage zone for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems, including a 333-well system that is planned as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The FAS is highly heterogeneous with respect to hydraulic conductivity, with meter- scale inter-bed variation exceeding seven orders of magnitude in some cases, even in South Florida where mega-karst is not well developed. Aquifer heterogeneity can have a major impact on ASR system performance because of its affects on the movement and mixing of stored water. Aquifer heterogeneity poses challenges for accurate modeling of the FAS, including solute transport modeling of ASR systems and variable density flow modeling of the freshwater/saltwater interface along coastal areas. Dispersivity is an important parameter in solute transport modeling, which is associated with aquifer heterogeneity. Commonly the values of dispersivity used in solute-transport modeling are derived from literature review and adjusted during model calibration process. Artificially large dispersivity values are often used in solute-transport models of ASR systems as a "fudge factor" to simulate the apparent greater mixing caused by inter-bed heterogeneity. This approach is problematic because the use of artificial hydraulic parameters for calibration opens the results of predictive simulations to question. The use of large dispersivity values to simulate aquifer heterogeneity also does not incorporate other impacts of aquifer heterogeneity, such as differential flow rates and migration distances between beds. The technical challenge is to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity into groundwater models at a scale that is sufficient to adequately simulate its effect on ASR system performance and coastal groundwater flow, while maintaining acceptable

  5. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City Aquifer in western Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately 193,000 acres and supplies ground water for irrigation, domestic, and industrial purposes in Beckham, Custer, Roger Mills, and Washita Counties along the divide between the Washita and Red River basins. The Elk City aquifer consists of the Elk City Sandstone and overlying terrace deposits, made up of clay, silt, sand and gravel, and dune sands in the eastern part and sand and gravel of the Ogallala Formation (or High Plains aquifer) in the western part of the aquifer. The Elk City aquifer is unconfined and composed of very friable sandstone, lightly cemented with clay, calcite, gypsum, or iron oxide. Most of the grains are fine-sized quartz but the grain size ranges from clay to cobble in the aquifer. The Doxey Shale underlies the Elk City aquifer and acts as a confining unit, restricting the downward movement of ground water. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Elk City aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:63,360. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

  6. Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) of chlorinated municipal drinking water in a confined aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Petersen, Christen E.; Glotzbach, Kenneth J.; Metzger, Loren F.; Christensen, Allen H.; Smith, Gregory A.; O'Leary, David R.; Fram, Miranda S.; Joseph, Trevor; Shannon, Heather

    2010-01-01

    About 1.02 x 106 m3 of chlorinated municipal drinking water was injected into a confined aquifer, 94-137 m below Roseville, California, between December 2005 and April 2006. The water was stored in the aquifer for 438 days, and 2.64 x 106 m3 of water were extracted between July 2007 and February 2008. On the basis of Cl data, 35% of the injected water was recovered and 65% of the injected water and associated disinfection by-products (DBPs) remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction. About 46.3 kg of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) entered the aquifer with the injected water and 37.6 kg of TTHM were extracted. As much as 44 kg of TTHMs remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction because of incomplete recovery of injected water and formation of THMs within the aquifer by reactions with freechlorine in the injected water. Well-bore velocity log data collected from the Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) well show as much as 60% of the injected water entered the aquifer through a 9 m thick, high-permeability layer within the confined aquifer near the top of the screened interval. Model simulations of ground-water flow near the ASR well indicate that (1) aquifer heterogeneity allowed injected water to move rapidly through the aquifer to nearby monitoring wells, (2) aquifer heterogeneity caused injected water to move further than expected assuming uniform aquifer properties, and (3) physical clogging of high-permeability layers is the probable cause for the observed change in the distribution of borehole flow. Aquifer heterogeneity also enhanced mixing of native anoxic ground water with oxic injected water, promoting removal of THMs primarily through sorption. A 3 to 4-fold reduction in TTHM concentrations was observed in the furthest monitoring well 427 m downgradient from the ASR well, and similar magnitude reductions were observed in depth-dependent water samples collected from the upper part of the screened interval in the ASR well near the end of the extraction

  7. Groundwater studies: principal aquifer surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Congress established the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to develop nationally consistent long-term datasets and provide information about the quality of the Nation’s streams and groundwater. The USGS uses objective and reliable data, water-quality models, and systematic scientific studies to assess current water-quality conditions, to identify changes in water quality over time, and to determine how natural factors and human activities affect the quality of streams and groundwater. NAWQA is the only non-regulatory Federal program to perform these types of studies; participation is voluntary. In the third decade (Cycle 3) of the NAWQA program (2013–2023), the USGS will evaluate the quality and availability of groundwater for drinking supply, improve our understanding of where and why water quality is degraded, and assess how groundwater quality could respond to changes in climate and land use. These goals will be addressed through the implementation of a new monitoring component in Cycle 3: Principal Aquifer Surveys.

  8. Distributional Scaling in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsinelli, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    An investigation is undertaken into the fractal scaling properties of the piezometric head in a heterogeneous unconfined aquifer. The governing equations for the unconfined flow are derived from conservation of mass and the Darcy law. The Dupuit approximation will be used to model the dynamics. The spatially varying nature of the tendency to conduct flow (e.g. the hydraulic conductivity) is represented as a stochastic process. Experimental studies in the literature have indicated that the conductivity belongs to a class of non-stationary stochastic fields, called H-ss fields. The uncertainty in the soil parameters is imparted onto the flow variables; in groundwater investigations the potentiometric head will be a random function. The structure of the head field will be analyzed with an emphasis on the scaling properties. The scaling scheme for the modeling equations and the simulation procedure for the saturated hydraulic conductivity process will be explained, then the method will be validated through numerical experimentation using the USGS Modflow-2005 software. The results of the numerical simulations demonstrate that the head will exhibit multi-fractal scaling if the hydraulic conductivity exhibits multi-fractal scaling and the differential equations for the groundwater equation satisfy a particular set of scale invariance conditions.

  9. A dynamic perennial firn aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Christianson, K.; van Pelt, W. J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and GPS observations are used to reveal a perennial firn aquifer (PFA) on a high icefield in Svalbard. This PFA appears to be fully analogous to those found in Greenland. A bright, widespread radar reflector separates relatively dry and water-saturated firn. This surface, the phreatic firn water table, is deeper beneath local surface elevation maxima, shallower in surface lows, and steeper where the surface is steep. The PFA is recharged by downward percolation of near-surface meltwater, and drained by flow subparallel to ice flow and the glacier surface. The water table of the PFA rises with increasing meltwater supply during summer, especially during warm years, and drops during winter. The reflector cross-cuts snow stratigraphy; we use the apparent deflection of accumulation layers due to the higher dielectric permittivity below the water table to infer that the firn pore space becomes progressively more saturated as depth increases. Radar data collected over several years indicate that the PFA responds rapidly (sub-annually) to the surface melt forcing. We use a coupled surface energy-balance and firn model, forced with from regional climate model data for the years 1961-2012, to estimate the amount of retained surface melt available to recharge the PFA. Results suggest that the water amount flowing into and out of the PFA is substantial, such that the PFA is capable of providing significant input to the englacial hydrology system.

  10. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : the Highland Rim aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee is primarily composed of Mississippian carbonates and occurs west of the Valley and Ridge Province. It crops out in the Highland Rim and the Sequatchie Valley. It has been removed by erosion from the Central Basin. Groundwater in the Highland Rim aquifer system occurs primarily in secondary openings including solution openings, joints, and faults. The Chattanooga Shale is the lower confining layer for the Highland Rim aquifer system. Under the Cumberland plateau, this aquifer system is separated from the overlying Pennsylvanian formations by the Pennington Shale. The Highland Rim aquifer system is an important source of drinking water. It supplies most of the rural, domestic, and many public supplies of drinking water in the Highland Rim. Where there is a dynamic flow system, dissolved solids concentrations are less than 500 mg/L. However, isolated cells may exist where the groundwater has dissolved solids concentrations of more than 1 ,000 mg/L. (USGS)

  11. Review of Aquifer Storage and Recovery Performance in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in Southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Interest and activity in aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) in southern Florida has increased greatly during the past 10 to 15 years. ASR wells have been drilled to the carbonate Floridan aquifer system at 30 sites in southern Florida, mostly by local municipalities or counties located in coastal areas. The primary storage zone at these sites is contained within the brackish to saline Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system. The strategy for use of ASR in southern Florida is to store excess freshwater available during the wet season in an aquifer and recover it during the dry season when needed for supplemental water supply. Each ASR cycle is defined by three periods: recharge, storage, and recovery. This fact sheet summarizes some of the findings of a second phase retrospective assessment of existing ASR facilities and sites.

  12. Gulf Coast regional aquifer-system analysis; a Mississippi perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grubb, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers in sediments of mostly Cenozoic age in an area of about 230,000 sq mi in the Central Plain of Alabama, Arkansas , Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas, and an additional 60,000 sq mi offshore. Three aquifer systems have been identified: the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and the coastal lowlands aquifer system. These aquifer systems thicken from < 100 ft near their updip limit to thousands of ft gulfward toward their downdip limits. The Mississippi embayment aquifer system exceeds 5,000 ft in thickness in central Louisiana and in southwestern Mississippi. The thickest area in southwestern Mississippi underlies most of the six Mississippi counties, centered around Jefferson County. The greatest thickness of the coastal lowlands aquifer system in Mississippi occurs in southern Hancock County where the system is composed of several individual aquifers and confining units. There are seven aquifers and three confining units in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, five aquifers and two confining units in the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and five aquifers and two confining units in the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Most of the thicker parts of each aquifer system contain moderately saline to very saline water. Water in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system is moderately saline to very saline in most of a seven county area in southwestern Mississippi. About 9,600 million gal/day (gpd) of ground water was pumped from the aquifers in the study area during 1980. About 15% of that pumpage (or about 1,400 million gpd was in Mississippi, mostly from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. About 10% of the Mississippi pumpage, or 140 million gpd, was from the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Preliminary results from simulation of

  13. An Epidemiologic Analysis of Diabetes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Casas-Figueroa, Luz Ángela

    2015-01-01

    The burden of diabetes is a global problem, wherein the significant growth of diabetes in Colombia reflects a complex pathophysiology and epidemiology found in many other South American nations. The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiologic data from Colombia and the South American region in general to identify certain disease drivers and target them for intervention to curb the increasing prevalence of diabetes. A detailed search was conducted using MEDLINE, SciELO, HINARI, LILACS, IMBIOMED, and Latindex databases, in addition to clinical practice guidelines, books, manuals, and other files containing relevant and verified information on diabetes in Colombia. According to the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes in Colombia is 7.1% and 8.5%, respectively. In contrast, a national survey in Colombia shows a prevalence ranging from 1.84% to 11.2%, depending on how the diagnosis is made, the criteria used, and the age range studied. The prevalence exclusively in rural areas ranges from 1.4% to 7.9% and in urban areas from 1% to 46%. The estimated mean overall (direct and indirect) cost attributed to type 2 diabetes is 5.7 billion Colombian pesos (US $2.7 million). Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death in Colombia with a rate of 15 deaths per 100,000 individuals. Based on a clustering of factors, 4 relevant disease drivers emerge that may account for the epidemiology of diabetes in Colombia: demographic transition, nutritional transition, forced displacement/internal migration and urban development, and promotion of physical activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stochastic analysis of virus transport in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Rehmann L.L.; Welty, C.; Harvey, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale model of virus transport in aquifers is derived using spectral perturbation analysis. The effects of spatial variability in aquifer hydraulic conductivity and virus transport (attachment, detachment, and inactivation) parameters on large-scale virus transport are evaluated. A stochastic mean model of virus transport is developed by linking a simple system of local-scale free-virus transport and attached-virus conservation equations from the current literature with a random-field representation of aquifer and virus transport properties. The resultant mean equations for free and attached viruses are found to differ considerably from the local-scale equations on which they are based and include effects such as a free-virus effective velocity that is a function of aquifer heterogeneity as well as virus transport parameters. Stochastic mean free-virus breakthrough curves are compared with local model output in order to observe the effects of spatial variability on mean one-dimensional virus transport in three-dimensionally heterogeneous porous media. Significant findings from this theoretical analysis include the following: (1) Stochastic model breakthrough occurs earlier than local model breakthrough, and this effect is most pronounced for the least conductive aquifers studied. (2) A high degree of aquifer heterogeneity can lead to virus breakthrough actually preceding that of a conservative tracer. (3) As the mean hydraulic conductivity is increased, the mean model shows less sensitivity to the variance of the natural-logarithm hydraulic conductivity and mean virus diameter. (4) Incorporation of a heterogeneous colloid filtration term results in higher predicted concentrations than a simple first-order adsorption term for a given mean attachment rate. (5) Incorporation of aquifer heterogeneity leads to a greater range of virus diameters for which significant breakthrough occurs. (6) The mean model is more sensitive to the inactivation rate of viruses

  15. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  16. A Black Hills-Madison Aquifer origin for Dakota Aquifer groundwater in northeastern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Randy; Harvey, F Edwin; Gosselin, David C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of the Dakota Aquifer in South Dakota attributed elevated groundwater sulfate concentrations to Madison Aquifer recharge in the Black Hills with subsequent chemical evolution prior to upward migration into the Dakota Aquifer. This study examines the plausibility of a Madison Aquifer origin for groundwater in northeastern Nebraska. Dakota Aquifer water samples were collected for major ion chemistry and isotopic analysis ((18)O, (2)H, (3)H, (14)C, (13)C, (34)S, (18)O-SO(4), (87)Sr, (37)Cl). Results show that groundwater beneath the eastern, unconfined portion of the study area is distinctly different from groundwater sampled beneath the western, confined portion. In the east, groundwater is calcium-bicarbonate type, with delta(18)O values (-9.6 per thousand to -12.4 per thousand) similar to local, modern precipitation (-7.4 per thousand to -10 per thousand), and tritium values reflecting modern recharge. In the west, groundwater is calcium-sulfate type, having depleted delta(18)O values (-16 per thousand to -18 per thousand) relative to local, modern precipitation, and (14)C ages 32,000 to more than 47,000 years before present. Sulfate, delta(18)O, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O-SO(4) concentrations are similar to those found in Madison Aquifer groundwater in South Dakota. Thus, it is proposed that Madison Aquifer source water is also present within the Dakota Aquifer beneath northeastern Nebraska. A simple Darcy equation estimate of groundwater velocities and travel times using reported physical parameters from the Madison and Dakota Aquifers suggests such a migration is plausible. However, discrepancies between (14)C and Darcy age estimates indicate that (14)C ages may not accurately reflect aquifer residence time, due to mixtures of varying aged water.

  17. Down the Slippery, Snowy Slopes of Colombia We Go

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Guerrillas, and Colombia’s New Violencia ." World Policy Journal XVII, no. 3 (Fall 2000). Available via Colombia International Affairs Online. Miller...William M. LeoGrande and Kenneth E. Sharpe, "Two Wars or One? Drugs, Guerrillas, and Colombia’s New Violencia ," World Policy Journal XVII, no. 3 (Fall

  18. 77 FR 59064 - United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... 178 RIN 1515-AD88 United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... of the United States- Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement entered into by the United States and the...-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (``CTPA'' or ``Agreement''), and on June 28, 2007, the Parties signed a...

  19. Aquifer-characteristics data for West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozar, Mark D.; Mathes, Melvin V.

    2001-01-01

    Specific-capacity, storage-coefficient, and specific-yield data for wells in West Virginia were compiled to provide a data set from which transmissivity could be estimated. This data can be used for analytical and mathematical groundwater flow modeling. Analysis of available storage-coefficient and (or) specific-yield data indicates the Ohio River alluvial aquifer has a median specific yield of 0.20, which is characteristic of an unconfined aquifer. The Kanawha River alluvial aquifer has a median specific yield of 0.003, which is characteristic of a semi-confined aquifer. The median storage coefficient of fractured-bedrock aquifers is only 0.007, which is characteristic of confined aquifers. The highest median transmissivity of a specific aquifer in West Virginia occurs in Ohio River alluvium (4,800 ft2/d); the second highest occurs in Kanawha River alluvium (1,600 ft2/d). The lowest median transmissivity (23 ft2/d) is for the McKenzie-Rose Hill-Tuscarora aquifer. Rocks of Cambrian age within the Waynesboro-Tomstown-Harpers-Weverton-Loudon aquifer had a low median transmissivity of only 67 ft2/d. Other aquifers with low transmissivities include the Hampshire Formation, Brallier-Harrell Formations, Mahantango Formations, Oriskany Sandstone, and the Conococheague Formation with median transmissivities of 74, 72, 92, 82, and 92 ft2/d, respectively. All other aquifers within the State had intermediate values of transmissivity (130-920 ft2/d). The highest median transmissivities among bedrock aquifers were those for aquifers within the Pennsylvanian age Pocahontas Formation (1,200 ft2/d) and Pottsville Group (1,300 ft2/d), and the Mississippian age Mauch Chunk Group (1,300 ft2/d). These rocks crop out primarily in the southern part of the State and to a lesser extent within the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle. The highest mean annual ground-water recharge rates within West Virginia (24.6 in.) occur within a band that extends

  20. Endemic goiter in western Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, E

    1983-01-01

    Goiter continues to occur in some areas of western Colombia despite iodine supplementation for 30 years. In 1973-1977, an average goiter prevalence of 15% (range 1-42%) still persisted among schoolchildren of 41 localities. Significant relationships were found between goiter prevalence and both the geological composition of watersheds and bacterial contamination of water supplies. Together, these associations account for 80% of the observed variation in goiter prevalence. The presence of sedimentary rocks rich in organic matter (coals, shales, etc.) was the best indicator of disease. The second best indicator, presence of K. pneumoniae in the water source, was associated with lower goiter prevalence but, as in other investigations, contamination of the pipeline system (households and schools) with gram-negative bacteria was associated with higher disease rates. Thus, epidemiological evidence indicates a cause-effect relationship between sources of drinking water and the persistence and development of goiter in this part of the world. Furthermore, identification of resorcinol, phthalate esters, and sulfur-bearing organic compounds, possibly aliphatic disulfides, in the water supplying the endemic goiter district of Candelaria town in western Colombia adds experimental support to this hypothesis. Resorcinol is derived from coal and humic substances, high molecular weight complex polymeric organic compounds present in sedimentary rocks, soils and water. Resorcinol is goitrogenic in man and experimental animals. Phthalate esters, also related to humic materials, undergo biodegradation by gram-negative bacteria with production of intermediate metabolites possessing antithyroid activity. Like phthalates and resorcinol, organic disulfides have also been identified as water contaminants in other parts of the world, and are known to be potent antithyroid compounds. The goitrogenic effect of organic and bacterial pollutants in water supplies is more pronounced in segments of

  1. Groundwater vulnerability mapping of Qatar aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalousha, Husam Musa

    2016-12-01

    Qatar is one of the most arid countries in the world with limited water resources. With little rainfall and no surface water, groundwater is the only natural source of fresh water in the country. Whilst the country relies mainly on desalination of seawater to secure water supply, groundwater has extensively been used for irrigation over the last three decades, which caused adverse environmental impact. Vulnerability assessment is a widely used tool for groundwater protection and land-use management. Aquifers in Qatar are carbonate with lots of fractures, depressions and cavities. Karst aquifers are generally more vulnerable to contamination than other aquifers as any anthropogenic-sourced contaminant, especially above a highly fractured zone, can infiltrate quickly into the aquifer and spread over a wide area. The vulnerability assessment method presented in this study is based on two approaches: DRASTIC and EPIK, within the framework of Geographical Information System (GIS). Results of this study show that DRASTIC vulnerability method suits Qatar hydrogeological settings more than EPIK. The produced vulnerability map using DRASTIC shows coastal and karst areas have the highest vulnerability class. The southern part of the country is located in the low vulnerability class due to occurrence of shale formation within aquifer media, which averts downward movement of contaminants.

  2. National Sole Source Aquifer GIS Layer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data set contains indexes and Esri shape files of boundaries of the designated sole source aquifers and related aquifer boundaries. Data provide a vector polygon GIS layer showing available materials representing extents at the land surface related to 78 designated Sole Source Aquifers (SSA) related to announcements in the Federal Register. GIS coverages for SSAs were obtained from EPA Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10 for a baseline period in September of 2009. Each SSA polygon was checked against the Federal Register (FR) determination for that SSA. These coverages were appended, in order to create a national seamless coverage of SSAs. There are 89 GIS polygons for the Sole Source Aquifers, since in addition to a single SSA designated area polygons, some Regions have delineated GIS layers for streamflow zones, aquifer recharge areas, and other features at the land surface important for the SSA designations. GIS materials are not available at this time for the St. Joseph SSA in Indiana [53 FR 23682 (1988)]. Additional information can be found at: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/OW/SSA_FR_notices_DWMA_Sept2009.Zip and https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/OW/SSA_IDS_revd.xls

  3. Ambient Flow and Heterogeneity in Multi-Aquifer Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D. J.; Gotkowitz, M. B.; Luczaj, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-aquifers wells, those wells that are open to more than one aquifer, have the potential to allow large quantities of flow between aquifers. Observed rates and direction of intra-borehole flow are often complex, reflecting the heterogeneity of the aquifers and variation of farfield heads. Spinner flow logs collected from several multi-aquifer wells in southern and eastern Wisconsin indicate the importance of flows through these wells in groundwater flow systems. The Paleozoic geology of Wisconsin, composed of more-or-less flat-lying sandstones, dolomites, and shales, gives rise to layered aquifer-aquitard systems where multi-aquifer wells are relatively common. A comparison of the flows in three multi-aquifer wells that cross the Wisconsin’s Paleozoic units showed heterogeniety in aquifers commonly thought to be homogeneous. Variation of the intra-borehole flow in a well gives an indication of heterogeneity and farfield heads in the aquifers. In the first example, the system was relatively simple, consisting of an aquitard (Eau Claire shale) between an upper aquifer (Wonewoc sandstone) and a lower aquifer (Mt Simon sandstone). Heads in the upper aquifer are higher than those in the lower aquifer. In this well, flows gradually increased with depth in the upper aquifer, remained constant in the aquitard, and then gradually decreased with depth in the lower aquifer. The gradual changes indicate relatively homogenous upper and lower aquifers. In the second example, the system also consisted of an aquitard (Tunnel City Group) between an upper aquifer (Sinnipee dolomite and the St. Peter sandstone) and a lower aquifer (Elk Mound Ground). As in the first example, heads in the upper aquifer are greater than those in the lower sandstone aquifer. In contrast to the first example, there were abrupt changes in intra-borehole flow in the upper aquifer, sometimes of more than 180 liters/minute over an interval of less than a meter. Caliper and television logging showed

  4. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  5. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions....

  6. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions....

  7. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions....

  8. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  9. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions....

  10. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  11. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  12. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  13. 40 CFR 147.2352 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2352 Section 147.2352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  14. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions....

  15. 40 CFR 147.502 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.502 Section 147.502 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  16. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  17. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  18. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  19. 40 CFR 147.1802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1802 Section 147.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  20. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  1. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  2. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions....

  3. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  4. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  5. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions....

  6. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  7. 40 CFR 147.2352 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2352 Section 147.2352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  8. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions....

  9. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions....

  10. 40 CFR 147.2352 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2352 Section 147.2352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  11. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  12. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  13. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  14. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions....

  15. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions....

  16. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  17. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  18. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  19. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  20. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  1. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  2. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions....

  3. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  4. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  5. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  6. 40 CFR 147.2352 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2352 Section 147.2352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  7. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  8. 40 CFR 147.152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.152 Section 147.152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  9. 40 CFR 147.152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.152 Section 147.152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  10. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  11. 40 CFR 147.652 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.652 Section 147.652 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  12. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  13. 40 CFR 147.1802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1802 Section 147.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  14. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  15. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  16. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  17. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  18. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  19. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  20. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  1. 40 CFR 147.1802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1802 Section 147.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  2. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  3. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  4. Project Summary. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  5. Project Summary. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  6. 40 CFR 147.2352 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2352 Section 147.2352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  7. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions. ...

  8. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1802 Section 147.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions. ...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  15. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions. ...

  16. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  18. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions. ...

  19. Effects of unsaturated zone on aquifer test analysis in a shallow-aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between two hypothetical flow models of an unconfined aquifer, one saturated and the other variably saturated, indicates that the variably saturated model which explicitly models drainage from the unsaturated zone provides a better conceptual framework for analyzing unconfined aquifer test data and better estimates of the lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity in fine-grained sands. Explicitly accounting for multiple aquifers, well-bore storage, and the effects of delayed drainage from the unsaturated zone increases confidence in aquifer property estimates by removing some assumptions and allowing for the inclusion of early time data and water-table observations in an aquifer test analysis. The inclusion of the unsaturated zone expands the number of parameters to be estimated, but reasonable estimates of lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of the unconfined aquifer can be obtained. For the cases examined, only the van Genuchten parameter ?? needed to be determined by the test, because the parameters n and ??(r) had a minimal effect on the estimates of hydraulic conductivities, and literature values could be used for these parameters. Estimates of lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivity using MODFLOW were not as good as the VS2DT based estimates and differed from the known values by as much as 30 percent. The hydraulic properties of a surficial aquifer system were estimated through a series of aquifer tests conducted at Cecil Field Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida. Aquifer test results were analyzed by calibrating a variably saturated, radial flow model to the measured drawdowns. Parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the difference between simulated and measured drawdowns with an optimization routine coupled to VS2DT and was constrained by assuming that the hydraulic properties of each aquifer or confining unit were homogeneous. Given the hydrogeologic conditions at the field site, estimating

  20. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Christenson, S.C.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

  1. Identifying structural styles in Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.P.; Van Nieuwenhuise, R.E.; Steuer, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Much of our understanding of the Earth is from the study of surface geology and seismic, but many surface structures are responses to deformation which occurred below sedimentary layers. The practice within the petroleum industry is to use top-down processes of analyzing the surface to understand the subsurface, and observed surface structural styles tend to influence seismic interpretations. Yet many conditions which influenced the structural styles seen at the surface are different at depth. Since seismic is a time representation of the Earth, many interpretation pitfalls may exist within areas of complex geology. Also, its reliability decreases with depth and with increasing geologic complexity. Forward modeling and pre-stack depth migration technologies are used to provide true depth images of the seismic data. Even with these advances in seismic imaging technology, the interpreter needs to incorporate additional data into the interpretation. Accurate structural identification requires the interpreter to integrate seismic with surface geology, remote sensing, gravity, magnetic data, geochemistry, fault-plane solutions from earthquakes, and regional tectonic studies. Incorporating these types of data into the interpretation will help us learn how basement is involved in the deformation of overlying sediments. A study of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia shows the deformation to be dominantly transpressional in style. Euler deconvolution of the areomagnetic data shows a highly fractured basement, steep fault lineaments, en echelon structures, and complex fault patterns, all of which would be typical of wrench-type deformation. Available surface geology, regional studies, earthquake data, and forward modeling support this interpretation.

  2. Frontier petroleum basins of Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, J.F. Jr.; Perez, V.E.

    1989-03-01

    The frontier basins of Colombia with hydrocarbon potential are numerous, have varying geological histories, and are in different stages of exploration development. In this paper, sedimentary or structural basins are classified as frontier petroleum basins if commercial discoveries of hydrocarbons are lacking, if the basin has not attained a high degree of exploration development, or if a new play concept has been perceived or developed for a portion of a mature exploration basin. Using these criteria for classification, the authors discuss the Cauca-Patia Choco-Pacifico, and Lower Magdalena basin complexes; the Cordillera Oriental foreland basin; and the Cesar-Rancheria, Sabana, and Amazonas basins. A comprehensive geological and structural setting of each of these frontier basins will be presented. The depositional and tectonic evolution of the basins will be highlighted, and the play concepts for each will be inventoried, catalogued, and categorized as to whether they are theoretical or established. The discussion of the available plays in each of these basins will include the main play concept elements of reservoirs traps, seals, source rocks, maturation, and timing. When detailed data permit, the reservoir and trap geometry will be presented.

  3. Colombia: why coal won't wait

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-11

    Colombia's coal production target is 68-million tons by the year 2000, with hopes to export 10% of world thermal-coal demand. Colombia's economic commitment to coal marketing is not an option, but an imperative. There are indications that coal production in the US - bogged down by complex transportation, environmental, and other disputes - will be revitalized, partly because Colombia will be added to the list of international coal-market competitors. Some coal-industry analysts recognize that the Colombian factor could, through stimulating price competition, encourage world coal consumption. Despite monumental infrastructure requirements that will turn the area between El Cerrejon and the Caribbean Sea into one integrated complex, the government is throwing itself heart and soul back into the coal age. This issue has the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for May 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  4. Groundwater Mounding in Non-uniform Aquifers with Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Noel, P.; Kacimov, A. R.; Al Maktoumi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many areas of the world (e.g. the Middle East and North Africa countries) are deficient in observation networks and hydrogeological data needed for Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) design. Therefore, diagnostic analytical approaches are appropriate for feasibility studies of MAR. It was found that the common assumption of aquifer thickness uniformity often does not hold, especially in mountainous watersheds. However, the only practical result available for non-uniform aquifers was developed for well hydraulics applications (point sinks or sources) by Hantush (1962), while the recharge zones may cover large areas on the scale of kilometers, such as temporarily filled impoundments (natural and engineered reservoirs in wadis, depressions, trenches, etc.) or perennial streams accepting massive treated wastewater discharge. To address these important, but overlooked MAR problems in sloping aquifers, a set of new closed-form analytical solutions for water table elevations were obtained. Interestingly, the 2D groundwater flow equation acquires the advection-dispersion equation form in these cases. The quadratures in closed-form solutions obtained by the Green's function method converge rapidly. These models account for both shapes and orientations of sources with respect to the direction of the aquifer base gradient. Qualitatively, solutions in sloping aquifers have an important trait: the mounding is limited in time and space, unlike in aquifers with a horizontal base. Aquifers with the greater slopes have the lesser potential of waterlogging from the rising water table and different storage characteristics (height and volume of locally stored water). Computational aspects of these solutions for MAR analyses are illustrated by example utilizing regional aquifer properties near Az Zarqa River, Jordan. (This study was supported by a grant from USAID-FABRI, project contract: AID-OAA-TO-11-00049, Subcontract: 1001624 -12S-19745).

  5. Aquifer parameter estimation from surface resistivity data.

    PubMed

    Niwas, Sri; de Lima, Olivar A L

    2003-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the additional use, other than ground water exploration, of surface geoelectrical sounding data for aquifer hydraulic parameter estimation. In a mesoscopic framework, approximated analytical equations are developed separately for saline and for fresh water saturations. A few existing useful aquifer models, both for clean and shaley sandstones, are discussed in terms of their electrical and hydraulic effects, along with the linkage between the two. These equations are derived for insight and physical understanding of the phenomenon. In a macroscopic scale, a general aquifer model is proposed and analytical relations are derived for meaningful estimation, with a higher level of confidence, of hydraulic parameter from electrical parameters. The physical reasons for two different equations at the macroscopic level are explicitly explained to avoid confusion. Numerical examples from existing literature are reproduced to buttress our viewpoint.

  6. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  7. Unconsolidated Aquifers in Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.

    2000-01-01

    Unconsolidated aquifers consisting of saturated sand and gravel are capable of supplying large quantities of good-quality water to wells in Tompkins County, but little published geohydrologic inform ation on such aquifers is available. In 1986, the U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) began collecting geohydrologic information and well data to construct an aquifer map showing the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins county. Data sources included (1) water-well drillers. logs; (2) highway and other construction test-boring logs; (3) well data gathered by the Tompkins County Department of Health, (4) test-well logs from geohydrologic consultants that conducted projects for site-specific studies, and (5) well data that had been collected during past investigations by the USGS and entered into the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. In 1999, the USGS, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Department of Planning, compiled these data to construct this map. More than 600 well records were entered into the NWIS database in 1999 to supplement the 350 well records already in the database; this provided a total of 950 well records. The data were digitized and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) coverage so that well locations could be plotted on a map, and well data could be tabulated in a digital data base through ARC/INFO software. Data on the surficial geology were used with geohydrologic data from well records and previous studies to delineate the extent of aquifers on this map. This map depicts (1) the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins County, and (2) locations of wells whose records were entered into the USGS NWIS database and made into a GIS digital coverage. The hydrologic information presented here is generalized and is not intended for detailed site evaluations. Precise locations of geohydrologic-unit boundaries, and a description of the hydrologic conditions within the units, would require additional detailed, site

  8. Hydrology of the shallow aquifer and uppermost semiconfined aquifer near El Paso, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.E.; Baker, E.T.; Sperka, Roger

    1997-01-01

    The reversal from upward to downward in vertical hydraulic gradient between the Rio Grande alluvium and the underlying Hueco bolson aquifer has induced shallow water in the alluvium to move downward into the deeper aquifer. The introduction of water from the alluvium probably has led to a gradual water-quality deterioration of ground water in the Hueco bolson aquifer. The extent of any deterioration is a major concern because the dissolved solids concentration in water from some wells is approaching 1,000 milligrams per liter and already has exceeded this limit in other wells.

  9. 40 CFR 147.3008 - Criteria for aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria for aquifer exemptions. 147... the Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3008 Criteria for aquifer exemptions. The aquifer exemption criterion in § 146.4(c) of this chapter shall not be available for...

  10. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  11. 40 CFR 147.3008 - Criteria for aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criteria for aquifer exemptions. 147... the Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3008 Criteria for aquifer exemptions. The aquifer exemption criterion in § 146.4(c) of this chapter shall not be available for...

  12. 40 CFR 147.3008 - Criteria for aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria for aquifer exemptions. 147... the Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3008 Criteria for aquifer exemptions. The aquifer exemption criterion in § 146.4(c) of this chapter shall not be available for...

  13. 40 CFR 147.3008 - Criteria for aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria for aquifer exemptions. 147... the Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3008 Criteria for aquifer exemptions. The aquifer exemption criterion in § 146.4(c) of this chapter shall not be available for...

  14. Groundwater modeling of the Calera Aquifer region in Central Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Calera Aquifer is the main source of water for irrigated agriculture, industrial, and drinking water purposes in the Calera Aquifer Region (CAR) in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. Irrigated agriculture accounts for 80% of the total groundwater extracted from the Calera Aquifer. In recent years, ...

  15. Aquifer characterization proposed SRC-I facility, Newman, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Dames and Moore conducted a two-phase groundwater supply and aquifer characterization study on a portion of the proposed Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) Demonstration Plant site at Newman, Kentucky. The objectives were to assess the transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and storability of the aquifer in the vicinity of the test well, and to determine the aquifer characteristics beneath the proposed facility.

  16. 40 CFR 147.3008 - Criteria for aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for aquifer exemptions. 147... the Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3008 Criteria for aquifer exemptions. The aquifer exemption criterion in § 146.4(c) of this chapter shall not be available for this...

  17. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  18. INTRODUCED LAND SNAILS AND SLUGS IN COLOMBIA.

    PubMed

    Hausdorf, BERNHARD

    2002-05-01

    Twelve species of introduced land molluscs, including seven slug species, have been found in the cold zone above 2000 m altitude in the Departamentos Cundinamarca and Boyacá, and the Distrito Especial in Colombia. The introduced land molluscs remain generally restricted to disturbed environments, from which native species are often absent. Most recorded species originated from Europe. Deroceras laeve has been present in Colombia for more than a century, whereas the other species are probably more recent introductions. The records of Boettgerilla pallens, which is indigenous to the Caucasus and has spread over Europe only during the last decades, demonstrates that the process of introduction of alien molluscs is continuing.

  19. Forensic investigation of sex crimes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cabelus, Nancy B; Sheridan, Gary T

    2007-01-01

    Victimization by sexual assault has become not only a public health and safety issue but a way of life for many in Colombia. Poverty, gender inequality, and a lack of family and community support contribute to the cycle of sexual violence. Ineffective medico-legal systems have added to a rate of 93% for sex crimes that go without arrest or prosecution in Bogotá, the capital. Collaborative efforts are underway between the United States and Colombian governments to change the criminal justice system and strengthen forensic investigation of sex crimes in Colombia.

  20. Aquifer susceptibility in Virginia, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow, George E.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Health, sampled water from 171 wells and springs across the Commonwealth of Virginia between 1998 and 2000 as part of the Virginia Aquifer Susceptibility study. Most of the sites sampled are public water supplies that are part of the comprehensive Source Water Assessment Program for the Commonwealth. The fundamental premise of the study was that the identification of young waters (less than 50 years) by multiple environmental tracers could be used as a guide for classifying aquifers in terms of susceptibility to contamination from near-surface sources. Environmental tracers, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), and carbon isotopes (14C and d13C) were used to determine the age of water discharging from wells and springs. Concentrations of CFCs greater than 5 picograms per kilogram and 3H concentrations greater than 0.6 tritium unit were used as thresholds to indicate that parts of the aquifer sampled have a component of young water and are, therefore, susceptible to near-surface contamination. Concentrations of CFCs exceeded the susceptibility threshold in 22 percent of the wells and in one spring sampled in the Coastal Plain regional aquifer systems. About 74 percent of the samples from wells with the top of the first water zone less than 100 feet below land surface exceeded the threshold values, and water supplies developed in the upper 100 feet of the Coastal Plain are considered to be susceptible to contamination from near-surface sources. The maximum depth to the top of the screened interval for wells that contained CFCs was less than 150 feet. Wells completed in the deep confined aquifers in the Coastal Plain generally contain water older than 1,000 years, as indicated by carbon-14 dating, and are not considered to be susceptible to contamination under natural conditions. All of the water samples from wells

  1. Aquifer geochemistry at potential aquifer storage and recovery sites in coastal plain aquifers in the New York city area, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C.J.; Misut, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of injecting oxic water from the New York city (NYC) drinking-water supply and distribution system into a nearby anoxic coastal plain aquifer for later recovery during periods of water shortage (aquifer storage and recovery, or ASR) were simulated by a 3-dimensional, reactive-solute transport model. The Cretaceous aquifer system in the NYC area of New York and New Jersey, USA contains pyrite, goethite, locally occurring siderite, lignite, and locally varying amounts of dissolved Fe and salinity. Sediment from cores drilled on Staten Island and western Long Island had high extractable concentrations of Fe, Mn, and acid volatile sulfides (AVS) plus chromium-reducible sulfides (CRS) and low concentrations of As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U. Similarly, water samples from the Lloyd aquifer (Cretaceous) in western Long Island generally contained high concentrations of Fe and Mn and low concentrations of other trace elements such as As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U, all of which were below US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and NY maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). In such aquifer settings, ASR operations can be complicated by the oxidative dissolution of pyrite, low pH, and high concentrations of dissolved Fe in extracted water.The simulated injection of buffered, oxic city water into a hypothetical ASR well increased the hydraulic head at the well, displaced the ambient groundwater, and formed a spheroid of injected water with lower concentrations of Fe, Mn and major ions in water surrounding the ASR well, than in ambient water. Both the dissolved O2 concentrations and the pH of water near the well generally increased in magnitude during the simulated 5-a injection phase. The resultant oxidation of Fe2+ and attendant precipitation of goethite during injection provided a substrate for sorption of dissolved Fe during the 8-a extraction phase. The baseline scenario with a low (0.001M) concentration of pyrite in aquifer sediments, indicated that nearly 190% more water

  2. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  3. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains Aquifer in western Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver, and the western counties of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 7,000 square miles of Oklahoma and is used extensively for irrigation. The High Plains aquifer is a water-table aquifer and consists predominately of the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and overlying Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits. In some areas the aquifer is absent and the underlying Triassic, Jurassic, or Cretaceous-age rocks are exposed at the surface. These rocks are hydraulically connected with the aquifer in some areas. The High Plains aquifer is composed of interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel, thin limestones, and caliche. The proportion of various lithological materials changes rapidly from place to place, but poorly sorted sand and gravel predominate. The rocks are poorly to moderately well cemented by calcium carbonate. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were created by extracting geologic contact lines from published digital surficial geology maps based on a scale of 1:125,000 for the panhandle counties and 1:250,000 for the western counties. The water-level elevation contours and some boundary lines were digitized from maps in a published water-level elevation map for 1980 based on a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values in this report were used as input to the ground-water flow model on the High Plains aquifer. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and

  4. Hydrogeochemical Analysis of an Overexploited Aquifer In Bangladesh Toward Managed Aquifer Recharge Project Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Wiegand, B. A.; Pervin, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-12-01

    In most parts of the upper Dupitila aquifer (Dhaka City, Bangladesh) the average groundwater depletion reaches 2-3 m/year due to increasing water demands of the growing population. To counteract overexploitation of the aquifer, a more sustainable water management is required. The analysis of the local water resources system suggests that Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) would help to restore groundwater resources to strengthen water supply of Dhaka City, e.g., by using collected urban monsoon runoff and excess surface water from rivers. To assess possible effects of surface water or rainwater injection on groundwater quality, a comprehensive hydrogeochemical survey of the Dupitila aquifer is required. This paper presents hydrogeochemical data to document the current status of groundwater quality and to evaluate potential groundwater pollution by mobilization of hazardous chemicals as a result of changes in the hydrochemical equilibria. We performed a comprehensive review of available secondary data sources and will present new results from hydrochemical and Sr isotope investigations of water samples that were conducted within this study. Currently, groundwater quality in the upper Dupitila aquifer is characterized by variations in the electrical conductivity in the range of 200 to 1100 μS/cm, which may indicate some anthropogenic contamination by leakage from waste disposal including the sewage network and from surface water infiltration into the groundwater aquifer. Dissolved oxygen concentrations range from 1.0 to 4.9 mg/L (average 2.5 mg/L) in the upper Dupitila aquifer, while the lower Dupilita aquifer shows dissolved oxygen concentrations in the range 0 to 0.7 mg/L. Concentrations of major ions show some variation primarily due to a sedimentologically/mineralogically heterogeneous aquifer composition (sand, gravel, clay horizons), but may also be affected by anthropogenic processes. The groundwater composition is predominated by Ca-Mg-HCO3 and saturation values

  5. The Coffee Sand and Ripley aquifers in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, E.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Coffee Sand and Ripley aquifers, of Cretaceous age, are in the Selma Group in northern Mississippi. The aquifers contain freshwater in an area of about 4,400 square miles in northern Mississippi. Water produced from the aquifers by public water systems and numerous industries in 1975 averaged about 4 Mgal/d. Regional water-level declines have been very small and the aquifers have a moderate potential for future development. The aquifers are used in some areas where there are no other significant sources of ground water. The most common problems in developing water supplies are low yields to wells and hard water. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. 40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147.2102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147...

  7. 40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147.2102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147.2102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147.2102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2102 Section 147.2102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS South Dakota § 147...

  11. 40 CFR 147.302 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.302 Section 147.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Colorado § 147.302...

  12. 40 CFR 147.302 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.302 Section 147.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Colorado § 147.302...

  13. 40 CFR 147.302 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.302 Section 147.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Colorado § 147.302...

  14. 40 CFR 147.302 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.302 Section 147.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Colorado § 147.302...

  15. Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

    1980-01-01

    The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

  16. Tertiary Aquifer Modeling Within the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csontos, R.; Waldron, B.; Anderson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The geologic and hydrogeologic characterization of the aquifers and their recharge area within the Central United States in west Tennessee, northern Mississippi and eastern Arkansas are poorly understood. Previous investigations have utilized overly generalized outcrop boundaries of the primary Tertiary aquifers based on sparse well log information and stream down-cutting to show formation location. Acquisition of data in the form of deep oil and gas wells along with shallow lignite borehole data from the North American Coal Company is enabling us to improve upon these prior formational boundaries and recharge area delineations. Additionally, utilization of those geophysical logs with numerous well log curves is allowing us to characterize each geologic unit as to the sand/clay composition, porosity, and depiction of facies changes within a three- dimensional context. This is made possible through the utilization of the oil industry standard mapping package, Petrel®. We use a combination of methods to illustrate the presence of clay bodies within the primary drinking water aquifer, historically modeled solely as a sand unit. Identification of these clay bodies will impact ground-water flow patterns and assist water utilities in reducing contamination threats. We will illustrate aquifer thickness variability owning to faulting and paleo-erosion that again may impact ground-water pathways.

  17. Identifying turbulent flow in carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Stephen R. H.; Soley, Robert W. N.

    2017-09-01

    Turbulent flow has a different hydraulic response compared to laminar flow and so it is important to be able to identify its occurrence in an aquifer, and to predict where it is likely to be found. Turbulent flow is associated with large apertures and rapid velocities, and these occur most frequently in carbonate aquifers. Methods for identifying turbulent flow include correlating spring discharge with head variation, calculating Reynolds numbers from spring discharge and tracer velocity, and plotting the spatial variation of head differences between high flow and low flow. The probability of turbulent flow increases as a function of permeability and of spring discharge, and the probability increases in a downgradient direction in an aquifer. Spring discharge is a key parameter for evaluating the presence of turbulent flow, which is likely to occur where a spring with a discharge > 1 L/s is fed by a single channel. Turbulent flow appears to be a major contributing factor to the occurrence of groundwater flooding in carbonate aquifers.

  18. Managing environmental problems in Cuban karstic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Leslie Molerio; Parise, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The Cuban archipelago hosts some of the most typical karst features in the Caribbean, and has very important and high-quality resources of karst water. Carbonate rocks cover about 70% of the country area, with a great variety of karst features, and outstanding exokarstic landforms such as the cone karst; in addition, many caves are regarded as cultural and historical sites. Protection of the karst hydric resources is therefore essential. In karst, the intrinsic vulnerability of the environment makes it highly susceptible to pollution, which may result in dramatic consequences for both the quality of karst water and the amount of water available. Many anthropogenic activities produce negative changes in the karst aquifers, in some cases with unrecoverable effects. In Cuba, five main sources of pollution to karst aquifers have been identified: sea water intrusion, agricultural practices, waste disposal, industrial activity, and mining and oil production. Due to the narrow and elongated configuration of the main island, wide portions of the territory are mostly affected by seawater intrusion problems, exacerbated by the concentration of both population and human activities in the largest towns located along, or very close to, the coasts. Seawater intrusion, however, is not the only source of pollution for Cuban karst aquifers. The other aforementioned sources are important, and may locally prevail (e.g. pollution resulting from sugar cane factories). Considerations on the management of karst aquifers and a brief description of the water quality monitoring system of Cuban inland waters are also provided.

  19. STUDY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study directed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will investigate the hydrogeology of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma. The five year study will involve field investigations including the installation of ne...

  20. Influence of aquifer properties on phytoremediation effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Daniel W; Massmann, Joel; Strand, Stuart E

    2003-01-01

    Recent research has shown that planting deep-rooted trees, such as poplar, can take up and degrade important ground water pollutants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) as they transpire water from the capillary fringe of shallow contaminated aquifers. The effect of hydrogeologic factors on the minimum plantation area needed to prevent downgradient migration of contaminated ground water is not well known. Accordingly, the objective of this research was to identify the hydrogeologic parameters that control phytoremediation effectiveness. We used a numerical ground water flow model to evaluate the effect that natural variations in hydrogeologic parameters and growing season duration have on the minimum plantation area required for capture. We found that the plantation area that was needed to completely capture a ground water contamination plume was directly proportional to aquifer horizontal hydraulic conductivity, saturated thickness, and ground water gradient. The plantation area needed for capture increased nonlinearly with increasing plume width, aquifer anisotropy, and decreasing growing season duration. The plantation area needed for capture was generally insensitive to aquifer-specific yield and storativity. Steady-state simulations can be used to predict the plantation area needed for capture in many applications. A particularly important finding of this work is that evapotranspiration fluxes through plantations appropriately sized to contain the plume substantially exceeded the ground water flux through the plume itself.

  1. Estimating Hydraulic Properties for Hawaiian Aquifers Using Aquifer Tests and Tidal Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzoll, K.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 30 years the population of the island of Maui, Hawaii, has significantly increased and so has the ground-water demand. To ensure prudent management of the ground-water resources, an improved understanding of ground-water flow systems is needed. At present, no large-scale estimation of the aquifer properties has been completed for Maui. Ground-water flow and chemical transport depends highly on aquifer characteristics such as storage properties and hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity. The suitability of several methods is examined for a number of Hawaiian aquifers. Seven analytical methods using constant and variable-rate withdrawals in a single well provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity for over 100 wells in central Maui. The spatial distribution permits to form regional clusters of similar hydraulic conductivity. The response of the harmonic ocean tide signal in several wells in the aquifer is investigated. Analytical methods and numerical modeling allow estimating aquifer diffusivity. Results of this analysis are in general agreement with typical values for confined and unconfined aquifers in central Maui. The results of this study will provide information needed to build a numerical ground-water flow model for central Maui in order to estimate ground-water availability.

  2. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : Cumberland Plateau aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Macy, Jo Ann; Mulderink, Dolores; Zemo, Dawn

    1986-01-01

    The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system consists of Pennsylvanian sandstones, conglomerates, shales, and coals which underlie the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. Major water-bearing zones occur within the sandstones and conglomerates in interconnected fractures. The water-bearing formations are separated by shale and siltstone that retard the vertical circulation of ground water. The Pennington Formation serves as the base of this aquifer system and is an effective confining unit. The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is an important water source for the Cumberland Plateau. Wells and springs from the aquifer system supply most of the rural domestic and public drinking-water supplies. Water from wells drilled into the Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is generally of good to excellent quality. Of the 32 water-quality analyses on file from this aquifer, only 2 had dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 500 milligrams per liter, and about three-fourths had less than 200 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. However, no samples from depths greater than 300 feet below land surface have been recorded. Ground water from locations where the sandstones are buried deeply, such as the Wartburg basin, may contain dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter.

  3. Delineation and description of the regional aquifer systems of Tennessee; Cumberland Plateau aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Macy, J.A.; Mulderink, Dolores; Zemo, Dawn

    1986-01-01

    The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system consists of Pennsylvanian sandstones, conglomerates, shales, and coals which underlie the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. Major water-bearing zones occur within the sandstones and conglomerates in interconnected fractures. The water-bearing formations are separated by shale and siltstone that retard the vertical circulation of ground water, The Pennington Formation serves as the base of this aquifer system and is an effective confining unit, The Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is an important water source for the Cumberland Plateau, wells and springs from the aquifer system supply most of the rural domestic and public drinking-water supplies, water from wells drilled into the Cumberland Plateau aquifer system is generally of good to excellent quality. Of the 32 water-quality analyses on file from this aquifer. only 2 had dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 500 milligrams per liter, and about three-fourths had less than 200 milligrams per liter dissolved solids, However, no samples from depths greater than 300 feet below land surface have been recorded. Ground water from locations where the sandstones are buried deeply, such as the Wartburg basin, may contain dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter.

  4. A potential groundwater aquifer for palaeoclimate reconstruction: Turonian aquifer, Tadla basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Radouan; Túri, Marianna; Palcsu, László; Marah, Hamid; Hakam, Oum Keltoum; Rinyu, László; Molnár, Mihály; Futó, István

    2017-08-01

    We undertook an environmental isotope investigation of groundwater from the Turonian Aquifer of Tadla Basin in Morocco in order to confirm that this aquifer could be a potential site for palaeoclimate reconstruction. The collected groundwater samples were examined for stable oxygen, hydrogen and carbon isotope ratio, as well as noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), 14C and 3H concentration. The measured stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope values show that the Turonian aquifer has two recharge areas, one with a heavier isotopic signature from the unconfined aquifer in the northern region (the area of Boujad), while the other is characterised by lighter isotopic composition in the north-eastern to the south-western part of the basin (to the North from Kasba Tadla). The calculated noble-gas solubility temperatures of the confined part of the aquifer are 2 °C higher than the recent mean annual air temperature (19 °C). Radiocarbon ages obtained from running different versions of Ingerson-Pearson models indicated that the recharge of this water occurred during the Holocene. We conclude that the Turonian aquifer might be a potential place for Late-Pleistocene palaeoclimate reconstruction if the research area were extended in the direct of flow path towards the western part of the basin and towards the foothills of the Phosphates Plateau.

  5. Hydrologeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effect of Lower Floridan aquifer pumping on the Upper Floridan aquifer, Pooler, Chatham County, Georgia, 2011–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Two test wells were completed in Pooler, Georgia, in 2011 to investigate the potential of using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of water for municipal use. One well was completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer at a depth of 1,120 feet (ft) below land surface; the other well was completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer at a depth of 486 ft below land surface. At the Pooler test site, the U.S. Geological Survey performed flowmeter surveys, packer-isolated slug tests within the Lower Floridan confining unit, slug tests of the entire Floridan aquifer system, and aquifer tests of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers. Drill cuttings, geophysical logs, and borehole flowmeter surveys indicate that the Upper Floridan aquifer extends 333 –515 ft below land surface, the Lower Floridan confining unit extends 515–702 ft below land surface, and the Lower Floridan aquifer extends 702–1,040 ft below land surface. Flowmeter surveys indicate that the Upper Floridan aquifer contains two water-bearing zones at depth intervals of 339 –350 and 375–515 ft; the Lower Floridan confining unit contains one zone at a depth interval of 550–620 ft; and the Lower Floridan aquifer contains five zones at depth intervals of 702–745, 745–925, 925–984, 984–1,015, and 1,015–1,040 ft. Flowmeter testing of the test borehole open to the entire Floridan aquifer system indicated that the Upper Floridan aquifer contributed 92.4 percent of the total flow rate of 708 gallons per minute; the Lower Floridan confining unit contributed 3.0 percent; and the Lower Floridan aquifer contributed 4.6 percent. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Lower Floridan confining unit derived from slug tests within three packer-isolated intervals ranged from 0.5 to 10 feet per day (ft/d). Aquifer-test analyses yielded values of transmissivity for the Upper Floridan aquifer, Lower Floridan confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer of 46,000, 700, and 4,000 feet squared per day (ft2/d

  6. Colombia Exports Its "New School" Blueprint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Asbel

    1999-01-01

    To compensate for disadvantages of traditional rural schools, Colombia's Escuela Nueva (New School) movement offers solutions such as self-instruction guides geared to aspects of daily life and flexible school schedules. Teacher training that encourages student and community involvement is a key element. Escuela Nueva successes have led to its…

  7. Current status of onchocerciasis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Corredor, A; Nicholls, R S; Duque, S; Munoz de Hoyos, P; Alvarez, C A; Guderian, R H; Lopez, H H; Palma, G I

    1998-05-01

    To assess the current epidemiologic status of onchocerciasis in Colombia two surveys were undertaken in 1995 in a suspected new focus on the border between Colombia and Ecuador and in the known focus located on the Micay River. No new focus was found along the Colombia-Ecuador border. In the known focus, communities along the upper Micay River and its tributaries were surveyed; 655 adults underwent physical examinations and skin biopsies. Infected individuals were found almost exclusively in the community of Naiciona, where prevalence of infection was 40% (36 of 91). Polymerase chain reaction detection of onchocercal DNA in skin snips correlated with the skin-snip biopsy results. The prevalence of punctate keratitis, the only ocular manifestation found, was 33%. A rapid entomologic assessment demonstrated Simulium exiguum infected with Onchocerca volvulus. This is the first finding in Colombia of naturally infected black flies and confirms S. exiguum as a vector species. These data will be used for implementing a control program using periodic ivermectin distribution.

  8. Rural-Urban Migration in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, T. Paul

    The rural-urban migration pattern in Colombia during the last 25 years has resulted in a population increase in urban areas from 30 to 52 percent of the total population. This study explores the causes of internal migration. Migration rates are estimated for various groups in the population to clarify who migrates and to where. A model of…

  9. Epidemiology and control of malaria in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Julio Cesar Padilla; Uribe, Gilberto Álvarez; Araújo, Roberto Montoya; Narváez, Pablo Chaparro; Valencia, Sócrates Herrera

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is currently one of the most serious public health problems in Colombia with an endemic/epidemic transmission pattern that has maintained endemic levels and an average of 105,000 annual clinical cases being reported over the last five years. Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 70% of reported cases with the remainder attributed almost exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum. A limited number of severe and complicated cases have resulted in mortality, which is a downward trend that has been maintained over the last few years. More than 90% of the malaria cases in Colombia are confined to 70 municipalities (about 7% of the total municipalities of Colombia), with high predominance (85%) in rural areas. The purpose of this paper is to review the progress of malaria-eradication activities and control measures over the past century within the eco-epidemiologic context of malaria transmission together with official consolidated morbidity and mortality reports. This review may contribute to the formulation of new antimalarial strategies and policies intended to achieve malaria elimination/eradication in Colombia and in the region. PMID:21881765

  10. Tightening the Screws: Restoring Security in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    21 Aug. 2002. LexisNexis. National Defense University, Fort McNair DC. 20 Sep. 2002. Gunson, Phil and Tamayo, Juan. “ Chavez may reopen the skies...story> Sweig, Julia E. “What Kind of War for Colombia?” Foreign Affairs Sep. – Oct. 2002. LexisNexis. National Defense University, Fort McNair DC. 20

  11. The State and Higher Education in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucio, Ricardo; Serrano, Mariana

    1993-01-01

    Development of higher education in Colombia is analyzed in the context of recent expansion, democratization, emphasis on quality, and efforts to differentiate programs and institutions. Critical policy areas emerging, overall funding and administration of the public sector, are examined; and possible future developments are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  12. Epidemiology and control of malaria in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Julio Cesar Padilla; Uribe, Gilberto Álvarez; Araújo, Roberto Montoya; Narváez, Pablo Chaparro; Valencia, Sócrates Herrera

    2011-08-01

    Malaria is currently one of the most serious public health problems in Colombia with an endemic/epidemic transmission pattern that has maintained endemic levels and an average of 105,000 annual clinical cases being reported over the last five years. Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 70% of reported cases with the remainder attributed almost exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum. A limited number of severe and complicated cases have resulted in mortality, which is a downward trend that has been maintained over the last few years. More than 90% of the malaria cases in Colombia are confined to 70 municipalities (about 7% of the total municipalities of Colombia), with high predominance (85%) in rural areas. The purpose of this paper is to review the progress of malaria-eradication activities and control measures over the past century within the eco-epidemiologic context of malaria transmission together with official consolidated morbidity and mortality reports. This review may contribute to the formulation of new antimalarial strategies and policies intended to achieve malaria elimination/eradication in Colombia and in the region.

  13. Colombia's Libraries: Modernizing amidst a Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Describes the impact that the war on drugs in Colombia has had on their library services and on the lives of professional librarians. Topics discussed include political, staffing, budget, resource, and physical plant problems; the serious shortage of professional librarians; and extending library service to rural areas. (LRW)

  14. Fuelling a National Innovation System in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucio-Arias, Diana

    2006-01-01

    This presentation of the innovation-driven environment in Colombia derives from important national efforts to gather and store pertinent information. Two large surveys have tested the "innovative behaviour" of Colombian manufacturing firms--the more recent of these was in 2005. Another information source is the Scienti platform, an…

  15. Bilingual Curriculum Construction and Empowerment in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mejia, Anne-Marie; Tejada, Harvey

    2003-01-01

    Traced development of a bilingual curriculum in a monolingual private school in Cali, Colombia, with particular reference to the creation of a curricular proposal in accord with the philosophy and expectations of the school community and the process of particular empowerment generated throughout the research. (Author/VWL)

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Luisa Maria; Rozo, Juan C.; Forero, Liliana; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    Using spoligotyping, we identified 13 genotypes and 17 orphan types among 160 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. The Beijing genotype represented 15.6% of the isolates and was correlated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, female sex of the patients, and residence in Buenaventura and may represent a new public health threat. PMID:21762581

  17. Colombia's Libraries: Modernizing amidst a Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Describes the impact that the war on drugs in Colombia has had on their library services and on the lives of professional librarians. Topics discussed include political, staffing, budget, resource, and physical plant problems; the serious shortage of professional librarians; and extending library service to rural areas. (LRW)

  18. Astroparticle physics at the Eastern Colombia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, Hernán; Núñez, Luis A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the emerging panorama of Astroparticle Physics at the Eastern Colombia region, and describe several ongoing projects, most of them related to the Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) Project. This research work is carried out at the Grupo de Investigaciones en Relatividad y Gravitacin of Universidad Industrial de Santander.

  19. 78 FR 6188 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Free Trade Agreement-Colombia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ..., Chile FTA, NAFTA, Oman FTA, and Peru FTA. Because the Colombia FTA construction threshold of $7,777,000... ``Colombia FTA, Chile FTA,'' and adding ``Chile FTA, Colombia FTA,'' in its place. BILLING CODE 6820-EP-P...

  20. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  1. Zika Virus Disease in Colombia - Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Oscar; Beltrán, Mauricio; Nelson, Christina A; Valencia, Diana; Tolosa, Natalia; Farr, Sherry L; Padilla, Ana V; Tong, Van T; Cuevas, Esther L; Espinosa-Bode, Andrés; Pardo, Lissethe; Rico, Angélica; Reefhuis, Jennita; González, Maritza; Mercado, Marcela; Chaparro, Pablo; Martínez Duran, Mancel; Rao, Carol Y; Muñoz, María M; Powers, Ann M; Cuéllar, Claudia; Helfand, Rita; Huguett, Claudia; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A; Ospina Martínez, Martha L

    2016-06-15

    Background Colombia began official surveillance for Zika virus disease (ZVD) in August 2015. In October 2015, an outbreak of ZVD was declared after laboratory-confirmed disease was identified in nine patients. Methods Using the national population-based surveillance system, we assessed patients with clinical symptoms of ZVD from August 9, 2015, to April 2, 2016. Laboratory test results and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated for a subgroup of pregnant women. Concurrently, we investigated reports of microcephaly for evidence of congenital ZVD. Results By April 2, 2016, there were 65,726 cases of ZVD reported in Colombia, of which 2485 (4%) were confirmed by means of reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The overall reported incidence of ZVD among female patients was twice that in male patients. A total of 11,944 pregnant women with ZVD were reported in Colombia, with 1484 (12%) of these cases confirmed on RT-PCR assay. In a subgroup of 1850 pregnant women, more than 90% of women who were reportedly infected during the third trimester had given birth, and no infants with apparent abnormalities, including microcephaly, have been identified. A majority of the women who contracted ZVD in the first or second trimester were still pregnant at the time of this report. Among the cases of microcephaly investigated from January 2016 through April 2016, four patients had laboratory evidence of congenital ZVD; all were born to asymptomatic mothers who were not included in the ZVD surveillance system. Conclusions Preliminary surveillance data in Colombia suggest that maternal infection with the Zika virus during the third trimester of pregnancy is not linked to structural abnormalities in the fetus. However, the monitoring of the effect of ZVD on pregnant women in Colombia is ongoing. (Funded by Colombian Instituto Nacional de Salud and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).

  2. Monitoring Aquifer Depletion from Space: Case Studies from the Saharan and Arabian Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.

    2013-12-01

    Access to potable fresh water resources is a human right and a basic requirement for economic development in any society. In arid and semi-arid areas, the characterization and understanding of the geologic and hydrologic settings of, and the controlling factors affecting, these resources is gaining increasing importance due to the challenges posed by increasing population. In these areas, there is immense natural fossil fresh water resources stored in large extensive aquifers, the transboundary aquifers. Yet, natural phenomena (e.g., rainfall patterns and climate change) together with human-related factors (e.g., population growth, unsustainable over-exploitation, and pollution) are threatening the sustainability of these resources. In this study, we are developing and applying an integrated cost-effective approach to investigate the nature (i.e., natural and anthropogenic) and the controlling factors affecting the hydrologic settings of the Saharan (i.e., Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System [NSAS], Northwest Sahara Aquifer System [NWSA]) and Arabian (i.e., Arabian Peninsula Aquifer System [APAS]) aquifer systems. Analysis of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-derived Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) inter-annual trends over the NSAS and the APAS revealed two areas of significant TWS depletions; the first correlated with the Dakhla Aquifer System (DAS) in the NSAS and second with the Saq Aquifer System (SAS) in the APAS. Annual depletion rates were estimated at 1.3 × 0.66 × 109 m3/yr and 6.95 × 0.68 × 109 m3/yr for DAS and SAS, respectively. Findings include (1) excessive groundwater extraction, not climatic changes, is responsible for the observed TWS depletions ;(2) the DAS could be consumed in 350 years if extraction rates continue to double every 50 years and the APAS available reserves could be consumed within 60-140 years at present extraction (7.08 × 109 m3/yr) and depletion rates; and (3) observed depletions over DAS and SAS and their

  3. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs Aquifer in western Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Becker, M.F.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Rush Spring aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Blaine, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Stephens, and Washita Counties. These digital data sets were developed by Mark F. Becker to use as input into a computer model that simulated ground-water flow in the Rush Springs aquifer (Mark F. Becker, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 1997). For the purposes of modeling the ground-water flow in the Rush Springs aquifer, Mark F. Becker (written commun., 1997) defined the Rush Springs aquifer to include the Rush Springs Formation, alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, and parts of the Marlow Formations, particularly in the eastern part of the aquifer boundary area. The Permian-age Rush Springs Formation consists of highly cross-bedded sandstone with some interbedded dolomite and gypsum. The Rush Springs Formation is overlain by Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits that consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Rush Springs Formation is underlain by the Permian-age Marlow Formation that consists of interbedded sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, gypsum-anhydrite, and dolomite beds (Mark F. Becker, written commun., 1997). The parts of the Marlow Formation that have high permeability and porosity are where the Marlow Formation is included as part of the Rush Springs aquifer. The Rush Springs aquifer underlies about 2,400 square miles of western Oklahoma and is an important source of water for irrigation, livestock, industrial, municipal, and domestic use. Irrigation wells are reported to have well yields greater than 1,000 gallons per minute (Mark F. Becker, written commun., 1997). Mark F. Becker created some of the aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets by digitizing parts of previously published surficial geology

  4. Selecting Aquifer Wells for Planned Gyroscopic Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, Michael James; Studley, Gregory Wayne

    2002-04-01

    Understanding the configuration of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer's water table is made difficult, in part, due to borehole deviation in aquifer wells. A borehole has deviation if it is not vertical or straight. Deviation impairs the analysis of water table elevation measurements because it results in measurements that are greater than the true distance from the top of the well to the water table. Conceptual models of the water table configuration are important to environmental management decision-making at the INEEL; these models are based on measurements of depth to the water table taken from aquifer wells at or near the INEEL. When accurate data on the amount of deviation in any given borehole is acquired, then measurements of depth-to-water can be adjusted to reflect the true depth so more accurate conceptual models can be developed. Collection of additional borehole deviation data with gyroscopic logging is planned for selected wells to further our confidence in the quality of water level measurements. Selection of wells for the planned logging is based on qualitative and quantitative screening criteria. An existing data set from magnetic deviation logs was useful in establishing these criteria however, are considered less accurate than gyroscopic deviation logs under certain conditions. Population distributions for 128 aquifer wells with magnetic deviation data were used to establish three quantitative screening thresholds. Qualitative criteria consisted of administrative controls, accessibility issues, and drilling methods. Qualitative criteria eliminated all but 116 of the 337 aquifer wells, in the vicinity of the INEEL, that were initially examined in this screening effort. Of these, 72 have associated magnetic deviation data; 44 do not. Twenty-five (25) of the 72 wells with magnetic deviation data have deviation greater than one of the three quantitative screening thresholds. These 25 are recommended for the planned gyroscopic borehole deviation

  5. Sedimentologic and diagenetic controls on aquifer properties, Lower Cretaceous Edwards Carbonate Aquifer, Texas: Implications for aquifer management

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.; Dutton, A.R.; Ruppel, S.C.

    1994-09-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of water in the Edwards aquifer was assessed using a core and log-based study. Porosity distribution reflects both depositional fabric and subsequent diagenesis. Vertical facies stacking patterns influence the depositional porosity as well as dolomitization and diagentic porosity modification. Subtidal facies deposited during sea level highstands are generally undolomitized and exhibit low porosity (5-10%); platform grainstones typically have high depositional porosity and significant solution enhancement (20-42% porosity). Dolomitized subtidal facies in tidal-flat-capped cycles have very high porosity (20-40%) because of selective dolomite dissolution in the freshwater aquifer. Porosity in gypsum beds is high in some areas because of dissolution and collapse, but low where gypsum was replaced by calcite cement. Low-energy subtidal and evaporitic units in the Maverick basin have porosity generally less than 15%. The overlying basinal packstones and grainstones have solution-enhanced porosities of 25 to 35%. Diagenesis associated with fluctuations in water chemistry near the saline-freshwater interface may explain one high-porosity trend. Other complex patterns of high and low porosity are attributed to structurally and hydrologically controlled porosity enhancement and cementation. Three-dimensional mapping of porosity trends provides data for improved aquifer management. Only about 3% of the maximum stored water lies above the water table at which natural spring flow is diminished. An average specific yield of 42% in the unconfined aquifer is determined from total porosity, changes in the water-table elevation, and changes in estimated recharge and discharge. Average storativity of 2.6 x 10{sup -4} in the confined Edwards is estimated using average porosity and barometric efficiency calculated from comparing water-level hydrographs and atmospheric pressure changes.

  6. Aquifer test to determine hydraulic properties of the Elm aquifer near Aberdeen, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaap, Bryan D.

    2000-01-01

    The Elm aquifer, which consists of sandy and gravelly glacial-outwash deposits, is present in several counties in northeastern South Dakota. An aquifer test was conducted northeast of Aberdeen during the fall of 1999 to determine the hydraulic properties of the Elm aquifer in that area. An improved understanding of the properties of the aquifer will be useful in the possible development of the aquifer as a water resource. Historical water-level data indicate that the saturated thickness of the Elm aquifer can change considerably over time. From September 1977 through November 1985, water levels at three wells completed in the Elm aquifer near the aquifer test site varied by 5.1 ft, 9.50 ft, and 11.1 ft. From June 1982 through October 1999, water levels at five wells completed in the Elm aquifer near the aquifer test site varied by 8.7 ft, 11.4 ft, 13.2 ft, 13.8 ft, and 19.7 ft. The water levels during the fall of 1999 were among the highest on record, so the aquifer test was affected by portions of the aquifer being saturated that might not be saturated during drier times. The aquifer test was conducted using five existing wells that had been installed prior to this study. Well A, the pumped well, has an operating irrigation pump and is centrally located among the wells. Wells B, C, D, and E are about 70 ft, 1,390 ft, 2,200 ft, and 3,100 ft, respectively, in different directions from Well A. Using vented pressure transducers and programmable data loggers, water-level data were collected at the five wells prior to, during, and after the pumping, which started on November 19, 1999, and continued a little over 72 hours. Based on available drilling logs, the Elm aquifer near the test area was assumed to be unconfined. The Neuman (1974) method theoretical response curves that most closely match the observed water-level changes at Wells A and B were calculated using software (AQTESOLV for Windows Version 2.13-Professional) developed by Glenn M. Duffield of Hydro

  7. The High Plains Aquifer, USA: Groundwater development and sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennehy, K.F.; Litke, D.W.; McMahon, P.B.

    2002-01-01

    The High Plains Aquifer, located in the United States, is one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world and is threatened by continued decline in water levels and deteriorating water quality. Understanding the physical and cultural features of this area is essential to assessing the factors that affect this groundwater resource. About 27% of the irrigated land in the United States overlies this aquifer, which yields about 30% of the nation's groundwater used for irrigation of crops including wheat, corn, sorghum, cotton and alfalfa. In addition, the aquifer provides drinking water to 82% of the 2.3 million people who live within the aquifer boundary. The High Plains Aquifer has been significantly impacted by human activities. Groundwater withdrawals from the aquifer exceed recharge in many areas, resulting in substantial declines in groundwater level. Residents once believed that the aquifer was an unlimited resource of high-quality water, but they now face the prospect that much of the water may be gone in the near future. Also, agricultural chemicals are affecting the groundwater quality. Increasing concentrations of nitrate and salinity can first impair the use of the water for public supply and then affect its suitability for irrigation. A variety of technical and institutional measures are currently being planned and implemented across the aquifer area in an attempt to sustain this groundwater resource for future generations. However, because groundwater withdrawals remain high and water quality impairments are becoming more commonplace, the sustainability of the High Plains Aquifer is uncertain.

  8. The dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Olga L; Parra, Diana C; González, Silvia A; González-Casanova, Inés; Forero, Ana Y; Garcia, Johnattan

    2014-12-01

    Almost all nutrition policies in Colombia currently focus on either undernutrition or obesity, with the predominant emphasis on undernutrition. It is crucial to assess the prevalence of the dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia to better target programs and policies. The aim was to estimate the national prevalence of the dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia at the individual and household levels in children aged <5 y, school-age children, adolescents, and adults. This was a cross-sectional analysis from the 2010 Colombian Demographic and Health Survey and the National Nutritional Survey that included 17,696 children aged <5 y, 25,508 school-aged children, 28,328 adolescents, 89,164 adults, and 10,487 households with mothers and children aged <5 y. The dual burden of malnutrition was defined as the coexistence of overweight and stunting or anemia in the same person or household. In Colombia, low to high prevalences of overweight and obesity (3.4-51.2%) coexist with moderate to high prevalences of anemia (8.1-27.5%) and stunting (13.2%). The observed prevalence of the dual burden was lower than expected. Approximately 5% of households had at least one stunted child aged <5 y and an overweight mother compared with an expected prevalence of 6.9% (P < 0.001). Among school-aged children, 0.1% were classified as stunted and obese and 1.4% were both anemic and overweight compared with expected prevalences of 0.5% (P < 0.001) and 1.5% (P = 0.037), respectively. Among 13- to 49-y-old women, 3.4% had anemia and were overweight compared with an expected prevalence of 3.5% (P = 0.038). National estimates of the dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia are lower than expected. Despite the independence of the occurrence of these conditions, the fact that the dual burden coexists at the national, household, and intraindividual levels suggests that public policies should address both conditions through multiple strategies. It is imperative to evaluate the current nutrition

  9. Carbonate diagenesis in a high transmissivity coastal aquifer, Biscayne Aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.; Walker, C. W.; Owosina, E. S.; Dickson, J. A. D.; Fallick, A. E.

    2001-09-01

    Cores collected through the Biscayne Aquifer (Plio-Pleistocene) in Hollywood, southeastern Florida, as part of the Hollywood Coastal Salinity Barrier Project provided an opportunity to examine the diagenesis of limestones and sandstones at the meteoric to marine water transition of one of the most transmissive aquifers in the world. The saline water front, and thus coastal mixing zone, has migrated landward approximately 1 km in the Hollywood area as the result of wellfield withdrawals. No changes in mineralogy (such as dolomitization), cement types and abundances, paragenetic sequence, or porosity are evident that can be correlated with the current or likely pre-development (wellfield withdrawals) location of the mixing zone. An approximately 2‰ downhole increase in calcite δ18O values is present in a core (HMW-6D) that penetrates the pre-development mixing zone, which may be related to either a down hole increase in salinity or to the interaction of meteoric waters with marine carbonate sediments during calcite cementation. The Biscayne Aquifer in Hollywood is currently a relatively quiescent diagenetic environment. The limited current diagenesis appears to consist of the dissolution of trace skeletal aragonite remaining in the aquifer, as suggested by a meteoric water Sr/Ca ratio similar to that of molluscan aragonite. It is proposed that a 'punctuated equilibria' model may be applicable to diagenesis in the Biscayne and other aquifers, in which limestones and sandstones entered a long period of diagenetic stasis after a period of relatively rapid textural and mineralogical stabilization.

  10. A potential groundwater aquifer for palaeoclimate reconstruction: Turonian Aquifer, Tadla Basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaadi, Radouan; Palcsu, László; Marah, Hamid; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Molnár, Mihály; Rinyu, László

    2016-04-01

    The study is an environmental isotope investigation of groundwater samples from the Turonian Aquifer of Tadla Basin in Morocco for the purpose to confirm that this aquifer could be a potential site for palaeoclimate reconstruction. The collected groundwater samples were examined for δ18O, δ2H, δ13C, noble gas concentrations, radiocarbon and tritium. Radiocarbon ages obtained from different isotope geochemical models indicates that the recharge of all these water samples occurred during the Holocene, we obtained a palaeotemperature record for the last 10 kyr. The calculated noble gas solubility temperatures of the confined part of the aquifer are varying around the recent mean annual soil temperature of 19 °C. However the noble gas temperatures of the unconfined part of the aquifer are a few degree C higher than expected. The obtained noble gas and tritium values might be stated this hypothesis as well. Based on these data, we conclude that the Turonian aquifer might be a potential place for Late-Pleistocene palaeoclimate reconstruction if the research area would be extended in the direct of flow-path towards the western part of the basin and towards the foothill of the Phosphates Plateau.

  11. Simulation of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Chris L.; Pope, Gary A.; Abriola, Linda M.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy

    1994-11-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-difference enhanced oil recovery simulator is adapted to model the SEAR process. This simulator incorporates the complex chemistry and multiphase transport behavior of surfactant/water/organic mixtures in permeable media. Model governing equations and parameter requirements are discussed, and simulations are employed to illustrate some important issues potentially affecting SEAR performance at the field scale. Simulations suggest that the total time for remediation could be reduced by more than an order of magnitude over conventional remediation approaches by employing SEAR. The assumptions, approximations, and conditions required to achieve such a favorable result are identified, and the importance of modeling as a quantitative tool for the assessment of SEAR is highlighted.

  12. Aquifer Structure Identification Using Stochastic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R; Dai, Zhenxue; Wolfsberg, Andrew V; Vrugt, Jasper A

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic inverse method for aquifer structure identification using sparse geophysical and hydraulic response data. The method is based on updating structure parameters from a transition probability model to iteratively modify the aquifer structure and parameter zonation. The method is extended to the adaptive parameterization of facies hydraulic parameters by including these parameters as optimization variables. The stochastic nature of the statistical structure parameters leads to nonconvex objective functions. A multi-method genetically adaptive evolutionary approach (AMALGAM-SO) was selected to perform the inversion given its search capabilities. Results are obtained as a probabilistic assessment of facies distribution based on indicator cokriging simulation of the optimized structural parameters. The method is illustrated by estimating the structure and facies hydraulic parameters of a synthetic example with a transient hydraulic response.

  13. Contamination and restoration of groundwater aquifers.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1993-01-01

    Humans are exposed to chemicals in contaminated groundwaters that are used as sources of drinking water. Chemicals contaminate groundwater resources as a result of waste disposal methods for toxic chemicals, overuse of agricultural chemicals, and leakage of chemicals into the subsurface from buried tanks used to hold fluid chemicals and fuels. In the process, both the solid portions of the subsurface and the groundwaters that flow through these porous structures have become contaminated. Restoring these aquifers and minimizing human exposure to the parent chemicals and their degradation products will require the identification of suitable biomarkers of human exposure; better understandings of how exposure can be related to disease outcome; better understandings of mechanisms of transport of pollutants in the heterogeneous structures of the subsurface; and field testing and evaluation of methods proposed to restore and cleanup contaminated aquifers. In this review, progress in these many different but related activities is presented. PMID:8354172

  14. Opportunities to enhance management of karstic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizek, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    Methods exist to obtain “new sources of water.” Examples include: (1) capturing and enhancing stormwater recharge and retention within diffuse-flow portions of karst and other aquifers; (2) recycling and reuse of waste water; (3) reducing evapotranspiration and rejected recharge; and (4) ameliorating atmospheric acid deposition through use of alkaline groundwater. These little used management methods have immense potential to sustain future water demands. Full utilization of “new” and traditional water resources requires an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework of karstic aquifers. Reliable conceptual, numerical flow and transport models are needed to help evaluate, select, and design viable water management options. Three such simulation examples are provided together with a discussion of Penn State’s Wastewater reuse project where recharge approaches 3.785 × 109l/year

  15. Analytic Element Modeling of Multi-Aquifer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, M.

    2002-05-01

    A new set of analytic elements has been developed for the modeling of steady-state flow in multi-aquifer systems. All analytic elements are exact solutions to the governing system of differential equations. As such, the leakage between aquifers is simulated exactly. Application of the new formulation has the advantage that the model domain is not discretized; all anlaytic elements represent hydrogeologic features in the aquifer system. The new elements may be used to simulate flow in systems with an arbitrary number of aquifers and leaky layers. They may also be applied to approximate three-dimensional flow to partially penetrating features if one is willing to discretize the aquifer vertically. Six multi-aquifer analytic elements have been developed and several more are under development. The following multi-aquifer hydrogeologic features may be modeled at the present time (March, 2002): an ambient flow gradient (uniform flow element); pumping wells, multi-aquifer wells, abandoned multi-aquifer wells, partially penetrating wells (well elements); river or stream segments, arms of radial collector wells (line-sink elements); areal recharge (circular area-sink elements); cylindrical domains with different aquifer and leaky layer properties, cylindrical holes in leaky layers (cylindrical inhomogeneity elements); single aquifers with polygonal domains consisting of multiple aquifers and leaky layers (aquifer-system inhomogeneity elements). Several new analytic elements are in different stages of development; they are intended for the modeling of the following features: impermeable walls, slurry walls (line-doublet elements), elliptical cylinder inclusions with different aquifer and leaky-layer properties (elliptical cylinder inhomogeneity elements), recharge areas bounded by polygons (polygonal area-sink elements). Analytic elements for multi-aquifer flow have been implemented in computational codes written in FORTRAN90 and Python. Practical applications include the

  16. Modelling hydropeaking effects on the riparian aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviglia, Annunziato; Zanol, Marco; Bellin, Alberto; Stecca, Guglielmo; Zolezzi, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Hydropower operations result in sharp water level and temperature fluctuations downstream the river section where water is released intermittently according to the pattern of hydropower generation. It has been widely recognized that these peaking flows cause severe degradation of the affected river reaches, but their biological effects and hydraulic behaviour have been studied mainly referring to the main channel. Field evidence (Sawyer et al., 2009, Loheide & Lundqvist, 2009) demonstrate that surface water level oscillations are associated with significant mass exchanges between the stream and its riparian aquifer that may have relevant, still largely unexplored, biogeochemical implications. The purpose of this study is to develop a simplified modelling approach to predict the effects of hydropeaking on subsurface flow into the riparian region. We propose a simplified model for surface - subsurface flow exchange where instream hydropeaking is assigned as boundary condition and that solves the unsteady, dimensionless 1D Boussinesq equations for the saturated zone of the riparian aquifer. This allows to quantify the lateral extent of the riparian region affected by hydropeaking oscillations. In particular, with this model we analyzed the temporal variations in the daily mass and thermal exchanges between the channel and the riparian aquifer, and identified the controlling factors. The role of longitudinal variations in channel morphology as well as of seasonal aquifer variations and land cover can also be examined through the proposed modelling framework. Sawyer, A.H., Cardenas, M.B., Bomar, A., and Mackey, M. 2009. Impact of dam operations on hyporheic exchange in the riparian zone of a regulated river. Hydrol. Process, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.7324 Loheide, S. P., II, and J. D. Lundquist (2009), Snowmelt-induced diel fluxes through the hyporheic zone, Water Resour. Res., 45, W07404, doi:10.1029/2008WR007329.

  17. Regional Groundwater Flow in the Louisville Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Tiaif, Syafrin; Serrano, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    The unconfined alluvial aquifer at Louisville, Kentucky, is an important source of water for domestic and industrial uses. It has been the object of several modeling studies in the past, particularly via the application of classical analytical solutions, and numerical solutions (finite differences and finite elements). A new modeling procedure of the Louisville aquifer is presented based on a modification of Adomian's Decomposition Method (ADM) to handle irregularly shaped boundaries. The new approach offers the simplicity, stability, and spatial continuity of analytical solutions, in addition to the ability to handle irregular boundaries typical of numerical solutions. It reduces to the application of a simple set of algebraic equations to various segments of the aquifer. The calculated head contours appear in reasonably agreement with those of previous studies, as well as with those from measured head values from the U.S. Geological Survey field measurement program. A statistical comparison of the error standard deviation is within the same range as that reported in previous studies that used complex numerical solutions. The present methodology could be easily implemented in other aquifers when preliminary results are needed, or when scarce hydrogeologic information is available. Advantages include a simple approach for preliminary groundwater modeling; an analytic description of hydraulic heads, gradients, fluxes, and flow rates; state variables are described continuously over the spatial domain; complications from stability and numerical roundoff are minimized; there is no need for a numerical grid or the handling of large sparse matrices; there is no need to use specialized groundwater software, because all calculations may be done with standard mathematics or spreadsheet programs. Nonlinearity, the effect of higher order terms, and transient simulations could be included if desired.

  18. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  19. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The agricultural system of corn, soybeans, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of

  20. Porosity development in coastal carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Konikow, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    Combines geochemical mixing theory with the hydrodynamics of fresh-water-salt-water mixing zones in a coupled reaction-transport model. Results from the reaction-path model PHREEQE are used with a variable-density groundwater flow and solute-transport model to simulate an idealized cross section of a coastal carbonate aquifer. The dissolution process is sensitive to fresh-water chemistry, groundwater velocities, and sea-level movement. -from Authors

  1. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  2. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of this practice.

  3. Vertically integrated flow in stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Otto D. L.

    2017-05-01

    We present a set of continuous discharge potentials that can be used to determine the vertically integrated flow in stratified aquifers. The method applies to cases where the boundaries are vertical and either the hydraulic head is given, or the boundary is a seepage face, or the integrated discharge is given. The approach is valid for cases of given recharge through the upper and/or lower boundaries of the aquifer. The method is valid for any values of hydraulic conductivity; there are no limitations of the contrast for the method to be valid. The flows in the strata may be either confined or unconfined, and locally perched conditions may exist, but the effect of capillarity is not included. The hydraulic head is determined by applying the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation. The main advantage of the approach is that very complex conditions in stratified aquifer systems, including locally perched conditions and extremely complex flow systems can be treated in a relatively straight forward approach by considering only the vertically integrated flow rates. The approach is particularly useful for assessing groundwater sustainability, as a model to be constructed prior to developing a fully three-dimensional numerical model.

  4. Sirenomelia: two cases in Cali, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Salcedo-Arellano, Maria Jimena; Ramirez-Cheyne, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of sirenomelia, a rare congenital defect with a prevalence rate of 1:100 000 births; both cases were observed in Cali, Colombia. Both pregnant women were referred from Buenaventura, Colombia. The expecting mothers shared multiple adverse sociodemographic factors. Their homes were located in a city where the entire population is of low socioeconomic status living under conditions of extreme poverty. They were uneducated, with nutritional deficiencies and no access to drinking water most of the time. Both were exposed to water and fish from a nearby river contaminated with leachate from a poorly managed landfill. A similar relation was previously reported in Cali in 2005 between environmental factors and sirenomelia. We suggest that there is a common aetiological factor of environmental origin between these two sirenomelia cases and propose that exposure to derivatives from landfills should be included among the factors for this rare defect of multifactorial aetiological origin. PMID:25636631

  5. Occupational and environmental medicine in Colombia.

    PubMed

    de la Hoz, R E; Guerrero, E; Espinosa, M T; de Fex, R L

    2000-04-01

    Colombia is a country rich in natural resources, with a steadily developing economy. Occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) education and practice have developed relatively recently in Colombia, mainly in response to a series of long overdue (and still partially implemented) reforms to the health care, social benefits, and education systems. Expansion in general and occupational health coverage of the Colombian population and development of OEM education and training were to be achieved through a clear stimulus to private sector initiatives. Despite some measurable overall progress, the goals remain elusive. This article discusses several aspects and the perspectives for further development of the specialty in this country, in the context of the socioeconomic factors involved in that process.

  6. Hand anthropometric study in northern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Trespalacios, Oscar; Martínez Buelvas, Laura; Hernández, José; Escobar, Jaime

    2016-09-02

    The main purpose of this study is to gather information about the dimensions of the northern Colombian (Caribbean region) population, focusing on the dimensions of the hand and comparing them with measurements from other regions. Thirty-two hand dimensions were chosen and 120 males and 86 females were measured. Results indicated that there were differences between the dimensions of the hand for men and women, showing that men are larger. Also, there was a comparison made between some measurements of other studies in different regions of Colombia, the USA, Chile, Jordan, Korea and Japan. The results indicated important physiological differences between regions in Colombia and across countries. It was therefore concluded that differences in anthropometric measurements must be included in the design and procurement of machinery and apparatus in order to avoid productivity loss, occupational injuries or illness.

  7. Aquifer transmissivity of porous media from resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwas, Sri; Singhal, D. C.

    1985-11-01

    To optimize the information/cost ratio and avoid the indiscriminate and excessive use of drilling and pump testing to calculate aquifer transmissivity an analytical relationship between modified transverse resistance and aquifer transmissivity has been developed for estimating transmissivity from resistivity sounding data. The relation takes into consideration the variation in the quality of groundwater. The relation has been tested successfully for the glacial aquifers of Rhode Island, U.S.A. and alluvial aquifers of three different areas of Uttar Pradesh, India. The practical applicability of the relation lies in the fact that if hydraulic conductivity is known for any reference point of a porous homogeneous aquifer, one can get fairly good idea of the transmissivity of the aquifer at other locations within a basin, from surface geo-electrical measurements.

  8. An evaluation of the bedrock aquifer system in northeastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Model simulations indicate that, by 1914, ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer system had already impacted the study area. Pumping in the Green Bay metropolitan area had lowered the potentiometric heads in aquifer 1 by 69 feet and in aquifer 2 by 55 feet. Model simulations indicate that, by 1981, ground-water withdrawals have caused a cone of depression centered in the city of De Pere area. The influence of the cone affects almost the entire study area and has significantly altered the horizontal and vertical flow regimes in the aquifer system. In 1981, computed drawdowns below the prepumping potentiometric surface of aquifer 1 range from 0 feet on the western side of the study area to 330 feet in the center of the cone of depression. In aquifer 2, the computed drawdown ranges from 0 feet on the western side of the study area to 253 feet in the center of the cone.

  9. Autosomal microsatellite data from Northwestern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Oscar Darío; Triana, Omar; Gaviria, Aníbal; Ibarra, Adriana Alexandra; Ochoa, Luz Mariela; Posada, Yeny; Maya, María Clara; Lareu, María Victoria; Brión, María; Acosta, María Amparo; Carracedo, Angel

    2006-07-13

    Allele frequencies and some forensic parameters for 12 autosomal microsatellites (CSF1PO, TPOX, THO1, VWA, D16S539, D7S820, D13S317, D5S818, F13A1, FESFPS, F13B, LPL) were estimated from three departments from Northwestern Colombia. The total number of samples analysed was 1045 individuals. Comparative analysis among the three studied departments and with other published Colombian populations were also performed and discussed.

  10. Balancing U.S. Strategy in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    in Colombia might indicate to others that weak democratic methods are not capable of governing in Latin America. The Colombian President, Alvaro Uribe...2004&m=May&x=2004051 9163815ASrelliMO. 5711481 &t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html>; Internet; accessed 14 September 2004. 24 Javier Fernandez, interview by...Internet. Accessed 16 September 2004. Fernandez, Javier . Interview by author with COL, Colombian Army. 23 February 2005, Carlisle Barracks, PA. Hill

  11. Colombia: Learning Institutions Enable Integrated Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Communist Party of Colombia), an army (which FARC itself claimed to be, the “ Popular Army,” or FARC–Ejército del Pueblo), and a united front (the...in the country, with the military invariably at the very top in popular esteem.10 Yet with processes and funding that were neither transparent nor...mature in incorporating its physical and popular elements. It is possibly more cohesive and more representative than at any time in its history. Most

  12. [Suicide trends in Colombia, 1985-2002].

    PubMed

    Cendales, Ricardo; Vanegas, Claudia; Fierro, Marco; Córdoba, Rodrigo; Olarte, Ana

    2007-10-01

    To report trends in mortality from suicide in Colombia from 1985 to 2002 by sex, age group, and method, and determine the number of Years of Potential Life Lost (YPLL) to suicide during this period. Age- and sex-specific and age-adjusted crude mortality rates were calculated based on mortality and population information available from the official database of the Department of National Statistics Administration, Colombia. YPLL were estimated and adjusted for societal impact, age, and poor quality of mortality records. The results were tabulated according to codes X600-X849 and Y870 from the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, 10th revision (ICD-10), and codes E950-E959 from the 9th revision (ICD-9). Suicide rates have been climbing in Colombia since 1998, particularly among young adults and males. The highest rates among males were in the age groups 20-29 years of age and over 70 years of age, and rates increased over time. Among females, the highest rates were recorded for the group 10-19 years of age. The YPLL rose in proportion with the increase in suicides, from 0.81% in 1981 to 2.20% in 2002. Among males, the most common methods used were firearms and explosives, hanging, and poison, with a relative increase in hanging; whereas among females, poison was most common. A rising trend in suicide rates in Colombia was confirmed, especially among the productive segment of the population, which has resulted in a marked increase in YPLL.

  13. Histoplasmosis laryngeal: report first case in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Moriones Robayo, Carlos Alberto; Guerra Ortiz, Claudia Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal histoplasmosis is a fungal infection that is frequent in Colombia. Laryngeal histoplasmosis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients through the dissemination of the fungus from the lungs to other organs. Histoplasmosis isolated laryngeal (primary) is rare. If a patient presents with a history of immunosuppression by renal transplant, primary laryngeal histoplasmosis with supraglottic granulomatous inflammation that was treated with amphotericin B and Itraconazole, with complete resolution of laryngeal lesions.

  14. Potentiometric map of the Cockfield Aquifer in Mississippi, fall 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darden, Daphne

    1986-01-01

    This map, the second in a series for the Cockfield aquifer in Mississippi, follows a map that delineated the 1980 potentiometric surface of the aquifer. This water level map is based on water level measurements made in about 80 wells in the Cockfield aquifer in the fall of 1984. The contours show altitudes at which water levels would have stood in tightly cased unpumped wells in fall 1984. (Lantz-PTT)

  15. Field Measurements and Modeling of the Southeast Greenland Firn Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, O. L.; Solomon, D. K.; Miège, C.; Voss, C. I.; Koenig, L.; Forster, R. R.; Schmerr, N. C.; Montgomery, L. N.; Legchenko, A.; Ligtenberg, S.

    2016-12-01

    An extensive firn aquifer forms in southeast Greenland as surface meltwater percolates through the upper seasonal snow and firn layers to depth and saturates open pore spaces. The firn aquifer is found at depths from about 10 to 35 m below the snow surface in areas with high accumulation rates and high melt rates. The firn aquifer retains significant volume of meltwater and heat within the ice sheet. The first-ever hydrologic and geochemical measurements from several boreholes drilled into the aquifer have been made 50 km upstream of Helheim Glacier terminus in SE Greenland. This field data is used with a version of the SUTRA groundwater simulator that represents the freeze/thaw process to model the hydrologic and thermal conditions of the ice sheet, including aquifer water recharge, lateral flow, and discharge. Meltwater generation during the summer season is modeled using degree day methods, and meltwater recharge to the aquifer (10-70 cm/year) is calculated using water level fluctuations and volumetric flow measurements (3e-7 to 5e-6 m3/s). Aquifer hydrologic parameters, including hydraulic conductivity (2e-5 to 4e -4 m/s), storativity, and specific discharge (3e-7 to 5e-6 m/s), are estimated from aquifer pumping tests and tracer experiments. In situ measurements were obtained using a novel heated piezometer, which advances downward through the unsaturated and saturated zones of the aquifer by melting the surrounding firn. Innovative modeling approaches blending unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow modeling and ice thermodynamics indicate the importance of surface topography controls on fluid flow within the aquifer, and forecast the nature and volume of aquifer water discharge into crevasses at the edge of the ice sheet. This pioneering study is crucial to understanding the aquifer's influence on mass balance estimates of the ice sheet.

  16. Mineral resources of Colombia (other than petroleum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singewald, Quentin Dreyer

    1950-01-01

    The following report summarizes data acquired during 1942-45, in Colombia, by geologists and engineers of the Foreign Economic Administration, with whom the United States Geological Survey cooperated. Twenty-nine mineral commodities are considered, but the data for five of them are scant because they were of no interest to FEA personnel. Petroleum is not considered. Preliminary to a review of individual mineral commodities, resumes are given of the general geography and geology of Colombia and of the country's mining laws. The principal mineral commodities, besides petroleum, produced in Colombia are (1) emeralds, gold, platinum, and silver, mainly for export, and (2) barite, cement, clay, coal, gypsum, salt, sand and gravel, silica, and stone, mainly for the domestic market. A large number of other mineral commodities are known in "raw" prospects, some of which may eventually become productive. Their distribution and apparent potentialities, as of 1945, are given. Factors unfavorable to mining are the ruggedness of the terrain, the scarcity of outcrops, and the very high transportation costs.

  17. Dengue mortality in Colombia, 1985-2012.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; León-Quevedo, Willian; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos Andrés

    2016-02-11

    Dengue in Colombia is an important public health problem due to the huge economic and social costs it has caused, especially during the disease outbreaks.  To describe the behavior of dengue mortality in Colombia between 1985 and 2012.  We conducted a descriptive study. Information was obtained from mortality and population projection databases provided by the Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística (DANE) for the 1985-2012 period. Mortality rates, rate ratios, and case fatality rates were estimated.  A total of 1,990 dengue deaths were registered during this period in Colombia. Dengue mortality rates presented an increasing trend with statistical significance between 1985 and 1998. Higher mortality rates were reported in men both younger than 5 years and older than 65 years. Between 1995 and 2012, category 1 to 4 municipalities reported the highest mortality rates. Case fatality rates varied during the period between 0.01% and 0.39%.  Dengue is an avoidable disease that should disappear from mortality statistics as a cause of death. The event is avoidable if the proposed activities from the Estrategia de Gestión Integrada (EGI)-Dengue are implemented and evaluated. We recommend encouraging the development of an informational culture to contribute to decision making and prioritizing resource allocation.

  18. [Recommendations for smoking cessation in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Alba, Luz Helena; Murillo, Raúl; Becerra, Nelci; Páez, Nelson; Cañas, Alejandra; Mosquera, Catalina; Castillo, Juan Sebastián; Camacho, Natalia; Gómez, Javier; García-Herreros, Plutarco; Bernal, Luis Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases represent the greatest burden of disease in Colombia for which smoking is the major risk factor. To provide clinical practice recommendations based upon efficacy and safety of smoking cessation therapies for Colombian adults. An adaptation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) based on the ADAPT methodology was performed. We searched CPG on Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, and Cochrane databases. Six months' cessation rates were appraised for brief and intensive counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion, varenicline, clonidine, nortriptyline, acupuncture, hypnosis, homeopathy, and combined treatments. CPG were evaluated with DELBI and selected when having a score above 60% for methodological rigor of development and applicability to the Colombian health system. Formal consensus was performed for questions without strong evidence. 925 references were found, 17 CPG were pre-selected and 5 selected for adaptation. Brief and intensive counseling, NRT, bupropion, nortriptyline, and varenicline are effective for smoking cessation (cessation rates augment 5.1%-22.7%). Alternative therapies have not demonstrated cessation efficacy. Concomitant use of different NRT is the only combination with demonstrated efficacy (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.3-2.7). Several alternatives for giving up tobacco smoking have confirmed efficacy. The absolute difference in cessation rates is variable among therapies and duration of effect requires further research. Brief and intensive counseling necessitate standardized formats for their implementation in Colombia. Economic evaluations are required to assess costs and benefits and to select the most suitable interventions for Colombia.

  19. [Cigarette taxes and demand in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Norman; Llorente, Blanca; Deaza, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Estimate price and income elasticities of aggregate demand for cigarettes in Colombia, by controlling for structural market changes since the late 1990s, to identify policy opportunities for taxes that could improve public health and increase tax revenues. Measurement of aggregate demand for cigarettes using gross income reported on value-added tax returns submitted to Colombia's National Tax and Customs Office (DIAN is the acronym in Spanish) by the tobacco product manufacturing industry, subtracting exports. A quarterly time series was obtained for the period 1994-2014. The econometric estimation using two-stage least squares controls for price endogeneity and uses a set of dummy variables to control for structural changes in the market and in its regulation. Demand is, from a statistical standpoint, sensitive to price and to income. Price elasticity of demand is -0.78 and income elasticity is 0.61. Inelastic demand implies that it is possible, through cigarette excise taxes, to meet public health targets and increase revenues simultaneously. The results also suggest that the considerable increase in household income in Colombia in the first decade of the 21st century increased purchasing power, which, lacking an accompanying tax increase, promoted cigarette consumption, with negative effects on public health, and wasted an opportunity to increase tax revenues.

  20. Management of aquifer recharge in Lebanon by removing seawater intrusion from coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Masciopinto, Costantino

    2013-11-30

    This study investigates the feasibility of management of aquifer recharge (MAR) in Lebanon by designing well barriers to remove seawater intrusion from the fractured carbonate aquifers. Groundwater flow and saltwater/freshwater 50% sharp interface have been modeled along the coastal area using the Ghyben-Herzberg theory. The groundwater flow simulations have been supported by field transmissivity estimations and depth measurements carried out on 44 wells during 2003. Results have shown the seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers at Jieh and Damour regions. Three well-injection barriers have been proposed. The water volumes for recharge and the barrier positions have been defined by means of groundwater flow simulations. MAR can provide a valuable contribution to colloid (even pathogen) removal from injectant water, although during water infiltration in subsoil the reduction of aquifer permeability causes clogging. A simple new model for estimating the soil-rock permeability reduction due to the well clogging has been presented. The MAR, including the soil aquifer treatment at Damour and Jieh regions, has been studied by considering aquifer transmissivity (and soil porosity) reduction caused by clogging. Furthermore, the appropriate mixing of the injectant water by using reclaimed water, groundwater and surface water can be simulated using the proposed models. The time required to achieve 5% of rock permeability reduction at the proposed well barriers ranged from 71 to 935 d, by changing water quality and flow rate for recharge. This study can assist regional governments with water management in areas affected by scarcity of freshwater by implementing appropriate well-barrier projects.

  1. Slugtests in fractured aquifers - advantages and caveats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The hydraulic characterisation of fractured aquifers is a challenge due to the large contrast between conductive fractures and a relative low conductive rock matrix. Depending on the type of problem, spanning from water resources issues at catchment scale to contaminant transport at local, borehole scale, different methodological approaches are required. The employment of slugtests as a characterisation method has a major advantage above classical pumping tests since they provide information also for the lower end of the permeability spectrum and are less logistically demanding. However, the volume of investigation of slugtests is generally small and limited to the immediate borehole area. The application of slug tests to fractured systems was investigated by Barker and Black (1983); Dougherty and Babu (1984) and Karasaki et al. (1988). Barker and Black (1983) pointed out the non-uniqueness of type curves with re¬spect to determining reservoir parameters, apart from hydraulic conductivity and sto¬rage coefficients. The unknowns in¬clude fissure densities, apertures and the hy¬draulic parameters of the rock matrix. They found that the Cooper method syste¬matically overestimates aquifer transmis-sivities by a factor of up to three. This figure however applies to a fairly homogeneously fissured aquifer such as the English Chalk. Dougherty and Babu (1984) examined in detail the effects of partial penetration, dif¬ferent skin factors and mass exchange coef-ficients in a double porosity system. They did however not present any parameter estimation solu¬tion. Karasaki et al. (1988) developed type curves for heterogeneous aquifer systems and came to the conclusion that "slug tests suffer problems of non-uniqueness to a greater ex¬tent than other well tests". In this paper, this aspect of non-uniqueness is addressed in detail, based on slugtest data in a fractured and karstified aquifer from the Swabian Alb in the SW of Germany, explanations and models of

  2. Forecasting natural aquifer discharge using a numerical model and convolution.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Kevin G; Johnson, Gary S; Van Kirk, Rob; Fairley, Jerry P

    2014-01-01

    If the nature of groundwater sources and sinks can be determined or predicted, the data can be used to forecast natural aquifer discharge. We present a procedure to forecast the relative contribution of individual aquifer sources and sinks to natural aquifer discharge. Using these individual aquifer recharge components, along with observed aquifer heads for each January, we generate a 1-year, monthly spring discharge forecast for the upcoming year with an existing numerical model and convolution. The results indicate that a forecast of natural aquifer discharge can be developed using only the dominant aquifer recharge sources combined with the effects of aquifer heads (initial conditions) at the time the forecast is generated. We also estimate how our forecast will perform in the future using a jackknife procedure, which indicates that the future performance of the forecast is good (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.81). We develop a forecast and demonstrate important features of the procedure by presenting an application to the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer in southern Idaho.

  3. Cleanup of fractured rock aquifers: Implications of matrix diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, R D; Scott, J I; Wilson, D J

    1993-01-01

    As contamination moves through a fractured rock aquifer, it tends to diffuse from the flowing fracture water into the rock's essentially stagnant pore water. This process tends both to retard a contamination plume's advance through a fractured rock aquifer and to substantially increase the difficulty of purging contamination from the aquifer. A mathematical model has been developed to evaluate the potential impact of this phenomenon upon water quality restoration in fractured rock aquifers. The numerical modeling reveals that cleanup of fractured rock aquifers will, in many cases, require many decades, even centuries, to achieve, particularly where substantial improvements in water quality are sought. The parameters which most strongly govern the degree to which matrix diffusion prolongs the aquifer restoration process are the rock's matrix porosity, fracture spacing, and matrix diffusivity, the chemical identity of the contaminant(s), and the length of time the aquifer has been contaminated.Since sedimentary rocks tend to have both relatively high matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, it can be particularly difficult to purge contamination from sedimentary rock aquifers. Crystalline rocks, in contrast, typically have lower matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, and therefore undergo more rapid cleanup. However, even in crystalline rocks, attainment of very high degrees of water quality improvement may be problematic. Numerical modeling also indicates that conventional groundwater 'pump and treat' programs are not likely to be very effective in speeding up aquifer restoration if the rate limiting step in the process is diffusion of contaminants from the rock matrix.

  4. Characteristics of Southern California coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, B.D.; Hanson, R.T.; Reichard, E.G.; Johnson, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Most groundwater produced within coastal Southern California occurs within three main types of siliciclastic basins: (1) deep (>600 m), elongate basins of the Transverse Ranges Physiographic Province, where basin axes and related fluvial systems strike parallel to tectonic structure, (2) deep (>6000 m), broad basins of the Los Angeles and Orange County coastal plains in the northern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province, where fluvial systems cut across tectonic structure at high angles, and (3) shallow (75-350 m), relatively narrow fluvial valleys of the generally mountainous southern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province in San Diego County. Groundwater pumped for agricultural, industrial, municipal, and private use from coastal aquifers within these basins increased with population growth since the mid-1850s. Despite a significant influx of imported water into the region in recent times, groundwater, although reduced as a component of total consumption, still constitutes a significant component of water supply. Historically, overdraft from the aquifers has caused land surface subsidence, flow between water basins with related migration of groundwater contaminants, as well as seawater intrusion into many shallow coastal aquifers. Although these effects have impacted water quality, most basins, particularly those with deeper aquifer systems, meet or exceed state and national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Municipalities, academicians, and local water and governmental agencies have studied the stratigraphy of these basins intensely since the early 1900s with the goals of understanding and better managing the important groundwater resource. Lack of a coordinated effort, due in part to jurisdictional issues, combined with the application of lithostratigraphic correlation techniques (based primarily on well cuttings coupled with limited borehole geophysics) have produced an often confusing, and occasionally conflicting

  5. Straddle-packer aquifer test analyses of the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.S.; Frederick, D.B.

    1997-01-01

    The State of Idaho INEL Oversight Program, with the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, and the Idaho Geologic Survey, used a straddle-packer system to investigate vertical variations in characteristics of the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Sixteen single-well aquifer tests were conducted on.isolated intervals in three observation wells. Each of these wells has approximately 200 feet of open borehole below the water table, penetrating the E through G and I basalt flow groups and interbedded sediments of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The success of the aquifer tests was limited by the inability to induce measurable drawdown in several zones. Time-drawdown data from aquifer tests were matched to type curves for 8 of the 16 zones tested. A single aquifer test at the water table exhibited greater curvature than those at depth. The increased degree of curvature suggests an unconfined response and resulted in an estimate of specific yield of 0.03. Aquifer tests below the water table generally yielded time-drawdown graphs with a rapid initial response followed by constant drawdown throughout the duration of the tests; up to several hours in length. The rapid initial response implies that the aquifer responds as a confined system during brief pumping periods. The nearly constant drawdown suggests a secondary source of water, probably vertical flow from overlying and underlying aquifer layers. Three analytical models were applied for comparison to the conceptual model and to provide estimates of aquifer properties. This, Hantush-Jacob leaky aquifer, and the Moench double-porosity fractured rock models were fit to time-drawdown data. The leaky aquifer type curves of Hantush and Jacob generally provided the best match to observed drawdown. A specific capacity regression equation was also used to estimate hydraulic conductivity.

  6. Hydrogeology and Aquifer Storage and Recovery Performance in the Upper Floridan Aquifer, Southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A.

    2007-01-01

    Well construction, hydraulic well test, ambient water-quality, and cycle test data were inventoried and compiled for 30 aquifer storage and recovery facilities constructed in the Floridan aquifer system in southern Florida. Most of the facilities are operated by local municipalities or counties in coastal areas, but five sites are currently being evaluated as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. The relative performance of all sites with adequate cycle test data was determined, and compared with four hydrogeologic and design factors that may affect recovery efficiency. Testing or operational cycles include recharge, storage, and recovery periods that each last days or months. Cycle test data calculations were made including the potable water (chloride concentration of less than 250 milligrams per liter) recovery efficiency per cycle, total recovery efficiency per cycle, and cumulative potable water recovery efficiencies for all of the cycles at each site. The potable water recovery efficiency is the percentage of the total amount of potable water recharged for each cycle that is recovered; potable water recovery efficiency calculations (per cycle and cumulative) were the primary measures used to evaluate site performance in this study. Total recovery efficiency, which is the percent recovery at the end of each cycle, however, can be substantially higher and is the performance measure normally used in the operation of water-treatment plants. The Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system currently is being used, or planned for use, at 29 of the aquifer storage and recovery sites. The Upper Floridan aquifer is continuous throughout southern Florida, and its overlying confinement is generally good; however, the aquifer contains brackish to saline ground water that can greatly affect freshwater storage and recovery due to dispersive mixing within the aquifer. The hydrogeology of the Upper Floridan varies in southern Florida; confinement

  7. The Politics of Rural School Reform: Escuela Nueva in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Patrick J.; Benveniste, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Traces evolution of rural-school education plan in Colombia (Escuela Nueva), focusing on importance of Colombia's changing political and social climate in policy development. Identifies three phases of reform development and implementation: grassroots, formalized, and decoupled. Uses Escuela Nueva to demonstrate importance of recognizing dynamic,…

  8. Why Has Peace Not Been Achieved in Colombia?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    Catalina Turbay Jiménez, El Estatuto de Seguridad : un Estudio de Caso, congresocienciapolitica.uniandes.edu.co (Accessed November 28, 2011). 23...Serafino, Colombia: Current Issues and Historical Background, 229. 24 David E. Spencer, Colombia Camino a la Recuperación: Seguridad y Gobernabilidad 1982

  9. Productivity of an unconfined aquifer as related to carbonate facies: the Coral Reef Aquifer of Collier County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Missimer, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    A 3-year investigation of the shallow, unconfined Coral Reef Aquifer of northern Collier County, Florida, has revealed the relationship of carbonate lithofacies to the transmissivity and specific yield of the aquifer. The geology of the aquifer was studied using cores, test wells, and both surface and borehole geophysics. Numerous aquifer performance tests were conducted to measure the hydraulic coefficients of the aquifer. The Coral Reef Aquifer consists of a surficial quartz sand mantel from 4 to 20 feet thick underlain by 24 to 70 feet of limestone. Four predominant lithofacies were found in the limestone: moldic arenaceous, molluscan packstone; corraline, moldic boundstone,; molluscan wackestone; and unconsolidated, agrillaceous wackestone. The base of the aquifer is formed by a low permeability, green dolosilt. Transmissivity values measured over a 12-square mile area ranged from 59,000 to 1,550,000 gpd/ft. The highest transmissivity values were associated with the occurrence of molluscan packstones. Estimated porosities in the molluscan packstone ranged up to 65% compared to 40% or less in the other lithofacies. The transmissivity of the aquifer was dependent primarily on the occurrence of the molluscan packstones and not greatly dependent on the overall aquifer thickness.

  10. Effects of a reactive barrier and aquifer geology on metal distribution and mobility in a mine drainage impacted aquifer.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Nora A; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W

    2005-06-01

    The Nickel Rim aquifer has been impacted for five decades by a metal-rich plume generated from the Nickel Rim mine tailings impoundment. Metals released by the oxidation of pyrrhotite in the unsaturated zone of the tailings migrate into the downgradient aquifer, affecting both the groundwater and the aquifer solids. A reactive barrier has been installed in the aquifer to remove sulfate and metals from the groundwater. The effect of the reactive barrier on metal concentrations in the aquifer solids has not previously been studied. In this study, a series of selective extraction procedures was applied to cores of aquifer sediment, to ascertain the distribution of metals among various solid phases present in the aquifer. Extraction results were combined with groundwater chemistry, geochemical modelling and solid-phase microanalyses, to assess the potential mobility of metals under changing geochemical conditions. Reactions within the reactive barrier caused an increase in the solid-phase carbonate content downgradient from the barrier. The concentrations of poorly crystalline, oxidized phases of Mn and Fe, as well as concentrations of Cr(III) associated with oxidized Fe, and poorly crystalline Zn, are lower downgradient from the barrier, whereas total solid-phase metal concentrations remain constant. Iron and Mn accumulate as oxidized, easily extractable forms in a peat layer overlying the aquifer. Although these oxides may buffer reducing plumes, they also have the potential to release metals to the groundwater, should a reduced condition be imposed on the aquifer by remedial actions.

  11. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, Marvin M.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is an important source of water that underlies about 2,320-square miles of parts of Osage, Pawnee, Payne, Creek, Lincoln, Okfuskee, and Seminole Counties. Approximately 75 percent of the water withdrawn from the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is for municipal use. Rural domestic use and water for stock animals account for most of the remaining water withdrawn. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is defined in a ground-water report as consisting principally of the rocks of the Late Pennsylvanian-age Vamoosa Formation and overlying Ada Group. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer consists of a complex sequence of fine- to very fine-grained sandstone, siltstone, shale, and conglomerate interbedded with very thin limestones. The water-yielding capabilities of the aquifer are generally controlled by lateral and vertical distribution of the sandstone beds and their physical characteristics. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is unconfined where it outcrops in about an 1,700-square-mile area. Most of the lines in the aquifer boundary, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were extracted from published digital surficial geology data sets based on a scale of 1:250,000, and represent geologic contacts. Some of lines in the data sets were interpolated in areas where the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is overlain by alluvial and terrace deposits near streams and rivers. These data sets include only the outcrop area of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer and where the aquifer is overlain by alluvial and terrace deposits. The hydraulic conductivity value and recharge rate are from a ground-water report about the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer. The water-level elevation contours were digitized from a mylar map, at a scale of 1:250,000, used to publish a plate in a ground-water report about the Vamoosa

  12. Hydrogeologic framework of the Michigan Basin regional aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westjohn, David B.; Weaver, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Mississippian and younger geologic units form a regional system of aquifers and confining units in the central Lower Peninsula of Michigan. The area of the regional aquifer system is about 22,000 square miles. The aquifer system consists of three bedrock aquifers, which are separated by confining units. Bedrock aquifers and confining units are overlain by surficial glaciofluvial aquifers, which are complexly intercalated with confining beds composed of glacial till and fine-grained lacustrine deposits.Geophysical and geologic logs were used to characterize the hydrogeologic framework of this regional aquifer system and to delineate and map boundaries of aquifers and confining units. Geophysical logs and water-quality data were used to delineate the base of freshwater within the aquifer system and to determine geologic controls on the distribution of freshwater in the aquifer-system units.Pleistocene glaciofluvial deposits are the largest reservoir of fresh ground water in the mapped region, and the thickness of this aquifer unit exceeds 900 feet in some areas. The Saginaw aquifer, the composite of sandstones of Pennsylvanian age, typically ranges in thickness from 100 to 350 feet in areas where this unit is used for water supply. In the western part of the aquifer system, the Saginaw aquifer is separated from glacial deposits by 100 to 150 feet of Jurassic "red beds." "Red beds" are a confining unit, and the Saginaw aquifer contains saline water where it is overlain by these deposits. The Saginaw confining unit, which is principally shale, separates the Saginaw aquifer from the underlying Parma-Bayport aquifer. Thickness of the Saginaw confining unit is about 50 feet in the eastern and the southern parts of the aquifer system, about 100 feet in the north, and 100 to 250 feet in the west. The Parma-Bayport aquifer, which consists mostly of permeable sandstones and carbonates, is 100 to 150 feet thick in most areas. The ParmaBayport aquifer contains freshwater only

  13. Aquifer Heterogeneity and the Management of Coastal Groundwater Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, R. G.; Guo, W.; Missimer, T. M.; Clayton, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    A major challenge in the development and protection of groundwater resources in coastal areas is managing the interaction of fresh and saline waters. Production wellfields are vulnerable to saline-water intrusion. The performance of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) and aquifer recharge systems in coastal settings is dependent upon the degree of migration and mixing of injected freshwater and ambient saline water in many places. Optimization of the development of freshwater resources thus requires the ability to accurately simulate the migration of saline waters in response to aquifer pumpage and the movement and mixing of injected freshwater. Aquifer heterogeneity can profoundly impact groundwater flow rates and patterns in coastal aquifers, particularly in karstic aquifers. The rate of migration of native saline water and injected freshwater in transmissive flow zones may be orders of magnitude greater than that estimated assuming a homogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity. High degrees of aquifer heterogeneity can result in rapid saline-water intrusion and can compromise the performance of ASR systems. Aquifer heterogeneity must therefore be quantified and incorporated in groundwater flow and solute transport models. Flowmeter logging allows for quantification of meter-scale variations in hydraulic conductivity. Advanced borehole geophysics, such as nuclear magnetic resonance logging, provide a means for in-situ measurement of finer (cm) scale variations in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, which can be incorporated directly into 3-D data management and visualization software and, in turn, solute-transport models. These new technologies can greatly improve our understanding of aquifer systems and help in aquifer management in the coastal areas.

  14. WTAQ - A computer program for aquifer-test analysis of confined and unconfined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; Moench, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    Computer program WTAQ was developed to implement a Laplace-transform analytical solution for axial-symmetric flow to a partially penetrating, finite-diameter well in a homogeneous and anisotropic unconfined (water-table) aquifer. The solution accounts for wellbore storage and skin effects at the pumped well, delayed response at an observation well, and delayed or instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone. For the particular case of zero drainage from the unsaturated zone, the solution simplifies to that of axial-symmetric flow in a confined aquifer. WTAQ calculates theoretical time-drawdown curves for the pumped well and observation wells and piezometers. The theoretical curves are used with measured time-drawdown data to estimate hydraulic parameters of confined or unconfined aquifers by graphical type-curve methods or by automatic parameter-estimation methods. Parameters that can be estimated are horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield. A sample application illustrates use of WTAQ for estimating hydraulic parameters of a hypothetical, unconfined aquifer by type-curve methods. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  15. Effects of clay dispersion on aquifer storage and recovery in coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; August, L.L.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic injection, storage, and withdrawal of freshwater in brackish aquifers is a form of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) that can beneficially supplement water supplies in coastal areas. A 1970s field experiment in Norfolk, Virginia, showed that clay dispersion in the unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer occurred because of cation exchange on clay minerals as freshwater displaced brackish formation water. Migration of interstitial clay particles clogged pores, reduced permeability, and decreased recovery efficiency, but a calcium preflush was found to reduce clay dispersion and lead to a higher recovery efficiency. Column experiments were performed in this study to quantify the relations between permeability changes and clay mineralogy, clay content, and initial water salinity. The results of these experiments indicate that dispersion of montmorillonite clay is a primary contributor to formation damage. The reduction in permeability by clay dispersion may be expressed as a linear function of chloride content. Incorporating these simple functions into a radial, cross-sectional, variable-density, ground-water flow and transport model yielded a satisfactory simulation of the Norfolk field test - and represented an improvement over the model that ignored changes in permeability. This type of model offers a useful planning and design tool for ASR operations in coastal clastic aquifer systems.

  16. Facies distributions, recharge-discharge relations, and aquifer sensitivity in a glacial aquifer system, northeastern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, A.H. ); Yarling, M. )

    1994-04-01

    The Huntertown aquifer system underlies about 650 km[sup 2] in the interlobate region of northeastern Indiana and corresponds to a sequence of Saginaw Lobe deposits sandwiched between two Erie Lobe till sheets. The northern part of the system typically consists of a 3 to 10 m thick basal outwash apron composed chiefly of sand and capped by a discontinuous sheet of sandy till. Several small to medium-sized (5 to 30km[sup 2]) ice-contact fans are superposed on this sequence and result in thick (15 to 30 m), transmissive sections of sand and gravel. To the southeast, these sediments grade into finer-grained fan-delta and slackwater facies associated with ancestral Lake Erie. Facies distributions, and thus aquifer connectivity, are related to topographic characteristics of the underlying till sheet, which controlled Saginaw Lobe meltwater drainage. The aquifer system is variably confined by a younger sequence of clayey tills and lacustrine mud. The degree of confinement is related to terrain characteristics, with the thickest till (15 to 25 m) being associated with ridged and moraines in the southern and central parts of the system. These features are characteristic of a regional discharge area and suggest a relatively longer residence time. Sensitivity of aquifers in this part of the system may thus be correspondingly less. The distribution of geochemical facies is much less predictable, however, and may be affected by several independent variables.

  17. Radial Dupuit interface flow to assess the aquifer storage and recovery potential of saltwater aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark

    2010-02-01

    A new accurate numerical solution is presented for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems in coastal aquifers; flow is approximated as radial Dupuit interface flow. The radial velocities of points on the interface are a function of time, the vertical coordinate, and the dimensionless parameter D (the discharge of the well divided by the product of the hydraulic conductivity, the square of the aquifer thickness, and the dimensionless density difference). The recovery efficiency of an ASR system (the ratio of the recovered volume of water divided by the injected volume of water) is determined by D and by the relative lengths of the injection, storage and recovery periods. Graphs are produced for the recovery efficiency as a function of parameter D for ASR operations with and without storage periods and for multiple cycles. The presented solutions and graphs are to be used as screening tools to assess the feasibility of specific injection, storage and recovery scenarios of planned ASR systems in saltwater aquifers without having to run complicated flow and transport models. When the screening tool indicates that recovery efficiencies are acceptable, the consideration of other features such as mixing and chemistry is warranted.

  18. Viva Colombia/Colombia Viva! A Fantasy Trip for the Five Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ramirez, Lori Langer

    2006-01-01

    In the author's experience, Colombia is among the most misunderstood Spanish-speaking countries. Most of the news about Columbia involves drug trafficking or guerilla warfare, due to the many social and political problems that face the country. It is rare that the public is informed about the culture and people of this beautiful South American…

  19. Toward Middle-Level Manpower Education for Colombia. A Report to USAID Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, B. Lamar

    Education for middle-level manpower, a high-priority need in Colombia, is discussed. The current programs of five educational agencies--universities, university institutes, SENA (National Apprentice Service), industrial schools, and agricultural schools--that are providing some preparation for middle-level manpower positions are described. A…

  20. Absolute hydraulic conductivity estimates from aquifer pumping and tracer tests in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Thorbjarnarson, K.W.; Huntley, D.; McCarty, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Independent estimates of absolute hydraulic conductivity were obtained by a standard aquifer pumping test and a forced-gradient tracer test in a highly heterogeneous aquifer. An aquifer hydraulic test was conducted to evaluate the average hydraulic conductivity (K), and to establish steady-state flow for the tracer test. An average K of 48 m/day was interpreted from the draw-down data in a fully screened well. Type-curve matching and simulation with MODFLOW of the hydraulic response in partially screened wells indicates K of 10 to 15 m/day for the upper section and 71 to 73 m/day for the deeper section. Iodide and fluorescent dye tracers were injected at low rates in wells located approximately 8 m upgradient of the production well. Tracer breakthrough was monitored in the production well and at ten depth intervals within the fully screened monitoring well. Interpretation of tracer response in the production well reveals tracer transport is limited to a 3.9 m thick section of the 20 m thick aquifer, with a hydraulic conductivity of 248 m/day. However, the depth distribution of these permeable strata cannot be determined from the production well tracer response. When sampled at 1.5 m depth intervals in the monitoring well, breakthrough was observed in only three intervals along the entire 18.2 m screened well. K estimates from tracer travel time within discrete high-permeability strata range from 31 to 317 m/day. Inclusion of permeameter K estimates for the lower permeability aquifer sands result in a range in relative K of 0.01 to 1.0. This field site has the highest absolute K estimate for a discrete stratum and the widest range in relative hydraulic conductivity among research field sites with K estimates for discrete strata. Within such a highly stratified aquifer, the use of an average K from an aquifer pumping test to predict solute transport results in great underestimation of transport distances for a given time period.

  1. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, Marylynn; Opsahl, Stephen P.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Herrington, Chris; Sample, Thomas; Banta, John (Ryan)

    2016-01-01

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3−) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3− in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008–12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3− stable isotopes (δ15N and δ18O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3− concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3− concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3− concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3−. These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3− contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008–10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3−than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously

  2. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  3. On concentrated solute sources in faulted aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, N. I.; Werner, A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Finite aperture faults and fractures within aquifers (collectively called 'faults' hereafter) theoretically enable flowing water to move through them but with refractive displacement, both on entry and exit. When a 2D or 3D point source of solute concentration is located upstream of the fault, the plume emanating from the source relative to one in a fault-free aquifer is affected by the fault, both before it and after it. Previous attempts to analyze this situation using numerical methods faced challenges in overcoming computational constraints that accompany requisite fine mesh resolutions. To address these, an analytical solution of this problem is developed and interrogated using statistical evaluation of solute distributions. The method of solution is based on novel spatial integral representations of the source with axes rotated from the direction of uniform water flow and aligning with fault faces and normals. Numerical exemplification is given to the case of a 2D steady state source, using various parameter combinations. Statistical attributes of solute plumes show the relative impact of parameters, the most important being, fault rotation, aperture and conductivity ratio. New general observations of fault-affected solution plumes are offered, including: (a) the plume's mode (i.e. peak concentration) on the downstream face of the fault is less displaced than the refracted groundwater flowline, but at some distance downstream of the fault, these realign; (b) porosities have no influence in steady state calculations; (c) previous numerical modeling results of barrier faults show significant boundary effects. The current solution adds to available benchmark problems involving fractures, faults and layered aquifers, in which grid resolution effects are often barriers to accurate simulation.

  4. Atmospheric Methane Contributions From Fractured Bedrock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrin, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater is not normally considered as an important contributor of atmospheric methane because the organic carbon content of aquifers is too low to sustain significant methanogenesis. Also, groundwater-generated methane partitions into the gas phase of the overlying soil, where it either dissolves in the pore water or is oxidized to carbon dioxide by methanotrophs. There are, however, localized conditions (related to human activities and hydrogeologic conditions) under which atmospheric contributions of groundwater-generated methane occur at the ground surface. Storing and transporting liquid petroleum products in the subsurface has resulted in the local introduction of high concentrations of degradable organic carbon and the creation of redox conditions that favor methanogenesis over more oxidative biodegradation pathways. Groundwater overlain by fractured bedrock, rather than by unconsolidated porous media, creates a situation where CH4 migrates through discrete fractures, thus limiting the soil volume and the surface area available for methanotrophic activity. The spatial distribution of methane in thin surface soils overlying bedrock suggests that CH4 migrates via fracture networks and that CH4 oxidation is a factor of about 50 less than that measured in typical unconsolidated soils. Atmospheric flux rates associated with contaminated bedrock aquifers were on the order of several grams of carbon (as CH4) per square meter, which is less than that reported for well documented sources (e.g., rice paddies) and probably represents a minor worldwide contribution. Nonetheless, these aquifers can represent an important localized source, can shift soils from a sink to a source of methane, and can permit petroleum products to load carbon (as biogenic CH4 and CO2) to the atmosphere without ever being combusted.

  5. Hydraulic tests in highly permeable aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Zhan, X.

    2004-01-01

    A semianalytical solution is presented for a mathematical model describing the flow of groundwater in response to a slug or pumping test in a highly permeable, confined aquifer. This solution, which is appropriate for wells of any degree of penetration and incorporates inertial mechanisms at both the test and observation wells, can be used to gain new insights into hydraulic tests in highly permeable settings. The oscillatory character of slug- and pumping-induced responses will vary considerably across a site, even in an essentially homogeneous formation, when wells of different radii, depths, and screen lengths are used. Thus variations in the oscillatory character of responses do not necessarily indicate variations in hydraulic conductivity (K). Existing models for slug tests in partially penetrating wells in high-K aquifers neglect the storage properties of the media. That assumption, however, appears reasonable for a wide range of common conditions. Unlike in less permeable formations, drawdown at an observation well in a high-K aquifer will be affected by head losses in the pumping well. Those losses, which affect the form of the pumping-induced oscillations, can be difficult to characterize. Thus analyses of observation-well drawdown should utilize data from the period after the oscillations have dissipated whenever possible. Although inertial mechanisms can have a large impact on early-time drawdown, that impact decreases rapidly with duration of pumping and distance to the observation well. Conventional methods that do not consider inertial mechanisms should therefore be viable options for the analysis of drawdown data at moderate to large times.

  6. Experiments in In-Situ Aquifer Denitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, I. A.; Spalding, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    During the past five years, denitrification experiments have been conducted in sand and gravel aquifers. Successive experiments have provided data showing both pitfalls and successes in designing sustainable injection/extraction systems for ground water denitrification. Testing has evolved from simple one-well to eight-well injection systems, commonly referred as Daisy systems. Aquifer profiles of the performance of denitrification were determined by multilevel sampling in two-foot intervals within the denitrification zone. Continuous and pulsed injection of organic carbon were tested, and in both cases the 40 mg NO3-N L-1 was reduced to below the detection limit (< 0.1 mg NO3-N L-1). Under continuous injection, accumulation of bacterial material in the vicinity of the injection well resulted in injection well clogging within 10 days. Using a dipole tool developed in the Water Sciences Laboratory, periodic cleaning was accomplished by circulating a cleaning solution (5% H2O2 and 0.02% NaOCl) in the injection well and adjacent ground water. Pulse injections, in which the carbon is separated from the nitrate, successfully alleviated the proliferation of bacterial accumulations without adversely affecting the performance of the denitrification process. Given that ethanol favored enhanced bacterial growth and increased the potential for biofouling of the equipment, acetate became the preferred carbon amendment. About 45% of the nitrate was denitrified before interception in the production well during a three-month pulsed injection experiment using the full eight-well Daisy design. Draw down of nondenitrified water from the upper two-thirds of the aquifer supplied nitrate to the production well and thus limited system performance.

  7. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, E. A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC), held in San Diego, California, 3 - 7 Aug. 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  8. Hydrologic data for aquifers in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulachok, G.N.; Wood, C.R.; Norton, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Selected data on the ground-water resources of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, are presented in this report. Information including water levels and data on aquifers is tabulated for 828 wells and 3 sumps. Chemical analyses are given for 1,467 water samples obtained from 205 sites and include 103 analyses for trace elements and 68 analyses for volatile organic compounds. An index of geophysical logs including gamma ray, neutron, caliper, fluid conductivity, fluid velocity, single-point resistance, spontaneous potential, and temperature determinations made in 51 wells is also presented. Data-collection sites are shown on a 1:50,000 scale location map.

  9. Analytical solution for aquifer decontamination by pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Shyun; Woodside, Greg D.

    1988-08-01

    Rehabilitation of polluted aquifers is an important issue in groundwater study. The use of withdrawal wells to extract dissolved solutes from contaminated aquifers is a possible mechanical remedial technique. A mathematical model dealing with aquifer decontamination by pumping is developed. The pumping well with a constant flow rate is taken into account as a mathematical sink located at the center of the plume to be removed. This plume is assumed to have a circular geometry inside which the solute concentration is axial symmetric with respect to the well and is incorporated into the model as an initial condition that can be formulated in an analytic or a sectionally continuous function capable of representing a wide range of uniform or nonuniform profiles. It assumes advection and longitudinal mechanical dispersion to be the transport mechanisms on a radially converging groundwater flow field. The analytical solution detecting concentration variation inside the aquifer is determined in closed forms with the Green's function approach and the Laplace transform technique. Using the field data presented by Pickens and Grisak (1981), the analytical solution obtained very accurately reproduces the reported concentration history at the well during the withdrawal phase of the single-well injection-withdrawal tracer test. It is found that if the initial conditions are expressed in functions presenting noticeable concentration gradients at the plume boundary, adverse dispersion against the converging groundwater movement would cause spreading of solutes beyond the original extent of plume during pumping. If the initial conditions gradually decrease to zero concentration at the plume boundary where negligible concentration gradients exist, concentration distributions do not extend beyond the initial condition envelopes during the withdrawal process. Since the well is placed at the center of the plume where maximum concentration occurs, the analytical solution evaluated at

  10. Denitrification in the karstic Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fork, M.; Albertin, A. R.; Heffernan, J. B.; Katz, B. G.; Cohen, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrate concentrations in the karstic Floridan Aquifer have increased dramatically over the past 50 years, owing to agricultural intensification and urbanization. Due to low concentrations of organic matter and moderately oxic conditions in the Floridan Aquifer, groundwater denitrification has been assumed to be negligible. In this study, we evaluate that assumption using both existing and new data describing dissolved gases (Ne, N2, O2, Ar) and NO3- concentration and isotopic composition (δ18O- and δ15N-NO3) in the aquifer’s artesian springs. For new data, we collected samples from 33 spring vents representing a gradient of both DO and NO3- concentrations in northern Florida and used Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) to directly measure dissolved N2 and Ar. We modeled the physical processes (recharge temperature, dissolution of excess air) driving super-saturation of N2 gas using Ne and Ar where data describing Ne were available. Ar concentrations were correlated closely with recharge temperature, which ranged from 15.7 - 22.2°C, while Ne was closely correlated with excess air, which ranged from 1.05 to 2.66 mg L-1 and averaged 1.83 mg L-1. Estimates of physical mechanisms allowed calculation of expected N2 concentrations that were compared to observed N2 concentrations. Where Ne data were unavailable, we assumed excess air equal to the empirical average. Overall, observed N2 exceeded expectations based on physical processes in 33 of 47 cases; average excess N2 was 0.48 mg L-1 across all sites. In addition, excess N2 was negatively correlated with DO (r2 = 0.46); springs with low DO (<2.5 mg L-1) had an average of 0.84 mg L-1 excess N2 while springs with higher DO contain little to no excess N2 (0.04 mg L-1). In addition, excess N2 was positively correlated with δ15N-NO3-. These observations are consistent with the widespread occurrence of denitrification in the Floridan Aquifer. Low DOC concentrations indicate that alternative electron donors may fuel

  11. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  12. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  13. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically < 10 ppm) and the expense of collecting large number of cores. An in-situ technique has been developed for studying uranium, iron and sulfur reduction dynamics during such bioremediation episodes. This technique uses in-well columns to obtain direct access to chemical and physical forms of U(IV) produced in the aquifer, evolving microbial communities, and trace and major ion groundwater constituents. While several studies have explored bioreduction of uranium under sulfate-reducing conditions, less attention has been paid to the initial iron-reducing phase, noted as being of particular importance to uranium removal. The aim of this work was to assess the formation of U(IV) during the early stages of a bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution

  14. Optimization of the Implementation of Managed Aquifer Recharge - Effects of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, Robert; Missimer, Thomas; Kneppers, Angeline

    2010-05-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has become a key component of integrated water resources management, especially in water scarce regions. MAR can serve the dual role of increasing the supply of available water and improving the quality of recharged water through natural attenuation processes. The performance of MAR systems is highly dependent upon site-specific hydrogeological conditions. Aquifer heterogeneity, such as the presence of high-permeability preferential flow zones and dual or even the so-called triple-porosity conditions, has been responsible for the under performance or failure of some MAR systems. Aquifer heterogeneity can result in much more rapid and unpredictable movement and mixing of recharged water and the bypassing of natural attenuation processes. A critical element of MAR projects is a detailed aquifer characterization and the development of groundwater flow and solute transport models at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales that accurately simulate local heterogeneous flow systems. Geochemical modeling based on high-quality, site-specific mineralogical and water chemistry data can also be used to predict the potential for adverse water-rock interactions such as the leaching of arsenic and trace metals into recharged water. Hydrogeological conditions that could lead to poor system performance should be identified early in the project development before the investment is made to construct a full-scale system. Hydrogeological conditions that have lead to poor MAR system performance are typically identifiable at the exploratory well stage of projects. Early detection of adverse hydrogeological conditions provides an opportunity to either abandon a likely under-performing project, select an alternative site with more favorable conditions, or modify the system design to be more compatible with local hydrogeology. Advanced borehole geophysical techniques and workflow software can allow for enhanced aquifer characterization and thus allow for

  15. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma. The Tillman terrace aquifer encompasses the unconsolidated terrace deposits and alluvium associated with the North Fork of the Red River and the Red River in the western half of Tillman County. These sediments consist of discontinuous layers of clay, sandy clay, sand, and gravel. The aquifer extends over an area of 285 square miles and is used for irrigation and domestic purposes. Granite and the Hennessey Formation outcrop in northern parts of the aquifer where alluvial deposits are absent. These outcrops were included as part of the aquifer in a thesis that modeled the ground-water flow in the aquifer. Most of the aquifer boundaries and some of the lines in the hydraulic conductivity and recharge data sets were extracted from a published digital surficial geology data set based on a scale of 1:250,000. Most of the lines in the hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and 1969 water-level elevation contour data sets, and one line in the aquifer boundary data set were digitized from a paper map published at a scale of 1:249,695 in a thesis in which the ground-water flow in the aquifer was modeled. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

  16. Effects of management policies, including artificial recharge, on salinization in a sloping aquifer: The Israeli Coastal Aquifer case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Shavit, U.

    2004-04-01

    Overexploitation of aquifers may impair groundwater quality and cause salinization, as occurs in the sloping Coastal Aquifer in Israel. The current management policy risks the future of the aquifer as the country's most important water reservoir. The paper examines a variety of policies and studies their impact on the salinization of the aquifer. Two quantitative approaches were applied: (1) a balance approach which was used to calculate the mean salinity of the aquifer water and (2) a 2-D numerical solution of the flow and transport equations in a 10 × 15 km cell representing a portion of the aquifer. The policy alternatives include desalination of imported freshwater (180-250 ppm Cl-), desalination of treated wastewater, and injection of the desalinated water. An increased pumping from the aquifer compensates for the injection of these waters. The results show that desalination of imported freshwater or wastewater with no injection would reduce the salinization rate of the aquifer only slightly, and that the effect would be noticeable only after a period corresponding to the retention time of the vadose zone. The alternatives that involve injection of desalinated water would stop the salinization process; the aquifer mean salinity would stabilize around the level that prevailed at the time of implementation of the injection policy. The numerical solution confirmed the conclusions of the balance approach while including the complex effect of the high-salinity boundary condition on the east and the role of thickness variations in a sloping aquifer. This approach addressed the influence of the spatial densities of pumping and of injection and showed that as the density increases, the numerical and balance solutions converge. It is shown that the numerical simulation should be used for future planning of the injection and pumping layout. Finally, calculations based on our results show that the alternatives involving injection of desalinated freshwater provide the

  17. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  18. Progress report on wells penetrating artesian aquifers in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, R.W.; Dyer, C.F.; Powell, J.E.

    1961-01-01

    Sufficient information is not available at present (1958) to permit a detailed description of the geologic and hydrologic properties of artesian aquifers or their correlation in South Dakota. The description of the various aquifers given in this report is, therefore, necessarily a general one.

  19. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  20. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  1. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  2. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  3. Retardation of arsenic transport through a Pleistocene aquifer.

    PubMed

    van Geen, Alexander; Bostick, Benjamín C; Pham, Thi Kim Trang; Vi, Mai Lan; Nguyen-Ngoc, Mai; Phu, Dao Manh; Pham, Hung Viet; Radloff, Kathleen; Aziz, Zahid; Mey, Jacob L; Stahl, Mason O; Harvey, Charles F; Oates, Peter; Weinman, Beth; Stengel, Caroline; Frei, Felix; Kipfer, Rolf; Berg, Michael

    2013-09-12

    Groundwater drawn daily from shallow alluvial sands by millions of wells over large areas of south and southeast Asia exposes an estimated population of over a hundred million people to toxic levels of arsenic. Holocene aquifers are the source of widespread arsenic poisoning across the region. In contrast, Pleistocene sands deposited in this region more than 12,000 years ago mostly do not host groundwater with high levels of arsenic. Pleistocene aquifers are increasingly used as a safe source of drinking water and it is therefore important to understand under what conditions low levels of arsenic can be maintained. Here we reconstruct the initial phase of contamination of a Pleistocene aquifer near Hanoi, Vietnam. We demonstrate that changes in groundwater flow conditions and the redox state of the aquifer sands induced by groundwater pumping caused the lateral intrusion of arsenic contamination more than 120 metres from a Holocene aquifer into a previously uncontaminated Pleistocene aquifer. We also find that arsenic adsorbs onto the aquifer sands and that there is a 16-20-fold retardation in the extent of the contamination relative to the reconstructed lateral movement of groundwater over the same period. Our findings suggest that arsenic contamination of Pleistocene aquifers in south and southeast Asia as a consequence of increasing levels of groundwater pumping may have been delayed by the retardation of arsenic transport.

  4. Substantial contribution of biomethylation to aquifer arsenic cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maguffin, Scott C.; Kirk, Matthew F.; Daigle, Ashley R.; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Jin, Qusheng

    2015-01-01

    Microbes play a prominent role in transforming arsenic to and from immobile forms in aquifers1. Much of this cycling involves inorganic forms of arsenic2, but microbes can also generate organic forms through methylation3, although this process is often considered insignificant in aquifers4, 5, 6, 7. Here we identify the presence of dimethylarsinate and other methylated arsenic species in an aquifer hosted in volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks. We find that dimethylarsinate is widespread in the aquifer and its concentration correlates strongly with arsenite concentration. We use laboratory incubation experiments and an aquifer injection test to show that aquifer microbes can produce dimethylarsinate at rates of about 0.1% of total dissolved arsenic per day, comparable to rates of dimethylarsinate production in surface environments. Based on these results, we estimate that globally, biomethylation in aquifers has the potential to transform 100 tons of inorganic arsenic to methylated arsenic species per year, compared with the 420–1,250 tons of inorganic arsenic that undergoes biomethylation in soils8. We therefore conclude that biomethylation could contribute significantly to aquifer arsenic cycling. Because biomethylation yields arsine and methylarsines, which are more volatile and prone to diffusion than other arsenic species, we further suggest that biomethylation may serve as a link between surface and subsurface arsenic cycling.

  5. Geohydrology of the Antlers aquifer (Cretaceous), southeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Donald L.; Davis, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    The Antlers aquifer, which consists of as much as 900 feet of friable sandstone, silt, clay, and shale, crops out in an area of 1,860 square miles and underlies about 4,400 square miles in southeastern Oklahoma. Precipitation ranges from 35 to 50 inches per year across the outcrop area, which is well suited to allow high rates of infiltration. The aquifer contains an estimated 31,600,000 acre-feet of water having less than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. The average saturated sand thickness is 250 feet. Aquifer tests in the confined part of the aquifer give an average storage coefficient of 0.0005 and an average transmissivity of 1,480 feet squared per day. The estimated specific yield of the unconfined part of the aquifer is 0.15; the transmissivity has not been determined. Large-capacity wells tapping the aquifer commonly yield 100 to 500 gallons per minute; the maximum measured yield is 1,700 gallons per minute. Water usage from the aquifer is very small owing to the availability of an abundance of surface water. Water quality throughout the central and northern part of the aquifer is generally acceptable for municipal use. A few wells, however, yield water containing concentrations of iron and manganese exceeding the limit recommended for municipal use by the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering (1972).

  6. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate whether denitrification would be a suitable alternative for biorestoration of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel. Microcosms were prepared from both uncontaminated and contaminated-aquifer material from the site, in ...

  7. The Active Bacterial Community in a Pristine Confined Aquifer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study of the active bacteria residing in a pristine confined aquifer provides unexpected insights into the ecology of iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the subsurface. At 18 wells in east-central Illinois, we trapped the microbes that attached to aquifer sedimen...

  8. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  9. 40 CFR 147.2802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2802 Section 147.2802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Northern Mariana Islands § 147.2802 Aquifer exemptions....

  10. 40 CFR 147.2802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2802 Section 147.2802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Northern Mariana Islands § 147.2802 Aquifer exemptions....

  11. Apparatus for Demonstrating Confined and Unconfined Aquifer Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Robert W.; O'Hannesin, Stephanie F.

    1984-01-01

    Students in hydrogeology classes commonly have difficulty appreciating differences between the mechanisms of water release from confined and unconfined aquifers. Describes a simple and inexpensive laboratory model for demonstrating the hydraulic responses of confined and unconfined aquifers to pumping. Includes a worked example to demonstrate the…

  12. 40 CFR 147.2802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2802 Section 147.2802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Northern Mariana Islands § 147.2802 Aquifer exemptions....

  13. 40 CFR 147.2802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2802 Section 147.2802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Northern Mariana Islands § 147.2802 Aquifer exemptions....

  14. Assessing Groundwater Storage Changes in Edwards-Trinity Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Michaels, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Existing water supplies in Texas are projected to decline by about 18 percent by 2060, a trend caused primarily by increases in water demand and depletion of aquifers. The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer system, a 200,000-km2 carbonate and clastic rock aquifer extending from southeastern Oklahoma to western Texas, provides water to all or parts of 38 counties in Texas. The extensive use of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer has already resulted in relatively large artesian pressure declines near population centers. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, significant uncertainty remains about the spatiotemporal replenishment characteristics of the aquifer. The U.S.-German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a unique opportunity to infer terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations on a regional basis. Previous studies have demonstrated the viability of using GRACE-derived TWS anomalies to conduct water budget analysis at both regional and continental scales. The purposes of our study are to (a) assess the potential of using GRACE, North America Land Assimilation System data, and in situ measurements to infer groundwater storage variations in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and (b) utilize remotely sensed data for informed groundwater resources management. Our preliminary results indicate that GRACE-derived TWS anomalies correlate well with results obtained through other means and, thus, the GRACE data could be a valuable tool for further calibrating a regional groundwater availability model developed for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

  15. Geohydrology of the Lloyd Aquifer, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garber, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Lloyd aquifer contains only about 9% of the water stored in Long Island 's groundwater system but is the only source of potable water for several communities near the north and south shores. The Lloyd aquifer is virtually untapped throughout most of central Long Island because current legal restrictions permit its use only in coastal areas. The upper surface of the Lloyd aquifer ranges in depth from 100 ft below land surface on the north shore to more than 1,500 ft on the south shore. Aquifer thickness increases southward from 50 ft to about 500 ft. Transmissivity ranges from 1,500 to 19,000 sq ft/day. All recharge (35 to 40 mil gal/day) and nearly all discharge is through the overlying confining unit. Nearly all of the pumpage (approximately 20 mil gal/day) is in Queens and along the north and south shores of Nassau County. Potable water can be obtained on most of Long Island in larger quantities and at shallower depths from other aquifers than from the Lloyd. Local contamination of these other aquifers, however, may require at least temporary withdrawals from the Lloyd in noncoastal areas. Significant withdrawals from the Lloyd aquifer may lower the potentiometric surface and thereby induce landward movement of sea water into the aquifer in coastal areas. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Hydraulic conductivity of a firn aquifer system in southeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Olivia L.; Solomon, D. Kip; Miège, Clément; Koenig, Lora S.; Forster, Richard R.; Montgomery, Lynn N.; Schmerr, Nicholas; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Legchenko, Anatoly; Brucker, Ludovic

    2017-05-01

    Some regions of the Greenland ice sheet, where snow accumulation and melt rates are high, currently retain substantial volumes of liquid water within the firn pore space throughout the year. These firn aquifers, found between 10-30 m below the snow surface, may significantly affect sea level rise by storing or draining surface meltwater. The hydraulic gradient and the hydraulic conductivity control flow of meltwater through the firn. Here we describe the hydraulic conductivity of the firn aquifer estimated from slug tests and aquifer tests at six sites located upstream of Helheim Glacier in southeastern Greenland. We conducted slug tests using a novel instrument, a piezometer with a heated tip that melts itself into the ice sheet. Hydraulic conductivity ranges between 2.5x10-5 and 1.1x10-3 m/s. The geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 2.7x10-4 m/s with a geometric standard deviation of 1.4 from both depth specific slug tests (analyzed using the Hvorslev method) and aquifer tests during the recovery period. Hydraulic conductivity is relatively consistent between boreholes and only decreases slightly with depth. The hydraulic conductivity of the firn aquifer is crucial for determining flow rates and patterns within the aquifer, which inform hydrologic models of the aquifer, its relation to the broader glacial hydrologic system, and its effect on sea level rise.

  17. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation – Principles and Technical Basis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at...

  18. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation – Principles and Technical Basis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at...

  19. 40 CFR 147.802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.802 Section 147.802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Iowa § 147.802 Aquifer...

  20. Apparatus for Demonstrating Confined and Unconfined Aquifer Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Robert W.; O'Hannesin, Stephanie F.

    1984-01-01

    Students in hydrogeology classes commonly have difficulty appreciating differences between the mechanisms of water release from confined and unconfined aquifers. Describes a simple and inexpensive laboratory model for demonstrating the hydraulic responses of confined and unconfined aquifers to pumping. Includes a worked example to demonstrate the…

  1. 40 CFR 147.2802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2802 Section 147.2802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Northern Mariana Islands § 147.2802 Aquifer exemptions. ...

  2. Retardation of arsenic transport through a Pleistocene aquifer

    PubMed Central

    van Geen, Alexander; Bostick, Benjamín C.; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Lan, Vi Mai; Mai, Nguyen-Ngoc; Manh, Phu Dao; Viet, Pham Hung; Radloff, Kathleen; Aziz, Zahid; Mey, Jacob L.; Stahl, Mason O.; Harvey, Charles F.; Oates, Peter; Weinman, Beth; Stengel, Caroline; Frei, Felix; Kipfer, Rolf; Berg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater drawn daily from shallow alluvial sands by millions of wells over large areas of South and Southeast Asia exposes an estimated population of over 100 million to toxic levels of arsenic (1). Holocene aquifers are the source of widespread arsenic poisoning across the region (2, 3). In contrast, Pleistocene sands deposited in this region more than ~12,000 years ago mostly do not host groundwater with high levels of arsenic. Pleistocene aquifers are increasingly used as a safe source of drinking water (4) and it is therefore important to understand under what conditions low levels of arsenic can be maintained. Here we reconstruct the initial phase of contamination of a Pleistocene aquifer near Hanoi, Vietnam. We demonstrate that changes in groundwater flow conditions and the redox state of the aquifer sands induced by groundwater pumping caused the lateral intrusion of arsenic contamination over 120 m from Holocene aquifer into a previously uncontaminated Pleistocene aquifer. We also find that arsenic adsorbs onto the aquifer sands and that there is a 16–20 fold retardation in the extent of the contamination relative to the reconstructed lateral movement of groundwater over the same period. Our findings suggest that arsenic contamination of Pleistocene aquifers in South and Southeast Asia as a consequence of increasing levels of groundwater pumping have been delayed by the retardation of arsenic transport. PMID:24025840

  3. Vinasse application to sugar cane fields. Effect on the unsaturated zone and groundwater at Valle del Cauca (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Ortegón, Gloria Páez; Arboleda, Fernando Muñoz; Candela, Lucila; Tamoh, Karim; Valdes-Abellan, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Extensive application of vinasse, a subproduct from sugar cane plantations for bioethanol production, is currently taking place as a source of nutrients that forms part of agricultural management in different agroclimatic regions. Liquid vinasse composition is characterised by high variability of organic compounds and major ions, acid pH (4.7), high TDS concentration (117,416-599,400mgL(-1)) and elevated EC (14,350-64,099μScm(-1)). A large-scale sugar cane field application is taking place in Valle del Cauca (Colombia), where monitoring of soil, unsaturated zone and the aquifer underneath has been made since 2006 to evaluate possible impacts on three experimental plots. For this assessment, monitoring wells and piezometers were installed to determine groundwater flow and water samples were collected for chemical analysis. In the unsaturated zone, tensiometers were installed at different depths to determine flow patterns, while suction lysimeters were used for water sample chemical determinations. The findings show that in the sandy loam plot (Hacienda Real), the unsaturated zone is characterised by low water retention, showing a high transport capacity, while the other two plots of silty composition presented temporal saturation due to La Niña event (2010-2011). The strong La Niña effect on aquifer recharge which would dilute the infiltrated water during the monitoring period and, on the other hand dissolution of possible precipitated salts bringing them back into solution may occur. A slight increase in the concentration of major ions was observed in groundwater (~5% of TDS), which can be attributed to a combination of factors: vinasse dilution produced by water input and hydrochemical processes along with nutrient removal produced by sugar cane uptake. This fact may make the aquifer vulnerable to contamination.

  4. Aquifers switched from confined to semiconfined by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheming; Wang, Guangcai

    2016-11-01

    Earthquake-induced aquifer parameter changes (e.g., permeability and hydraulic diffusivity) have been documented in many studies. However, changes in the confinement of an aquifer from confined to semiconfined following an earthquake have not been reported. Here we focus on the tidal response of the water level in four wells following the 2008 Wenchuan Mw 7.9 and 2013 Lushan Mw 6.6 earthquakes to show that earthquakes can change confined aquifers to semiconfined aquifers by reopening of preexisting vertical fractures (and later healing). This study has important implications because a switch from confined to semiconfined means a change of vertical hydraulic connection, which may affect the vulnerability of an aquifer, the integrity of underground waste repositories, and the safety of groundwater supplies.

  5. Maintenance and stability of introduced genotypes in groundwater aquifer material

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Sayler, G.S.; Wilson, J.T.; Houston, L.; Pacia, D.

    1987-05-01

    Three indigenous groundwater bacterial strains and Pseudomonas putida harboring plasmids TOL (pWWO) and RK2 were introduced into experimentally contaminated groundwater aquifer microcosms. Maintenance of the introduced genotypes was measured over time by colony hybridization with gene probes of various specificity. On the basis of the results of colony hybridization quantitation of the introduced organisms and genes, all introduced genotypes were stably maintained at approximately 10/sup 5/ positive hybrid colonies g/sup -1/ of aquifer microcosm material throughout an 8-week incubation period. Concomitant removal of the environmental contaminants, viz., toluene, chlorobenzene, and styrene, in both natural (uninoculated) and inoculated aquifer microcosms was also demonstrated. The results indicate that introduced catabolic plasmids, as well as indigenous organisms, can be stably maintained in groundwater aquifer material without specific selective pressure for the introduced genotypes. These results have positive implications for in situ treatment and biodegradation in contaminated aerobic groundwater aquifers.

  6. Southwest principal aquifers regional ground-water quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anning, D.W.; Thiros, S.A.; Bexfield, L.M.; McKinney, T.S.; Green, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a regional analysis of water quality in the principal aquifers in the southwestern United States. The Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers in the region to ground-water contamination by synthesizing the baseline knowledge of ground-water quality conditions in 15 basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. The improved understanding of aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability to contamination is assisting in the development of tools that water managers can use to assess and protect the quality of ground-water resources. This fact sheet provides an overview of the basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States and description of the completed and planned regional analyses of ground-water quality being performed by the SWPA study.

  7. Potentiometric map of the Cockfield Aquifer in Mississippi, fall, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wasson, B.E.

    1981-01-01

    This potentiometric map of the Cockfield aquifer is the eleventh in a series of maps, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources , Bureau of Land and Water Resources, delineating the potentiometric surfaces of the major aquifers in Mississippi. In the outcrop area of the Cockfield quifer the potentiometric surface is strongly affected by recharge from precipitation, by topography, and by drainage of the aquifer by streams. The potentiometric surface slopes downward generally to the west away from the area of outcrop and is strongly affected by large ground-water withdrawals in the Jackson and Greenville areas. Historically, water levels in or near the outcrop of the Cockfield aquifer have shown little or no long-term changes, but in much of the confined part of the aquifer during the past 20 years, water levels have declined from 1 to 2 feet per year. (USGS)

  8. Maintenance and stability of introduced genotypes in groundwater aquifer material.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, R K; Sayler, G S; Wilson, J T; Houston, L; Pacia, D

    1987-01-01

    Three indigenous groundwater bacterial strains and Pseudomonas putida harboring plasmids TOL (pWWO) and RK2 were introduced into experimentally contaminated groundwater aquifer microcosms. Maintenance of the introduced genotypes was measured over time by colony hybridization with gene probes of various specificity. On the basis of the results of colony hybridization quantitation of the introduced organisms and genes, all introduced genotypes were stably maintained at approximately 10(5) positive hybrid colonies g-1 of aquifer microcosm material throughout an 8-week incubation period. Concomitant removal of the environmental contaminants, viz., toluene, chlorobenzene, and styrene, in both natural (uninoculated) and inoculated aquifer microcosms was also demonstrated. The results indicate that introduced catabolic plasmids, as well as indigenous organisms, can be stably maintained in groundwater aquifer material without specific selective pressure for the introduced genotypes. These results have positive implications for in situ treatment and biodegradation in contaminated aerobic groundwater aquifers. Images PMID:3300546

  9. Glacierized headwater streams as aquifer recharge corridors, subarctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, A. K.; Gädeke, A.; O'Neel, S.; Gatesman, T. A.; Douglas, T. A.

    2017-07-01

    Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15-28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%). About half of annual headwater streamflow is lost to the aquifer (38 to 56%). The estimated long-term change in glacier-derived aquifer recharge exceeds the observed increase in Tanana River base flow. Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.

  10. Hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, J.E.; Stewart, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the surficial aquifer system in Dade County, begun in 1983, is part of a regional study of the aquifer system in southeastern Florida. Test drilling for lithologic samples, flow measurements during drilling, aquifer testing, and analyses of earlier data permitted delineation of the hydraulic conductivity distribution (on hydrogeologic sections), the aquifers in the system, the generalized transmissivity distribution, and interpretation of the ground-water flow system. The surficial aquifer system, in which an unconfined ground-water flow system exists, is composed of the sediments from land surface downward to the top of a regionally extensive zone of sediments of low permeability called the intermediate confining unit. The aquifer system units, which vary in composition from clay-size sediments to cavernous limestone, are hydro stratigraphically divided into the Biscayne aquifer at the top; an intervening semiconfining unit that consists principally of clayey sand; a predominantly gray limestone aquifer in the Tamiami Formation in western and west-central Dade County; and sand or clayey sand near the base of the surficial aquifer system. The base of the surficial aquifer system ranges from a depth of about 175 to 210 feet below land surface in westernmost Dade County to greater than 270 feet in northeastern Dade County. Test drilling and aquifer-test data indicate a complex hydraulic conductivity distribution. Hydraulic conductivities of the very highly permeable zone of the Biscayne aquifer commonly exceed 10,000 feet per day; in the gray limestone aquifer, they range from 210 to 780 feet per day. Transmissivities of the surficial aquifer system vary locally but have a recognizable areal trend. Estimated values generally are about 300,000 feet squared per day or greater in nearly all of central and eastern Dade County. Transmissivity is lower to the west, decreasing to less than 75,000 feet squared per day in western Dade County. High

  11. Simple method for quick estimation of aquifer hydrogeological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Li, Y. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Development of simple and accurate methods to determine the aquifer hydrogeological parameters was of importance for groundwater resources assessment and management. Aiming at the present issue of estimating aquifer parameters based on some data of the unsteady pumping test, a fitting function of Theis well function was proposed using fitting optimization method and then a unitary linear regression equation was established. The aquifer parameters could be obtained by solving coefficients of the regression equation. The application of the proposed method was illustrated, using two published data sets. By the error statistics and analysis on the pumping drawdown, it showed that the method proposed in this paper yielded quick and accurate estimates of the aquifer parameters. The proposed method could reliably identify the aquifer parameters from long distance observed drawdowns and early drawdowns. It was hoped that the proposed method in this paper would be helpful for practicing hydrogeologists and hydrologists.

  12. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  13. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, Patrick W.

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  14. Aquifer overexploitation: what does it mean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Emilio

    2002-02-01

    Groundwater overexploitation and aquifer overexploitation are terms that are becoming common in water-resources management. Hydrologists, managers and journalists use them when talking about stressed aquifers or some groundwater conflict. Overexploitation may be defined as the situation in which, for some years, average aquifer ion rate is greater than, or close to the average recharge rate. But rate and extent of recharge areas are often very uncertain. Besides, they may be modified by human activities and aquifer development. In practice, however, an aquifer is often considered as overexploited when some persistent negative results of aquifer development are felt or perceived, such as a continuous water-level drawdown, progressive water-quality deterioration, increase of ion cost, or ecological damage. But negative results do not necessarily imply that ion is greater than recharge. They may be simply due to well interferences and the long transient period that follow changes in the aquifer water balance. Groundwater storage is depleted to some extent during the transient period after ion is increased. Its duration depends on aquifer size, specific storage and permeability. Which level of "aquifer overexploitation" is advisable or bearable, depends on the detailed and updated consideration of aquifer-development effects and the measures implemented for correction. This should not be the result of applying general rules based on some indirect data. Monitoring, sound aquifer knowledge, and calculation or modelling of behaviour are needed in the framework of a set of objectives and policies. They should be established by a management institution, with the involvement of groundwater stakeholders, and take into account the environmental and social constraints. Aquifer overexploitation, which often is perceived to be associated with something ethically bad, is not necessarily detrimental if it is not permanent. It may be a step towards sustainable development. Actually

  15. Ithomiini butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hymphalidae) of Antioquia, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, C E; Willmott, K R; Vila, R; Uribe, S I

    2013-04-01

    Colombia is one of the most biodiverse countries on the planet. However, economic and scientific investment in completing inventories of its biodiversity has been relatively poor in comparison with other Neotropical countries. Butterflies are the best studied group of invertebrates, with the highest proportion of known to expected species. More than 3,200 species of butterflies have been recorded in Colombia, although the study of the still many unexplored areas will presumably increase this number. This work provides a list of Ithomiini butterflies collected in the department of Antioquia and estimates the total number of species present, based on revision of entomological collections, records in the literature and field work performed between 2003 and 2011. The list includes 99 species and 32 genera, representing 27% of all Ithomiini species. We report 50 species of Ithomiini not formerly listed from Antioquia, and found the highest diversity of ithomiine species to be at middle elevations (900-1,800 m). The mean value of the Chao2 estimator for number of species in Antioquia is 115 species, which is close to a predicted total of 109 based on known distributions of other Ithomiini not yet recorded from the department. Nine species are potentially of particular conservation importance because of their restricted distributions, and we present range maps for each species. We also highlight areas in Antioquia with a lack of biodiversity knowledge to be targeted in future studies. This paper contributes to mapping the distribution of the Lepidoptera of Antioquia department in particular and of Colombia in general.

  16. Energy resources of Pacific Coast of Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno Salazar, R.

    1986-07-01

    Despite failure of modest exploration efforts to yield commercial hydrocarbon production in the Choco-Pacific coastal basin of Colombia, recent geophysical, geochemical, and surface geologic investigations indicate a potential for petroleum accumulations, which could be related to fields located on the western basins of Ecuador that in fact constitute an extension of the Colombian Pacific geologic scheme. The Choco-Pacific coastal basin of Colombia covers an area of approximately 70,000 km/sup 2/, of which 14,000 km/sup 2/ lies offshore. The structural style of this area corresponds to a convergent plate basin created over folded oceanic sediments and adjacent to the subduction zone. Such a framework could be conducive to an attractive array of potential hydrocarbon-bearing traps. Geochemical knowledge of potential source rocks of Cretaceous and early Tertiary age confers an added attraction to the area. Most evaluations reveal kerogen-rich, gas-prone organic matter. Nevertheless, the existence of oil seeps from Cretaceous outcrops could indicate sufficient thermal maturity for oil generation. Adequate reservoirs could be found in sandy or calcareous rocks of late Eocene to Oligocene age, predominantly of marine origin with an estimated thickness exceeding 20,000 ft. Colombia has been one of the leading world producers of gold and platinum, mostly derived from the vast alluvial cover of the onshore area of the basin. In rocks cropping out in the Western Cordillera (eastern margin of the basin), deposits of potentially commercial value of porphyry copper and molybdenum, as well as massive sulfur, manganese, and bauxite, have been found.

  17. APOE gene polymorphism analysis in Barranquilla, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Martha; Arias, Isis; Rolón, Gloria; Hernández, Enio; Garavito, Pilar; Silvera-Redondo, Carlos

    2016-03-03

    The genetic variability present in the APOE gene polymorphism is considered an important factor associated with predisposition to diseases affecting lipid metabolism, as well as heart diseases and Alzheimer's disease, among others. Understanding it as a risk factor in different populations and ethnic groups is a useful tool.  To analyze the APOE gene polymorphism and determine allelic and genotypic frequencies of a representative sample of population from Barranquilla, Colombia.  We performed a descriptive and comparative study. The sample size was 227 unrelated individuals from Barranquilla, Colombia.  The most frequent allele was the ε3, with 85%, followed by the ε4 allele (13%) and ε2 (1.8%). The genotypes found were: ε3/ε3: 71.8%, ε3/ε4: 24.2%, ε2/ε3: 2.2%, ε2/ε4: 1.3% and ε4/ε4: 0.4%. The ε2/ε2 genotype was not found in this study. The sample exhibited the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.  The frequency of the ε3 allele and the ε3/ε3 genotype was similar to that reported in the literature in countries like Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and in some Colombian Amerindian ethnic groups. The ε2/ε2 genotype was absent. This result is consistent with those found in other population groups worldwide. The frequency of the ε4 allele and the genotypes associated in this population could be related to the presence of diseases such as hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction and Alzheimer.

  18. Epidemiology of endemic goitre in western Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gaitan, E.; Merino, H.; Rodriguez, G.; Medina, P.; Meyer, J. D.; DeRouen, T. A.; MacLennan, R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports on recent epidemiological observations in western Colombia, which further demonstrate the presence of naturally-occurring goitrogens contaminating water supplies in areas where goitre persists despite prolonged and continuous iodine supplementation. 'Prospective' and 'cross-sectional' studies in 41 localities where the populations have been on a uniform and adequate iodine supplementation for the last 10-20 years indicate that, in the endemia of western Colombia, environmental factors other than nutritional iodine deficiency are responsible for differences in goitre prevalence. Further epidemiological studies to determine the causal factors for the persistence of the endemia established a correlation between the sources of drinking water and goitre prevalence rates. Organic compounds containing sulfur with marked thionamide-like antithyroid activity were isolated from water supplying endemic goitre districts, and results are presented supporting the hypothesis that sedimentary rocks rich in organic matter are the main source of water-borne goitrogens. Bacteriological investigations showed that the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae in drinking water and bacterial concentration were related significantly with goitre prevalence only in the presence of other variables, particularly the presence of sedimentary rocks. In the light of these epidemiological observations and experimental studies it may be concluded that, at present, endemic goitre in western Colombia is not due to nutritional iodine deficiency, but that water supplies are contaminated with sulfur-bearing organic compounds with thionamide-like antithyroid activity most probably deriving from sedimentary rocks rich in organic matter and that these compounds are the main factor underlying the endemia. PMID:80287

  19. [Characterisation of Suicide in Colombia, 2000 2010].

    PubMed

    Cardona Arango, Doris; Medina-Pérez, Óscar Adolfo; Cardona Duque, Deisy Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem worldwide, affecting all population groups, regardless of age, gender, or area of residence. The aim of this investigation was to characterise the recorded suicides in Colombia, between the years 2000 and 2010, according to the variables of the person, time and place. Descriptive quantitative study with information from secondary sources, from the death certificates of deceased people by suicide registered with the National Bureau of Statistics. The behaviour of the deaths and mortality, were determined using the denominator population projections of Colombia and the Amazon, Andean, Atlantic Coast, Eastern Plains and Pacific regions. Descriptive measurements and mortality rates were calculated using these. A total of 24,882 suicides were recorded in the eleven years studied, with a mean of 6.2 people per day, which increased to 8.0 during holidays The mean age of death was 34.5 years (men 36.4, women 27.7), with male deaths (78.1%) and urban areas (66%) predominating. The greatest risk of dying from this cause was recorded in the Eastern Plains, in young adults and seniors, and residents in rural areas. Suicide rates in Colombia show a downward trend, with a mean of 5.3/100,000 inhabitants, and with an increased risk in men (3.7 times the risk in women, in young adults (9/100,000). A higher death rate was recorded in single people in the months of December and January, and at weekends. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Envenomation by Bothrops punctatus in southwestern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos A; Vallejo, Alexandra

    2016-12-15

    Bothrops punctatus (Chocoan forest lancehead) is a semi-arboreal pitviper species distributed in Panamá, Colombia, and Ecuador, whose human envenomation is poorly characterized. We describe two patients bitten by B. punctatus, whose most relevant clinical feature was the development of a severe coagulopathy with few local manifestations (mild edema without signs of necrosis) at the site of the bite. Patients quickly improved their clinical and laboratory abnormalities after polyvalent antivenom application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydraulic Tomography to Characterization of Heterogeneity of Unconfined Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Yeh, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    Analytical models are the most widely used methods for analyzing pumping tests in unconfined aquifers. However, one major group analytical models assume instantaneous and complete drainage at the water table and therefore are inadequate to account for gradual drainage of water from the vadose zone due to pumping; the other major group analytical models use an exponential function of drawdown at the water table to account for gradual drainage and are subsequently limited to represent the highly non-linear flow in the vadose zone. Moreover, both models assume aquifer homogeneity while the natural aquifers are inherently heterogeneous. Recently emerged Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a cost-effective method for mapping spatial distribution of aquifer hydraulic properties. HT takes advantage of the power of numerical models and fuses information from multiple cross-hole tests conducted at different locations to image aquifers in great details. In this study, we apply HT concept to unconfined aquifers. To accurately simulate the flow behavior due to a HT survey in an unconfined aquifer, a fully three dimensional variably saturated flow model based on mixed form of Richards equation is used. Pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated zones are used to estimate spatial variations of hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and soil water constitutive model parameters through a sequential successive linear estimator. A systematic approach that uses wavelet analysis, least-square method, and fuzzy similarity compassion is applied for data denoising, statistic inputs, convergence, and performance assessment. A cross-correlation is also performed to investigate the relation between pressure change and different parameters. The HT method for unconfined aquifers is tested in a synthetic aquifer. The tests show that the proposed HT method effectively maps heterogeneity of the unconfined aquifer and predicts the vadose zone responses due to a pumping test more accurately

  2. Geomorphic Controls on Aquifer Geometry in Northwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, W. M.; Densmore, A. L.; Sinha, R.; Gupta, S.; Mason, P. J.; Singh, A.; Joshi, S. K.; Nayak, N.; Kumar, M.; Shekhar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic foreland basin suffers from one of the highest rates of groundwater extraction in the world, especially in the Indian states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan. To understand the effects of this extraction on ground water levels, we must first understand the geometry and sedimentary architecture of the aquifer system, which in turn depend upon its geomorphic setting. We use satellite images and digital elevation models to map the geomorphology of the Sutlej and Yamuna river systems, while aquifer geometry is assessed using ~250 wells that extend to ~300 m depth in Punjab and Haryana. The Sutlej and Yamuna rivers have deposited large sedimentary fans at their outlets. Elongate downslope ridges on the fan surfaces form distributary networks that radiate from the Sutlej and Yamuna fan apices, and we interpret these ridges as paleochannel deposits associated with discrete fan lobes. Paleochannels picked out by soil moisture variations illustrate a complex late Quaternary history of channel avulsion and incision, probably associated with variations in monsoon intensity. Aquifer bodies on the Sutlej and Yamuna fans have a median thickness of 7 and 6 m, respectively, and follow a heavy-tailed distribution, probably because of stacked sand bodies. The percentage of aquifer material in individual lithologs decreases downstream, although the exponent on the thickness distribution remains the same, indicating that aquifer bodies decrease in number down fan but do not thin appreciably. Critically, the interfan area between the Sutlej and Yamuna fans has thinner aquifers and a lower proportion of aquifer material, despite its proximal location. Our data show that the Sutlej and Yamuna fan systems form the major aquifer systems in this area, and that their geomorphic setting therefore provides a first-order control on aquifer distribution and geometry. The large spatial heterogeneity of the system must be considered in any future aquifer management scheme.

  3. Aquifer Tests and Characterization of Transmissivity, Ada-Vamoosa Aquifer on the Osage Reservation, Osage County, Oklahoma, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, Marvin M.; DeHay, Kelli

    2008-01-01

    The Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of northeastern Oklahoma is a sedimentary bedrock aquifer of Pennsylvanian age that crops out over 800 square miles of the Osage Reservation. The Osage Nation needed additional information regarding the production potential of the aquifer to aid them in future development planning. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Osage Nation, conducted a study of aquifer properties in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. This report presents the results of the aquifer tests from 20 wells in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer and one well in a minor aquifer east of the Ada-Vamoosa outcrop on the Osage Reservation. Well information for 17 of the 21 wells in this report was obtained from the Indian Health Service. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during this investigation are pumping well data from four domestic wells collected during the summer of 2006. Transmissivity values were calculated from well pumping data or were estimated from specific capacity values depending on the reliability of the data. The estimated transmissivity values are 1.1 to 4.3 times greater than the calculated transmissivity values. The calculated and estimated transmissivity values range from 5 to 1,000 feet squared per day.

  4. The Sparta aquifer in Arkansas' critical ground-water areas: Response of the aquifer to supplying future water needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Phillip D.; Fugitt, D. Todd

    1999-01-01

    The Sparta aquifer is a confined aquifer of great regional importance that comprises a sequence of unconsolidated sand, silt, and clay units extending across much of eastern and southeastern Arkansas and into adjoining States. Water use from the aquifer has doubled since 1975 and continues to increase, and large water-level declines are occurring in many areas of the aquifer. To focus State attention and resources on the growing problem and to provide a mechanism for locally based education and management, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission has designated Critical Ground-Water Areas in some counties (see page 6, ?What is a Critical Ground-Water Area??). Ground-water modeling study results show that the aquifer cannot continue to meet growing water-use demands. Dewatering of the primary producing sands is predicted to occur within 10 years in some areas if current trends continue. The predicted dewatering will cause reduced yields and damage the aquifer. Modeling also shows that a concerted ground-water conservation management plan could enable sustainable use of the aquifer. Water-conservation measures and use of alternative sources that water managers in Union County (an area of high demand and growth in Arkansas' initial five-county Critical Ground-Water Area) think to be realistic options result in considerable recovery in water levels in the aquifer during a 30-year model simulation.

  5. Denitrification in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard L.; Duff, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Denitrification was assayed by the acetylene blockage technique in slurried core material obtained from a freshwater sand and gravel aquifer. The aquifer, which has been contaminated with treated sewage for more than 50 years, had a contaminant plume greater than 3.5-km long. Near the contaminant source, groundwater nitrate concentrations were greater than 1 mM, whereas 0.25 km downgradient the central portion of the contaminant plume was anoxic and contained no detectable nitrate. Samples were obtained along the longitudinal axis of the plume (0 to 0.25 km) at several depths from four sites. Denitrification was evident at in situ nitrate concentrations at all sites tested; rates ranged from 2.3 to 260 pmol of N2O produced (g of wet sediment)−1 h−1. Rates were highest nearest the contaminant source and decreased with increasing distance downgradient. Denitrification was the predominant nitrate-reducing activity; no evidence was found for nitrate reduction to ammonium at any site. Denitrifying activity was carbon limited and not nitrate limited, except when the ambient nitrate level was less than the detection limit, in which case, even when amended with high concentrations of glucose and nitrate, the capacity to denitrify on a short-term basis was lacking. These results demonstrate that denitrification can occur in groundwater systems and, thereby, serve as a mechanism for nitrate removal from groundwater. PMID:16347621

  6. Optimizing multiphase aquifer remediation using ITOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

    1994-06-01

    The T2VOC computer model for simulating the transport of organic chemical contaminants in non-isothermal multiphase systems has been coupled to the ITOUGH2 code which solves parameter optimization problems. This allows one to use nonlinear programming and simulated annealing techniques to solve groundwater management problems, i.e. the optimization of multiphase aquifer remediation. This report contains three illustrative examples to demonstrate the optimization of remediation operations by means of simulation-minimization techniques. The code iteratively determines an optimal remediation strategy (e.g. pumping schedule) which minimizes, for instance, pumping and energy costs, the time for cleanup, and residual contamination. While minimizing the objective function is straightforward, the relative weighting of different performance measures--e.g. pumping costs versus cleanup time versus residual contaminant content--is subject to a management decision process. The intended audience of this report is someone who is familiar with numerical modeling of multiphase flow of contaminants, and who might actually use T2VOC in conjunction with ITOUGH2 to optimize the design of aquifer remediation operations.

  7. Feasibility studies of aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for a particular heating or cooling application is an interdisciplinary effort, requiring (at a minimum) expertise in engineering and hydrology. The feasibility study should proceed in two distinct stages. The first stage, which is limited in scope and detail, is intended to show if an ATES system is technically and economically suited to the application. Focus of this preliminary investigation is on revealing the existence of factors that might weigh heavily against the use of ATES methods, and, in the absence of such factors, on choosing a suitable scale for the ATES plant and well field. The results of the preliminary investigation are used to determine if more detailed investigation--including field studies--are justified, and to facilitate comparing the advantages of ATES to those of other means of providing heating or cooling. The second stage of the feasibility study focuses on detailed aquifer characterization, refinement of engineering design and cost estimates, and economic and environmental risk analysis. The results of this investigation, if favorable, will be used to justify the expense of constructing the ATES system.

  8. Thickness and hydrogeology of aquifers and confining units below the upper glacial aquifer on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soren, Julian; Simmons, Dale L.

    1987-01-01

    Three extensive unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifers on Long Island lie between the island 's upper glacial aquifer and its southward-dipping crystalline bedrock surface. The island 's aquifers have been heavily pumped, mainly for public-water supply, but most of this pumpage since the 1960 's has come from below the upper glacial aquifer because the upper aquifer has been increasingly contaminated by substances introduced through the land surface. In 1984, an average of 370 million gal/day (gpd) was pumped from the groundwater reservoir, 80% (298 million gpd) of which was from aquifers below the upper glacial aquifer. The artesian Lloyd aquifer, confined between bedrock and the overlying Raritan clay, is the basal unit in Long Island 's groundwater reservoir. The Lloyd underlies nearly all of the island and has a maximum thickness of about 550 ft. It is a minor aquifer; public-supply pumpage from the Lloyd in 1984 averaged 18 million gpd. The Magothy aquifer overlies the Raritan clay beneath most of the island and attains a maximum thickness of 1,050 ft. The Magothy has been the principal source of public water supply since 1960's, and public-supply pumpage in 1984 averaged 278 million gpd. The Jameco aquifer occurs only in buried valleys that were cut into the Magothy deposits in the extreme western part of Long Island; thus, the aquifer has good lateral and vertical hydraulic continuity with the Magothy. The Jameco attains a maximum thickness of 200 ft. Jameco deposits have greater average hydraulic conductivity than the Magothy and are considered to form a broad, highly conductive local stringer in the upper part of the Magothy. The Jameco is a minor aquifer; in 1984, average public-supply pumpage was 2 million gpd. In the southern part of the island, the Magothy-Jameco system is artesian, overlain by the Gardiners Clay in the western part of the island, and by the Gardiners Clay and the Monmouth greensand in the eastern two thirds. North of the Gardiners

  9. Inferring Aquifer Transmissivity from River Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichakis, Ioannis; Pistocchi, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Daily streamflow data is the measurable result of many different hydrological processes within a basin; therefore, it includes information about all these processes. In this work, recession analysis applied to a pan-European dataset of measured streamflow was used to estimate hydrogeological parameters of the aquifers that contribute to the stream flow. Under the assumption that base-flow in times of no precipitation is mainly due to groundwater, we estimated parameters of European shallow aquifers connected with the stream network, and identified on the basis of the 1:1,500,000 scale Hydrogeological map of Europe. To this end, Master recession curves (MRCs) were constructed based on the RECESS model of the USGS for 1601 stream gauge stations across Europe. The process consists of three stages. Firstly, the model analyses the stream flow time-series. Then, it uses regression to calculate the recession index. Finally, it infers characteristics of the aquifer from the recession index. During time-series analysis, the model identifies those segments, where the number of successive recession days is above a certain threshold. The reason for this pre-processing lies in the necessity for an adequate number of points when performing regression at a later stage. The recession index derives from the semi-logarithmic plot of stream flow over time, and the post processing involves the calculation of geometrical parameters of the watershed through a GIS platform. The program scans the full stream flow dataset of all the stations. For each station, it identifies the segments with continuous recession that exceed a predefined number of days. When the algorithm finds all the segments of a certain station, it analyses them and calculates the best linear fit between time and the logarithm of flow. The algorithm repeats this procedure for the full number of segments, thus it calculates many different values of recession index for each station. After the program has found all the

  10. Flow pattern in regional aquifers and flow relations between the lower Colorado River valley and regional aquifers in six counties of southeastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    The lower Colorado River discussed in this report consists of the 318- river-mile reach from Mansfield Dam near Austin, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico. The river is underlain directly or indirectly by six regional aquifers the Trinity Group, Edwards, Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Gulf Coast; the Trinity Group aquifer is further subdivided into the lower Trinity, middle Trinity, and upper Trinity aquifers. Generalized potentiometric-surface maps of each regional aquifer show the ground-water-flow pattern near the river valley. Each regional aquifer discharges water to the lower Colorado River valley, particularly in the outcrop area of each aquifer. Only the Gulf Coast aquifer in central Wharton County appears to be recharged by water in the river valley. A summary map shows those subreaches of the lower Colorado River that gain water from the aquifers and those subreaches that lose water to the aquifers.

  11. Management of city aquifers from anthropogenic activities: Example of the Windhoek aquifer, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapani, Benjamin S.; Schreiber, Ute

    As the city of Windhoek is growing rapidly, it has become increasingly obvious that dangers to the underlying groundwater aquifer have become imminent, and need addressing immediately. Water infiltration and the transportation of contaminants from anthropogenic activities through soils into the bedrock and hence the aquifer involve soil maturity, chemical and microbial processes and the climate of a particular area. The thin immature soil horizon (circa 5-20 cm) over the Windhoek schist implies that most areas of the city are built directly on bedrock, making the aquifer vulnerable. Anthropogenic activities from the use of pesticides for weed control, oil spills, toxic chemical spills, dumping of undesired substances by residents and high fertilizer application rates for lawns can lead to the contamination of groundwater. The result of our study show that the soil composition in Windhoek lacks mature clay minerals and is enriched in micas, quartz and albite. Some areas in the northern and southern industrial areas show contamination in heavy metals Pb, Zn, Cu and Ni. To the west of the city, close to the textile factory, soils are contaminated with ammonium compounds. The hydrochemistry of these pesticides and fertilizers can cause severe pollution to the groundwater if the practice is not carefully monitored. In addition, the rapid expansion of uncontrolled settlements without proper sanitation and reticulation has made the problems much more difficult. The geology of the city of Windhoek consists of the Kuiseb Schist, locally known as the “Windhoek Schist” and amphibolites. The Kuiseb schist possesses pervasive cleavage that renders the underlying lithology to be permeable to percolating water and fluids from the surface into the aquifer. The fissility and fracture density of the schist imply that leakage of surface waters, phenols, septic tank spills and industrial contaminants may reach the aquifer in unusually high rainfall years. Organic fuels and oils

  12. Exploring Aquifer Heterogeneity and Anisotropy Using Sequential Pumping Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, S. G.; Keating, E. H.

    2005-12-01

    A sequential pair of traditional aquifer tests was performed using both municipal water supply and numerous observation wells. Initially, a 25-day aquifer test was conducted at well PM-2 at a constant discharge rate of 79 lps (1,249 gpm), while supply wells PM-4 and PM-5 were used as observation wells. Then a 21-day aquifer test was conducted at well PM-4 at a constant discharge rate of 94 lps (1,494 gpm) while supply wells PM-2 and PM-5 were used as observation wells. These data reveal horizontal propagation of drawdown in the regional aquifer beyond 2,650 m (8,700 ft) from each production well, and a pronounced resistance to vertical drawdown propagation at shallower depths. Hydraulically, the regional aquifer seems to behave like a semi-confined aquifer with leaky units located above a highly conductive layer that averages about 260 m (850 ft) in thickness. Analyses of drawdown and recovery data from individual observation wells in the first test suggest that the highly conductive layer between wells PM-2 and PM-4 has a transmissivity of about 400 m2/day (4,250 ft2/day) and a storage coefficient of about 0.00035. Analyses of data from the second test suggest a transmissivity of 600 m2/day (6,450 ft2/day) and a storage coefficient of about 0.00039. The aquifer thins between PM-4 and PM-5 to an effective thickness of about 150 m (490 ft), while the aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient increase only slightly. It is unclear if these differences are indeed significant, or if they simply reflect combined parameter uncertainty arising from natural variability and the type-curve solution method. While these analyses yield excellent type-curve matches, they fail to explain differences in measured vertical pressure responses from multi-screened observation wells. In addition, multi-dimensional numerical flow models mimic both horizontal and vertical hydraulic responses very well, and suggest that the aquifer is actually phreatic. These tests demonstrate that the

  13. Colombia continues to yield major oil, gas discoveries

    SciTech Connect

    McGettigan, C.K.; Hunt, D.G.

    1996-07-15

    Colombia, where petroleum development began in 1908, is still yielding giant and supergiant discoveries. Recent successes result from improvements in exploration technology, in infrastructure, and in terms of participation offered by the Colombian government. Colombia has 13 sedimentary basins covering an area of 700,000 sq km out of a total country area of 1,350,000 sq km, including the continental shelf. This article highlights four of the seven basins currently productive in Colombia, providing an overview of geology and recent exploration activity.

  14. Smokefree implementation in Colombia: Monitoring, outside funding, and business support.

    PubMed

    Uang, Randy; Crosbie, Eric; Glantz, Stanton A

    2017-01-01

    To analyze successful national smokefree policy implementation in Colombia, a middle income country. Key informants at the national and local levels were interviewed and news sources and government ministry resolutions were reviewed. Colombia's Ministry of Health coordinated local implementation practices, which were strongest in larger cities with supportive leadership. Nongovernmental organizations provided technical assistance and highlighted noncompliance. Organizations outside Colombia funded some of these efforts. The bar owners' association provided concerted education campaigns. Tobacco interests did not openly challenge implementation. Health organization monitoring, external funding, and hospitality industry support contributed to effective implementation, and could be cultivated in other low and middle income countries.

  15. Population dynamics of Anopheles nuneztovari in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Díaz, Nelson; Sallum, Maria Anice M; Correa, Margarita M

    2016-11-01

    Anopheles nuneztovari is an important Colombian malaria vector widespread on both sides of the Andean Mountains, presenting morphological, behavioral and genetic heterogeneity throughout the country. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the population structure and distribution of An. nuneztovari in Colombia are associated with ecological and physical barriers present in a heterogeneous landscape. Further, differences in behavior were addressed. A total of 5392 specimens of An. nuneztovari were collected. Mitochondrial and nuclear marker analyses detected subdivision among the northwest-west, northeast and east populations. For both markers, isolation by distance (~53%) and isolation by resistance (>30%) were determinants of population genetic differentiation. This suggests that physical barriers, geographical distance and ecological differences on both sides of the Andean Mountains promoted the genetic differentiation and population subdivision of An. nuneztovari in Colombia. This species showed the highest biting activity after 20:00h; indoor and outdoor preferences were found in all localities. These results indicated that the most effective interventions for controlling vector populations on both sides of the Andes need to be region-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tuberculosis control and managed competition in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Gaviria, Marta Beatriz; Franco, Alvaro; Restrepo, Roman; Hincapié, Doracelly; Blas, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Law 100 introduced the Health Sector Reform in Colombia, a model of managed competition. This article addresses the effects of this model in terms of output and outcomes of TB control. Trends in main TB control indicators were analysed using secondary data sources, and 25 interviews were done with key informants from public and private insurers and provider institutions, and from the health directorate level. We found a deterioration in the performance of TB control: a decreasing number of BCG vaccine doses applied, a reduction in case finding and contacts identification, low cure rates and an increasing loss of follow up, which mainly affects poor people. Fragmentation occurred as the atomization and discontinuity of the technical processes took place, there was a lack of coordination, as well as a breakdown between individual and collective interventions, and the health information system began to disintegrate. The introduction of the Managed Competition (MC) in Colombia appeared to have adverse effects on TB control due to the dominance of the economic rationality in the health system and the weak state stewardship. Our recommendations are to restructure the reform's public health component, strengthen the technical capacity in public health of the state, mainly at the local and departmental levels, and to improve the health information system by reorienting its objectives to public health goals.

  17. [Hepatitis C virus genotypes circulating in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Santos, Óscar; Gómez, Alberto; Vizcaíno, Viviana; Casas, María Consuelo; Ramírez, María Del Pilar; Olaya, Patricia

    2017-01-24

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a worldwide public health problem; it has been estimated that over 180 million people are infected with this virus worldwide. Its precise incidence and prevalence (i.e., epidemiology) and the most frequent circulating genotypes in Colombia are unknown. To describe the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and subtypes in infected Colombian patients. We recovered the data on 1,538 HCV isolates from 1,527 patients in two Colombian reference laboratories typed by PAGE or qPCR. Patients' mean age was 53 years; 70% of them were 40 to 70 years old, and 52%, females; 57% of all tests were ordered in Bogotá and 80% of cases were from Cundinamarca, Valle and Atlántico departments. Genotype 1 was detected in 88.6% of cases, distributed as follows: 70% subtype 1b, 13.5% subtype 1a and 5.1%, undetermined subtypes. Genotype 2 was found in 5.4% of the patients, genotype 3 in 2% and genotype 4 in 4%. Mixed genotypes were found in 0.8% of the samples. Genotype 1 is the most common HCV genotype circulating in Colombia, and subtype 1b the most frequent.

  18. Colombia's national plan for sexual education.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The brief summary of Colombia's government's plan for sex education emphasized the active involvement of all sectors of society and targeted individuals, families, and society. The National Plan for Sex Education (PNES) was established by the Colombian presidential program for youth, women, and the family (PROMOVER). The plan is an evolution of rights and duties laid out in the National Constitution of 1991 on sexuality. The plan has the support of the First Lady of Colombia. The Foundation of Human and Social Development will provide technical support, and activities will be coordinated between the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, and the Colombian Institute of Family Welfare. The objectives of PNES are to promote the development of attitudes that value sexuality, value social gender equality, value autonomy, value responsibility, value harmony of interactions and solidarity, and value sexual health. PNES will begin with planning, coordinating between ministries and sectors, and implementing the decentralized and participatory action plan. The plan involves training, research, communication, services, and institutionalization. Training will be the first priority and will be directed to sensitizing officials and officials administering the plan about sexuality and sex education, to case workers involved with therapeutic interventions, and to youth, parents, and sexually active adolescents. The plan includes criteria for selecting legal advisors and staff from nongovernmental organizations, who will administer the training and evaluations.

  19. 40 CFR 144.7 - Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of drinking water and exempted aquifers. 144.7 Section 144.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 144.7 Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers. (a) The... underground sources of drinking water, all aquifers and parts of aquifers which meet the definition of...

  20. 40 CFR 144.7 - Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of drinking water and exempted aquifers. 144.7 Section 144.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 144.7 Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers. (a) The... underground sources of drinking water, all aquifers and parts of aquifers which meet the definition of...

  1. 40 CFR 144.7 - Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of drinking water and exempted aquifers. 144.7 Section 144.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 144.7 Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers. (a) The... underground sources of drinking water, all aquifers and parts of aquifers which meet the definition of...

  2. 40 CFR 144.7 - Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of drinking water and exempted aquifers. 144.7 Section 144.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 144.7 Identification of underground sources of drinking water and exempted aquifers. (a) The... underground sources of drinking water, all aquifers and parts of aquifers which meet the definition of...

  3. Optimized System to Improve Pumping Rate Stability During Aquifer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Rasmussen, T. C.; Lyons, C.; Pennell, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test, increasing the dynamic head losses. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, lending it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. It employs commonly available components (e.g., datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flow meters), and is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. No modifications to the control system were required, though a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically-significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95 percent CI) was from +/-0.0041 gpm to +/-0.0144 gpm, across a wide range in field conditions. Additional analyses show that errors in early time pumping rates cause errors in aquifer property estimates, and that optimizing the pumping rates would provide a more error-free data set for estimating aquifer hydraulic properties.

  4. Preserving an underground aquifer: More than meets the eye

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, K.

    1995-11-01

    Odessa, Texas, is situated just along the southern fringes of North America`s largest aquifer. Commonly called a titanic underground sponge, the Ogallalla aquifer stretches from Texas to South Dakota and is comprised of several small aquifers, collectively termed the High Plains Aquifer. With concern for one of the area`s most abundant water resources on the rise, the aquifer has also become a priority for officials from the city of Odessa, especially those associated with the landfill. The Johnson Ranch Landfill, which receives approximately 100,000 tons per year (tpy) of municipal solid waste (MSW) from the 89,699 residents of the city of Odessa, has been in operation for about 10 years. The aquifer extends one-third of the way across the city of Odessa and lies just 65 to 70 feet below the surface, with landfill excavation reaching depths of about 40 feet. To help preserve the aquifer, the landfill contracted with Freese and Nichols, Inc. (Forth Worth, Texas), and S.W. Howell Engineering (Odessa) in 1993, to design a liner system with a primary goal of protecting the Ogallalla. One of the changes required under the new regulations was the installation of a linear system that would act as a barrier between groundwater and the leachate generated at the landfill.

  5. Availability of water from the Outwash Aquifer, Marion County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    The outwash aquifer in Marion County, Indiana is a continuous, unconfined sand and gravel deposit containing isolated boulder, till, silt, and clay deposits along the White River, Fall Creek, and Eagle Creek. Flow in the aquifer is from the boundaries of the aquifer with the Tipton till plain toward the streams and major pumping centers in the aquifer. A two-dimensional, finite-difference model of the outwash aquifer was calibrated to water levels of October 6 to 10, 1980 and used to estimate availability of water in the aquifer. A drawdown limit of 50-percent saturated thickness applied to 78 simulated-pumping wells assumed to be 1 foot in diameter produced 97 cubic feet per second from the outwash aquifer. Streamflow reductions caused by 97 cubic feet per second simulated pumpage and constant-flux boundaries were estimated to be 85 cubic feet per second in the White River and 12 cubic feet per second in Fall Creek. In comparison, the 7-day, 10-year low flows were 83 cubic feet per second in the White River near Nora and 23 cubic feet per second in Fall Creek at Millersville. Simulated pumpage of 115 cubic feet per second and constant-flux boundaries produced streamflow reductions of 101 cubic feet per second on the White River and 13 cubic feet per second on Fall Creek. (USGS)

  6. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: Mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface.

  7. Groundwater quality of porous aquifers in Greece: a synoptic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalaki, P.; Voudouris, K.

    2008-04-01

    Greece is dependent on groundwater resources for its water supply. The main aquifers are within carbonate rocks (karstic aquifers) and coarse grained Neogene and Quaternary deposits (porous aquifers). The use of groundwater resources has become particularly intensive in coastal areas during the last decades with the intense urbanization, tourist development and irrigated land expansion. Sources of groundwater pollution are the seawater intrusion due to over-exploitation of coastal aquifers, the fertilizers from agricultural activities and the disposal of untreated wastewater in torrents or in old pumping wells. In the last decades the total abstractions from coastal aquifers exceed the natural recharge; so the aquifer systems are not used safely. Over-exploitation causes a negative water balance, triggering seawater intrusion. Seawater intrusion phenomena are recorded in coastal aquifer systems. Nitrate pollution is the second major source of groundwater degradation in many areas in Greece. The high levels of nitrate are probably the result of over-fertilization and the lack of sewage systems in some urban areas.

  8. Reduction of nitrate in aquifer microcosms by carbon additions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obenhuber, Donald C.; Lowrance , Richard

    1991-01-01

    Aquifer microcosms were used to examine the effects of NO−3 and C amendments on groundwater from the Claiborne aquifer. Nitrate concentrations of 12.17 mg L−1 in aquifer microcosms were reduced 0.92%/d to 5.84 mg L−1 by the addition of 10 mg C L−1 for 35 d. Nitrate disappearance correlated with increases in number of denitrifiers and dissolved N2O concentration and decreases in dissolved oxygen, suggesting biological denitrification. Nitrate/chloride ratios decreased in microcosms with 10 mg C L−1 added and then increased when the C addition was removed. Carbon additions of 0.4 mg C L−1 had no effect on the microbial or chemical properties of the microcosms. Nitrous oxide levels in wells sampling the Claiborne aquifer showed an increase with depth, indicating N2O production within the aquifer. Microcosms are useful tools to examine biological transformations of chemical contaminants in unconsolidated aquifer material. The remediation of NO−3 contaminated aquifers by organic infusion is possible and appears to be a function of microbial denitrification.

  9. Aquifer characterisation in East Timor, with ground TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley-Cooper, A.

    2011-12-01

    An assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Groundwater Resources in East Timor led by Geosciences Australia is aimed at assisting East Timor's government to better understand and manage their groundwater resources. Form the current known information most aquifers in Timor-Leste are recharged by rainfall during the wet season. There is a concern that without a regular recharge, the stored groundwater capacity will decrease. Timor's population increase has caused a higher demand for groundwater which is currently been met by regulated pumping bores which are taped into deep aquifers, plus the sprouting of unregulated spear point bores in the shallow aquifers . Both groundwater recharge and the aquifers morphology need to be better understood in order to ensure supply and so groundwater can be managed for the future. Current weather patterns are expected to change and this could cause longer periods of drought or more intense rainfall, which in turn, would affect the availability and quality of groundwater. Salt water intrusions pose a threat on the low-lying aquifers as sea level rises. Australia's CSIRO has undertaken a series hydrogeophysical investigations employing ground TEM to assist in the characterisation of three aquifers near Dili, Timor Leste's capital. Interpreting ground water chemistry and dating; jointly with EM data has enhanced the understanding of the aquifers architecture, groundwater quality and helped identify potential risks of seawater intrusions.

  10. Initial study of thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. [UCATES

    SciTech Connect

    Haitjema, H.M.; Strack, O.D.L.

    1986-04-01

    Convective heat transport in unconfined aquifers is modeled in a semi-analytic way. The transient groundwater flow is modeled by superposition of analytic functions, whereby changes in the aquifer storage are represented by a network of triangles, each with a linearly varying sink distribution. This analytic formulation incorporates the nonlinearity of the differential equation for unconfined flow and eliminates numerical dispersion in modeling heat convection. The thermal losses through the aquifer base and vadose zone are modeled rather crudely. Only vertical heat conduction is considered in these boundaries, whereby a linearly varying temperature is assumed at all times. The latter assumption appears reasonable for thin aquifer boundaries. However, assuming such thin aquifer boundaries may lead to an overestimation of the thermal losses when the aquifer base is regarded as infinitely thick in reality. The approach is implemented in the computer program UCATES, which serves as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive screening tool for ATES systems in unconfined aquifers. In its present form, the program is capable of predicting the relative effects of regional flow on the efficiency of ATES systems. However, only after a more realistic heatloss mechanism is incorporated in UCATES will reliable predictions of absolute ATES efficiencies be possible.

  11. New solutions for the confined horizontal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    The Boussinesq equation is a dynamical equation for the free surface of saturated subsurface flows over an impervious bed. Boussinesq equation is non-linear. The non-linearity comes from the reduction of the dimensionality of the problem: The flow is assumed to be vertically homogeneous, therefore the flow rate through a cross section of the flow is proportional to the free surface height times the hydraulic gradient, which is assumed to be equal to the slope of the free surface. In the present work we consider the case of the subsurface flow with horizontal bed. This is a case with an infinite Henderson and Wooding parameter, that is, it is the limiting case where the non-linear term is present in the Boussinesq equation while the linear spatial derivative term vanishes. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave exists in this case as there is no exact solution for the build-up phase. Neither is there an exact recession-phase solution that holds in early times, as the Boussinesq separable solution is actually an asymptotic solution for large times. We construct approximate solutions for the horizontal aquifer which utilize directly the dynamical content of the non-linear Boussinesq equation. The approximate character of the solution lies in the fact that we start with a pre-supposed form for the solution, an educated guess, based on the nature of the initial condition as well as empirical observations from the numerical solution of the problem. The forms we shall use are power series of the location variable x along the bed with time-dependent coefficients. The series are not necessarily analytic. The boundary conditions are incorporated in the structure of the series from the beginning. The time-dependent coefficients are then determined by applying the Boussinesq equation and its spatial derivatives at the end-points of the aquifer. The forms are chosen also on the basis of their solubility; we would like to be able to construct explicitly the approximate

  12. Denitrification in a deep basalt aquifer: implications for aquifer storage and recovery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Dennis; Melady, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) can provide a means of storing water for irrigation in agricultural areas where water availability is limited. A concern, however, is that the injected water may lead to a degradation of groundwater quality. In many agricultural areas, nitrate is a limiting factor. In the Umatilla Basin in north central Oregon, shallow alluvial groundwater with elevated nitrate-nitrogen of <3 mg/L to >9 mg/L is injected into the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), a transmissive confined aquifer(s) with low natural recharge rates. Once recovery of the injected water begins, however, NO3 -N in the recovered water decreases quickly to <3 mg/L (Eaton et al. 2009), suggesting that NO3 -N may not persist within the CRBG during ASR storage. In contrast to NO3 -N, other constituents in the recovered water show little variation, inconsistent with migration or simple mixing as an explanation of the NO3 -N decrease. Nitrogen isotopic ratios (δ(15) N) increase markedly, ranging from +3.5 to > +50, and correlate inversely with NO3 -N concentrations. This variation occurs in <3 weeks and recovery of <10% of the originally injected volume. TOC is low in the basalt aquifer, averaging <1.5 mg/L, but high in the injected source water, averaging >3.0 mg/L. Similar to nitrate concentrations, TOC drops in the recovered water, consistent with this component contributing to the denitrification of nitrate during storage. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  13. Arsenic release from Floridan Aquifer rock during incubations simulating aquifer storage and recovery operations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Norton, Stuart B; Annable, Michael D; Harris, Willie G

    2016-05-01

    While aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is becoming widely accepted as a way to address water supply shortages, there are concerns that it may lead to release of harmful trace elements such as arsenic (As). Thus, mechanisms of As release from limestone during ASR operations were investigated using 110-day laboratory incubations of core material collected from the Floridan Aquifer, with treatment additions of labile or refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) or microbes. During the first experimental phase, core materials were equilibrated with native groundwater lacking in DO to simulate initial non-perturbed anaerobic aquifer conditions. Then, ASR was simulated by replacing the native groundwater in the incubations vessels with DO-rich ASR source water, with DOM or microbes added to some treatments. Finally, the vessels were opened to the atmosphere to mimic oxidizing conditions during later stages of ASR. Arsenic was released from aquifer materials, mainly during transitional periods at the beginning of each incubation stage. Most As released was during the initial anaerobic experimental phase via reductive dissolution of Fe oxides in the core materials, some or all of which may have formed during the core storage or sample preparation period. Oxidation of As-bearing Fe sulfides released smaller amounts of As during the start of later aerobic experimental phases. Additions of labile DOM fueled microbially-mediated reactions that mobilized As, while the addition of refractory DOM did not, probably due to mineral sorption of DOM that made it unavailable for microbial utilization or metal chelation. The results suggest that oscillations of groundwater redox conditions, such as might be expected to occur during an ASR operation, are the underlying cause of enhanced As release in these systems. Further, ASR operations using DOM-rich surface waters may not necessarily lead to additional As releases.

  14. Rates of microbial metabolism in deep coastal plain aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Rates of microbial metabolism in deep anaerobic aquifers of the Atlantic coastal plain of South Carolina were investigated by both microbiological and geochemical techniques. Rates of [2-14C]acetate and [U-14C]glucose oxidation as well as geochemical evidence indicated that metabolic rates were faster in the sandy sediments composing the aquifers than in the clayey sediments of the confining layers. In the sandy aquifer sediments, estimates of the rates of CO2 production (millimoles of CO2 per liter per year) based on the oxidation of [2-14C]acetate were 9.4 x 10-3 to 2.4 x 10-1 for the Black Creek aquifer, 1.1 x 10-2 for the Middendorf aquifer, and <7 x 10-5 for the Cape Fear aquifer. These estimates were at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than previously published estimates that were based on the accumulation of CO2 in laboratory incubations of similar deep subsurface sediments. In contrast, geochemical modeling of groundwater chemistry changes along aquifer flowpaths gave rate estimates that ranged from 10-4 to 10-6 mmol of CO2 per liter per year. The age of these sediments (ca. 80 million years) and their organic carbon content suggest that average rates of CO2 production could have been no more than 10-4 mmol per liter per year. Thus, laboratory incubations may greatly overestimate the in situ rates of microbial metabolism in deep subsurface environments. This has important implications for the use of laboratory incubations in attempts to estimate biorestoration capacities of deep aquifers. The rate estimates from geochemical modeling indicate that deep aquifers are among the most oligotrophic aquatic environments in which there is ongoing microbial metabolism.

  15. Rates of microbial metabolism in deep coastal plain aquifers.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, F H; Lovley, D R

    1990-06-01

    Rates of microbial metabolism in deep anaerobic aquifers of the Atlantic coastal plain of South Carolina were investigated by both microbiological and geochemical techniques. Rates of [2-C]acetate and [U-C]glucose oxidation as well as geochemical evidence indicated that metabolic rates were faster in the sandy sediments composing the aquifers than in the clayey sediments of the confining layers. In the sandy aquifer sediments, estimates of the rates of CO(2) production (millimoles of CO(2) per liter per year) based on the oxidation of [2-C] acetate were 9.4 x 10 to 2.4 x 10 for the Black Creek aquifer, 1.1 x 10 for the Middendorf aquifer, and <7 x 10 for the Cape Fear aquifer. These estimates were at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than previously published estimates that were based on the accumulation of CO(2) in laboratory incubations of similar deep subsurface sediments. In contrast, geochemical modeling of groundwater chemistry changes along aquifer flowpaths gave rate estimates that ranged from 10 to 10 mmol of CO(2) per liter per year. The age of these sediments (ca. 80 million years) and their organic carbon content suggest that average rates of CO(2) production could have been no more than 10 mmol per liter per year. Thus, laboratory incubations may greatly overestimate the in situ rates of microbial metabolism in deep subsurface environments. This has important implications for the use of laboratory incubations in attempts to estimate biorestoration capacities of deep aquifers. The rate estimates from geochemical modeling indicate that deep aquifers are among the most oligotrophic aquatic environments in which there is ongoing microbial metabolism.

  16. Groundwater level responses to precipitation variability in Mediterranean insular aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Garcia, Celso; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique

    2017-09-01

    Groundwater is one of the largest and most important sources of fresh water on many regions under Mediterranean climate conditions, which are exposed to large precipitation variability that includes frequent meteorological drought episodes, and present high evapotranspiration rates and water demand during the dry season. The dependence on groundwater increases in those areas with predominant permeable lithologies, contributing to aquifer recharge and the abundance of ephemeral streams. The increasing pressure of tourism on water resources in many Mediterranean coastal areas, and uncertainty related to future precipitation and water availability, make it urgent to understand the spatio-temporal response of groundwater bodies to precipitation variability, if sustainable use of the resource is to be achieved. We present an assessment of the response of aquifers to precipitation variability based on correlations between the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) at various time scales and the Standardized Groundwater Index (SGI) across a Mediterranean island. We detected three main responses of aquifers to accumulated precipitation anomalies: (i) at short time scales of the SPI (<6 months); (ii) at medium time scales (6-24 months); and at long time scales (>24 months). The differing responses were mainly explained by differences in lithology and the percentage of highly permeable rock strata in the aquifer recharge areas. We also identified differences in the months and seasons when aquifer storages are more dependent on precipitation; these were related to climate seasonality and the degree of aquifer exploitation or underground water extraction. The recharge of some aquifers, especially in mountainous areas, is related to precipitation variability within a limited spatial extent, whereas for aquifers located in the plains, precipitation variability influence much larger areas; the topography and geological structure of the island explain these differences. Results

  17. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  18. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    DOE PAGES

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; ...

    2016-06-28

    Cross-hole slug test date are analyzed with an extended version of a recently published unconfined aquifer model accounting for waterable effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The use of cross-hole slug test data to characterize aquifer heterogeneity and source/observation well oscillation parameters is evaluated. The data were collected in a series of multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests conducted at a site in Widen, Switzerland. Furthermore, the tests involved source and observation well pairs separated by distances of up to 4 m, and instrumented with pressure transducers to monitor aquifer response in discrete intervals.

  19. Review of coastal-area aquifers in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyl, G.; Dennis, I.

    2010-02-01

    The coastal aquifer systems of Africa are comprised of various geological formations. These aquifer systems consist of either folded, continental or alluvial deposits. Groundwater resource availability along the coastal areas of Africa is briefly reported and the current state of seawater intrusion has been summarized. A select number of notable examples are given to highlight the effect of saline intrusion on coastal development of cities and regional aquifers. The role of conflict resolution is briefly discussed, as well as management approaches, which include monitoring of contamination and governmental accountability. Regional cooperation is presented as a method of ensuring a sustainable water resource in an area, as well as strengthening social and political alliances.

  20. Water levels in bedrock aquifers in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradford, Wendell L.

    1981-01-01

    This report on water levels in bedrock aquifers in South Dakota is the result of a continuing investigation begun in 1959 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Water and Natural Resources. The purpose of the investigation is to collect data on the artesian water supply in the bedrock aquifers and to present these data in data reports that will aid in planning the use and conservation of water from these aquifers in South Dakota. The locations of wells were data have been collected are included. (USGS)

  1. Chilean Earthquakes: Aquifer Responses at the Russian Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besedina, Alina; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Gorbunova, Ella; Svintsov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    We studied hydrogeological responses to the passage of seismic waves from the Chilean earthquakes with Ms ≥7.6 at epicentral distances of about 126°. The variation in the levels of confined and unconfined aquifers was analyzed under platform conditions at the Mikhnevo Geophysical Observatory near Moscow, Russia. Synchronous recording of seismic and hydrogeological data enabled us to evaluate the amplitude-frequency response of aquifers. The study shows that medium response to dynamic impact depends on various physical parameters of the aquifers.

  2. Lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystems in deep basalt aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, T.O.; McKinley, J.P.

    1995-10-20

    Bacterial communities were detected in deep crystalline rock aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). CRB ground waters contained up to 60 {mu}M dissolved H{sub 2} and autotrophic microorganisms outnumbered heterotrophs. Stable carbon isotope measurements implied that autotrophic methanogenesis dominated this ecosystem and was coupled to the depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon. In laboratory experiments, H{sub 2} a potential energy source for bacteria, was produced by reactions between crushed basalt and anaerobic water. Microcosms containing only crushed basalt and ground water supported microbial growth. These results suggest that the CRB contains a lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem that is independent of photosynthetic primary production. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Hydrologic time and sustainability of shallow aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William; ,

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of water and short intervals of time are coeval events that began about 6000 BC in Mesopotamia. Even though time and hydrology have been intimately entwined, with time terms in the denominator of many hydrologic parameters, hydrology's a priori claim to time has not been consummated. Moreover, time takes on a greater importance now than in the past as the focus shifts to small site-scale aquifers whose sustainability can be physically and chemically threatened. One of the challenges for research in hydrogeology is to establish time scales for hydrologic phenomena such as infiltration rates, groundwater flow rates, rates of organic and inorganic reactions, and rates of groundwater withdrawal over the short term, and the long term and to understand the consequences of these various time scales. Credible monitoring programs must consider not only the spatial scale, but also the time scale of the phenomena being monitored.

  4. Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Time-of-travel transport estimation is employed to predict contaminant migration in karst aquifers. Estimation of time-of-travel transport is conditioned on the set of hydraulic-flow that occur within karst conduits. These parameters are applied to surface-water models to reflect time-of-travel flow and geometries are determined empirically through quantitative ground-water tracing studies. Quantitative ground-water tracing studies are based on a comprehensive tracer budget and numerical analysis of the tracer recovery curves for time-of-travel parameters that include mean residence time, mean flow velocity, longitudinal dispersivity, karst conduit volume, cross-sectional area, diameter, and hydraulic depth for use in surface-water models.

  5. Classroom Activities to Make Aquifers Transparent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J. P.; Mays, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have shown that in-class hands-on activities help K-12 students gain a deeper conceptual understanding for the subject matter. With funding from the National Science Foundation, the University of Colorado Denver is working to increase the availability of groundwater-related hands-on activities in TeachEngineering, a peer-reviewed online database of searchable lesson plans for use by K-12 teachers and other educators. In this presentation, we would like to present and solicit feedback on groundwater-related hands-on demonstrations such as quicksand, infiltration into porous pavement, or using refractive index matching to render transparent porous media that allow lasers to measure flow within model groundwater aquifers.

  6. Neptunium migration in salt brine aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Bidoglio, G.; DePlano, A.

    1986-09-01

    Investigation of reactions between neptunium and soil samples representative of the saline area around the Gorleben salt dome (Federal Republic of Germany) was conducted to obtain an understanding of the transport mechanism of neptunium in saturated brine aquifers. Leaching of /sup 237/ Np-doped glasses with brine under oxic conditions resulted in the release of soluble species of Np(V). Adsorption parameters obtained from the application of nonlinear sorption isotherms to static experiments were used to interpret the migration of neptunium through soil columns. The existence of two different adsorption sites reacting with neptunium at different rates was postulated. Retardation factors under oxic and anoxic conditions were measured. In anoxic environments such as those found in undisturbed repository horizons, more neptunium activity was fixed by the soil.

  7. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Floridan aquifer system and effect of Lower Floridan aquifer withdrawals on the Upper Floridan aquifer at Barbour Pointe Community, Chatham County, Georgia, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard; Clarke, John S.

    2016-06-02

    Two test wells were completed at the Barbour Pointe community in western Chatham County, near Savannah, Georgia, in 2013 to investigate the potential of using the Lower Floridan aquifer as a source of municipal water supply. One well was completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer at a depth of 1,080 feet (ft) below land surface; the other well was completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer at a depth of 440 ft below land surface. At the Barbour Pointe test site, the U.S. Geological Survey completed electromagnetic (EM) flowmeter surveys, collected and analyzed water samples from discrete depths, and completed a 72-hour aquifer test of the Floridan aquifer system withdrawing from the Lower Floridan aquifer.Based on drill cuttings, geophysical logs, and borehole EM flowmeter surveys collected at the Barbour Pointe test site, the Upper Floridan aquifer extends 369 to 567 ft below land surface, the middle semiconfining unit, separating the two aquifers, extends 567 to 714 ft below land surface, and the Lower Floridan aquifer extends 714 to 1,056 ft below land surface.A borehole EM flowmeter survey indicates that the Upper Floridan and Lower Floridan aquifers each contain four water-bearing zones. The EM flowmeter logs of the test hole open to the entire Floridan aquifer system indicated that the Upper Floridan aquifer contributed 91 percent of the total flow rate of 1,000 gallons per minute; the Lower Floridan aquifer contributed about 8 percent. Based on the transmissivity of the middle semiconfining unit and the Floridan aquifer system, the middle semiconfining unit probably contributed on the order of 1 percent of the total flow.Hydraulic properties of the Upper Floridan and Lower Floridan aquifers were estimated based on results of the EM flowmeter survey and a 72-hour aquifer test completed in Lower Floridan aquifer well 36Q398. The EM flowmeter data were analyzed using an AnalyzeHOLE-generated model to simulate upward borehole flow and determine the transmissivity of

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: An Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment of the Paluxy Aquifer, Central Texas, USA, Using GIS and a Modified DRASTIC Approach.

    PubMed

    Fritch; McKnight; Yelderman; Arnold

    2000-03-01

    / The Paluxy aquifer in north-central Texas is composed primarily of Lower Cretaceous clastics. This aquifer provides water for both domestic and agricultural purposes in the region. The study area for this investigation incorporates the outcrop and recharge areas, as well as the confined and unconfined portions of the aquifer. The purpose of this investigation is to perform a groundwater vulnerability assessment on the Paluxy aquifer using the GRASS 4.1 geographic information system combined with a modified DRASTIC approach. DRASTIC is an acronym for the variables that control the groundwater pollution potential (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media,Topography, Impact of the vadose zone, andConductivity of the aquifer). Using such an approach allows one to investigate the potential for groundwater contamination on a regional, rather than site-specific, scale. Based upon data from variables such as soil permeability, depth to water, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, and topography, subjective numerical weightings have been assigned according to the variable's relative importance in regional groundwater quality. The weights for each variable comprise a GIS map layer. These map layers are combined to formulate the final groundwater pollution potential map. Using this method of investigation, the pollution potential map for the study area classifies 47% of the area as having low pollution potential, 26% as having moderate pollution potential, 22% as having high pollution potential, and 5% as having very high pollution potential.

  9. An aquifer vulnerability assessment of the Paluxy Aquifer, central Texas, USA, using GIS and a modified DRASTIC approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fritch, T.G.; McKnight, C.L.; Yelderman, J.C. Jr.; Arnold, J.G.

    2000-03-01

    The Paluxy aquifer in north-central Texas is composed primarily of Lower Cretaceous clastics. This aquifer provides water for both domestic and agricultural purposes in the region. The study area for this investigation incorporates the outcrop and recharge areas, as well as the confined and unconfined portions of the aquifer. The purpose of this investigation is to perform a groundwater vulnerability assessment on the Paluxy aquifer using the GRASS 4.1 geographic information system combined with a modified DRASTIC approach. DRASTIC is an acronym for the variables that control the groundwater pollution potential (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of the vadose zone, and Conductivity of the aquifer). Using such an approach allows one to investigate the potential for groundwater contamination on a regional, rather than site-specific, scale. Based upon data from variables such as soil permeability, depth to water, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, and topography, subjective numerical weightings have been assigned according to the variable's relative importance in regional groundwater quality. The weights for each variable comprise a GIS map layer. These map layers are combined to formulate the final groundwater pollution potential map. Using this method of investigation, the pollution potential map for the study area classified 47% of the area as having low pollution potential, 26% as having moderate pollution potential, 22% as having high pollution potential, and 5% as having very high pollution potential.

  10. Hydrogeochemical analysis for Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiri, Ata Allah; Moghaddam, Asghar Asghari; Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Fijani, Elham

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the hydrogeochemical processes of groundwater in the Tasuj plain, Iran. The Tasuj plain is one of the 12 marginal plains around Urmia Lake which is currently under a critical ecological condition. In the last decades, the Tasuj plain aquifer suffered from severe groundwater level declination and caused degradation of groundwater quality. To better understand hydrogeochemical processes in the Tasuj plain, this study adopted graphical methods and multivariate statistical techniques to analyze groundwater samples. A total of 504 groundwater samples was obtained from 34 different locations (qanats, wells, and springs) over 12 years (1997-2009) and analyzed for 15 water quality parameters. From the results, the Piper diagram indicated four groundwater types and the Stiff diagram showed eight different sources of groundwater samples. The Durov diagram identified five major hydrogeochemical processes in the aquifer. However, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) identified five water types in the groundwater samples because HCA was able to analyze more chemical and physical data than graphical methods. The HCA result was checked by discriminant analysis and found consistency in all samples that were classified into correct groups. Using factor analysis, we identified three factors that accounted for 81.6% of the total variance of the dataset. Based on the high factor loadings of the variables, factors 1 and 2 reflected the natural hydrogeochemical processes and factor 3 explained the effect of agricultural fertilizers and human activities in the Tasuj plain. Dendrograms from 2000 to 2009 were studied to understand the temporal variation of groundwater quality. Comparing the distributions of groundwater types in 2000 and 2009, we found that the mixing zone was expanded. This may be due to artificial groundwater recharge in the recharge area and the effect of inverse ion exchange in the discharge area.

  11. UAVSAR Acquires False-Color Image of Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-03

    This false-color image of Colombia Galeras Volcano, was acquired by UAVSAR on March 13, 2013. A highly active volcano, Galeras features a breached caldera and an active cone that produces numerous small to moderate explosive eruptions.

  12. Waldemar Wilhelm: father of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Waldemar Wilhelm (1913-1994) was honored by the Asociación Colombiana de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial (Colombian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) as the Father of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Colombia. Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Wilhelm graduated as a dentist from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in 1936. He emigrated shortly thereafter to Colombia, receiving his dental license there in 1943. He completed his oral and maxillofacial surgery training at Nordwestdeutsche Kieferklinic, under the tutelage of Prof. Dr. Dr. Karl Schuchardt in Hamburg. In 1950, he settled in Bogotá, where he joined the Universidad Nacional School of Dentistry, opened Colombia's first oral and maxillofacial surgery department at Hospital San José, and trained the first maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia in 1958.

  13. Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162464.html Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC Study ... born with devastating birth defects linked to the Zika virus is no longer confined to Brazil, a ...

  14. Finite-difference interblock transmissivity for unconfined aquifers and for aquifers having smoothly varying transmissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, D.J.; Appel, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    More accurate alternatives to the widely used harmonic mean interblock transmissivity are proposed for block-centered finite-difference models of ground-water flow in unconfined aquifers and in aquifers having smoothly varying transmissivity. The harmonic mean is the exact interblock transmissivity for steady-state one-dimensional flow with no recharge if the transmissivity is assumed to be spatially uniform over each finite-difference block, changing abruptly at the block interface. However, the harmonic mean may be inferior to other means if transmissivity varies in a continuous or smooth manner between nodes. Alternative interblock transmissivity functions are analytically derived for the case of steady-state one-dimensional flow with no recharge. The second author has previously derived the exact interblock transmissivity, the logarithmic mean, for one-dimensional flow when transmissivity is a linear function of distance in the direction of flow. We show that the logarithmic mean transmissivity is also exact for uniform flow parallel to the direction of changing transmissivity in a two- or three-dimensional model, regardless of grid orientation relative to the flow vector. For the case of horizontal flow in a homogeneous unconfined or water-table aquifer with a horizontal bottom and with areally distributed recharge, the exact interblock transmissivity is the unweighted arithmetic mean of transmissivity at the nodes. This mean also exhibits no grid-orientation effect for unidirectional flow in a two-dimensional model. For horizontal flow in an unconfined aquifer with no recharge where hydraulic conductivity is a linear function of distance in the direction of flow the exact interblock transmissivity is the product of the arithmetic mean saturated thickness and the logarithmic mean hydraulic conductivity. For several hypothetical two- and three-dimensional cases with smoothly varying transmissivity or hydraulic conductivity, the harmonic mean is shown to yield

  15. Hyper-resolution aquifer map of North America: estimating alluvial aquifer thickness, vertical structure, and conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I.; Condon, L. E.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The lack of robust, spatially distributed data of the subsurface is a major limitation for complex and realistic groundwater dynamics within large-scale land surface, hydrologic, and climate models. Improving these inputs will enable a more realistic physical representation of the groundwater system and are especially needed as these models more the higher resolutions. Here, we present a new parameterization of aquifer stratification and three-dimensional input dataset over Continental North America. We estimated thickness of alluvial aquifers for North America at 250m2 resolution based on terrain attributes, such as curvature, and calibrated this with U.S. groundwater studies. Also, spatial distribution, thickness, and depth of confining layers are estimated by using information of U.S. groundwater studies. A dataset of aquifer thickness was not previously available at this level of detail, over this extent. The new derived aquifer map is used as an input to the integrated physical hydrological model ParFlow. Two smaller domains, representing different hydrogeological settings (i.e. parts of the Central Valley and High Plains) were selected for a sensitivity analysis. In this sensitivity analysis, we perturbed model parameter values and vertical and horizontal resolution under stead-state forcing (precipitation - evaporation). Specifically, the model was run with various conductivities, using global scale data of Gleeson et al. (2014) and regional scale data of U.S.G.S. groundwater studies, and various vertical and horizontal (i.e. 1km2, 250m2) discretization. Simulated groundwater depths and streamflow were evaluated against observations. The results show that model performance improves with increased horizontal and vertical discretization, and that variation in conductivity has the highest impact on spatial distribution of groundwater depth and simulated streamflow. In future work, human water demands will be added to the model to study the sensitivity of

  16. Liberty and Order: Reintegration as Counter-Insurgency in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    experienced the same fits and starts as others in the region. There have been successes , including the reintegration of the M-19 (Movimiento del 19... REINTEGRATION AS COUNTER-INSURGENCY IN COLOMBIA Mr. GREGORY E. PHILLIPS, DOS COURSE 5601 and 5602 FUNDAMENTALS OF STRATEGIC LOGIC and THE NATURE OF...COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liberty and Order: Reintegration as Counter-Insurgency in Colombia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Colombia: Gateway to Defeating Transnational Hell in the Western Hemisphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    eliminating coca in southern Colombia region of Putumayo. These crops are being destroyed by aircraft spraying the fields with an herbicide named Glyphosate ...democracy. 6 Fifty Five percent of all terrorist attacks on U.S. interests in 2001 occurred in Colombia. Occidental Petroleum Corporation, a U.S. based oil...million. Many of those remaining have fled ungoverned areas where terrorists find sanctuary, logistical bases , training, and planning for future attacks

  18. Monitoring technologies for the evaluation of a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment system in coastal aquifer environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallioras, Andreas; Tsertou, Athanasia; Foglia, Laura; Bumberger, Jan; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Schüth, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater has an important role to play in water reuse. Treated sewage effluent can be infiltrated into the ground for recharge of aquifers. As the effluent water moves through the soil and the aquifer, it undergoes significant quality improvements through physical, chemical, and biological processes in the underground environment. Collectively, these processes and the water quality improvement obtained are called soil-aquifer-treatment (SAT) or geopurification. Recharge systems for SAT can be designed as infiltration-recovery systems, where all effluent water is recovered as such from the aquifer, or after blending with native groundwater. SAT typically removes essentially all suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminthic eggs). Concentrations of synthetic organic carbon, phosphorous, and heavy metals are greatly reduced. The pilot site of LTCP will involve the employment of infiltration basins, which will be using waters of impaired quality as a recharge source, and hence acting as a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment, SAT, system. T he LTCP site will be employed as a pilot SAT system complemented by new technological developments, which will be providing continuous monitoring of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of infiltrating groundwater through all hydrologic zones (i.e. surface, unsaturated and saturated zone). This will be achieved through the development and installation of an integrated system of prototype sensors, installed on-site, and offering a continuous evaluation of the performance of the SAT system. An integrated approach of the performance evaluation of any operating SAT system should aim at parallel monitoring of all hydrologic zones, proving the sustainability of all involved water quality treatment processes within unsaturated and saturated zone. Hence a prototype system of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors will be developed, in order to achieve

  19. Fracture trace map and single-well aquifer test results in a carbonate aquifer in Berkeley County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Kurt J.; Podwysocki, Melvin H.; Crider, E. Allen; Weary, David J.

    2005-01-01

    These data contain information on the results of single-well aquifer tests, lineament analysis, and a bedrock geologic map compilation for the low-lying carbonate and shale areas of eastern Berkeley County, West Virginia. Efforts have been initiated by management agencies of Berkeley County in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey to further the understanding of the spatial distribution of fractures in the carbonate regions and their correlation with aquifer properties. This report presents transmissivity values from about 200 single-well aquifer tests and a map of fracture-traces determined from aerial photos and field investigations. Transmissivity values were compared to geologic factors possibly affecting its magnitude.

  20. Estimating harvested rainwater at greenhouses in south Portugal aquifer Campina de Faro for potential infiltration in Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luís; Monteiro, José Paulo; Leitão, Teresa; Lobo-Ferreira, João Paulo; Oliveira, Manuel; Martins de Carvalho, José; Martins de Carvalho, Tiago; Agostinho, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The Campina de Faro (CF) aquifer system, located on the south coast of Portugal, is an important source of groundwater, mostly used for agriculture purposes. In some areas, this multi-layered aquifer is contaminated with high concentration of nitrates, possibly arising from excessive usage of fertilizers, reaching to values as high as 300 mg/L. In order to tackle this problem, Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques are being applied at demonstration scale to improve groundwater quality through aquifer recharge, in both infiltration basins at the river bed of ephemeral river Rio Seco and existing traditional large diameter wells located in this aquifer. In order to assess the infiltration capacity of the existing infrastructures, in particular infiltration basins and large diameter wells at CF aquifer, infiltration tests were performed, indicating a high infiltration capacity of the existing infrastructures. Concerning the sources of water for recharge, harvested rainwater at greenhouses was identified in CF aquifer area as one of the main potential sources for aquifer recharge, once there is a large surface area occupied by these infrastructures at the demo site. This potential source of water could, in some cases, be redirected to the large diameter wells or to the infiltration basins at the riverbed of Rio Seco. Estimates of rainwater harvested at greenhouses were calculated based on a 32 year average rainfall model and on the location of the greenhouses and their surface areas, the latter based on aerial photograph. Potential estimated annual rainwater intercepted by greenhouses at CF aquifer accounts an average of 1.63 hm3/year. Nonetheless it is unlikely that the totality of this amount can be harvested, collected and redirected to aquifer recharge infrastructures, for several reasons, such as the lack of appropriate greenhouse infrastructures, conduits or a close location between greenhouses and large diameter wells and infiltration basins. Anyway, this