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Sample records for moti yung dongdai

  1. HH-MOTiF: de novo detection of short linear motifs in proteins by Hidden Markov Model comparisons.

    PubMed

    Prytuliak, Roman; Volkmer, Michael; Meier, Markus; Habermann, Bianca H

    2017-04-29

    Short linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are self-sufficient functional sequences that specify interaction sites for other molecules and thus mediate a multitude of functions. Computational, as well as experimental biological research would significantly benefit, if SLiMs in proteins could be correctly predicted de novo with high sensitivity. However, de novo SLiM prediction is a difficult computational task. When considering recall and precision, the performances of published methods indicate remaining challenges in SLiM discovery. We have developed HH-MOTiF, a web-based method for SLiM discovery in sets of mainly unrelated proteins. HH-MOTiF makes use of evolutionary information by creating Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) for each input sequence and its closely related orthologs. HMMs are compared against each other to retrieve short stretches of homology that represent potential SLiMs. These are transformed to hierarchical structures, which we refer to as motif trees, for further processing and evaluation. Our approach allows us to identify degenerate SLiMs, while still maintaining a reasonably high precision. When considering a balanced measure for recall and precision, HH-MOTiF performs better on test data compared to other SLiM discovery methods. HH-MOTiF is freely available as a web-server at http://hh-motif.biochem.mpg.de. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Characterization of icebergs and floating sea ice in the Yung Sund fjord in Greenland from satellite radar and optical images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaso, Stephane; Gay, Michel; Gervaise, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    At the Zackenberg site, sea ice starts to move between June and September resulting in icebergs flowing freely on the sea. Splitting into smaller parts, they reduce in size. Icebergs represent a risk for maritime transport and needs to be studied. In order to determine iceberg density per surface unit, size distribution, and movement of icebergs, we need to observe, detect, range and track them. The use of SAR images is particularly well adapted in regions where cloud cover is very present. We focused our study on the Yung Sund fjord in Greenland, where lots of icebergs and sea ice are generated during the summer. In the beginning of July, sea ice breaks up first, followed by icebergs created by the different glaciers based in the ocean. During our investigation, we noticed that the iceberg and sea ice were drifting very fast and thus, we needed to adapt our methodology. To achieve our goal, we collected all remote sensing data available in the region, principally Sentinel 1/2 and LandSAT 8 during one ice free season (from July 1st 2016 to September 30th, 2016). We developed an original approach in order to detect, characterize and track icebergs and sea ice independently from data. The iceberg detection was made using a watershed technique. The advantage of this technique is that it can be applied to both optical and radar images. For the latter, calibrated intensity is transformed into an image using a scaling function, in order to make ice brighter. Land data is masked using a topographic map. When data is segmented, a statistical test derived from the CFAR approach is performed to isolate an iceberg and floating sea ice from the ocean. Finally, a method, such SIFT or BRISK is used to identify and track the different segmented object. These approaches give a representation of the object and make the tracking easier and independent of the scale and rotation, which can occur because icebergs are dependent on ocean currents and wind. Finally, to fill in the gap

  3. Assessing the Efficacy of MOTI-4 for Reducing the Use of Cannabis Among Youth in the Netherlands: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Hans B; Candel, Math J J M; Kaplan, Charles D; van de Mheen, Dike; de Vries, Nanne K

    2016-06-01

    The Moti-4 intervention, in which motivational interviewing, self-monitoring, and strengthening behavioral control are used, was developed in the Netherlands in response to several rapid assessments of problematic use of cannabis among vulnerable adolescents. The main goal of the study reported in this article was to determine whether the Moti-4 intervention was able to reduce two outcome measures pertaining to the level of cannabis use; the amount of Euros spent a week on cannabis and the mean number of cannabis joints (cigarettes) smoked in a week. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 6-month follow-up, 27 trained Dutch prevention workers recruited 71 Moti-4 participants and 60 controls assigned to usual care. Participants were Dutch youth aged 14-24 years who had used cannabis during the preceding month. At baseline (T0), post-test (T1) and 6-month follow-up (T2), participants completed a questionnaire with 51 items. The 27 prevention workers also completed a checklist to assess the fidelity of delivering each item to each participant in the Moti-4 protocol. Multilevel and binary logistic regression was used to assess the impact of the prevention worker and 14 participant variables on the likelihood of drop-out. Mean scores for cannabis use outcome measures by Moti-4 participants and controls at baseline, T1 and T2 were compared using paired sample t-tests. Top-down multiple regression was used to assess relationships between Moti-4 and 13 other variables on the one hand and changes in weekly cannabis use at T1 and T2 on the other. The Moti-4 experimental condition had a significant and positive influence in reducing the level of expenditure on cannabis (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in outcome, neither for the 4 participating institutes nor for the professionals implementing the intervention. Baseline cannabis use was the strongest predictor (p<0.001) of weekly cannabis expenditure at posttest and 6-month follow-up. This effect was still

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of MotY, a stator component of the Vibrio alginolyticus polar flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Akari; Sakuma, Mayuko; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Kojima, Seiji; Namba, Keiichi; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi

    2007-02-01

    Crystals of MotY, a stator protein of the V. alginolyticus polar flagellar motor, have been produced and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus is rotated by the sodium motor. The stator unit of the sodium motor consists of four different proteins: PomA, PomB, MotX and MotY. MotX and MotY, which are unique components of the sodium motor, form the T-ring structure attached to the LP ring in the periplasmic space. MotY has a putative peptidoglycan-binding motif in its C-terminal region and MotX is suggested to interact with PomB. Thus, MotX and MotY are thought to be required for incorporation and stabilization of the PomA/B complex. In this study, mature MotY composed of 272 amino-acid residues and its SeMet derivative were expressed with a C-terminal hexahistidine-tag sequence, purified and crystallized. Native crystals were grown in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.1, c = 132.6 Å. SeMet-derivative crystals belonged to the same space group with the same unit-cell parameters as the native crystals. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of the SeMet derivative showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that the derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  5. Combining Persuasive Technology With Behavioral Theory to Support Weight Maintenance Through a Mobile Phone App: Protocol for the MotiMate App

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Gilly A; Freyne, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of health-focused mobile phone apps available for download increases daily, with weight management apps being among the most proliferative. However, most lack theoretic grounding or evidence of efficacy. There is a significant body of literature which provides evidence for behaviors which are associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Behavioral theory also provides further insight regarding successful behavior change and maintenance. Objective We aimed to apply this knowledge to the development of the functionality of an app targeting weight loss maintenance. Methods We have subsequently undertaken the development of a persuasive and behavior targeting mobile app (MotiMate) to assist in maintenance of weight loss. MotiMate combines persuasive and behavior change theories in a practical targeted tool through its motivational messages, personalized feedback, and intelligent supportive tools to manage weight, food, exercise, mood and stress. Results The development and trial of MotiMate received funding support in May 2014. All 88 volunteers started the trial by December 2014 and were in the process of completing their final visits when this paper was submitted (May 2015). Data analysis is currently underway. Conclusions The paper has presented a scientifically informed mobile phone app to support weight loss maintenance. Further evaluation of its efficacy is in progress. Trial Registration ANZCTR 12614000474651; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366120 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eJeQiKxi). PMID:26747725

  6. Combining Persuasive Technology With Behavioral Theory to Support Weight Maintenance Through a Mobile Phone App: Protocol for the MotiMate App.

    PubMed

    Brindal, Emily; Hendrie, Gilly A; Freyne, Jill

    2016-01-08

    The prevalence of health-focused mobile phone apps available for download increases daily, with weight management apps being among the most proliferative. However, most lack theoretic grounding or evidence of efficacy. There is a significant body of literature which provides evidence for behaviors which are associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Behavioral theory also provides further insight regarding successful behavior change and maintenance. We aimed to apply this knowledge to the development of the functionality of an app targeting weight loss maintenance. We have subsequently undertaken the development of a persuasive and behavior targeting mobile app (MotiMate) to assist in maintenance of weight loss. MotiMate combines persuasive and behavior change theories in a practical targeted tool through its motivational messages, personalized feedback, and intelligent supportive tools to manage weight, food, exercise, mood and stress. The development and trial of MotiMate received funding support in May 2014. All 88 volunteers started the trial by December 2014 and were in the process of completing their final visits when this paper was submitted (May 2015). Data analysis is currently underway. The paper has presented a scientifically informed mobile phone app to support weight loss maintenance. Further evaluation of its efficacy is in progress. ANZCTR 12614000474651; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366120 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eJeQiKxi).

  7. Prevalence of parasitic infection in captive wild animals in Bir Moti Bagh mini zoo (Deer Park), Patiala, Punjab

    PubMed Central

    Mir, A. Q.; Dua, K.; Singla, L. D.; Sharma, S.; Singh, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was conducted to know the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of captive wild animals at Bir Moti Bagh Mini Zoo (Deer Park), Patiala, Punjab. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 fecal samples from eight species of captive animals including Civet cat (Viverra zibetha), Porcupine (Hystrix indica), Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus), Spotted deer (Axis axis), Black buck (Antelope cervicapra), Sambar deer (Cervus unicolor), Hog deer (Axis porcinus), and Barking deer (Muntiacus muntjak) were screened using classical parasitological techniques including sedimentation and floatation technique. Results: Out of 31 fecal samples examined, 20 were positive for parasitic ova/oocysts of different species indicating an overall prevalence of 68.0%. The six different types of parasites observed in the study included strongyle (67%), Strongyloides spp. (14%), coccidia (38%), Trichuris spp. (19%), ascarid (10%), and Capillaria spp. (10%). Strongyles were the most common parasites observed (67%) followed by coccidia (38%). Mixed helminth and protozoan infection were observed in 48% of animals. No cestode or trematodes were detected during the study. Conclusion: The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites without overt clinical signs of disease or mortality as observed in this study is suggestive of subclinical infection. The findings will help in formulating the appropriate deworming protocol for parasitic control in these captive animals. PMID:27397973

  8. Investigating Remediation Reagents Injection and Rainfall Effect by using Self-Potential Method in a Soil and Groundwater Contamination Site located in Yung Kang, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Dong, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Yao-Tsung; Lin, Su-Tien; Ho, Ching-Jen

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have proposed the use of time-lapse SP (self-potential) monitoring system to investigate a remediation reagents injection and rainfall effect in the soil and groundwater contamination site which was located in Yung Kang, Taiwan. We set up two mutually perpendicular survey lines to continuously record the SP data at a sampling rate of 25 Hz. One extended in N-S direction for a total length of 85 m with 17 potential electrodes and 1 common reference electrode. Another extended in E-W direction for a total length of 35 m with 7 potential electrodes and 1 common reference electrode. By averaging 1 day hourly SP median data, we calculated the time-lapse SPT (self-potential tomography) with a published code SP2DINV, and got the following results. First and foremost, from the daily SPTs, we found some artificial structures at a depth of circa 5 m. Then, by observing the positive and negative electric potential distributions in both N-S and E-W SPTs, we determined that the regional groundwater flow direction was in NE. Besides, making use of interpolation scheme, we filtered the rainfall effect out of the raw SP data. Then from the SPTs within the rainy days, we successfully demonstrated the SP response to the precipitation. And this phenomenon was interpreted as streaming potential which was caused from the enhancement of groundwater pressure. In addition, we correlated the charge density variation above 5m from SPTs with daily rainfall from August to September, to evaluate the Streaming Potential Coupling Coefficient. Last but not the least, by analyzing the SPTs variation from 13th to 18th October 2015 and from 23th to 25th November 2015, we compared the SPTs difference between two remediation reagents injection periods. And we also computed the passing time of the equal-potential lines between two fixed points, to evaluate the apparent hydraulic conductivities in this study area.

  9. A randomized pilot study of MOtiVation and Enhancement (MOVE) Training for negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn I; Roberts, David; Mintz, Jim; Maples, Natalie; Li, Xueying; Medellin, Elisa; Brown, Matt

    2015-07-01

    Among individuals with schizophrenia, those who have persistent and clinically significant negative symptoms (PNS) have the poorest functional outcomes and quality of life. The NIMH-MATRICS Consensus Statement indicated that these symptoms represent an unmet therapeutic need for large numbers of individuals with schizophrenia. No psychosocial treatment model addresses the entire constellation of PNS. 51 patients with PNS were randomized into one of two groups for a period of 9 months: 1) MOtiVation and Enhancement (MOVE) or 2) treatment as usual. MOVE is a home based, manual-driven, multi-modal treatment that employs a number of cognitive and behavioral principles to address the broad range of factors contributing to PNS and their functional consequences. The components of MOVE include: Environmental supports to prompt initiation and persistence, in-vivo skills training to ameliorate deficits and encourage interaction, cognitive behavioral techniques to address self-defeating attitudes, in-vivo training in emotional processing to address affective blunting and problems in identifying emotions, and specific techniques to address the deficits in anticipatory pleasure. Patients were assessed at baseline and each 3 months with multiple measures of negative symptoms. Repeated measures analyses of variance for mixed models indicated significant Group by Time effects for the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA; p<.02) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS; p<.04). Group differences were not significant until 9 months of treatment and were not significant for the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Further investigation of a comprehensive treatment for PNS, such as MOVE, is warranted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modeling constitutive behavior of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel under hot compression using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sumantra

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) model has been suggested to predict the constitutive flow behavior of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel under hot deformation. Hot compression tests in the temperature range 850°C- 1250°C and strain rate range 10-3-102 s-1 were carried out. These tests provided the required data for training the neural network and for subsequent testing. The inputs of the neural network are strain, log strain rate and temperature while flow stress is obtained as output. A three layer feed-forward network with ten neurons in a single hidden layer and back-propagation learning algorithm has been employed. A very good correlation between experimental and predicted result has been obtained. The effect of temperature and strain rate on flow behavior has been simulated employing the ANN model. The results have been found to be consistent with the metallurgical trend. Finally, a monte carlo analiysis has been carried out to find out the noise sensitivity of the developed model.

  11. Mo/Ti Diffusion Bonding for Making Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Kisor, Adam; Caillat, Thierry; Lara, Liana; Ravi, Vilupanur; Firdosy, Samad; Fleuiral, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state diffusion bonding process that exploits the eutectoid reaction between molybdenum and titanium has been developed for use in fabricating thermoelectric devices based on skutterudite compounds. In essence, the process is one of heating a flat piece of pure titanium in contact with a flat piece of pure molybdenum to a temperature of about 700 C while pushing the pieces together with a slight pressure [a few psi (of the order of 10 kPa)]. The process exploits the energy of mixing of these two metals to form a strong bond between them. These two metals were selected partly because the bonds formed between them are free of brittle intermetallic phases and are mechanically and chemically stable at high temperatures. The process is a solution of the problem of bonding hot-side metallic interconnections (denoted hot shoes in thermoelectric jargon) to titanium-terminated skutterudite n and p legs during the course of fabrication of a unicouple, which is the basic unit cell of a thermoelectric device (see figure). The hot-side operating temperature required for a skutterudite thermoelectric device is 700 C. This temperature precludes the use of brazing to attach the hot shoe; because brazing compounds melt at lower temperatures, the hot shoe would become detached during operation. Moreover, the decomposition temperature of one of the skutterudite compounds is 762 C; this places an upper limit on the temperature used in bonding the hot shoe. Molybdenum was selected as the interconnection metal because the eutectoid reaction between it and the titanium at the ends of the p and n legs has characteristics that are well suited for this application. In addition to being suitable for use in the present bonding process, molybdenum has high electrical and thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability - characteristics that are desired for hot shoes of thermoelectric devices. The process takes advantage of the chemical potential energy of mixing between molybdenum and titanium. These metals have a strong affinity for each other. They are almost completely soluble in each other and remain in the solid state at temperatures above the eutectoid temperature of 695 C. As a result, bonds formed by interdiffusion of molybdenum and titanium are mechanically stable at and well above the original bonding temperature of about 700 C. Inasmuch as the bonds are made at approximately the operating temperature, thermomechanical stresses associated with differences in thermal expansion are minimized.

  12. Wristband Accelerometers to motiVate arm Exercise after Stroke (WAVES): study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Da Silva, Ruth; Balaam, Madelaine; Brkic, Lianne; Jackson, Dan; Jamieson, Dan; Ploetz, Thomas; Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; van Wijck, Frederike; Price, Christopher

    2016-10-21

    Loss of upper limb function affects up to 85 % of acute stroke patients. Recovery of upper limb function requires regular intensive practise of specific upper limb tasks. To enhance intensity of practice interventions are being developed to encourage patients to undertake self-directed exercise practice. Most interventions do not translate well into everyday activities and stroke patients continue to find it difficult remembering integration of upper limb movements into daily activities. A wrist-worn device has been developed that monitors and provides 'live' upper limb activity feedback to remind patients to use their stroke arm in daily activities (The CueS wristband). The aim of this trial is to assess the feasibility of a multi-centre, observer blind, pilot randomised controlled trial of the CueS wristband in clinical stroke services. This pilot randomised controlled feasibility trial aims to recruit 60 participants over 15 months from North East England. Participants will be within 3 months of stroke which has caused new reduced upper limb function and will still be receiving therapy. Each participant will be randomised to an intervention or control group. Intervention participants will wear a CueS wristband (between 8 am and 8 pm) providing "live" feedback towards pre-set movement goals through a simple visual display and vibration prompts whilst undertaking a 4-week upper limb therapy programme (reviewed twice weekly by an occupational/physiotherapist). Control participants will also complete the 4-week upper limb therapy programme but will wear a 'sham' CueS wristband that monitors upper limb activity but provides no feedback. Outcomes will determine study feasibility in terms of recruitment, retention, adverse events, adherence and collection of descriptive clinical and accelerometer motor performance data at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks. The WAVES study will address an important gap in the evidence base by reporting the feasibility of undertaking an evaluation of emerging and affordable technology to encourage impaired upper limb activity after stroke. The study will establish whether the study protocol can be supported by clinical stroke services, thereby informing the design of a future multi-centre randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost-effectiveness. ISRCTN:82306027 . Registered 12 July 2016.

  13. Soundness and Completeness of Formal Encryption: The Cases of Key Cycles and Partial Information Leakage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    implementations of equational theories against passive adversaries. In L. Caires, G. Italiano , L. Monteiro, C. Palamidessi, and M. Yung, editors...protocol security logic. In L. Caires, G. Italiano , L. Monteiro, C. Palamidessi, and M. Yung, editors, Proceedings of the The 32nd International Collo

  14. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  15. Predicting Site Index in Young Black Walnut Plantations

    Treesearch

    Craig K. Losche; Richard C. Schlesinger

    1975-01-01

    Prediction of black walnut height at age 25 is graphically represented for two soil-site groups. The landowner or manager can use this growth prediction to assess the productivity of yung black walnut plantations.

  16. The Development of Space Science and Technology in China,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-22

    TESI ’.V-i . (0 00 FTD-ID (RS) T-0282-86 ~/ 4: FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA by Yung-An Liu...TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0282-86 22 May 1986 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-86-C-001864 THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA By: Yung-An Liu English

  17. Relative efficiency of North Carolina designs I and II and standard design III in three wheat crosses.

    PubMed

    Singh, S

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of three analyses, namely, Designs I and II of Comstock and Robinson (1952) and standard Design III analysis of Kearsey and Jinks (1968), was compared in the F2s of three wheat crosses (Norteno 67 x HD 1982, HD 1982 x Moti and Sonalika x Moti) for plant height, spikelets per spike and yield per plant. The three analyses showed a remarkable agreement in estimating the additive (D) component for all three characters in all three crosses. But, as regards the estimation of dominance ] (H) component, standard Design III analysis proved to be more efficient than the other two analyses in crosses 2 (HD 1982 x Moti) and 3 (Sonalika x Moti) for all three characters except spikelets per spike in cross 3.

  18. Assessment of mdm2 Alterations on p53 Expression in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Bueso-Ramos, C., Manshouri, T., Haidar , M., Yung, Y., McCown, P., Ordonez, N., Glassman, A., Sneige, J., and Albitar, M. Abnormal expression of mdm2 in...during mammary tumorigenesis. Int J Cancer. 81: 292-298, 1999. 31. Bueso-Ramos, C, Manshouri, T., Haidar , M., Huh, Y., Keating, M., and Albitar, M...Bueso-Ramos, C, Manshouri. T.. Haidar , M., Yung, Y.. McCown. P., Ordonez, N., Glassman, A.. Sneige. J., and Albitar, M. Abnormal expression of mdm2

  19. New Visions in Asian American Studies. Diversity, Community, Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays from the eighth national conference of the Association for Asian American Studies is organized into four sections: history and women's studies; social science; literature; and Hawaiian studies. The following papers are included: (1) "History and Women Studies" (Yung); (2) "From Old to New Plantations: Labor's Growing…

  20. JPRS Report East Asia Southeast Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-24

    Bernabe Buscayno, better: known as "Kumander Dante," on the second leg of the Partido ng Bayan’s seven day Mindanao cam- paign, in an evening...34Kaya. nila nagawa iyon ay dahil sa sistema . Hindi natin sila sinisisi. Ang ating sisihin ay ang sistema at ang nagpa- pairal ng sistema ; yung mga

  1. 77 FR 72873 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Charleston. Smith William A 09028 Charleston. Johnson Christine Marie 14010 Charleston. Elizabeth. Smith.... Schaible-Klaiss Kathleen M 22382 Chicago. Abel Danette Marie 15313 Chicago. Carcione Lisa 10590 Chicago... John Andres 14852 Los Angeles. ] Yung Lily Phu 20198 Los Angeles. Ching Ann Curie 15445 Los...

  2. New Visions in Asian American Studies. Diversity, Community, Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of essays from the eighth national conference of the Association for Asian American Studies is organized into four sections: history and women's studies; social science; literature; and Hawaiian studies. The following papers are included: (1) "History and Women Studies" (Yung); (2) "From Old to New Plantations: Labor's Growing…

  3. Effects of Modular Technology Education on Junior High Students' Achievement Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Cory; Daugherty, Michael; Merrill, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In the quest to improve public schools, an education in basic technological concepts and systems, or "technological literacy," has been viewed as an important part of a school curriculum (Dugger & Yung, 1995, pp. 7-8). Proponents of technology education have claimed that technological knowledge may be critical to the future needs of…

  4. Measuring Civic Engagement Processes and Youth Civic Empowerment in the Classroom: The CIVVICS Observation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolte, Laurel Cadwallader; Isenbarger, Molly; Cohen, Alison Klebanoff

    2014-01-01

    Grounded in the context of the gap in civic participation, action-based civics curricula, and how classroom interactions may affect student development, we present the CIVVICS (Civic Interactions motiVating diVerse Individuals in Classroom Settings) observation tool. CIVVICS's four domains--Lesson Planning and Implementation, Classroom…

  5. The Use of Chaff in Space as a Jamming Device between Ground Stations and Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of Fi•Yu es Figure Page 1. Rasic Orbital Parameters . . . . . . . .... 2. Satellite Orientation for Cases I, II, III, and IV...Moti r on Spin Direction PCe of sot on c.SSO..!Path of notion Case.X AngLe of Tk~t Case-III Cast IV Figure 2. SatelLite Orientation for Cases I, II

  6. Influence of Muzzle Brakes Upon the Trajectory of Fin-Stabilized Projectiles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    parked in a number of ordnance museums around the world; however, in this case, it has been designed with the saboted projectile as the prime moti...Naval Weapons Center Cockeysville, MD 21030 ATTN: Tech Info Div Washington, DC 20375 1 Advanced Technology Labs ATTN: Mr. J. Erdos 1 Commander Merrick

  7. Copyright, Patent, and Trade Secret Protection of Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    i1volved is specifi~ed. Scientific truths, mathematical formulas, principici5 in the abstract, fundamental t~ ruths , original causes, and motie~ cnno...transfers, between after Benson) before the Supreme Court’s the scratchpad registers and the system decision in Parker v. Fook, 437 U.S. 584, 98 babe

  8. Microfluidically supported biochip design for culture of endothelial cell layers with improved perfusion conditions.

    PubMed

    Raasch, Martin; Rennert, Knut; Jahn, Tobias; Peters, Sven; Henkel, Thomas; Huber, Otmar; Schulz, Ingo; Becker, Holger; Lorkowski, Stefan; Funke, Harald; Mosig, Alexander

    2015-03-02

    Hemodynamic forces generated by the blood flow are of central importance for the function of endothelial cells (ECs), which form a biologically active cellular monolayer in blood vessels and serve as a selective barrier for macromolecular permeability. Mechanical stimulation of the endothelial monolayer induces morphological remodeling in its cytoskeleton. For in vitro studies on EC biology culture devices are desirable that simulate conditions of flow in blood vessels and allow flow-based adhesion/permeability assays under optimal perfusion conditions. With this aim we designed a biochip comprising a perfusable membrane that serves as cell culture platform multi-organ-tissue-flow (MOTiF biochip). This biochip allows an effective supply with nutrition medium, discharge of catabolic cell metabolites and defined application of shear stress to ECs under laminar flow conditions. To characterize EC layers cultured in the MOTiF biochip we investigated cell viability, expression of EC marker proteins and cell adhesion molecules of ECs dynamically cultured under low and high shear stress, and compared them with an endothelial culture in established two-dimensionally perfused flow chambers and under static conditions. We show that ECs cultured in the MOTiF biochip form a tight EC monolayer with increased cellular density, enhanced cell layer thickness, presumably as the result of a rapid and effective adaption to shear stress by remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Moreover, endothelial layers in the MOTiF biochip express higher amounts of EC marker proteins von-Willebrand-factor and PECAM-1. EC layers were highly responsive to stimulation with TNFα as detected at the level of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression and modulation of endothelial permeability in response to TNFα/IFNγ treatment under flow conditions. Compared to static and two-dimensionally perfused cell culture condition we consider MOTiF biochips as a valuable tool for studying EC biology in vitro under

  9. Wear Resistant Coating on Tungsten Carbide Hard Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskolkova, T. N.

    2015-09-01

    The article reveals new knowledge about the role of zirconium in the composition of (Ti, Zr)N ion-plasma coating applied on WC10KS alloy. It is determined that when zirconium is introduced into ion-plasma coating TiN (50%) wear resistance and adhesion strength grow, nanohardness increases by 23% (up to 38500MPa), Yung's modulus rises by 67%, friction coefficient reduces to p = 0.07 and performance characteristics of a carbide alloy improve.

  10. The Formation and Fate of Internal Waves in the South China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    Tswen-Yung (David) Tang7 Internal gravity waves, the subsurface analogue of the familiar surface gravity waves that break on beaches, are ubiquitous in...of their representation in numerical climate predictions. Internal gravity waves are propagating disturbances of the ocean’s density stratification...Their physics resembles that of surface gravity waves but with buoyancy rather than gravity providing their restoring force—making them much larger

  11. Fatigue Characterization of Fabricated Ship Details. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Mattos, R.J., Higashida , Y. and Burk, J.D. (1978) "Estimation of Fatigue Initiation Life of Weld." ASTM STP 684, 134-158. A-2. Lawrence, F.V., Jr., Ho...coefficient as a function of ultimate strength and hardness[A-7]. 180 1.0 - I I I I a I.I 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 1 I I I I - Yung Higashida A36fWMI A A L HAZ

  12. [The Jung model of active style of schema].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-12-01

    Yung was of an opinion that the borderline personality as a pathology results from the experiences of a frightened and violence-experiencing child who is left to their own devices in the hostile world. In that situation, the child, longing for safety, simultaneously experiences fear of abuse, hurt and rejection and remains distrustful. In order to understand the dramatic changes in the individual's behaviour, in case of the borderline personality disorders, Yung developed the concept, presented by Aaron Beck at the therapeutic workshops in the 1980s. Beck's concept was based upon the assumption that some pathological states expressed strong emotional states, experienced in childhood on the basis of regression. Yung presented them in the form of conceptualization in the categories of the active styles of schema. Apart from the states of regression, he also differentiated less regressive styles of schema. The style of schema should be interpreted as a pattern of experiencing, thinking and behaviour, based upon a determined set of schema, and characterized by independence from other styles.

  13. Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Conversion (AMTEC) for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Cole, T.; Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Performance parameters of the Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) for a 100 kW electric power system have been calculated at four technological levels assuming a heat pipe-cooled nuclear reactor heat source. The most advanced level considered would operate between 1180 K converter temperature and 711 K radiator temperature at 16 percent efficiency, and would weigh 1850 kg with a radiator area of 43 sq m. In addition, electrode research studies for the AMTEC systems have been conducted utilizing an experimental test cell of Bankston et al. (1983) and Mo and several Mo-Ti electrodes. It was found that the Mo-Ti electrodes offered no improvement in lifetime characteristics over the pure Mo electrodes, however, oxygen treatment of a degraded Mo electrode restored its specific power output to 90 percent of its original specific power and maintained this level for 60 hr, thus offering a potential for lifetime stability.

  14. Molybdenum-titanium phase diagram evaluated from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilai, Shmuel; Toher, Cormac; Curtarolo, Stefano; Levy, Ohad

    2017-07-01

    The design of next generation β -type titanium implants requires detailed knowledge of the relevant stable and metastable phases at temperatures where metallurgical heat treatments can be performed. Recently, a standard specification for surgical implant applications was established for Mo-Ti alloys. However, the thermodynamic properties of this binary system are not well known and two conflicting descriptions of the β -phase stability have been presented in the literature. In this study, we use ab initio calculations to investigate the Mo-Ti phase diagram. These calculations predict that the β phase is stable over a wide concentration range, in qualitative agreement with one of the reported phase diagrams. In addition, they predict stoichiometric compounds, stable at temperatures below 300 ∘C , which have not yet been detected by experiments. The resulting solvus, which defines the transition to the β -phase solid solution, therefore occurs at lower temperatures and is more complex than previously anticipated.

  15. Optimal Regulation of Structural Systems with Uncertain Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-02

    been addressed, in part, by Statistical Energy Analysis . Moti- vated by a concern with high frequency vibration and acoustical- structural...Parameter Systems," AFOSR-TR-79-0753 (May, 1979). 25. R. H. Lyon, Statistical Energy Analysis of Dynamical Systems: Theory and Applications, (M.I.T...Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1975). 26. E. E. Ungar, " Statistical Energy Analysis of Vibrating Systems," Trans. ASME, J. Eng. Ind. 89, 626 (1967). 139 27

  16. Approaches Towards the Identification of Patterns in Violent Events, Baghdad, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    moti- vation was to assess the extent to which data culled by means of content analysis from open source news reports could be used to construct...limited, although approaches are outlined that could be followed in a situation where more extensive data are available (e.g., using classified sources of...statistical tests most com- monly used in practice are presented. This also includes a discussion of new techniques proposed to deal with binary (zero

  17. Joint Refugee Information Clearing Office (JRICO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-02

    WASHDC//DAPE-PRO// f. Office hours: 0800-1700, Mon-Fri FOR THE DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF FOR PERSONNEL: DISTRIBUTION DACS DAAG DAAR DACA DACH DAEN...E F T 0 « «««»»«««ft««««*»**«**«« lamoMZ JUN 75 Ffl CDR TAGCEN lilASHK/ZDAAG-NFF// TO AIG 7MOti INFO DA IÜASHK// DACA DAPE DALO DAMO

  18. Effects of Simulator Training and Platform Motion on Air-to-Surface Weapons Delivery Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    specifications, or other data is not to be regarded by implication or otherwise, as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or...training value can be The air.to-surface mission is a major role for the demonstrated for the presence of moti-on, cost- Tactical Air Command (TAC...several studies which ment must be developed to train personnel for addressed the value of motion cueing to the their effective utilization. As regards

  19. Feasibility Study of Alternative Fabrication Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    solution would be to continually deform the lead liner i as it goes through the sewing path to make it conform to the sew- ing path. The second method...SELECMe I $ I I ~ I~ i -( 2)MOTiWc BA5e I PC-90 FIJOUS1R#AL SOLID SrAT- coJtiRoi.5 -YO&iK PA. wWWAY(Z) o-rAL CENTRAL PROCESSORL UNIT LPC .90 IIJOU57RIAL

  20. Motion of Thin Bodies at High Supersonic Velocities USSR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    8217The ’change in 6 under the condition that K remain constant is simply a change in the scale in the non steady-state problem. Thus, the problem on...constant 2petd. The ae.ed of piston moti(.n is 3 •-* " obviously e uel to the vertical Ve - M0.-7 ioe• ty of the Vedge, i e, , . . . - .v = IV tgE( (4.3) V

  1. A Methodology for Assessing the Impact of Sea Level Rise on Representative Military Installations in the Southwestern United States (RC-1703)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-03

    Fort Poin ean sea lev ctonic moti ace fluids. U o the retrea  San Francisco t, San Francisc el caused b ons, consol plift genera t of the gla...Interdisciplinary Perspective. Ph.D. thesis, Christian ‐Albrechts‐Universität zu Kiel. 628 Klein, R.J.T. and R.J. Nicholls. 1999. Assessment of

  2. Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen Maser Dissociators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    ATOMIC VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OUT OF HYDROGEN MASER DISSOCIATORS Bernardo Jaduszliwer and Yat C. Chan Chemistry and Physics Laboratory The... dissociators , of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was moti- vated by lang-term reliability issues related to the possible usc of masers as...hydrogen budgct will depend not only on the dissoci - ation efficiency, but also the vclocity distribution of the hydrogen atorrls leaving the

  3. Handbook of Smart Weapon and PGM Related Acronyms and Terms. 2nd Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    VVavo! MNS Mission N~ca!s Stat,-mcnt MOA Momorranclun- of A~gr~crnrict MOCIVt MotoI Orgonic Chomicol Vo~por pcoso!ition MOPFET Moclulation Popoa MESFEf...MOME3E MotaI Orgonic Molocular 5oam Epitoxy MORE Multiplo OptioI Rocornnoi55acc, sy~tom MOS Mot~i Oxicle smiconcluctI’or5 MOFARS Moving Targcot System MOTP

  4. European Scientific Notes. Volume 34. Number 5,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-31

    equipment for the past mendous advantage over visual and in- five years. frared optical reproductions because From a commercial standpoint, it operates...time tests, those sleep quality (good versus poor sleep) given placebos perform better than and performance. The "fault" is motI- those given hypnotics ...after-effects other troughs in physiological states. of the hypnotic . In fact, there was As Bryce Hartman (USAP School of Aero- a tendency to report

  5. Special Operations Research Topics 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    seeks to explore the antecedents of FFF with a focus on the social , environmental, and psychological factors that deter or moti- vate foreign...in 5, 10, 15 years? What future state, non-state, social , and technological “game changers” could impact global U.S. inter- ests? What do SOF need to...conditions is a POTFF issue as much as an operational issue. Is there evidence that suggests whether ( social or task) cohesion erodes during long dura

  6. Inter-ion coulomb interactions in a magneto-optical trap ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; McClelland, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    We have investigated the role played by inter-ion Coulomb interactions in a magneto-optical trap ion source (MOTIS). Using a Monte Carlo simulation accounting for all pair-wise ion-ion Coulomb interactions in the source, we have calculated the broadening of the transverse spatial and velocity distributions as well as the increase in emittance over a range of beam currents and extraction electric fields. Using a 7Li MOTIS, we have experimentally studied the broadening of the spatial distribution as a function of total beam current and extraction electric field by measuring the fraction of the beam current that passes through a 20 μm diameter aperture. The Monte Carlo simulations agree well with the experimental results, indicating that such simulations capture the essential physics of the source. Our results show that while Coulomb interactions can cause a significant increase in emittance in some situations, it is possible to keep the effects to an acceptable level by suitable choice of extraction field and beam current. These considerations are essential to the process of optimizing MOTIS geometry and operating conditions for use in high-resolution focused ion beam applications.

  7. Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    from Poly (L- lactic acid ) and Pluronic 104," Appl. Spectrosc. 2010, 64, 359-364. • P.J.R. Roche, M.C-K Cheung, K.Y. Yung, A.G. Kirk, V.P. Chodavarpu...hypertrophic scarring is the result of a protein imbalance at the injury site, the biochemical characterization of the burn wound from the time of...Characterize the protein biochemistry of burn wounds. a. Analyze wound fluid samples to determine proteins present a. Identify trends present in

  8. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atmospheric Ozone: Its Variation and Human Influences, Aldeia das Acoteias, Algarve, Portugal, October 1-13, 1979,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    conditions, J. Geophys. Res., 82, 5923-5927, 1977. Hameed, S., J. P. Pinto and R. W. Stewart, Sensitivity of the predicted CO-OH-CH4 perturba- tion to...Systems of the World, Cambridge University Press, 1974. Hameed, S., J.P. Pinto , R.W. Stewart, Sensitivity of the Predicted CO-OH-CH4 Perturbation to...sensitized decomposition of 03: The reactions of CIO and 0CZO with 031 J. Photochem. 10, 163-186, 1979. 465 WATSON Yung, Y. L., P. J. Pinto , R. T

  9. Limitations on Design Principles for Public Key Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    receiving the increase such as a full name, employee ID number, etc. There are bearer authorizations, messages which apply to the bearer of that...protocol is that Alice’s signature on the unencrypted H and T is useless. If Bob wants to argue before a judge that Alice engaged in this protocol run...ACM Press, New York, November 1993. [5] R. Bird, I. Gopal, A. Herzberg , P. Janson, S. Kut- ten, R. Molva, and M. Yung. Systematic Design of a Family

  10. Synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer inserted carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A. Jeong; Nam, Young Woo; Park, Yung Woo

    2008-03-01

    The carbon nanotubes filled with the photo-conducting polymer poly(N-vinyl carbazole) and the conducting polymer polypyrrole were prepared by polymerizing the monomers inside the nanotubes using the supercritical carbon dioxide. The endohedral nanotubes were characterized by HRTEM and ^1H NMR, which confirmed that the inserted material was indeed the conducting polymer [1]. I-V characteristics of the polymer inserted carbon nanotubes are presented. [1] Johannes Steinmetz, Soyoung Kwon, Hyun-Jung Lee, Edy Abou-Hamad, Robert Almairac, Christophe Goze-Bac, Hwayong Kim, Yung-Woo Park,, Chem. Phys. Lett., 431, 139 (2006)

  11. JPRS Report, China.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-28

    Affairs advisors, 13 are from busisness circles. Cheng Yu-tung, Li Chao-chi, Kuo Bin- hsiang , Wu Kuang-cheng, as well as advisors appointed last...Machinery Group 70 Kuo He-nien Chairman of the Board, Chia Li Trading Co. Ltd 69 Kuo Ping- hsiang Chairman of the Board, New Hung Chi Real Estate Development... chuan Director of the Board, Yung An Group 55 Li Ye-kuang Chairman of Social Connection Co. 57 Hsieh Kuo-ming Chairman of the Board, Chen Ta Group

  12. International Symposium on Organosilicon Chemistry (8th) Held in St. Louis Missouri on 7-12 June 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-13

    22 P.O. Box 101 69191 Saint-Fons Cedex, France Fushun, Sichuan People’s Republic of China Jorge Cervantes Facultad de Quimica Yung-Lin Chen...Chemistry Alessandro Degl’Innocenti Northern Illinois University Centro C.N.R. Composti Eterociclici DeKalb, Illinois 60115 Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ...8217 ’qt’ ff" ’ ’ ’’or Alfredo Ricci James Rozell Dipartimento de Chimica Organica Department of Chemistry University of Florence University of Texas Via

  13. Gas Transport Through Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-25

    parameter set (Schlenk- rich et al.. 1996; MacKerell et al., 1998) were used. Parame- ters for C02 or 02 were taken from the literature (Harris and...Yung, 1995; Schlenkrich et al., 1996; MacKerell et al.. 1998) and are listed in Supplemental material (Table SI). Assum- ing periodic boundary...aquaglyccroporins AQP7 and AQP9. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 6053 6058. MacKerell Jr., A.D., Bashford, D., Bellott, M„ el al.. 1998. All-atom empirical

  14. JPRS Report, China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-19

    the nutrition of their food. The con- sumption amount of various kinds of non-staple food increased by a big margin. Residents bought a greater...tons 38.9 Oil-bearing Crops (excl sunflower seeds ) 264,000 tons 1.7 Of which: Rapeseed 90,000 tons 10.7 Sugar beet 563,000 tons 8.0 Flue-cured...percent were optimistic about social order. This poll was planned and directed jointly by scholars Lin Chia -ch’eng [2651 0857 6134], Hung Yung-chin [3163

  15. Avian artificial insemination and semen preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Risser, Arthur C.; Todd, Frank S.

    1983-01-01

    Summary: Artificial insemination is a practical propagation tool that has been successful with a variety of birds. Cooperative, massage, and electroejaculation and modifications of these three basic methods of semen collection are described for a variety of birds. Semen color and consistency and sperm number, moti!ity, and morphology, as discussed, are useful indicators of semen quality, but the most reliable test of semen quality is the production of fertile eggs. Successful cryogenic preservation of avian semen with DMSO or glycerol as the cryoprotectant has been possible. Although the methods for preservation require special equipment, use of frozen semen requires only simple insemination supplies

  16. Defense AT&L Magazine: A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 33, Number 4, DAU 180

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Experience has shown there will be no quick fixes or miracle transformations. But even so, it isn’t like try- ing to turn lead into gold. This...104 per cen t gro wth 02- 03 Power of the PLM 51 Defense AT&L: July-August 2004 cantly contribute to AT&L Goal Number 7—a moti- vated, agile workforce...Hawaii Army National Guard, Fort Ruger, Hawaii, Environmental Quality—Individ- ual/Team Robins Air Force Base, Ga., Pollution Prevention—In- dustrial

  17. Investigation into the use of short message services to expand uptake of human immunodeficiency virus testing, and whether content and dosage have impact.

    PubMed

    de Tolly, Katherine; Skinner, Donald; Nembaware, Victoria; Benjamin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence rates in the world, but despite the well-established benefits of HIV counseling and testing (HCT), there is low uptake of HCT. The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of using short message services (SMSs) to encourage HCT while interrogating the impact of altering SMS content and dosage (the number of SMSs). About 2,533 participants were recruited via an SMS sent to 24,000 mobiles randomly sampled from a pre-existing database. Recruits were randomly allocated to four intervention groups that received 3 or 10 informational (INFO) or motivational (MOTI) SMSs, and a control group. After the intervention, participants were prompted to go for HCT, and postintervention assessment was done after 3 weeks. In comparison with the control, receipt of 10 MOTI messages had the most impact on uptake of HCT with a 1.7-fold increased odds of testing (confidence interval 95%; p=0.0036). The lack of efficacy of three SMSs indicates a threshold effect, that is, a minimum number of MOTI SMSs is required. INFO SMSs, whether 3 or 10 were sent, did not have a statistically significant effect. The cost can be calculated for the marginal effect of the SMSs, that is, the cost to get people to test over and above those who were likely to test without the intervention. Use of 10 MOTI SMSs yielded a cost-per-tester of $2.41. While there are methodological issues apparent in our study, the results demonstrate the potential of SMSs to influence the uptake of HCT, the importance of appropriate content, and the need to determine a threshold for SMS-based interventions. These results indicate a potential for SMSs to be used more generally for interventions encouraging people to take health-related actions, and the need for further research in this field. The reasonable cost-per-tester is promising for the scale-up of such an intervention.

  18. Engineering Systems Thinking: Definition, Assessing and Correlation with Project Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Engineering  Systems   Thinking :  Definition, Assessing and Correlation with  Project Success Moti Frank – HIT, Holon Institute of Technology, Israel...00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineering Systems Thinking : Definition, Assessing and Correlation with Project Success 5a...b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Engineering  Systems   Thinking : •Definition

  19. Superstring limit of Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Popov, Alexander D.

    2016-11-01

    It was pointed out by Shifman and Yung that the critical superstring on X10 =R4 ×Y6, where Y6 is the resolved conifold, appears as an effective theory for a U(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs system with four fundamental Higgs scalars defined on Σ2 ×R2, where Σ2 is a two-dimensional Lorentzian manifold. Their Yang-Mills model supports semilocal vortices on R2 ⊂Σ2 ×R2 with a moduli space X10. When the moduli of slowly moving thin vortices depend on the coordinates of Σ2, the vortex strings can be identified with critical fundamental strings. We show that similar results can be obtained for the low-energy limit of pure Yang-Mills theory on Σ2 × Tp2, where Tp2 is a two-dimensional torus with a puncture p. The solitonic vortices of Shifman and Yung then get replaced by flat connections. Various ten-dimensional superstring target spaces can be obtained as moduli spaces of flat connections on Tp2, depending on the choice of the gauge group. The full Green-Schwarz sigma model requires extending the gauge group to a supergroup and augmenting the action with a topological term.

  20. Authigenesis of vivianite as influenced by methane-induced sulfidization in cold-seep sediments off southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ta-Wei; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Wang, Yunshuen

    2014-08-01

    Authigenesis of iron-rich phosphate nodules occurs in iron-rich cold-seep sediments (MD052911 core) at Yung-An Ridge offshore southwestern Taiwan. Raman, FTIR, and quantitative X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopic analyses indicate that the phosphate mineral is vivianite (or barićite) and shows Fe/Mg molar ratios spanning from ca. 0.6 to 4.0 and a general down core trend of increasing Fe/Mg ratios. The formation of vivianite is limited to a depth interval of 13-17 mbsf (meters below seafloor) and is most prominent at ∼16 mbsf in association with high dissolved iron concentrations and depleted dissolved sulfide below a peak sulfidization zone (enriched in mackinawite and greigite). Alternate growths of vivianite and iron monosulfides and compositional zoning with Mg enriched towards the peripheries of individual nodules occur in the transition from the zone of vivianite mineralization to the sulfidization zone. The crystallization of vivianite below the sulfidization front could have been favored by scavenging of downward diffusive dissolved sulfide from pore waters in the sulfidization zone. Alternate growths and overlapping of the zones of iron monosulfides and vivianite can be attributed to fluctuations of the sulfidization front and methane flux. The discovery of vivianite in the Yung-An Ridge sediments implies that authigenic vivianite can be an important sink for phosphorus burial in cold-seep sediments that have high reactive-iron contents and high sedimentation rates.

  1. Titan ocean: Ethane, methane, nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Detection of the atmosphere of Saturn's satellite Titan by the Voyager I spacecraft indicated an abundance of only 3 mol % methane (CH4). Recently J.I. Lunine, D.J. Stevenson, and Y.L. Yung calculated that 3 mol % methane is sufficiently low to preclude the stable coexistence of liquid methane on Titan's surface, which has a temperature of 94 K (Science, 222, 1229, 1983). Instead, Lunine et al. suggest that Titan's atmospheric methane may have broken down by a catalyzed photochemical reaction to ethane (C2H6). The resulting ocean would consist of a mixture of C2H6 and CH4 in the proportion of 3 to 1.

  2. The connection between typological complexes of properties of the nervous system, temperaments, and personality types in the professions and sports.

    PubMed

    Drozdovski, Aleksandr K

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental studies in education, professions and sports, an attempt was made to combine the following two historically disconnected research directions in the study of the natural human traits into a single coordinate system: Pavlov's theory on the properties of the nervous system, as well as the types of higher nervous activity, and Jung's theory on psychological types. It is noted that Pavlov's school of thought was developed by his followers in Russia within the scientific school of differential psychophysiology, while Yung's theory was developed through the works of well-known American researchers Myers and Keirsey. The spatial model that is presented here rests on the knowledge of the properties of the human nervous system and enables the prediction of psychological characteristics, temperament, and psychological types of individuals belonging to a wide age range.

  3. Laboratory studies on the reactions between chlorine, sulfur dioxide, and oxygen - Implications for the Venus stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Leu, M.-T.; Smith, R. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform IR spectrophotometry is used to monitor the reactants and products in a Venus stratosphere simulation study involving the photolysis of mixtures of Cl2 and SO2, with and without O2 present in an atmosphere of N2. When several speculative reactions inferred from these experiments are incorporated by the Yung and DeMore (1982) model of Venus stratospheric chemistry, it emerges that SO2Cl2 is a key reservoir species for chlorine, and that the reaction between Cl and SO2 furnishes an important cycle for the destruction of O2 and the conversion of SO2 to H2SO4, thereby providing a possible solution to the photochemistry of the Venus stratosphere.

  4. Recovery of Weak Factor Loadings When Adding the Mean Structure in Confirmatory Factor Analysis: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This article extends previous research on the recovery of weak factor loadings in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) by exploring the effects of adding the mean structure. This issue has not been examined in previous research. This study is based on the framework of Yung and Bentler (1999) and aims to examine the conditions that affect the recovery of weak factor loadings when the model includes the mean structure, compared to analyzing the covariance structure alone. A simulation study was conducted in which several constraints were defined for one-, two-, and three-factor models. Results show that adding the mean structure improves the recovery of weak factor loadings and reduces the asymptotic variances for the factor loadings, particularly for the models with a smaller number of factors and a small sample size. Therefore, under certain circumstances, modeling the means should be seriously considered for covariance models containing weak factor loadings. PMID:26779071

  5. Comparative Genomics of Cluster O Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Cresawn, Steven G.; Pope, Welkin H.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Bowman, Charles A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Dedrick, Rebekah M.; Adair, Tamarah; Anders, Kirk R.; Ball, Sarah; Bollivar, David; Breitenberger, Caroline; Burnett, Sandra H.; Butela, Kristen; Byrnes, Deanna; Carzo, Sarah; Cornely, Kathleen A.; Cross, Trevor; Daniels, Richard L.; Dunbar, David; Findley, Ann M.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; Golebiewska, Urszula P.; Hartzog, Grant A.; Hatherill, J. Robert; Hughes, Lee E.; Jalloh, Chernoh S.; De Los Santos, Carla; Ekanem, Kevin; Khambule, Sphindile L.; King, Rodney A.; King-Smith, Christina; Klyczek, Karen; Krukonis, Greg P.; Laing, Christian; Lapin, Jonathan S.; Lopez, A. Javier; Mkhwanazi, Sipho M.; Molloy, Sally D.; Moran, Deborah; Munsamy, Vanisha; Pacey, Eddie; Plymale, Ruth; Poxleitner, Marianne; Reyna, Nathan; Schildbach, Joel F.; Stukey, Joseph; Taylor, Sarah E.; Ware, Vassie C.; Wellmann, Amanda L.; Westholm, Daniel; Wodarski, Donna; Zajko, Michelle; Zikalala, Thabiso S.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages – viruses of mycobacterial hosts – are genetically diverse but morphologically are all classified in the Caudovirales with double-stranded DNA and tails. We describe here a group of five closely related mycobacteriophages – Corndog, Catdawg, Dylan, Firecracker, and YungJamal – designated as Cluster O with long flexible tails but with unusual prolate capsids. Proteomic analysis of phage Corndog particles, Catdawg particles, and Corndog-infected cells confirms expression of half of the predicted gene products and indicates a non-canonical mechanism for translation of the Corndog tape measure protein. Bioinformatic analysis identifies 8–9 strongly predicted SigA promoters and all five Cluster O genomes contain more than 30 copies of a 17 bp repeat sequence with dyad symmetry located throughout the genomes. Comparison of the Cluster O phages provides insights into phage genome evolution including the processes of gene flux by horizontal genetic exchange. PMID:25742016

  6. Introgression of Shoot Fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) Resistance QTLs into Elite Post-rainy Season Sorghum Varieties Using Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MABC).

    PubMed

    Gorthy, Sunita; Narasu, Lakshmi; Gaddameedi, Anil; Sharma, Hari C; Kotla, Anuradha; Deshpande, Santosh P; Are, Ashok K

    2017-01-01

    Shoot fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) is a serious pest in sorghum production. Management of shoot fly using insecticides is expensive and environmentally un-safe. Developing host-plant resistance is the best method to manage shoot fly infestation. Number of component traits contribute for imparting shoot fly resistance in sorghum and molecular markers have been reported which were closely linked to QTLs controlling these component traits. In this study, three QTLs associated with shoot fly resistance were introgressed into elite cultivars Parbhani Moti (= SPV1411) and ICSB29004 using marker assisted backcrossing (MABC). Crosses were made between recurrent parents and the QTL donors viz., J2658, J2614, and J2714. The F1s after confirmation for QTL presence were backcrossed to recurrent parents and the resultant lines after two backcrosses were selfed thrice for advancement. The foreground selection was carried out in F1 and BCnF1 generations with 22 polymorphic markers. Forty-three evenly distributed simple sequence repeat markers in the sorghum genome were used in background selection to identify plants with higher recurrent parent genome recovery. By using two backcrosses and four rounds of selfing, six BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2658, five BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2714 and six BC2F4 progenies were selected for Parbhani Moti × J2614 crosses. Phenotyping of these lines led to the identification of two resistant lines for each QTL region present on chromosome SBI-01, SBI-07 and SBI-10 in ICSB 29004 and Parbhani Moti. All the introgression lines (ILs) showed better shoot fly resistance than the recurrent parents and their agronomic performance was the same or better than the recurrent parents. Further, the ILs had medium plant height, desirable maturity with high yield potential which makes them better candidates for commercialization. In the present study, MABC has successfully improved the shoot fly resistance in

  7. Introgression of Shoot Fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) Resistance QTLs into Elite Post-rainy Season Sorghum Varieties Using Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MABC)

    PubMed Central

    Gorthy, Sunita; Narasu, Lakshmi; Gaddameedi, Anil; Sharma, Hari C.; Kotla, Anuradha; Deshpande, Santosh P.; Are, Ashok K.

    2017-01-01

    Shoot fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) is a serious pest in sorghum production. Management of shoot fly using insecticides is expensive and environmentally un-safe. Developing host–plant resistance is the best method to manage shoot fly infestation. Number of component traits contribute for imparting shoot fly resistance in sorghum and molecular markers have been reported which were closely linked to QTLs controlling these component traits. In this study, three QTLs associated with shoot fly resistance were introgressed into elite cultivars Parbhani Moti (= SPV1411) and ICSB29004 using marker assisted backcrossing (MABC). Crosses were made between recurrent parents and the QTL donors viz., J2658, J2614, and J2714. The F1s after confirmation for QTL presence were backcrossed to recurrent parents and the resultant lines after two backcrosses were selfed thrice for advancement. The foreground selection was carried out in F1 and BCnF1 generations with 22 polymorphic markers. Forty-three evenly distributed simple sequence repeat markers in the sorghum genome were used in background selection to identify plants with higher recurrent parent genome recovery. By using two backcrosses and four rounds of selfing, six BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2658, five BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2714 and six BC2F4 progenies were selected for Parbhani Moti × J2614 crosses. Phenotyping of these lines led to the identification of two resistant lines for each QTL region present on chromosome SBI-01, SBI-07 and SBI-10 in ICSB 29004 and Parbhani Moti. All the introgression lines (ILs) showed better shoot fly resistance than the recurrent parents and their agronomic performance was the same or better than the recurrent parents. Further, the ILs had medium plant height, desirable maturity with high yield potential which makes them better candidates for commercialization. In the present study, MABC has successfully improved the shoot fly resistance in

  8. [Results of school children with enterobiasis in Tainan city, treated with mebendazole].

    PubMed

    Chang, J H; Huang, W H; Chen, E R; Hu, S C

    1995-01-01

    There were 2,471 school children suffering from enterobiasis in six primary schools of Tainan city. The infected children in five primary schools, Po-Ai, Yung-Hua, Fu-Hsiao, Pao-Jeng and Hsin-Nan, were treated with one single dosage of 100 mg mebendazole. In Shih-Men primary school, the sixth, the students were given placebos as a control group. Negative conversion rates of infected children were examined after three weeks of chemotherapy and school children in the six primary schools were surveyed for enterobiasis two months after chemotherapy to obtain infection rates. The method of examination was two consecutive-day adhesive cellophane perianal swabs. With the purpose of evaluating the efficiency of treatment, positive reduction rates were used and calculated according to the infection rates of school children gained before and after chemotherapy. Those rates in Pao-Jeng, Fu-Hsiao, Yung-Hua, Po-Ai and Hsin-Nan were 62.1%, 47.8%, 41.8%, 37.1% and 3.3%, respectively, and in Shih-Men 3.9%. Judging the data obtained from each grade or each class of schools showed that the efficacy of chemotherapy in reducing the rate of infection was variable. Hence, one single dose of mebendazole and education on personal hygiene were not sufficient to reduce the prevalence of enterobiasis in primary schools. This was because the cycle of E. vermicularis was relatively short, cutting out the routes of transmission was very difficult, and the factors involved were very complex. Overall, though the positive reduction rate presented in Hsin-Nan primary school showed nearly no success in reducing the infection, the other four schools showed valuable rates. Whether continue a treatment, of about three-months in duration, can inhibit the prevalence of enterobiasis among children in primary schools or not will need further study.

  9. Mapping water in Jupiter with Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, Thibault; Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Jarchow, C.; Billebaud, F.; Orton, G.; Rengel, M.; Sagawa, H.; Lara, L.; Gonzalez, A.; HssO Team

    2010-10-01

    A major discovery of ISO was the detection of water in the upper atmospheres of the four giant planets and Titan (Feuchtgruber et al, 1997; Coustenis et al, 1998), implying the existence of external sources of water. This oxygen supply, which manifests itself also through the presence of CO2 and CO in these atmospheres, may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity (Prather et al,1978), (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) (Strobel and Yung, 1979; Prangé et al, 2006), (iii) cometary ``Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type'’ impacts (Lellouch et al, 1995). Disentangling the various sources at Jupiter is a key objective of the Herschel Space Observatory key program HssO (Hartogh et al, 2009). Herschel/HIFI observed H2O in Jupiter at 1669 GHz in a 5x5 point map on July 7, 2010. From this observation, we will present and discuss the search for latitudinal variability of H2O in Jupiter. Acknowledgement: Research by T. Cavalié was supported by the Fondation des Amis des Sciences. References: Coustenis et al, A&A 336,L85-L89. Feuchtgruber et al, 1997. Nature 389, 159-162. Hartogh et al, 2009. Planet. Space Sci. 57, 1596-1606. Lellouch et al, 1995. Nature 373, 592-595. Prangé et al, 2006. Icarus 180, 379-392. Prather, 1978. ApJ 223, 1072-1081. Strobel & Yung, 1979. Icarus 37, 256-263.

  10. Multiple Vibrio fischeri genes are involved in biofilm formation and host colonization

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Hogan, David; Gorman, Clayton; Quintanal-Villalonga, Alvaro; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are increasingly recognized as the predominant form for survival in the environment for most bacteria. The successful colonization of Vibrio fischeri in its squid host Euprymna tasmanica, involves complex microbe-host interactions mediated by specific genes that are essential for biofilm formation and colonization. In the present investigation, structural and regulatory genes were selected to study their role in biofilm formation and host colonization. We have mutated several genes (pilT, pilU, flgF, motY, ibpA and mifB) by an insertional inactivation strategy. Results demonstrate that structural genes responsible for synthesis of type IV pili and flagella are crucial for biofilm formation and host infection. Moreover, regulatory genes affect colony aggregation by various mechanisms including alteration of synthesis of transcriptional factors and regulation of extracellular polysaccharide production. These results reflect the significance of how genetic alterations influence communal behavior, which is important in understanding symbiotic relationships. PMID:22486781

  11. List mode reconstruction for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2002-07-03

    Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject moti is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time vary ingrate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts.

  12. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  13. Monitoring of magnetic nano-particles in EOR by using the CSEM modeling and inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, J. Y.; KIM, S.; Jeong, G.; Hwang, J.; Min, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    EOR, which injects water, CO2, or other chemical components into reservoirs to increase the production rate of oil and gas, has widely been used. To promote efficiency of EOR, it is important to monitor distribution of injected materials in reservoirs. Using nano-particles in EOR has advantages that the size of particles is smaller than the pore and particles can be characterized by various physical properties. Specifically, if we use magnetic nano-particles, we can effectively monitor nano-particles by using the electromagnetic survey. CSEM, which can control the frequency range of source, is good to monitor magnetic nano-particles under various reservoir circumstances. In this study, we first perform numerical simulation of 3D CSEM for reservoir under production. In general, two wells are used for EOR: one is for injection, and the other is for extraction. We assume that sources are applied inside the injection well, and receivers are deployed inside the extraction well. To simulate the CSEM survey, we decompose the total fields into primary and secondary fields in Maxwell's equations. For the primary fields, we calculate the analytic solutions of the layered earth. With the calculated primary fields, we compute the secondary fields due to anomalies using the edge-based finite-element method. Finally, we perform electromagnetic inversion for both conductivity and permeability to trace the distribution of magnetic nano-particles. Since these two parameters react differently according to the frequency range of sources, we can effectively describe the distribution of magnetic nano-particles by considering two parameters at the same time. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning(KETEP) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy(MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea (No. 20168510030830), and by the International Cooperation (No. 2012-8510030010) of KETEP, and by the Dual Use Technology Program, granted

  14. [A study on the size, location and medical function of the Jaedong Jejoongwon].

    PubMed

    Park, H W; Lee, K L; Wang, H J

    2000-06-01

    This is the study of Jaedong Jejoongwon, the first westernized hospital in Korea founded in 1885. To build the groundwork for study of Jejoongwon, its size, location, building structure, and medical functions were studied. At the same time, the history of Jejoongwon, particularly that of the time when there arose a need for its moving and expansion, was studied. Jaedong Jejoongwon was founded in a renovated building. The building was formerly owned by Hong Young-sik, who was killed while leading the Gapsinjungbyun. According to the existing block plan of Jaedong Jejoongwon, when it was opened in 1885, it was located in the place which later became a park. Nowadays this park is to northwest of the Constitutional Court. At that time, its size was about 600 p'yung. As the medical school was built, from end of 1885 to early 1886, Jejoongwon was expanded to north, and its size was enlarged to 862.16 p'yung. Jaedong Jejoongwon reflected the characteristics of western medical system. When it was opened in 1885, Jejoongwon consisted of a servants' room, an assistants' room, the outpatient clinic, the operation room (which was also used as the pharmacy), surgical wards, women's wards, and general wards. In 1886, as the number of patients was increased and medical school was opened, the function and the structure of hospital changed. The most significant change was that a new medical school building was built, as the nearby buildings were brought. The medical school consisted of the students' dormitory, a chemistry laboratory, and classrooms. Moreover, new functions were added to already-existed hospital building : a contagious ward, a waiting room for outpatients, an eye ward, a darkroom, a room for special diagnosis and treatment, and a vaccination room. Also, from the time when it was first opened, Jejoongwon needed the expansion, as too many patients came in and the medical education was started. Therefore, in the summer of 1886, Allen positively explored ways toward the

  15. Extreme Global Variability in the Middle Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Sandor, B. J.; Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.

    2005-12-01

    Circulation and photochemical behaviors of the Venus middle atmosphere (mesosphere, 65-105 km altitudes) exhibit remarkable temporal variations that are often defined by ground-based studies. Sub-millimeter spectral line observations in particular play an important role in the investigation of the Venus mesosphere due to relatively strong transitions for CO, HDO, SO2, and SO in this wavelength region and the pressure-broadened lineshapes of these absorptions. Venus nightside sub-millimeter 12CO spectra (345 GHz) exhibit very sharp, deep absorption cores which yield excellent temperature weighting functions about the Venus mesopause (Clancy et al., 2003) and maximum sensitivity to Doppler line shifts, a modest 10 m/sec line-of-sight wind is easily detectable in short integration periods (5-10 minutes). An accumulated set of James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations during Venus inferior conjunctions in 2000, 2002, and 2004 provide nightside mapping of Doppler winds, CO and temperatures over the 95-105 km altitude region. The nightside distribution of winds varies over all observed timescales. For periods separated by one week, the Venus nightside global circulation changes character from zonal rotation to subsolar-to-antisolar (SS-AS) flow. On hourly timescales, wind velocities may vary by > 50 m/sec over 3000 km spatial scales. The instantaneous nightside circulation field is extremely asymmetric in latitude and local time. During the June 2004 inferior conjunction of Venus, we also obtained the first detection of mesospheric SO2 and a very sensitive upper limit for SO; indicating Venus mesospheric SO2 abundances roughly twice that predicted by the preferred Venus photochemical model of Yung and DeMore (1982), and an SO2/SO ratio at least 8 times the same model predictions. These departures from the model are probably due in large part to the fixed water vapor abundance of 1 ppmv throughout the Venus mesosphere, employed in the Yung and DeMore model for

  16. Submillimeter Observations of Global Variations in Chemistry and Dynamics in the Venus Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Sandor, B. J.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.

    2005-08-01

    Circulation and photochemical behaviors of the Venus middle atmosphere (mesosphere, 65-105 km altitudes) exhibit remarkable temporal variations that are often defined by ground-based studies. Sub-millimeter spectral line observations in particular play and important role in the investigation of the Venus mesosphere due to relatively strong transitions for CO, HDO, SO2, and SO in the wavelength region and the pressure-broadened lineshapes of these absorptions. Venus nightside sub-millimeter 12CO spectra (345 GHz) exhibit sharp, deep absorption cores that yield excellent temperature weighting functions about the Venus mesopause (Clancy et al., 2003) and maximum sensitivity to Doppler line shifts, a modest 10 m/sec line-of-sight wind is easily detectable in short integrations (5-10 minutes). An accumulated set of James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations during Venus inferior conjunctions in 2000, 2002, and 2004 provide nightside mapping of Doppler winds, CO, and temperatures over the 95-105 km altitude region. The nightside distribution of winds varies over all observed timescales. For periods separated by one week, the Venus nightside global circulation changes character for zonal rotation to subsolar-to-antisolar (SS-AS) flow. On hourly timescales, wind velocities may vary by > 50 m/sec over 3000 km spatial scales. The instantaneous nightside circulation field is extremely asymmetric in latitude and local time. During the June 2004 inferior conjunction of Venus, we also obtained the first detection of mesospheric SO2 and a very sensitive upper limit for SO; indicating Venus mesospheric SO2 abundances roughly twice that predicted by the preferred photochemical model of Yung and DeMore (1982), and an SO2/SO ratio at least 8 times the same model predictions. These departures from the model are probably due in large part to the fixed water vapor abundance of 1 ppmv throughout the Venus mesosphere, employed in the Yung and DeMore model for lack of data. As an

  17. Nitrogen Chemistry in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; Zhang, X.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s atmosphere has evolved over time into its current state through complex photochemical processes (Yung et al. 1984), involving nitrogen (N2), the dominant molecular species in the atmosphere, as well as methane (CH4). It has been proposed that this composition may be analogous to the early Earth’s, as it certainly provides an abundance of hydrocarbons the like from which early life may have arisen (Coustenis & Taylor 1999; Lunine 2005). Recent results from the Cassini spacecraft have greatly improved our knowledge of the current state of Titan’s atmosphere, and measurements made by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) in particular are able to probe the region of interest from 400 km to 1500 km in altitude where much of the photochemistry on Titan occurs (Shemansky et al. 2005, Koskinen et al. 2011). This photochemistry in part converts nitrogen from stable N2 molecules and incorporates it into detectable hydrocarbon products such as HCN, HC3N, and other heavier compounds. Therefore the nitrogen story is of particular interest, and we examine UVIS occultation observations in both the EUV and FUV regions of the spectrum in order to directly retrieve the vertical profiles of N2 in addition to its related hydrocarbon derivatives. Constraints from UVIS on temperature profiles of the upper atmosphere are also examined and compared to current results from the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS), which probes a region above 1000 km altitude in Titan’s atmosphere (Westlake et al. 2011). References: Coustenis, A., and F. Taylor: “Titan: The Earth-Like Moon”. Singapore: World Scientific, 1999. Koskinen, T. T., et al.: “The mesosphere and thermosphere of Titan revealed by Cassini/UVIS stellar occultations”. Icarus, Vol. 216, pp. 507-534, 2011. Lunine, J. I.: “Astrobiology: A Multidisciplinary Approach”. San Francisco, CA: Pearson Addison Wesley, 2005. Shemansky, D. E., et al.: “The Cassini UVIS stellar probe of the Titan atmosphere

  18. Titan's Timescales: Constraints On The Age of The Methane-Supported Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Mandt, K.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere, unique amongst moons in the solar system presents a persistent riddle: how can it survive over geologic time if its methane is being rapidly destroyed by solar radiation and will last only another ~20 Myr? (Yung et al. 1984; Krasnopolsky 2010) Methane, the second most abundant (CH4, 2-6%) atmospheric gas after nitrogen (N2, 98-94%) supports the entire atmosphere via its greenhouse effect (McKay 1991) and total loss of methane could theoretically lead to atmospheric collapse (Lorenz et al. 1997). In this presentation we will review the available evidence constraining methane's prior lifetime in the atmosphere, including (i) isotopic constraints, especially D/H and 12C/13C in CH4 (Nixon et al. 2012; Mandt et al. 2012), 40Ar and 36Ar abundances, and 14N/15N in N2 (Niemann et al. 2010); (ii) the surface hydrocarbon inventory (Lorenz et al. 2008); (iii) the time to chemically produce Titan's CO (Hörst et al. 2008); (iv) the crater retention age of the surface (Neish and Lorenz 2012); (v) interior models (Tobie et al. 2006); (vi) changes in Titan's shape (Choukroun and Sotin 2012). Each of these independent lines of evidence yields a time estimate that, although individually ambiguous, combine to provide context for a cohesive understanding of the history of Titan's methane. We will conclude by summarizing the current constraints on the age of Titan's atmosphere in its present form, and highlight the key remaining challenges and critical measurements and modeling work needed to further refine our understanding of Titan's perplexing atmospheric history. References: Choukroun, M. and Sotin, C., Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L04201, 2012. Hörst, S. M., R. V. Yelle and V. Vuitton, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006, 2008. Krasnopolsky, V. A., Plan. and Space Sci., 58, 1507-1515, 2010. Lorenz, R. D., C. P. McKay and J. I. Lunine, Science, 275, 642-644, 1997. Lorenz, R. D. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02206, 2008. McKay, C. P., J. B. Pollack and R

  19. Technical Knowledge, Cultural Practices and Social Boundaries: Wan-Nan Scholars and the Recasting of Jesuit Astronomy, 1600-1800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ping-Yi.

    Taking four Wan-nan Confucian scholars--Yang Kuang -hsien, Mei Wen-ting, Chiang Yung and Tai Chen--as examples, this dissertation studies how an immigrant Jesuit scientific community built and defended itself in a specialized institutional niche located at the Ch'ing court and how a defeated Chinese scientific tradition successfully survived by occupying a broader cultural space, with the Manchu emperor in between. Special attention is paid to how these four Confucian scholars constructed social boundaries between the Chinese and the Westerners in their astronomical discourses and how they domesticated Western astronomy in order to fit the Chinese cultural conditions situated in the power structure built by the Manchus. This inquiry begins with a brief introduction of Wan-nan and the Wan-nan school. I then discuss how the Jesuits legitimated their knowledge during the Ming -Ch'ing transition, and how Jesuit astronomy was situated within the power nexus between the Confucian literati and the emperors. The next chapter focuses on Yang Kuang-hsien and his challenges to the Jesuits. I examine his strategies and the power structure in which Yang carried out his challenge to the Jesuits. The fourth and fifth chapters investigate how Mei Wen-ting restructured the relationship between Confucianism and astronomy. The former chapter focuses on Mei's social networking and his ambivalence towards the Ming and Ch'ing dynasties, on the one hand, and towards Chinese and Western learning on the other. The latter chapter deals with how Mei Wen-ting recast Chinese astronomical tradition and Confucianism. In the sixth chapter, I will compare the fame of Chiang Yung and Tai Chen in order to demonstrate how astronomy was practiced in evidential studies after Mei Wen-ting, and how evidential studies itself conveyed an ideological construction of the other. Through integrating Western astronomy with indigenous tradition while exorcising the otherness contained within the cultural package

  20. Helical Majorana fermions in d+id'-wave topological superconductivity of doped correlated quantum spin Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chung-Hou; Sun, Shih-Jye; Chang, Yung-Yeh; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Fuchun

    Large Hubbard U limit of the Kane-Mele model on a zigzag ribbon of honeycomb lattice near half-filling is studied via a renormalized mean-field theory. The ground state exhibits time-reversal symmetry (TRS) breaking dx2 -y2 + idxy -wave superconductivity. At large spin-orbit coupling, the Z2 topological phase with non-trivial spin Chern number in the pure Kane-Mele model is persistent into the TRS broken state (called ``spin-Chern phase''), and has two pairs of counter-propagating helical Majorana modes at the edges. As the spin-orbit coupling is reduced, the system undergoes a topological quantum phase transition from the spin-Chern to chiral superconducting states. Possible relevance of our results to adatom-doped graphene and irridate compounds is discussed.Ref.:Shih-Jye Sun, Chung-Hou Chung, Yung-Yeh Chang, Wei-Feng Tsai, and Fu-Chun Zhang, arXiv:1506.02584. CHC acknowledges support from NSC Grant No. 98-2918-I-009-06, No. 98-2112-M-009-010-MY3, the NCTU-CTS, the MOE-ATU program, the NCTS of Taiwan, R.O.C.

  1. Summer fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases N2O, CH4 and CO2 from mangrove soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Chen, G C; Tam, N F Y; Ye, Y

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric fluxes of N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2) from the soil in four mangrove swamps in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, South China were investigated in the summer of 2008. The fluxes ranged from 0.14 to 23.83 micromol m(-2)h(-1), 11.9 to 5168.6 micromol m(-2)h(-1) and 0.69 to 20.56 mmol m(-2)h(-1) for N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2), respectively. Futian mangrove swamp in Shenzhen had the highest greenhouse gas fluxes, followed by Mai Po mangrove in Hong Kong. Sha Kong Tsuen and Yung Shue O mangroves in Hong Kong had similar, low fluxes. The differences in both N(2)O and CH(4) fluxes among different tidal positions, the landward, seaward and bare mudflat, in each swamp were insignificant. The N(2)O and CO(2) fluxes were positively correlated with the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphate, total iron and NH(4)(+)-N contents, as well as the soil porosity. However, only soil NH(4)(+)-N concentration had significant effects on CH(4) fluxes.

  2. Study of Tropospheric Ozone and UV Reflectivity Using TOMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    2002-01-01

    Perhaps the single most important result from the study of Chuang and Yung is that the interannual variability of the Earth's albedo (especially in Spring) on land is dominated by snow/ice, and not by clouds. This interannual variability could be the major driver of changes in the atmosphere and the biosphere. It is plausible that the interannual variability of snow/ice, through interactions with the atmosphere and biosphere, is responsible for the interannual variability of atmospheric CO2. By carefully studying the albedo variations off the Peru coast, we found evidence for indirect aerosol effect on clouds. Based on a detailed analysis of the cloud data obtained by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (SCCP) in the years 1983-1991, we show that besides the reported 3 % variation in global cloudiness, the global mean cloud optical thickness (MCOT) also has significant variation which is out of phase with that of the global cloudiness. The combined effect of the two opposing variations may be a null effect on the cloud reflectivity. These results are consistent with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) reflectively measurements. The MCOT variation is further shown to be correlated with both the solar cycle and the ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) cycle. Our present analysis cannot distinguish which of the above two provides better correlation, although independent data from the High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) from 1990 to 1996 favor the solar cycle. Future data are needed to identify the true cause of these changes.

  3. Mars atmospheric D/H - Consistent with polar volatile theory?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1990-01-01

    Current theories on the Martian water history are discussed on the basis of data for the D/H ratio in the Martian atmosphere (which was found to be enhanced by a factor of 6 + or - relative to the value on earth). In particular, the calculations of Yung et al. (1988), on the basis of their photochemical model, are found to be inconsistent with current theories for the evolution of the polar deposits on Mars. While the photochemical model predicts that about 95 percent of the Martian water has escaped over geologic time and the nonatmospheric reservoir is now only 02 m thick, the polar volatile theory suggest that polar deposits contain the equivalent of tens of meters of water, requiring a more rapid escape of H and D to space than predicted by the photochemical model to match the observed D/H ratio. The paper examines the behavior of the polar caps and the atmospheric water vapor over geologic time and the loss of H and D to space. It is concluded that, at present, it is premature to accept a specific history for water on Mars.

  4. A first application of marine-controlled source method on gas-hydrate study off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Hsu, S.; Chen, C.; Evans, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom simulating reflector (BSR), high methane flux, shallow sulfide/methane interface, fluid gushed from the seafloor, self-carbonate within sediment, methane reef, and self-biome are widely distributed in the offshore of the southwestern Taiwan. These geophysical and geochemistry signatures imply a high gas hydrate reservoir area. However, the upper bound of the gas hydrate and shallow section of the sediment are still unclear. This study shows the results of our first marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey in 2010 and provides the information of shallow sediment around the offshore of southwestern Taiwan. Three target areas were conducted: the southeast of Small Ryukyu Islands (seepage, G96), west of Yung-An Ridge (YAR) and northwest of Good Weather Ridge (GWR). In total, fourteen survey lines have been carried out, and the total survey length is about 72 km. Our preliminary result shows that the resistivity/porosity anomalies within pockmarks and seepages correspond to the features from the sub-bottom profilers. The range of porosity change is 4 % in G96 and YAR sites, while in the GWR site there is up to 8 % of porosity change and implies a high gas hydrate potential area.

  5. Schrödinger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilmister, C. W.

    1989-03-01

    1. Introduction C. W. Kilmister; 2. Boltzmann's influence on Schrödinger Dieter Flamm; 3. Schrödinger's original interpretation of the Schrödinger equation: a rescue attempt Jon Dorling; 4. Are there quantum jumps? J. S. Bell; 5. Square root of minus one, complex phases and Erwin Schrödinger Chen Ning Yung; 6. Consequences of the Schrödinger equation for atomic and molecular physics W. E. Thirring; 7. Molecular dynamics: from H + H, to biomolecules Martin Karplus; 8. Orbital presentation of chemical reactions Kenichi Fukui; 9. Quantum chemistry A. D. Buckingham; 10. Eamon de Valera, Erwin Schrödinger and the Dublin Institute Sir William McCrea; 11. Do bosons condense? J. T. Lewis; 12. Schrödinger's nonlinear optics James McConnell; 13. Schrödinger's unified field theory seen 40 years later O. Hittmair; 14. The Schrödinger equation of the Universe S. W. Hawking; 15. Overview of particle physics A. Salam; 16. Gauge fields, topological defects and cosmology T. W. B. Kibble; 17. Quantum theory and astronomy M. J. Seaton; 18. Schrödinger's contributions to chemistry and biology Linus Pawling; 19. Erwin Schrödinger's What is Life? and molecular biology M. F. Perutz.

  6. Patient motivation and adherence to postsurgery rehabilitation exercise recommendations: the influence of physiotherapists' autonomy-supportive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derwin K; Lonsdale, Chris; Ho, Po Y; Yung, Patrick S; Chan, Kai M

    2009-12-01

    Chan DK, Lonsdale C, Ho PY, Yung PS, Chan KM. Patient motivation and adherence to postsurgery rehabilitation exercise recommendations: the influence of physiotherapists' autonomy-supportive behaviors. To investigate the impact of physiotherapists' autonomy-supportive behaviors on patients' motivation and rehabilitation adherence after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Retrospective study. Outpatient orthopedic clinic of a university medical center. Postsurgery ACL reconstruction patients (N=115; minimum postsurgery interval, 6mo; mean +/- SD postsurgery interval, 1.77+/-0.8y). Not applicable. Questionnaires measuring autonomy support from physiotherapists (Health Care Climate Questionnaire), treatment motivation (Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire), and rehabilitation adherence (adapted from the Sport Injury Rehabilitation Adherence Scale and the Patient Self-Report Scales of Their Home-Based Rehabilitation Adherence). Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that patients' treatment motivation mediated the relationship between physiotherapists' autonomy-supportive behaviors and rehabilitation adherence. Autonomy-supportive behavior positively predicted autonomous treatment motivation (beta=.22, P<.05). Rehabilitation adherence (R(2)=.28) was predicted positively by autonomous motivation (beta=.64, P<.05) and negatively predicted by controlled motivation (beta=-.28, P<.05). These preliminary findings are promising and provide an empirical basis for further research to test the efficacy of autonomy support training designed to increase patients' rehabilitation adherence.

  7. Universal structure motifs in biominerals: a lesson from nature for the efficient design of bioinspired functional materials.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joe; Böhm, Corinna F; Wolf, Stephan E

    2017-08-06

    Biominerals are typically indispensable structures for their host organism in which they serve varying functions, such as mechanical support and protection, mineral storage, detoxification site, or as a sensor or optical guide. In this perspective article, we highlight the occurrence of both structural diversity and uniformity within these biogenic ceramics. For the first time, we demonstrate that the universality-diversity paradigm, which was initially introduced for proteins by Buehler et al. (Cranford & Buehler 2012 Biomateriomics; Cranford et al. 2013 Adv. Mater.25, 802-824 (doi:10.1002/adma.201202553); Ackbarow & Buehler 2008 J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci.5, 1193-1204 (doi:10.1166/jctn.2008.001); Buehler & Yung 2009 Nat. Mater.8, 175-188 (doi:10.1038/nmat2387)), is also valid in the realm of biomineralization. A nanogranular composite structure is shared by most biominerals which rests on a common, non-classical crystal growth mechanism. The nanogranular composite structure affects various properties of the macroscale biogenic ceramic, a phenomenon we attribute to emergence. Emergence, in turn, is typical for hierarchically organized materials. This is a clear call to renew comparative studies of even distantly related biomineralizing organisms to identify further universal design motifs and their associated emergent properties. Such universal motifs with emergent macro-scale properties may represent an unparalleled toolbox for the efficient design of bioinspired functional materials.

  8. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of Venus SO sub 2 and SO

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Chan Y.; Esposito, L.W.; Skinner, T.E. )

    1990-05-20

    Results of recent International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of Venus made on January 20, 1987, and April 2 and 3, 1988, along with a reanalysis of the 1979 observations (Conway et al., 1979) are presented. The observations indicate that the amount of sulfur dioxide at the cloud tops of Venus declined by a factor of 8 {plus minus} 4 from 3809 {plus minus} 70 ppb in 1987 and 1988. These values are consistent with the Pioneer Venus results (L.W. Esposito, A recalibration of the solar flux for Pioneer Venus results and a comparison of existing SO{sub 2} measurements on Venus, unpublished manuscript, 1989). The authors identify absorption features of sulfur monoxide for the first time, and estimate the SO mixing ratio above the cloud level is 20 {plus minus} 10 ppb for 1979. This is consistent with photochemical models by Winick and Stewart (1980) and Yung and DeMore (1982) and with the upper limit from Wilson et al. (1981).

  9. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  10. Formation of C-N-Si Film for Interlayer of Hard Material Coating by Pulsed Discharge Plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nitride (C-N) and Si added C-N (C-N-Si) films were deposited on SKD61 steel plate by pulsed discharge (PD) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD). When the films were deposited with N2 and H2 diluted CH4 source gases, the deposition rate increased and the hardness decreased with increasing CH4 concentration. By means of adding mono-methyl-silane (MMS) gas to the source gases, the C-N-Si film having high hardness of 10 GPa and low Yung's modulus of 80 GPa could be deposited. The FT-IR spectrum of the films showed a peak of graphitic ring and peaks of terminating with H and N were observed. Raman spectra showed D and G peaks at around 1350 and 1590 cm-1, respectively. The intensity of D peak compared to G peak decreased when MMS was added. Ball on disk test of the C-N-Si film against SUJ2 ball showed the friction coefficient was about 0.2. These results shows that the C-N-Si film having high hardness and low Young's modulus, which is suitable for interlayer of hard film coating, can deposit by the PD plasma CVD, and suggest that the film is composed of fullerene-like structure which forms resilient and fracture tough materials.

  11. 2D-4D correspondence: Towers of kinks versus towers of monopoles in N=2 theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolokhov, Pavel A.; Shifman, Mikhail; Yung, Alexei

    2012-04-01

    We continue to study the BPS spectrum of the N=(2,2) CPN-1 model with the ZN-symmetric twisted mass terms. We focus on analysis of the “extra” towers found previously in [P. A. Bolokhov, M. Shifman, and A. Yung, arXiv:1104.5241], and compare them to the states that can be identified in the quasiclassical domain. Exact analysis of the strong-coupling states shows that not all of them survive when passing to the weak-coupling domain. Some of the states decay on the curves of the marginal stability. Thus, not all strong-coupling states can be analytically continued to weak coupling to match the observable bound states. At weak coupling, we confirm the existence of bound states of topologically charged kinks and elementary quanta. Quantization of the U(1) kink modulus leads to formation of towers of such states. For the ZN-symmetric twisted masses their number is by far less than N-1 as was conjectured previously. We investigate the quasiclassical limit and show that out of N possible towers only two survive in the spectrum for odd N, and a single tower for even N. In the case of CP2 theory the related curves of the marginal stability are discussed in detail. In these points we overlap and completely agree with the results of Dorey and Petunin. We also comment on 2D-4D correspondence.

  12. The Validity of the 16-Item Version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ-16) to Screen for Ultra High Risk of Developing Psychosis in the General Help-Seeking Population

    PubMed Central

    Ising, Helga K.; Veling, Wim; Loewy, Rachel L.; Rietveld, Marleen W.; Rietdijk, Judith; Dragt, Sara; Klaassen, Rianne M. C.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Wunderink, Lex; Linszen, Don H.; van der Gaag, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In order to bring about implementation of routine screening for psychosis risk, a brief version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ; Loewy et al., 2005) was developed and tested in a general help-seeking population. We assessed a consecutive patient sample of 3533 young adults who were help-seeking for nonpsychotic disorders at the secondary mental health services in the Hague with the PQ. We performed logistic regression analyses and CHi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision tree analysis to shorten the original 92 items. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the psychometric properties of the PQ-16. In the general help-seeking population, a cutoff score of 6 or more positively answered items on the 16-item version of the PQ produced correct classification of Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State (Yung et al., 2005) psychosis risk/clinical psychosis in 44% of the cases, distinguishing Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS) diagnosis from no CAARMS diagnosis with high sensitivity (87%) and specificity (87%). These results were comparable to the PQ-92. The PQ-16 is a good self-report screen for use in secondary mental health care services to select subjects for interviewing for psychosis risk. The low number of items makes it quite appropriate for screening large help-seeking populations, thus enhancing the feasibility of detection and treatment of ultra high-risk patients in routine mental health services. PMID:22516147

  13. Conflict Aversion: Preference for Ambiguity vs Conflict in Sources and Evidence.

    PubMed

    Smithson

    1999-09-01

    This research investigates preferences and judgments under ambiguous vs conflicting information. Three studies provided evidence for two major hypotheses: (1) Conflicting messages from two equally believable sources are dispreferred in general to two informatively equivalent, ambiguous, but agreeing messages from the same sources (i.e., conflict aversion); and (2) conflicting sources are perceived as less credible than ambiguous sources. Studies 2 and 3 yielded evidence for two framing effects. First, when the outcome was negative, subjects' preferences were nearly evenly split between conflict and ambiguity, whereas a positive outcome produced marked conflict aversion. Second, a high probability of a negative outcome or a low probability of a positive one induced conflict preference. However, no framing effects were found for source credibility judgments. Study 3 also investigated whether subject identification with a source might affect preferences or credibility judgments, but found no evi dence for such an effect. The findings suggest cognitive and moti vational explanations for conflict aversion as distinct from ambi guity aversion. The cognitive heuristic is that conflict raises suspicions about whether the sources are trustworthy or credi ble. The motivational explanation stems from that idea that if sources disagree, then the judge not only becomes uncertain but also must disagree with at least one of the sources, whereas if the sources agree then the judge may agree with them and only has to bear the uncertainty. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. NASA Tech Briefs, July 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Topics covered include: Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module; "Smart" Sensor Module; Portable Apparatus for Electrochemical Sensing of Ethylene; Increasing Linear Dynamic Range of a CMOS Image Sensor; Flight Qualified Micro Sun Sensor; Norbornene-Based Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Cells; Making Single-Source Precursors of Ternary Semiconductors; Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells; Mo/Ti Diffusion Bonding for Making Thermoelectric Devices; Photodetectors on Coronagraph Mask for Pointing Control; High-Energy-Density, Low-Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells; G4-FETs as Universal and Programmable Logic Gates; Fabrication of Buried Nanochannels From Nanowire Patterns; Diamond Smoothing Tools; Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function; Rarefying Spectra of Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators; Large-Area Permanent-Magnet ECR Plasma Source; Slot-Antenna/Permanent-Magnet Device for Generating Plasma; Fiber-Optic Strain Gauge With High Resolution And Update Rate; Broadband Achromatic Telecentric Lens; Temperature-Corrected Model of Turbulence in Hot Jet Flows; Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation; Automated Knowledge Discovery From Simulators; Electro-Optical Modulator Bias Control Using Bipolar Pulses; Generative Representations for Automated Design of Robots; Mars-Approach Navigation Using In Situ Orbiters; Efficient Optimization of Low-Thrust Spacecraft Trajectories; Cylindrical Asymmetrical Capacitors for Use in Outer Space; Protecting Against Faults in JPL Spacecraft; Algorithm Optimally Allocates Actuation of a Spacecraft; and Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets.

  15. Comparison of a Simple Patched Conic Trajectory Code to Commercially Available Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    AndersonPark, Brooke M.; Wright, Henry S.

    2007-01-01

    Often in spaceflight proposal development, mission designers must eva luate numerous trajectories as different design factors are investiga ted. Although there are numerous commercial software packages availab le to help develop and analyze trajectories, most take a significant amount of time to develop the trajectory itself, which isn't effectiv e when working on proposals. Thus a new code, PatCon, which is both q uick and easy to use, was developed to aid mission designers to condu ct trade studies on launch and arrival times for any given target pla net. The code is able to run quick analyses, due to the incorporation of the patched conic approximation, to determine the trajectory. PatCon provides a simple but accurate approximation of the four body moti on problem that would be needed to solve any planetary trajectory. P atCon has been compared to a patched conic test case for verification, with limited validation or comparison with other COTS software. This paper describes the patched conic technique and its implementation i n PatCon. A description of the results and comparison of PatCon to ot her more evolved codes such as AGI#s Satellite Tool Kit and JAQAR As trodynamics# Swingby Calculator is provided. The results will include percent differences in values such as C3 numbers, and Vinfinity at a rrival, and other more subjective results such as the time it takes to build the simulation, and actual calculation time.

  16. Mutational analysis and overproduction effects of MotX, an essential component for motor function of Na+-driven polar flagella of Vibrio.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2016-10-25

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor complex composed of various proteins. The motor contains a central rod, multiple ring-like structures and stators. The Na(+)-driven polar flagellar motor of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus has a specific ring, called the 'T-ring', which consists of two periplasmic proteins, MotX and MotY. The T-ring is essential for assembly of the torque-generating unit, the PomA/PomB stator complex, into the motor. To investigate the role of the T-ring for motor function, we performed random mutagenesis of the motX gene on a plasmid. The isolated MotX mutants showed nonmotile, slow-motile, and up-motile phenotypes by the expression from the plasmid. Deletion analysis indicated that the C-terminal region and the signal peptide in MotX are not always essential for flagellar motor function. We also found that overproduction of MotX caused the delay of growth and aberrant cell shape. MotX might have unexpected roles not only in flagellar motor function but also in cell morphology control.

  17. Aging behavior and mechanical properties of maraging steels in the presence of submicrocrystalline Laves phase particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, A.; Ghavidel, M.R. Zamanzad; Nedjad, S. Hossein; Heidarzadeh, A.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2011-10-15

    Cold rolling and annealing of homogenized Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels resulted in the formation of submicrocrystalline Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Ti) Laves phase particles. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile and hardness tests were used to study the microstructure, aging behavior and mechanical properties of the annealed steels. The annealed microstructures showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor tensile ductility was obtained after substantial age hardening in the specimens with 2% and 4% chromium. Increasing chromium addition up to 6% toughened the aged microstructure at the expense of the fracture stress by increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. The Laves phase particles acted as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation. - Highlights: {yields} Laves phases dispersed in a BCC iron matrix by annealing of cold rolled samples. {yields} The samples showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. {yields} Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor ductility was obtained after age hardening. {yields} Increasing chromium addition toughened the aged microstructure. {yields} Laves phase particles acting as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation.

  18. Visualization of bacterial flagella dynamics in a viscous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jamel; Kim, Minjun

    2016-11-01

    We report on the dynamics of tethered bacterial flagella in an applied viscous shear flow and analyze their behavior using image processing. Flagellin proteins were repolymerized into flagellar filaments functionalized with biotin at their proximal end, and allowed to self-assemble within a micro channel coated with streptavidin. It was observed that all attached flagellar filaments aligned with the steady shear flow of various polymeric solutions. Furthermore it was observed that many of the filaments were stretched, and at elevated flow rates began to undergo polymorphic transformations, which were initiated at one end of the flagellum. When undergoing a change to a different helical form the flagellum was observed to transform to an oppositely handed helix, as to counteract the viscous torque imparted by the shear flow. It was also observed that some flagellar filaments did not undergo polymorphic transformations, but rotated about their helical axis. The rate of this rotation appears to be a function of the applied flow rate. These results expand on previous experimental work and aid in the development of a novel platform that harnesses the autonomic response of a 'forest' of bacterial flagella for engineering applications. This work was funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1000255, KEIT MOTIE Grant No. 10052980, and with Government support under and awarded by DoD, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a.

  19. Documentation & Condition Mapping for Restoration & Revitalisation of Historic Sheesh Mahal & Char Bagh Complex in Patiala (punjab), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, S.

    2017-08-01

    Located in the Northern State of Punjab, the historic city of Patiala has always been a centre of culture in north India, and has seen the evolution of its own distinct style of architecture with Rajput and Mughal influences. The city is renowned for its rich architectural heritage, Music, Craft, Sports and Cuisine. The fourth Maharaja Narinder Singh was a great patron of art, architecture and music and it was during his time that several palaces like the Moti Bagh Palace, Sheesh Mahal and Banasur Bagh were designed followed by Baradari Palace. Later it was Maharaja Bhupinder Singh (1900-1938) who made Patiala State famous with his lavish lifestyle.This paper describes the process followed for Documentation and condition assessment of the historic Sheesh Mahal & Char Bagh Complex in order to restore and revitalise the palace building and the Mughal garden. The exercise included Archival research, Field surveys, Condition Mapping, inventories using traditional methods as well as GIS and preparation of restoration & conservation solutions along with post conservation management manual. The Major challenges encountered were identifying the correct documentation methodology for mapping as well as managing the large database generated on site. The Documentation and Mapping was used as a significant tool to guide towards the conservation and Management strategy of the complex.

  20. "Tinni" Rice ( Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Production: An Integrated Sociocultural Agroecosystem in Eastern Uttar Pradesh of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjay K.; Turner, Nancy J.; Pandey, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports how Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and informal cultural institutions have conserved key varieties of the wildgrowing rice, ` tinni' (red rice, or brownbeard rice, Oriza rufipogon Griff.), within the Bhar community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was conducted, using conventional and participatory methods, in 10 purposively selected Bhar villages. Two distinct varieties of tinni (` tinni patali' and ` tinni moti') with differing habitats and phenotypic characters were identified. Seven microecosystems (Kari, Badaila, Chammo, Karmol, Bhainsiki, Bhainsala and Khodailia) were found to support these varieties in differing proportions. Tinni rice can withstand more extreme weather conditions (the highest as well as lowest temperatures and rainfall regimes) than the `genetically improved' varieties of rice ( Oriza sativa L.) grown in the region. Both tinni varieties are important bioresources for the Bhar's subsistence livelihoods, and they use distinctive conservation approaches in their maintenance. Bhar women are the main custodians of tinni rice agrobiodiversity, conserving tinni through an institution called Sajha. Democratic decision-making at meetings organized by village elders determines the market price of the tinni varieties. Overall, the indigenous institutions and women's participation seem to have provided safeguards from excessive exploitation of tinni rice varieties. The maintenance of tinni through cultural knowledge and institutions serves as an example of the importance of locally maintained crop varieties in contributing to people's resilience and food security in times of rapid social and environmental change.

  1. Free-surface turbulent wake of a surface-piercing slender body at various Froude numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeonghwa; Samad, Abdus; Rhee, Shin Hyung

    2016-11-01

    Free-surface effects on the near-wake around a surface-piercing slender body were investigated through flow field and wave elevation measurements. The near-wake flow field was measured by a towed underwater stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) system. The measured flow field was analyzed to obtain coherent turbulence structures by using the Reynolds and proper orthogonal decomposition methods. Three different Froude numbers (Fr) - 0.126, 0.282, and 0.400 - were selected to represent mild, intermediate, and violent free-surface motions. At Fr = 0.126, the wave was hardly visible, although the turbulence strength and isotropy increased near the free-surface. At Fr = 0.282, though it was steady and smooth, wave-induced separation was clearly observed near the juncture of the free-surface and model trailing edge. At Fr = 0.400, wave breaking and the resulting bubbly free-surface were developed with an expanded wave-induced separation region. The wave-induced separation stimulated momentum transfer and turbulence dissipation, resulting in a significant change in the frequency of dominant free-surface motion in the downstream. This research was supported by the IT R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT (Grant No. 100660329) and the National Research Foundation of Korea, Grant funded by the Korean government (Grant No. 2013R1A1A2012597).

  2. Isolation of Vibrio alginolyticus sodium-driven flagellar motor complex composed of PomA and PomB solubilized by sucrose monocaprate.

    PubMed

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Kojima, Masaru; Homma, Michio

    2004-04-01

    The polar flagella of Vibrio alginolyticus have sodium-driven motors, and four membrane proteins, PomA, PomB, MotX and MotY, are essential for torque generation of the motor. PomA and PomB are believed to form a sodium-conducting channel. This paper reports the purification of the motor complex by using sucrose monocaprate, a non-ionic detergent, to solubilize the complex. Plasmid pKJ301, which encodes intact PomA, and PomB tagged with a C-terminal hexahistidine that does not interfere with PomB function, was constructed. The membrane fraction of cells transformed with pKJ301 was solubilized with sucrose monocaprate, and the solubilized materials were applied to a Ni-NTA column. The imidazole eluate contained both PomA and PomB, which were further purified by anion-exchange chromatography. Gel-filtration chromatography was used to investigate the apparent molecular size of the complex; the PomA/PomB complex was eluted as approx. 900 kDa and PomB alone was eluted as approx. 260 kDa. These findings suggest that the motor complex may have a larger structure than previously assumed.

  3. A Modified Normalization Technique for Frequency-Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Jeong, G.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Heo, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique to estimate subsurface material properties minimizing the misfit function built with residuals between field and modeled data. To achieve computational efficiency, FWI has been performed in the frequency domain by carrying out modeling in the frequency domain, whereas observed data (time-series data) are Fourier-transformed.One of the main drawbacks of seismic FWI is that it easily gets stuck in local minima because of lacking of low-frequency data. To compensate for this limitation, damped wavefields are used, as in the Laplace-domain waveform inversion. Using damped wavefield in FWI plays a role in generating low-frequency components and help recover long-wavelength structures. With these newly generated low-frequency components, we propose a modified frequency-normalization technique, which has an effect of boosting contribution of low-frequency components to model parameter update.In this study, we introduce the modified frequency-normalization technique which effectively amplifies low-frequency components of damped wavefields. Our method is demonstrated for synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning(KETEP) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy(MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea (No. 20168510030830) and by the Dual Use Technology Program, granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea.

  4. Specificity of motor components in the dual flagellar system of Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32.

    PubMed

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian; Held, Susanne; Windel, Natalie; Paulick, Anja; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai M

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are intricate nanomachines in which the stator units and rotor component FliM may be dynamically exchanged during function. Similar to other bacterial species, the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32 possesses a complete secondary flagellar system along with a corresponding stator unit. Expression of the secondary system occurs during planktonic growth in complex media and leads to the formation of a subpopulation with one or more additional flagella at random positions in addition to the primary polar system. We used physiological and phenotypic characterizations of defined mutants in concert with fluorescent microscopy on labelled components of the two different systems, the stator proteins PomB and MotB, the rotor components FliM(1) and FliM(2), and the auxiliary motor components MotX and MotY, to determine localization, function and dynamics of the proteins in the flagellar motors. The results demonstrate that the polar flagellum is driven by a Na(+)-dependent FliM(1)/PomAB/MotX/MotY flagellar motor while the secondary system is rotated by a H(+)-dependent FliM(2)/MotAB motor. The components were highly specific for their corresponding motor and are unlikely to be extensively swapped or shared between the two flagellar systems under planktonic conditions. The results have implications for both specificity and dynamics of flagellar motor components. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  6. Influence of plasma molybdenizing and shot-peening on fretting damage behavior of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chang-bin; Liu, Dao-xin; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Qin, Lin; Liu, Cheng-song

    2016-12-01

    Effect of plasma molybdenizing and shot-peening on fretting wear and fretting fatigue behaviors of Ti6Al4V alloy was investigated. The plasma molybdenized layer composed of a dense molybdenum deposition layer and a Mo-Ti solid-solution layer can increase surface hardness by 2.8 times and cause its volume loss by fretting wear to decrease to 1/14 compared with that of the substrate. Plasma molybdenized treatment results in a significant decrease in resistance of the substrate to fretting fatigue. It is ascribed that the molybdenized layer with high hardness yields a low toughness, and its high surface roughness leads to a micro-notched effect. However, proper combination plasma molybdenizing and subsequent shot-peening may enhance the simultaneous fretting fatigue and fretting wear resistance of Ti6Al4V significantly, which can decrease the fretting wear volume loss to 1/27, and may increase the fretting fatigue life by more than 69 times. A synergistic improvement in fretting fatigue of the titanium alloy by combining surface alloying with shot-peening can be achieved. The results indicate that a beneficial residual compressive stress distribution, high surface hardness with suitable hardness gradient distribution, good apparent toughness, relatively low surface roughness, and excellent surface integrity are achieved.

  7. "Tinni" rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) production: an integrated sociocultural agroecosystem in eastern Uttar Pradesh of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjay K; Turner, Nancy J; Pandey, C B

    2012-01-01

    This study reports how Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and informal cultural institutions have conserved key varieties of the wildgrowing rice, 'tinni' (red rice, or brownbeard rice, Oriza rufipogon Griff.), within the Bhar community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was conducted, using conventional and participatory methods, in 10 purposively selected Bhar villages. Two distinct varieties of tinni ('tinni patali' and 'tinni moti') with differing habitats and phenotypic characters were identified. Seven microecosystems (Kari, Badaila, Chammo, Karmol, Bhainsiki, Bhainsala and Khodailia) were found to support these varieties in differing proportions. Tinni rice can withstand more extreme weather conditions (the highest as well as lowest temperatures and rainfall regimes) than the 'genetically improved' varieties of rice (Oriza sativa L.) grown in the region. Both tinni varieties are important bioresources for the Bhar's subsistence livelihoods, and they use distinctive conservation approaches in their maintenance. Bhar women are the main custodians of tinni rice agrobiodiversity, conserving tinni through an institution called Sajha. Democratic decision-making at meetings organized by village elders determines the market price of the tinni varieties. Overall, the indigenous institutions and women's participation seem to have provided safeguards from excessive exploitation of tinni rice varieties. The maintenance of tinni through cultural knowledge and institutions serves as an example of the importance of locally maintained crop varieties in contributing to people's resilience and food security in times of rapid social and environmental change.

  8. The FlgT Protein Is Involved in Aeromonas hydrophila Polar Flagella Stability and Not Affects Anchorage of Lateral Flagella.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila sodium-driven polar flagellum has a complex stator-motor. Consist of two sets of redundant and non-exchangeable proteins (PomA/PomB and PomA2/PomB2), which are homologs to other sodium-conducting polar flagellum stator motors; and also two essential proteins (MotX and MotY), that they interact with one of those two redundant pairs of proteins and form the T-ring. In this work, we described an essential protein for polar flagellum stability and rotation which is orthologs to Vibrio spp. FlgT and it is encoded outside of the A. hydrophila polar flagellum regions. The flgT was present in all mesophilic Aeromonas strains tested and also in the non-motile Aeromonas salmonicida. The A. hydrophila ΔflgT mutant is able to assemble the polar flagellum but is more unstable and released into the culture supernatant from the cell upon completion assembly. Presence of FlgT in purified polar hook-basal bodies (HBB) of wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting and electron microscopy observations showed an outer ring of the T-ring (H-ring) which is not present in the ΔflgT mutant. Anchoring and motility of proton-driven lateral flagella was not affected in the ΔflgT mutant and specific antibodies did not detect FlgT in purified lateral HBB of wild type strain.

  9. The FlgT Protein Is Involved in Aeromonas hydrophila Polar Flagella Stability and Not Affects Anchorage of Lateral Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila sodium-driven polar flagellum has a complex stator-motor. Consist of two sets of redundant and non-exchangeable proteins (PomA/PomB and PomA2/PomB2), which are homologs to other sodium-conducting polar flagellum stator motors; and also two essential proteins (MotX and MotY), that they interact with one of those two redundant pairs of proteins and form the T-ring. In this work, we described an essential protein for polar flagellum stability and rotation which is orthologs to Vibrio spp. FlgT and it is encoded outside of the A. hydrophila polar flagellum regions. The flgT was present in all mesophilic Aeromonas strains tested and also in the non-motile Aeromonas salmonicida. The A. hydrophila ΔflgT mutant is able to assemble the polar flagellum but is more unstable and released into the culture supernatant from the cell upon completion assembly. Presence of FlgT in purified polar hook-basal bodies (HBB) of wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting and electron microscopy observations showed an outer ring of the T-ring (H-ring) which is not present in the ΔflgT mutant. Anchoring and motility of proton-driven lateral flagella was not affected in the ΔflgT mutant and specific antibodies did not detect FlgT in purified lateral HBB of wild type strain. PMID:27507965

  10. Novel co-enrichment method for isolation of magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorty, Ajay M; Shaikh, Nasir R

    2015-04-01

    A novel co-enrichment technique was designed for enrichment of magnetotactic bacteria from soil, water, and sediments. Delayed addition of iron uptake inducer and the iron source proved amenable to induce magnetosome synthesis by MTB followed by their separation from consortium using magnetic flux. We successfully enriched and isolated both North seeking as well as South seeking magnetotactic bacteria from Lonar Lake (Buldhana), Moti Lake (Jalna), Ghanewadi Lake (Jalna), Ganesh Lake (Miraj), Rankala Lake (Kolhapur), and industrial metal-contaminated glaying soils (Jalna) and a soil (Karad), (MS, India) exposed to high-voltage electric current. The hanging drop preparations and growth under magnetic stress on low-agar media allowed conformation of magnetotactic behavior of the isolates. Both Gram positive and Gram negative MTB were isolated with diverse morphologies. South seeking population was more predominant. The soil inhabitants showed little dwelling property which was more prominent in case of aquatic inhabitants. The use of in situ pH and salt concentrations during enrichment and isolation found suited. The simultaneous growth of whole consortium in the system ensured the in situ simulation of microenvironment needful for proper growth of fastidious MTB.

  11. S3 and S4 abundances and improved chemical kinetic model for the lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing ratios of S3 and S4 are obtained from reanalysis of the spectra of true absorption in the visible range retrieved by Maiorov et al. (Maiorov, B.S. et al. [2005]. Solar Syst. Res. 39, 267-282) from the Venera 11 observations. These mixing ratios are fS3 = 11 ± 3 ppt at 3-10 km and 18 ± 3 ppt at 10-19 km, fS4 = 4 ± 4 ppt at 3-10 km and 6 ± 2 ppt at 10-19 km, and show a steep decrease in both S3 and S4 above 19 km. Photolysis rates of S3 and S4 at various altitudes are calculated using the Venera 11 spectra and constant photolysis yields as free parameters. The chemical kinetic model for the Venus lower atmosphere (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2007]. Icarus 191, 25-37) has been improved by inclusion of the S4 cycle from Yung et al. (Yung, Y.L. et al. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00B34), reduction of the H2SO4 and CO fluxes at the upper boundary of 47 km by a factor of 4 in accord with the recent photochemical models for the middle atmosphere, by using a closed lower boundary for OCS instead of a free parameter for this species at the surface, and some minor updates. Our model with the S4 cycle but without the SO3 + 2 OCS reaction suggested by Krasnopolsky and Pollack (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Pollack, J.B. [1994]. Icarus 109, 58-78) disagrees with the observations of OCS, CO, S3, and S4. However, inclusion of the S4 cycle improves the model fit to all observational constraints. The best-fit activation energy of 7800 K for thermolysis of S4 supports the S4 enthalpy from Mills (Mills, K.C. [1974]. Thermodynamic Data for Inorganic Sulfides, Selenides and Tellurides. Butterworths, London). Chemistry of the Venus lower atmosphere is initiated by disequilibrium products H2SO4 and CO from the middle atmosphere, photolysis of S3 and S4, and thermochemistry in the lowest scale height. The chemistry is mostly driven by sulfur that is formed in a slow reaction SO + SO, produces OCS, and results in dramatic changes in abundances of OCS, CO, and free sulfur allotropes. The SX + OCS

  12. SOIR/VEX mesospheric aerosols observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilquet, Valérie; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Drummond, Rachel; Mahieux, Arnaud; Robert, Séverine; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2013-04-01

    , A. Mahieux, A.A. Fedorova, O.I. Korablev., E. Marcq, Y.L. Yung, X. Zhang. Icarus, 217, 740-751 (2012). Sandor, B.J., R.T. Clancy, G. Moriarty-Schieven, F.P. Mills. Icarus, 208, 49-60 (2010). Wilquet, V., A. Fedorova, F. Montmessin, R. Drummond, A. Mahieux, A.C. Vandaele, E. Villard, O. Korablev, and J.-L. Bertaux. J. Geophys. Res., 114 (E00B42), doi:10.1029/2008JE003186 (2009). Wilquet, V., R. Drummond, A. Mahieux, S. Robert, A.C. Vandaele, J.-L. Bertaux. Icarus 217, 875-881 (2012). Zhang, X., M. Chang Liang, F.P. Mills, D.A. Belyaev, Y.L. Yung. Icarus, 217, 714-739 (2012).

  13. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  14. Relating sulfate and methane dynamics to geology: Accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Dale, Andrew W.; Wallmann, Klaus; Haeckel, Matthias; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Chen, Nai-Chen; Chen, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-Wen; Lin, Saulwood; Sun, Chih-Hsien; You, Chen-Feng; Horng, Chorng-Shern; Wang, Yunshuen; Chung, San-Hsiung

    2013-07-01

    Geochemical data (CH4, SO42-, I-, Cl-, particulate organic carbon (POC), δ13C-CH4, and δ13C-CO2) are presented from the upper 30 m of marine sediment on a tectonic submarine accretionary wedge offshore southwest Taiwan. The sampling stations covered three ridges (Tai-Nan, Yung-An, and Good Weather), each characterized by bottom simulating reflectors, acoustic turbidity, and different types of faulting and anticlines. Sulfate and iodide concentrations varied little from seawater-like values in the upper 1-3 m of sediment at all stations; a feature that is consistent with irrigation of seawater by gas bubbles rising through the soft surface sediments. Below this depth, sulfate was rapidly consumed within 5-10 m by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition. Carbon isotopic data imply a mainly biogenic methane source. A numerical transport-reaction model was used to identify the supply pathways of methane and estimate depth-integrated turnover rates at the three ridges. Methane gas ascending from deep layers, facilitated by thrusts and faults, was by far the dominant term in the methane budget at all sites. Differences in the proximity of the sampling sites to the faults and anticlines mainly accounted for the variability in gas fluxes and depth-integrated AOM rates. By comparison, methane produced in situ by POC degradation within the modeled sediment column was unimportant. This study demonstrates that the geochemical trends in the continental margins offshore SW Taiwan are closely related to the different geological settings.

  15. Coupled Sulfur and Chlorine Chemistry in Venus' Upper Cloud Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Franklin P.

    2006-09-01

    Venus' atmosphere likely contains a rich variety of sulfur and chlorine compounds because HCl, SO2, and OCS have all been observed. Photodissociation of CO2 and SO2 in the upper cloud layer produces oxygen which can react directly or indirectly with SO2 to form SO3 and eventually H2SO4. Photodissociation of HCl within and above the upper cloud layer produces chlorine which can react with CO and O2 to form ClCO and ClC(O)OO. These two species have been identified as potentially critical intermediaries in the production of CO2. Much less work has been done on the potential coupling between sulfur and chlorine chemistry that may occur within the upper cloud layer. Several aspects have been examined in recent modeling: (1) linkage of the CO2 and sulfur oxidation cycles (based on ideas from Yung and DeMore, 1982), (2) reaction of Cl with SO2 to form ClSO2 (based on ideas from DeMore et al., 1985), and (3) the chemistry of SmCln for m,n = 1,2 (based on preliminary work in Mills, 1998). Initial results suggest the chemistry of SmCln may provide a pathway for accelerated production of polysulfur, Sx, if the oxygen abundance in the upper cloud layer is as small as is implied by the observational limit on O2 (Trauger and Lunine, 1983). Initial results also suggest that ClSO2 can act as a buffer which helps increase the scale height of SO2 and decrease the rate of production of H2SO4. This presentation will describe the results from this modeling; discuss their potential implications for the CO2, sulfur oxidation, and polysulfur cycles; and outline key observations from Venus Express that can help resolve existing questions concerning the chemistry of Venus' upper cloud. Partial funding for this research was provided by the Australian Research Council.

  16. Molecular level models for CO{sub 2} sorption in nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A.; Ravikovitch, P.I.; Neimark, A.V,

    1999-12-07

    Adsorption of carbon dioxide in slit-shaped carbon micropores at 273 K has been studied by means of the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory (NLDFT). Three molecular models of CO{sub 2} have been used. Long-run GCMC simulations were performed with the three-center model of Harris and Yung. For NLDFT calculations, the authors developed an effective Lennard-Jones (LJ) model. GCMC simulations of the effective LJ model of CO{sub 2} have been performed for comparison. For each model used, parameters of intermolecular potentials have been determined and validated against two-phase bulk equilibrium data and experimental adsorption isotherms on graphite at 273 and 195 K. In the range of pore widths from 3 to 15 {angstrom}, the NLDFT isotherms of CO{sub 2} adsorption are overall in a satisfactory agreement with the GCMC isotherms generated using the three-center model. Some deviations have been observed between 6.5 and 8.5 {angstrom}, where the adsorbate undergoes a transition from a single-layer to a two-layer structure. The models developed are recommended for studying carbon dioxide adsorption in microporous adsorbents and also for calculating pore size distributions in carbonaceous materials and soil particles. The NLDFT model has the advantage of being much less computationally demanding, whereas the three-center GCMC model serves as a benchmark for quantitative estimates and can be used for studying CO{sub 2} sorption at ambient conditions close to the critical temperature.

  17. Observations of Altitude Dependence and Temporal Variation of ClO in the Venus Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Brad J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the first observations of ClO in the Venus mesosphere indicate ClO is present above 85 +/-3 km altitude and not below. The retrieved nightside mean abundances show a factor of 2 decrease between observation dates Oct. 23 and Nov. 11, 2015, with change between the two dates evident at more than two sigma confidence. Abundances and altitude distributions are retrieved from submm spectroscopic observations of the 352.88 GHz line of 35ClO (made with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope - JCMT - located an Mauna Kea, Hawaii).Detection of ClO in the Venus atmosphere confirms a theory put forward by Yung and DeMore (1982) that the Venus atmosphere is stabilized as CO2 due to chlorine catalytic recombination of CO and O. (Without some form of catalysis, the Venus atmosphere would have 10s of percent CO and O2, but it is in fact 97% CO2 and 3% N2, with only trace amounts of CO and O2.) Detailed retrieval of ClO abundances and altitude distributions (the focus of this talk) provides greater insight to the catalytic process, and to other aspects of Venus atmospheric chlorine chemistry. We compare findings of our quantitave retrieval with predictions of photochemical models, and discuss the implications for chlorine photochemisty of the Venus atmosphere. We also discuss retrieved ClO temporal variation with that of upper mesospheric HCl (Sandor and Clancy, 2012).[We acknowledge funding of this project by NASA grants NNX10AB33G, NNX12AI32G, and NNX14AK05G, as well as NSF grant AST-1312985.

  18. Hydrogen in biogas and its impact to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Laukenmann, S.; Stams, A. J. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    The shortage and increase in cost of fossil fuels leads to an increased interest in renewable energy sources. One important renewable energy source is biogas, produced by fermentation of organic material. During the last ten years the number of biogas plants has continuously increased and it is expected to increase further. Biogas is a mixture of mainly methane and carbon dioxide but contains also molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogen content of biogas depends on the used substrate and the production process. Hydrogen is also produced by conversion of biogas. Although hydrogen is considered as one of the most important future energy carriers, little is known about the global biogeochemical cycle of this trace gas (Rhee et al. 2006) and its impact to the atmosphere is discussed controversially. In order to assess the impact of an expected increasing H2 concentration to the atmosphere a fundamental understanding of the sources and sinks of the global H2 cycle is indispensable (Tromp et al. 2003, Warwick et al. 2004). Due to the large mass difference between hydrogen and deuterium the isotope composition is one possibility to obtain further information about the sources and sinks. Here we will present first results of the isotope composition of hydrogen in biogas. Literature Rhee, T.S., C.A.M. Brenninkmeijer, and T. Röckmann; The overwhelming role of soils in the global atmospheric hydrogen cycle, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 1611-1625, 2006. Tromp, T.K., Shi, R.-L., Allen, M., Eiler, J.M., and Y. L. Yung1; Potential Environmental Impact of a Hydrogen Economy on the Stratosphere, Science, 300, 1740-1742, 2003. Warwick, N.J., Bekki, S., Nisbet, E.G., and J.A. Pyle; Impact of a hydrogen economy on the stratosphere and troposphere studied in a 2-D model; Geo.Res.Lett., 31, L05107, doi:10.1029/2003GL019224, 2004.

  19. Perturbative and nonperturbative aspects of heterotic sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaoyi

    Supersymmetric nonlinear sigma models are interesting from various perspectives. They are useful for understanding the most fundamental theory of our world, and for low-energy effective model-building. Mathematically, they make surprising connections between different exciting areas such as complex geometry, deformation theory, quantum algebra and topology. In this thesis, we study perturbative and nonperturbative aspects of sigma models with N = (0, 2) supersymmetry, with an emphasize on a possible version of extended 4d/2d correspondence. We showed that in some N = (0, 2) models, β functions calculated through Feynman graphs can be reproduced by nonrenormalization theorems. And the result can further be compared with the supercurrent analysis. These cases including linear models, minimal CP(1) model (other CP(N) models are obstructed by global anomaly) together with its extended cousins, and heterotic CP(N) models. Nonperturbatively we built the instanton measure for minimal CP(1) model and its (0, 2)-extended cousins. The instanton measure bears similarity to the instanton measure for 4d super-Yang-Mills theories. Through this analogy, there seems to be a correspondence between N = 1 theories in 4d and N = (0, 2) theories in 2d, which extends previous results initiated by Edalati-Tong and Shifman-Yung. An interesting by-product is also obtained during the procedure, which shows that for non-minimal (globally anomaly-free) N = (0, 2) models with CP(1) as target spaces, there seems always exist certain infrared fixed points, induced by the behavior of chiral fermions.

  20. Photochemical Distribution of Venusian Sulfur and Halogen Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, C. D.; Mills, F.; Brecht, A.; Bougher, S. W.; Yung, Y. L.

    2010-10-01

    The photochemistry of Venus’ atmosphere from the cloudtops to 110 km has been modeled using an updated/expanded chemical scheme, with the view to improving our understanding of the vertical distributions of sulfur and halogen species. We mainly follow Yung and DeMore (1982), Mills (1998), Pernice et al. (2004), and Krasnopolsky (2009) in our choice of chemical reactions, chemical rate constants, and boundary conditions for several key species. We examine two models, with HCl mixing ratios of 10-7 and 4 x 10-7, respectively. The former corresponds to Venus Express observations made at high northern latitudes and the latter to the mid- to low-latitude value Young (1972) determined based on infrared measurements by Connes et al (1967). Both models agree satisfactorily with stratospheric observations of key species such as CO, O2 and SO2, but we hope to better quantify the implications of the different HCl mixing ratios observed. Additionally, we perform sensitivity tests where water is set to 31 ppm at 40 km, but vary the SO2 mixing ratio at the lower boundary about a nominal value of 25 ppm. We also consider a range of eddy diffusion profiles and other sensitivity studies. For most cases, K = Ko (n(z)/n_ref)-a, where Ko is the eddy diffusion coefficient at some reference altitude, n is the number density, z is altitude, and a is the variable parameter (<1). Our modeling suggests lower HCl abundances result in greater abundances of SO2, SO, and SO3 generally lower O2 abundances, and greater ClO abundances. Also, the effects on sulfur compounds seems more evident/pronounced for lower mixing ratios of SO2 at the lower boundary as well as higher up in the atmosphere i.e. above 58 km. We consider both SO2 observations of Bertaux et al (2009) and Sandor and Clancy (2010) in our analysis of results.

  1. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning")[2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Ammonia - Hydrocarbon Ices Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, P. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas.1,2 This discrepancy highlights an important gap in our understanding of ammonia and its spectral signatures in Jupiter's atmosphere. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning").2,3 We are performing laboratory experiments that investigate the above hypotheses. Thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light. These spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the photophysical and chemical processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. Our current results indicate a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene. Furthermore, strongest suppression is observed in the case of benzene, followed in magnitude by hexane and cyclohexane. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Patricia A. Engel was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  3. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.

    2006-09-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning") [2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  4. An experimental study on interactions between Titan tholin and H atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Imanaka, H.; Khare, B. N.; Bakes, E. L. O.; McKay, C. P.; Sugita, S.; Matsui, T.

    2005-08-01

    One of the key processes to understand the atmospheric chemistry of Titan is the removal of hydrogen (H) atom formed by photochemistry because the low concentration of H atom is necessary for unsaturated hydrocarbons to be stable in the atmosphere [1]. Previous theoretical studies suggest interactions of H atom with another H in the organic haze forming H2 molecule as one of the removal process of H atoms in the stratosphere of Titan [1, 2, 3]. However, there has been no experimental study to investigate interactions of H with Titan haze analogs, termed Titan tholin. In this study, we conduct laboratory experiment to irradiate deuterium (D) atom to Titan tholin formed from N2/CH4 gas mixtures and analyze both the gas products and the change in the infrared spectra of the tholin due to irradiations. Our experimental results indicate that interactions of D (H) atom with Titan tholin are composed of three reactions; a) abstraction of hydrogen forming HD (H2) gas, b) addition of D (H) atom into tholin (hydrogenation of tholin), and c) removal of carbon and/or nitrogen from tholin as methane and/or ammonia. Furthermore, we find that unsaturated bonds in Titan tholin are lost by forming saturated bonds due to D atom irradiation indicating that the addition of D atom (hydrogenation) proceeds more efficiently than the abstraction of H. These results strongly suggest that the organic haze is an efficient sink of H atom in Titan's atmosphere. In particular, an efficient capturing of H atom into the organic haze may reduce the concentrations of both atomic and molecular hydrogen in Titan's stratosphere from the calculation results by photochemical models. [1] Yung et al., 1984, Astrophys. J. Sup., vol.55, 465; [2] Bakes et al., 2003, Icarus, 161, 468; [3] Lebonnois et al., 2003, Icarus, 161, 474

  5. Cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of Kv1.2 regulation in the rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R; Fuchs, Jason R; Green, John T; Morielli, Anthony D

    2012-01-01

    The potassium channel Kv1.2 alpha-subunit is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites where its pharmacological inhibition increases excitability (Khavandgar et al., 2005). Kv1.2 is also expressed in cerebellar basket cell (BC) axon terminals (Sheng et al., 1994), where its blockade increases BC inhibition of PCs (Southan and Robertson, 1998a). Secretin receptors are also expressed both in PC dendrites and BC axon terminals (reviewed in (Yuan et al.). The effect of secretin on PC excitability is not yet known, but, like Kv1.2 inhibitors, secretin potently increases inhibitory input to PCs (Yung et al., 2001). This suggests secretin may act in part by suppressing Kv1.2. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a mechanism of Kv1.2 suppression (Nesti et al., 2004). This process can be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA) (Connors et al., 2008). Since secretin receptors activate PKA (Wessels-Reiker et al., 1993), we tested the hypothesis that secretin regulates Kv1.2 trafficking in the cerebellum. Using cell surface protein biotinylation of rat cerebellar slices, we found secretin decreased cell-surface Kv1.2 levels by modulating Kv1.2 endocytic trafficking. This effect was mimicked by activating adenylate cyclase (AC) with forskolin, and was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of AC or PKA. Imaging studies identified the BC axon terminal and Purkinje cell dendrites as loci of AC-dependent Kv1.2 trafficking. The physiological significance of secretin regulated Kv1.2 endocytosis is supported by our finding that infusion into the cerebellar cortex of either the Kv1.2 inhibitor Tityustoxin-Kα, or of the Kv1.2 regulator secretin, significantly enhances acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats. PMID:22764231

  6. Photochemical Distribution of Venusian Sulfur and Halogen Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Chris; Atreya, S.; Mills, F.; Yung, Y.; Wong, A.

    2008-09-01

    The photochemistry of Venus’ atmosphere from 40 to 100 km has been modeled using an updated/expanded chemical scheme, with the view to improving our understanding of the vertical distributions of sulfur and halogen species. We mainly follow Yung and DeMore (1982), Mills (1998), and Pernice et al. (2004) in our choice of chemical reactions, chemical rate constants, and boundary conditions for 38 species. We examine two models, with HCl mixing ratios of 10-7 and 4 x 10-7, respectively. The former corresponds to Venus Express observations made at high northern latitudes and the latter to the mid- to low-latitude value Young (1972) determined based on infrared measurements by Connes et al (1967). Both models agree satisfactorily with stratospheric observations of key species such as CO, O2 and SO2, but we hope to better quantify the implications of the different HCl mixing ratios observed. Additionally, we perform sensitivity tests where water is set to 31 ppm at 40 km, but vary the SO2 mixing ratio at the lower boundary about a nominal value of 25 ppm. We also consider a range of eddy diffusion profiles and other sensitivity studies. For most cases, K = Ko (n(z)/n_ref)-a, where Ko is the eddy diffusion coefficient at some reference altitude, n is the number density, z is altitude, and a is the variable parameter (<1). Our modeling suggests lower HCl abundances result in greater abundances of SO2, SO, and SO3 generally lower O2 abundances, and greater ClO abundances. Also, the effects on sulfur compounds seems more evident/pronounced for lower mixing ratios of SO2 at the lower boundary as well as higher up in the atmosphere i.e. above 58 km. We will use some of this 1-D chemistry in the Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) (Bougher et al, 1997) for comparison to VEX datasets.

  7. On the one-dimensional chemistry-diffusion model in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Showman, Adam

    Most of the current atmospheric chemistry models for planets (e.g., Krasnopolsky & Parshev 1981; Yung et al., 1984; Lavvas et al., 2008) and exo-planets (e.g., Moses et al., 2011; Line et al., 2011; Hu et al., 2012) adopt a one-dimensional (1D) chemistry-diffusion approach in the vertical coordinate such as pressure or altitude. Although only a crude approximation, these 1D models have succeeded in explaining the global-averaged vertical profiles of many chemical species in observations. One of the important assumptions of these models is that, all chemical species are transported via the same eddy diffusion profile. Here we show that, as also noticed in the Earth community (e.g., Holton 1986), in the presence of horizontal transport driven by eddies in the middle atmospheres such as the stratospheres on Earth and Titan, this “homogenous eddy diffusion” assumption generally breaks down. Instead, the eddy diffusion should depend both on the horizontal eddy mixing and the chemical lifetime of the species. It implies that the long-lived species and short-lived species could have significantly different eddy diffusion profiles. We show analytically why this new approach is more physically based. We also show numerically why the old approach fails compared with the globally averaged results from a more realistic two-dimensional (2D) simulation using the state-of-art Caltech/JPL 2D chemistry-diffusion-advection model (Zhang et al., 2013), and discuss the possible consequences. This research was supported by the Bisgrove Scholar Program in the University of Arizona.

  8. [From influence to confluence : positioning the history of pre-modern Korean medicine in East Asia].

    PubMed

    Suh, Soyoung

    2010-12-31

    This article surveys studies focusing on pre-modern Korean medicine, which are both written in English and analyzed primary sources up to 1876. Overall, the history of pre-modern Korean medicine is an unknown filed in Anglophone academia. Yung Sik Kim's, James Palais's, and Carter Ecart's problematization of the nationalist framework of Korean scholarship partially explains the marginality of the field. Addressing these criticisms, this review argues that pre-modern Korean medicine's uneasy task lies in both elaborating Korea's own experience of medicine, while simultaneously avoiding making the "Korean" category itself essential. Korean narratives of premodern medicine need to go beyond the mere territorilalization of Korean medicine against its Chinese, Japanese, or Western counterparts, thereby to tackle the field's own boundary of research objects. The existing scholarship in English responds to this challenge by primarily examining the way in which Korea has shared textual tradition with China. Sirhak scholars' innovation in medicine, visual representation of Tongŭi bogam, Korean management of epidemics in the eleventh century, and Korean indexing of local botanicals, engages not only native achievements, but also the process of modifying medicine across geographical and political boundaries. More to the point, the emerging native narratives, although written in Korean, are implicitly resonant with those currently present in Anglophone academia. Taking "tension," "intertextuality," and "local traits" as a lens, this article assesses a series of current research in Korea. Aiming to go beyond appeals for a "distinctively" Korean experience of medicine, the future study of Korean pre-modern medicine will further elucidate confluences of different flows, such as "Chinese and Korean," "universal and local," "center and periphery," and "native and foreign," which will eventually articulate a range of Korean techniques of creating a bricolage in medicine.

  9. a New Hybrid Program for Fitting Rotationally Resolved Spectra of Methylamine-Like Molecules: Application to 2-METHYLMALONALDEHYDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Isabelle; Hougen, Jon T.

    2015-06-01

    A new hybrid-model fitting program for methylamine-like molecules has been developed, based on an effective Hamiltonian in which the ammonia-like inversion motion is treated using a tunneling formalism, while the internal-rotation motion is treated using an explicit kinetic energy operator and potential energy function. The Hamiltonian in the computer program is set up as a 2x2 partitioned matrix, where each diagonal block consists of a traditional torsion-rotation Hamiltonian (as in the earlier program BELGI), and the two off-diagonal blocks contain all tunneling terms. This hybrid formulation permits the use of the permutation-inversion group G6 (isomorphic to C3v) for terms in the two diagonal blocks, but requires G12 for terms in the off-diagonal blocks. Our first application of the new program is to 2-methylmalonaldehyde. Microwave data for this molecule were previously fit (essentially to experimental measurement error) using an all-tunneling Hamiltonian formalism to treat both large-amplitude-motions. For 2-methylmalonaldehyde, the hybrid program achieves a fit of nearly the same quality as that obtained by the all-tunneling program, but fits with the hybrid program eliminate a large discrepancy between internal rotation barriers in the OH and OD isotopologues of 2-methylmalonaldehyde that arose in fits with the all-tunneling program. Other molecules for application of the hybrid program will be mentioned. V.V. Ilyushin, E.A. Alekseev, Yung-Ching Chou, Yen-Chu Hsu, J. T. Hougen, F.J. Lovas, L. Picraux, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251 (2008) 56-63

  10. Evaluation of the models available for the prediction of pressure drop in venturi scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J A; Alonso, D F; Costa, M A; Azzopardi, B J; Coury, J R

    2001-01-29

    The major running cost derived from the operation of venturi scrubbers is pressure drop. In the present study, the predictions of different models are compared to experimental data from venturi scrubbers of different sizes (throat diameter from 1.9 to 16cm), geometries, operating variables and liquid injection arrangements. As a result, it is concluded that most of the models must be used with caution. Much attention must be paid to the validity of the assumptions employed in the mathematical models. The equations proposed by Calvert [Scrubbing, Air Pollution, 3rd Edition, Vol. IV, Academic Press, New York, 1982], Yung et al. [JAPCA 27 (1977) 348] or Hesketh [Atomization and cloud behaviour in wet scrubbers, in: Proceedings of the US-USSR Symposium Control Fine Particulate Emissions 1974, San Francisco, 15-18 January 1974] produce good results only in very specific situations. The model proposed by Boll [Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 12 (1973) 40] is simple, easy to compute and agrees reasonably well with the experimental data. Unfortunately, it cannot predict the effect of different liquid injection arrangements. The model by Azzopardi and coworkers [Filtr. Sep. 21 (1984) 196; Trans. IchemE. 69B (1991) 237; Chem Eng. J. 67 (1997) 9] was the only one to give good predictions for all the range of variables studied. On the other hand, this model is not simple and requires from the engineer an additional effort in terms of computation. In order to apply this model to the rectangular geometry, the concept of hydraulic equivalent diameter was used.

  11. Variability of CO, OCS And H2O Below The Clouds of Venus From VIRTIS-HNight-side Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcq, Emmanuel; Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Piccioni, G.; VIRTIS Team

    2007-10-01

    The VIRTIS imaging spectrometer has provided numerous spectra of Venus since the beginning of the Venus Express mission in April 2006. The high resolution of the H-channel (R 2000) enables the investigation of the composition below the clouds using the thermal emission from the night side of the planet, since several absorption of minor components (CO, OCS, H2O, HDO, SO2, HF) are located in the 2.3 µm transparency window of CO2. Using a radiative transfer computer model, we were able to derive constraints on the vertical profiles of CO, OCS and H2O in the 30-40 km altitude range up to areas unreacheable with Earth-based instruments (0° - 60°S). Our findings extend the latitudinal trends already noticed from both space (Collard et al., 1993, using Galileo/NIMS) and Earth (Marcq et al. 2005,2006, using IRTF/SpeX): an increase of CO towards high latitudes (30 ± 10 % between 60°S and 0°), a correlated decrease of OCS in the same region and a constant abundance of 28 ± 4 ppmv at 35 km for H2O. The latitudinal variations of CO are in good agreement with the VIRTIS-M observations from Tsang et al. (private communication). The quantitative interpretation of CO and OCS variations in terms of global-scale vertical circulation is in progress, using circulation models such as Yung et al's (private communication) in 2D and Lebonnois et al.'s (38th DPS meeting, #19.04) in 3D, thus helping in precising the understanding of both dynamics and chemistry in the deep atmopshere of Venus. This work has been funded by the CNES space agency.

  12. The influence of acetabular cup material on pelvis cortex surface strains, measured using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, A S; Taylor, A C; Browne, M

    2012-02-23

    Acetabular cup loosening is a late failure mode of total hip replacements, and peri-prosthetic bone deterioration may promote earlier failure. Preservation of supporting bone quality is a goal for implant design and materials selection, to avoid stress shielding and bone resorption. Advanced polymer composite materials have closer stiffness to bone than metals, ceramics or polymers, and have been hypothesised to promote less adverse bone adaptation. Computer simulations have supported this hypothesis, and the present study aimed to verify this experimentally. A composite hemi-pelvis was implanted with Cobalt Chromium (CoCr), polyethylene (UHMWPE) and MOTIS(®)carbon-fibre-reinforced polyether etherketone (CFR-PEEK) acetabular cups. In each case, load was applied to the implanted pelvis and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used for surface strain measurement. The test was repeated for an intact hemi-pelvis. Trends in implanted vs. intact bone principal strains were inspected to assess the average principal strain magnitude change, allowing comparison of the potential bone responses to implantation with the three cups. The CFR-PEEK cup was observed to produce the closest bone strain to the intact hip in the main load path, the superior peri-acetabular cortex (+12% on average, R(2)=0.84), in comparison to CoCr (+40%, R(2)=0.91) and UHWMPE cups (-26%, R(2)=0.94). Clinical observations have indicated that increased periacetabular cortex loading may result in reduced polar cancellous bone loading, leading to longer term losses in periprosthetic bone mineral density. This study provides experimental evidence to verify previous computational studies, indicating that cups produced using materials with stiffness closer to cortical bone recreate physiological cortical bone strains more closely and could, therefore, potentially promote less adverse bone adaptation than stiffer press-fitted implants in current use.

  13. SU-E-J-217: Accuracy Comparison Between Surface and Volumetric Registrations for Patient Setup of Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y; Li, R; Na, Y; Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatment CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)

  14. Roles of charged residues of rotor and stator in flagellar rotation: comparative study using H+-driven and Na+-driven motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Yang, Junghoon; Fukuoka, Hajime; Homma, Michio; Blair, David F

    2006-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, rotation of the flagellar motor has been shown to depend upon electrostatic interactions between charged residues of the stator protein MotA and the rotor protein FliG. These charged residues are conserved in the Na+-driven polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus, but mutational studies in V. alginolyticus suggested that they are relatively unimportant for motor rotation. The electrostatic interactions detected in E. coli therefore might not be a general feature of flagellar motors, or, alternatively, the V. alginolyticus motor might rely on similar interactions but incorporate additional features that make it more robust against mutation. Here, we have carried out a comparative study of chimeric motors that were resident in E. coli but engineered to use V. alginolyticus stator components, rotor components, or both. Charged residues in the V. alginolyticus rotor and stator proteins were found to be essential for motor rotation when the proteins functioned in the setting of the E. coli motor. Patterns of synergism and suppression in rotor/stator double mutants indicate that the V. alginolyticus proteins interact in essentially the same way as their counterparts in E. coli. The robustness of the rotor-stator interface in V. alginolyticus is in part due to the presence of additional charged residues in PomA but appears mainly due to other factors, because an E. coli motor using both rotor and stator components from V. alginolyticus remained sensitive to mutation. Motor function in V. alginolyticus may be enhanced by the proteins MotX and MotY.

  15. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Kinase Activity Is Required for the Hyperphosphorylation of Retinoblastoma Protein and Inhibits the Formation of Nuclear Aggresomes

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, Mark N.; Sztul, Elizabeth; Daily, Shannon L.; Perry, Amie L.; Frederick, Samuel L.; Gill, Rachel B.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Varnum, Susan M.; Smith, Richard D.; Kern, Earl R.

    2008-05-01

    Cells infected with human cytomegalovirus in the absence of UL97 kinase activity produce large nuclear aggregates that sequester considerable quantities of viral proteins. A transient expression assay suggested that pp71 and IE1 were also involved in this process, and this suggestion was significant, since both proteins have been reported to interact with components of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (ND10) and also interact functionally with retinoblastoma pocket proteins (RB). PML bodies have been linked to the formation of nuclear aggresomes, and colocalization studies suggested that viral proteins were recruited to these structures and that UL97 kinase activity inhibited their formation. Proteins associated with PML bodies were examined by Western blot analysis, and pUL97 appeared to specifically affect the phosphorylation of RB in a kinasedependent manner. Three consensus RB binding motifs were identified in the UL97 kinase, and recombinant viruses were constructed in which each was mutated to assess a potential role in the phosphorylation of RB and the inhibition of nuclear aggresome formation. The mutation of either the conserved LxCxE RB binding moti for the lysine required for kinase activity impaired the ability of the virus to stabilize and phosphorylate RB. We concluded from these studies that both UL97 kinase activity and the LxCxE RB binding motif are required for the phosphorylation and stabilization of RB in infected cells and that this effect can be antagonized by the antiviral drug maribavir. These data also suggest a potential link between RB function and the formation of aggresomes.

  16. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  17. Comparison of Sub1 markers and their combinations for submergence tolerance and analysis of adaptation strategies of rice in rainfed lowland ecology.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sharat Kumar; Barik, Saumya Ranjan; Sahoo, Jayashree; Pandit, Elssa; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Pani, Dipti Ranjan; Anandan, Annamalai

    2015-10-01

    Ninety lowland rice cultivars of the eastern region of India were collected and screened for submergence and water logging tolerance and further used for validating the efficiency of molecular markers and their combinations for submergence tolerance. Submergence tolerance and elongation ability of the tested genotypes were measured in screening tanks along with tolerant and susceptible checks. The genotypes FR13A, Khoda, CR Dhan 300, Savitri Sub1, IR64 Sub1, IC-568009 and IC-568842 exhibited high submergence tolerance may be used as donor in the breeding program. Landrace 'Khoda' showed tolerance to submergence with moderate elongation ability for adaption. Boitalpakhia, Gayatri, Atiranga, Aghonibora, Chakaakhi, Moti, IC-567993 and IC-568921 possessed both characters of moderate elongation ability and moderate tolerance to submergence. Both of these traits are required for lowland varieties of eastern India to survive under flash flood and accumulated stagnant water conditions. RM8300, Sub1A203, AEX, Sub1BC2 and Sub1C173 were employed for molecular screening to identify the submergence-tolerant genotypes. Sub1A203 was capable of differentiating the tolerant and susceptible genotypes into groups. RM8300 and Sub1BC2 could also differentiate the genotypes with inclusion of some susceptible genotypes. The AEX and Sub1C173 marker could not show discrimination among the genotypes with respect to the traits. Using Sub1A203+Sub1BC2 was better amongst the combinations studied. The results of the study indicated a trend toward a negative association of Sub1BC2 with submergence tolerance while AEX and Sub1C marker did not show any significant association. The donors identified can be useful as parental lines while the molecular markers can be used for marker-assisted breeding work. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Schottky barrier parameters and structural properties of rapidly annealed Zr Schottky electrode on p-type GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal Reddy, V.; Asha, B.; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2017-06-01

    The Schottky barrier junction parameters and structural properties of Zr/p-GaN Schottky diode are explored at various annealing temperatures. Experimental analysis showed that the barrier height (BH) of the Zr/p-GaN Schottky diode increases with annealing at 400 °C (0.92 eV (I-V)/1.09 eV (C-V)) compared to the as-deposited one (0.83 eV (I-V)/0.93 eV (C-V)). However, the BH decreases after annealing at 500 °C. Also, at different annealing temperatures, the series resistance and BH are assessed by Cheung's functions and their values compared. Further, the interface state density (N SS) of the diode decreases after annealing at 400 °C and then somewhat rises upon annealing at 500 °C. Analysis reveals that the maximum BH is obtained at 400 °C, and thus the optimum annealing temperature is 400 °C for the diode. The XPS and XRD analysis revealed that the increase in BH may be attributed to the creation of Zr-N phases with increasing annealing up to 400 °C. The BH reduces for the diode annealed at 500 °C, which may be due to the formation of Ga-Zr phases at the junction. The AFM measurements reveal that the overall surface roughness of the Zr film is quite smooth during rapid annealing process. Project supported by the R&D Program for Industrial Core Technology (No. 10045216) and the Transfer Machine Specialized Lighting Core Technology Development Professional Manpower Training Project (No. N0001363) Funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE), Republic of Korea.

  19. Potential Impact of the National Plan for Future Electric Power Supply on Air Quality in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) announced the national plan for Korea's future electric power supply (2013 - 2027) in 2013. According to the plan, the national demand for electricity will be increased by 60% compared to that of 2010 and primary energy sources for electric generation will still lean on the fossil fuels such as petroleum, LNG, and coal, which would be a potential threat to air quality of Korea. This study focused on two subjects: (1) How the spatial distribution of the primary air pollutant's emissions (i.e., NOx, SOx, CO, PM) will be changed and (2) How the primary emission changes will influence on the national ambient air quality including ozone in 2027. We used GEOS-Chem model simulation with modification of Korean emissions inventory (Clean Air Policy Support System (CAPSS)) to simulate the current and future air quality in Korea. The national total emissions of CO, NOx, SOx, PM in year 2027 will be increased by 3%, 8%, 13%, 2%, respectively compared to 2010 and there are additional concern that the future location of the power plants will be closer to the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), where there are approximately 20 million population vulnerable to the potentially worsened air quality. While there are slight increase of concentration of CO, NOx, SOx, and PM in 2027, the O3 concentration is expected to be similar to the level of 2010. Those results may imply the characteristics of air pollution in East Asia such as potentially severe O3 titration and poorer O3/CO or O3/NOx ratio. Furthermore, we will discuss on the impact of transboundary pollution transport from China in the future, which is one of the large factors to control the air quality of Korea.

  20. Diverse interface effects on ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling in asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junctions: the role of the interfacial bonding structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, X T; Chen, W J; Jiang, G L; Wang, B; Zheng, Yue

    2016-01-28

    Interface and size effects on electric/magnetic orders and magnetoelectric coupling are vital in the modern application of quantum-size functional devices based on multiferroic tunnel junctions. In order to give a comprehensive study of the interface and size effects, the properties of a typical asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junction, i.e., Fe/BaTiO3/Co, have been calculated using the first-principles simulations. Most importantly, all of the eight possible structures with four combinations of electrode/ferroelectric interfaces (i.e., Fe/BaO, Fe/TiO2, Co/BaO and Co/TiO2) and a series of barrier thicknesses have been taken into account. In this work, the equilibrium configurations, polarization, charge density, spin density and magnetic moments, etc., have been completely simulated and comprehensively analyzed. It is found that the ferroelectric stability is determined as a competition outcome of the strength of short-range chemical bondings and long-range depolarization/built-in fields. M/BaO (M = magnetic metal) terminations show an extraordinary enhancement of local polarization near the interface and increase the critical thickness of ferroelectricity. The bistability of polarization is well kept at the M/TiO2 interface. At the same time, the induced magnetic moment on atoms at the interfaces is rather localized and dominated by the local interfacial configuration. Reversing electric polarization can switch the induced magnetic moments, wherein atoms in M-O-Ti and M-Ti-O chains show preference for being magnetized. In addition, the difference between the sum of the interfacial magnetic moments is also enlarged with the increase of the barrier thickness. Our study provides a comprehensive and detailed reference to the manipulation and utilization of the interface, size and magnetoelectric effects in asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junctions.

  1. Geotechnical and rheological characteristics of waste materials taken from abandoned mine deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sueng-Won; Ji, Sang Woo; Fukuoka, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    According to the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy in Korean (MOTIE), approximately 5,000 metal mines are spread in the Republic of Korea, but almost 80% mines are still left without any proper remediation and cleanup. The physic-chemical properties of waste materials in the mountainous area are strongly affected by heavy rainfall. Failed sediments pose the largest threat to the mountain communities and environments. In particular, a significant amount of heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead etc., is introduced to soil systems. This study examined the geotechnical and rheological characteristics of waste rock materials collected from mine deposits, located in Imgi-ri, Busan Metropolitan City, Korea. We used a ring shear apparatus for geotechnical properties and a rheometer for rheological properties. The materials collected from mines are classified as gravelly sand soils. A series of drained and undrained ring shear tests were performed to examine the stress characteristics with regard to (i) shearing time dependency, (ii) shear speed dependency, and (iii) normal stress dependency. In addition, the grain crushing in the shear zone was examined to explain a high mobile failed masses. This work is also concerned with post-failure characteristics of rainfall-induced debris flows. From the rheological tests, the materials examined exhibited the shear-thinning behavior, which is the viscosity decreases with increasing shear rates. In the relationship between shear stress and shear rate, one of simplest rheological models, i.e., the ideal Bingham fluid model, is selected to examine the debris flow potential. There are positive relationships between the volumetric concentration of sediment ranging from 50% to 65% and rheological values (i.e., yield stress and viscosities). However, the difference in rheological parameters is of significance for given shear rates. The effect of wall-slip in different geometries between ball and vane

  2. Corrosion resistance of weldable super 13Cr stainless steel in H{sub 2}S containing CO{sub 2} environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, M.; Amaya, H.; Kondo, K.; Ogawa, K.; Mori, T.

    1996-08-01

    The weldable super 13Cr stainless steel was investigated because of the application for flow line in CO{sub 2} environments with a little amount of H{sub 2}S. TIG welding in the condition of no post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was used as the welding technique. The lowering of C content less than 0.01 mass% in the weldable steel decreased a maximum hardness in the heat-affected zone(HAZ) and mitigated the sulfide stress cracking (SSC) susceptibility. The increasing of Mo content from 2.0 mass% of the super 13Cr stainless steel OCTG (0.02C-12Cr-5.5Ni-2Mo) to 2.5 mass% improved SSC resistance in the HAZ. Based on these results, the weldable super 13Cr stainless steel, which consisted of 0.007C-12Cr-6Ni-2.5Mo-Ti, has been developed. The welded-joint with the yield strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and enough corrosion resistance was completed by using the welding material of super duplex stainless steel which had 25Cr-9Ni-3Mo-2W-0.3N. The corrosion resistance to SSC at room temperatures and localized-corrosion at elevated temperatures of the welded-joint was the same as the super 13Cr stainless steel OCTG. The improvement effect of the corrosion resistance by means of Mo addition was discussed based on the stability of Cr oxide passive film, the analysis results of the surface film formed in the CO{sub 2} environment containing H{sub 2}S, and calculated-solubility of oxides, FeCO{sub 3} and sulfides in that environment. It was clarified that Mo assisted the formation of the Cr oxide passive film in the inner layer of the surface film and the formation of Mo sulfide in the outer layer.

  3. Impact of learning nutrition on medical students: their eating habits, knowledge and confidence in addressing dietary issues of patients.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shama; Dwivedi, Shraddha; Khan, Maroof A

    2011-12-01

    Nutrition is an important component in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases and is a cornerstone in strategies for disease prevention and health promotion. Despite the acknowledged importance of nutrition, there is evidence to indicate that the nutrition training of medical students is inadequate in both quality and quantity. The study aimed to know the dietary/eating habits of medical students, assess their knowledge on nutrition and to assess their confidence in addressing the dietary issues of patients. It was a cross-sectional study conducted on final year medical students, interns and postgraduate students of Moti Lal Nehru Government Medical College, Allahabad. The sampling was purposive and a total of 218 participated in the study voluntarily. Overall 55% of the students were less knowledgeable and only 45% of them were more knowledgeable. Most (62%) postgraduates were more knowledgeable (p < 0.001). Majority of them (89.9%) were having healthy eating habits. There was no association between their healthy habits and more knowledge (p > 0.340). Only 45.4% of them were confident in assessing the diet of patients and 44% of them were confident in recommending change of diet in patients. However this study shows no association between increase in the level of knowledge and confidence levels of the students (p > 0.339 and p > 0.109) suggesting that we need to incorporate innovative teaching methods to increase their confidence. Most students (79%) said that the medical curriculum was either just enough or not enough in preparing them to deal with the dietary issues of patients and 55% of them were of the opinion that the faculty should be trained in nutrition. The study results intend to stimulate active consideration of proper role of nutrition learning in medical education.

  4. High-pressure experiments on the stability of methane hydrates in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system with applications to Titan's cryovolcanism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.; Le Menn, E.; Grasset, O.

    2007-08-01

    The current methane abundance in Titan's thick atmosphere cannot be explained without the existence of replenishment processes. Indeed, the intense photochemistry taking place in the atmosphere would destroy the 2-5% CH4 amounts measured by the GCMS onboard the Huygens probe [1] within 10-100 Myr [e.g. 2]. Among the several hypotheses that could explain this replenishment, release of methane during cryovolcanic events seems highly likely. The VIMS [3] and Radar instruments [4] onboard the Cassini spacecraft have brought substantial evidence for cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface. A numerical model has shown the possibility to release CH4 by dissociating methane clathrate hydrates at depth, due to interaction of a clathrate layer with warm ice intrusions [5]. However, the effect of volatile compounds, dissolved (e.g. N2) or in solution (e.g. NH3), would most certainly play a major role in cryovolcanic processes. High-pressure low-temperature experimental investigations on the effect of ammonia on methane hydrates' dissociation are conducted within an optical sapphire-anvil cell. Preliminary results have been previously presented, which lead to contradictory interpretations so far [6,7]. As further experiments are being performed, the reliability of the experimental measurements and the reasons for observing discrepancies in the results can be adressed with more and more confidence. This poster will discuss the experimental issues encountered in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system, up-todate experimental results, as well as their implications for Titan's cryovolcanism. References: [1] Niemann HB et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005). [2] Yung YL et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl., 55, 465-506 (1984). [3] Sotin C et al., Nature 435, 786-789 (2005). [4] Lopes RMC et al., Icarus 186, 395-412 (2007). [5] Tobie G et al., Nature 440 (2), 61-64 (2006). [6] Choukroun M et al., 37th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #1640 (2006). [7] Choukroun M et al., 38th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf

  5. D/H on Mars: Effects of floods, volcanism, impacts, and polar processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Water in the Martian atmosphere is 5.1 times more enriched in deuterium than terrestial water. The enrichment has been previously attributed to either a massive loss of water early in the planet's history or the presence of only a very small reservoir of water that has exchanged with the atmosphere over geologic time. Both these interpretations appear inconsistent with geologic evidence of large floods and sustained volcanism. Large floods are believed to have episodically introduced large amounts of water onto the surface. During a large flood roughly 1017 g of water would almost immediately sublime into the atmospher and be frozen out on polar terrain, to form a new layer several centimeters thick. The long-term effect of a flood would depend on where the water pooled after the flood. If the water pooled at low latitudes, all the water would slowly sublime into the atmosphers and ultimately be frozen out at the poles, thereby adding several meters to the polar deposits for each flood. If the water pooled at high latitude, it would form a permanent ice deposit, largely isolated from further interchange with the atmosphere. Volcanism has also episodically introduced water into the atmosphere. Most of this water has become incorporated into the polar deposits. That released over the last 3.5 Ga could have added a few kilometers to the polar deposits, depending on the amount of dust incorporated along with the ice. Large cometary impacts would have introduced additional large amounts of water into the atmosphere. The long-term evolution of D/H in the atmosphere depends on the rate of exchange of water between the atmosphere and the polar deposits. If exchange is active, then loss rates of hydrogen from the upper atmosphere are substantially higher than those estimated by Y. L. Yung, J. Wen, J. P. Pinto, M. Allen, K. K. Pierce, and S. Paulsen [Icarus 76, 146-159 (1988)]. More plausibly, exchange of water between the atmosphere and the polar deposits is limited, so

  6. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra and Light-curves for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, G.; Meadows, V. S.; Crisp, D.; Fong, W.; Velusamy, T.; Allen, M.

    2004-11-01

    NASA and ESA are currently studying mission concepts for space-based observatories to search for and characterize extrasolar terrestrial planets. Any planet directly detected by this first generation of space-missions will be resolved only as point sources. Basic information can be gleaned from the object's distance from the star and its apparent brightness, but the presence of a planetary atmosphere of unknown composition will complicate the determination of planetary properties. Disk-averaged spectroscopy will be our best tool for discriminating between Jovian/Terrestrial planets, and between Terrestrial planets of different types. We simulate spectrally-dependent light-curves and disk-averaged spectra of a plausible range of extrasolar terrestrial planets to determine the detectability of biosignatures by proposed space-based observatories. The core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model (SMART by D.Crisp), used to generate a database of synthetic spectra for a variety of atmospheric/surface properties, viewing angles, illuminations and cloud coverage. To simulate a wider range of terrestrial planets than those found in our system SMART can be coupled to a versatile climate model (G. Tinetti and D. Crisp) and a chemistry model, (Kinetics, by M. Allen and Y. Yung). Our model generates a variety of products including disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light-curves and the spectral variability at visible and IR wavelengths as a function of viewing angle. These results can be processed with an instrument simulator to improve our understanding of the detectable characteristics as viewed by the first generation extrasolar terrestrial planet detection and characterization missions. These tools were used to simulate an increasingly frozen Mars, an increasingly cloudy/forested/oceanic/tilted/eccentric-orbit Earth-like planet, and to determine the detectability of biosignatures (e.g. red-edge signal). The Earth

  7. Variations of carbon monoxide in the martian lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Our observations of variations of CO on Mars by means of the ground-based spatially-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2003]. J. Geophys. Res. 108(E2), 5010; Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2007]. Icarus 190, 93-102) have been significantly improved using the 13CO lines near 4148 cm-1 and the CO2 lines near 4570 cm-1. These lines are of optimal strength, of low sensitivity to variations of temperature, and covered by the ATMOS solar spectrum that makes it possible to use the synthetic spectra technique for retrieval of CO and CO2 to get CO mixing ratios. The CO2 line strengths from Toth et al. (2008) were also essential to improve accuracy of the results. The 13CO/CO ratio of 1.023 times the terrestrial carbon isotope ratio was calculated using the known 13CO2/CO2 = 1.046 in the martian atmosphere (Webster, C.R., et al. [2013]. Science 341, 260-263), the photo-induced isotope fractionation (Miller, C.E., Yung, Y.L. [2000]. J. Geophys. Res. 105(D23), 29039-29051) in the CO2 photolysis, and isotope fractionation in the reaction between CO and OH (Feilberg, K.L., Johnson, M.S., Nielsen, C.J. [2005]. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2318-2323). The observations were conducted at LS = 60°, 89°, 110°, and 145° and extend over the maximum of CO in the southern hemisphere during the northern summer. The CO mixing ratio was observed to be constant over the 55°S-90°N latitudinal range to within 7%, for each observed LS period. Therefore our observations show that the enrichment of incondensable gases by condensation of CO2 in the southern polar regions does not significantly extend to the middle and low latitudes. This behavior agrees with the Mars Climate Database (Lefevre, F., Forget, F. [2009]. Nature 460, 720-722), whereas most other observations exhibit much larger latitudinal gradients and seasonal variations. Our measurements do not show the CO depletion at high northern latitudes predicted by MCD of ∼20% at LS≈ 60-150° and observed as much stronger

  8. A physical model of Titan's aerosols.

    PubMed

    Toon, O B; McKay, C P; Griffith, C A; Turco, R P

    1992-01-01

    Microphysical simulations of Titan's stratospheric haze show that aerosol microphysics is linked to organized dynamical processes. The detached haze layer may be a manifestation of 1 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes above 300 km. The hemispherical asymmetry in the visible albedo may be caused by 0.05 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes of 150 to 200 km, we predict contrast reversal beyond 0.6 micrometer. Tomasko and Smith's (1982, Icarus 51, 65-95) model, in which a layer of large particles above 220 km altitude is responsible for the high forward scattering observed by Rages and Pollack (1983, Icarus 55, 50-62), is a natural outcome of the detached haze layer being produced by rising motions if aerosol mass production occurs primarily below the detached haze layer. The aerosol's electrical charge is critical for the particle size and optical depth of the haze. The geometric albedo, particularly in the ultraviolet and near infrared, requires that the particle size be near 0.15 micrometer down to altitudes below 100 km, which is consistent with polarization observations (Tomasko and Smith 1982, West and Smith 1991, Icarus 90, 330-333). Above about 400 km and below about 150 km Yung et al.'s (1984, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 55, 465-506) diffusion coefficients are too small. Dynamical processes control the haze particles below about 150 km. The relatively large eddy diffusion coefficients in the lower stratosphere result in a vertically extensive region with nonuniform mixing ratios of condensable gases, so that most hydrocarbons may condense very near the tropopause rather than tens of kilometers above it. The optical depths of hydrocarbon clouds are probably less than one, requiring that abundant gases such as ethane condense on a subset of the haze particles to create relatively large, rapidly removed particles. The wavelength dependence of the optical radius is calculated for use in analyzing observations of the geometric albedo. The lower

  9. Hydrogen in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    Although hydrogen (H2) is considered as one of the most important future energy carriers, little is known about the global biogeochemical cycle of this trace gas (Rhee et al. 2006). In order to assess the potential impact of expected increasing H2 concentrations to the atmosphere a fundamental understanding of the global H2 cycle is indispensable (Tromp et al. 2003, Warwick et al. 2004). Oceans are one source of atmospheric H2, produced by biological processes such as fermentation and N2-fixation and abiotic photochemical processes (Punshon and Moore 2008 and references herein). Further information can be obtained by studying the isotope composition of H2. However, the isotopic ratio of oceanic released H2 is unknown and has so far only been estimated from thermodynamic equilibrium. We investigated the atmospheric D/H isotopic ratio of H2 in the Atlantic Ocean. First results of atmospheric H2 isotope ratios from the West African coast of Mauritania and from a meridional transect over the Atlantic Ocean will be presented. Samples were taken onboard the German research vessel "Poseidon" in February 2007 associated to SOPRAN and during the cruise Ant XXIV-4 with the German research vessel "Polarstern" in April 2008 between Punta Arenas (Chile) and Bremerhaven (Germany). Literature Punshon, S. and R.M. Moore; Aerobic hydrogen production and dinitrogen fixation in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101; Limnol. Oceanogr., 53(6), 2749-2753, 2008. Rhee, T.S., C.A.M. Brenninkmeijer, and T. Röckmann; The overwhelming role of soils in the global atmospheric hydrogen cycle, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 1611-1625, 2006. Tromp, T.K., Shi, R.-L., Allen, M., Eiler, J.M., and Y. L. Yung1; Potential Environmental Impact of a Hydrogen Economy on the Stratosphere, Science, 300, 1740-1742, 2003. Warwick, N.J., Bekki, S., Nisbet, E.G., and J.A. Pyle; Impact of a hydrogen economy on the stratosphere and troposphere studied in a 2-D model; Geo.Res.Lett., 31, L05107, doi:10

  10. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo L; Singh, Baljit K; McCaughey, Kelly M; Alcantara, Raniel R; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S; Nguyen, Henry N; Friera, Annabelle M; White, Kathy A; McLaughlin, John R; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M; Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Claypool, Mark D; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C; Gelman, Marina S; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L; Creger, Daniel P; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J; Powers, Scott K; Masuda, Esteban S; Taylor, Vanessa C; Payan, Donald G; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-07-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.-Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  11. Photochemical Distribution of Venusian Sulfur and Halogen Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Chris; Bougher, S.; Yung, Y.; Brecht, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent observations of enhanced amounts of SO2 at 100 km by Venus Express (Bertaux et al, 2009; Marcq et al, 2012) suggest that there is a hitherto unknown source of gaseous sulfur species in the upper atmosphere of Venus. The observations of Sandor and Clancy (2010) also show short and longterm variations in mesopause-level (90-100 km) SO and SO2. Zhang et al (2010) argue that the photolysis of H2SO4 vapor derived from evaporation of H2SO4 aerosols provides a source of SO3, which upon photolysis yields SO2. In this study, the photochemistry and dynamics of Venus’ atmosphere from the cloud tops to 110 km has been modeled using an updated/expanded chemical scheme, with the view to improving our understanding of the vertical and global distributions of sulfur and halogen species by application of the 1-D Caltech/JPL KINETICS chemistry tracer species profiles to the Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) (Bougher et al, 1997) for comparison to VEx and ground-based datasets. Specifically, we compare our model results with the SO2 observations of Bertaux et al (2009), Sandor and Clancy (2010), and Marcq et al (2012) in our analysis. We mainly follow Yung and DeMore (1982), Mills (1998), Pernice et al. (2004), Krasnopolsky (2010), and Zhang et al. (2010) in our choice of chemical reactions, chemical rate constants, and boundary conditions for 38 species. We will examine a model with an HCl mixing ratio of 1E-7 corresponding to Venus Express observations made at high northern latitudes. Our modeling agrees satisfactorily with stratospheric observations of key species such as CO, O2 and SO2, and we better quantify the implications of the different HCl mixing ratios observed. As well, we also include other tunable parameters in our study such as considering a range of eddy diffusion profiles that vary by a factor of 10 and other sensitivity studies such as wave drag using Rayleigh friction parameters.

  12. Laboratory Studies of Ammonia Ices Relevant to the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, R. T.; Boulter, J. E.; Baer, C. E.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya and A.-S. Wong, Eos. Trans. 84(46), Fall. Meet. Suppl., Abstract A12A-0072 (2003), and references therein. 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  13. Methane flux and sulfate reduction variations in the continental margin offshore southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y.; Lin, S.; Yang, T. F.; Chen, Y.; Liu, C.; Wang, Y.; Chung, S.

    2008-12-01

    Methane gas is an important greenhouse gas. It can affect global climate if large amounts of methane gas release to the atmosphere. During migration, methane will be consumed via anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) before reaching seawater or the atmosphere (Hinrichs et al, 1999). High methane concentration associated with gas hydrate will enhance sulfate reduction and AOM, resulting in steep sulfate gradients and shallow sulfate-methane interface (SMI) (Borowski et al., 1999). Therefore, sulfate profile is useful to estimate methane flux if AOM become the predominant process in sediment. During our TowCam survey, methane seep-related seafloor features, especially authigenic carbonate buildups, chimney structures and chemosynthetic communities, were found in the continental margin offshore southwestern Taiwan. In order to understand methane flux and sulfate reduction variations in this study area, piston cores and gravity cores were collected on board the r/v Ocean Research I. Sediment samples collected were analyzed for methane, sulfate, dissolved sulfide, pyrite-sulfide, organic carbon, and carbonate content. Spatial variations of methane concentration and sulfate reduction were found in this study area. Shallow SMI and high methane concentration were found on the front of the accretional wedge close to the deformation front (Yung-An lineament). Some SMI depth is shallower than 1m. Methane and dissolved sulfide concentration were as high as 10mM at some locations. Concentration of methane and dissolved sulfide decreased while SMI depth increase away from the accretional wedge front from west to east. C-13 isotope depleted authigenic carbonate and mussel tissues found on gas seep area showed that methane is the major carbon source and the AOM is an important biogeochemical process in the study area. The range of sulfate and methane flux calculated by the Fick's law were 1.80-219 mmole/m2/yr and 0.01-87 mmole/m2/yr, respectively. Sulfate flux, however, was higher

  14. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo L.; Singh, Baljit K.; McCaughey, Kelly M.; Alcantara, Raniel R.; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S.; Nguyen, Henry N.; Friera, Annabelle M.; White, Kathy A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Claypool, Mark D.; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C.; Gelman, Marina S.; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L.; Creger, Daniel P.; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Powers, Scott K.; Masuda, Esteban S.; Taylor, Vanessa C.; Payan, Donald G.; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is associated with the development of diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction, and respiratory muscle weakness is thought to contribute significantly to delayed weaning of patients. Therefore, therapeutic strategies for preventing these processes may have clinical benefit. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in CMV-mediated diaphragm wasting and weakness in rats. CMV-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction coincided with marked increases in STAT3 phosphorylation on both tyrosine 705 (Tyr705) and serine 727 (Ser727). STAT3 activation was accompanied by its translocation into mitochondria within diaphragm muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhibition of JAK signaling during CMV prevented phosphorylation of both target sites on STAT3, eliminated the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 within the mitochondria, and reversed the pathologic alterations in mitochondrial function, reduced oxidative stress in the diaphragm, and maintained normal diaphragm contractility. In addition, JAK inhibition during CMV blunted the activation of key proteolytic pathways in the diaphragm, as well as diaphragm atrophy. These findings implicate JAK/STAT3 signaling in the development of diaphragm muscle atrophy and dysfunction during CMV and suggest that the delayed extubation times associated with CMV can be prevented by inhibition of Janus kinase signaling.—Smith, I. J., Godinez, G. L., Singh, B. K., McCaughey, K. M., Alcantara, R. R., Gururaja, T., Ho, M. S., Nguyen, H. N., Friera, A. M., White, K. A., McLaughlin, J. R., Hansen, D., Romero, J. M., Baltgalvis, K. A., Claypool, M. D., Li, W., Lang, W., Yam, G. C., Gelman, M. S., Ding, R., Yung, S. L., Creger, D. P., Chen, Y., Singh, R., Smuder, A. J., Wiggs, M. P., Kwon, O.-S., Sollanek, K. J., Powers, S. K., Masuda, E. S., Taylor, V. C., Payan, D. G

  15. IUSSP activities. Committee on Historical Demography. Report: Conference on Asian Population History, Taipei, Taiwan, 4-8 January 1996.

    PubMed

    Osirike, A B

    1996-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the Asian Population History Conference held in Taipei, Taiwan, January 4-8, 1996. 41 papers were presented on seven themes: Asian population growth, epidemiological transition and public health, mortality trends in pretransitional populations, marriage patterns and demographic systems, fertility levels and trends in pretransitional Asian populations, migration and population distribution, and family systems. Papers were presented by Anthony Reid; Chris Wilson; Bruce Fetter; Sumit Guha; Sheila Zurbrigg; Timothy Dyson and Monica Das Gupta; Cameron Campbell; Robert Shepherd; Ann Jannetta; Chai-Bin Park, Eise Yokoyama, and Sadahiko Nozaki; Peter Boomgaard; Jose Antonio Ortega Osona; Osamu Saito; Ts'ui-jung Liu and Shi-yung Liu; Wen Shang Yang; Dallas Fernando; Bruce Caldwell; A. Francis Gealogo; S. Irudaya Rajan; Kiyoshi Hamano; Guo Songyi; Wang Feng and James Lee; Christopher Langford; Terence H. Hull; Paul K.C. Liu; Xizhe Peng and Yangfang Hou; Ken'ichi Tomobe; Nokiro O. Tsuya; Peter Xenos; Daniel Doeppers; Chaonan Chen and Su-fen Liu; Jiang Tao; Akira Hayami and Emiko Ochiai; Arthur P. Wolf and Chuang Ying-chang; Myron L. Cohen; Burton Pasternak; Zhongwei Zhao; Li-shou Yang, Arland Thornton, and Tamara Hareven; Chi-chun Yi and Yu-hsia Lu; Lai Huimin; Ding Yizhuang; and John Caldwell, who chaired the concluding session. John Caldwell concluded that the conference provided an impressive collection of findings on Asian population history. There was much more research possible, particularly research based on India's rich historical data archives. Research was needed to confirm the assertion that Asian mortality transition began after the two world wars. A focus on natural family planning methods used prior to the transition was suggested. International Union for Scientific Study of Population Committee Chairman David Reher suggested multidisciplinary research on Asian differences in fertility, mortality, and migration. Hayami and Ts

  16. The distribution of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in the magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, Henrik; Shemansky, Don E.; Liu, Xianming

    2009-12-01

    The intensity of H Ly α1216A˚ ( 2P- 1S) and OI 1304A˚ ( 2p33s3S-2p4P) is mapped in the magnetosphere of Saturn using the ultraviolet imaging spectrograph (UVIS) [Esposito, L.W., Barth, C.A., Colwell, J.E., Lawrence, G.M., McClintock, W.E., Stewart, A.I.F., Keller, H.U., Korth, A., Lauche, H., Festou, M.C., Lane, A.L., Hansen, C.J., Maki, J.N., West, R.A., Jahn, H., Reulke, R., Warlich, K., Shemansky, D.E., Yung, Y.L., 2004. The Cassini ultraviolet imaging spectrograph investigation. Space Science Reviews 115, 299-361] onboard Cassini. Spatial coverage is built up by stepping the slit sequentially across the system (system scan). Data are obtained at a large range of space-craft-Saturn distances. The observed atomic hydrogen distribution is very broad, extending beyond 40RS in the equatorial plane, with the intensity increasing with decreasing distances to Saturn. The distribution displays persistent local-time asymmetries, and is seen connecting continuously to the upper atmosphere of the planet at sub-solar latitudes located well outside of the equatorial (ring) plane. This is consistent with the source of the atomic hydrogen being located at the top of the atmosphere on the sun-lit side of the planet on the southern hemisphere. In addition there are a number of temporally persistent features in the intensity distribution, indicating a complex hydrogen energy distribution. The emission from OI 1304A˚ is generally distributed as a broad torus centered around ˜4RS although the position of the peak intensity can vary by as much as ±1RS. There is significant intensity present out to ±10RS. HST observations of hydroxyl (OH) are re-analyzed and display a distribution half as broad as that of oxygen, also centered at 4RS. The observed atomic oxygen distribution requires a sourcing of 1.3×1028atomss-1 against loss due to charge capture with the plasma. Using the ion partitioning of Schippers et al. [2008. Multi-instrument analysis of electron populations in Saturn

  17. Effect of Solar Variability on Earth Climate Patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Feynman, J.

    2006-12-01

    .1029/2001JD001239, 2002; Ruzmaikin, A., J, Feynman, Xun Jiang, D. C. Noone, A. M. Waple &Y. L. Yung, Geophys. Res. Let., 31, L12201, 2004; Ruzmaikin, A., J. K. Lawrence &A. C. Cadavid, J. Atmos. Space Phys., 68, 1311, 2006.

  18. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E.; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J.; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B.; Bowman, Frederick P.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10−9 to 10−7 M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor–small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro. Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo. Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.—Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery

  19. NOTE: On the Deuterium Abundance on Mars and Some Related Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir

    2000-12-01

    Strong fractionation of deuterium in photolysis of H 2O and above the hygropause reduces the production of HD relative to H 2 on Mars by a factor of 3.7 total. The model by Y. L. Yung et al. (1988, Icarus76, 146-159) for deuterium fractionation in chemical reactions on Mars corrected for this factor results in (HD/H 2)/(HDO/H 2O)=0.43. This value may fit the deuterium abundance observed by V. A. Krasnopolsky et al. (1998, Science 280, 1576-1580) if the eddy diffusion coefficient does not depend on solar activity: K=1.4×10 13n-1/2 cm 2 s -1 (model 2). The Mariner 9 observations show very low variability of atomic oxygen at the 1.2 n bar pressure level (h˜125 km) with solar activity. This requires eddy diffusion to be proportional to the solar activity index F10.7: K=( F10.7 cm/30)×10 13n-1/2 cm 2 s -1 (model 1). The fractionation factor for escape of hydrogen isotopes is equal to 0.016 and 0.135 for models 1 and 2. These values have been averaged over the solar cycle. The three-reservoir model for hydrogen isotope fractionation suggested by Krasnopolsky et al. (1998) involves a reservoir composed primarily of water ice in the polar caps that isotopically interacts with the atmosphere. Assuming that water ice is half of the total volume of the polar caps and the polar-layered deposits, the total loss of water from Mars is equal to 65 and 120 m for models 1 and 2, respectively. Along with thermal and nonthermal escape, these values may include the loss of water by oxidation of regolith, if the released hydrogen escaped with isotopic fractionation. Although the solar-wind α particles are the main source of He on Mars, capture of the solar-wind H + and D + ions by Mars has a negligible effect on the thermospheric abundances of H and D. Improved observations of minor components in Mars' thermosphere may resolve the problem of eddy diffusion at various solar activity and choosing between the models.

  20. A mechanistic interpretation of the wave-particle interaction of Landau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-10-01

    There are two halves to the wave-particle interaction: first there is the effect of the wave on the resonant particles and second the effect of the resonant particles back on the wave. This presentation will focus on the second half of the interaction, which is usually described through Poisson's equation, or equivalently, through a dispersion relation obtained from Poisson's equation. For example, for the case of a Langmuir wave with phase velocity on the tail of a Maxwellian velocity distribution, the resonant electrons make a small imaginary contribution to the wave dispersion relation, which yields a small imaginary contribution to the wave frequency, implying wave damping. An alternate, more mechanical interpretation, starts from the observation that the wave-induced displacement of the non-resonant electrons satisfies an oscillator equation that is driven by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons. This field drives the oscillator resonantly since the resonant electrons travel at the wave phase velocity. From this perspective, the wave damping simply results from the drive of the bare electric field from the resonant electrons back on the wave oscillator. The resonant wave-particle interaction also occurs in waves that are governed by ExB drift dynamics, such as diocotron waves that are excited on a nonneutral plasma column. The column undergoes an ExB drift rotation, and at a resonant radius, the rotational flow matches the azimuthal phase speed of the wave, yielding a wave-particle resonance. Again a mechanical interpretation of the wave damping is possible. The bare electric field from the resonant particles produces ExB drift motion that symmetrizes the plasma column, that is, damps the wave. This mechanistic interpretation also works for the case of Landau growth and for the case where nonlinear effects, such as trapping, play a role in the resonant particle dynamics. In collaboration with Chi Yung Chim. Supported by National Science

  1. Phase diagram and density of fluids in the water-methanol system: experiments and implications for the crystallization and dynamics of subsurface oceans in icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, C.; Mantegazzi, D.; Deschamps, F.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2013-12-01

    : Deschamps, F., Mousis, O., Sanchez-Valle, C., and Lunine, J.I., Astrophys. J., 2010. Hodyss, R., Parkinson, C.D. Johnson, V.D., Stern, J.V., Goguen, J.D, Yung, Y.L., and Kanik, I., Geophys. Res. Lett., 1992. Miller, G.A., and Carpenter, D.A., J. Chem. Eng. Data, 1964. Vuillard, G., and Sanchez, M., Bull. Soc. Chim. France, 1961.

  2. The Sensitivity of Venus' Oxygen Budget to Venus' Mesospheric Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, K.; Mills, F.; Yung, Y.; Allen, M.

    2009-05-01

    The dominant chemical cycle in Venus' mesosphere above the clouds (70-110 km altitude) is the CO2 cycle. The primary steps of this cycle are photodissociation of CO2 to produce CO and O on the day side, transport of CO and O from the day side to the night side, formation of O2 on the day and night sides, and production of CO2 from CO and O2. Many photochemical models have attempted to identify the mechanisms by which CO2 is produced, but none has satisfactorily reproduced the observational upper limit on the O2 abundance (Trauger and Lunine 1983, Krasnopolsky 2006). In these models (Yung and DeMore 1982, Krasnopolsky and Parshev 1983, Pernice et al 2004) the assumed mesospheric vertical pressure and temperature profiles were derived from Pioneer Venus data. However, recent SPICAV observations (Bertaux et al. 2007) indicate mesospheric temperatures at 110 km may be up to 50 K warmer than the standard values adopted from the Pioneer Venus data. The CO2 cross section is sensitive to temperature, so an increase in temperature in the upper part of the mesosphere will increase photodissociation in the upper part of the mesosphere and decrease photodissociation at lower altitudes. These changes should, in turn, affect the abundances and vertical profiles of CO, O2 and O. We have developed a simplified version of the Caltech/JPL photochemical model (Allen et al. 1981) which limits the mesospheric chemistry solely to carbon and oxygen species. Using temperature dependent CO2 cross-section data in this model, we will investigate the impact of temperature on the vertical profile of CO2 photodissociation and the calculated abundances of CO, O, and O2. Two sets of temperature dependent CO2 cross section data a) Lewis and Carver 1983, and b) Yoshino et al. 1996; Parkinson et al 2003 will be utilized in this study. The sensitivity of the model results to differences between the two sets of cross section measurements will be quantified.

  3. Night OH in the mesosphere of Venus and Earth: A comparative planetology perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, C. D.; Brecht, A.; Bougher, S.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-05-01

    Satellite measurements of the terrestrial nightside mesosphere from the MLS/Aura MLS instrument show a layer of OH near 82 km. This layer confirms earlier measurements by ground-based UVFTS. The MLS and UVFTS observations measure OH in the lowest vibrational state and are distinct, but related chemically, from vibrationally-excited emission from the OH Meinel bands in the near infrared. The Caltech 1-D KINETICS model has been extended to include vibrational dependence of OH reactions and shows good agreement with MLS OH data and with observations of the Meinel bands [1]. The model shows a chemical lifetime of HOx that increases from less than a day at 80 km to over a month at 87 km. Above this altitude transport processes become an im-portant part of HOx chemistry. The model predicts that ground state OH represents 99% of the total OH up to 84 km. Similarly, Venus airglow emissions detected at wavelengths of 1.40 to 1.49 and 2.6 to 3.14 μm in limb observations by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) on the Venus Express spacecraft are attributed to the OH Meinel band transitions as well [2]. The integrated emission rates for the OH Meinel bands were measured to be 100±40 and 880±90 kR respectively, both peaking at an altitude of 96±2 km near midnight local time for the considered orbit. We use the same Caltech 1-D KINETICS model to model these observations for Venus as was used for the Earth [1] and discuss the conclusions from a comparative planetology perspec-tive, highlighting the similarities and differences between Venus and Earth. References: [1] Pickett H. M., Read W. G., Lee K. K. and Yung Y. L. (2006) GRL, 33, L19808. [2] Piccioni G., Drossart P., Zasova L., Migliorini A., Gérard J.-C., Mills F. P., Shakun A., Garcia Munoz A., Ignatiev N., Grassi D., Cottini V., Taylor F. W., Erard S., and the VIRTIS-Venus Express Technical Team (2008) A and A., 483, L29-L33.

  4. The role of spatial frequency channels in letter identification.

    PubMed

    Majaj, Najib J; Pelli, Denis G; Kurshan, Peri; Palomares, Melanie

    2002-04-01

    How we see is today explained by physical optics and retinal transduction, followed by feature detection, in the cortex, by a bank of parallel independent spatial-frequency-selective channels. It is assumed that the observer uses whichever channels are best for the task at hand. Our current results demand a revision of this framework: Observers are not free to choose which channels they use. We used critical-band masking to characterize the channels mediating identification of broadband signals: letters in a wide range of fonts (Sloan, Bookman, Künstler, Yung), alphabets (Roman and Chinese), and sizes (0.1-55 degrees ). We also tested sinewave and squarewave gratings. Masking always revealed a single channel, 1.6+/-0.7 octaves wide, with a center frequency that depends on letter size and alphabet. We define an alphabet's stroke frequency as the average number of lines crossed by a slice through a letter, divided by the letter width. For sharp-edged (i.e. broadband) signals, we find that stroke frequency completely determines channel frequency, independent of alphabet, font, and size. Moreover, even though observers have multiple channels, they always use the same channel for the same signals, even after hundreds of trials, regardless of whether the noise is low-pass, high-pass, or all-pass. This shows that observers identify letters through a single channel that is selected bottom-up, by the signal, not top-down by the observer. We thought shape would be processed similarly at all sizes. Bandlimited signals conform more to this expectation than do broadband signals. Here, we characterize processing by channel frequency. For sinewave gratings, as expected, channel frequency equals sinewave frequency f(channel)=f. For bandpass-filtered letters, channel frequency is proportional to center frequency f(channel) proportional, variantf(center) (log-log slope 1) when size is varied and the band (c/letter) is fixed, but channel frequency is less than proportional to center

  5. Cryohydrovolcanism: A Missing Link in the Mars Water Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, E. J.

    2001-12-01

    Observations of the apparently recent flow of liquid water on the surface of Mars (Malin & Edgett 2000, Science 288, 2330) demand an explanatory mechanism and suggest a more complex history for martian water. Gaidos (2001, Icarus, in press) has proposed that freezing and pressurization of deep aquifers, a consequence of planetary cooling or long-term changes in climate, results in the rapid expulsion of liquid water to the surface or into the shallow regolith where it can carve the gully-like features. In terrestrial permafrost regions, freezing and pressurization of confined aquifers creates pingos and icing outbursts. Cryohydrovolcanism, if it occurs on Mars, provides a mechanism for the transport of water from deep aquifers to the surface, and from there to the atmosphere, and polar caps. This activity may have tangible geomorphological, hydrological, and geochemical effects other than the gullies. At epochs of low obliquity, water ice erupted to the surface or into the interstitial space of the shallow crust will be unstable with respect to the polar caps and will migrate to high latitudes. During periods of high obliquity, lower insolation and higher atmospheric water vapor content may allow water erupted at lowers latitudes to persist as surface or near-surface ice for significant periods of time. The total volume of water displaced from the freezing of a global aquifer in an idealized regolith (Clifford 1993, J. Geophys. Res. 98, 10973) is comparable to that in the present polar caps. If the D/H of the reservoir is similar to that of SNC meteorites (e.g., Leshin 2000, Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 2017) the current mean rate of water transport to the surface is sufficient to buffer atmospheric D/H at its present value against fractionating escape to space (Kass & Yung 1999, Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 365; Donahue 2001, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 827). In fact, the model indicates that significant cryovolcanic activity has taken place within the past 10 kyr

  6. 12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yahya; Tezel, Onur; Salman, Necati; Cevik, Erdem; Algaba-Montes, Margarita; Oviedo-García, Alberto; Patricio-Bordomás, Mayra; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Ali, Abbas; Mustafa, Alrayah; Abdelrahman, Ihab; Bahar, Mustafa; Ali, Osama; Lester Kirchner, H; Prosen, Gregor; Anzic, Ajda; Leeson, Paul; Bahreini, Maryam; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Hosseinnejad, Houman; Blecher, Gabriel; Meek, Robert; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Ćuti, Edina Ćatić; Belina, Stanko; Vančina, Tihomir; Kovačević, Idriz; Rustemović, Nadan; Chang, Ikwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Cheng, Chi-Yung; Pan, Hsiu-Yung; Kung, Chia-Te; Ćurčić, Ela; Pritišanac, Ena; Planinc, Ivo; Medić, Marijana Grgić; Radonić, Radovan; Fasina, Abiola; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova L; Henwood, Patricia S; Fochi, Oliviero; Favarato, Moreno; Bonanomi, Ezio; Tomić, Ivan; Ha, Youngrock; Toh, Hongchuen; Harmon, Elizabeth; Chan, Wilma; Baston, Cameron; Morrison, Gail; Shofer, Frances; Hua, Angela; Kim, Sharon; Tsung, James; Gunaydin, Isa; Kekec, Zeynep; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Kim, Jinjoo; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Gyoosung; Shim, Dowon; Lee, Ji-Han; Ambrozic, Jana; Prokselj, Katja; Lucovnik, Miha; Simenc, Gabrijela Brzan; Mačiulienė, Asta; Maleckas, Almantas; Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Mačiulis, Vytautas; Macas, Andrius; Mohite, Sharad; Narancsik, Zoltan; Možina, Hugon; Nikolić, Sara; Hansel, Jan; Petrovčič, Rok; Mršić, Una; Orlob, Simon; Lerchbaumer, Markus; Schönegger, Niklas; Kaufmann, Reinhard; Pan, Chun-I; Wu, Chien-Hung; Pasquale, Sarah; Doniger, Stephanie J; Yellin, Sharon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Potisek, Maja; Drnovšek, Borut; Leskovar, Boštjan; Robinson, Kristine; Kraft, Clara; Moser, Benjamin; Davis, Stephen; Layman, Shelley; Sayeed, Yusef; Minardi, Joseph; Pasic, Irmina Sefic; Dzananovic, Amra; Pasic, Anes; Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Hauptman, Ana Godan; Brajkovic, Ana Vujaklija; Babel, Jaksa; Peklic, Marina; Radonic, Vedran; Bielen, Luka; Ming, Peh Wee; Yezid, Nur Hafiza; Mohammed, Fatahul Laham; Huda, Zainal Abidin; Ismail, Wan Nasarudin Wan; Isa, W Yus Haniff W; Fauzi, Hashairi; Seeva, Praveena; Mazlan, Mohd Zulfakar

    2016-09-01

    veterans: a retrospective analysis from the first Croatian veteran's hospitalEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz KovačevićA15 The challenge of AAA: unusual case of obstructive jaundiceEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Nadan RustemovićA16 Educational effectiveness of easy-made new simulator model for ultrasound-guided procedures in pediatric patients: vascular access and foreign body managementIkwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun KimA17 Detection of uterine rupture by point-of-care ultrasound at emergency department: a case reportChi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te KungA18 Abdominal probe in the hands of interns as a relevant diagnostic tool in revealing the cause of heart failureEla Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan RadonićA19 Needs assessment of the potential utility of point-of-care ultrasound within the Zanzibar health systemAbiola Fasina, Anthony J. Dean, Nova L. Panebianco, Patricia S. HenwoodA20 Ultrasonographic diagnosis of tracheal compressionOliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio BonanomiA21 The role of ultrasound in the detection of lung infiltrates in critically ill patients: a pilot studyMarijana Grgić Medić, Ivan Tomić, Radovan RadonićA22 The SAFER Lasso; a novel approach using point-of-care ultrasound to evaluate patients with abdominal complaints in the emergency departmentYoungrock Ha, Hongchuen TohA23 Awareness and use of clinician-performed ultrasound among clinical clerkship facultyElizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Nova Panebianco, Anthony J. DeanA24 Clinical outcomes in the use of lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumoniasAngela Hua, Sharon Kim, James TsungA25 Effectiveness of ultrasound in hypotensive patientsIsa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan AyA26 Moderate-to-severe left ventricular ejection fraction related to short-term mortality of patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

  7. Environmental impact studies for gas hydrate production test in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2017-04-01

    To develop potential future energy resources, the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program has been carried out since 2005. The program has been supported by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE), and carried out by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), the Korea Gas Corporation (KOGAS) and the Korea National Oil Corporation (KNOC) under the management of Gas Hydrate R&D Organization (GHDO). As a part of this national program, geophysical surveys, geological studies on gas hydrates and two deep drilling expeditions were performed. Gas hydrate-bearing sand layers suitable for production using current technologies were found during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) in 2010. Environmental impact studies (EIS) also have been carried out since 2012 by KIGAM in cooperation with domestic and foreign universities and research organizations to ensure safe production test that will be performed in near future. The schedule of production test is being planned. The EIS includes assessment of environmental risks, examination on domestic environmental laws related with production test, collection of basic oceanographic information, and baseline and monitoring surveys. Oceanographic information and domestic environmental laws are already collected and analyzed. Baseline survey has been performed using the in-house developed system, KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) since 2013. It will also be performed. R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM used for KISOS operation. As a part of this EIS, pseudo-3D Chirp survey also was carried out in 2014 to determine the development of fault near the potential testing site. Using KIGAM Seafloor Monitoring System (KIMOS), monitoring survey is planned to be performed from three month before production test to three months after production test. The geophysical survey for determining the change of gas hydrate reservoirs and production-efficiency around the production well would also be

  8. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  9. Comparison of misfit functions for phase-only inversion in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G.; Jeong, W.; Min, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    results than the logarithmic and conventional II methods. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the KETEP grant funded by the Korean government MOTIE and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" grant funded by the MOF of Korea.

  10. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results from the Western Rim of Endeavour Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Gellert, R.; Sims, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rover Oppor­tunity includes the Microscopic Imager (MI), a fixed-focus close-up camera mounted on the instrument arm. The MI acquires images at a scale of 31 µm/pixel over a broad spectral range (400 to 700 nm) using only natural illumination of target surfaces. Opportunity has been exploring exposures of Noachian-age rocks along the rim of Endeavour crater since August 2011, moti­vated by orbital spectral evidence for phyllosilicates at multiple locations along the crater's rim. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, the rover mis­sion is focusing on characterizing outcrop multispectral reflectance with Pancam, elemental chemistry with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and microtexture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. In addition, the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) gives an indication of rock hardness. After traversing more than 42 km (26 miles) since landing in 2004, the rover entered "Marathon Valley" to investigate rock exposures in which phyllosili­cates were detected by the CRISM instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Where clastic textures are resolved, the outcrop pavement in Marathon Valley consists of poorly-sorted dark, sub-rounded to sub-angular clasts in a soft (based on RAT grind data), fine-grained, brighter matrix (see Figure showing 5x5 cm post-grind MI mosaic of "Pierre Pinaut3," acquired on Sol 4373 when target was fully shadowed). These observations are consistent with high-energy emplacement due to impact cratering. The soft, recessive, altered appearance of the matrix material suggests that it is the likely host of phyllosilicate alteration in these rocks. The bedrock appears to have been aqueously altered, but APXS measurements of major elements indicate that the alteration was isochemical, unlike in other Endeavour rim rocks. Also, MI views of a small patch of dark sand

  11. SU-E-I-92: Is Photon Starvation Preventing Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm From Working in KVCT?

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-01

    hip implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  12. Fundamental studies of diffusion barriers for copper metallization and atomic layer deposited high-kappa films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Prodyut

    Copper is used as interconnect material due to its lower resistivity, higher melting point and higher electromigration resistance than those of Al. However, Cu diffuses rapidly into Si and SiO2, to form Cu-silicides at temperatures as low as 200°C. Being highly resistive, Cu-silicides are detrimental in the performance of the integrated circuits. The continued downscaling of device dimensions has placed a high priority on the development of thin diffusion barrier layers in copper metallization. The effectiveness and performance of Mo-based bi-layers, such as Mo/WN, Mo/Ti, and Mo/TiN, and a ternary single layer, Mo-V nitride, deposited using magnetron sputtering are investigated in this work. The Cu/barrier film(s)/Si structures are annealed at high temperatures in N2 and the interactions between the layers along with the possible formation of any anneal-induced reaction products are evaluated using different techniques. The formation of Cu3Si due to the intermixing of Cu and Si is indicative of barrier breakdown. The decreasing device dimensions in microelectronic circuits set high demands for film conformality as the barrier layer thickness is anticipated to decrease to 1.9 nm for the 25 nm node (by 2015). In order to meet future requirement of ultrathin barriers, the apparently counter-intuitive approach of using insulating films, such as HfO2 and Al2O 3, deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique has been studied and revealed interesting and promising results. In microelectronics fabrication, there is also a need for thin films with high dielectric constant (kappa) in order to continue device dimension reduction of logic and memory devices. With conventional SiO2 based materials, continued scale minimization mandates single digit atomic layer thicknesses of the dielectric layers that lead to the ultimate limitation of quantum mechanical tunneling. To overcome this limitation, high-kappa metal oxides have been recognized as future gate dielectrics

  13. SU-C-207-01: Four-Dimensional Inverse Geometry Computed Tomography: Concept and Its Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kang, S; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In past few years, the inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) system has been developed to overcome shortcomings of a conventional computed tomography (CT) system such as scatter problem induced from large detector size and cone-beam artifact. In this study, we intend to present a concept of a four-dimensional (4D) IGCT system that has positive aspects above all with temporal resolution for dynamic studies and reduction of motion artifact. Methods: Contrary to conventional CT system, projection data at a certain angle in IGCT was a group of fractionated narrow cone-beam projection data, projection group (PG), acquired from multi-source array which have extremely short time gap of sequential operation between each of sources. At this, for 4D IGCT imaging, time-related data acquisition parameters were determined by combining multi-source scanning time for collecting one PG with conventional 4D CBCT data acquisition sequence. Over a gantry rotation, acquired PGs from multi-source array were tagged time and angle for 4D image reconstruction. Acquired PGs were sorted into 10 phase and image reconstructions were independently performed at each phase. Image reconstruction algorithm based upon filtered-backprojection was used in this study. Results: The 4D IGCT had uniform image without cone-beam artifact on the contrary to 4D CBCT image. In addition, the 4D IGCT images of each phase had no significant artifact induced from motion compared with 3D CT. Conclusion: The 4D IGCT image seems to give relatively accurate dynamic information of patient anatomy based on the results were more endurable than 3D CT about motion artifact. From this, it will be useful for dynamic study and respiratory-correlated radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Industrial R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT [10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI guided tumor tracking] and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A

  14. Swell effect correction for the high-resolution marine seismic data acquired using an airgun and an 8-channel streamer cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Wonsik; Kim, Byoung-yeop; Cheong, Snons; Kim, Young-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Energy Technology Innovation (ETI) Project of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE). The authors thank the officers and crew of the R/V Tamhae II for their efforts in the field survey.

  15. SU-E-T-258: Development of a New Patient Set-Up Monitoring System Using Force Sensing Resistor (FSR) Sensor for the Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, M; Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    the Industrial R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT. [10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI guided tumor tracking] and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT&Future Planning.

  16. Strong Local-Nonlocal Coupling for Integrated Fracture Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John; Silling, Stewart A.; Mitchell, John A.; Seleson, Pablo D.; Bond, Stephen D.; Parks, Michael L.; Turner, Daniel Z.; Burnett, Damon J.; Ostien, Jakob; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-09-01

    dramatically improved consistency at domain boundaries, and an enhancement to the meshfree discretization applied to peridynamic models that removes irregularities at the limit of the nonlocal length scale and dramatically improves conver- gence behavior. Finally, a novel approach for modeling ductile failure has been developed, moti- vated by the desire to apply coupled local-nonlocal models to a wide variety of materials, including ductile metals, which have received minimal attention in the peridynamic literature. Software im- plementation of the partial-stress coupling strategy, the position-aware peridynamic constitutive models, and the strategies for improving the convergence behavior of peridynamic models was completed within the Peridigm and Albany codes, developed at Sandia National Laboratories and made publicly available under the open-source 3-clause BSD license.

  17. Presolar Graphite from AGB Stars: Microstructure and s-Process Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, Thomas K.; Stadermann, Frank J.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-10-01

    Correlated transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry with submicron spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) investigations of the same presolar graphites spherules from the Murchison meteorite were conducted, to link the isotopic anomalies with the mineralogy and chemical composition of the graphite and its internal grains. Refractory carbide grains (especially titanium carbide) are commonly found within the graphite spherules, and most have significant concentrations of Zr, Mo, and Ru in solid solution, elements primarily produced by s-process nucleosynthesis. The effect of chemical fractionation on the Mo/Ti ratio in these carbides is limited, and therefore from this ratio one can infer the degree of s-process enrichment in the gas from which the graphite condensed. The resulting s-process enrichments within carbides are large (~200 times solar on average), showing that most of the carbide-containing graphites formed in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. NanoSIMS measurements of these graphites also show isotopically light carbon (mostly in the 100<12C/13C<400 range). The enrichment of these presolar graphites in both s-process elements and 12C considerably exceeds that astronomically observed around carbon stars. However, a natural correlation exists between 12C and s-process elements, as both form in the He intershell region of thermally pulsing AGB stars and are dredged up together to the surface. Their observation together suggests that these graphites may have formed in chemically and isotopically inhomogeneous regions around AGB stars, such as high-density knots or jets. As shown in the companion paper, a gas density exceeding that expected for smooth mass outflows is required for graphite of the observed size to condense at all in circumstellar environments, and the spatially inhomogeneous, high-density regions from which they condense may also be incompletely mixed with the surrounding gas. We have greatly expanded

  18. SU-E-I-60: Quality Assurance Testing Methods and Customized Phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y

    2015-06-15

    factors simultaneously. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  19. Oceanus: A New Frontiers orbiter to study Titan's potential habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Hayes, Alex; Malaska, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Trainer, Melissa; Tortora, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    product of the decay of 40K contained in the silicate core, and methane whose origin is still controversial argue for ex-change processes between the interior and the atmosphere. Like we see here on Earth, these processes will be chronicled in the interaction between geological features on Titan's surface. Oceanus will investigate specific features identified by Cassini as potential candidates for cryvolcanism, impact, and tectonic processes that could facilitate exchange with the interior. Acknowledgments: This work has been per-formed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. References: [1] Stofan E.R. et al. (2007) Nature. [2] Sotin C. et al. (2012) Icarus. [3] Iess L. et al. (2012) Science. [4] Castillo-Rogez J.C. and Lunine J.I. (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett. [5] Coates A.J. et al. (2007) Geophys. Res. Let. [6] Lavvas P. et al. (2008) Planet. Space Sci. [7] Yung Y.L. et al. (1984) Astrophys. J. [8] Sotin C. et al. (2005) Nature.

  20. Titan's Propane from Cassini Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Flaud, J.-M.; Bezard, B.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Ansty, T. M.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    in this spectral region. In this paper, we present the CIRS spectra showing all the visible propane bands, with a view to stimulating laboratory spectroscopic study of the remaining mid-IR bands (especially at 869, 922, 1054 and 1158 cm-1). We also report on our progress in the modeling of the 6-8 and 13 micron bands, and give an update on the propane abundance at low latitudes. References: Coustenis et al., Icarus 161, pp. 383-403, 2003. Flaud et al., J. Chem. Phys. 114, pp. 9361-9366, 2001. Husson et al., J. Quant. Spectro. Rad. Trans. 48, pp. 509-518, 1992. Khare et al., Icarus 60, pp. 127-137, 1984. Maguire et al, Nature 292, pp. 683-686, 1981. Roe et al., Astrophys. J. 597, pp. L65-L68, 2003. Yung et al., Astrophys. J. Supp. 55, pp. 465-506, 1984.

  1. The influence of photochemical fractionation on the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratios - detailed analysis of current photochemical loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.; Liang, M. C.; Bell, J.

    2012-04-01

    . Robertson, and S. Lebonnois: " Coupled ion and neutral rotating model of Titan’s upper atmosphere". Icarus, Vol. 197, pp. 236-262, 2008. Liang M., A. N. Heays, B. R. Lewis, S. T. Gibson and Y. L. Yung: “Source of nitrogen isotope anomaly in HCN in the atmosphere of Titan”. Astrophys. J., Vol. 664, pp. L115-L118, 2007. Mandt, K. E., J. H. Waite, Jr., B. A. Magee, J. Bell, J. Lunine, O. Mousis and D. Cordier: “Isotopic evolution of Titan’s main atmospheric constituents”. Planetary and Space Science, Vol. 57, pp. 1917-1930, 2009. Niemann, H.B., S.K. Atreya, J.E. Demick, D. Gautier, J.A. Haberman, D.N. Harpold, W.T. Kasprzak, J.I. Lunine, T.C. Owen and F. Raulin: “The composition of Titan’s lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment”. J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 115, pp. E12006, 2010. Vinatier, S., et al.: “Vertical abundance profiles of hydrocarbons in Titan’s atmosphere at 15o S and 80o N retrieved from Cassini/CIRS spectra”. Icarus, Vol. 188, pp. 120-138, 2007.

  2. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    ., Hess, P. G., Collins, W. D., Emmons, L. K., Ginoux, P., Luo, C. and Tie, X. X. (2005). "Response of a coupled chemistry-climate model to changes in aerosol emissions: Global impact on the hydrological cycle and the tropospheric burdens of OH, ozone and NOx." Geophysical Research Letters 32(16). Lamarque, J.-F., Kinnison, D. E., Hess, P. G. and Vitt, F. (2008). "Simulated lower stratospheric trends between 1970 and 2005: identifying the role of climate and composition changes." Journal of Geophysical Research 113(D12301). Price, H., Jaegle, L., Rice, A., Quay, P., Novelli, P. C. and Gammon, R. (2007). "Global budget of molecular hydrogen and its deuterium content: constraints from ground station, cruise, and aircraft observations." Journal of Geophysical Research 112(D22108). Sanderson, M. G., Collins, W. J., Derwent, R. G. and Johnson, C. E. (2003). "Simulation of Global Hydrogen Levels Using a Lagrangian Three-Dimensional Model." Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 46(1): 15-28. Schultz, M. G., Diehl, T., Brasseur, G. P. and Zittel, W. (2003). "Air Pollution and Climate-Forcing Impacts of a Global Hydrogen Economy." Science 302(5645): 624-627. Tromp, T. K., Shia, R. L., Allen, M., Eiler, J. M. and Yung, Y. L. (2003). "Potential environmental impact of a hydrogen economy on the stratosphere." Science 300(5626): 1740-1742. van Ruijven, B., Hari, L., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2008). "The potential role of hydrogen in India and Western Europe." Energy Policy 36(5): 1649-1665. van Ruijven, B., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2007). "The potential role of hydrogen in energy systems with and without climate policy." International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32(12): 1655-1672. van Vuuren, D. P. (2007). Energy systems and climate policy. Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Faculty of Science. Utrecht, Utrecht University: 326.

  3. Accidental Predissociation: A Special Case of Photo-Induced Isotope Fractionation Effect and Possible Occurrence in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    light of these data, anomalous isotopic fractionations associated with accidental predissociation will be discussed for the CO and N2. These fractionations are important as VUV-photodissociation of CO and N2 have been invoked in solar nebula (self-shielding, (9-10)) to explain the observed iso-topic signatures in different solar system objects neglecting these isotope effects during photo-dissociation. References: 1. Y. L. Yung, C. E. Miller, Science 278, 1778 (1997). 2. S. Chakraborty, S. K. Bhattacharya, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2164 (2003). 3. H. Lefebvre-Brion, R. W. Field, The Spectra and Dynamics of Diatomic Molecules. (Elsevier Academic Press, 2004). 4. A. J. Lorquet, J. C. Lorquet, Chem. Phys. Lett. 26, 138 (1974). 5. W. Ubachs, I. Velchev, P. Cacciani, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 547 (2000). 6. H. Lefebvre-Brion, R. Colin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 33 (1977). 7. S. Chakraborty, M. Ahmed, T. L. Jackson, M. H. Thiemens, Science 321, 1328 (2008). 8. S. Chakraborty, M. Ahmed, T. L. Jackson, M. H. Thiemens, Science 324, 4 (2009). 9. R. N. Clayton, Nature 415, 860 (2002). 10. J. R. Lyons, E. D. Young, Nature 435, 317 (2005).

  4. Wave propagation, scattering and emission in complex media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    propagation in forested environment / K. Sarabandi, I. Koh. Angle-of-arrival fluctuations due to meteorological conditions in the diffraction zone of C-band radio waves, propagated over the ground surface / T. A. Tyufilina, A. A. Meschelyakov, M. V. Krutikov. Simulating radio channel statistics using ray based prediction codes / H. L. Bertoni. Measurement and simulation of ultra wideband antenna elements / W. Sörgel, W. Wiesbeck. The experimental investigation of a ground-placed radio complex synchronization system / V. P. Denisov ... [et al.] -- VII. Computational electromagnetics. Analysis of 3-D electromagnetic wave scattering with the Krylov subspace FFT iterative methods / R. S. Chen ... [et al.]. Sparse approximate inverse preconditioned iterative algorithm with block toeplitz matrix for fast analysis of microstrip circuits / L. Mo, R. S. Chen, E. K. N. Yung. An Efficient modified interpolation technique for the translation operators in MLFMA / J. Hu, Z. P. Nie, G. X. Zou. Efficient solution of 3-D vector electromagnetic scattering by CG-MLFMA with partly approximate iteration / J. Hu, Z. P. Nie. The effective constitution at interface of different media / L. G. Zheng, W. X. Zhang. Novel basis functions for quadratic hexahedral edge element / P. Liu ... [et al.]. A higher order FDTD method for EM wave propagation in collision plasmas / S. B. Liu, J. J. Mo, N. C. Yuan. Attenuation of electric field eradiated by underground source / J. P. Dong, Y. G. Gao.

  5. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    (Texas Tech University), Weidong Li (IHEP) 3) Readout techniques - Gerald Eigen (University of Bergen), Zheng Wang (IHEP) 4) Operating calorimeters and calibration - Marat Gataullin (CERN), Francesco Lanni (BNL) 5) Future calorimetry - Tohru Takeshita (Shinshu University), Lei Xia (Argonne National Laboratory) 6) Astrophysics and neutrino calorimetry - Giuliana Fiorillo (INFN), Hiro Tajima (SLAC) List of Participants AKCHURIN, NuralTexas Tech University AN, ZhenghuaIHEP AUFFRAY, EtiennetteCERN BANFI, DaniloUniversità degli Studi di Milano, INFN BASHARINA-FRESHVILLE, AnastasiaUniversity College London BEAUCHEMIN, Pierre-HuguesUniversity of Oxford BENAGLIA, Andrea DavideUniversity of Milano - Bicocca and INFN BIAN, JianminIHEP BIINO, CristinaINFN BILKI, BurakUniversity of Iowa BLAHA, JanLAPP BOUDRY, VincentLLR / CNRS-IN2P3 CAI, XiaoIHEP CAPONE, AntonioPhysics Department University "La Sapienza" and INFN CAVALLARI, FrancescaCERN and INFN Rome CECCHI, ClaudiaUniversity di Perugia e INFN CHANG, JinfanIHEP CHEN, HuchengBrookhaven National Laboratory CHILDERS, TaylorUniversität Heidelberg - Kirchhoff-Institut für Physik DAO, ValerioGeneva University - DPNC DE LA TAILLE, ChristopheIN2P3/OMEGA-LAL DIEMOZ, MarcellaINFN Roma DOTTI, AndreaCERN EIGEN, GeraldUniversity of Bergen EPIFANOV, DenisBudker Institute of Nuclear Physics FAIVRE, JulienLPSC Grenoble France FANG, JianIHEP FANG, ShuangshiIHEP FANTONI, AlessandraINFN - LNF FERRI, FedericoCEA/Saclay Irfu/SPP FERRONI, FernandoSapienza University & INFN Roma FISK, Henry EugeneFermilab GABALDON, CarolinaCERN GARUTTI, ErikaDESY GAUDIO, GabriellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia GILLBERG, DagCarleton University GIOVANNINI, PaolaMax-Planck-Institut für Physik GLAZOV, AlexanderDESY GRACHOV, OlegUniversity of Kansas HAPPACHER, FabioINFN HE, MiaoIHEP HORI, YasutoUniversity of Tokyo, CNS HU, TaoIHEP HULTH, Per-OlofStockholm University JUN, Soon YungCarnegie Mellon University JURK, StefanISEG Spezialelektronik gmb