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Sample records for mosca-negra-dos-citros aleurocanthus woglumi

  1. [Occurrence of Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in the state of Maranhão, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Raimunda N S; da Silva, Gilson S; Araújo, José R G; Das Chagas, Evandro F; Moreira, Aldenise A; Soares, Ana T M

    2006-01-01

    Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby in citrus and mango crops in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, is recorded. Samples of 2003 and 2004 from several counties were identified and deposited in the Insect Collection of the Laboratório de Entomologia of the Núcleo de Biotecnologia Agronômica, Universidade Estadual do Maranhão.

  2. Characterization of Paecilomycescinnamomeus from the camellia whitefly, Aleurocanthus camelliae (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), infesting tea in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu; Takatsuka, Jun; Shimazu, Mitsuaki

    2012-05-01

    The whitefly, Aleurocanthus camelliae Kanmiya and Kasai (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is an invasive species in Japan that was first discovered in 2004 on tea in Kyoto. Soon after its arrival epizootics of an entomopathogenic fungus were observed in populations of the whitefly in many tea-growing regions. Here we identify this fungus as Paecilomyces cinnamomeus (Petch) Samson and W. Gams (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) based on morphological characteristics and molecular analyses. This is the first record of P. cinnamomeus in Japan and also the first time it has been recorded from the genus Aleurocanthus. A isolate of P. cinnamomeus caused greater than 50% and 90% infection in whitefly nymphs at 1×10(6) and 1×10(7)conidia/ml respectively, while the commercial mycoinsecticides Preferd® (Isaria fumosorosea) and Mycotal® (Lecanicillium muscarium) caused <10% infection at their recommended field rates (5×10(6) and 9×10(6)conidia/ml, respectively), suggesting that P. cinnamomeus may be more useful as a control agent than the currently available mycoinsecticides. Optimum and upper limit temperatures for in vitro growth of P. cinnamomeus isolates were 22.5-25°C and 32.5°C, respectively. At field rates, the fungicide thiophanate-methyl caused some inhibition of in vitro growth of P. cinnamomeus isolates, and the bactericide copper oxychloride and the insecticides tolfenpyrad and methidathion were strongly inhibitory. The findings obtained in this study will be useful in the development of microbial control programs using P. cinnamomeus against A. camelliae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae: Insights into Gene Arrangement and Genome Organization within the Family Aleyrodidae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Pin-Wu; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Jun; Peng, Ping

    2016-11-07

    There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported whitefly mt genomes. The mt genome of A. camelliae is 15,188 bp long, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 21 tRNA genes and a putative control region (GenBank: KU761949). The tRNA gene, trnI, has not been observed in this genome. The mt genome has a unique gene order and shares most gene boundaries with Tetraleurodes acaciae. Nineteen of 21 tRNA genes have the conventional cloverleaf shaped secondary structure and two (trnS₁ and trnS₂) lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. Using ARWEN and homologous sequence alignment, we have identified five tRNA genes and revised the annotation for three whitefly mt genomes. This result suggests that most absent genes exist in the genomes and have not been identified, due to be lack of technology and inference sequence. The phylogenetic relationships among 11 whiteflies and Drosophila melanogaster were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Aleurocanthus camelliae and T. acaciae form a sister group, and all three Bemisia tabaci and two Bemisia afer strains gather together. These results are identical to the relationships inferred from gene order. We inferred that gene rearrangement plays an important role in the mt genome evolved from whiteflies.

  4. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae: Insights into Gene Arrangement and Genome Organization within the Family Aleyrodidae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Pin-Wu; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Jun; Peng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported whitefly mt genomes. The mt genome of A. camelliae is 15,188 bp long, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 21 tRNA genes and a putative control region (GenBank: KU761949). The tRNA gene, trnI, has not been observed in this genome. The mt genome has a unique gene order and shares most gene boundaries with Tetraleurodes acaciae. Nineteen of 21 tRNA genes have the conventional cloverleaf shaped secondary structure and two (trnS1 and trnS2) lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. Using ARWEN and homologous sequence alignment, we have identified five tRNA genes and revised the annotation for three whitefly mt genomes. This result suggests that most absent genes exist in the genomes and have not been identified, due to be lack of technology and inference sequence. The phylogenetic relationships among 11 whiteflies and Drosophila melanogaster were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Aleurocanthus camelliae and T. acaciae form a sister group, and all three Bemisia tabaci and two Bemisia afer strains gather together. These results are identical to the relationships inferred from gene order. We inferred that gene rearrangement plays an important role in the mt genome evolved from whiteflies. PMID:27827992

  5. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Citrus Spiny Whitefly Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaintance) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae): Implications for the Phylogeny of Whiteflies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Mu, Li-Xia; Wang, Ji-Rui; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (15,220 bp) of the citrus spiny whitefly, Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaintance), a well-known pest from the superfamily Aleyrodidae. The A. spiniferus mitogenome contains 36 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 21 transfer RNAs (tRNA), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) and a large non-coding region (control region, CR). Like most whiteflies, the A. spiniferus mitogenome had a large degree of rearrangement due to translocation of the nad3-trnG-cox3 gene cluster. The 13 PCGs initiated with ATN and generally terminated with TAA, although some used TAG or T as stop codons; atp6 showed the highest evolutionary rate, whereas cox2 appeared to have the lowest rate. The A. spiniferus mitogenome had 21 tRNAs with a typical cloverleaf secondary structure composed of four arms. Modeling of the two rRNA genes indicated that their secondary structure was similar to that of other insects. The CR of A. spiniferus was 920 bp and mapped between the nad3-trnG-cox3 and trnI-trnM gene clusters. One potential stem-loop structure and five tandem repeats were identified in the CR. Phylogenetic relationships of 11 species from the Aleyrodidae were analyzed based on the deduced amino acid sequences of the 13 PCGs and evolutionary characteristics were explored. Species with more genetic rearrangements were generally more evolved within the Aleyrodidae. PMID:27551782

  6. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Citrus Spiny Whitefly Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaintance) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae): Implications for the Phylogeny of Whiteflies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Mu, Li-Xia; Wang, Ji-Rui; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (15,220 bp) of the citrus spiny whitefly, Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaintance), a well-known pest from the superfamily Aleyrodidae. The A. spiniferus mitogenome contains 36 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 21 transfer RNAs (tRNA), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) and a large non-coding region (control region, CR). Like most whiteflies, the A. spiniferus mitogenome had a large degree of rearrangement due to translocation of the nad3-trnG-cox3 gene cluster. The 13 PCGs initiated with ATN and generally terminated with TAA, although some used TAG or T as stop codons; atp6 showed the highest evolutionary rate, whereas cox2 appeared to have the lowest rate. The A. spiniferus mitogenome had 21 tRNAs with a typical cloverleaf secondary structure composed of four arms. Modeling of the two rRNA genes indicated that their secondary structure was similar to that of other insects. The CR of A. spiniferus was 920 bp and mapped between the nad3-trnG-cox3 and trnI-trnM gene clusters. One potential stem-loop structure and five tandem repeats were identified in the CR. Phylogenetic relationships of 11 species from the Aleyrodidae were analyzed based on the deduced amino acid sequences of the 13 PCGs and evolutionary characteristics were explored. Species with more genetic rearrangements were generally more evolved within the Aleyrodidae.

  7. Residue dynamics of acephate and methamidophos in urban dooryard citrus foliage, Pompano Beach, Florida--August-September 1978.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, G E; Bogan, M D

    1980-06-01

    Residues of acephate and its toxic metabolite methamidophos, attributable to the State-Federal program for eradication of the citrus blackfly (CBF) [Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby] on citrus foliage, were assessed in urban areas in Pompano Beach, Florida. Eighteen dooryard citrus trees were sampled on two line transects, each ca 1.6 km long, along two city streets. The trees were sampled twice monthly for five months, beginning before chemical treatments were applied, continuing through the acephate treatment period, and ending when residues decreased below the limits of detection. Acephate and methamidophos residues, as high as 302.5 ppm and 15.8 ppm, respectively, were detected on leaves within one day after the first of a series of three treatments. Significant conversion of acephate to methamidophose was observed. Of the 143 samples collected, 114 contained measurable residues of both compounds; methamidophos accounted for an average of 19 percent of the total residues. Both compounds degraded rapidly, however, and residues averaged below 1 ppm approximately four weeks after the third treatment in the series. Average foliar half-lives for acephate and methamidophos were 8.93 days (SD = 2.52) and 8.40 days (SD = 2.55), respectively.

  8. Fungal phyllosphere communities are altered by indirect interactions among trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jose L; French, J Victor; Summy, Kenneth R; Baines, Anita Davelos; Little, Christopher R

    2009-05-01

    Trophic interactions involving predators, herbivores, and plants have been described in terrestrial systems. However, there is almost no information on the effect of trophic interactions on microbial phyllosphere community abundance, diversity, or structure. In this study, the interaction between a parasitoid, an insect herbivore, and the fungal phyllosphere community is examined. Parasitoid wasps have an indirect negative impact on fungal community diversity. On the citrus phyllosphere, the exotic wasp species, Amitus hesperidum and Encarsia opulenta, may parasitize the citrus blackfly (Aleurocanthus woglumi). If parasitism levels are low, the blackfly may produce significant amounts of honeydew secretions on the surface of the leaf. Honeydew deposition provides a carbon-rich substrate for the development of fungal growth persisting as sooty mold on the leaves. Leaves from sooty mold-infested grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) trees were collected from multiple orchards in south Texas. The effect of different levels of exotic parasite activity, citrus blackfly, and sooty mold infestation on phyllosphere mycobiota community structure and diversity was examined. Our results suggest the presence of the parasitoid may lead to a top-down trophic cascade affecting phyllosphere fungal community diversity and structure. Additionally, persistent sooty mold deposits that have classically been referred to as Capnodium citri (and related asexual morphological forms) actually comprise a myriad of fungal species including many saprophytes and potential fruit and foliar pathogens of citrus.