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Sample records for motile mammalian cilia

  1. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  2. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  3. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Kleene, Steven J.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and send signals to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane, which results in changes in concentrations of ions, especially calcium ions, in the cilia. These changes, in turn, affect motility and the ability of the signaling pathways in the cilia and cell body to carry on the signal transduction. We review here the activities of ion channels in cilia in animals from protists to vertebrates. PMID:25892740

  4. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  5. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Wesley R; Malarkey, Erik B; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C; Porath, Jonathan D; Birket, Susan E; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Challa, Anil K; Kesterson, Robert A; Rowe, Steven M; Drummond, Iain A; Parant, John M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Porter, Mary E; Yoder, Bradley K; Berbari, Nicolas F

    2016-07-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants in

  6. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Wesley R.; Malarkey, Erik B.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Birket, Susan E.; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Drummond, Iain A.; Parant, John M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or ‘primary’ cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants

  7. Sensory functions of motile cilia and implication for bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raksha; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Horani, Amjad; Cabellon, Michelle C.; Walter, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are specialized organelles that extend from the surface of cells into the local environment. Airway epithelial cell cilia are motile to provide mucociliary clearance for host defense. On other cells, solitary cilia are specialized to detect chemical or mechanosensory signals. Sensory proteins in motile cilia have recently been identified that detect shear stress, osmotic force, fluid flow, bitter taste and sex hormones. The relationship of sensory function in human motile cilia to disease is now being revealed. One example is polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. As a complex, these proteins function as a flow sensor in cilia and are mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The polycystins are also expressed in motile cilia of the airways, potentially operating as sensors in the lung. Computed tomography studies from patients with ADPKD revealed radiographic evidence for bronchiectasis, suggesting that polycystin-1 and -2 are important in lung function. The expression of this complex and sensory channel TRPV4, and bitter taste and sex hormones receptors in motile cilia indicate that the cell is wired to interpret environmental cues to regulate cilia beat frequency and other functions. Defective signaling of sensory proteins may result in a ciliopathy that includes lung disease. PMID:22202111

  8. Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S; King, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are cellular organelles that appeared early in the evolution of eukaryotes. These structures and the pool of about 600genes involved in their assembly and function are highly conserved in organisms as distant as single-cell protists, like Chlamydomonas reinhardtti, and humans (Silflow and Lefebvre, 2001). A significant body of work on the biology of cilia has been produced over the years, with the help of powerful model organisms including C. reinhardtti, Caenorhabditis elegans, sea urchins, and mice. However, specific limitations of these systems, especially regarding the ability to efficiently study gene loss-of-function, warrant the search for a new model organism to study cilia and cilia-based motility. Schmidtea mediterranea is a species of planarian (Class: Tubellaria) with a well-defined monostratified ciliated epithelium, which contributes to the motility of the organism, in addition to other more specialized ciliary structures. The use of S. mediterranea as an experimental system to study stem cell biology and regeneration has led to a recently sequenced genome and to the development of a wide array of powerful tools including the ability to inhibit gene expression via RNA interference. In addition, we have developed and describe here a number of methods for analyzing motile cilia in S. mediterranea. Overall, S. mediterranea is a highly versatile, easy to maintain, and genetically tractable organism that provides a powerful alternative model system for the study of motile cilia.

  9. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  10. Specialized Cilia in Mammalian Sensory Systems.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nathalie; Lösl, Marlene; Schröder, Nadja; Gießl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved and important microtubule-based organelles that project from the surface of eukaryotic cells and act as antennae to sense extracellular signals. Moreover, cilia have emerged as key players in numerous physiological, developmental, and sensory processes such as hearing, olfaction, and photoreception. Genetic defects in ciliary proteins responsible for cilia formation, maintenance, or function underlie a wide array of human diseases like deafness, anosmia, and retinal degeneration in sensory systems. Impairment of more than one sensory organ results in numerous syndromic ciliary disorders like the autosomal recessive genetic diseases Bardet-Biedl and Usher syndrome. Here we describe the structure and distinct functional roles of cilia in sensory organs like the inner ear, the olfactory epithelium, and the retina of the mouse. The spectrum of ciliary function in fundamental cellular processes highlights the importance of elucidating ciliopathy-related proteins in order to find novel potential therapies. PMID:26378583

  11. Specialized Cilia in Mammalian Sensory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Nathalie; Lösl, Marlene; Schröder, Nadja; Gießl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved and important microtubule-based organelles that project from the surface of eukaryotic cells and act as antennae to sense extracellular signals. Moreover, cilia have emerged as key players in numerous physiological, developmental, and sensory processes such as hearing, olfaction, and photoreception. Genetic defects in ciliary proteins responsible for cilia formation, maintenance, or function underlie a wide array of human diseases like deafness, anosmia, and retinal degeneration in sensory systems. Impairment of more than one sensory organ results in numerous syndromic ciliary disorders like the autosomal recessive genetic diseases Bardet-Biedl and Usher syndrome. Here we describe the structure and distinct functional roles of cilia in sensory organs like the inner ear, the olfactory epithelium, and the retina of the mouse. The spectrum of ciliary function in fundamental cellular processes highlights the importance of elucidating ciliopathy-related proteins in order to find novel potential therapies. PMID:26378583

  12. Efficient live fluorescence imaging of intraflagellar transport in mammalian primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a motile process critical for building most cilia, including those of mammalian cells. Defects in IFT lead to short or missing cilia, and in animals can cause defects in development, for example in hedgehog mediated signaling, as well as disease symptoms such as polycystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration. Understanding how IFT works is thus a high priority in ciliary biology. Imaging of living cells has played a key role in understanding the mechanism of IFT, and this is particularly the case in mammalian cells where biochemical analysis of IFT is extremely difficult, due to the difficulty of isolating cilia away from the rest of the cell. Imaging IFT in living mammalian cells requires solution to several problems: constructing cell lines that express fluorescent protein tagged IFT proteins, obtaining cell populations with a high degree of ciliation, confocal or TIRF imaging with sufficient time resolution and signal to noise ratio to observe the majority of IFT particles as they travel back and forth inside the cilium, and analyzing the image data to extract quantitative measurements of IFT. We describe optimized solutions to each of these technical challenges. Using the approaches described here, mammalian cultured cells become powerful platforms for quantitative analysis of IFT dynamics. PMID:25837392

  13. The coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151 is required for the function of IFT-dependent motile cilia in animals.

    PubMed

    Jerber, Julie; Baas, Dominique; Soulavie, Fabien; Chhin, Brigitte; Cortier, Elisabeth; Vesque, Christine; Thomas, Joëlle; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles endowed with essential physiological and developmental functions. In humans, disruption of cilia motility or signaling leads to complex pleiotropic genetic disorders called ciliopathies. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multi-subunit motile components such as dynein arms, but mechanisms underlying their assembly pathway and transport into the axoneme are still largely unknown. We identified a previously uncharacterized coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151, which is evolutionarily conserved in motile ciliated species and shares ancient features with the outer dynein arm-docking complex 2 of Chlamydomonas. In Drosophila, we show that CG14127/CCDC151 is associated with motile intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent cilia and required for geotaxis behavior of adult flies. In zebrafish, Ccdc151 is expressed in tissues with motile cilia, and morpholino-induced depletion of Ccdc151 leads to left-right asymmetry defects and kidney cysts. We demonstrate that Ccdc151 is required for proper motile function of cilia in the Kupffer's vesicle and in the pronephros by controlling dynein arm assembly, showing that Ccdc151 is a novel player in the control of IFT-dependent dynein arm assembly in animals. However, we observed that CCDC151 is also implicated in other cellular functions in vertebrates. In zebrafish, ccdc151 is involved in proper orientation of cell divisions in the pronephros and genetically interacts with prickle1 in this process. Furthermore, knockdown experiments in mammalian cells demonstrate that CCDC151 is implicated in the regulation of primary cilium length. Hence, CCDC151 is required for motile cilia function in animals but has acquired additional non-motile functions in vertebrates.

  14. c21orf59/kurly Controls Both Cilia Motility and Polarization.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Kimberly M; Grimes, Daniel T; Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Werner, Michael E; Ku, Tse-Shuen J; Kim, Sun K; Pelliccia, Jose L; Morante, Nicholas F C; Mitchell, Brian J; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2016-03-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based projections that function in the movement of extracellular fluid. This requires cilia to be: (1) motile and driven by dynein complexes and (2) correctly polarized on the surface of cells, which requires planar cell polarity (PCP). Few factors that regulate both processes have been discovered. We reveal that C21orf59/Kurly (Kur), a cytoplasmic protein with some enrichment at the base of cilia, is needed for motility; zebrafish mutants exhibit characteristic developmental abnormalities and dynein arm defects. kur was also required for proper cilia polarization in the zebrafish kidney and the larval skin of Xenopus laevis. CRISPR/Cas9 coupled with homologous recombination to disrupt the endogenous kur locus in Xenopus resulted in the asymmetric localization of the PCP protein Prickle2 being lost in mutant multiciliated cells. Kur also makes interactions with other PCP components, including Disheveled. This supports a model wherein Kur plays a dual role in cilia motility and polarization.

  15. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  16. Non-motile primary cilia as fluid shear stress mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Nauli, Surya M; Jin, Xingjian; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A; El-Jouni, Wassim; Su, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that transmit extracellular signals into intracellular biochemical responses. Structural and functional defects in primary cilia are associated with a group of human diseases, known as ciliopathies, with phenotypes ranging from cystic kidney and obesity to blindness and mental retardation. Primary cilia mediate mechano- and chemosensation in many cell types. The mechanosensory function of the primary cilia requires the atypical G-protein-coupled receptor polycystin-1 and the calcium-permeable nonselective cation channel polycystin-2. Mechanical stimulations such as fluid-shear stress of the primary cilia initiate intracellular calcium rise, nitric oxide release, and protein modifications. In this review, we describe a set of protocols for cell culture to promote ciliation, mechanical stimulations of the primary cilia, and measurements of calcium rise and nitric oxide release induced by fluid shear stress. PMID:23522462

  17. Sperm-Associated Antigen–17 Gene Is Essential for Motile Cilia Function and Neonatal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Henderson, Scott C.; Corwin, Frank D.; Zweit, Jamal; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Subler, Mark; Salloum, Fadi N.; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), resulting from defects in cilia assembly or motility, is caused by mutations in a number of genes encoding axonemal proteins. PCD phenotypes are variable, and include recurrent respiratory tract infections, bronchiectasis, hydrocephaly, situs inversus, and male infertility. We generated knockout mice for the sperm-associated antigen–17 (Spag17) gene, which encodes a central pair (CP) protein present in the axonemes of cells with “9 + 2” motile cilia or flagella. The targeting of Spag17 resulted in a severe phenotype characterized by immotile nasal and tracheal cilia, reduced clearance of nasal mucus, profound respiratory distress associated with lung fluid accumulation and disruption of the alveolar epithelium, cerebral ventricular expansion consistent with emerging hydrocephalus, failure to suckle, and neonatal demise within 12 hours of birth. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the loss of one CP microtubule in approximately one quarter of tracheal cilia axonemes, an absence of a C1 microtubule projection, and other less frequent CP structural abnormalities. SPAG6 and SPAG16 (CP proteins that interact with SPAG17) were increased in tracheal tissue from SPAG17-deficient mice. We conclude that Spag17 plays a critical role in the function and structure of motile cilia, and that neonatal lethality is likely explained by impaired airway mucociliary clearance. PMID:23418344

  18. Loss of Dishevelleds disrupts planar polarity in ependymal motile cilia and results in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Shinya; Nakatani, Jin; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cheng, JrGang; Belinson, Haim; Inubushi, Toshiro; Snider, William D; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-08-01

    Defects in ependymal (E) cells, which line the ventricle and generate cerebrospinal fluid flow through ciliary beating, can cause hydrocephalus. Dishevelled genes (Dvls) are essential for Wnt signaling, and Dvl2 has been shown to localize to the rootlet of motile cilia. Using the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) mouse, we show that compound genetic ablation of Dvls causes hydrocephalus. In hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) mutants, E cells differentiated normally, but the intracellular and intercellular rotational alignments of ependymal motile cilia were disrupted. As a consequence, the fluid flow generated by the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) E cells was significantly slower than that observed in control mice. Dvls were also required for the proper positioning of motile cilia on the apical surface. Tamoxifen-induced conditional removal of Dvls in adult mice also resulted in defects in intracellular rotational alignment and positioning of ependymal motile cilia. These results suggest that Dvls are continuously required for E cell planar polarity and may prevent hydrocephalus. PMID:25043421

  19. Loss of Dishevelleds disrupts planar polarity in ependymal motile cilia and results in hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Shinya; Nakatani, Jin; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cheng, JrGang; Belinson, Haim; Inubushi, Toshiro; Snider, William D.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Álvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Defects in ependymal (E) cells, which line the ventricle and generate cerebrospinal fluid flow through ciliary beating, can cause hydrocephalus. Dishevelled genes (Dvls) are essential for Wnt signaling and Dvl2 has been shown to localize to the rootlet of motile cilia. Using the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− mouse, we show that compound genetic ablation of Dvls causes hydrocephalus. In hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− mutants, E cells differentiated normally, but the intracellular and intercellular rotational alignments of ependymal motile cilia were disrupted. As a consequence, the fluid flow generated by the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− E cells was significantly slower than that observed in control mice. Dvls were also required for the proper positioning of motile cilia on the apical surface. Tamoxifen-induced conditional removal of Dvls in adult mice also resulted in defects in intracellular rotational alignment and positioning of ependymal motile cilia. These results suggest that Dvls are continuously required for E cell planar polarity and may prevent hydrocephalus. PMID:25043421

  20. The ciliary pocket: an endocytic membrane domain at the base of primary and motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Ghossoub, Rania; Blisnick, Thierry; Meunier, Alice; Serres, Catherine; Silbermann, Flora; Emmerson, Chris; Romeo, Kelly; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Schmitt, Alain; Saunier, Sophie; Spassky, Nathalie; Bastin, Philippe; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2010-05-15

    Cilia and flagella are eukaryotic organelles involved in multiple cellular functions. The primary cilium is generally non motile and found in numerous vertebrate cell types where it controls key signalling pathways. Despite a common architecture, ultrastructural data suggest some differences in their organisation. Here, we report the first detailed characterisation of the ciliary pocket, a depression of the plasma membrane in which the primary cilium is rooted. This structure is found at low frequency in kidney epithelial cells (IMCD3) but is associated with virtually all primary cilia in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE1). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence analysis and videomicroscopy revealed that the ciliary pocket establishes closed links with the actin-based cytoskeleton and that it is enriched in active and dynamic clathrin-coated pits. The existence of the ciliary pocket was confirmed in mouse tissues bearing primary cilia (cumulus), as well as motile cilia and flagella (ependymal cells and spermatids). The ciliary pocket shares striking morphological and functional similarities with the flagellar pocket of Trypanosomatids, a trafficking-specialised membrane domain at the base of the flagellum. Our data therefore highlight the conserved role of membrane trafficking in the vicinity of cilia. PMID:20427320

  1. Reptin/Ruvbl2 is a Lrrc6/Seahorse interactor essential for cilia motility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Yuan, Shiaulou; Cao, Ying; Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Li, Yuanyuan; Kishimoto, Norihito; DiBella, Linda; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2013-07-30

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective cilia motility. The identified PCD genes account for about half of PCD incidences and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that Reptin/Ruvbl2, a protein known to be involved in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation, is essential for cilia motility in zebrafish. We further show that Reptin directly interacts with the PCD protein Lrrc6/Seahorse and this interaction is critical for the in vivo function of Lrrc6/Seahorse in zebrafish. Moreover, whereas the expression levels of multiple dynein arm components remain unchanged or become elevated, the density of axonemal dynein arms is reduced in reptin(hi2394) mutants. Furthermore, Reptin is highly enriched in the cytosol and colocalizes with Lrrc6/Seahorse. Combined, these results suggest that the Reptin-Lrrc6/Seahorse complex is involved in dynein arm formation. We also show that although the DNA damage response is induced in reptin(hi2394) mutants, it remains unchanged in cilia biogenesis mutants and lrrc6/seahorse mutants, suggesting that increased DNA damage response is not intrinsic to ciliary defects and that in vertebrate development, Reptin functions in multiple processes, both cilia specific and cilia independent.

  2. Ex vivo Method for High Resolution Imaging of Cilia Motility in Rodent Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  3. Ex vivo method for high resolution imaging of cilia motility in rodent airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  4. An Outer Arm Dynein Conformational Switch Is Required for Metachronal Synchrony of Motile Cilia in Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.

    2010-01-01

    Motile cilia mediate the flow of mucus and other fluids across the surface of specialized epithelia in metazoans. Efficient clearance of peri-ciliary fluids depends on the precise coordination of ciliary beating to produce metachronal waves. The role of individual dynein motors and the mechanical feedback mechanisms required for this process are not well understood. Here we used the ciliated epithelium of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to dissect the role of outer arm dynein motors in the metachronal synchrony of motile cilia. We demonstrate that animals that completely lack outer dynein arms display a significant decline in beat frequency and an inability of cilia to coordinate their oscillations and form metachronal waves. Furthermore, lack of a key mechanosensitive regulatory component (LC1) yields a similar phenotype even though outer arms still assemble in the axoneme. The lack of metachrony was not due simply to a decrease in ciliary beat frequency, as reducing this parameter by altering medium viscosity did not affect ciliary coordination. In addition, we did not observe a significant temporal variability in the beat cycle of impaired cilia. We propose that this conformational switch provides a mechanical feedback system within outer arm dynein that is necessary to entrain metachronal synchrony. PMID:20844081

  5. A Structural Basis for How Motile Cilia Beat

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter; Heuser, Thomas; Sale, Winfield S.

    2014-01-01

    The motile cilium is a mechanical wonder, a cellular nanomachine that produces a high-speed beat based on a cycle of bends that move along an axoneme made of 9+2 microtubules. The molecular motors, dyneins, power the ciliary beat. The dyneins are compacted into inner and outer dynein arms, whose activity is highly regulated to produce microtubule sliding and axonemal bending. The switch point hypothesis was developed long ago to account for how sliding in the presence of axonemal radial spoke–central pair interactions causes the ciliary beat. Since then, a new genetic, biochemical, and structural complexity has been discovered, in part, with Chlamydomonas mutants, with high-speed, high-resolution analysis of movement and with cryoelectron tomography. We stand poised on the brink of new discoveries relating to the molecular control of motility that extend and refine our understanding of the basic events underlying the switching of arm activity and of bend formation and propagation. PMID:26955066

  6. Comparative analysis of mammalian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D M

    1972-05-01

    Spermatozoa of several mammalian species were studied by means of high-speed cinematography and electron microscopy. Three types of motile patterns were observed in mouse spermatozoa. The first type involved an asymmetrical beat which seemed to propel the sperm in circular paths. The second type involved rotation of the sperm and appeared to allow them to maintain straight paths. In the third type of pattern, the sperm appeared to move by crawling on surfaces in a snakelike manner. Spermatozoa of rabbit and Chinese hamster also had an asymmetrical beat which sometimes caused them to swim in circles. In spite of the asymmetry of the beat, these spermatozoa were also able to swim in straight paths by rotating around a central axis as they swam. Spermatozoa of some species appeared very flexible; their flagella formed arcs with a very small radius of curvature as they beat. Spermatozoa of other species appeared very stiff, and their flagella formed arcs with a very large radius of curvature. The stiffness of the spermatozoan appeared to correlate positively with the cross-sectional area of the dense fibers. This suggests that the dense fibers may be stiff elastic elements. Opossum sperm become paired as they pass through the epididymis. Pairs of opossum spermatozoa beat in a coordinated, alternating manner.

  7. Loss of ASP but not ROPN1 reduces mammalian ciliary motility.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Gambling, Todd M; Carson, Johnny L; Carr, Daniel W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) signaling is targeted by interactions with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) via a dimerization/docking domain on the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA. Four other mammalian proteins [AKAP-associated sperm protein (ASP), ropporin (ROPN1), sperm protein 17 (SP17) and calcium binding tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated protein (CABYR)] share this highly conserved RII dimerization/docking (R2D2) domain. ASP and ROPN1 are 41% identical in sequence, interact with a variety of AKAPs in a manner similar to PKA, and are expressed in ciliated and flagellated human cells. To test the hypothesis that these proteins regulate motility, we developed mutant mouse lines lacking ASP or ROPN1. Both mutant lines produced normal numbers of cilia with intact ciliary ultrastructure. Lack of ROPN1 had no effect on ciliary motility. However, the beat frequency of cilia from mice lacking ASP is significantly slower than wild type, indicating that ASP signaling may regulate ciliary motility. This is the first demonstration of in vivo function for ASP. Similar localization of ASP in mice and humans indicates that these findings may translate to human physiology, and that these mice will be an excellent model for future studies related to the pathogenesis of human disease.

  8. Loss of ASP but not ROPN1 reduces mammalian ciliary motility

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Sarah E.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Gambling, Todd M.; Carson, Johnny L.; Carr, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) signaling is targeted by interactions with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) via a dimerization/docking domain on the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA. Four other mammalian proteins (ASP, ROPN1, SP17, and CABYR) share this highly conserved RII dimerization/docking (R2D2) domain. ASP and ROPN1 are 41% identical in sequence, interact with a variety of AKAPs in a manner similar to PKA, and are expressed in ciliated and flagellated human cells. To test the hypothesis that these proteins regulate motility, we developed mutant mouse lines lacking ASP or ROPN1. Both mutant lines produced normal numbers of cilia with intact ciliary ultrastructure. Lack of ROPN1 had no effect on ciliary motility. However, the beat frequency of cilia from mice lacking ASP is significantly slower than wild type, indicating that ASP signaling may regulate ciliary motility. This is the first demonstration of in vivo function for ASP. Similar localization of ASP in mice and humans indicates that these findings may translate to human physiology, and that these mice will be an excellent model for future studies related to the pathogenesis of human disease. PMID:22021175

  9. RC/BTB2 is essential for formation of primary cilia in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Wei; Ni, Jin; Wu, Jinghua; Liu, Junping; Zhang, Zhengang; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hongfei; Shi, Yuqin; Teves, Maria E; Song, Shizheng; Strauss, Jerome F; Zhang, Zhibing

    2015-04-01

    RC/BTB2 is a binding partner of sperm associated antigen 16S (SPAG16S), which is a regulator of spermiogenesis in mice, a process during which sperm flagella are formed. The expression of Rc/btb2 is also regulated by multicilin, a protein that controls ciliogenesis. Given that mouse Rc/btb2 mRNA is not only expressed in tissues bearing motile cilia, but also in tissues without motile cilia, we investigated whether RC/BTB2 plays a role in the general process of ciliogenesis by studying two cell lines that have primary cilia, NIH3T3, and IMCD3. We discovered that the subcellular localization of RC/BTB2 in the NIH3T3 and IMCD3 cells encompasses the pathway for ciliogenesis. RC/BTB2 was found in the Golgi bodies and centrosomes, two key structures essential for normal ciliogenesis. Knockdown of Rc/btb2 gene expression in these cell lines disrupted ciliogenesis. The percentage of cells with primary cilia was significantly reduced in stable cell lines transduced with specific Rc/btb2 shRNA viruses as compared to the control cells. When cilia were formed in the knockdown cells, they were significantly shorter than those in the control cells. Knockdown of Rc/btb2 expression did not affect cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Exogenous expression of RC/BTB2 in these stable knockdown cells restored ciliogenesis. These findings suggest that RC/BTB2 is a necessary component of the process of formation of primary cilia in somatic cells, perhaps through the transportation of cargos from Golgi bodies to centrosomes for cilia assembling. PMID:25762510

  10. Collective motion of motile cilia: from human airways to model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Feriani, Luigi; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Kotar, Jurij

    Mammalian airways are a fantastic playground of nonlinear phenomena, from the function of individual active filaments, to the emerging collective behaviour, to the rheology of the mucus solution surrounding cilia. We have been investigating the fundamental physics of this system through a variety of model system approaches, both experimental and computational. In the last year we have started measurements on living human cells, observing cilia shape during beating, and measuring speed and coherence of the collective dynamics. We report on significant differences in the collective motion in ciliated cell carpets from a variety of diseases, and we attempt to reconcile the collective dynamical phenotypes to the properties of individual filaments and the mechanics of the environment.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  12. The evolution of eukaryotic cilia and flagella as motile and sensory organelles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David R

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are motile organelles built on a scaffold of doublet microtubules and powered by dynein ATPase motors. Some thirty years ago, two competing views were presented to explain how the complex machinery of these motile organelles had evolved. Overwhelming evidence now refutes the hypothesis that they are the modified remnants of symbiotic spirochaete-like prokaryotes, and supports the hypothesis that they arose from a simpler cytoplasmic microtubule-based intracellular transport system. However, because intermediate stages in flagellar evolution have not been found in living eukaryotes, a clear understanding of their early evolution has been elusive. Recent progress in understanding phylogenetic relationships among present day eukaryotes and in sequence analysis of flagellar proteins have begun to provide a clearer picture of the origins of doublet and triplet microtubules, flagellar dynein motors, and the 9+2 microtubule architecture common to these organelles. We summarize evidence that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotic organisms possessed a 9+2 flagellum that was used for gliding motility along surfaces, beating motility to generate fluid flow, and localized distribution of sensory receptors, and trace possible earlier stages in the evolution of these characteristics.

  13. Mammalian cilia function is independent of the polymeric state of tubulin glycylation.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Starlette J Y; Bré, Marie-Hélène; Hallworth, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Polyglycylation is a polymeric post-translational modification of tubulin that is ubiquitous and widely present in cilia and flagella. It consists of the addition of highly variable numbers of glycyl residues as side chains onto the gamma carboxyl group of specific glutamyl residues at the C-termini of alpha- and beta-tubulin. The function of polyglycylation is poorly understood, however, studies in Tetrahymena have shown that the mutation of polyglycylation sites in beta-tubulin resulted in axonemal abnormality or lethality. This suggests that polyglycylation is functionally essential in protists. We hypothesize that polyglycylation is also essential in mammalian cilia and that the extent of polyglycylation has functional significance. In this study, we examined polyglycylation states in ciliated tissues and in mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures. We utilized two antibodies, TAP 952 and AXO 49, which recognize glutamyl sites possessing monomeric glycylation sites and glutamyl sites possessing polymeric glycylation sites, respectively. Monomeric glycylation sites were observed in cilia of all the ciliated tissues examined but were invariably excluded from the distal tips. In contrast, polymeric glycylation sites were rare, but when observed, they were localized at the bases of cilia. During ciliogenesis, in epithelial cell cultures, monomeric glycylation sites were observed, but the extent of polymeric glycylation sites were variable and were only observed during the early stages of the cultures. Our observations suggest that while monomeric glycylation sites are universal and likely essential in mammalian cilia, polymeric glycylation sites are not required for ciliary beating. Rather, our observations suggest that the number of added glycyl residues increases progressively from the tips of cilia toward their bases.

  14. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-12-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho-Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry-mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis.

  15. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho–Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry–mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis. PMID:26446842

  16. Primary cilia utilize glycoprotein-dependent adhesion mechanisms to stabilize long-lasting cilia-cilia contacts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The central tenet of cilia function is sensing and transmitting information. The capacity to directly contact extracellular surfaces would empower primary cilia to probe the environment for information about the nature and location of nearby surfaces. It has been well established that flagella and other motile cilia perform diverse cellular functions through adhesion. We hypothesized that mammalian primary cilia also interact with the extracellular environment through direct physical contact. Methods We identified cilia in rod photoreceptors and cholangiocytes in fixed mouse tissues and examined the structures that these cilia contact in vivo. We then utilized an MDCK cell culture model to characterize the nature of the contacts we observed. Results In retina and liver tissue, we observed that cilia from nearby cells touch one another. Using MDCK cells, we found compelling evidence that these contacts are stable adhesions that form bridges between two cells, or networks between many cells. We examined the nature and duration of the cilia-cilia contacts and discovered primary cilia movements that facilitate cilia-cilia encounters. Stable adhesions form as the area of contact expands from a single point to a stretch of tightly bound, adjacent cilia membranes. The cilia-cilia contacts persisted for hours and were resistant to several harsh treatments such as proteases and DTT. Unlike many other cell adhesion mechanisms, calcium was not required for the formation or maintenance of cilia adhesion. However, swainsonine, which blocks maturation of N-linked glycoproteins, reduced contact formation. We propose that cellular control of adhesion maintenance is active because cilia adhesion did not prevent cell division; rather, contacts dissolved during mitosis as cilia were resorbed. Conclusions The demonstration that mammalian primary cilia formed prolonged, direct, physical contacts supports a novel paradigm: that mammalian primary cilia detect features of the

  17. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A.; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia. PMID:27055101

  18. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  19. The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea as a model for studying motile cilia and multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Basquin, Cyril; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Azimzadeh, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a powerful model system to study the assembly and function of cilia. S. mediterranea is a free-living flatworm that uses the beating of cilia on its ventral epidermis for locomotion. The ventral epidermis is composed of a single layer of multiciliated cells highly similar to the multiciliated cells that line the airway, the brain ventricles, and the oviducts in humans. The genome of S. mediterranea has been sequenced and efficient methods for targeting gene expression by RNA interference (RNAi) are available. Locomotion defects induced by perturbing the expression of ciliary genes can be often detected by simple visual screening, and more subtle defects can be detected by measuring locomotion speed. Cilia are present in large numbers and are directly accessible, which facilitates analyses by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Here we describe a set of methods for maintaining planarians in the lab. These include gene knockout by RNAi, cilia visualization by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and live imaging.

  20. Mutations in zebrafish leucine-rich repeat-containing six-like affect cilia motility and result in pronephric cysts, but have variable effects on left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Serluca, Fabrizio C; Xu, Bo; Okabe, Noriko; Baker, Kari; Lin, Shin-Yi; Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Konieczkowski, David J; Jaffe, Kimberly M; Bradner, Joshua M; Fishman, Mark C; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2009-05-01

    Cilia defects have been implicated in a variety of human diseases and genetic disorders, but how cilia motility contributes to these phenotypes is still unknown. To further our understanding of how cilia function in development, we have cloned and characterized two alleles of seahorse, a zebrafish mutation that results in pronephric cysts. seahorse encodes Lrrc6l, a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein that is highly conserved in organisms that have motile cilia. seahorse is expressed in zebrafish tissues known to contain motile cilia. Although mutants do not affect cilia structure and retain the ability to interact with Disheveled, both alleles of seahorse strongly affect cilia motility in the zebrafish pronephros and neural tube. Intriguingly, although seahorse mutations variably affect fluid flow in Kupffer's vesicle, they can have very weak effects on left-right patterning. Combined with recently published results, our alleles suggest that the function of seahorse in cilia motility is separable from its function in other cilia-related phenotypes.

  1. Primary cilia and kidney injury: current research status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixuan

    2013-01-01

    Cilia, membrane-enclosed organelles protruding from the apical side of cells, can be divided into two classes: motile and primary cilia. During the past decades, motile cilia have been intensively studied. However, it was not until the 1990s that people began to realize the importance of primary cilia as cellular-specific sensors, particularly in kidney tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that primary cilia may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and planar cell polarity. Many signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and mammalian target of rapamycin, have been located to the primary cilia. Thus primary cilia have been regarded as a hub that integrates signals from the extracellular environment. More importantly, dysfunction of this organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of human genetic diseases, named ciliopathies. The significance of primary cilia in acquired human diseases such as hypertension and diabetes has gradually drawn attention. Interestingly, recent reports disclosed that cilia length varies during kidney injury, and shortening of cilia enhances the sensitivity of epithelial cells to injury cues. This review briefly summarizes the current status of cilia research and explores the potential mechanisms of cilia-length changes during kidney injury as well as provides some thoughts to allure more insightful ideas and promotes the further study of primary cilia in the context of kidney injury. PMID:23904226

  2. Primary cilia and kidney injury: current research status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Dong, Zheng

    2013-10-15

    Cilia, membrane-enclosed organelles protruding from the apical side of cells, can be divided into two classes: motile and primary cilia. During the past decades, motile cilia have been intensively studied. However, it was not until the 1990s that people began to realize the importance of primary cilia as cellular-specific sensors, particularly in kidney tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that primary cilia may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and planar cell polarity. Many signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and mammalian target of rapamycin, have been located to the primary cilia. Thus primary cilia have been regarded as a hub that integrates signals from the extracellular environment. More importantly, dysfunction of this organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of human genetic diseases, named ciliopathies. The significance of primary cilia in acquired human diseases such as hypertension and diabetes has gradually drawn attention. Interestingly, recent reports disclosed that cilia length varies during kidney injury, and shortening of cilia enhances the sensitivity of epithelial cells to injury cues. This review briefly summarizes the current status of cilia research and explores the potential mechanisms of cilia-length changes during kidney injury as well as provides some thoughts to allure more insightful ideas and promotes the further study of primary cilia in the context of kidney injury.

  3. Studies on cilia. 3. Further studies on the cilium tip and a "sliding filament" model of ciliary motility.

    PubMed

    Satir, P

    1968-10-01

    This study confirms and extends previous work on the lateral cilia of the fresh-water mussel, Elliptio complanatus, in support of a "sliding filament" mechanism of ciliary motility wherein peripheral filaments (microtubules) do not change length during beat (see Satir, 1967). Short sequences of serial sections of tips are examined in control (nonbeating) and activated (metachronal wave) preparations. Several different tip types, functional rather than morphogenetic variants, are demonstrated, but similarly bent cilia have similar tips. The peripheral filaments are composed of two subfibers: a and b. The bent regions of cilia are in the form of circular arcs, and apparent differences in subfiber-b length at the tip are those predicted solely by geometry of the stroke without the necessity of assuming filament contraction. Various subfibers b apparently move with respect to one another during beat, since small systematic variations in relative position can be detected from cilium to cilium. While subfiber-b lengths are uniform throughout, subfiber-a lengths are morphologically different for each filament: 8 and 3 are about 0.8 micro longer than 1, 4 and 5, but each unique length is independent of stroke position or tip type. Subfiber-a does not contract, nor does it move, e.g. slide, with respect to subfiber-b of the same doublet. The central pair of filaments extends to the tip of the cilium where its members fuse. Subunit assembly in ciliary microtubules is evidently precise. This may be of importance in establishing the relationships needed for mechanochemical interactions that produce sliding and beat.

  4. Intraflagellar transport, cilia, and mammalian Hedgehog signaling: analysis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ocbina, Polloneal Jymmiel R; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2008-08-01

    Genetic studies in the mouse have shown that Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) is essential for mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction. In this study, we take advantage of wild type and IFT mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to characterize additional aspects of the relationship between IFT and Hh signaling. Exposure to Sonic hedgehog (Shh) ligand or expression of an activated allele of Smo, SmoA1, activates an Hh reporter in wild-type MEFs, but not in MEFs derived from embryos that lack IFT172 or the Dync2h1 subunit of the retrograde IFT motor. Similarly, decreased activity of either Sufu or PKA, two negative regulators of Hh signal transduction, activates the pathway in wild-type, but not IFT mutant, MEFs. In contrast to wild-type MEFs, Smo is constitutively present in the cilia of Dync2h1 mutant MEFs. This finding suggests that IFT-dependent trafficking of Hh pathway components through the cilium is essential for their function.

  5. 1001 model organisms to study cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Vincensini, Laetitia; Blisnick, Thierry; Bastin, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Most mammalian cell types have the potential to assemble at least one cilium. Immotile cilia participate in numerous sensing processes, while motile cilia are involved in cell motility and movement of extracellular fluid. The functional importance of cilia and flagella is highlighted by the growing list of diseases due to cilia defects. These ciliopathies are marked by an amazing diversity of clinical manifestations and an often complex genetic aetiology. To understand these pathologies, a precise comprehension of the biology of cilia and flagella is required. These organelles are remarkably well conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this review, we describe the strengths of various model organisms to decipher diverse aspects of cilia and flagella biology: molecular composition, mode of assembly, sensing and motility mechanisms and functions. Pioneering studies carried out in the green alga Chlamydomonas established the link between cilia and several genetic diseases. Moreover, multicellular organisms such as mouse, zebrafish, Xenopus, Caenorhabditis elegans or Drosophila, and protists such as Paramecium, Tetrahymena and Trypanosoma or Leishmania each bring specific advantages to the study of cilium biology. For example, the function of genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia (due to defects in ciliary motility) can be efficiently assessed in trypanosomes.

  6. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Chunyue; Jiang, Qian; Li, Huili; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Bao, Yihua; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC). We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1. DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10) resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans. PMID:27543293

  7. Quantifying hyperoxia-mediated damage to mammalian respiratory cilia-driven fluid flow using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gamm, Ute A.; Huang, Brendan K.; Syed, Mansoor; Zhang, Xuchen; Bhandari, Vineet; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Oxygen supplementation [hyperoxia, increased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2)] is an indispensable treatment in the intensive care unit for patients in respiratory failure. Like other treatments or drugs, hyperoxia has a risk-benefit profile that guides its clinical use. While hyperoxia is known to damage respiratory epithelium, it is unknown if damage can result in impaired capacity to generate cilia-driven fluid flow. Here, we demonstrate that quantifying cilia-driven fluid flow velocities in the sub-100 μm/s regime (sub-0.25 in./min regime) reveals hyperoxia-mediated damage to the capacity of ciliated respiratory mucosa to generate directional flow. Flow quantification was performed using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography (PTV-OCT) in ex vivo mouse trachea. The ability of PTV-OCT to detect biomedically relevant flow perturbations in the sub-100 μm/s regime was validated by quantifying temperature- and drug-mediated modulation of flow performance in ex vivo mouse trachea. Overall, PTV-OCT imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow in ex vivo mouse trachea is a powerful and straightforward approach for studying factors that modulate and damage mammalian respiratory ciliary physiology. PMID:26308164

  8. Quantifying hyperoxia-mediated damage to mammalian respiratory cilia-driven fluid flow using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Ute A; Huang, Brendan K; Syed, Mansoor; Zhang, Xuchen; Bhandari, Vineet; Choma, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen supplementation [hyperoxia, increased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 )] is an indispensable treatment in the intensive care unit for patients in respiratory failure. Like other treatments or drugs, hyperoxia has a risk-benefit profile that guides its clinical use. While hyperoxia is known to damage respiratory epithelium, it is unknown if damage can result in impaired capacity to generate cilia-driven fluid flow. Here, we demonstrate that quantifying cilia-driven fluid flow velocities in the sub-100 μm/s regime (sub-0.25 in./min regime) reveals hyperoxia-mediated damage to the capacity of ciliated respiratory mucosa to generate directional flow. Flow quantification was performed using particle tracking velocimetry optical coherence tomography (PTV-OCT) in ex vivo mouse trachea. The ability of PTV-OCT to detect biomedically relevant flow perturbations in the sub-100 μm/s regime was validated by quantifying temperature- and drug-mediated modulation of flow performance in ex vivo mouse trachea. Overall, PTV-OCT imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow in ex vivo mouse trachea is a powerful and straightforward approach for studying factors that modulate and damage mammalian respiratory ciliary physiology.

  9. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors.

  10. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors. PMID:26365258

  11. Cilia Dysfunction in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Ann E.; Walters, Matthew S.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the human airway epithelium is the presence of ciliated cells bearing motile cilia, specialized cell surface projections containing axonemes comprised of microtubules and dynein arms, which provide ATP-driven motility. In the airways, cilia function in concert with airway mucus to mediate the critical function of mucociliary clearance, cleansing the airways of inhaled particles and pathogens. The prototypical disorder of respiratory cilia is primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder that leads to impaired mucociliary clearance, repeated chest infections, and progressive destruction of lung architecture. Numerous acquired lung diseases are also marked by abnormalities in both cilia structure and function. In this review we summarize current knowledge regarding airway ciliated cells and cilia, how they function to maintain a healthy epithelium, and how disorders of cilia structure and function contribute to inherited and acquired lung disease. PMID:25386990

  12. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon–associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  13. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  14. Evaluating efficiency and robustness in cilia design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Motile cilia are used by many eukaryotic cells to transport flow. Cilia-driven flows are important to many physiological functions, yet a deep understanding of the interplay between the mechanical structure of cilia and their physiological functions in healthy and diseased conditions remains elusive. To develop such an understanding, one needs a quantitative framework to assess cilia performance and robustness when subject to perturbations in the cilia apparatus. Here we link cilia design (beating patterns) to function (flow transport) in the context of experimentally and theoretically derived cilia models. We particularly examine the optimality and robustness of cilia design. Optimality refers to efficiency of flow transport, while robustness is defined as low sensitivity to variations in the design parameters. We find that suboptimal designs can be more robust than optimal ones. That is, designing for the most efficient cilium does not guarantee robustness. These findings have significant implications on the understanding of cilia design in artificial and biological systems.

  15. Evaluating efficiency and robustness in cilia design.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Motile cilia are used by many eukaryotic cells to transport flow. Cilia-driven flows are important to many physiological functions, yet a deep understanding of the interplay between the mechanical structure of cilia and their physiological functions in healthy and diseased conditions remains elusive. To develop such an understanding, one needs a quantitative framework to assess cilia performance and robustness when subject to perturbations in the cilia apparatus. Here we link cilia design (beating patterns) to function (flow transport) in the context of experimentally and theoretically derived cilia models. We particularly examine the optimality and robustness of cilia design. Optimality refers to efficiency of flow transport, while robustness is defined as low sensitivity to variations in the design parameters. We find that suboptimal designs can be more robust than optimal ones. That is, designing for the most efficient cilium does not guarantee robustness. These findings have significant implications on the understanding of cilia design in artificial and biological systems. PMID:27078459

  16. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  17. Species-Specific Adaptations of Trypanosome Morphology and Motility to the Mammalian Host.

    PubMed

    Bargul, Joel L; Jung, Jamin; McOdimba, Francis A; Omogo, Collins O; Adung'a, Vincent O; Krüger, Timothy; Masiga, Daniel K; Engstler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    African trypanosomes thrive in the bloodstream and tissue spaces of a wide range of mammalian hosts. Infections of cattle cause an enormous socio-economic burden in sub-Saharan Africa. A hallmark of the trypanosome lifestyle is the flagellate's incessant motion. This work details the cell motility behavior of the four livestock-parasites Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei, T. evansi and T. congolense. The trypanosomes feature distinct swimming patterns, speeds and flagellar wave frequencies, although the basic mechanism of flagellar propulsion is conserved, as is shown by extended single flagellar beat analyses. Three-dimensional analyses of the trypanosomes expose a high degree of dynamic pleomorphism, typified by the 'cellular waveform'. This is a product of the flagellar oscillation, the chirality of the flagellum attachment and the stiffness of the trypanosome cell body. The waveforms are characteristic for each trypanosome species and are influenced by changes of the microenvironment, such as differences in viscosity and the presence of confining obstacles. The distinct cellular waveforms may be reflective of the actual anatomical niches the parasites populate within their mammalian host. T. vivax displays waveforms optimally aligned to the topology of the bloodstream, while the two subspecies T. brucei and T. evansi feature distinct cellular waveforms, both additionally adapted to motion in more confined environments such as tissue spaces. T. congolense reveals a small and stiff waveform, which makes these parasites weak swimmers and destined for cell adherence in low flow areas of the circulation. Thus, our experiments show that the differential dissemination and annidation of trypanosomes in their mammalian hosts may depend on the distinct swimming capabilities of the parasites. PMID:26871910

  18. Species-Specific Adaptations of Trypanosome Morphology and Motility to the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    McOdimba, Francis A.; Omogo, Collins O.; Adung’a, Vincent O.; Krüger, Timothy; Masiga, Daniel K.; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes thrive in the bloodstream and tissue spaces of a wide range of mammalian hosts. Infections of cattle cause an enormous socio-economic burden in sub-Saharan Africa. A hallmark of the trypanosome lifestyle is the flagellate’s incessant motion. This work details the cell motility behavior of the four livestock-parasites Trypanosoma vivax, T. brucei, T. evansi and T. congolense. The trypanosomes feature distinct swimming patterns, speeds and flagellar wave frequencies, although the basic mechanism of flagellar propulsion is conserved, as is shown by extended single flagellar beat analyses. Three-dimensional analyses of the trypanosomes expose a high degree of dynamic pleomorphism, typified by the ‘cellular waveform’. This is a product of the flagellar oscillation, the chirality of the flagellum attachment and the stiffness of the trypanosome cell body. The waveforms are characteristic for each trypanosome species and are influenced by changes of the microenvironment, such as differences in viscosity and the presence of confining obstacles. The distinct cellular waveforms may be reflective of the actual anatomical niches the parasites populate within their mammalian host. T. vivax displays waveforms optimally aligned to the topology of the bloodstream, while the two subspecies T. brucei and T. evansi feature distinct cellular waveforms, both additionally adapted to motion in more confined environments such as tissue spaces. T. congolense reveals a small and stiff waveform, which makes these parasites weak swimmers and destined for cell adherence in low flow areas of the circulation. Thus, our experiments show that the differential dissemination and annidation of trypanosomes in their mammalian hosts may depend on the distinct swimming capabilities of the parasites. PMID:26871910

  19. CFAP54 is required for proper ciliary motility and assembly of the central pair apparatus in mice

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Casey W.; Craige, Branch; Kroeger, Tiffany V.; Finn, Rozzy; Wyatt, Todd A.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Strittmatter, Lara; Hendricks, Gregory M.; Witman, George B.; Lee, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella play critical roles in fluid clearance and cell motility, and dysfunction commonly results in the pediatric syndrome primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). CFAP221, also known as PCDP1, is required for ciliary and flagellar function in mice and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, where it localizes to the C1d projection of the central microtubule apparatus and functions in a complex that regulates flagellar motility in a calcium-dependent manner. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the mouse homologues of the other C. reinhardtii C1d complex members are primarily expressed in motile ciliated tissues, suggesting a conserved function in mammalian motile cilia. The requirement for one of these C1d complex members, CFAP54, was identified in a mouse line with a gene-trapped allele. Homozygous mice have PCD characterized by hydrocephalus, male infertility, and mucus accumulation. The infertility results from defects in spermatogenesis. Motile cilia have a structural defect in the C1d projection, indicating that the C1d assembly mechanism requires CFAP54. This structural defect results in decreased ciliary beat frequency and perturbed cilia-driven flow. This study identifies a critical role for CFAP54 in proper assembly and function of mammalian cilia and flagella and establishes the gene-trapped allele as a new model of PCD. PMID:26224312

  20. Undulipodia, flagella and cilia.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L

    1980-01-01

    The term flagella is ambiguous. It refers to bacterial structures composed of flagellin protein and to eukaryotic structures composed of microtubule proteins and ATPase (tubulin and dynein). The fact that cilia are nearly identical to eukaryotic flagella and have nothing in common with prokaryotic flagella is not apparent from the terminology. It is proposed that the 30-year old suggestion of Smagina and reiterated by Kuznicki and others, be adopted: that cilia and eukaryotic flagella be called "undulipodia." The term flagella ought to be restricted to prokaryotic organelles, bacterial flagella and spirochaete axial filaments: solid structures composed of flagellin which protrude through the plasma membrane and lack intrinsic motility throughout their length. Undulipodia are defined as intrinsically motile intracellular structures showing a 9-fold symmetry in the pattern of arrangement of 24 nm diameter microtubules. They are limited to eukaryotes, members of the protoctist, animal and plant kingdoms.

  1. Primary cilia in the developing and mature brain

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Coufal, Nicole G.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia were the largely neglected non-motile counterparts of their better-known cousin, the motile cilia. For years these non-motile cilia were considered evolutionary remnants of little consequence to cellular function. Fast-forward 10 years and we now recognize primary cilia as key integrators of extracellular ligand-based signaling and cellular polarity, which regulate neuronal cell fate, migration differentiation, as well as a host of adult behaviors. Important future questions will focus on structure-function relationships, their roles in signaling and disease, and as areas of target for treatments. PMID:24811376

  2. Altering the motility of Trypanosoma cruzi with rabbit polyclonal anti-peptide antibodies reduces infection to susceptible mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Finkelsztein, Eli J; Diaz-Soto, Juan C; Vargas-Zambrano, Juan C; Suesca, Elizabeth; Guzmán, Fanny; López, Manuel C; Thomas, M Carmen; Forero-Shelton, Manu; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; González, John M

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi's trypomastigotes are highly active and their incessant motility seems to be important for mammalian host cell infection. The kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11) is a protein expressed in all parasite stages, which induces a cellular and humoral immune response in the infected host, and is hypothesized to participate in the parasite's motility. An N-terminal peptide from KMP-11, termed K1 or TcTLE, induced polyclonal antibodies that inhibit parasitic invasion of Vero cells. The goal of this study was to evaluate the motility and infectivity of T. cruzi when exposed to polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies. Rabbits were immunized with TcTLE peptide along with FIS peptide as an immunomodulator. ELISA assay results showed that post-immunization sera contained high titers of polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies, which were also reactive against the native KMP-11 protein and live parasites as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry assays. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi were incubated with pre- or post-immunization sera, and infectivity to human astrocytes was assessed by Giemsa staining/light microscope and flow cytometry using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeled parasites. T. cruzi infection in astrocytes decreased approximately by 30% upon incubation with post-immunization sera compared with pre-immunization sera. Furthermore, trypomastigotes were recorded by video microscopy and the parasite's flagellar speed was calculated by tracking the flagella. Trypomastigotes exposed to post-immunization sera had qualitative alterations in motility and significantly slower flagella (45.5 µm/s), compared with those exposed to pre-immunization sera (69.2 µm/s). In summary, polyclonal anti-TcTLE serum significantly reduced the parasite's flagellar speed and cell infectivity. These findings support that KMP-11 could be important for parasite motility, and that by targeting its N-terminal peptide infectivity can be reduced.

  3. Left-right asymmetry: cilia and calcium revisited.

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; Vick, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Leftward flow generated by motile cilia is known to underlie left-right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos. A new study now links intraciliary calcium oscillations to cilia motility and the downstream nodal signaling cascade that drives left-sided development. PMID:25734272

  4. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  5. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  6. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  7. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  8. Functional optical coherence tomography for high-resolution mapping of cilia beat frequency in the mouse oviduct in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C.; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-02-01

    Since mouse is a superior model for genetic analysis of human disorders, reproductive studies in mice have significant implications on further understanding of fertility and infertility in humans. Fertilized oocytes are transported through the reproductive tract by motile cilia lining the lumen of the oviduct as well as by oviduct contractions. While the role of cilia is well recognized, ciliary dynamics in the oviduct is not well understood, largely owing to the lack of live imaging approaches. Here, we report in vivo micro-scale mapping of cilia and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the mouse oviduct using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This functional imaging method is based on spectral analysis of the OCT speckle variations produced by the beat of cilia in the oviduct, which does not require exogenous contrast agents. Animal procedures similar to the ones used for production of transgenic mice are utilized to expose the reproductive organs for imaging in anesthetized females. In this paper, we first present in vivo structural imaging of the mouse oviduct capturing the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo and then show the result of depth-resolved high-resolution CBF mapping in the ampulla of the live mouse. These data indicate that this structural and functional OCT imaging approach can be a useful tool for a variety of live investigations of mammalian reproduction and infertility.

  9. Sensory roles of neuronal cilia: cilia development, morphogenesis, and function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Barr, Maureen M

    2008-01-01

    In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia are found on the dendritic endings of sensory neurons. C. elegans cilia are classified as 'primary' or 'sensory' according to the '9+0' axonemal ultrastructure (nine doublet outer microtubules with no central microtubule pair) and lack of motility, characteristics of '9+2' cilia. The C. elegans ciliated nervous system allows the animal to perceive environmental stimuli and make appropriate developmental, physiological, and behavioral decisions. In vertebrates, the biological significance of primary cilia had been largely neglected. Recent findings have placed primary/sensory cilia in the center of cellular signaling and developmental processes. Studies using genetic model organisms such as C. elegans identified the link between ciliary dysfunction and human ciliopathies. Future studies in the worm will address important basic questions regarding ciliary development, morphogenesis, specialization, and signaling functions. PMID:18508635

  10. Using Xenopus skin to study cilia development and function.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions.

  11. Autophagy and regulation of cilia function and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Orhon, I; Dupont, N; Pampliega, O; Cuervo, A M; Codogno, P

    2015-01-01

    Motile and primary cilia (PC) are microtubule-based structures located at the cell surface of many cell types. Cilia govern cellular functions ranging from motility to integration of mechanical and chemical signaling from the environment. Recent studies highlight the interplay between cilia and autophagy, a conserved cellular process responsible for intracellular degradation. Signaling from the PC recruits the autophagic machinery to trigger autophagosome formation. Conversely, autophagy regulates ciliogenesis by controlling the levels of ciliary proteins. The cross talk between autophagy and ciliated structures is a novel aspect of cell biology with major implications in development, physiology and human pathologies related to defects in cilium function. PMID:25361082

  12. Making sense of cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sloboda, Roger D.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2007-01-01

    Data reported at an international meeting on the sensory and motile functions of cilia, including the primary cilium found on most cells in the human body, have thrust this organelle to the forefront of studies on the cell biology of human disease. PMID:18025299

  13. IFT-Cargo Interactions and Protein Transport in Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2015-12-01

    The motile and sensory functions of cilia and flagella are indispensable for human health. Cilia assembly requires a dedicated protein shuttle, intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional motility of multi-megadalton protein arrays along ciliary microtubules. IFT functions as a protein carrier delivering hundreds of distinct proteins into growing cilia. IFT-based protein import and export continue in fully grown cilia and are required for ciliary maintenance and sensing. Large ciliary building blocks might depend on IFT to move through the transition zone, which functions as a ciliary gate. Smaller, freely diffusing proteins, such as tubulin, depend on IFT to be concentrated or removed from cilia. As I discuss here, recent work provides insights into how IFT interacts with its cargoes and how the transport is regulated. PMID:26498262

  14. Bbof1 is required to maintain cilia orientation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Werner, Michael E.; Stubbs, Jennifer; Joens, Matt S.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Mitchell, Brian J.; Kintner, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Multiciliate cells (MCCs) are highly specialized epithelial cells that employ hundreds of motile cilia to produce a vigorous directed flow in a variety of organ systems. The production of this flow requires the establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) whereby MCCs align hundreds of beating cilia along a common planar axis. The planar axis of cilia in MCCs is known to be established via the PCP pathway and hydrodynamic cues, but the downstream steps required for cilia orientation remain poorly defined. Here, we describe a new component of cilia orientation, based on the phenotypic analysis of an uncharacterized coiled-coil protein, called bbof1. We show that the expression of bbof1 is induced during the early phases of MCC differentiation by the master regulator foxj1. MCC differentiation and ciliogenesis occurs normally in embryos where bbof1 activity is reduced, but cilia orientation is severely disrupted. We show that cilia in bbof1 mutants can still respond to patterning and hydrodynamic cues, but lack the ability to maintain their precise orientation. Misexpression of bbof1 promotes cilia alignment, even in the absence of flow or in embryos where microtubules and actin filaments are disrupted. Bbof1 appears to mediate cilia alignment by localizing to a polar structure adjacent to the basal body. Together, these results suggest that bbof1 is a basal body component required in MCCs to align and maintain cilia orientation in response to flow. PMID:23900544

  15. Cilia driven flow networks in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Chrsitian; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Neurons exchange soluble substances via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system. The walls of the ventricular cavities are covered with motile cilia that constantly beat and thereby induce a directional flow. We recently discovered that cilia in the third ventricle generate a complex flow pattern leading to partitioning of the ventricular volume and site-directed transport paths along the walls. Transient and daily recurrent alterations in the cilia beating direction lead to changes in the flow pattern. This has consequences for delivery of CSF components along the near wall flow. The contribution of this cilia-induced flow to overall CSF flow remains to be investigated. The state-of-art lattice Boltzmann method is adapted for studying the CFS flow. The 3D geometry of the third ventricle at high resolution was reconstructed. Simulation of CSF flow without cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about unidirectional flow does not explain how different components of CSF can be delivered to their various target sites. We study the contribution of the cilia-induced flow pattern to overall CSF flow and identify target areas for site-specific delivery of CSF-constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  16. Axonemal motility in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Kamiya, Ritsu

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella rapidly propagate bending waves and produce water flow over the cell surface. Their function is important for the physiology and development of various organisms including humans. The movement is based on the sliding between outer doublet microtubules driven by axonemal dyneins, and is regulated by various axonemal components and environmental factors. For studies aiming to elucidate the mechanism of cilia/flagella movement and regulation, Chlamydomonas is an invaluable model organism that offers a variety of mutants. This chapter introduces standard methods for studying Chlamydomonas flagellar motility including analysis of swimming paths, measurements of swimming speed and beat frequency, motility reactivation in demembranated cells (cell models), and observation of microtubule sliding in disintegrating axonemes. Most methods may be easily applied to other organisms with slight modifications of the medium conditions.

  17. Cilia involvement in patterning and maintenance of the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Courtney J; Serra, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Although the expression of cilia on chondrocytes was described over 40 years ago, the importance of this organelle in skeletal development and maintenance has only recently been recognized. Primary cilia are found on most mammalian cells and have been shown to play a role in chemosensation and mechanosensation. A growing number of human pleiotropic syndromes have been shown to be associated with ciliary or basal body dysfunction. Skeletal phenotypes, including alterations in limb patterning, endochondral bone formation, craniofacial development, and dentition, have been described in several of these syndromes. Additional insights into the potential roles and mechanisms of cilia action in the mammalian skeleton have been provided by research in model organisms including mouse and zebrafish. In this article we describe what is currently known about the localization of cilia in the skeleton as well as the roles and underlying molecular mechanisms of cilia in skeletal development. PMID:19147010

  18. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS). We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi) and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a peripheral receptor protein remain

  19. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions.

  20. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions. PMID:26597000

  1. Left-right organizer flow dynamics: how much cilia activity reliably yields laterality?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro; Ferreira, Rita R; Guerrero, Adán; Pintado, Petra; Tavares, Bárbara; Amaro, Joana; Smith, Andrew A; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2014-06-23

    Internal organs are asymmetrically positioned inside the body. Embryonic motile cilia play an essential role in this process by generating a directional fluid flow inside the vertebrate left-right organizer. Detailed characterization of how fluid flow dynamics modulates laterality is lacking. We used zebrafish genetics to experimentally generate a range of flow dynamics. By following the development of each embryo, we show that fluid flow in the left-right organizer is asymmetric and provides a good predictor of organ laterality. This was tested in mosaic organizers composed of motile and immotile cilia generated by dnah7 knockdowns. In parallel, we used simulations of fluid dynamics to analyze our experimental data. These revealed that fluid flow generated by 30 or more cilia predicts 90% situs solitus, similar to experimental observations. We conclude that cilia number, dorsal anterior motile cilia clustering, and left flow are critical to situs solitus via robust asymmetric charon expression. PMID:24930722

  2. FOXJ1 Prevents Cilia Growth Inhibition by Cigarette Smoke in Human Airway Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brekman, Angelika; Walters, Matthew S.; Tilley, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelium ciliated cells play a central role in clearing the lung of inhaled pathogens and xenobiotics, and cilia length and coordinated beating are important for airway clearance. Based on in vivo studies showing that the airway epithelium of healthy smokers has shorter cilia than that of healthy nonsmokers, we investigated the mechanisms involved in cigarette smoke–mediated inhibition of ciliogenesis by assessing normal human airway basal cell differentiation in air–liquid interface (ALI) cultures in the presence of nontoxic concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Measurements of cilia length from Day 28 ALI cultures demonstrated that CSE exposure was associated with shorter cilia (P < 0.05), reproducing the effect of cigarette smoking on cilia length observed in vivo. This phenotype correlated with a broad CSE-mediated suppression of genes involved in cilia-related transcriptional regulation, intraflagellar transport, cilia motility, structural integrity, and basal body development but not of control genes or epithelial barrier integrity. The CSE-mediated inhibition of cilia growth could be prevented by lentivirus-mediated overexpression of FOXJ1, the major cilia-related transcription factor, which led to partial reversal of expression of cilia-related genes suppressed by CSE. Together, the data suggest that components of cigarette smoke are responsible for a broad suppression of genes involved in cilia growth, but, by stimulating ciliogenesis with the transcription factor FOXJ1, it may be possible to maintain close to normal cilia length despite the stress of cigarette smoking. PMID:24828273

  3. Novel roles for the radial spoke head protein 9 in neural and neurosensory cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Irina; TeSlaa, Jessica J.; Tatarsky, Rose L.; Keller, Abigail N.; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Nyholm, Molly K.; Wolman, Marc A.; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are cell surface organelles with key roles in a range of cellular processes, including generation of fluid flow by motile cilia. The axonemes of motile cilia and immotile kinocilia contain 9 peripheral microtubule doublets, a central microtubule pair, and 9 connecting radial spokes. Aberrant radial spoke components RSPH1, 3, 4a and 9 have been linked with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a disorder characterized by ciliary dysmotility; yet, radial spoke functions remain unclear. Here we show that zebrafish Rsph9 is expressed in cells bearing motile cilia and kinocilia, and localizes to both 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. Using CRISPR mutagenesis, we show that rsph9 is required for motility of presumptive 9 + 2 olfactory cilia and, unexpectedly, 9 + 0 neural cilia. rsph9 is also required for the structural integrity of 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. rsph9 mutant larvae exhibit reduced initiation of the acoustic startle response consistent with hearing impairment, suggesting a novel role for Rsph9 in the kinocilia of the inner ear and/or lateral line neuromasts. These data identify novel roles for Rsph9 in 9 + 0 motile cilia and in sensory kinocilia, and establish a useful zebrafish PCD model. PMID:27687975

  4. STUDIES ON CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    1963-01-01

    Upon excision into spring water, the lateral cilia of the gill of the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanatus (Solander) stop beating, but 0.04 M potassium ion can activate the gill so that these cilia again beat with metachronal rhythm. One per cent osmium tetroxide quickly pipetted onto a fully activated gill fixes the lateral cilia in a pattern that preserves the form and arrangement of the metachronal wave, and permits the cilia to be studied with the electron microscope in all stages of their beat cycle. Changes are seen in the fixed active preparation that are not present in the inactive control, i.e., in the packing of the cilia, the position of the axis of the ciliary cross-section, and the diameter of the ring of peripheral filaments. Analysis of these parameters may lead to new correlations between ciliary fine structure and function. PMID:14079494

  5. In vivo micro-scale tomography of ciliary behavior in the mammalian oviduct.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C; Behringer, Richard R; Larina, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia in the mammalian oviduct play a key role in reproduction, such as transporting fertilized oocytes to the uterus for implantation. Due to their small size (~5-10 μm in length and ~300 nm in diameter), live visualization of cilia and their activity in the lumen of the oviduct through tissue layers represents a major challenge not yet overcome. Here, we report a functional low-coherence optical imaging technique that allows in vivo depth-resolved mapping of the cilia location and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the intact mouse oviduct with micro-scale spatial resolution. We validate our approach with widely-used microscopic imaging methods, present the first in vivo mapping of the oviduct CBF in its native context, and demonstrate the ability of this approach to differentiate CBF in different locations of the oviduct at different post-conception stages. This technique opens a range of opportunities for live studies in reproductive medicine as well as other areas focused on cilia activity and related ciliopathies. PMID:26279472

  6. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    rapid and reversible. Pervanadate also increased tyrosine phosphorylation of different proteins in capacitated and noncapacitated spermatozoa. Results showed that the phosphatases PTPN11, DUSP4, and DUSP3 are present in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa. PTPRB is also present in boar and stallion spermatozoa but was not detected in dog. The subcellular distribution of the identified phosphatases is diverse, suggesting that they likely have specific roles in sperm. Finally, PTP activity has a positive role in the regulation of motility and is involved in protein tyrosine phosphorylation in mammalian sperm.

  7. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  8. [The importance of model organisms to study cilia and flagella biology].

    PubMed

    Vincensini, Laetitia; Blisnick, Thierry; Bastin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are ubiquitous organelles that protrude from the surfaces of many cells, and whose architecture is highly conserved from protists to humans. These complex organelles, composed of over 500 proteins, can be either immotile or motile. They are involved in a myriad of biological processes, including sensing (non-motile cilia) and/or cell motility or movement of extracellular fluids (motile cilia). The ever-expanding list of human diseases linked to defective cilia illustrates the functional importance of cilia and flagella. These ciliopathies are characterised by an impressive diversity of symptoms and an often complex genetic etiology. A precise knowledge of cilia and flagella biology is thus critical to better understand these pathologies. However, multi-ciliated cells are terminally differentiated and difficult to manipulate, and a primary cilium is assembled only when the cell exits from the cell cycle. In this context the use of model organisms, that relies on the high degree of structural but also of molecular conservation of these organelles across evolution, is instrumental to decipher the many facets of cilia and flagella biology. In this review, we highlight the specific strengths of the main model organisms to investigate the molecular composition, mode of assembly, sensing and motility mechanisms and functions of cilia and flagella. Pioneering studies carried out in the green alga Chlamydomonas established the link between cilia and several genetic diseases. Moreover, multicellular organisms such as mouse, zebrafish, Xenopus, C. elegans or Drosophila, and protists like Paramecium, Tetrahymena and Trypanosoma or Leishmania each bring specific advantages to the study of cilium biology. For example, the function of genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia (due to defects in ciliary motility) can be efficiently assessed in trypanosomes.

  9. Using Xenopus Skin to Study Cilia Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Michael E.; Mitchell, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions. PMID:23522471

  10. Using Xenopus skin to study cilia development and function.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions. PMID:23522471

  11. Cilia propel the embryo in the right direction.

    PubMed

    Brueckner, M

    2001-07-15

    Cilia have long been suspected to play a role in the determination of left-right asymmetry. Humans with the dominantly inherited condition Kartagener syndrome have defective cilia and a 50% incidence of mirror-image positioning of their organs (situs inversus). Analysis of mouse mutations affecting ciliary biogenesis and motility has demonstrated that the molecular motors kinesin and dynein are required to establish normal handed organismal asymmetry. The cilia that propel formation of the embryonic left-right axis are not conventional cilia, but monocilia. They are found on the node, or organizer, of the gastrulation-stage mouse embryo where they drive net leftward movement of the fluid surrounding the node, and initiate left-right asymmetry.

  12. Primary cilia are not calcium-responsive mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Delling, M; Indzhykulian, A A; Liu, X; Li, Y; Xie, T; Corey, D P; Clapham, D E

    2016-03-31

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling.

  13. Primary Cilia Are Not Calcium-Responsive Mechanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Delling, M.; Indzhykulian, A. A.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Xie, T.; Corey, D. P.; Clapham, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium1. This Ca2+- Responsive MechanoSensor (CaRMS) hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers2,3. Here, we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. First, we developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca2+ influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signaling. PMID:27007841

  14. Primary cilia are not calcium-responsive mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Delling, M; Indzhykulian, A A; Liu, X; Li, Y; Xie, T; Corey, D P; Clapham, D E

    2016-03-31

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling. PMID:27007841

  15. Lack of centrioles and primary cilia in STIL(-/-) mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    David, Ahuvit; Liu, Fengying; Tibelius, Alexandra; Vulprecht, Julia; Wald, Diana; Rothermel, Ulrike; Ohana, Reut; Seitel, Alexander; Metzger, Jasmin; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Izraeli, Shai; Krämer, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    Although most animal cells contain centrosomes, consisting of a pair of centrioles, their precise contribution to cell division and embryonic development is unclear. Genetic ablation of STIL, an essential component of the centriole replication machinery in mammalian cells, causes embryonic lethality in mice around mid gestation associated with defective Hedgehog signaling. Here, we describe, by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, that STIL(-/-) mouse embryos do not contain centrioles or primary cilia, suggesting that these organelles are not essential for mammalian development until mid gestation. We further show that the lack of primary cilia explains the absence of Hedgehog signaling in STIL(-/-) cells. Exogenous re-expression of STIL or STIL microcephaly mutants compatible with human survival, induced non-templated, de novo generation of centrioles in STIL(-/-) cells. Thus, while the abscence of centrioles is compatible with mammalian gastrulation, lack of centrioles and primary cilia impairs Hedgehog signaling and further embryonic development. PMID:25486474

  16. Lack of centrioles and primary cilia in STIL(-/-) mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    David, Ahuvit; Liu, Fengying; Tibelius, Alexandra; Vulprecht, Julia; Wald, Diana; Rothermel, Ulrike; Ohana, Reut; Seitel, Alexander; Metzger, Jasmin; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Izraeli, Shai; Krämer, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    Although most animal cells contain centrosomes, consisting of a pair of centrioles, their precise contribution to cell division and embryonic development is unclear. Genetic ablation of STIL, an essential component of the centriole replication machinery in mammalian cells, causes embryonic lethality in mice around mid gestation associated with defective Hedgehog signaling. Here, we describe, by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, that STIL(-/-) mouse embryos do not contain centrioles or primary cilia, suggesting that these organelles are not essential for mammalian development until mid gestation. We further show that the lack of primary cilia explains the absence of Hedgehog signaling in STIL(-/-) cells. Exogenous re-expression of STIL or STIL microcephaly mutants compatible with human survival, induced non-templated, de novo generation of centrioles in STIL(-/-) cells. Thus, while the abscence of centrioles is compatible with mammalian gastrulation, lack of centrioles and primary cilia impairs Hedgehog signaling and further embryonic development.

  17. Evolutionarily ancient association of the FoxJ1 transcription factor with the motile ciliogenic program.

    PubMed

    Vij, Shubha; Rink, Jochen C; Ho, Hao Kee; Babu, Deepak; Eitel, Michael; Narasimhan, Vijayashankaranarayanan; Tiku, Varnesh; Westbrook, Jody; Schierwater, Bernd; Roy, Sudipto

    2012-01-01

    It is generally believed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was a unicellular organism with motile cilia. In the vertebrates, the winged-helix transcription factor FoxJ1 functions as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Despite the antiquity of cilia, their highly conserved structure, and their mechanism of motility, the evolution of the transcriptional program controlling ciliogenesis has remained incompletely understood. In particular, it is presently not known how the generation of motile cilia is programmed outside of the vertebrates, and whether and to what extent the FoxJ1-dependent regulation is conserved. We have performed a survey of numerous eukaryotic genomes and discovered that genes homologous to foxJ1 are restricted only to organisms belonging to the unikont lineage. Using a mis-expression assay, we then obtained evidence of a conserved ability of FoxJ1 proteins from a number of diverse phyletic groups to activate the expression of a host of motile ciliary genes in zebrafish embryos. Conversely, we found that inactivation of a foxJ1 gene in Schmidtea mediterranea, a platyhelminth (flatworm) that utilizes motile cilia for locomotion, led to a profound disruption in the differentiation of motile cilia. Together, all of these findings provide the first evolutionary perspective into the transcriptional control of motile ciliogenesis and allow us to propose a conserved FoxJ1-regulated mechanism for motile cilia biogenesis back to the origin of the metazoans.

  18. Evolutionarily Ancient Association of the FoxJ1 Transcription Factor with the Motile Ciliogenic Program

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hao Kee; Babu, Deepak; Eitel, Michael; Narasimhan, Vijayashankaranarayanan; Tiku, Varnesh; Westbrook, Jody; Schierwater, Bernd; Roy, Sudipto

    2012-01-01

    It is generally believed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was a unicellular organism with motile cilia. In the vertebrates, the winged-helix transcription factor FoxJ1 functions as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Despite the antiquity of cilia, their highly conserved structure, and their mechanism of motility, the evolution of the transcriptional program controlling ciliogenesis has remained incompletely understood. In particular, it is presently not known how the generation of motile cilia is programmed outside of the vertebrates, and whether and to what extent the FoxJ1-dependent regulation is conserved. We have performed a survey of numerous eukaryotic genomes and discovered that genes homologous to foxJ1 are restricted only to organisms belonging to the unikont lineage. Using a mis-expression assay, we then obtained evidence of a conserved ability of FoxJ1 proteins from a number of diverse phyletic groups to activate the expression of a host of motile ciliary genes in zebrafish embryos. Conversely, we found that inactivation of a foxJ1 gene in Schmidtea mediterranea, a platyhelminth (flatworm) that utilizes motile cilia for locomotion, led to a profound disruption in the differentiation of motile cilia. Together, all of these findings provide the first evolutionary perspective into the transcriptional control of motile ciliogenesis and allow us to propose a conserved FoxJ1-regulated mechanism for motile cilia biogenesis back to the origin of the metazoans. PMID:23144623

  19. Functional diversity of axonemal dyneins as assessed by in vitro and in vivo motility assays of Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Ritsu; Yagi, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    This review outlines the current knowledge of the functional diversity of axonemal dyneins, as revealed by studies with the model organism Chlamydomonas. Axonemal dyneins, which comprise outer and inner dynein arms, power cilia and flagella beating by producing sliding movements between adjacent outer-doublet microtubules. Outer- and inner-arm dyneins have traditionally been considered similar in structure and function. However, recent evidence suggests that they differ rather strikingly in subunit composition, axonemal arrangement, and molecular motor properties. We posit that these arms make up two largely independent motile systems; whereas outer-arm dynein can generate axonemal beating by itself under certain conditions, inner-arm dynein can generate beating only in cooperation with the central pair/radial spokes. This conclusion is supported by genome analyses of various organisms. Outer-arm dynein appears to be particularly important for nodal cilia of mammalian embryos that function for determination of left-right body asymmetry.

  20. Putative roles of cilia in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul; Jenkins, Dagan

    2011-10-01

    The last 10 years has witnessed an explosion in research into roles of cilia in cystic renal disease. Cilia are membrane-enclosed finger-like projections from the cell, usually on the apical surface or facing into a lumen, duct or airway. Ten years ago, the major recognised functions related to classical "9+2" cilia in the respiratory and reproductive tracts, where co-ordinated beating clears secretions and assists fertilisation respectively. Primary cilia, which have a "9+0" arrangement lacking the central microtubules, were anatomical curiosities but several lines of evidence have implicated them in both true polycystic kidney disease and other cystic renal conditions: ranging from the homology between Caenorhabditis elegans proteins expressed on sensory cilia to mammalian polycystic kidney disease (PKD) 1 and 2 proteins, through the discovery that orpk cystic mice have structurally abnormal cilia to numerous recent studies wherein expression of nearly all cyst-associated proteins has been reported in the cilia or its basal body. Functional studies implicate primary cilia in mechanosensation, photoreception and chemosensation but it is the first of these which appears most important in polycystic kidney disease: in the simplest model, fluid flow across the apical surface of renal cells bends the cilia and induces calcium influx, and this is perturbed in polycystic kidney disease. Downstream effects include changes in cell differentiation and polarity. Pathways such as hedgehog and Wnt signalling may also be regulated by cilia. These data support important roles for cilia in the pathogenesis of cystic kidney diseases but one must not forget that the classic polycystic kidney disease proteins are expressed in several other locations where they may have equally important roles, such as in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, whilst it is not just aberrant cilia signalling that can lead to de-differentiation, loss of polarity and other characteristic features of

  1. Cilia and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, cilia have moved from relative obscurity to a position of importance for understanding multiple complex human diseases. Now termed the ciliopathies, these diseases inflict devastating effects on millions of people worldwide. In this review, written primarily for teachers and students who may not yet be aware of the recent exciting developments in this field, we provide a general overview of our current understanding of cilia and human disease. We start with an introduction to cilia structure and assembly and indicate where they are found in the human body. We then discuss the clinical features of selected ciliopathies, with an emphasis on primary ciliary dyskinesia, polycystic kidney disease, and retinal degeneration. The history of ciliopathy research involves a fascinating interplay between basic and clinical sciences, highlighted in a timeline. Finally, we summarize the relative strengths of individual model organisms for ciliopathy research; many of these are suitable for classroom use. PMID:25960570

  2. Primary Cilia and Dendritic Spines: Different but Similar Signaling Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Nechipurenko, Inna V.; Doroquez, David B.; Sengupta, Piali

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-motile cilia and dendritic spines are cellular compartments that are specialized to sense and transduce environmental cues and presynaptic signals, respectively. Despite their unique cellular roles, both compartments exhibit remarkable parallels in the general principles, as well as molecular mechanisms, by which their protein composition, membrane domain architecture, cellular interactions, and structural and functional plasticity are regulated. We compare and contrast the pathways required for the generation and function of cilia and dendritic spines, and suggest that insights from the study of one may inform investigations into the other of these critically important signaling structures. PMID:24048681

  3. Assembly and dynamics of synthetic cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Tim

    2012-02-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach towards studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up. We find that simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent produce spontaneous oscillations in MT bundles, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Furthermore, bundles in close proximity spontaneously coordinate their beating to generate metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in ciliary fields. These findings and future refinements of the system can potentially provide insights into general design principles required for engineering synthetic cilia as well as understanding the biological analogues.

  4. Sensory cilia in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Keil, Thomas A

    2012-11-01

    In arthropods, the modified primary cilium is a structure common to all peripheral sensory neurons other than photoreceptors. Since its first description in 1958, it has been investigated in great detail in numerous sense organs (sensilla) of many insect species by means of electron microscopy and electrophysiology. The perfection of molecular biological methods has led to an enormous advance in our knowledge about development and function of sensory cilia in the fruitfly since the end of the last century. The cilia show a wealth of adaptations according to their different physiological roles: chemoreception, mechanoreception, hygroreception, and thermoreception. Divergent types of receptors and channels have evolved fulfilling these tasks. The number of olfactory receptor genes can be close to 300 in ants, whereas in crickets slightest mechanical stimuli are detected by the interaction of extremely sophisticated biomechanical devices with mechanosensory cilia. Despite their enormous morphological and physiological divergence, sensilla and sensory cilia develop according to a stereotyped pattern. Intraflagellar transport genes have been found to be decisive for proper development and function.

  5. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development.

    PubMed

    Marra, Amanda N; Li, Yue; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health. PMID:27389733

  6. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Amanda N.; Li, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health. PMID:27389733

  7. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development.

    PubMed

    Marra, Amanda N; Li, Yue; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health.

  8. nlz1 is required for cilia formation in zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sunit; Sriskanda, Shahila; Boobalan, Elangovan; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Elkahloun, Abdel; Brooks, Brian P

    2015-10-15

    The formation of cilia is a fundamental developmental process affecting diverse functions such as cellular signaling, tissue morphogenesis and body patterning. However, the mechanisms of ciliogenesis during vertebrate development are not fully understood. In this report we describe a novel role of the Nlz1 protein in ciliogenesis. We demonstrate morpholino-mediated knockdown of nlz1 in zebrafish causes abnormal specification of the cells of Kupffer's vesicle (KV); a severe reduction of the number of cilia in KV, the pronephros, and the neural floorplate; and a spectrum of later phenotypes reminiscent of human ciliopathies. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that Nlz1 acts downstream of Foxj1a and Wnt8a/presumed canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, Nlz1 contributes to motile cilia formation by positively regulating Wnt11/presumed non-canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest a novel role of nlz1 in ciliogenesis and the morphogenesis of multiple tissues.

  9. nlz1 is required for cilia formation in zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sunit; Sriskanda, Shahila; Boobalan, Elangovan; Alur, Ramakrishna. P.; Elkahloun, Abdel

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cilia is a fundamental developmental process affecting diverse functions such as cellular signaling, tissue morphogenesis and body patterning. However, the mechanisms of ciliogenesis during vertebrate development are not fully understood. In this report we describe a novel role of the Nlz1 protein in ciliogenesis. We demonstrate morpholino-mediated knockdown of nlz1 in zebrafish causes abnormal specification of the cells of Kupffer’s vesicle (KV); a severe reduction of the number of cilia in KV, the pronephros, and the neural floorplate; and a spectrum of later phenotypes reminiscent of human ciliopathies. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that Nlz1 acts downstream of Foxj1a and Wnt8a/presumed canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, Nlz1 contributes to motile cilia formation by positively regulating Wnt11/presumed non-canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest a novel role of nlz1 in ciliogenesis and the morphogenesis of multiple tissues. PMID:26327644

  10. Polaris, a protein involved in left-right axis patterning, localizes to basal bodies and cilia.

    PubMed

    Taulman, P D; Haycraft, C J; Balkovetz, D F; Yoder, B K

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in Tg737 cause a wide spectrum of phenotypes, including random left-right axis specification, polycystic kidney disease, liver and pancreatic defects, hydrocephalus, and skeletal patterning abnormalities. To further assess the biological function of Tg737 and its role in the mutant pathology, we identified the cell population expressing Tg737 and determined the subcellular localization of its protein product called Polaris. Tg737 expression is associated with cells possessing either motile or immotile cilia and sperm. Similarly, Polaris concentrated just below the apical membrane in the region of the basal bodies and within the cilia or flagellar axoneme. The data suggest that Polaris functions in a ciliogenic pathway or in cilia maintenance, a role supported by the loss of cilia on the ependymal cell layer in ventricles of Tg737(orpk) brains and by the lack of node cilia in Tg737(Delta2-3betaGal) mutants. PMID:11251073

  11. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  12. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  13. A chemical screen identifies class A G-protein coupled receptors as regulators of cilia

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Marley, Aaron; Lin, Henry; Gregori-Puigjane, Elisabet; Shoichet, Brian K.; von Zastrow, Mark; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2012-01-01

    Normal cilia length and motility are critical for proper cellular function. Prior studies of the regulation of ciliary structure and length have primarily focused on the intraflagellar transport machinery and motor proteins required for ciliary assembly and disassembly. However, several mutants with abnormal length flagella highlight the importance of signaling proteins as well. In this study, an unbiased chemical screen was performed to uncover signaling pathways that are critical for ciliogenesis and length regulation using flagella of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model. The annotated Sigma LOPAC1280 chemical library was screened for effects on flagellar length, motility and severing as well as cell viability. Assay data were clustered to identify pathways regulating flagella. The most frequently target found to be involved in flagellar length regulation was the family of dopamine binding G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In mammalian cells, cilium length could indeed be altered with expression of the dopamine D1 receptor. Our screen thus reveals signaling pathways that are potentially critical for ciliary formation, resorption, and length maintenance, which represent candidate targets for therapeutic intervention of disorders involving ciliary malformation and malfunction. PMID:22375814

  14. The Heterotaxy gene, GALNT11, glycosylates Notch to orchestrate cilia type and laterality

    PubMed Central

    Boskovski, Marko T.; Yuan, Shiaulou; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Goth, Christoffer Knak; Makova, Svetlana; Clausen, Henrik; Brueckner, Martina; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotaxy (Htx) is a disorder of left-right (LR) body patterning, or laterality, that is associated with major congenital heart disease1. The etiology and mechanism underlying most human Htx is poorly understood. In vertebrates, laterality is initiated at the embryonic left-right organizer (LRO), where motile cilia generate leftward flow that is detected by immotile sensory cilia, which transduce flow into downstream asymmetric signals2–6. The mechanism that specifies these two cilia types remains unknown. We now show that the GalNAc-type O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT11 is crucial to such determination. We previously identified GALNT11 as a candidate disease gene in a patient with Htx7, and now demonstrate, in Xenopus, that galnt11 activates Notch signaling. GALNT11 O-glycosylates NOTCH1 peptides in vitro, thereby supporting a mechanism of Notch activation either by increasing ADAM17-mediated ectodomain shedding of the Notch receptor or by modification of specific EGF repeats. We further developed a quantitative live imaging technique for Xenopus LRO cilia and show that galnt11-mediated notch1 signaling modulates the spatial distribution and ratio of motile and immotile cilia at the LRO. galnt11 or notch1 depletion increases the ratio of motile cilia at the expense of immotile cilia and produces a laterality defect reminiscent of loss of the ciliary sensor Pkd2. In contrast, Notch overexpression decreases this ratio mimicking the ciliopathy, primary ciliary dyskinesia. Together, our data demonstrate that Galnt11 modifies Notch, establishing an essential balance between motile and immotile cilia at the LRO to determine laterality and identifies a novel mechanism for human Htx. PMID:24226769

  15. The heterotaxy gene GALNT11 glycosylates Notch to orchestrate cilia type and laterality.

    PubMed

    Boskovski, Marko T; Yuan, Shiaulou; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Goth, Christoffer Knak; Makova, Svetlana; Clausen, Henrik; Brueckner, Martina; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2013-12-19

    Heterotaxy is a disorder of left-right body patterning, or laterality, that is associated with major congenital heart disease. The aetiology and mechanisms underlying most cases of human heterotaxy are poorly understood. In vertebrates, laterality is initiated at the embryonic left-right organizer, where motile cilia generate leftward flow that is detected by immotile sensory cilia, which transduce flow into downstream asymmetric signals. The mechanism that specifies these two cilia types remains unknown. Here we show that the N-acetylgalactosamine-type O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT11 is crucial to such determination. We previously identified GALNT11 as a candidate disease gene in a patient with heterotaxy, and now demonstrate, in Xenopus tropicalis, that galnt11 activates Notch signalling. GALNT11 O-glycosylates human NOTCH1 peptides in vitro, thereby supporting a mechanism of Notch activation either by increasing ADAM17-mediated ectodomain shedding of the Notch receptor or by modification of specific EGF repeats. We further developed a quantitative live imaging technique for Xenopus left-right organizer cilia and show that Galnt11-mediated Notch1 signalling modulates the spatial distribution and ratio of motile and immotile cilia at the left-right organizer. galnt11 or notch1 depletion increases the ratio of motile cilia at the expense of immotile cilia and produces a laterality defect reminiscent of loss of the ciliary sensor Pkd2. By contrast, Notch overexpression decreases this ratio, mimicking the ciliopathy primary ciliary dyskinesia. Together our data demonstrate that Galnt11 modifies Notch, establishing an essential balance between motile and immotile cilia at the left-right organizer to determine laterality, and reveal a novel mechanism for human heterotaxy. PMID:24226769

  16. Recruitment of β-Arrestin into Neuronal Cilia Modulates Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 3 Ciliary Localization

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jill A.; Schmid, Cullen L.; Bley, Elizabeth; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Bohn, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential sensory and signaling organelles present on nearly every mammalian cell type. Defects in primary cilia underlie a class of human diseases collectively termed ciliopathies. Primary cilia are restricted subcellular compartments, and specialized mechanisms coordinate the localization of proteins to cilia. Moreover, trafficking of proteins into and out of cilia is required for proper ciliary function, and this process is disrupted in ciliopathies. The somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (Sstr3) is selectively targeted to primary cilia on neurons in the mammalian brain and is implicated in learning and memory. Here, we show that Sstr3 localization to cilia is dynamic and decreases in response to somatostatin treatment. We further show that somatostatin treatment stimulates β-arrestin recruitment into Sstr3-positive cilia and this recruitment can be blocked by mutations in Sstr3 that impact agonist binding or phosphorylation. Importantly, somatostatin treatment fails to decrease Sstr3 ciliary localization in neurons lacking β-arrestin 2. Together, our results implicate β-arrestin in the modulation of Sstr3 ciliary localization and further suggest a role for β-arrestin in the mediation of Sstr3 ciliary signaling. PMID:26503786

  17. [The rebirth of the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella].

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The sensory and motility functions of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for cell survival in protozoans and for cell differentiation and homoeostasis in metazoans. Ciliary biology has benefited early on from the input of electron microscopy. Over the last decade, the visualization of cellular structures has greatly progressed, thus it becomes timely to review the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. Briefly touching upon the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme, we dwell extensively on the transition zone, the singlet zone, the ciliary necklace, cap and crown. The relation of the singlet zone to sensory and/or motile function, the link of the ciliary cap to microtubule dynamics and to ciliary beat, the involvement of the ciliary crown in ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the role of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier will all be discussed.

  18. Kinesin-13 regulates the quantity and quality of tubulin inside cilia

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Krishna Kumar; Jiang, Yu-Yang; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Kushida, Yasuharu; Alford, Lea M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Hennessey, Todd; Gaertig, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin-13, an end depolymerizer of cytoplasmic and spindle microtubules, also affects the length of cilia. However, in different models, depletion of kinesin-13 either lengthens or shortens cilia, and therefore the exact function of kinesin-13 in cilia remains unclear. We generated null mutations of all kinesin-13 paralogues in the ciliate Tetrahymena. One of the paralogues, Kin13Ap, localizes to the nuclei and is essential for nuclear divisions. The remaining two paralogues, Kin13Bp and Kin13Cp, localize to the cell body and inside assembling cilia. Loss of both Kin13Bp and Kin13Cp resulted in slow cell multiplication and motility, overgrowth of cell body microtubules, shortening of cilia, and synthetic lethality with either paclitaxel or a deletion of MEC-17/ATAT1, the α-tubulin acetyltransferase. The mutant cilia assembled slowly and contained abnormal tubulin, characterized by altered posttranslational modifications and hypersensitivity to paclitaxel. The mutant cilia beat slowly and axonemes showed reduced velocity of microtubule sliding. Thus kinesin-13 positively regulates the axoneme length, influences the properties of ciliary tubulin, and likely indirectly, through its effects on the axonemal microtubules, affects the ciliary dynein-dependent motility. PMID:25501369

  19. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  20. A cell-based screen for inhibitors of flagella-driven motility in Chlamydomonas reveals a novel modulator of ciliary length and retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Feldman, Jessica L; Wilson, Christopher W; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Snedecor, June; Williams, Janice; Sun, Zhaoxia; Marshall, Wallace F

    2011-03-01

    Cilia are motile and sensory organelles with critical roles in physiology. Ciliary defects can cause numerous human disease symptoms including polycystic kidneys, hydrocephalus, and retinal degeneration. Despite the importance of these organelles, their assembly and function is not fully understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model system for studies of ciliary assembly and function. Here we describe our initial efforts to build a chemical-biology toolkit to augment the genetic tools available for studying cilia in this organism, with the goal of being able to reversibly perturb ciliary function on a rapid time-scale compared to that available with traditional genetic methods. We screened a set of 5520 compounds from which we identified four candidate compounds with reproducible effects on flagella at nontoxic doses. Three of these compounds resulted in flagellar paralysis and one induced flagellar shortening in a reversible and dose-dependent fashion, accompanied by a reduction in the speed of intraflagellar transport. This latter compound also reduced the length of cilia in mammalian cells, hence we named the compound "ciliabrevin" due to its ability to shorten cilia. This compound also robustly and reversibly inhibited microtubule movement and retrograde actin flow in Drosophila S2 cells. Ciliabrevin may prove especially useful for the study of retrograde actin flow at the leading edge of cells, as it slows the retrograde flow in a tunable dose-dependent fashion until flow completely stops at high concentrations, and these effects are quickly reversed upon washout of the drug.

  1. Primary cilia enhance kisspeptin receptor signaling on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koemeter-Cox, Andrew I.; Sherwood, Thomas W.; Green, Jill A.; Steiner, Robert A.; Berbari, Nicolas F.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Askwith, Candice C.; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Most central neurons in the mammalian brain possess an appendage called a primary cilium that projects from the soma into the extracellular space. The importance of these organelles is highlighted by the fact that primary cilia dysfunction is associated with numerous neuropathologies, including hyperphagia-induced obesity, hypogonadism, and learning and memory deficits. Neuronal cilia are enriched for signaling molecules, including certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), suggesting that neuronal cilia sense and respond to neuromodulators in the extracellular space. However, the impact of cilia on signaling to central neurons has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r), a GPCR that is activated by kisspeptin to regulate the onset of puberty and adult reproductive function, is enriched in cilia projecting from mouse gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Interestingly, GnRH neurons in adult animals are multiciliated and the percentage of GnRH neurons possessing multiple Kiss1r-positive cilia increases during postnatal development in a progression that correlates with sexual maturation. Remarkably, disruption of cilia selectively on GnRH neurons leads to a significant reduction in kisspeptin-mediated GnRH neuronal activity. To our knowledge, this result is the first demonstration of cilia disruption affecting central neuronal activity and highlights the importance of cilia for proper GPCR signaling. PMID:24982149

  2. Axonemal Positioning and Orientation in 3-D Space for Primary Cilia: What is Known, What is Assumed, and What Needs Clarification

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia E.; Wilsman, Norman J.

    2012-01-01

    Two positional characteristics of the ciliary axoneme – its location on the plasma membrane as it emerges from the cell, and its orientation in three-dimensional space – are known to be critical for optimal function of actively motile cilia (including nodal cilia), as well as for modified cilia associated with special senses. However, these positional characteristics have not been analyzed to any significant extent for primary cilia. This review briefly summarizes the history of knowledge of these two positional characteristics across a wide spectrum of cilia, emphasizing their importance for proper function. Then the review focuses what is known about these same positional characteristics for primary cilia in all major tissue types where they have been reported. The review emphasizes major areas that would be productive for future research for understanding how positioning and 3-D orientation of primary cilia may be related to their hypothesized signaling roles within different cellular populations. PMID:22012592

  3. Effect of ionic strength, serum albumin and other macromolecules on the maintenance of motility and the surface of mammalian spermatozoa in a simple medium.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Dott, H M; Foster, G C

    1978-01-01

    The seminal plasma in sperm suspensions from boar, bull, rabbit, ram and stallion was replaced with simple defined media as completely as possible by a combination of centrifugation through Ficoll and dilution. After this process, motility declined and the cells showed a tendency to agglutinate and/or stick to glass. Varying the ionic strength of the medium had little effect upon these parameters but sperm motility was preserved better in the presence of serum albumin. When a number of purified proteins and other macromolecules were tested individually in this way for their motility-preserving ability, bovine or human serum albumin was consistently the most effective. Defatting the albumin or altering its nature by mild reduction, oxidation or alkylation had little detectable effect on its motility-preserving ability; the protein did not appear to be acting as a chelator of metal ions, for it could not be replaced by EDTA. The response of the spermatozoa to replacemrnt of seminal plasma varied between species: bull spermatozoa were particularly sensitive and serum albumin had little effect upon their subsequent motility.

  4. What makes cilia beat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok; Foster, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    There have been numerous attempts at understanding the mechanism responsible for producing steady beat in cilia that propel eukaryotic cells. The core structure of a cilium, known as the axoneme, consists of nine microtubules doublet surrounding a central pair of microtubules. The dynein motors on the doublets generate active shear forces that are responsible for relative sliding and bending of the cilium. Several theories have been put forward over the last sixty years but none are supported through a careful analysis of the ciliary beating. We have combined the methods of slender body theory and multipole expansions - both developed by Professor Acrivos and his students - to analyze in detail the hydrodynamics of ciliary beating in ten different cases. The analysis is used to infer the internal dynamics of cilia and, in particular, the active forces generated by the dynein motors along the length of cilia. We find that the properties of the axoneme vary along the length of a cilium. In the central region, the active forces generated are primarily dependent on the rate of sliding of the microtubules. This region therefore appears to be optimized to propagate a wave down the length of the cilium. The proximal region near the cell body appears more complex and may be suitable for creating waves. These conclusions from the hydrodynamic analysis are consistent with a recent study that reports different structures of the axoneme in these two regions. The detailed comparison with various theories of axoneme dynamics/collective behavior of molecular motors show that none of the existing theories are adequate for predicting the correct active moments generated so that the mechanism for ciliary beating still remains unresolved.

  5. Symmetry Breaking in a Model for Nodal Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokaw, Charles J.

    2005-03-01

    Nodal cilia are very short cilia found in the embryonic node on the ventral surface of early mammalian embryos. They create a right to left fluid flow that is responsible for determining the normal asymmetry of the internal organs of the mammalian body. To do this, the distal end of the cilium must circle in a counterclockwise sense. Computer simulations with 3-dimensional models of flagella allow examination of 3-dimensional movements such as those of nodal cilia. 3-dimensional circling motions of short cilia can be achieved with velocity controlled models, in which dynein activity is regulated by sliding velocity. If dyneins on one outer doublet are controlled by the sliding velocity experienced by that doublet, the system is symmetric, and the 3-dimensional models can show either clockwise or counterclockwise circling. My computer simulations have examined two possible symmetry breaking mechanisms: 1) dyneins on doublet N are regulated by a mixture of the sliding velocities experienced by doublets N and N+1 (numbered in a clockwise direction, looking from the base). or 2) symmetry is broken by an off-axis force that produces a right-handed twist of the axoneme, consistent with observations that some dyneins can rotate their substrate microtubules in a clockwise direction.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hilfinger, Andreas; Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-05-01

    Cilia and flagella are hairlike extensions of eukaryotic cells which generate oscillatory beat patterns that can propel micro-organisms and create fluid flows near cellular surfaces. The evolutionary highly conserved core of cilia and flagella consists of a cylindrical arrangement of nine microtubule doublets, called the axoneme. The axoneme is an actively bending structure whose motility results from the action of dynein motor proteins cross-linking microtubule doublets and generating stresses that induce bending deformations. The periodic beat patterns are the result of a mechanical feedback that leads to self-organized bending waves along the axoneme. Using a theoretical framework to describe planar beating motion, we derive a nonlinear wave equation that describes the fundamental Fourier mode of the axonemal beat. We study the role of nonlinearities and investigate how the amplitude of oscillations increases in the vicinity of an oscillatory instability. We furthermore present numerical solutions of the nonlinear wave equation for different boundary conditions. We find that the nonlinear waves are well approximated by the linearly unstable modes for amplitudes of beat patterns similar to those observed experimentally. PMID:19518491

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of cilia and flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfinger, Andreas; Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-05-01

    Cilia and flagella are hairlike extensions of eukaryotic cells which generate oscillatory beat patterns that can propel micro-organisms and create fluid flows near cellular surfaces. The evolutionary highly conserved core of cilia and flagella consists of a cylindrical arrangement of nine microtubule doublets, called the axoneme. The axoneme is an actively bending structure whose motility results from the action of dynein motor proteins cross-linking microtubule doublets and generating stresses that induce bending deformations. The periodic beat patterns are the result of a mechanical feedback that leads to self-organized bending waves along the axoneme. Using a theoretical framework to describe planar beating motion, we derive a nonlinear wave equation that describes the fundamental Fourier mode of the axonemal beat. We study the role of nonlinearities and investigate how the amplitude of oscillations increases in the vicinity of an oscillatory instability. We furthermore present numerical solutions of the nonlinear wave equation for different boundary conditions. We find that the nonlinear waves are well approximated by the linearly unstable modes for amplitudes of beat patterns similar to those observed experimentally.

  8. A focal adhesion factor directly linking intracellularly motile Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii to the actin-based cytoskeleton of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T; Ebel, F; Domann, E; Niebuhr, K; Gerstel, B; Pistor, S; Temm-Grove, C J; Jockusch, B M; Reinhard, M; Walter, U

    1995-04-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal adhesion-associated substrate of both the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, accumulates on the surface of intracytoplasmic bacteria prior to the detection of F-actin 'clouds'. VASP remains associated with the surface of highly motile bacteria, where it is polarly located, juxtaposed between one extremity of the bacterial surface and the front of the actin comet tail. Since actin filament polymerization occurs only at the very front of the tail, VASP exhibits properties of a host protein required to promote actin polymerization. Purified VASP binds directly to the ActA polypeptide in vitro. A ligand-overlay blot using purified radiolabelled VASP enabled us to identify the ActA homologue of the related intracellular motile pathogen, Listeria ivanovii, as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. VASP also associates with actin filaments recruited by another intracellularly motile bacterial pathogen, Shigella flexneri. Hence, by the simple expedient of expressing surface-bound attractor molecules, bacterial pathogens effectively harness cytoskeletal components to achieve intracellular movement.

  9. hemingway is required for sperm flagella assembly and ciliary motility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soulavie, Fabien; Piepenbrock, David; Thomas, Joëlle; Vieillard, Jennifer; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Cortier, Elisabeth; Laurençon, Anne; Göpfert, Martin C.; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Cilia play major functions in physiology and development, and ciliary dysfunctions are responsible for several diseases in humans called ciliopathies. Cilia motility is required for cell and fluid propulsion in organisms. In humans, cilia motility deficiencies lead to primary ciliary dyskinesia, with upper-airways recurrent infections, left–right asymmetry perturbations, and fertility defects. In Drosophila, we identified hemingway (hmw) as a novel component required for motile cilia function. hmw encodes a 604–amino acid protein characterized by a highly conserved coiled-coil domain also found in the human orthologue, KIAA1430. We show that HMW is conserved in species with motile cilia and that, in Drosophila, hmw is expressed in ciliated sensory neurons and spermatozoa. We created hmw-knockout flies and found that they are hearing impaired and male sterile. hmw is implicated in the motility of ciliated auditory sensory neurons and, in the testis, is required for elongation and maintenance of sperm flagella. Because HMW is absent from mature flagella, we propose that HMW is not a structural component of the motile axoneme but is required for proper acquisition of motile properties. This identifies HMW as a novel, evolutionarily conserved component necessary for motile cilium function and flagella assembly. PMID:24554765

  10. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  11. Intracellular and extracellular forces drive primary cilia movement

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Burnette, Dylan T.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are ubiquitous, microtubule-based organelles that play diverse roles in sensory transduction in many eukaryotic cells. They interrogate the cellular environment through chemosensing, osmosensing, and mechanosensing using receptors and ion channels in the ciliary membrane. Little is known about the mechanical and structural properties of the cilium and how these properties contribute to ciliary perception. We probed the mechanical responses of primary cilia from kidney epithelial cells [Madin–Darby canine kidney-II (MDCK-II)], which sense fluid flow in renal ducts. We found that, on manipulation with an optical trap, cilia deflect by bending along their length and pivoting around an effective hinge located below the basal body. The calculated bending rigidity indicates weak microtubule doublet coupling. Primary cilia of MDCK cells lack interdoublet dynein motors. Nevertheless, we found that the organelles display active motility. 3D tracking showed correlated fluctuations of the cilium and basal body. These angular movements seemed random but were dependent on ATP and cytoplasmic myosin-II in the cell cortex. We conclude that force generation by the actin cytoskeleton surrounding the basal body results in active ciliary movement. We speculate that actin-driven ciliary movement might tune and calibrate ciliary sensory functions. PMID:25605896

  12. Analysis of properties of cilia using Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidyalakshmi; Corpuz, Elizabeth O; Hubenschmidt, Mark J; Townsend, Caroline R; Asai, David J; Wilkes, David E

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are important structures required for the motility of cells, the movement of medium across the surfaces of cells, and the connections between the receptor and synthetic portions of sensory cells. The axoneme forms the cytoskeleton of the cilium comprising several hundreds of proteins that assemble into the 9 + 2 arrangement of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, the inner and outer rows of dynein arms, and many other structures. Tetrahymena thermophila is an excellent model organism for the study of cilia and ciliogenesis. The cell is covered by about 1,000 cilia which are essential for survival. Additionally, the Tetrahymena genome is available and targeted genetic manipulations are straightforward. In this chapter, we describe five protocols that examine properties of cilia: (a) measuring mRNA levels to see the effect of deciliation on gene expression; (b) swimming velocity and linearity; (c) ciliary length and density; (d) phagocytosis that occurs through the ciliated oral apparatus; and (e) depolarization-induced ciliary reversal.

  13. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2013-12-01

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways.

  14. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N; Clapham, David E

    2013-12-12

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways. PMID:24336289

  15. Ophiobolin A from Bipolaris oryzae perturbs motility and membrane integrities of porcine sperm and induces cell death on mammalian somatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Ottó; Papp, Tamás; Berta, Máté; Zana, Annamária; Forgó, Péter; Dombi, György; Andersson, Maria A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Szekeres, András

    2014-09-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing a brown spot disease in rice, and produces substance that strongly perturbs motility and membrane integrities of boar spermatozoa. The substance was isolated from the liquid culture of the fungal strain using extraction and a multi-step semi-preparative HPLC procedures. Based on the results of mass spectrometric and 2D NMR techniques, the bioactive molecule was identified as ophiobolin A, a previously described sesterterpene-type compound. The purified ophiobolin A exhibited strong motility inhibition and viability reduction on boar spermatozoa. Furthermore, it damaged the sperm mitochondria significantly at sublethal concentration by the dissipation of transmembrane potential in the mitochondrial inner membrane, while the plasma membrane permeability barrier remained intact. The study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of ophiobolin A toward somatic cell lines is higher by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to other mitochondriotoxic mycotoxins, and towards sperm cells unique by replacing the progressive motility by shivering tail beating at low exposure concentration. PMID:25251540

  16. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier YR; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly conserved mechanism involving more than 20 IFT proteins. However, the functions of individual IFT proteins are mostly unclear. To help address this issue, we focused on a putative IFT protein TTC26/DYF13. Using live imaging and biochemical approaches we show that TTC26/DYF13 is an IFT complex B protein in mammalian cells and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knockdown of TTC26/DYF13 in zebrafish embryos or mutation of TTC26/DYF13 in C. reinhardtii, produced short cilia with abnormal motility. Surprisingly, IFT particle assembly and speed were normal in dyf13 mutant flagella, unlike in other IFT complex B mutants. Proteomic and biochemical analyses indicated a particular set of proteins involved in motility was specifically depleted in the dyf13 mutant. These results support the concept that different IFT proteins are responsible for different cargo subsets, providing a possible explanation for the complexity of the IFT machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01566.001 PMID:24596149

  17. Sperm-Associated Antigen 6 (SPAG6) Deficiency and Defects in Ciliogenesis and Cilia Function: Polarity, Density, and Beat

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Sears, Patrick R.; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhengang; Tang, Waixing; van Reesema, Lauren; Costanzo, Richard M.; Davis, C. William; Knowles, Michael R.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    SPAG6, an axoneme central apparatus protein, is essential for function of ependymal cell cilia and sperm flagella. A significant number of Spag6-deficient mice die with hydrocephalus, and surviving males are sterile because of sperm motility defects. In further exploring the ciliary dysfunction in Spag6-null mice, we discovered that cilia beat frequency was significantly reduced in tracheal epithelial cells, and that the beat was not synchronized. There was also a significant reduction in cilia density in both brain ependymal and trachea epithelial cells, and cilia arrays were disorganized. The orientation of basal feet, which determines the direction of axoneme orientation, was apparently random in Spag6-deficient mice, and there were reduced numbers of basal feet, consistent with reduced cilia density. The polarized epithelial cell morphology and distribution of intracellular mucin, α-tubulin, and the planar cell polarity protein, Vangl2, were lost in Spag6-deficient tracheal epithelial cells. Polarized epithelial cell morphology and polarized distribution of α-tubulin in tracheal epithelial cells was observed in one-week old wild-type mice, but not in the Spag6-deficient mice of the same age. Thus, the cilia and polarity defects appear prior to 7 days post-partum. These findings suggest that SPAG6 not only regulates cilia/flagellar motility, but that in its absence, ciliogenesis, axoneme orientation, and tracheal epithelial cell polarity are altered. PMID:25333478

  18. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  19. Oda16/Wdr69 is essential for axonemal dynein assembly and ciliary motility during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunlei; Wang, Guangliang; Amack, Jeffrey D; Mitchell, David R

    2010-08-01

    In the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Oda16 functions during ciliary assembly as an adaptor for intraflagellar transport of outer arm dynein. Oda16 orthologs only occur in genomes of organisms that use motile cilia; however, such cilia play multiple roles during vertebrate development and the contribution of Oda16 to their assembly remains unexplored. We demonstrate that the zebrafish Oda16 ortholog (Wdr69) is expressed in organs with motile cilia and retains a role in dynein assembly. Antisense morpholino knockdown of Wdr69 disrupts ciliary motility and results in multiple phenotypes associated with vertebrate ciliopathies. Affected cilia included those in Kupffer's vesicle, where Wdr69 plays a role in generation of asymmetric fluid flow and establishment of organ laterality, and otic vesicles, where Wdr69 is needed to develop normal numbers of otoliths. Analysis of cilium ultrastructure revealed loss of outer dynein arms in morphant embryos. These results support a remarkable level of functional conservation for Oda16/Wdr69. PMID:20568242

  20. Chronic effects of nitrogen dioxide on cilia in hamster bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Heller, R F; Gordon, R E

    1986-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide has been shown to have a deleterious effect on the structure and function of respiratory cilia. This study focuses on both the alterations of cilia morphology, and the ciliated cell response induced by nitrogen dioxide, in order to determine the mechanism(s) leading to ciliary dysfunction. Ciliated cells of the respiratory airways of hamsters, exposed to 30 ppm nitrogen dioxide for 5 months, 7 days/week, 22 hours/day, were examined ultrastructurally using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of thin sections, freeze-fracture replicas, and thin sections of tissues treated with cationized ferritin. SEM and TEM preparations appeared to show a generalized reduction in number and length of cilia. It was common to see basal bodies with no ciliary shaft and many cilia at different stages of growth. It was also apparent that the cilia were most fragile just below the ciliary necklaces. After breakage, the plasma membranes of the remaining ciliary stubs covered the exposed basal bodies. During the early stages of ciliary regeneration, freeze fracture replicas showed the emergence of membrane particles which appeared to correlate with cationized ferritin binding sites. As the cilia increased in length, the particles assembled into a necklace-like arrangement, varying in ring number and particle distribution as compared to the 5 to 7 well organized rings observed in controls. In corresponding thin sections, cationized ferritin appeared bound to sites in the region of the ciliary necklace particles. As the cilia developed further, the cationic ferritin binding at these sites diminished. This data suggests that nitrogen dioxide had an affect on the plasma membranes of ciliated cells. One of the major sites affected by the nitrogen dioxide was the ciliary necklace region. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide appeared to lead to increased ciliary fragility, stunted ciliary growth, and loss of ciliary motility. The rings of ciliary

  1. Zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants disrupt cilia but do not affect hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Shannon C; Haynes, Tony; Perkins, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Cilia formation requires intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. Recent studies indicate that mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling requires cilia. It is unclear, however, if the requirement for cilia and IFT proteins in Hh signaling represents a general rule for all vertebrates. Here we examine zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 mutants and morphants for defects in Hh signaling. Although ift57 and ift88 mutants and morphants contained residual maternal protein, the cilia were disrupted. In contrast to previous genetic studies in mouse, mutations in zebrafish IFT genes did not affect the expression of Hh target genes in the neural tube and forebrain and had no quantitative effect on Hh target gene expression. Zebrafish IFT mutants also exhibited no dramatic changes in the craniofacial skeleton, somite formation, or motor neuron patterning. Thus, our data indicate the requirement for cilia in the Hh signal transduction pathway may not represent a universal mechanism in vertebrates.

  2. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism.

  3. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism. PMID:27353389

  4. Quantitative description of fluid flows produced by left-right cilia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fox, Craig; Manning, M Lisa; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia generate directional flows that move mucus through airways, cerebrospinal fluid through brain ventricles, and oocytes through fallopian tubes. In addition, specialized monocilia beat in a rotational pattern to create asymmetric flows that are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryogenesis. These monocilia, which we refer to as "left-right cilia," produce a leftward flow of extraembryonic fluid in a transient "organ of asymmetry" that directs asymmetric signaling and development of LR asymmetries in the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. The asymmetric flows are thought to establish a chemical gradient and/or activate mechanosensitive cilia to initiate calcium ion signals and a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) pathway on the left side of the embryo, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. The zebrafish organ of asymmetry, called Kupffer's vesicle, provides a useful model system for investigating LR cilia and cilia-powered fluid flows. Here, we describe methods to visualize flows in Kupffer's vesicle using fluorescent microspheres and introduce a new and freely available MATLAB particle tracking code to quantitatively describe these flows. Analysis of normal and aberrant flows indicates this approach is useful for characterizing flow properties that impact LR asymmetry and may be more broadly applicable for quantifying other cilia flows. PMID:25837391

  5. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  6. Self-assembled artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Mojca; Potočnik, Anton; Kavčič, Blaž; Osterman, Natan; Poberaj, Igor; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan

    2010-01-01

    Due to their small dimensions, microfluidic devices operate in the low Reynolds number regime. In this case, the hydrodynamics is governed by the viscosity rather than inertia and special elements have to be introduced into the system for mixing and pumping of fluids. Here we report on the realization of an effective pumping device that mimics a ciliated surface and imitates its motion to generate fluid flow. The artificial biomimetic cilia are constructed as long chains of spherical superparamagnetic particles, which self-assemble in an external magnetic field. Magnetic field is also used to actuate the cilia in a simple nonreciprocal manner, resulting in a fluid flow. We prove the concept by measuring the velocity of a cilia-pumped fluid as a function of height above the ciliated surface and investigate the influence of the beating asymmetry on the pumping performance. A numerical simulation was carried out that successfully reproduced the experimentally obtained data. PMID:19934055

  7. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-01-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell’s antenna to obesity and type II diabetes. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 647-654] PMID:26538252

  8. Characterization of cancer stem cells and primary cilia in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gate, David; Danielpour, Moise; Bannykh, Serguei; Town, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a tumor of the cerebellum, is the most common pediatric central nervous system malignancy. These tumors are etiologically linked to mutations in the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, which signals through the primary, non-motile cilium. The growth of these aggressive tumors relies on self-renewal of tumor-propagating cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Previous reports have implicated CD133-expressing cells as CSCs in brain tumors, while those expressing CD15 have been shown to propagate medulloblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that CD133+ and CD15+ cells are distinct medulloblastoma populations. CD15+ cells comprise approximately 0.5-1% of total human medulloblastoma cells, display CSC properties in culture and are detected in the Smoothened A1 transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. Additionally, we report on a medulloblastoma patient with enriched CD15+ cells in recurrent vs primary medulloblastoma. We also demonstrate that human medulloblastoma cells critically rely on establishment of primary cilia to drive Shh-mediated cell division. Primary cilia are found in external granule cells of human fetal cerebellum and in 12/14 medulloblastoma samples. Yet, CD15+ medulloblastoma cells lack primary cilia, suggesting that this CSC population signals independently of Shh. These results are important when considering the effects of current and prospective treatment modalities on medulloblastoma CSC populations. PMID:25921740

  9. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling. PMID:25992706

  10. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling.

  11. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  12. Ultrastructure of cilia and flagella - back to the future!

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella perform motility and sensory functions which are essential for cell survival in protozoans, and to organism development and homoeostasis in metazoans. Their ultrastructure has been studied from the early beginnings of electron microscopy, and these studies continue to contribute to much of our understanding about ciliary biology. In the light of the progress made in the visualization of cellular structures over the last decade, we revisit the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. We briefly describe the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme before focusing extensively on the transition zone, the ciliary necklace, the singlet zone, the ciliary cap and the ciliary crown. We discuss how the singlet zone is linked to sensory and/or motile function, the contribution of the ciliary crown to ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the relationship between the ciliary cap and microtubule growth and shortening, and its relation to ciliary beat. We further examine the involvement of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier.

  13. Centrin 2 Is Required for Mouse Olfactory Ciliary Trafficking and Development of Ependymal Cilia Planar Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Irwin, Mavis; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are ancient calmodulin-related Ca2+-binding proteins associated with basal bodies. In lower eukaryotes, Centrin2 (CETN2) is required for basal body replication and positioning, although its function in mammals is undefined. We generated a germline CETN2 knock-out (KO) mouse presenting with syndromic ciliopathy including dysosmia and hydrocephalus. Absence of CETN2 leads to olfactory cilia loss, impaired ciliary trafficking of olfactory signaling proteins, adenylate cyclase III (ACIII), and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, as well as disrupted basal body apical migration in postnatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In mutant OSNs, cilia base-anchoring of intraflagellar transport components IFT88, the kinesin-II subunit KIF3A, and cytoplasmic dynein 2 appeared compromised. Although the densities of mutant ependymal and respiratory cilia were largely normal, the planar polarity of mutant ependymal cilia was disrupted, resulting in uncoordinated flow of CSF. Transgenic expression of GFP-CETN2 rescued the Cetn2-deficiency phenotype. These results indicate that mammalian basal body replication and ciliogenesis occur independently of CETN2; however, mouse CETN2 regulates protein trafficking of olfactory cilia and participates in specifying planar polarity of ependymal cilia. PMID:24790208

  14. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex. PMID:27493552

  15. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  16. Adipogenic Differentiation of hMSCs is Mediated by Recruitment of IGF‐1r Onto the Primary Cilium Associated With Cilia Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Dalbay, Melis T.; Connelly, John T.; Chapple, J. Paul; Knight, Martin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary cilia are single non‐motile organelles that provide a highly regulated compartment into which specific proteins are trafficked as a critical part of various signaling pathways. The absence of primary cilia has been shown to prevent differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Changes in primary cilia length are crucial for regulating signaling events; however it is not known how alterations in cilia structure relate to differentiation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in primary cilia structure are required for stem cell differentiation. hMSCs expressed primary cilia that were labeled with acetylated alpha tubulin and visualized by confocal microscopy. Chemically induced differentiation resulted in lineage specific changes in cilia length and prevalence which were independent of cell cycle. In particular, adipogenic differentiation resulted in cilia elongation associated with the presence of dexamethasone, while insulin had an inhibitory effect on cilia length. Over a 7‐day time course, adipogenic differentiation media resulted in cilia elongation within 2 days followed by increased nuclear PPARγ levels; an early marker of adipogenesis. Cilia elongation was associated with increased trafficking of insulin‐like growth factor‐1 receptor β (IGF‐1Rβ) into the cilium. This was reversed on inhibition of elongation by IFT‐88 siRNA transfection, which also decreased nuclear PPARγ. This is the first study to show that adipogenic differentiation requires primary cilia elongation associated with the recruitment of IGF‐1Rβ onto the cilium. This study may lead to the development of cilia‐targeted therapies for controlling adipogenic differentiation and associated conditions such as obesity. Stem Cells 2015;33:1952–1961 PMID:25693948

  17. Swimming with protists: perception, motility and flagellum assembly.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Portman, Neil; McKean, Paul G

    2008-11-01

    In unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, fast cell motility and rapid movement of material over cell surfaces are often mediated by ciliary or flagellar beating. The conserved defining structure in most motile cilia and flagella is the '9+2' microtubule axoneme. Our general understanding of flagellum assembly and the regulation of flagellar motility has been led by results from seminal studies of flagellate protozoa and algae. Here we review recent work relating to various aspects of protist physiology and cell biology. In particular, we discuss energy metabolism in eukaryotic flagella, modifications to the canonical assembly pathway and flagellum function in parasite virulence. PMID:18923411

  18. Swimming with protists: perception, motility and flagellum assembly.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Portman, Neil; McKean, Paul G

    2008-11-01

    In unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, fast cell motility and rapid movement of material over cell surfaces are often mediated by ciliary or flagellar beating. The conserved defining structure in most motile cilia and flagella is the '9+2' microtubule axoneme. Our general understanding of flagellum assembly and the regulation of flagellar motility has been led by results from seminal studies of flagellate protozoa and algae. Here we review recent work relating to various aspects of protist physiology and cell biology. In particular, we discuss energy metabolism in eukaryotic flagella, modifications to the canonical assembly pathway and flagellum function in parasite virulence.

  19. General and cell-type specific mechanisms target TRPP2/PKD-2 to cilia.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Qin, Hongmin; Knobel, Karla M; Hu, Jinghua; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Barr, Maureen M

    2006-10-01

    Ciliary localization of the transient receptor potential polycystin 2 channel (TRPP2/PKD-2) is evolutionarily conserved, but how TRPP2 is targeted to cilia is not known. In this study, we characterize the motility and localization of PKD-2, a TRPP2 homolog, in C. elegans sensory neurons. We demonstrate that GFP-tagged PKD-2 moves bidirectionally in the dendritic compartment. Furthermore, we show a requirement for different molecules in regulating the ciliary localization of PKD-2. PKD-2 is directed to moving dendritic particles by the UNC-101/adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex. When expressed in non-native neurons, PKD-2 remains in cell bodies and is not observed in dendrites or cilia, indicating that cell-type specific factors are required for directing PKD-2 to the dendrite. PKD-2 stabilization in cilia and cell bodies requires LOV-1, a functional partner and a TRPP1 homolog. In lov-1 mutants, PKD-2 is greatly reduced in cilia and forms abnormal aggregates in neuronal cell bodies. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is not essential for PKD-2 dendritic motility or access to the cilium, but may regulate PKD-2 ciliary abundance. We propose that both general and cell-type-specific factors govern TRPP2/PKD-2 subcellular distribution by forming at least two steps involving somatodendritic and ciliary sorting decisions. PMID:16943275

  20. Rab10 associates with primary cilia and the exocyst complex in renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Babbey, Clifford M.; Bacallao, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Rab10, a mammalian homolog of the yeast Sec4p protein, has previously been associated with endocytic recycling and biosynthetic membrane transport in cultured epithelia and with Glut4 translocation in adipocytes. Here, we report that Rab10 associates with primary cilia in renal epithelia in culture and in vivo. In addition, we find that Rab10 also colocalizes with exocyst proteins at the base of nascent cilia, and physically interacts with the exocyst complex, as detected with anti-Sec8 antibodies. These data suggest that membrane transport to the primary cilum may be mediated by interactions between Rab10 and an exocyst complex located at the cilium base. PMID:20576682

  1. Particle manipulation using vibrating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallapragada, Phanindra; Kelly, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The ability to manipulate small particles suspended in fluids has many practical applications, ranging from the mechanical testing of macromolecules like DNA to the controlled abrasion of brittle surfaces for precision polishing. A natural method is non-contact manipulation of particles through boundary excitations. Particle-manipulation via a vibrating cilia to establish controlled fluid flows with desired patterns of transport is one such bioinspired method. We show experimental results on the clustering and transport of finite-sized particles in the streaming flow set up by the oscillating cilia. We further show computations to explain the effects of hyperbolic structures in the four dimensional phase space of the dynamics of finite-sized particles.

  2. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Proteins Critical for Cilia Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanan; Cao, Jingli; Huang, Shan; Feng, Di; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xueliang; Yan, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Cilia formation and function require a special set of trafficking machinery termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), consisting mainly of protein complexes IFT-A, IFT-B, BBSome, and microtubule-dependent molecular motors. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (TTC) proteins are widely involved in protein complex formation. Nine of them are known to serve as components of the IFT or BBSome complexes. How many TTC proteins are cilia-related and how they function, however, remain unclear. Here we show that twenty TTC genes were upregulated by at least 2-fold during the differentiation of cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs) into multiciliated cells. Our systematic screen in zebrafish identified four novel TTC genes, ttc4, -9c, -36, and -39c, that are critical for cilia formation and motility. Accordingly, their zebrafish morphants displayed typical ciliopathy-related phenotypes, including curved body, abnormal otolith, hydrocephalus, and defective left-right patterning. The morphants of ttc4 and ttc25, a known cilia-related gene, additionally showed pronephric cyst formation. Immunoprecipitation indicated associations of TTC4, -9c, -25, -36, and -39c with components or entire complexes of IFT-A, IFT-B, or BBSome, implying their participations in IFT or IFT-related activities. Our results provide a global view for the relationship between TTC proteins and cilia. PMID:25860617

  3. HEATR2 Plays a Conserved Role in Assembly of the Ciliary Motile Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    zur Lage, Petra; Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Schmidts, Miriam; Shoemark, Amelia; Garcia Munoz, Amaya; Halachev, Mihail R.; Gautier, Philippe; Yeyati, Patricia L.; Bonthron, David T.; Carr, Ian M.; Hayward, Bruce; Markham, Alexander F.; Hope, Jilly E.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Jackson, Ian J.; Durand, Bénédicte; Reith, Walter; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jarman, Andrew P.; Mill, Pleasantine

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved microtubule-based structures that perform a variety of sensory and motility functions during development and adult homeostasis. In humans, defects specifically affecting motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, infertility and laterality defects in the genetically heterogeneous disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD). Using the comparatively simple Drosophila system, in which mechanosensory neurons possess modified motile cilia, we employed a recently elucidated cilia transcriptional RFX-FOX code to identify novel PCD candidate genes. Here, we report characterization of CG31320/HEATR2, which plays a conserved critical role in forming the axonemal dynein arms required for ciliary motility in both flies and humans. Inner and outer arm dyneins are absent from axonemes of CG31320 mutant flies and from PCD individuals with a novel splice-acceptor HEATR2 mutation. Functional conservation of closely arranged RFX-FOX binding sites upstream of HEATR2 orthologues may drive higher cytoplasmic expression of HEATR2 during early motile ciliogenesis. Immunoprecipitation reveals HEATR2 interacts with DNAI2, but not HSP70 or HSP90, distinguishing it from the client/chaperone functions described for other cytoplasmic proteins required for dynein arm assembly such as DNAAF1-4. These data implicate CG31320/HEATR2 in a growing intracellular pre-assembly and transport network that is necessary to deliver functional dynein machinery to the ciliary compartment for integration into the motile axoneme. PMID:25232951

  4. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously—instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold—compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers. PMID:23487771

  5. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-03-19

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously--instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold--compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers.

  6. Entropy-based measures of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing derived from quantitative optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekera, Kenny; Jonas, Stephan; Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia are cellular organelles that project from different epithelial surfaces including respiratory epithelium. They generate directional fluid flow that removes harmful pathogens and particulate matter from the respiratory system. While it has been known that primary ciliary dyskinesia increases the risk of recurrent pulmonary infections, there is now heightened interest in understanding the role that cilia play in a wide-variety of respiratory diseases. Different optical imaging technologies are being investigated to visualize cilia-driven fluid flow, and quantitative image analysis is used to generate measures of ciliary performance. Here, we demonstrate the quantification of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing using spatial and temporal measures of Shannon information entropy. Using videomicroscopy, we imaged in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow generated by the epidermis of the Xenopus tropicalis embryo. Flow was seeded with either dyes or microparticles. Both spatial and temporal measures of entropy show significant levels of mixing, with maximum entropy measures of ~6.5 (out of a possible range of 0 to 8). Spatial entropy measures showed localization of mixing "hot-spots" and "cold-spots" and temporal measures showed mixing throughout.In sum, entropy-based measures of microfluidic mixing can characterize in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow and hold the potential for better characterization of ciliary dysfunction.

  7. An Essential Role for Dermal Primary Cilia in Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Jonathan; Laag, Essam; Michaud, Edward J.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based organelle implicated as an essential component of a number of signaling pathways. It is present on cells throughout the mammalian body; however, its functions in most tissues remain largely unknown. Herein we demonstrate that primary cilia are present on cells in murine skin and hair follicles throughout morphogenesis and during hair follicle cycling in postnatal life. Using the Cre-lox system, we disrupted cilia assembly in the ventral dermis and evaluated the effects on hair follicle development. Mice with disrupted dermal cilia have severe hypotrichosis (lack of hair) in affected areas. Histological analyses reveal that most follicles in the mutants arrest at stage 2 of hair development and have small or absent dermal condensates. This phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in the skin of mice lacking Shh or Gli2. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicates that the hedgehog pathway is downregulated in the dermis of the cilia mutant hair follicles. Thus, these data establish cilia as a critical signaling component required for normal hair morphogenesis and suggest that this organelle is needed on cells in the dermis for reception of signals such as sonic hedgehog. PMID:18987668

  8. Live Imaging of the Ependymal Cilia in the Lateral Ventricles of the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Al Omran, Alzahra J; Saternos, Hannah C; Liu, Tongyu; Nauli, Surya M; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated ependymal cells line the ventricles in the adult brain. Abnormal function or structure of ependymal cilia is associated with various neurological deficits. The current ex vivo live imaging of motile ependymal cilia technique allows for a detailed study of ciliary dynamics following several steps. These steps include: mice euthanasia with carbon dioxide according to protocols of The University of Toledo's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); craniectomy followed by brain removal and sagittal brain dissection with a vibratome or sharp blade to obtain very thin sections through the brain lateral ventricles, where the ependymal cilia can be visualized. Incubation of the brain's slices in a customized glass-bottom plate containing Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)/High-Glucose at 37 °C in the presence of 95%/5% O2/CO2 mixture is essential to keep the tissue alive during the experiment. A video of the cilia beating is then recorded using a high-resolution differential interference contrast microscope. The video is then analyzed frame by frame to calculate the ciliary beating frequency. This allows distinct classification of the ependymal cells into three categories or types based on their ciliary beating frequency and angle. Furthermore, this technique allows the use of high-speed fluorescence imaging analysis to characterize the unique intracellular calcium oscillation properties of ependymal cells as well as the effect of pharmacological agents on the calcium oscillations and the ciliary beating frequency. In addition, this technique is suitable for immunofluorescence imaging for ciliary structure and ciliary protein localization studies. This is particularly important in disease diagnosis and phenotype studies. The main limitation of the technique is attributed to the decrease in live motile cilia movement as the brain tissue starts to die. PMID:26067390

  9. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  10. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  11. Interactive computer-assisted approach for evaluation of ultrastructural cilia abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Siegmund, Heiko; Semmelmann, Matthias; Grafe, Claudia; Evert, Matthias; Schroeder, Josef A.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction - Diagnosis of abnormal cilia function is based on ultrastructural analysis of axoneme defects, especialy the features of inner and outer dynein arms which are the motors of ciliar motility. Sub-optimal biopsy material, methodical, and intrinsic electron microscopy factors pose difficulty in ciliary defects evaluation. We present a computer-assisted approach based on state-of-the-art image analysis and object recognition methods yielding a time-saving and efficient diagnosis of cilia dysfunction. Method - The presented approach is based on a pipeline of basal image processing methods like smoothing, thresholding and ellipse fitting. However, integration of application specific knowledge results in robust segmentations even in cases of image artifacts. The method is build hierarchically starting with the detection of cilia within the image, followed by the detection of nine doublets within each analyzable cilium, and ending with the detection of dynein arms of each doublet. The process is concluded by a rough classification of the dynein arms as basis for a computer-assisted diagnosis. Additionally, the interaction possibilities are designed in a way, that the results are still reproducible given the completion report. Results - A qualitative evaluation showed reasonable detection results for cilia, doublets and dynein arms. However, since a ground truth is missing, the variation of the computer-assisted diagnosis should be within the subjective bias of human diagnosticians. The results of a first quantitative evaluation with five human experts and six images with 12 analyzable cilia showed, that with default parameterization 91.6% of the cilia and 98% of the doublets were found. The computer-assisted approach rated 66% of those inner and outer dynein arms correct, where all human experts agree. However, especially the quality of the dynein arm classification may be improved in future work.

  12. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A primary cilium is a solitary slender non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane1. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, they also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signaling2 and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways3. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia employ diverse ion channels4-7. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells8 but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC, PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease9, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane (TM) proteins (PKD1, PKD1-L1 and PKD1-L2) remarkable for a large extracellular N-terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a GPCR proteolytic site, and the 6-TM channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2-L1, PKD2-L2; TRPPs). Evidence suggests that the PKD1s associate with the PKD2s via coiled-coil domains10-12. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and employ it to directly record from primary cilia and demonstrate that PKD1-L1 and PKD2-L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with the companion manuscript2, we show that the PKD1-L1/PKD2-L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established Hedgehog pathways. PMID:24336289

  13. Out of the cleanroom, self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Gao, Yang; Wyss, Hans; Anderson, Patrick; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-01

    Micro-sized hair-like structures, such as cilia, are abundant in nature and have various functionalities. Many efforts have been made to mimic the fluid pumping function of cilia, but most of the fabrication processes for these "artificial cilia" are tedious and expensive, hindering their practical application. In this paper a cost-effective in situ fabrication technique for artificial cilia is demonstrated. The cilia are constructed by self-assembly of micron sized magnetic beads and encapsulated with soft polymer coatings. Actuation of the cilia induces an effective fluid flow, and the cilia lengths and distribution can be adjusted by varying the magnetic bead concentration and fabrication parameters.

  14. Protein composition and movements of membrane swellings associated with primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Haymour, Hanan S.; Lo, Shao T.; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A.; Atkinson, Kimberly F.; Ward, Christopher J.; Gao, Min; Wessely, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of many ciliary proteins has been linked to a list of diseases, from cystic kidney to obesity and from hypertension to mental retardation. We previously proposed that primary cilia are unique communication organelles that function as microsensory compartments that house mechanosensory molecules. Here we report that primary cilia exhibit membrane swellings or ciliary bulbs, which based on their unique ultrastructure and motility, could be mechanically regulated by fluid-shear stress. Together with the ultrastructure analysis of the swelling, which contains monosialodihexosylganglioside (GM3), our results show that ciliary bulb has a distinctive set of functional proteins, including GM3 synthase (GM3S), bicaudal-c1 (Bicc1), and polycystin-2 (PC2). In fact, results from our cilia isolation demonstrated for the first time that GM3S and Bicc1 are members of the primary cilia proteins. Although these proteins are not required for ciliary membrane swelling formation under static condition, fluid-shear stress induced swelling formation is partially modulated by GM3S. We therefore propose that the ciliary bulb exhibits a sensory function within the mechano-ciliary structure. Overall, our studies provided an important step towards understanding the ciliary bulb function and structure. PMID:25650235

  15. [Primary cilia and hedgehog signaling].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori

    2015-07-01

    The primary cilium is an immotile organelle protruding from the cell surface in almost all vertebrate cells. Many molecules inside the primary cilia coordinately play a pivotal role, so genetic defects of these components result in diverse congenital malformations of the brain, eye, liver, kidney, and skeleton. Hedgehog signaling is a highly conserved pathway regulating morphogenesis in early development and tumorigenesis postnatally. Recently, advanced molecular biology has revealed that components of hedgehog signaling such as PTCH1, SMO, and GLI specifically translocate within the primary cilium upon the ligand binding of the hedgehog protein, and transduce the biological growth signal from the cell surface to the nucleus. Haploinsufficiency of the components in the primary cilium would inhibit the hedgehog pathway, resulting in developmental anomalies like ventral neural tube defects. Since the hedgehog-dependent pathway is critical for vertebrate development, it is crucial to elucidate the functional roles of hedgehog-related proteins in the primary cilium. PMID:26353446

  16. Ciliary motility activity measurement using a dense optical flow algorithm.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Eduardo; Armengot, Miguel; Mata, Manuel; Cortijo, Julio; Riera, Jaime; Hueso, José L; Moratal, David

    2013-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. In this study, an automatic method has been established to determine the ciliary motility activity from cell cultures by means of optical flow computation, and has been applied to 136 control cultures and to 144 RSV-infected cultures. The control group presented an average of cell surface with cilia motility per field of 41 ± 15 % (mean ± standard deviation), while the infected group presented a 11 ± 5 %, t-Student p<0.001. The cutoff value to classify a infected specimen was <17.89 % (sensitivity 0.94, specificity 0.93). This methodology has proved to be a robust technique to evaluate cilia motility in cell cultures. PMID:24110720

  17. A Conditional Mutant Having Paralyzed Cilia and a Block in Cytokinesis Is Rescued by Cytoplasmic Exchange in Tetrahymena Thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, D. G.; Thatcher, T.; Bowen, J.; Bruns, P. J.; Gorovsky, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Nineteen mutants that are conditional for both the ability to regain motility following deciliation and the ability to grow were isolated. The mutations causing slow growth were placed into five complementation groups. None of the mutations appears to affect energy production as all mutants remained motile at the restrictive temperature. In three complementation groups protein synthesis and the levels of mRNA encoding α-tubulin or actin were largely unaffected at the restrictive temperature, consistent with the hypothesis that mutations in these three groups directly affect the assembly of functional cilia and growth. Complementation group 1 was chosen for further characterization. Both phenotypes were shown to be linked, suggesting they are caused by a single mutation. Group 1 mutants regenerated cilia at the restrictive temperature, but the cilia were nonmotile. This mutation also caused a block in cytokinesis at the restrictive temperature but did not affect nuclear divisions or DNA synthesis. The block in cell division was transiently rescued by wild-type cytoplasm exchanged when mutants were paired with wild-type cells during conjugation (round 1 of genomic exclusion). Thus, at least one mutation has been isolated that affects assembly of some microtubule-based structures in Tetrahymena (cilia during regeneration) but not others (nuclei divide at 38°), and the product of this gene is likely to play a role in both ciliary function and in cytokinesis. PMID:3224807

  18. Foxj1 regulates floor plate cilia architecture and modifies the response of cells to sonic hedgehog signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Catarina; Ribes, Vanessa; Kutejova, Eva; Cayuso, Jordi; Lawson, Victoria; Norris, Dominic; Stevens, Jonathan; Davey, Megan; Blight, Ken; Bangs, Fiona; Mynett, Anita; Hirst, Elizabeth; Chung, Rachel; Balaskas, Nikolaos; Brody, Steven L.; Marti, Elisa; Briscoe, James

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog signalling is essential for the embryonic development of many tissues including the central nervous system, where it controls the pattern of cellular differentiation. A genome-wide screen of neural progenitor cells to evaluate the Shh signalling-regulated transcriptome identified the forkhead transcription factor Foxj1. In both chick and mouse Foxj1 is expressed in the ventral midline of the neural tube in cells that make up the floor plate. Consistent with the role of Foxj1 in the formation of long motile cilia, floor plate cells produce cilia that are longer than the primary cilia found elsewhere in the neural tube, and forced expression of Foxj1 in neuroepithelial cells is sufficient to increase cilia length. In addition, the expression of Foxj1 in the neural tube and in an Shh-responsive cell line attenuates intracellular signalling by decreasing the activity of Gli proteins, the transcriptional mediators of Shh signalling. We show that this function of Foxj1 depends on cilia. Nevertheless, floor plate identity and ciliogenesis are unaffected in mouse embryos lacking Foxj1 and we provide evidence that additional transcription factors expressed in the floor plate share overlapping functions with Foxj1. Together, these findings identify a novel mechanism that modifies the cellular response to Shh signalling and reveal morphological and functional features of the amniote floor plate that distinguish these cells from the rest of the neuroepithelium. PMID:21098568

  19. Kinesin-II is preferentially targeted to assembling cilia and is required for ciliogenesis and normal cytokinesis in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M; Marsala, C; Kosoy, R; Gaertig, J

    1999-10-01

    We cloned two genes, KIN1 and KIN2, encoding kinesin-II homologues from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and constructed strains lacking either KIN1 or KIN2 or both genes. Cells with a single disruption of either gene showed partly overlapping sets of defects in cell growth, motility, ciliary assembly, and thermoresistance. Deletion of both genes resulted in loss of cilia and arrests in cytokinesis. Mutant cells were unable to assemble new cilia or to maintain preexisting cilia. Double knockout cells were not viable on a standard medium but could be grown on a modified medium on which growth does not depend on phagocytosis. Double knockout cells could be rescued by transformation with a gene encoding an epitope-tagged Kin1p. In growing cells, epitope-tagged Kin1p preferentially accumulated in cilia undergoing active assembly. Kin1p was also detected in the cell body but did not show any association with the cleavage furrow. The cell division arrests observed in kinesin-II knockout cells appear to be induced by the loss of cilia and resulting cell paralysis.

  20. On the numbering of peripheral doublets in cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, B A

    1988-01-01

    The nine microtubular doublets of cilia and flagella have distinctive features that make it possible to assign an index number to each of them. Such an indexing has been used for a long time for animal cilia and flagella, whereas other indexing systems have been proposed recently for plant cilia. It is shown here that the similarity between cilia from animals and cilia from plants and protists is so great that the same indexing system can be used for all cilia regardless of their derivation.

  1. Primary cilia signaling mediates intraocular pressure sensation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Na; Conwell, Michael D; Chen, Xingjuan; Kettenhofen, Christine Insinna; Westlake, Christopher J; Cantor, Louis B; Wells, Clark D; Weinreb, Robert N; Corson, Timothy W; Spandau, Dan F; Joos, Karen M; Iomini, Carlo; Obukhov, Alexander G; Sun, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked congenital disease that presents with congenital cataracts and glaucoma, as well as renal and cerebral dysfunction. OCRL, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, is mutated in Lowe syndrome. We previously showed that OCRL is involved in vesicular trafficking to the primary cilium. Primary cilia are sensory organelles on the surface of eukaryotic cells that mediate mechanotransduction in the kidney, brain, and bone. However, their potential role in the trabecular meshwork (TM) in the eye, which regulates intraocular pressure, is unknown. Here, we show that TM cells, which are defective in glaucoma, have primary cilia that are critical for response to pressure changes. Primary cilia in TM cells shorten in response to fluid flow and elevated hydrostatic pressure, and promote increased transcription of TNF-α, TGF-β, and GLI1 genes. Furthermore, OCRL is found to be required for primary cilia to respond to pressure stimulation. The interaction of OCRL with transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a ciliary mechanosensory channel, suggests that OCRL may act through regulation of this channel. A novel disease-causing OCRL allele prevents TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling. In addition, TRPV4 agonist GSK 1016790A treatment reduced intraocular pressure in mice; TRPV4 knockout animals exhibited elevated intraocular pressure and shortened cilia. Thus, mechanotransduction by primary cilia in TM cells is implicated in how the eye senses pressure changes and highlights OCRL and TRPV4 as attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of glaucoma. Implications of OCRL and TRPV4 in primary cilia function may also shed light on mechanosensation in other organ systems.

  2. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms. PMID:24296415

  3. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms.

  4. Dual intravitreal foreign body: Intravitreal cilia in penetrating injury.

    PubMed

    Azad, Shorya; Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Rajvardhan; Bypareddy, Ravi; Rathi, Anubha

    2015-01-01

    Intraocular cilia, though a rare condition, has been previously reported in cases of open globe injury. We discuss a unique case of intravitreal cilia, found incidentally during vitrectomy for intravitreal foreign body removal.

  5. ciliaFA: a research tool for automated, high-throughput measurement of ciliary beat frequency using freely available software

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of ciliary function for assessment of patients suspected of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and for research studies of respiratory and ependymal cilia requires assessment of both ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency. While direct measurement of beat frequency from high-speed video recordings is the most accurate and reproducible technique it is extremely time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a freely available automated method of ciliary beat frequency analysis from digital video (AVI) files that runs on open-source software (ImageJ) coupled to Microsoft Excel, and to validate this by comparison to the direct measuring high-speed video recordings of respiratory and ependymal cilia. These models allowed comparison to cilia beating between 3 and 52 Hz. Methods Digital video files of motile ciliated ependymal (frequency range 34 to 52 Hz) and respiratory epithelial cells (frequency 3 to 18 Hz) were captured using a high-speed digital video recorder. To cover the range above between 18 and 37 Hz the frequency of ependymal cilia were slowed by the addition of the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin. Measurements made directly by timing a given number of individual ciliary beat cycles were compared with those obtained using the automated ciliaFA system. Results The overall mean difference (± SD) between the ciliaFA and direct measurement high-speed digital imaging methods was −0.05 ± 1.25 Hz, the correlation coefficient was shown to be 0.991 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were from −1.99 to 1.49 Hz for respiratory and from −2.55 to 3.25 Hz for ependymal cilia. Conclusions A plugin for ImageJ was developed that extracts pixel intensities and performs fast Fourier transformation (FFT) using Microsoft Excel. The ciliaFA software allowed automated, high throughput measurement of respiratory and ependymal ciliary beat frequency (range 3 to 52 Hz) and avoids operator error due to selection bias. We have

  6. Structural defects in cilia of the choroid plexus, subfornical organ and ventricular ependyma are associated with ventriculomegaly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus is a heterogeneous disorder with multiple etiologies that are not yet fully understood. Animal models have implicated dysfunctional cilia of the ependyma and choroid plexus in the development of the disorder. In this report, we sought to determine the origin of the ventriculomegaly in four Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS) mutant mouse strains as models of a ciliopathy. Methods Evans Blue dye was injected into the lateral ventricle of wild- type and BBS mutant mice to determine whether obstruction of intra- or extra-ventricular CSF flow contributed to ventriculomegaly. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the ultrastructure of the choroid plexus, subfornical organ (SFO), subcommisural organ (SCO), and ventricular ependyma to evaluate their ultrastructure and the morphology of their primary and motile cilia. Results and discussion No obstruction of intra- or extra-ventricular CSF flow was observed, implying a communicating form of hydrocephalus in BBS mutant mice. TEM analyses of the mutants showed no evidence of choroidal papillomas or breakdown of the blood:CSF barrier. In contrast, structural defects were observed in a subpopulation of cilia lining the choroid plexus, SFO, and ventricular ependyma. These included disruptions of the microtubular structure of the axoneme and the presence of electron-dense vesicular-like material along the ciliary shaft and at the tips of cilia. Conclusions Abnormalities in cilia structure and function have the potential to influence ciliary intraflagellar transport (IFT), cilia maintenance, protein trafficking, and regulation of CSF production. Ciliary structural defects are the only consistent pathological features associated with CSF-related structures in BBS mutant mice. These defects are observed from an early age, and may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of ventriculomegaly. PMID:23046663

  7. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  8. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  9. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  10. Cilia and coordination of signaling networks during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Koefoed, Karen; Veland, Iben Rønn; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Larsen, Lars Allan; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate a wide variety of different signaling pathways to control cellular processes during development and in tissue homeostasis. Defects in function or assembly of these antenna-like structures are therefore associated with a broad range of developmental disorders and diseases called ciliopathies. Recent studies have indicated a major role of different populations of cilia, including nodal and cardiac primary cilia, in coordinating heart development, and defects in these cilia are associated with congenital heart disease. Here, we present an overview of the role of nodal and cardiac primary cilia in heart development. PMID:24345806

  11. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  12. Fish and frogs: models for vertebrate cilia signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wessely, Oliver; Obara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The presence of cilia in many vertebrate cell types and its function has been ignored for many years. Only in the past few years has its importance been rediscovered. In part, this was triggered by the realization that many gene products mutated in polycystic kidney diseases are localized to cilia and dysfunctional cilia result in kidney disease. Another breakthrough was the observation that the establishment of the left-right body axis is dependent on cilia function. Since then, many other developmental paradigms have been shown to rely on cilia-dependent signaling. In addition to mouse and Chlamydomonas, lower vertebrate model systems such as zebrafish, medaka and Xenopus have provided important new insights into cilia signaling and its role during embryonic development. This review will summarize those studies. We will also illustrate how these lower vertebrates are promising model systems for future studies defining the physiological function of cilia during organogenesis and disease pathophysiology. PMID:17981674

  13. Mammalian Axoneme Central Pair Complex Proteins: Broader Roles Revealed by Gene Knockout Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Zhang, Zhibing; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    The axoneme genes, their encoded proteins, their functions and the structures they form are largely conserved across species. Much of our knowledge of the function and structure of axoneme proteins in cilia and flagella is derived from studies on model organisms like the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The core structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, which in most motile cilia and flagella contains a 9 + 2 configuration of microtubules. The two central microtubules are the scaffold of the central pair complex (CPC). Mutations that disrupt CPC genes in Chlamydomonas and other model organisms result in defects in assembly, stability and function of the axoneme, leading to flagellar motility defects. However, targeted mutations generated in mice in the orthologous CPC genes have revealed significant differences in phenotypes of mutants compared to Chlamydomonas. Here we review observations that support the concept of cell-type specific roles for the CPC genes in mice, and an expanded repertoire of functions for the products of these genes in cilia, including non-motile cilia, and other microtubule-associated cellular functions. PMID:26785425

  14. Drosophila sensory cilia lacking MKS proteins exhibit striking defects in development but only subtle defects in adults

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Joshua S.; Davis, Ilan; Barker, Amy R.; Dawe, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cilia are conserved organelles that have important motility, sensory and signalling roles. The transition zone (TZ) at the base of the cilium is crucial for cilia function, and defects in several TZ proteins are associated with human congenital ciliopathies such as nephronophthisis (NPHP) and Meckel–Gruber syndrome (MKS). In several species, MKS and NPHP proteins form separate complexes that cooperate with Cep290 to assemble the TZ, but flies seem to lack core components of the NPHP module. We show that MKS proteins in flies are spatially separated from Cep290 at the TZ, and that flies mutant for individual MKS genes fail to recruit other MKS proteins to the TZ, whereas Cep290 seems to be recruited normally. Although there are abnormalities in microtubule and membrane organisation in developing MKS mutant cilia, these defects are less apparent in adults, where sensory cilia and sperm flagella seem to function quite normally. Thus, localising MKS proteins to the cilium or flagellum is not essential for viability or fertility in flies. PMID:27577095

  15. The CSC proteins FAP61 and FAP251 build the basal substructures of radial spoke 3 in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Urbanska, Paulina; Song, Kangkang; Joachimiak, Ewa; Krzemien-Ojak, Lucja; Koprowski, Piotr; Hennessey, Todd; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Fabczak, Hanna; Gaertig, Jacek; Nicastro, Daniela; Wloga, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Dynein motors and regulatory complexes repeat every 96 nm along the length of motile cilia. Each repeat contains three radial spokes, RS1, RS2, and RS3, which transduct signals between the central microtubules and dynein arms. Each radial spoke has a distinct structure, but little is known about the mechanisms of assembly and function of the individual radial spokes. In Chlamydomonas, calmodulin and spoke-associated complex (CSC) is composed of FAP61, FAP91, and FAP251 and has been linked to the base of RS2 and RS3. We show that in Tetrahymena, loss of either FAP61 or FAP251 reduces cell swimming and affects the ciliary waveform and that RS3 is either missing or incomplete, whereas RS1 and RS2 are unaffected. Specifically, FAP251-null cilia lack an arch-like density at the RS3 base, whereas FAP61-null cilia lack an adjacent portion of the RS3 stem region. This suggests that the CSC proteins are crucial for stable and functional assembly of RS3 and that RS3 and the CSC are important for ciliary motility. PMID:25694453

  16. Disruption of Mks1 localization to the mother centriole causes cilia defects and developmental malformations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; SanAgustin, Jovenal T.; Francis, Richard; Tansey, Terry; Henry, Charisse; Wang, Baolin; Lemley, Bethan; Pazour, Gregory J.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a recessive disorder resulting in multiple birth defects that are associated with mutations affecting ciliogenesis. We recovered a mouse mutant with a mutation in the Mks1 gene (Mks1del64-323) that caused a 260-amino-acid deletion spanning nine amino acids in the B9 domain, a protein motif with unknown function conserved in two other basal body proteins. We showed that, in wild-type cells, Mks1 was localized to the mother centriole from which the cilium was generated. However, in mutant Mks1del64-323 cells, Mks1 was not localized to the centriole, even though it maintained a punctate distribution. Resembling MKS patients, Mks1 mutants had craniofacial defects, polydactyly, congenital heart defects, polycystic kidneys and randomized left-right patterning. These defects reflected disturbance of functions subserved by motile and non-motile cilia. In the kidney, glomerular and tubule cysts were observed along with short cilia, and cilia were reduced in number to a near-complete loss. Underlying the left-right patterning defects were fewer and shorter nodal cilia, and analysis with fluorescent beads showed no directional flow at the embryonic node. In the cochlea, the stereocilia were mal-patterned, with the kinocilia being abnormally positioned. Together, these defects suggested disruption of planar cell polarity, which is known to regulate node, kidney and cochlea development. In addition, we also showed that Shh signaling was disrupted. Thus, in the neural tube, the floor plate was not specified posteriorly even as expression of the Shh mediator Gli2 increased. By contrast, the Shh signaling domain was expanded in the anterior neural tube and anterior limb bud, consistent with reduced Gli3-repressor (Gli3R) function. The latter probably accounted for the preaxial digit duplication exhibited by the Mks1del64-323 mutants. Overall, these findings indicate that centriole localization of Mks1 is required for ciliogenesis of motile

  17. The polycystic kidney disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, polaris, and cystin, are co-localized in renal cilia.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bradley K; Hou, Xiaoying; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2002-10-01

    Recent evidence has suggested an association between structural and/or functional defects in the primary apical cilium of vertebrate epithelia and polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In Caenorhabditis elegans, the protein orthologues of the PKD-related proteins, polycystin-1 (LOV-1), polycystin-2 (PKD2), and polaris (OSM-5), co-localize in the cilia of male-specific sensory neurons, and defects in these proteins cause abnormalities of cilia structure and/or function. This study sought to determine whether the mammalian polycystins are expressed in primary cilia of renal epithelia and whether these proteins co-localize with polaris and cystin, the newly described, cilia-associated protein that is disrupted in the cpk mouse. To begin to address this issue, the expression of the protein products encoded by the PKD1, PKD2, Tg737, and cpk genes were examined in mouse cortical collecting duct (mCCD) cells using an immunofluorescence-based approach with a series of previously well-characterized antibodies. The mCCD cells were grown on cell culture inserts to optimize cell polarization and cilia formation. The data demonstrate co-localization in cilia of polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, which are the principal proteins involved in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with polaris and cystin, which are proteins that are disrupted in the Tg737(orpk)and cpk mouse models of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, respectively. These data add to a growing body of evidence that suggests that primary cilium plays a key role in normal physiologic functions of renal epithelia and that defects in ciliary function contribute to the pathogenesis of PKD. PMID:12239239

  18. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion. PMID:21331419

  19. Evolutionary implications of localization of the signaling scaffold protein parafusin to both cilia and the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satir, Birgit Hegner; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Liu, Li; Lethan, Mette; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-02-01

    Parafusin (PFUS), a 63 kDa protein first discovered in the eukaryote Paramecium and known for its role in apicomplexan exocytosis, provides a model for the common origin of cellular systems employing scaffold proteins for targeting and signaling. PFUS is closely related to eubacterial rather than archeal phosphoglucomutases (PGM) - as we proved by comparison of their 88 sequences - but has no PGM activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis with a PFUS-specific peptide antibody showed presence of this protein around the base region of primary cilia in a variety of mammalian cell types, including mouse embryonic (MEFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs), human carcinoma stem cells (NT-2 cells), and human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Further, PFUS localized to the nucleus of fibroblasts, and prominently to nucleoli of MEFs. Localization studies were confirmed by Western blot analysis, showing that the PFUS antibody specifically recognizes a single protein of ca. 63 kDa in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that PFUS localized to nuclei and cilia in Paramecium. These results support the suggestion that PFUS plays a role in signaling between nucleus and cilia, and that the cilium and the nucleus both evolved around the time of eukaryotic emergence. We hypothesize that near the beginnings of eukaryotic cell evolution, scaffold proteins such as PFUS arose as peripheral membrane protein identifiers for cytoplasmic membrane trafficking and were employed similarly during the subsequent evolution of exocytic, nuclear transport, and ciliogenic mechanisms.

  20. Ciliae-based actuator with piezoelectric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Peter P.; Carrasco, Alvaro; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2012-06-01

    Small actuators based on the inverse piezoelectric effect are successfully deployed in commercial applications. Usually, ultrasonic motors are used. Based on resonance effects these motors provide a pronounced nonlinearity at low speeds and thus put high demands on the control algorithm. In contrast, piezoelectric stepping motors are mechanically complex and provide only low speeds. The contribution at hand describes a proposed design for a new piezoelectric motor based on cilia friction that can be manufactured at low costs. The cilia are made from uniaxial carbon-fibre reinforced plastics. The derived CFRP-brushes are pressed perpendicularly to the rotor surface to produce force or torque. First experiments prove the feasibility of the concept. A net pushing force of 500 mN is achieved.

  1. Kinesin-II Is Preferentially Targeted to Assembling Cilia and Is Required for Ciliogenesis and Normal Cytokinesis in TetrahymenaV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason M.; Marsala, Christine; Kosoy, Roman; Gaertig, Jacek

    1999-01-01

    We cloned two genes, KIN1 and KIN2, encoding kinesin-II homologues from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and constructed strains lacking either KIN1 or KIN2 or both genes. Cells with a single disruption of either gene showed partly overlapping sets of defects in cell growth, motility, ciliary assembly, and thermoresistance. Deletion of both genes resulted in loss of cilia and arrests in cytokinesis. Mutant cells were unable to assemble new cilia or to maintain preexisting cilia. Double knockout cells were not viable on a standard medium but could be grown on a modified medium on which growth does not depend on phagocytosis. Double knockout cells could be rescued by transformation with a gene encoding an epitope-tagged Kin1p. In growing cells, epitope-tagged Kin1p preferentially accumulated in cilia undergoing active assembly. Kin1p was also detected in the cell body but did not show any association with the cleavage furrow. The cell division arrests observed in kinesin-II knockout cells appear to be induced by the loss of cilia and resulting cell paralysis. PMID:10512852

  2. Primary Cilia and the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Olga V.; Pugacheva, Elena N.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that protrude from the cell surface, and function as sensors for mechanical and chemical environmental cues that regulate cellular differentiation or division. In metazoans, ciliary signaling is important both during organismal development and in the homeostasis controls of adult tissues, with receptors for the Hedgehog, PDGF, Wnt, and other signaling cascades arrayed and active along the ciliary membrane. In normal cells, cilia are dynamically regulated during cell cycle progression: present in G0 and G1 cells, and usually in S/G2 cells, but almost invariably resorbed before mitotic entry, to re-appear post-cytokinesis. This periodic resorption and reassembly of cilia, specified by interaction with the intrinsic cell cycle machinery, influences the susceptibility of cells to the influence of extrinsic signals with cilia-associated receptors. Pathogenic conditions of mammals associated with loss of or defects in ciliary integrity include a number of developmental disorders, cystic syndromes in adults, and some cancers. With the continuing expansion of the list of human diseases associated with ciliary abnormalities, the identification of the cellular mechanisms regulating ciliary growth and disassembly has become a topic of intense research interest. Although these mechanisms are far from being understood, a number of recent studies have begun to identify key regulatory factors that may begin to offer insight into disease pathogenesis and treatment. In this chapter we will discuss the current state of knowledge regarding cell cycle control of ciliary dynamics, and provide general methods that can be applied to investigate cell cycle-dependent ciliary growth and disassembly. PMID:20362089

  3. Forces Applied by Cilia Measured on Explants from Mucociliary Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A.

    2007-01-01

    Forces applied by intact mucus-propelling cilia were measured for the first time that we know of using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrooptic system. The AFM probe was dipped into a field of beating cilia and its time-dependent deflection was recorded as it was struck by the cilia while the electrooptic system simultaneously and colocally measured the frequency to ensure that no perturbation was induced by the AFM probe. Using cilia from frog esophagus, we measured forces of ∼0.21 nN per cilium during the effective stroke. This value, together with the known internal structure of these cilia, leads to the conclusion that most dynein arms along the length of the axoneme contribute to the effective stroke of these cilia. PMID:17142280

  4. Simulation of metachronal wave in a model of pulmonary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2006-03-01

    A simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in carpets of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia base is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. The 9+2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes. The possibility of formation of metachronal waves under different assumptions of boundary conditions is investigated and shown to be dependent on the surrounding geometry.

  5. Heterotrimeric Kinesin-II Is Required for the Assembly of Motile 9+2 Ciliary Axonemes on Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Robert L.; Scholey, Jonathan M.

    1997-01-01

    Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is a plus end– directed microtubule (MT) motor protein consisting of distinct heterodimerized motor subunits associated with an accessory subunit. To probe the intracellular transport functions of kinesin-II, we microinjected fertilized sea urchin eggs with an anti–kinesin-II monoclonal antibody, and we observed a dramatic inhibition of ciliogenesis at the blastula stage characterized by the assembly of short, paralyzed, 9+0 ciliary axonemes that lack central pair MTs. Control embryos show no such defect and form swimming blastulae with normal, motile, 9+2 cilia that contain kinesin-II as detected by Western blotting. Injection of anti–kinesin-II into one blastomere of a two-cell embryo leads to the development of chimeric blastulae covered on one side with short, paralyzed cilia, and on the other with normal, beating cilia. We observed a unimodal length distribution of short cilia on anti–kinesin-II–injected embryos corresponding to the first mode of the trimodal distribution of ciliary lengths observed for control embryos. This short mode may represent a default ciliary assembly intermediate. We hypothesize that kinesin-II functions during ciliogenesis to deliver ciliary components that are required for elongation of the assembly intermediate and for formation of stable central pair MTs. Thus, kinesin-II plays a critical role in embryonic development by supporting the maturation of nascent cilia to generate long motile organelles capable of producing the propulsive forces required for swimming and feeding. PMID:9281580

  6. Methods for Studying Movement of Molecules Within Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and eukaryotic flagella (interchangeable terms) requires the import of numerous proteins from the cell body into the growing organelle. Proteins move into and inside cilia by diffusion and by motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT). Many aspects of ciliary protein transport such as the distribution of unloading sites and the frequency of transport can be analyzed using direct in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we will describe how to use total internal reflection fluorescence microcopy (TIRFM) to analyze protein transport in the flagella of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used model for cilia and cilia-related disease.

  7. Methods for Studying Movement of Molecules Within Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and eukaryotic flagella (interchangeable terms) requires the import of numerous proteins from the cell body into the growing organelle. Proteins move into and inside cilia by diffusion and by motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT). Many aspects of ciliary protein transport such as the distribution of unloading sites and the frequency of transport can be analyzed using direct in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we will describe how to use total internal reflection fluorescence microcopy (TIRFM) to analyze protein transport in the flagella of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used model for cilia and cilia-related disease. PMID:27514917

  8. Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility.

    PubMed

    King, Stephen M; Patel-King, Ramila S

    2016-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are carnivorous invertebrates with astounding regenerative properties. They have a ventral surface on which thousands of motile cilia are exposed to the extracellular environment. These beat in a synchronized manner against secreted mucus thereby propelling the animal forward. Similar to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is easy to maintain in the laboratory and is highly amenable to simple RNAi approaches through feeding with dsRNA. The methods are simple and robust, and the level of gene expression reduction that can be obtained is, in many cases, almost total. Moreover, cilia assembly and function is not essential for viability in this organism, as animals readily survive for weeks even with the apparent total absence of this organelle. Both genome and expressed sequence tag databases are available and allow design of vectors to target any desired gene of choice. Combined, these feature make planaria a useful model system in which to examine ciliary assembly and motility, especially in the context of a ciliated epithelium where many organelles beat in a hydrodynamically coupled synchronized manner. In addition, as planaria secrete mucus against which the cilia beat to generate propulsive force, this system may also prove useful for analysis of mucociliary interactions. In this chapter, we provide simple methods to maintain a planarian colony, knockdown gene expression by RNAi, and analyze the resulting animals for whole organism motility as well as ciliary architecture and function.

  9. Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility.

    PubMed

    King, Stephen M; Patel-King, Ramila S

    2016-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are carnivorous invertebrates with astounding regenerative properties. They have a ventral surface on which thousands of motile cilia are exposed to the extracellular environment. These beat in a synchronized manner against secreted mucus thereby propelling the animal forward. Similar to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is easy to maintain in the laboratory and is highly amenable to simple RNAi approaches through feeding with dsRNA. The methods are simple and robust, and the level of gene expression reduction that can be obtained is, in many cases, almost total. Moreover, cilia assembly and function is not essential for viability in this organism, as animals readily survive for weeks even with the apparent total absence of this organelle. Both genome and expressed sequence tag databases are available and allow design of vectors to target any desired gene of choice. Combined, these feature make planaria a useful model system in which to examine ciliary assembly and motility, especially in the context of a ciliated epithelium where many organelles beat in a hydrodynamically coupled synchronized manner. In addition, as planaria secrete mucus against which the cilia beat to generate propulsive force, this system may also prove useful for analysis of mucociliary interactions. In this chapter, we provide simple methods to maintain a planarian colony, knockdown gene expression by RNAi, and analyze the resulting animals for whole organism motility as well as ciliary architecture and function. PMID:27514927

  10. Cilia and Nuclear Pore Proteins: Pore No More?

    PubMed

    Obado, Samson O; Rout, Michael P

    2016-09-12

    Nuclear pore proteins at the base of cilia were thought to regulate transport into cilia. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Del Viso et al. (2016) challenge this view, showing instead that pore proteins localize to ciliary basal bodies and that their perturbation leads to congenital heart disease. PMID:27623377

  11. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in ATR(ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  12. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  13. Cilia and Polycystic Kidney Disease, Kith and Kin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis. PMID:24898006

  14. Cilia and polycystic kidney disease, kith and kin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-06-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis.

  15. STUDIES ON CILIA. THE FIXATION OF THE METACHRONAL WAVE.

    PubMed

    SATIR, P

    1963-08-01

    Upon excision into spring water, the lateral cilia of the gill of the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanatus (Solander) stop beating, but 0.04 M potassium ion can activate the gill so that these cilia again beat with metachronal rhythm. One per cent osmium tetroxide quickly pipetted onto a fully activated gill fixes the lateral cilia in a pattern that preserves the form and arrangement of the metachronal wave, and permits the cilia to be studied with the electron microscope in all stages of their beat cycle. Changes are seen in the fixed active preparation that are not present in the inactive control, i.e., in the packing of the cilia, the position of the axis of the ciliary cross-section, and the diameter of the ring of peripheral filaments. Analysis of these parameters may lead to new correlations between ciliary fine structure and function.

  16. Development of actuation system for artificial cilia with magnetic elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Saijou, Akinori; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of magnetically actuated artificial cilia. Natural cilia are a highly efficient device that produces flow under a small-Reynolds-number state. There are two important characteristics of natural cilia; one is asymmetric movement, which is composed of effective and recovery strokes, and the other is the phase difference of a stroke in each cilium in an array that will produce a metachronal wave. In this paper, we propose an actuation system for artificial cilia composed of a silicone elastomer and multiparticle chains of a magnetic material. The applied magnetic field is controlled by rotation of a permanent magnet. This rotating magnetic field induced an asymmetric movement similar to that of a natural cilium. We also changed the orientation angle of multiparticle chains to control the phase difference of a stroke in each artificial cilium. This technique would help to realize metachronal waves of artificial cilia.

  17. Loss of primary cilia occurs early in breast cancer development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell surface. Primary cilia play a critical role in development and disease through regulation of signaling pathways including the Hedgehog pathway. Recent mouse models have also linked ciliary dysfunction to cancer. However, little is known about the role of primary cilia in breast cancer development. Primary cilia expression was characterized in cancer cells as well as their surrounding stromal cells from 86 breast cancer patients by counting cilia and measuring cilia length. In addition, we examined cilia expression in normal epithelial and stromal cells from reduction mammoplasties as well as histologically normal adjacent tissue for comparison. Results We observed a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells on both premalignant lesions as well as in invasive cancers. This loss of cilia does not correlate with increased proliferative index (Ki67-positive cells). However, we did detect rare ciliated cancer cells present in patients with invasive breast cancer and found that these express a marker of basaloid cancers that is associated with poor prognosis (Cytokeratin 5). Interestingly, the percentage of ciliated stromal cells associated with both premalignant and invasive cancers decreased when compared to stromal cells associated with normal tissue. To understand how cilia may be lost during cancer development we analyzed the expression of genes required for ciliogenesis and/or ciliary function and compared their expression in normal versus breast cancer samples. We found that expression of ciliary genes were frequently downregulated in human breast cancers. Conclusions These data suggest that primary cilia are lost early in breast cancer development on both the cancer cells and their surrounding stromal cells. PMID:24987519

  18. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  19. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  20. Basal foot MTOC organizes pillar MTs required for coordination of beating cilia

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Daniel K.; Magescas, Jérémy; Piolot, Tristan; Dumoux, Maud; Vesque, Christine; Pichard, Evelyne; Dang, Tien; Duvauchelle, Boris; Poirier, Françoise; Delacour, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Coordination of ciliary beating is essential to ensure mucus clearance in the airway tract. The orientation and synchronization of ciliary motion responds in part to the organization of the underlying cytoskeletal networks. Using electron tomography on mouse trachea, we show that basal bodies are collectively hooked at the cortex by a regular microtubule array composed of 4-5 microtubules. Removal of Galectin-3, one of basal body components, provokes misrecruitment of γ-tubulin, disorganization of this microtubule framework emanating from the basal foot cap, together with loss of basal body alignment and cilium orientation, defects in cilium organization and reduced fluid flow in the tracheal lumen. We conclude that Galectin-3 plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the microtubule organizing center of the cilium and the “pillar” microtubules, and that this network is instrumental for the coordinated orientation and stabilization of motile cilia. PMID:25215410

  1. Self-eating to remove cilia roadblock.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zaiming; Zhu, Muyuan; Zhong, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Autophagy delivers many proteins and cellular components to the lysosome for degradation via selective or nonselective mechanisms. By controlling the stability of defined protein factors, autophagy might regulate cellular processes in a precise and finely-tuned manner. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy positively regulates the biogenesis of the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that senses the environment and transduces signals. Defects in the function or structure of cilia cause a number of human diseases called "ciliopathies." We found that the autophagosome membrane anchored protein LC3 interacts with OFD1 (oral-facial-digital syndrome 1) and removes it from the centriolar satellite upon serum starvation to initiate primary cilium biogenesis. OFD1 regulation and primary cilium formation are defective in autophagy-deficient cells, and reducing OFD1 protein levels through RNA interference rescues primary cilium formation. More strikingly, knockdown of OFD1 induces primary cilium formation in unstressed cells as well as in a human breast cancer cell that was previously reported to have lost the ability to form primary cilia. These findings therefore suggest an unexpected link among autophagy, ciliogenesis, ciliopathy, and cancers. PMID:24343661

  2. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases, such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  3. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  4. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  5. The role of QseC quorum-sensing sensor kinase in colonization and norepinephrine-enhanced motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhirmurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the presence of the mammalian hormone Norepinephrine (NE) revealed up-regulation of chemotaxis and motility genes. Motility assays confirmed enhanced motility of wild-type S. Typhimurium in the presence of NE that could be block...

  6. In vivo investigation of cilia structure and function using Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are key organelles in development and homeostasis. The ever-expanding complement of cilia associated proteins necessitates rapid and tractable models for in vivo functional investigation. Xenopus laevis provides an attractive model for such studies, having multiple ciliated populations, including primary and multiciliated tissues. The rapid external development of Xenopus and the large cells make it an especially excellent platform for imaging studies. Here we present embryological and cell-biological methods for the investigation of cilia structure and function in Xenopus laevis, with a focus on quantitative live and fixed imaging. PMID:25837389

  7. STED and STORM Superresolution Imaging of Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Yang, T Tony; Chong, Weng Man; Liao, Jung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic lengths of molecular arrangement in primary cilia are below the diffraction limit of light, challenging structural and functional studies of ciliary proteins. Superresolution microscopy can reach up to a 20 nm resolution, significantly improving the ability to map molecules in primary cilia. Here we describe detailed experimental procedure of STED microscopy imaging and dSTORM imaging, two of the most powerful superresolution imaging techniques. Specifically, we emphasize the use of these two methods on imaging proteins in primary cilia. PMID:27514922

  8. Cartilage Abnormalities Associated with Defects of Chondrocytic Primary Cilia in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Anjan P.; Martin, James A.; Zhang, Qihong; Sheffield, Val C.; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia are found on nearly every mammalian cell, including osteocytes, fibroblasts, and chondrocytes. However, the functions of primary cilia have not been extensively studied in these cells, particularly chondrocytes. Interestingly, defects in the primary cilium result in skeletal defects such as polydactyly in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS), a ciliary disorder that also results in obesity, retinopathy, and cognitive impairments (1–4). Wild-type mice and mutant mice of the ciliary proteins Bbs1, Bbs2, and Bbs6 were evaluated with respect to histological and biochemical differences in chondrocytes from articular cartilage and xiphoid processes. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, chondrocytic cilia were visualized from the load-bearing joints and non-load-bearing xiphoid processes. Significant differences in ciliary morphology were not identified between mutant and wild-type mice. However, after expanding chondrocytes in cell culture and implanting them in solid agarose matrix, it was seen that the fraction of ciliated cells in cultures from mutant mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type cultures (p<.05). In addition, in Safranin-O-stained whole joint sections, Bbs mutant mice had significantly lower articular joint thickness (p<.05) and lower proteoglycan content saturation (p<.05) than wild-type mice. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences of cell distribution between Bbs mutant and wild-type mice (p<.05), indicating that mutant articular cartilage had changes consistent with early signs of osteoarthritis. These data indicate that Bbs genes and their functions in the chondrocytic primary cilium are important for normal articular cartilage maintenance. PMID:19195025

  9. CLEM Methods for Studying Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Frank P; Perumal, Geoffrey S; Kolstrup, Johan; Satir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CLEM (correlated light and electron microscope) imaging is a highly useful technique for examining primary cilia. With CLEM, it is possible to determine the distribution of tagged proteins along the ciliary membrane and axoneme with high precision. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) permits measurement of ciliary length and orientation in relation to nearby cellular structures in a 3D image; in optimal cases, this can be combined with superresolution microscopy of selected ciliary components as they enter or leave the cilium. This chapter discusses CLEM methods. In the method described in detail, samples are completely processed for sequential fluorescence and SEM observation. This method is ideal for robust antibody localization and minimizes image manipulation in correlating the fluorescent and SEM images. Alternative methods prepare samples for fluorescence imaging followed by processing for SEM then observation in the SEM. This method is ideal for optimal fluorescence imaging, particularly live cell imaging. PMID:27514923

  10. Cell motility on nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masahiro; Tsai, Irene; Green, Angelo; Jacobson, Bruce; Russell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Cell motility is strongly influenced by the structure of the substratum. Understanding cells motility on a surface has significant applications both in vivo and in vitro applications, such as biological sensors and hip replacement. A gradient surface is used to study the effect of the lateral nanotopography on cell motility. A gradient surface is generated by block copolymer and homopolymer blends, where the concentration of the components varies uniformly across the surface. The two homopolymers phase separate on the micron scale and this length scale gradually decrease to the nanoscopic, i.e. microphase separation of the diblock, as the copolymer concentration increases. Quantitative analysis of the speed of cell migration is correlated to the lateral length scale of the surface.

  11. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  12. Regulation of flagellar motility by the conserved flagellar protein CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cochran, Deborah A.; Gargano, Mary D.; King, Iryna; Samhat, Nayef K.; Burger, Benjain P.; Sabourin, Katherine R.; Hou, Yuqing; Awata, Junya; Parry, David A.D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Witman, George B.; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are vital sensory and motile organelles. The calcium channel PKD2 mediates sensory perception on cilia and flagella, and defects in this can contribute to ciliopathic diseases. Signaling from Pkd2-dependent Ca2+ rise in the cilium to downstream effectors may require intermediary proteins that are largely unknown. To identify these proteins, we carried out genetic screens for mutations affecting Drosophila melanogaster sperm storage, a process mediated by Drosophila Pkd2. Here we show that a new mutation lost boys (lobo) encodes a conserved flagellar protein CG34110, which corresponds to vertebrate Ccdc135 (E = 6e-78) highly expressed in ciliated respiratory epithelia and sperm, and to FAP50 (E = 1e-28) in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar proteome. CG34110 localizes along the fly sperm flagellum. FAP50 is tightly associated with the outer doublet microtubules of the axoneme and appears not to be a component of the central pair, radial spokes, dynein arms, or structures defined by the mbo waveform mutants. Phenotypic analyses indicate that both Pkd2 and lobo specifically affect sperm movement into the female storage receptacle. We hypothesize that the CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50 family of conserved flagellar proteins functions within the axoneme to mediate Pkd2-dependent processes in the sperm flagellum and other motile cilia. PMID:21289096

  13. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms develop coordinated beating patterns on surfaces lined with cilia known as metachronal waves. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it has been shown that hydrodynamic interactions alone can lead the system to synchronize. However, several microorganisms possess a curve-shaped ciliate body and so to understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the natural periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wavelike behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of metachronal waves in ciliated microorganisms can arise solely from the hydrodynamic interactions between the cilia. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it was observed that fluid forces can lead the system to form a metachronal wave. However, several microorganisms such as paramecium and volvox possess a curved shaped ciliate body. To understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the embedded periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wave-like behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  15. The significance of ultrastructural abnormalities of human cilia.

    PubMed

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Makey, A R; Rawbone, R

    1981-12-01

    The electronmicroscopic structure of cilia was studied from the inferior turbinate of the nose in 22 adults, and in 84 biopsies from the bronchial tree of 40 adults. The incidence of compound cilia and abnormal microtubular structures was assessed. There were significant variations in the incidence of abnormalities in different parts of the airways and even within different areas of the same electronmicroscopic section. The focal nature of differences in structure of cilia indicate that abnormalities found in a single biopsy do not necessarily reflect a generalized change in the bronchial tree. Thus, such a finding should not be used as evidence that the abnormalities of cilia are the cause of decrease in mucociliary clearance or that they play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis and sinusitis.

  16. The functional expression and motile properties of recombinant outer arm dynein from Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Edamatsu, Masaki

    2014-05-16

    Cilia and flagella are motile organelles that play various roles in eukaryotic cells. Ciliary movement is driven by axonemal dyneins (outer arm and inner arm dyneins) that bind to peripheral microtubule doublets. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of ciliary movement requires the genetic engineering of axonemal dyneins; however, no expression system for axonemal dyneins has been previously established. This study is the first to purify recombinant axonemal dynein with motile activity. In the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, recombinant outer arm dynein purified from ciliary extract was able to slide microtubules in a gliding assay. Furthermore, the recombinant dynein moved processively along microtubules in a single-molecule motility assay. This expression system will be useful for investigating the unique properties of diverse axonemal dyneins and will enable future molecular studies on ciliary movement.

  17. [The flagellum: from cell motility to morphogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kohl, Linda; Robinson, Derrick; Bastin, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Flagella and cilia are elaborate cytoskeletal structures conserved from protists to mammals, where they fulfil functions related to motility or sensitivity. We demonstrate a novel role for the flagellum in the control of cell morphogenesis and division of Trypanosoma brucei. To investigate flagellum functions, its formation was perturbed by inducible RNA interference silencing of components required for intraflagellar transport (IFT), a dynamic process necessary for flagellum assembly. First, we show that down-regulation of IFT leads to assembly of a shorter flagellum. Strikingly, cells with a shorter flagellum are smaller, with a direct correlation between flagellum length and cell size. Detailed morphogenetic analysis reveals that the tip of the new flagellum defines the point where cytokinesis is initiated. Furthermore, when new flagellum formation is completely blocked, non-flagellated cells are very short, lose their normal shape and polarity and fail to undergo cytokinesis. We show that flagellum elongation controls formation of cytoskeletal structures present in the cell body that act as molecular organisers of the cell.

  18. Evolution: Tracing the origins of centrioles, cilia, and flagella.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Santos, Zita; Azimzadeh, Juliette; Pereira-Leal, José B; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica

    2011-07-25

    Centrioles/basal bodies (CBBs) are microtubule-based cylindrical organelles that nucleate the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. CBBs, cilia, and flagella are ancestral structures; they are present in all major eukaryotic groups. Despite the conservation of their core structure, there is variability in their architecture, function, and biogenesis. Recent genomic and functional studies have provided insight into the evolution of the structure and function of these organelles. PMID:21788366

  19. Evolution: Tracing the origins of centrioles, cilia, and flagella.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Santos, Zita; Azimzadeh, Juliette; Pereira-Leal, José B; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica

    2011-07-25

    Centrioles/basal bodies (CBBs) are microtubule-based cylindrical organelles that nucleate the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. CBBs, cilia, and flagella are ancestral structures; they are present in all major eukaryotic groups. Despite the conservation of their core structure, there is variability in their architecture, function, and biogenesis. Recent genomic and functional studies have provided insight into the evolution of the structure and function of these organelles.

  20. Microscale imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is important for multiple processes in the body, including respiratory mucus clearance, gamete transport in the oviduct, right-left patterning in the embryonic node, and cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Multiple imaging techniques have been applied towards quantifying ciliary flow. Here we review common velocimetry methods of quantifying fluid flow. We then discuss four important optical modalities, including light microscopy, epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography, that have been used to investigate cilia-driven flow. PMID:25417211

  1. Effectiveness of Hair Bundle Motility as the Cochlear Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The effectiveness of hair bundle motility in mammalian and avian ears is studied by examining energy balance for a small sinusoidal displacement of the hair bundle. The condition that the energy generated by a hair bundle must be greater than energy loss due to the shear in the subtectorial gap per hair bundle leads to a limiting frequency that can be supported by hair-bundle motility. Limiting frequencies are obtained for two motile mechanisms for fast adaptation, the channel re-closure model and a model that assumes that fast adaptation is an interplay between gating of the channel and the myosin motor. The limiting frequency obtained for each of these models is an increasing function of a factor that is determined by the morphology of hair bundles and the cochlea. Primarily due to the higher density of hair cells in the avian inner ear, this factor is ∼10-fold greater for the avian ear than the mammalian ear, which has much higher auditory frequency limit. This result is consistent with a much greater significance of hair bundle motility in the avian ear than that in the mammalian ear. PMID:19917218

  2. Pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia array for biomimetic fluid propulsion.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Benjamin; de Volder, Michaël; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-11-21

    Arrays of beating cilia emerged in nature as one of the most efficient propulsion mechanisms at a small scale, and are omnipresent in microorganisms. Previous attempts at mimicking these systems have foundered against the complexity of fabricating small-scale cilia exhibiting complex beating motions. In this paper, we propose for the first time arrays of pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia that are able to address some of these issues. These artificial cilia arrays consist of six highly flexible silicone rubber actuators with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 8 mm that can be actuated independently from each other. In an experimental setup, the effects of the driving frequency, phase difference and duty cycle on the net flow in a closed-loop channel have been studied. Net fluid speeds of up to 19 mm s(-1) have been measured. Further, it is possible to invert the flow direction by simply changing the driving frequency or by changing the duty cycle of the driving block pulse pressure wave without changing the bending direction of the cilia. Using PIV measurements, we corroborate for the first time existing mathematical models of cilia arrays to measurements on prototypes.

  3. Metachronal wave formation in a model of pulmonary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mitran, Sorin M

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in rows of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia bases is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. In contrast with immersed boundary methods, this technique allows a natural enforcement of boundary conditions without the need for smoothing of singular force distributions. The fluid domains are discretized using a finite volume method. The 9 + 2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. The microtubule skeleton is cross-linked to itself and to the cilium membrane through spring elements which model nexin links. The cilium membrane itself is considered to be elastic and subject to fluid stresses computed from the moving grid formulation as well as internal forces transmitted from the microtubule skeleton. A cilium is set into motion by the action of dynein molecules exerting forces between adjacent microtubules. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes.

  4. Metachronal wave formation in a model of pulmonary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin M.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in rows of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia bases is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. In contrast with immersed boundary methods, this technique allows a natural enforcement of boundary conditions without the need for smoothing of singular force distributions. The fluid domains are discretized using a finite volume method. The 9 + 2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. The microtubule skeleton is cross-linked to itself and to the cilium membrane through spring elements which model nexin links. The cilium membrane itself is considered to be elastic and subject to fluid stresses computed from the moving grid formulation as well as internal forces transmitted from the microtubule skeleton. A cilium is set into motion by the action of dynein molecules exerting forces between adjacent microtubules. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes. PMID:19169426

  5. Branchial cilia and sperm flagella recruit distinct axonemal components.

    PubMed

    Konno, Alu; Shiba, Kogiku; Cai, Chunhua; Inaba, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella have highly conserved 9 + 2 structures. They are functionally diverged to play cell-type-specific roles even in a multicellular organism. Although their structural components are therefore believed to be common, few studies have investigated the molecular diversity of the protein components of the cilia and flagella in a single organism. Here we carried out a proteomic analysis and compared protein components between branchial cilia and sperm flagella in a marine invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. Distinct feature of protein recruitment in branchial cilia and sperm flagella has been clarified; (1) Isoforms of α- and β-tubulins as well as those of actins are distinctly used in branchial cilia or sperm flagella. (2) Structural components, such as dynein docking complex, tektins and an outer dense fiber protein, are used differently by the cilia and flagella. (3) Sperm flagella are specialized for the cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein and for energy metabolism by glycolytic enzymes. Our present study clearly demonstrates that flagellar or ciliary proteins are properly recruited according to their function and stability, despite their apparent structural resemblance and conservation.

  6. Pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia array for biomimetic fluid propulsion.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Benjamin; de Volder, Michaël; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-11-21

    Arrays of beating cilia emerged in nature as one of the most efficient propulsion mechanisms at a small scale, and are omnipresent in microorganisms. Previous attempts at mimicking these systems have foundered against the complexity of fabricating small-scale cilia exhibiting complex beating motions. In this paper, we propose for the first time arrays of pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia that are able to address some of these issues. These artificial cilia arrays consist of six highly flexible silicone rubber actuators with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 8 mm that can be actuated independently from each other. In an experimental setup, the effects of the driving frequency, phase difference and duty cycle on the net flow in a closed-loop channel have been studied. Net fluid speeds of up to 19 mm s(-1) have been measured. Further, it is possible to invert the flow direction by simply changing the driving frequency or by changing the duty cycle of the driving block pulse pressure wave without changing the bending direction of the cilia. Using PIV measurements, we corroborate for the first time existing mathematical models of cilia arrays to measurements on prototypes. PMID:26439855

  7. Endothelial Cilia Are Essential for Developmental Vascular Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Yu, Jianxin A.; Li, Jade; Li, Yuanyuan; Weinstein, Brant M.; Nicoli, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is a signaling platform of the vertebrate cell. It has a critical role in polycystic kidney disease and nephronophthisis. Cilia have been detected on endothelial cells, but the function of these organelles in the vasculature remains incompletely defined. In this study, using genetic and chemical genetic tools in the model organism zebrafish, we reveal an essential role of cilia in developmental vascular integrity. Embryos expressing mutant intraflagellar transport genes, which are essential and specific for cilia biogenesis, displayed increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage, whereas the morphology of the vasculature remained normal. Moreover, cilia were present on endothelial cells in the developing zebrafish vasculature. We further show that the involvement of cilia in vascular integrity is endothelial autonomous, because endothelial-specific re-expression of intraflagellar transport genes in respective mutants rescued the intracranial hemorrhage phenotype. Finally, whereas inhibition of Hedgehog signaling increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage in ciliary mutants, activation of the pathway rescued this phenotype. In contrast, embryos expressing an inactivating mutation in pkd2, one of two autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease genes, did not show increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage. These results suggest that Hedgehog signaling is a major mechanism for this novel role of endothelial cilia in establishing vascular integrity. PMID:25214579

  8. Modelling the fluid mechanics of cilia and flagella in reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Smith, Andrew A; Smith, David J; Loghin, Daniel; Blake, John R

    2012-10-01

    Cilia and flagella are actively bending slender organelles, performing functions such as motility, feeding and embryonic symmetry breaking. We review the mechanics of viscous-dominated microscale flow, including time-reversal symmetry, drag anisotropy of slender bodies, and wall effects. We focus on the fundamental force singularity, higher-order multipoles, and the method of images, providing physical insight and forming a basis for computational approaches. Two biological problems are then considered in more detail: 1) left-right symmetry breaking flow in the node, a microscopic structure in developing vertebrate embryos, and 2) motility of microswimmers through non-Newtonian fluids. Our model of the embryonic node reveals how particle transport associated with morphogenesis is modulated by the gradual emergence of cilium posterior tilt. Our model of swimming makes use of force distributions within a body-conforming finite-element framework, allowing the solution of nonlinear inertialess Carreau flow. We find that a three-sphere model swimmer and a model sperm are similarly affected by shear-thinning; in both cases swimming due to a prescribed beat is enhanced by shear-thinning, with optimal Deborah number around 0.8. The sperm exhibits an almost perfect linear relationship between velocity and the logarithm of the ratio of zero to infinite shear viscosity, with shear-thickening hindering cell progress.

  9. Electron microscopy of flagella, primary cilia, and intraflagellar transport in flat-embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Michaela; Scholz, Dirk; Geimer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is an evolutionarily highly conserved, microtubule-based, bidirectional transport system found in eukaryotic cilia/flagella and is indispensable for their assembly, maintenance, and sensory functions. Powered by two different motor complexes, linear arrays of protein particles, called IFT trains, are transported from the base to the tip of the cilium/flagellum and back, carrying axonemal precursors to the tip for assembly and turnover products back to the cell body for recycling. The dynamics of IFT can be visualized using various types of live-cell microscopy techniques, but for analyzing the ultrastructure of IFT trains, transmission electron microscopy is indispensable. The focus of this chapter is to describe the application of the flat embedding technique to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and monolayers of mammalian culture cells. Such flat embeddings are well suited for the analysis of the ultrastructure of the IFT system by standard electron microscopy and electron tomography.

  10. Gastrointestinal motility revisited: The wireless motility capsule

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Adam D; Scott, S Mark

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The wireless motility capsule (WMC) is a novel ambulatory technology that concurrently measures intraluminal pH, temperature, and pressure as it traverses the gastrointestinal tract. Objectives We aim to provide a concise summary of the WMC, detailing the procedure for its administration and the parameters it records. We also review the evidence that has validated the WMC against other methods currently regarded as ‘gold standard’. Conclusions The WMC offers a number of advantages over and above current techniques, especially with respect to patient tolerability, safety, and standardization. The WMC represents a considerable enhancement of the researchers’ and clinicians’ investigatory armamentarium. If this technology becomes widely adopted, coupled with international consensus upon the interpretation of physiological data derived therein, it may herald a new and exciting era in gastrointestinal physiology. PMID:24917991

  11. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  12. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  13. Oscillations of Eukaryotic Cilia and Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2006-11-01

    The undulating beat of eukaryotic flagella and cilia produces forces that move cells and cause locomotion. The timing mechanisms that generate these periodic undulations are still mysterious and the question of how these oscillations arise is still a subject of much research - both experimental and theoretical. Recent experimental results on paralyzed and reconstituted flagella offer new insight into the dynamical mechanisms that could result in sustained waveform generation. Motivated by these recent experimental results we propose a model that mimics the flagellar structure as motor driven elastic, inextensible filaments. We hypothesize that the oscillations arise due to motor (dynein) driven, constrained, relative sliding of parts of the flagella. The dynamical equations describing the evolution of the populations of attached and detached motors is actively coupled to the local configuration as well as local sliding velocities via strain and configuration dependent kinetic reaction rates. At the same time, the filament configuration is actively coupled to the motor densities via the dependence of the active internal torque densities on the motor populations as well as their internal state. Appropriate ensemble averaged force-velocity relationships for the motors completes the set of equations. Numerical solutions reveal onset of dynamical instabilities via Hopf-bifurcations with oscillatory waveforms emerging from a trivial base state corresponding to a straight, non-moving flagellum.

  14. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved. PMID:21614349

  15. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  16. [Esophageal motility disorders].

    PubMed

    Dughera, L; Battaglia, E; Emanuelli, G

    2001-09-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are usually diagnosed when esophageal manometry is performed in patients with unexplained non-cardiac chest pain, non obstructive dysphagia or as a part of the preoperative evaluation for surgery of gastroesophageal reflux. Classification of these abnormalities has been a subject of controversy. These esophageal contraction abnormalities can be separated manometrically from the motor pattern seen in normal subjects, however, their clinical relevance is still unclear and debated. Many patients demonstrate motility abnormalities in the manometry laboratories, but may lack correlation with their presenting symptoms. Medical treatment can decrease symptoms particularly chest pain or acid reflux but there is no significant changes in the manometric patterns. Such motor abnormalities may not reflect a true disease state, but they could be markers of other abnormalities and they can modify the initial manometric findings in time.

  17. An ocular motility conundrum

    PubMed Central

    McElnea, Elizabeth Margaret; Stephenson, Kirk; Lanigan, Bernie; Flitcroft, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Two siblings, an 11-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl presented with bilateral symmetrical ptosis and limited eye movements. Having already been reviewed on a number of occasions by a variety of specialists in multiple hospital settings a diagnosis of their ocular motility disorder had remained elusive. We describe their cases, outline the differential diagnosis and review the investigations performed which were influential in finally making a diagnosis. PMID:25349186

  18. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  19. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 101 μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale. PMID:26045730

  20. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 10(1 ) μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale.

  1. Ultrastructure and motion analysis of permeabilized Paramecium capable of motility and regulation of motility.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, S J; Hamasaki, T; Satir, P

    1988-01-01

    Structural and behavioral features of intact and permeabilized Paramecium tetraurelia have been defined as a basis for study of Ca2+ control of ciliary reversal. Motion analysis of living paramecia shows that all the cells in a population swim forward with gently curving spirals at speeds averaging 369 +/- 19 microns/second. Ciliary reversal occurs in 10% of the cell population per second. Living paramecia, quick-fixed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), show metachronal waves and an effective stroke obliquely toward the posterior end of the cell. Upon treatment with Triton X-100, swimming ceases and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveal cilia that uniformly project perpendicularly from the cell surface. Thin sections of these cells indicate that the ciliary, cell, and outer alveolar membranes are greatly disrupted or entirely missing and that the cytoplasm is also disrupted. These permeabilized paramecia can be reactivated and are capable of motility and regulation of motility. Motion analysis of cells reactivated with Mg2+ and ATP in low Ca2+ buffer (pCa greater than 7) shows that 71% swim forward in straight or curved paths at speeds averaging 221 +/- 20 microns/second. When these cells are quick-fixed for SEM the metachronal wave patterns of living, forward swimming cells reappear. Motion analysis of permeabilized cells reactivated in high Ca2+ buffers (pCa 5.5) shows that 94% swim backward in tight spirals at a velocity averaging 156 +/- 7 microns/second. SEM reveals a metachronal wave pattern with an effective stroke toward the anterior region. Although the permeabilized cells do not reverse spontaneously, the pCa response is preserved and the Ca2+ switch remains intact. The ciliary axonemes are largely exposed to the external environment. Therefore, the behavioral responses of these permeabilized cells depend on interaction of Ca2+ with molecules that remain bound to the axonemes throughout the extraction and reactivation procedures.

  2. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2012-03-01

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated is characterised as a function of the cilia spacing, the length of the metachronal wave, and a dimensionless parameter that characterises the relative importance of the viscous forces over the elastic forces in the cilia.

  3. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Khaderi, S. N.; den Toonder, J. M. J.; Onck, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated is characterised as a function of the cilia spacing, the length of the metachronal wave, and a dimensionless parameter that characterises the relative importance of the viscous forces over the elastic forces in the cilia. PMID:22662092

  4. Cilia-Like Beating of Active Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Timothy; Welch, David; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism that drives the regular beating of individual cilia and flagella, as well as dense ciliary fields, remains unclear. We describe a minimal model system, composed of microtubules and molecular motors, which self-assemble into active bundles exhibiting beating patterns reminiscent of those found in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. These observations suggest that hundreds of molecular motors, acting within an elastic microtubule bundle, spontaneously synchronize their activity to generate large-scale oscillations. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that densely packed, actively bending bundles spontaneously synchronize their beating patterns to produce collective behavior similar to metachronal waves observed in ciliary fields. The simple in vitro system described here could provide insights into beating of isolated eukaryotic cilia and flagella, as well as their synchronization in dense ciliary fields. PMID:21778400

  5. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest. PMID

  6. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, T; Satir, P

    1975-08-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest.

  7. Metachronal Wave of Cilia Transport in a Curved Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Sohail; Sadaf, Hina

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the mechanism of cilia-induced flow is discussed through a mathematical model. In this analysis two-dimensional flow of a viscous fluid is observed in a curved channel with ciliated walls. The features of ciliary structures are determined by the dominance of viscous effects over inertial effects using the long-wavelength approximation. The flow is modeled in both fixed and wave frame references. The exact solution is calculated for the velocity profile and the flow properties for the viscous fluid are determined as a function of the cilia and metachronal wave velocity. Results for the pressure rise, pressure gradient and stream function are constructed and analyzed graphically.

  8. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  9. Motility disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    Milla, P J

    1998-12-01

    Motility disorders are very common in childhood, causing a number of gastrointestinal symptoms: recurrent vomiting, abdominal pain and distension, constipation and obstipation, and loose stools. The disorders result from disturbances of gut motor control mechanisms caused by either intrinsic disease of nerve and muscle, central nervous system dysfunction or perturbation of the humoral environment in which they operate. Intrinsic gut motor disease and central nervous system disorder are most usually congenital in origin, and alterations of the humoral environment acquired. Irritable bowel syndrome occurs in children as well as adults and is multifactorial in origin, with an interplay of psychogenic and organic disorders. PMID:10079906

  10. Sliding Motility in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Asunción; Torello, Sandra; Kolter, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacteria are nonflagellated gram-positive microorganisms. Previously thought to be nonmotile, we show here that Mycobacterium smegmatis can spread on the surface of growth medium by a sliding mechanism. M. smegmatis spreads as a monolayer of cells which are arranged in pseudofilaments by close cell-to-cell contacts, predominantly along their longitudinal axis. The monolayer moves away from the inoculation point as a unit with only minor rearrangements. No extracellular structures such as pili or fimbriae appear to be involved in this process. The ability to translocate over the surface correlates with the presence of glycopeptidolipids, a mycobacterium-specific class of amphiphilic molecules located in the outermost layer of the cell envelope. We present evidence that surface motility is not restricted to M. smegmatis but is also a property of the slow-growing opportunistic pathogen M. avium. This form of motility could play an important role in surface colonization by mycobacteria in the environment as well as in the host. PMID:10572138

  11. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  12. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  13. Spontaneous embryonic motility: an enduring legacy.

    PubMed

    Bekoff, A

    2001-04-01

    This chapter addresses the influential contributions Viktor Hamburger has made to our understanding of embryonic motor behavior. With his classic review, published in 1963, Viktor Hamburger opened up the field of embryonic motor behavior, which had lain almost completely dormant for many years. He focused his observations and experimental studies on the spontaneously generated embryonic movements rather than on reflex responses. As a result, he and his colleagues firmly established the central generation of embryonic motility as a basic component of embryonic behavior in chicks. These studies were also extended to rat fetuses, showing that similar principles apply to mammalian fetuses. All of us who have followed after him owe Viktor Hamburger an enormous debt of gratitude for his pioneering work. PMID:11255029

  14. Lithium chloride modulates chondrocyte primary cilia and inhibits Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Clare L; Wiles, Anna; Poole, C Anthony; Knight, Martin M

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) exhibits significant therapeutic potential as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Hedgehog signaling is activated in osteoarthritis, where it promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Hedgehog signaling requires the primary cilium such that maintenance of this compartment is essential for pathway activity. Here we report that LiCl (50 mM) inhibits Hedgehog signaling in bovine articular chondrocytes such that the induction of GLI1 and PTCH1 expression is reduced ​ by 71 and 55%, respectively. Pathway inhibition is associated with a 97% increase in primary cilia length from 2.09 ± 0.7 μm in untreated cells to 4.06 ± 0.9 μm in LiCl-treated cells. We show that cilia elongation disrupts trafficking within the axoneme with a 38% reduction in Arl13b ciliary localization at the distal region of the cilium, consistent with the role of Arl13b in modulating Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we demonstrate similar increases in cilia length in human chondrocytes in vitro and after administration of dietary lithium to Wistar rats in vivo. Our data provide new insights into the effects of LiCl on chondrocyte primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling and shows for the first time that pharmaceutical targeting of the primary cilium may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499268

  15. Primary Cilia Regulate Branching Morphogenesis During Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kimberly M.; Liu, Bob Y.; Tlsty, Thea D.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During mammary gland development an epithelial bud undergoes branching morphogenesis to expand into a continuous tree-like network of branched ducts [1]. The process involves multiple cell types that are coordinated by hormones and growth factors coupled with signaling events including Wnt and Hedgehog [2-5]. Primary cilia play key roles in the development of many organs by coordinating extracellular signaling (Wnt, Hedgehog) with cellular physiology [6-8]. During mammary development, we find cilia on luminal epithelial, myoepithelial and stromal cells during early branching morphogenesis when epithelial ducts extend into the fat pad and undergo branching morphogenesis. When branching is complete, cilia disappear from luminal epithelial cells but remain on myoepithelial and stromal cells. Ciliary dysfunction caused by intraflagellar transport (IFT) defects results in branching defects. These include decreased ductal extension and decreased secondary and tertiary branching along with reduced lobular-alveolar development during pregnancy and lactation. We find increased canonical Wnt and decreased Hedgehog signaling in the mutant glands, which is consistent with the role of cilia in regulating these pathways [6-11]. In mammary gland and other organs, increased canonical Wnt [12-14] and decreased Hedgehog [15, 16] signaling decreases branching morphogenesis suggesting that Wnt and Hedgehog signaling connect ciliary dysfunction to branching defects. PMID:20381354

  16. The metachronal wave of lateral cilia of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Aiello, E; Sleigh, M A

    1972-09-01

    The form of beat of cilia and the structure of the metachronal wave on the lateral gill epithelium of Mytulus edulis have been studied on living material by interference-contrast microscopy and stroboscopic illumination, and compared with the same features in rapid-fixed preparations studied by light microscopy and with the scanning electron microscope. The most striking finding is that the beat of the cilia is not planar, as previously assumed, but involves a sideways movement in the recovery stroke Previous reports on nonplanar ciliary beating from protozoan examples describe a planar effective stroke and a counterclockwise rotation in the recovery stroke; in this molluscan example there is a clockwise rotation in the recovery stroke The lateral inclination of the cilia in the recovery stroke is in the same direction as the propagation of the waves, and the orientation of cilia in the recovery stroke is thought to determine whether the waves move to the left or right of the direction of the effective stroke

  17. Complex interactions between genes controlling trafficking in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Ocbina, Polloneal Jymmiel R; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T; Moskowitz, Ivan; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2011-06-01

    Cilia-associated human genetic disorders are striking in the diversity of their abnormalities and their complex inheritance. Inactivation of the retrograde ciliary motor by mutations in DYNC2H1 causes skeletal dysplasias that have strongly variable expressivity. Here we define previously unknown genetic relationships between Dync2h1 and other genes required for ciliary trafficking. Mutations in mouse Dync2h1 disrupt cilia structure, block Sonic hedgehog signaling and cause midgestation lethality. Heterozygosity for Ift172, a gene required for anterograde ciliary trafficking, suppresses cilia phenotypes, Sonic hedgehog signaling defects and early lethality of Dync2h1 homozygotes. Ift122, like Dync2h1, is required for retrograde ciliary trafficking, but reduction of Ift122 gene dosage also suppresses the Dync2h1 phenotype. These genetic interactions illustrate the cell biology underlying ciliopathies and argue that mutations in intraflagellar transport genes cause their phenotypes because of their roles in cilia architecture rather than direct roles in signaling.

  18. Optimization of bio-inspired multi-segment IPMC cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, S.; Conn, A. T.; Rossiter, J. M.; Ieropoulos, I.; Walters, P.

    2010-04-01

    In nature, unidirectional fluid flows are often induced at micro-scales by cilia and related organelles. A controllable unidirectional flow is beneficial at these scales for a range of novel robotic and medical applications, whether the flow is used for propulsion (e.g. swimming robots) or mass transfer (e.g. prosthetic trachea). Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that can be used directly as active propulsive surfaces rather than a traditional motor and propeller. IPMC actuators with two segmented electrodes that attempt to mimic the motion of cilia-like organelles have been realized. In this paper the optimization of these actuators towards producing unidirectional flows is described. A parametric study of the kinematic and hydrodynamic effect of modulating the drive signal has been conducted. As with eukaryotic cilia and flagella found in mammals, the segmented IPMC actuator can generate both flexural (asymmetric) and undulatory (symmetric) motions from the same physical structure. The motion is controlled by applying profiles of driving frequencies and phase differences. Kinematic analysis using a camera and laser displacement sensor has been used to measure and classify different motion types. The hydrodynamic forces produced by each motion type have been estimated using particle-tracking flow visualization. This allows drive signal profiles to be ranked in terms of fluid flow momentum transfer and directionality. Using the results of the parametric study, the IPMC motion is optimized towards producing unidirectional flow via repeatable cilia-inspired motion.

  19. Ins and outs of GPCR signaling in primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based signaling organelles that convey extracellular signals into a cellular response in most vertebrate cell types. The physiological significance of primary cilia is underscored by the fact that defects in assembly or function of these organelles lead to a range of severe diseases and developmental disorders. In most cell types of the human body, signaling by primary cilia involves different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which transmit specific signals to the cell through G proteins to regulate diverse cellular and physiological events. Here, we provide an overview of GPCR signaling in primary cilia, with main focus on the rhodopsin-like (class A) and the smoothened/frizzled (class F) GPCRs. We describe how such receptors dynamically traffic into and out of the ciliary compartment and how they interact with other classes of ciliary GPCRs, such as class B receptors, to control ciliary function and various physiological and behavioral processes. Finally, we discuss future avenues for developing GPCR-targeted drug strategies for the treatment of ciliopathies. PMID:26297609

  20. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  1. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  2. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  3. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders and Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, numerous studies have been performed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of acupuncture or electroacupuncture (EA) on gastrointestinal motility and patients with functional gastrointestinal diseases. A PubMed search was performed on this topic and all available studies published in English have been reviewed and evaluated. This review is organized based on the gastrointestinal organ (from the esophagus to the colon), components of gastrointestinal motility and the functional diseases related to specific motility disorders. It was found that the effects of acupuncture or EA on gastrointestinal motility were fairly consistent and the major acupuncture points used in these studies were ST36 and PC6. Gastric motility has been mostly studied, whereas much less information is available on the effect of EA on small and large intestinal motility or related disorders. A number of clinical studies have been published, investigating the therapeutic effects of EA on a number of functional gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. However, the findings of these clinical studies were inconclusive. In summary, acupuncture or EA is able to alter gastrointestinal motility functions and improve gastrointestinal motility disorders. However, more studies are needed to establish the therapeutic roles of EA in treating functional gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:20363196

  4. Hippi is essential for node cilia assembly and Sonic hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Caroline; Dickinson, Robin J.; Houtzager, Vicky M.; Cullum, Rebecca; Montpetit, Rachel; Metzler, Martina; Simpson, Elizabeth M.; Roy, Sophie; Hayden, Michael R.; Hoodless, Pamela A.; Nicholson, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Hippi functions as an adapter protein that mediates pro-apoptotic signaling from poly-glutamine-expanded huntingtin, an established cause of Huntington disease, to the extrinsic cell death pathway. To explore other functions of Hippi we generated Hippi knock-out mice. This deletion causes randomization of the embryo turning process and heart looping, which are hallmarks of defective left–right (LR) axis patterning. We report that motile monocilia normally present at the surface of the embryonic node, and proposed to initiate the break in LR symmetry, are absent on Hippi−/− embryos. Furthermore, defects in central nervous system development are observed. The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is downregulated in the neural tube in the absence of Hippi, which results in failure to establish ventral neural cell fate. Together, these findings demonstrate a dual role for Hippi in cilia assembly and Shh signaling during development, in addition to its proposed role in apoptosis signal transduction in the adult brain under pathogenically stressful conditions. PMID:17027958

  5. Motility and microtubule depolymerization mechanisms of the Kinesin-8 motor, KIF19A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Doudou; Nitta, Ryo; Morikawa, Manatsu; Yajima, Hiroaki; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Shigematsu, Hideki; Kikkawa, Masahide; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    The kinesin-8 motor, KIF19A, accumulates at cilia tips and controls cilium length. Defective KIF19A leads to hydrocephalus and female infertility because of abnormally elongated cilia. Uniquely among kinesins, KIF19A possesses the dual functions of motility along ciliary microtubules and depolymerization of microtubules. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these functions we solved the crystal structure of its motor domain and determined its cryo-electron microscopy structure complexed with a microtubule. The features of KIF19A that enable its dual function are clustered on its microtubule-binding side. Unexpectedly, a destabilized switch II coordinates with a destabilized L8 to enable KIF19A to adjust to both straight and curved microtubule protofilaments. The basic clusters of L2 and L12 tether the microtubule. The long L2 with a characteristic acidic-hydrophobic-basic sequence effectively stabilizes the curved conformation of microtubule ends. Hence, KIF19A utilizes multiple strategies to accomplish the dual functions of motility and microtubule depolymerization by ATP hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18101.001 PMID:27690357

  6. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  7. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components.

  8. Effects of cochlear loading on the motility of active outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHCs) power the amplification of sound-induced vibrations in the mammalian inner ear through an active process that involves hair-bundle motility and somatic motility. It is unclear, though, how either mechanism can be effective at high frequencies, especially when OHCs are mechanically loaded by other structures in the cochlea. We address this issue by developing a model of an active OHC on the basis of observations from isolated cells, then we use the model to predict the response of an active OHC in the intact cochlea. We find that active hair-bundle motility amplifies the receptor potential that drives somatic motility. Inertial loading of a hair bundle by the tectorial membrane reduces the bundle’s reactive load, allowing the OHC’s active motility to influence the motion of the cochlear partition. The system exhibits enhanced sensitivity and tuning only when it operates near a dynamical instability, a Hopf bifurcation. This analysis clarifies the roles of cochlear structures and shows how the two mechanisms of motility function synergistically to create the cochlear amplifier. The results suggest that somatic motility evolved to enhance a preexisting amplifier based on active hair-bundle motility, thus allowing mammals to hear high-frequency sounds. PMID:23509256

  9. Motile components in spermatids as related to transport of spermatids and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Walt, H; Hedinger, C

    1983-01-01

    Two distinctly different components of motility were detected in living early spermatids of the rat using phase contrast microscopy and video-analysis: the primary flagellum (a 9 + 2 axonema) executes wave-like motion in three dimensions. At the same time the flagellum displays alternatively in clockwise and counter-clockwise directions partial torsion, whereas shortening and elongation can also be observed. The second component is based on rhythmical movements of the spermatid cytoplasm at identical stages. During differentiation the capacity for motion reduces progressively. For instance, late spermatids are only capable of bending their now thickened flagellum. Spermatozoa were found immotile. Germ cells during differentiation are thought to contribute themselves to their transfer through the germinal epithelium. Reduction of motility in the differentiating flagellum is due to growing accessory structures surrounding the axonema, whereas motility of the cytoplasm is reduced by its resorption. In man, some forms of hypofertility and sterility, such as the immotile-cilia syndrome, might already be caused by imperfect motile components present in spermatids.

  10. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  11. Cilia-based flow network in the brain ventricles.

    PubMed

    Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Christian; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Eichele, Gregor

    2016-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid conveys many physiologically important signaling factors through the ventricular cavities of the brain. We investigated the transport of cerebrospinal fluid in the third ventricle of the mouse brain and discovered a highly organized pattern of cilia modules, which collectively give rise to a network of fluid flows that allows for precise transport within this ventricle. We also discovered a cilia-based switch that reliably and periodically alters the flow pattern so as to create a dynamic subdivision that may control substance distribution in the third ventricle. Complex flow patterns were also present in the third ventricles of rats and pigs. Our work suggests that ciliated epithelia can generate and maintain complex, spatiotemporally regulated flow networks. PMID:27387952

  12. Structural and functional hierarchy of eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Omoto, C K

    1995-01-01

    There are now a variety of methods to investigate the morphofunctional aspects of eukaryotic cilia and cilia. These methods are useful for investigating the basic mechanism of eukaryotic axonemal mechanochemical function and understanding the function and interaction of its components. It is clear that the complex structure of eukaryotic axoneme requires the combination of all these techniques to unravel its mystery. The compositionally simple in vitro microtubule assays are crucial in investigating the functions of different dyneins within an axoneme. However, because such assays do not include other components of the axoneme and the important mechanical feedback present in a beating axoneme, reactivation of the entire structure will continue to play a basic role in the morphofunctional study of eukaryotic axonemes.

  13. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ambartsumyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    The most common and challenging gastrointestinal motility disorders in children include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal achalasia, gastroparesis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting children and is diagnosed clinically and treated primarily with acid secretion blockade. Esophageal achalasia, a less common disorder in the pediatric patient population, is characterized by dysphagia and treated with pneumatic balloon dilation and/or esophagomyotomy. Gastroparesis and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction are poorly characterized in children and are associated with significant morbidity. Constipation is among the most common complaints in children and is associated with significant morbidity as well as poor quality of life. Data on epidemiology and outcomes, clinical trials, and evaluation of new diagnostic techniques are needed to better diagnose and treat gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. We present a review of the conditions and challenges related to these common gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:24799835

  14. Shape determination in motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilner, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Flat, simple shaped, rapidly gliding fish keratocyte cell is the model system of choice to study cell motility. The cell motile appendage, lamellipod, has a characteristic bent-rectangular shape. Recent experiments showed that the lamellipodial geometry is tightly correlated with cell speed and with actin dynamics. These quantitative data combined with computational modeling suggest that a model for robust actin treadmill inside the 'unstretchable membrane bag'. According to this model, a force balance between membrane tension and growing and pushing actin network distributed unevenly along the cell periphery can explain the cell shape and motility. However, when adhesion of the cell to the surface weakens, the actin dynamics become less regular, and myosin-powered contraction starts playing crucial role in stabilizing the cell shape. I will illustrate how the combination of theoretical and experimental approaches helped to unravel the keratocyte motile behavior.

  15. Spontaneous Creation of Macroscopic Flow and Metachronal Waves in an Array of Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirao, B.; Joanny, J.

    2007-03-01

    Cells or bacteria carrying cilia on their surface show many striking features : alignment of cilia in an array, two-phase asymmetric beating for each cilium, coordination between cilia and existence of metachronal waves with a constant phase difference between two adjacent cilia. We give simple theoretical arguments based on hydrodynamic coupling and an internal mechanism of the cilium derived from the behavior of a collection of molecular motors, to account qualitatively for these cooperative features. Hydrodynamic interactions can lead to the alignment of an array of cilia. We study the effect of a transverse external flow and obtain a two-phase asymmetrical beating, faster along the flow and slower against the flow, proceeding around an average curved position. We show that an aligned array of cilia is able to spontaneously break the left-right symmetry and to create a global average flow. Metachronism arises as a local minimum of the beating threshold and leads to a rather constant flow.

  16. Atypical cilia in the tracheal epithelium of healthy water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Bruno, F; Dallai, R; Galati, P; Pazzanese, P; Roperto, F

    1999-07-01

    Samples of tracheal mucosa were obtained from 10 healthy adult water buffaloes and 50 000 cilia were examined ultrastructurally. Ciliary abnormalities were found in all 10 subjects. Atypical cilia occurred as compound cilia (up to 1.5%), intracytoplasmic cilia (0.07%) and swollen cilia (0.05%). The microtubular pattern was determined in 5000 cross-sectioned cilia, with about 7% showing axonemal abnormalities in which peripheral defects prevailed. Some electron-dense plugs appeared inside the cylinder lumen of 2.5% of basal bodies. Freeze-fracture studies revealed a ciliary necklace composed of up to eight rows of intramembranous particles. This fine detail appeared to differ from that of other small and large ruminants.

  17. Fluid mechanics of nodal flow due to embryonic primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Blake, J R; Gaffney, E A

    2008-05-01

    Breaking of left-right symmetry is crucial in vertebrate development. The role of cilia-driven flow has been the subject of many recent publications, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. At approximately 8 days post-fertilization, after the establishment of the dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior axes, a depressed structure is found on the ventral side of mouse embryos, termed the ventral node. Within the node, 'whirling' primary cilia, tilted towards the posterior, drive a flow implicated in the initial left-right signalling asymmetry. However, the underlying fluid mechanics have not been fully and correctly explained until recently and accurate characterization is required in determining how the flow triggers the downstream signalling cascades. Using the approximation of resistive force theory, we show how the flow is produced and calculate the optimal configuration to cause maximum flow, showing excellent agreement with in vitro measurements and numerical simulation, and paralleling recent analogue experiments. By calculating numerical solutions of the slender body theory equations, we present time-dependent physically based fluid dynamics simulations of particle pathlines in flows generated by large arrays of beating cilia, showing the far-field radial streamlines predicted by the theory.

  18. IFT46 plays crucial roles in craniofacial and cilia development.

    PubMed

    Park, Inji; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Chowon; Ismail, Tayaba; Kim, Yoo-Kyung; Park, Jeen-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Park, Tae-Joo; Park, Mae-Ja; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2016-08-26

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system is essential for bidirectional movement of ciliary components from the basal body to the tip beneath the ciliary sheath and is conserved for cilia and flagella formation in most vertebrates. IFT complex A is involved in anterograde trafficking, whereas complex B is involved in retrograde trafficking. IFT46 is well known as a crucial component of IFT complex B, however, its developmental functions are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the novel functions of IFT46 during vertebrate development, especially, ciliogenesis and neurogenesis, because IFT46 is strongly expressed in both multiciliated cells of epithelial and neural tissues. Knockdown of IFT46 using morpholino microinjections caused shortening of the body axis as well as the formation of fewer and shorter cilia. Furthermore, loss of IFT46 down-regulated the expression of the neural plate and neural tube markers, thus may influence Wnt/planar cell polarity and the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway during neurogenesis. In addition, loss of IFT46 caused craniofacial defects by interfering with cartilage formation. In conclusion, our results depict that IFT46 plays important roles in cilia as well as in neural and craniofacial development. PMID:27320864

  19. Nature-inspired micro-fluidic manipulation using artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Toonder, Jaap; de Goede, Judith; Khatavkar, Vinayak; Anderson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    One particular micro-fluidics manipulation mechanism ``designed'' by nature is that due to a covering of beating cilia over the external surface of micro-organisms (e.g. Paramecium). A cilium can be viewed as a small hair or flexible rod (in protozoa: typical length 10 μm and diameter 0.1 μm) which is attached to the surface. We have developed polymer micro-actuators, made with standard micro-technology processing, which respond to an applied electrical or magnetic field by changing their shape. The shape and size of the polymer actuators mimics that of cilia occurring in nature. We have shown experimentally that, indeed, our artificial cilia can induce significant flow velocities of at least 75 μm/s in a fluid with a viscosity of 10 mPas. In this paper we will give an overview of our activities in developing the polymer actuators and the corresponding technology, show experimental and numerical fluid flow results, and finally assess the feasibility of applying this new and attractive micro-fluidic actuation method in functional biosensors.

  20. Micromotion of mammalian cells measured electrically.

    PubMed Central

    Giaever, I; Keese, C R

    1991-01-01

    Motility is a fundamental property of mammalian cells that normally is observed in tissue culture by time lapse microscopy where resolution is limited by the wavelength of light. This paper examines a powerful electrical technique by which cell motion is quantitatively measured at the nanometer level. In this method, the cells are cultured on small evaporated gold electrodes carrying weak ac currents. A large change in the measured electrical impedance of the electrodes is observed when cells attach and spread on these electrodes. When the impedance is tracked as a function of time, fluctuations are observed that are a direct measure of cell motion. Surprisingly, these fluctuations continue even when the cell layer becomes confluent. By comparing the measured impedance with a theoretical model, it is clear that under these circumstances the average motions of the cell layer of 1 nm can be inferred from the measurements. We refer to this aspect of cell motility as micromotion. PMID:1881923

  1. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  2. Intraflagellar Transport Gene Expression Associated with Short Cilia in Smoking and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Justina; Heldrich, Jonna; Fuller, Jennifer; Staudt, Michelle R.; Radisch, Sharon; Hollmann, Charleen; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Kaner, Robert J.; Salit, Jacqueline; Yee-Levin, Jenny; Sridhar, Sriram; Pillai, Sreekumar; Hilton, Holly; Wolff, Gerhard; Bitter, Hans; Visvanathan, Sudha; Fine, Jay; Stevenson, Christopher S.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Tilley, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and COPD are associated with decreased mucociliary clearance, and healthy smokers have shorter cilia in the large airway than nonsmokers. We hypothesized that changes in cilia length are consistent throughout the airway, and we further hypothesized that smokers with COPD have shorter cilia than healthy smokers. Because intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the process by which cilia of normal length are produced and maintained, and alterations in IFT lead to short cilia in model organisms, we also hypothesized that smoking induces changes in the expression of IFT-related genes in the airway epithelium of smokers and smokers with COPD. To assess these hypotheses, airway epithelium was obtained via bronchoscopic brushing. Cilia length was assessed by measuring 100 cilia (10 cilia on each of 10 cells) per subject and Affymetrix microarrays were used to evaluate IFT gene expression in nonsmokers and healthy smokers in 2 independent data sets from large and small airway as well as in COPD smokers in a data set from the small airway. In the large and small airway epithelium, cilia were significantly shorter in healthy smokers than nonsmokers, and significantly shorter in COPD smokers than in both healthy smokers and nonsmokers. The gene expression data confirmed that a set of 8 IFT genes were down-regulated in smokers in both data sets; however, no differences were seen in COPD smokers compared to healthy smokers. These results support the concept that loss of cilia length contributes to defective mucociliary clearance in COPD, and that smoking-induced changes in expression of IFT genes may be one mechanism of abnormally short cilia in smokers. Strategies to normalize cilia length may be an important avenue for novel COPD therapies. PMID:24465567

  3. Movement of Naegleria fowleri stimulated by mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cline, M; Carchman, R; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1986-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri amebae, but not those of N. australiensis, N. gruberi, or N. lovaniensis, demonstrated enhanced motility when placed in proximity to mammalian cells. Amebae of nonpathogenic species of Naegleria, however, were more motile in cell culture medium than the amebae of N. fowleri. The locomotory response of highly pathogenic mouse-passaged N. fowleri amebae to nerve cells was greater than axenically cultured amebae. The enhanced mobility elicited by whole nerve cells or disrupted nerve cells was not directed migration but chemokinetic. Naegleria fowleri responded to disrupted neuroblastoma cells more vigorously than to disrupted African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells.

  4. Kit signaling is required for development of coordinated motility patterns in zebrafish gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rich, Adam; Gordon, Scott; Brown, Chris; Gibbons, Simon J; Schaefer, Katherine; Hennig, Grant; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2013-06-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide a pacemaker signal for coordinated motility patterns in the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Kit signaling is required for development and maintenance of ICC, and these cells can be identified by Kit-like immunoreactivity. The zebrafish GI tract has two distinct ICC networks similar to mammals, suggesting a similar role in the generation of GI motility; however, a functional role for Kit-positive cells in zebrafish has not been determined. Analysis of GI motility in intact zebrafish larvae was performed during development and after disruption of Kit signaling. Development of coordinated motility patterns occurred after 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) and correlated with appearance of Kit-positive cells. Disruptions of Kit signaling using the Kit antagonist imatinib mesylate, and in Sparse, a null kita mutant, also disrupted development of coordinated motility patterns. These data suggest that Kit signaling is necessary for development of coordinated motility patterns and that Kit-positive cells in zebrafish are necessary for coordinated motility patterns.

  5. No Correlates for Somatic Motility in Freeze-Fractured Hair-Cell Membranes of Lizards and Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köppl, C.; Forge, A.; Manley, G. A.

    2003-02-01

    It is not known whether active processes in mammals and non-mammals are due to the same underlying mechanism. To address this, we studied the size and density of particles in hair-cell membranes in mammals, in a lizard, the Tokay gecko, and in a bird, the barn owl. We surmised that if the prominent particles described in mammalian outer-hair-cell membranes are responsible for cochlear motility, a similar occurrence in non-mammalian hair cells would argue for similar mechanisms. Particle densities differed, however, substantially from those of mammals, suggesting that non-mammals have no membrane-based motility.

  6. [Mechanism of bacterial gliding motility].

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have various way to move over solid surfaces, such as glass, agar, and host cell. These movements involve surface appendages including flagella, type IV pili and other "mysterious" nano-machineries. Gliding motility was a term used various surface movements by several mechanisms that have not been well understood in past few decades. However, development of visualization techniques allowed us to make much progress on their dynamics of machineries. It also provided us better understanding how bacteria move over surfaces and why bacteria move in natural environments. In this review, I will introduce recent studies on the gliding motility of Flavobacteium and Mycoplasma based on the detail observation of single cell and its motility machinery with micro-nano scales. PMID:26632217

  7. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.1,2 Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an ‘importer’, loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range ‘transporter’, driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies. PMID:27384150

  8. High-Frequency Power Gain in the Mammalian Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid Ó.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2011-11-01

    Amplification in the mammalian inner ear is thought to result from a nonlinear active process known as the cochlear amplifier. Although there is much evidence that outer hair cells (OHCs) play a central role in the cochlear amplifier, the mechanism of amplification remains uncertain. In non-mammalian ears hair bundles can perform mechanical work and account for the active process in vitro, yet in the mammalian cochlea membrane-based electromotility is required for amplification in vivo. A key issue is how OHCs conduct mechanical power amplification at high frequencies. We present a physical model of a segment of the mammalian cochlea that can amplify the power of external signals. In this representation both electromotility and active hair-bundle motility are required for mechanical power gain at high frequencies. We demonstrate how the endocochlear potential, the OHC resting potential, Ca2+ gradients, and ATP-fueled myosin motors serve as the energy sources underlying mechanical power gain in the cochlear amplifier.

  9. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-02-29

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  10. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-01-01

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26923764

  11. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  12. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  13. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  14. Autophagy Regulates Formation of Primary Cilia in Mefloquine-Treated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Bae, Dong-Jun; Kim, Eun Sung; Kim, Han Byeol; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia have critical roles in coordinating multiple cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulation of primary cilia is implicated in various ciliopathies. To identify specific regulators of autophagy, we screened chemical libraries and identified mefloquine, an anti-malaria medicine, as a potent regulator of primary cilia in human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Not only ciliated cells but also primary cilium length was increased in mefloquine-treated RPE cells. Treatment with mefloquine strongly induced the elongation of primary cilia by blocking disassembly of primary cilium. In addition, we found that autophagy was increased in mefloquine-treated cells by enhancing autophagic flux. Both chemical and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppressed ciliogenesis in mefloquine-treated RPE cells. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagy induced by mefloquine positively regulates the elongation of primary cilia in RPE cells. PMID:26157548

  15. Primary cilia of inv/inv mouse renal epithelial cells sense physiological fluid flow: bending of primary cilia and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Dai; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2005-01-01

    Primary cilia are hypothesized to act as a mechanical sensor to detect renal tubular fluid flow. Anomalous structure of primary cilia and/or impairment of increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in response to fluid flow are thought to result in renal cyst formation in conditional kif3a knockout, Tg737 and pkd1/pkd2 mutant mice. The mutant inv/inv mouse develops multiple renal cysts like kif3a, Tg737 and pkd1/pkd2 mutants. Inv proteins have been shown to be localized in the renal primary cilia, but response of inv/inv cilia to fluid stress has not been examined. In the present study, we examined the mechanical response of primary cilia to physiological fluid flow using a video microscope, as well as intracellular Ca2+ increases in renal epithelial cells from normal and inv/inv mice in response to flow stress. Percentages of ciliated cells and the length of primary cilia were not significantly different between primary renal cell cultures from normal and inv/inv mutant mice. Localization of inv protein was restricted to the base of primary cilia even under flow stress. Inv/inv mutant cells had similar bending mechanics of primary cilia in response to physiological fluid flow compared to normal cells. Furthermore, no difference was found in intracellular Ca2+ increases in response to physiological fluid flow between normal and inv/inv mutant cells. Our present study suggests that the function of the inv protein is distinct from polaris (the Tg737 gene product), polycystins (pkd1 and pkd2 gene products). PMID:16474191

  16. Ion channels that control fertility in mammalian spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy; Chung, Jean-Ju; Clapham, David E

    2008-01-01

    Whole-cell voltage clamp of mammalian spermatozoa was first achieved in 2006. This technical advance, combined with genetic deletion strategies, makes unambiguous identification of sperm ion channel currents possible. This review summarizes the ion channel currents that have been directly measured in mammalian sperm, and their physiological roles in fertilization. The predominant currents are a Ca2+-selective current requiring expression of the 4 mCatSper genes, and a rectifying K+ current with properties most similar to mSlo3. Intracellular alkalinization activates both channels and induces hyperactivated motility.

  17. Regulation of cilia assembly, disassembly, and length by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Li, Guihua; Pan, Junmin

    2009-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which cells are able to assemble, regulate, and disassemble cilia or flagella is not yet completely understood. Recent studies in several model systems, including Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, Leishmania, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals, provide increasing biochemical and genetic evidence that phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases plays a key role in cilia assembly, disassembly, and length regulation. Members of several protein kinase families--including aurora kinases, never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and a novel cyclin-dependent protein kinase--are involved in the ciliary regulation process. Among the newly identified protein kinase substrates are Chlamydomonas kinesin-13 (CrKinesin13), a microtubule depolymerizer, and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a microtubule deacetylase. Chlamydomonas aurora/Ipl1p-like protein kinase (CALK) and CrKinesin13 are two proteins that undergo phosphorylation changes correlated with flagellar assembly or disassembly. CALK becomes phosphorylated when flagella are lost, whereas CrKinesin13 is phosphorylated when new flagella are assembled. Conversely, suppressing CrKinesin13 expression results in cells with shorter flagella. PMID:20362099

  18. IFT46 plays an essential role in cilia development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Ji-Ae, Kim; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Yeong Ko, Je; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Jeong, Yun-Mi; You, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Joon; Park, Doo-Sang; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Aizawa, Shinichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Park, Jong-Hoon; Zhou, Weibin; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-04-15

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that project into the extracellular space. Ciliary defects are associated with several human diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, primary ciliary dyskinesia, left-right axis patterning, hydrocephalus and retinal degeneration. However, the genetic and cellular biological control of ciliogenesis remains poorly understood. The IFT46 is one of the highly conserved intraflagellar transport complex B proteins. In zebrafish, ift46 is expressed in various ciliated tissues such as Kupffer׳s vesicle, pronephric ducts, ears and spinal cord. We show that ift46 is localized to the basal body. Knockdown of ift46 gene results in multiple phenotypes associated with various ciliopathies including kidney cysts, pericardial edema and ventral axis curvature. In ift46 morphants, cilia in kidney and spinal canal are shortened and abnormal. Similar ciliary defects are observed in otic vesicles, lateral line hair cells, olfactory pits, but not in Kupffer׳s vesicle. To explore the functions of Ift46 during mouse development, we have generated Ift46 knock-out mice. The Ift46 mutants have developmental defects in brain, neural tube and heart. In particular Ift46(-/-) homozygotes displays randomization of the embryo heart looping, which is a hallmark of defective left-right (L/R) axis patterning. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IFT46 has an essential role in vertebrate ciliary development.

  19. A mechanical model for guided motion of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, P.; Beck, K. L.; Lenz, P.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a generic, purely mechanical model for environment-sensitive motion of mammalian cells that is applicable to chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and durotaxis as modes of motility. It is able to theoretically explain all relevant experimental observations, in particular, the high efficiency of motion, the behavior on inhomogeneous substrates, and the fixation of the lagging pole during motion. Furthermore, our model predicts that efficiency of motion in following a gradient depends on cell geometry (with more elongated cells being more efficient).

  20. Osmotic damage as a predictor of motility loss during convective desiccation of bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Ranjan; Jimenez, Jorge; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2013-12-01

    Current state-of-the art technologies are lagging in the application of desiccation storage to mammalian cells using nonreducing sugars. For bovine sperm, motility is irreversibly lost before reaching a sufficiently low moisture content necessary for preservation. It is hypothesized that much of the damage during drying is related to the osmotic stress encountered due to increased osmolarity of the extracellular environment. To test this hypothesis, we subjected sperm to liquid hyperosmotic environments for varying time-periods and measured their motility. We then extracted parameters for two models for motility loss based on these experiments: a first-order rate injury model (Fast or Slow) and a multi-modal (MM) injury model. The MM injury model incorporated an additional function accounting for damage induced by a time-independent osmotic change. Based on these models, we predicted sperm motility loss measured from natural and forced convective desiccation experiments. The MM injury model was able to closely bracket motility loss for desiccation as an osmotic change event with time-independent and time-dependent components. While the mechanistic basis of osmotic damage requires further exploration, the model can serve as a bracketing tool for predicting motility loss during desiccation based on excipients designed to minimize osmotic damage.

  1. Cilia internal mechanism and metachronal coordination as the result of hydrodynamical coupling

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Shay; Levit-Gurevich, Konstantin; Liron, Nadav; Blum, Jacob J.

    1997-01-01

    We present a simple but realistic model for the internal bend-generating mechanism of cilia, using parameters obtained from the analysis of data of the beat of a single cilium, and incorporate it into a recently developed dynamical model. Comparing the results to experimental data for two-dimensional beats, we demonstrate that the model captures the essential features of the motion, including many properties that are not built in explicitly. The beat pattern and frequency change in response to increased viscosity and the presence of neighboring cilia in a realistic fashion. Using the model, we are able to investigate multicilia configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. When two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phase, they synchronize within two cycles, as observed in experiments in which two flagella beating out of phase are brought close together. Examination of various multicilia configurations shows that metachronal patterns (i.e., beats with a constant phase difference between neighboring cilia) evolve autonomously. This provides modeling evidence in support of the conjecture that metachronism may occur as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamical interactions between the cilia. PMID:9177158

  2. Spontaneous Creation of Macroscopic Flow and Metachronal Waves in an Array of Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guirao, Boris; Joanny, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    Cells carrying cilia on their surface show many striking features: alignment of cilia in an array, two-phase asymmetric beating for each cilium, and existence of metachronal coordination with a constant phase difference between two adjacent cilia. We give simple theoretical arguments based on hydrodynamic coupling and an internal mechanism of the cilium derived from the behavior of a collection of molecular motors to account qualitatively for these cooperative features. Hydrodynamic interactions can lead to the alignment of an array of cilia. We study the effect of a transverse external flow and obtain a two-phase asymmetrical beating, faster along the flow and slower against the flow, proceeding around an average curved position. We show that an aligned array of cilia is able to spontaneously break the left-right symmetry and to create a global average flow. Metachronal coordination arises as a consequence of the internal mechanism of the cilia and their hydrodynamic couplings, with a wavelength comparable to that found in experiments. It allows the cilia to start beating at a lower adenosine-triphosphate threshold and at a higher frequency than for a single cilium. It also leads to a rather stationary flow, which might be its major advantage. PMID:17189311

  3. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  4. Role of cilia in normal pancreas function and in diseased states.

    PubMed

    diIorio, Philip; Rittenhouse, Ann R; Bortell, Rita; Jurczyk, Agata

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia play an essential role in modulating signaling cascades that shape cellular responses to environmental cues to maintain proper tissue development. Mutations in primary cilium proteins have been linked to several rare developmental disorders, collectively known as ciliopathies. Together with other disorders associated with dysfunctional cilia/centrosomes, affected individuals have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, neurologic disorders, and diabetes. In pancreatic tissues, cilia are found exclusively in islet and ductal cells where they play an essential role in pancreatic tissue organization. Their absence or disorganization leads to pancreatic duct abnormalities, acinar cell loss, polarity defects, and dysregulated insulin secretion. Cilia in pancreatic tissues are hubs for cellular signaling. Many signaling components, such as Hh, Notch, and Wnt, localize to pancreatic primary cilia and are necessary for proper development of pancreatic epithelium and β-cell morphogenesis. Receptors for neuroendocrine hormones, such as Somatostatin Receptor 3, also localize to the cilium and may play a more direct role in controlling insulin secretion due to somatostatin's inhibitory function. Finally, unique calcium signaling, which is at the heart of β-cell function, also occurs in primary cilia. Whereas voltage-gated calcium channels trigger insulin secretion and serve a variety of homeostatic functions in β-cells, transient receptor potential channels regulate calcium levels within the cilium that may serve as a feedback mechanism, regulating insulin secretion. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the role of primary cilia in normal pancreas function and in the diseased state. PMID:24861006

  5. Loss of primary cilia results in deregulated and unabated apical calcium entry in ARPKD collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Ferguson, William B; Fuson, Amanda L; Xie, Yi; Fintha, Attila; Komlosi, Peter; Yoder, Bradley K; Schwiebert, Erik M; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Bell, P Darwin

    2006-06-01

    Recent genetic analysis has identified a pivotal role of primary cilia in the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). However, little is known regarding how cilia loss/dysfunction contributes to cyst development. In epithelial cells, changes in apical fluid flow induce cilia-mediated Ca2+ entry via polycystin-2 (PC2), a cation channel. The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney (orpk) mouse contains a mutated Tg737 gene that disrupts expression of polaris, a protein required for ciliogenesis. These studies examine the effect of cilia malformation on Ca2+ entry in orpk cilia(-) collecting duct principal cells, and in orpk cells in which wild-type Tg737 was reintroduced, orpk cilia(+). [Ca2+]i was monitored in confluent cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy. Intrinsic apical Ca2+ entry was measured by Mn2+ quenching and Ca2+ depletion/readdition under flow conditions below the threshold for stimulation. We found that unstimulated apical Ca2+ entry was markedly increased in cilia(-) cells and was sensitive to Gd3+, an inhibitor of PC2. Electrophysiological measurements demonstrate increased abundance of an apical channel, consistent with PC2, in cilia(-) cells. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that PC2, normally expressed on and at the base of cilia in orpk cilia(+) cells, was observed throughout the apical membrane in cilia(-) cells. Furthermore, cilia(-) cells displayed elevated subapical Ca2+ levels measured with the near-membrane Ca2+ indicator FFP-18. We propose that cilia exert a tonic regulatory influence on apical Ca2+ entry, and absence of cilia results in loss of spatial organization of PC2, causing unregulated Ca2+ entry and elevations in subapical [Ca2+], a factor which may contribute to cyst formation. PMID:16396941

  6. Association of Lis1 with outer arm dynein is modulated in response to alterations in flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein regulatory factor Lis1, which induces a persistent tight binding to microtubules and allows for transport of cargoes under high-load conditions, is also present in motile cilia/flagella. We observed that Lis1 levels in flagella of Chlamydomonas strains that exhibit defective motility due to mutation of various axonemal substructures were greatly enhanced compared with wild type; this increase was absolutely dependent on the presence within the flagellum of the outer arm dynein α heavy chain/light chain 5 thioredoxin unit. To assess whether cells might interpret defective motility as a “high-load environment,” we reduced the flagellar beat frequency of wild-type cells through enhanced viscous load and by reductive stress; both treatments resulted in increased levels of flagellar Lis1, which altered the intrinsic beat frequency of the trans flagellum. Differential extraction of Lis1 from wild-type and mutant axonemes suggests that the affinity of outer arm dynein for Lis1 is directly modulated. In cytoplasm, Lis1 localized to two punctate structures, one of which was located near the base of the flagella. These data reveal that the cell actively monitors motility and dynamically modulates flagellar levels of the dynein regulatory factor Lis1 in response to imposed alterations in beat parameters. PMID:22855525

  7. Modulation of primary cilia length by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Akie; Yamato, Shogo; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Kobayashi, Yuki; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The MCH-MCHR1 system has been implicated in the regulation of feeding, emotional processing, and sleep in rodents. Recent work revealed that MCHR1 is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia of the central nervous system. Cilia have various chemosensory functions in many types of cell, and ciliary dysfunction is associated with ciliopathies such as polycystic kidney disease and obesity. Although dynamic modulation of neuronal cilia length is observed in obese mice, the functional interaction of neuronal ciliary GPCR and its endogenous ligand has not yet been elucidated. We report here that MCH treatment significantly reduced cilia length in hTERT-RPE1 cells (hRPE1 cells) transfected with MCHR1. Quantitative analyses indicated that MCH-induced cilia shortening progressed in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 lower than 1nM when cells were treated for 6h. Although the assembly and disassembly of primary cilia are tightly coupled to the cell cycle, cell cycle reentry was not a determinant of MCH-induced cilia shortening. We confirmed that MCH elicited receptor internalization, Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in MCHR1-expressing hRPE1 cells. Among these diverse pathways, we revealed that Gi/o-dependent Akt phosphorylation was an important component in the initial stage of MCH-induced cilia length shortening. Furthermore, induction of fewer cilia by Kif3A siRNA treatment significantly decreased the MCH-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, indicating the functional importance of the MCHR1-Akt pathway in primary cilia. Taken together, the present data suggest that the MCH-MCHR1 axis may modulate the sensitivity of cells to external environments by controlling the cilia length. Therefore, further characterization of MCHR1 as a ciliary GPCR will provide a potential molecular mechanism to link cilia length

  8. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  9. Microfabrication of IPMC cilia for bio-inspired flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Li, Wen; Tan, Xiaobo

    2012-04-01

    As the primary flow sensing organ for fishes, the lateral line system plays a critical role in fish behavior. Analogous to its biological counterpart, an artificial lateral line system, consisting of arrays of micro flow sensors, is expected to be instrumental in the navigation and control of underwater robots. In this paper we investigate the microfabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) cilia for the purpose of flow sensing. While existing macro- and microfabrication methods for IPMCs have predominantly focused on planar structures, we propose a device where micro IPMC beams stand upright on a substrate to effectively interact with the flow. Challenges in the casting of 3D Nafion structure and selective formation of electrodes are discussed, and potential solutions for addressing these challenges are presented together with preliminary microfabrication results.

  10. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies.

  11. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies. PMID:26231314

  12. Ultrastructural basis for ciliary motility.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, B A

    1983-01-01

    The axoneme of a cilium or a sperm tail is a machinery of great complexity. The mechano-chemical work is exerted by the dynein arms and brings about a sliding of the microtubular doublets relative to each other. Nexin links hold the doublets together and restrict the sliding; this makes the cilium bend rather than slide apart. The spokes have several functions and one is to prevent the cilium from becoming buckled when bending. There is a structure called the ciliary necklace in the proximal region of the cilium; this is believed to influence the activity of the cilium by regulating the calcium influx. The two principal pathways, which can be used to explore the ciliary machinery and its many components are (a) "chemical dissection" of the cilium by selectively dissolving the various parts of the machinery and (b) examination of ciliary mutants which can be obtained from experiments with protists or at the investigation of the population attending lung clinics or male fertility clinics as patients. Such human ciliary mutants usually belong to the immotile-cilia syndrome.

  13. Motility is crucial for the infectious life cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Syed Z; Manne, Akarsh; Stewart, Philip E; Bestor, Aaron; Rosa, Patricia A; Charon, Nyles W; Motaleb, M A

    2013-06-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, exists in a zoonotic cycle involving an arthropod tick and mammalian host. Dissemination of the organism within and between these hosts depends upon the spirochete's ability to traverse through complex tissues. Additionally, the spirochete outruns the host immune cells while migrating through the dermis, suggesting the importance of B. burgdorferi motility in evading host clearance. B. burgdorferi's periplasmic flagellar filaments are composed primarily of a major protein, FlaB, and minor protein, FlaA. By constructing a flaB mutant that is nonmotile, we investigated for the first time the absolute requirement for motility in the mouse-tick life cycle of B. burgdorferi. We found that whereas wild-type cells are motile and have a flat-wave morphology, mutant cells were nonmotile and rod shaped. These mutants were unable to establish infection in C3H/HeN mice via either needle injection or tick bite. In addition, these mutants had decreased viability in fed ticks. Our studies provide substantial evidence that the periplasmic flagella, and consequently motility, are critical not only for optimal survival in ticks but also for infection of the mammalian host by the arthropod tick vector. PMID:23529620

  14. A role for central spindle proteins in cilia structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Kieserman, Esther K.; Wang, Peggy I.; Basten, Sander G.; Giles, Rachel H.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wallingford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis and ciliogenesis are fundamental cellular processes that require strict coordination of microtubule organization and directed membrane trafficking. These processes have been intensely studied, but there has been little indication that regulatory machinery might be extensively shared between them. Here, we show that several central spindle/midbody proteins (PRC1, MKLP-1, INCENP, centriolin) also localize in specific patterns at the basal body complex in vertebrate ciliated epithelial cells. Moreover, bioinformatic comparisons of midbody and cilia proteomes reveal a highly significant degree of overlap. Finally, we used temperature-sensitive alleles of PRC1/spd-1 and MKLP-1/zen-4 in C. elegans to assess ciliary functions while bypassing these proteins' early role in cell division. These mutants displayed defects in both cilia function and cilia morphology. Together, these data suggest the conserved re-use of a surprisingly large number of proteins in the cytokinetic apparatus and in cilia. PMID:21246755

  15. Metachronal wave of artificial cilia array actuated by applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Marume, Ryuma; Saijou, Akinori; Kudo, Kentaro; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a biomimetic microstructure related to cilia, which are effective fluidic and conveying systems in nature, is described. Authors have already reported that a magnetic elastomer pillar actuated by a rotating magnetic field can work like a natural cilium. In the present work, we show examples of a cilia array with a metachronal wave as the next step. A metachronal wave is a sequential action of a number of cilia. It is theoretically known that a metachronal wave gives a higher fluidic efficiency; however, there has been no report on a metachronal wave by artificial cilia. We prepared magnetic elastomer pillars that contain chainlike clusters of magnetic particles. The orientation of chains was set to be different in each pillar so that each pillar will deform with a different phase.

  16. Primary cilia found on HeLa and other cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Tia J; Falk, Matthias M

    2015-11-01

    For many years now, researchers have known of a sensory appendage on the surface of most differentiated cell types called primary cilium. Primary cilia are both chemo- and mechano-sensory in function and have an obvious role in cell cycle control. Because of this, it has been thought that primary cilia are not found on rapidly proliferating cells, for example, cancer cells. Here we report using immunofluorescent staining for the ciliary protein Arl13b that primary cilia are frequently found on HeLa (human epithelial adenocarcinoma) and other cancer cell lines such as MG63 (human osteosarcoma) commonly used for cell culture studies and that the ciliated population is significantly higher (ave. 28.6% and 46.5%, respectively in starved and 15.7-18.6% in un-starved cells) than previously anticipated. Our finding impacts the current perception of primary cilia formed in highly proliferative cells.

  17. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  18. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study renal development and disease: sexy cilia.

    PubMed

    Barr, Maureen M

    2005-02-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has no kidney per se, yet "the worm" has proved to be an excellent model to study renal-related issues, including tubulogenesis of the excretory canal, membrane transport and ion channel function, and human genetic diseases including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The goal of this review is to explain how C. elegans has provided insight into cilia development, cilia function, and human cystic kidney diseases.

  20. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  1. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  2. Spatial organization of cilia tufts governs airways mucus transport: Application to severe asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelloufi, Mustapha Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2014-11-01

    We study the coupling between both density and spatial repartition of beating cilia tufts, and the coordinated transport of mucus in an in-vitro epithelial model. We use a fully differentiated model epithelium in air liquid interface (ALI) obtained from endo-bronchial biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with asthma. The asthma phenotype is known to persist in the model. Mucus transport is characterized by the trajectories and velocities of microscopic beads incorporated in the mucus layer. When the beating cilia tufts density is higher than dc = 11/100 × 100 μm2 a spherical spiral coordinated mucus transport is observed over the whole ALI chamber (radius = 6 mm). Below dc, local mucus coordinated transport is observed on small circular domains on the epithelium surface. We reveal that the radii of these domains scale with the beating cilia tufts density with a power 3.7. Surprisingly, this power law is independent on cilia beat frequency, concentration and rheological properties of mucus for healthy subject and patient with asthma. The rotating or linear mucus transport is related to dispersion of the cilia tufts on the epithelium surface. We show that impaired mucus transport observed in severe asthma model epithelia is due to a drastic lack and dysfunction of cilia tufts. The author acknowledges the support of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under reference ANR-13-BSV5-0015-01.

  3. Hippocampal and cortical primary cilia are required for aversive memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Berbari, Nicolas F; Malarkey, Erik B; Yazdi, S M Zaki R; McNair, Andrew D; Kippe, Jordyn M; Croyle, Mandy J; Kraft, Timothy W; Yoder, Bradley K

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for decades that neurons throughout the brain possess solitary, immotile, microtubule based appendages called primary cilia. Only recently have studies tried to address the functions of these cilia and our current understanding remains poor. To determine if neuronal cilia have a role in behavior we specifically disrupted ciliogenesis in the cortex and hippocampus of mice through conditional deletion of the Intraflagellar Transport 88 (Ift88) gene. The effects on learning and memory were analyzed using both Morris Water Maze and fear conditioning paradigms. In comparison to wild type controls, cilia mutants displayed deficits in aversive learning and memory and novel object recognition. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons from mutants displayed an altered paired-pulse response, suggesting that loss of IFT88 can alter synaptic properties. A variety of other behavioral tests showed no significant differences between conditional cilia mutants and controls. This type of conditional allele approach could be used to distinguish which behavioral features of ciliopathies arise due to defects in neural development and which result from altered cell physiology. Ultimately, this could lead to an improved understanding of the basis for the cognitive deficits associated with human cilia disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and possibly more common ailments including depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25184295

  4. Centrosomal protein CP110 controls maturation of the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sharda Prasad; Sharma, Neel Kamal; Liu, Chunqiao; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in cilia centrosomal genes cause pleiotropic clinical phenotypes, collectively called ciliopathies. Cilia biogenesis is initiated by the interaction of positive and negative regulators. Centriolar coiled coil protein 110 (CP110) caps the distal end of the mother centriole and is known to act as a suppressor to control the timing of ciliogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that CP110 promotes cilia formation in vivo, in contrast to findings in cultured cells. Cp110−/− mice die shortly after birth owing to organogenesis defects as in ciliopathies. Shh signaling is impaired in null embryos and primary cilia are reduced in multiple tissues. We show that CP110 is required for anchoring of basal bodies to the membrane during cilia formation. CP110 loss resulted in an abnormal distribution of core components of subdistal appendages (SDAs) and of recycling endosomes, which may be associated with premature extension of axonemal microtubules. Our data implicate CP110 in SDA assembly and ciliary vesicle docking, two requisite early steps in cilia formation. We suggest that CP110 has unique context-dependent functions, acting as both a suppressor and a promoter of ciliogenesis. PMID:26965371

  5. The N-DRC forms a conserved biochemical complex that maintains outer doublet alignment and limits microtubule sliding in motile axonemes

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; VanderWaal, Kristyn; Perrone, Catherine A.; Mueller, Joshua; Fox, Laura; Sale, Winfield S.; Porter, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    The nexin–dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) is proposed to coordinate dynein arm activity and interconnect doublet microtubules. Here we identify a conserved region in DRC4 critical for assembly of the N-DRC into the axoneme. At least 10 subunits associate with DRC4 to form a discrete complex distinct from other axonemal substructures. Transformation of drc4 mutants with epitope-tagged DRC4 rescues the motility defects and restores assembly of missing DRC subunits and associated inner-arm dyneins. Four new DRC subunits contain calcium-signaling motifs and/or AAA domains and are nearly ubiquitous in species with motile cilia. However, drc mutants are motile and maintain the 9 + 2 organization of the axoneme. To evaluate the function of the N-DRC, we analyzed ATP-induced reactivation of isolated axonemes. Rather than the reactivated bending observed with wild-type axonemes, ATP addition to drc-mutant axonemes resulted in splaying of doublets in the distal region, followed by oscillatory bending between pairs of doublets. Thus the N-DRC provides some but not all of the resistance to microtubule sliding and helps to maintain optimal alignment of doublets for productive flagellar motility. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms that regulate motility and further highlight the importance of the proximal region of the axoneme in generating flagellar bending. PMID:23427265

  6. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  7. The mechanism of self-organized beating of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Jyothish Sulochana

    The internal structure and physical properties of cilia are well known. The relevant hydrodynamics is also well known. But the mechanism behind the coordinated activity of the dynein molecular motors is not known. Based on experimental observations, it has been concluded that this mechanism cannot be due to control from the cell body. The possible mechanism has to be self-organized and the trigger for motor activation/deactivation has to be something related to the geometry of the ciliary axoneme. This thesis critically evaluates the most widely currently cited models and suggests an alternative model for how cilia beat. From the literature we obtained wave forms of ciliary beating at different instants in the beat cycle. These instants were digitized and interpolated. From this data, we were able to calculate the hydrodynamic force distribution (external force distribution) on the cilia and the translational and rotational velocities of the cell body. Once the hydrodynamic force distribution was obtained, we calculated the internal force distribution in the cilium using an equation we derived. Once this was known, we were able to calculate parameters of the ciliary axoneme such as the dynamic stiffness. The stiffness is the ratio of the first Fourier modes of the internal force distribution and the relative sliding between the doublet microtubules that form the axoneme. We found that the first mode was the dominant one and is the one we used for calculations. We were also able to calculate the energy involved in formation and propagation of the wave that produces the ciliary beating. We discovered that the dynamic stiffness varies along the length of a cilium. We determined that in the central region of the cilium, the stiffness is almost purely imaginary which means that the sliding velocity follows the internal force generation in that region rather than sliding. We also found that in Fourier space, the flexural rigidity (kappa=EI where E is Young's modulus and

  8. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  9. Tyrosination of α-tubulin controls the initiation of processive dynein-dynactin motility.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Richard J; Huynh, Walter; Vale, Ronald D; Sirajuddin, Minhajuddin

    2016-06-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of α/β-tubulin are believed to regulate interactions with microtubule-binding proteins. A well-characterized PTM involves in the removal and re-ligation of the C-terminal tyrosine on α-tubulin, but the purpose of this tyrosination-detyrosination cycle remains elusive. Here, we examined the processive motility of mammalian dynein complexed with dynactin and BicD2 (DDB) on tyrosinated versus detyrosinated microtubules. Motility was decreased ~fourfold on detyrosinated microtubules, constituting the largest effect of a tubulin PTM on motor function observed to date. This preference is mediated by dynactin's microtubule-binding p150 subunit rather than dynein itself. Interestingly, on a bipartite microtubule consisting of tyrosinated and detyrosinated segments, DDB molecules that initiated movement on tyrosinated tubulin continued moving into the segment composed of detyrosinated tubulin. This result indicates that the α-tubulin tyrosine facilitates initial motor-tubulin encounters, but is not needed for subsequent motility. Our results reveal a strong effect of the C-terminal α-tubulin tyrosine on dynein-dynactin motility and suggest that the tubulin tyrosination cycle could modulate the initiation of dynein-driven motility in cells.

  10. Langevin Dynamics Deciphers the Motility Pattern of Swimming Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Pfohl, Thomas; Engstler, Markus; Friedrich, Rudolf; Stark, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The parasite African trypanosome swims in the bloodstream of mammals and causes the highly dangerous human sleeping sickness. Cell motility is essential for the parasite’s survival within the mammalian host. We present an analysis of the random-walk pattern of a swimming trypanosome. From experimental time-autocorrelation functions for the direction of motion we identify two relaxation times that differ by an order of magnitude. They originate from the rapid deformations of the cell body and a slower rotational diffusion of the average swimming direction. Velocity fluctuations are athermal and increase for faster cells whose trajectories are also straighter. We demonstrate that such a complex dynamics is captured by two decoupled Langevin equations that decipher the complex trajectory pattern by referring it to the microscopic details of cell behavior.

  11. DYX1C1 is required for axonemal dynein assembly and ciliary motility

    PubMed Central

    Tarkar, Aarti; Loges, Niki T.; Slagle, Christopher E.; Francis, Richard; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Tamayo, Joel V.; Shook, Brett; Cantino, Marie; Schwartz, Daniel; Jahnke, Charlotte; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Raidt, Johanna; Pennekamp, Petra; Abouhamed, Marouan; Hjeij, Rim; Köhler, Gabriele; Griese, Matthias; Li, You; Lemke, Kristi; Klena, Nikolas; Liu, Xiaoqin; Gabriel, George; Tobita, Kimimasa; Jaspers, Martine; Morgan, Lucy C.; Shapiro, Adam J.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Mans, Dorus A.; Carson, Johnny L.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Wolf, Whitney E.; Chen, Serafine; Lucas, Jane S.; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Plagnol, Vincent; Schmidts, Miriam; Boldt, Karsten; Roepman, Ronald; Zariwala, Maimoona; Lo, Cecilia W.; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Knowles, Michael R.; Burdine, Rebecca D.; LoTurco, Joseph J.; Omran, Heymut

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dyx1c1 has been associated with dyslexia and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex. Unexpectedly, we found that deletion of Dyx1c1 exons 2–4 in mice caused a phenotype resembling primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by chronic airway disease, laterality defects, and male infertility. This phenotype was confirmed independently in mice with a Dyx1c1c.T2A start codon mutation recovered from an ENU mutagenesis screen. Morpholinos targeting dyx1c1 in zebrafish also created laterality and ciliary motility defects. In humans, recessive loss-of-function DYX1C1 mutations were identified in twelve PCD individuals. Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence analyses of DYX1C1-mutant motile cilia in mice and humans revealed disruptions of outer and inner dynein arms (ODA/IDA). DYX1C1 localizes to the cytoplasm of respiratory epithelial cells, its interactome is enriched for molecular chaperones, and it interacts with the cytoplasmic ODA/IDA assembly factor DNAAF2/KTU. Thus, we propose that DYX1C1 is a newly identified dynein axonemal assembly factor (DNAAF4). PMID:23872636

  12. Identification of Cilia Genes That Affect Cell-Cycle Progression Using Whole-Genome Transcriptome Analysis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    PubMed Central

    Albee, Alison J.; Kwan, Alan L.; Lin, Huawen; Granas, David; Stormo, Gary D.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule based organelles that project from cells. Cilia are found on almost every cell type of the human body and numerous diseases, collectively termed ciliopathies, are associated with defects in cilia, including respiratory infections, male infertility, situs inversus, polycystic kidney disease, retinal degeneration, and Bardet-Biedl Syndrome. Here we show that Illumina-based whole-genome transcriptome analysis in the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies 1850 genes up-regulated during ciliogenesis, 4392 genes down-regulated, and 4548 genes with no change in expression during ciliogenesis. We examined four genes up-regulated and not previously known to be involved with cilia (ZMYND10, NXN, GLOD4, SPATA4) by knockdown of the human orthologs in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (hTERT-RPE1) cells to ask whether they are involved in cilia-related processes that include cilia assembly, cilia length control, basal body/centriole numbers, and the distance between basal bodies/centrioles. All of the genes have cilia-related phenotypes and, surprisingly, our data show that knockdown of GLOD4 and SPATA4 also affects the cell cycle. These results demonstrate that whole-genome transcriptome analysis during ciliogenesis is a powerful tool to gain insight into the molecular mechanism by which centrosomes and cilia are assembled. PMID:23604077

  13. The sense of smell, its signalling pathways, and the dichotomy of cilia and microvilli in olfactory sensory cells

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Smell is often regarded as an ancillary perception in primates, who seem so dominated by their sense of vision. In this paper, we will portray some aspects of the significance of olfaction to human life and speculate on what evolutionary factors contribute to keeping it alive. We then outline the functional architecture of olfactory sensory neurons and their signal transduction pathways, which are the primary detectors that render olfactory perception possible. Throughout the phylogenetic tree, olfactory neurons, at their apical tip, are either decorated with cilia or with microvilli. The significance of this dichotomy is unknown. It is generally assumed that mammalian olfactory neurons are of the ciliary type only. The existance of so-called olfactory microvillar cells in mammals, however, is well documented, but their nature remains unclear and their function orphaned. This paper discusses the possibility, that in the main olfactory epithelium of mammals ciliated and microvillar sensory cells exist concurrently. We review evidence related to this hypothesis and ask, what function olfactory microvillar cells might have and what signalling mechanisms they use. PMID:17903277

  14. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  15. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  16. Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Barreto, Sara; Lacroix, Damien

    2015-08-21

    Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.

  17. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  18. Primary cilia expression in bone marrow in response to mechanical stimulation in explant bioreactor culture.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, T R; Schiavi, J; Alyssa Varsanik, M; Voisin, M; Birmingham, E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow contains a multitude of mechanically sensitive cells that may participate in mechanotransduction. Primary cilia are sensory organelles expressed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblasts, osteocytes, and other cell types that sense fluid flow in monolayer culture. In marrow, cilia could similarly facilitate the sensation of relative motion between adjacent cells or interstitial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine the response of cilia to mechanical stimulation of the marrow. Bioreactors were used to supply trabecular bone explants with low magnitude mechanical stimulation (LMMS) of 0.3 ×g at 30 Hz for 1 h/d, 5 d/week, inducing shear stresses in the marrow. Four groups were studied: unstimulated (UNSTIM), stimulated (LMMS), and with and without chloral hydrate (UNSTIM+CH and LMMS+CH, respectively), which was used to disrupt cilia. After 19 days of culture, immunohistochemistry for acetylated α-tubulin revealed that more cells expressed cilia in culture compared to in vivo controls. Stimulation decreased the number of cells expressing cilia in untreated explants, but not in CH-treated explants. MSCs represented a greater fraction of marrow cells in the untreated explants than CH-treated explants. MSCs harvested from the stimulated groups were more proliferative than in the unstimulated explants, but this effect was absent from CH treated explants. In contrast to the marrow, neither LMMS nor CH treatment affected bone formation as measured by mineralising surface. Computational models indicated that LMMS does not induce bone strain, and the reported effects were thus attributed to shear stress in the marrow. From a clinical perspective, genetic or pharmaceutical alterations of cilia expression may affect marrow health and function. PMID:27434268

  19. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  20. Asian Motility Studies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotility in Asian IBS patients were reviewed. MEDLINE search work was performed including following terms, 'IBS,' 'motility,' 'transit time,' 'esophageal motility,' 'gastric motility,' 'small intestinal motility,' 'colonic motility,' 'anorectal function,' and 'gallbladder motility' and over 100 articles were categorized under 'esophagus,' 'stomach,' 'small intestine,' 'colon,' 'anorectum,' 'gallbladder,' 'transit,' 'motor pattern,' and 'effect of stressors.' Delayed gastric emptying, slow tansit in constipation predominant IBS patients, rapid transit in diarrhea predominant IBS patients, accelerated motility responses to various stressors such as meals, mental stress, or corticotrophin releasing hormones, and altered rectal compliance and altered rectal accomodation were reported in many Asian studies regarding IBS. Many conflicting results were found among these studies and there are still controversies to conclude these as unique features of Asian IBS patients. Multinational and multicenter studies are needed to be performed vigorously in order to elaborate characteristics as well as differences of altered motililty in Asian patients with IBS. PMID:20535342

  1. Kobe earthquake and reduced sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Fukuda, K; Shimizu, T; Yomura, W; Shimizu, S

    1996-06-01

    We investigated a possible relationship between the Kobe earthquake (January 17, 1995) and the quality of semen. We assessed sperm concentration and motility of 27 male patients who had a concentration of more than 30 million/ml and >40% sperm motility within 5 months before the earthquake. Twelve male patients from districts with a magnitude of <4 on the Richter scale showed no difference in sperm concentration and motility before and after the earthquake. Of 15 male patients from districts with a magnitude of >6, five patients whose houses received no damage showed no distinct changes in sperm concentration and motility. In contrast, 10 patients whose houses were partially or completely destroyed showed significantly (P < 0.001) lower sperm motility after the earthquake than before, although no significant difference of sperm concentration could be observed. Of these latter 10 patients, seven could be followed. In six patients, sperm motility was restored between 2 and 9 months after the earthquake; the sperm motility in one patient, whose father died a victim of the house crash, has not yet recovered. Thus, the acute stress resulting from such a catastrophic earthquake could be a possible cause of reduced sperm motility.

  2. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  3. “Mating Behavior, Male Sensory Cilia, and Polycystins in C. elegans” Chapter

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of C. elegans males and the male-specific sensory neurons required for mating behaviors has provided insight into the molecular function of polycystins and mechanisms that are needed for polycystin ciliary localization. In humans, polycystin 1 and polycystin 2 are needed for kidney function; loss of polycystin function leads to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystins localize to cilia in C. elegans and mammals, a finding that has guided research into ADPKD. The discovery that the polycystins form ciliary receptors in male-specific neurons needed for mating behaviors has also helped to unlock insights into two additional exciting new areas: the secretion of extracellular vesicles; and mechanisms of ciliary specialization. First, we will summarize the studies done in C. elegans regarding the expression, localization, and function of the polycystin 1 and 2 homologs, LOV-1 and PKD-2, and discuss insights gained from this basic research. Molecules that are co-expressed with the polycystins in the male-specific neurons may identify evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms for polycystin function and localization. We will discuss the finding that polycystins are secreted in extracellular vesicles that evoke behavioral change in males, suggesting that such vesicles provide a novel form of communication to conspecifics in the environment. In humans, polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles are secreted in urine and can be taken up by cilia, and quickly internalized. Therefore, communication by polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles may also use mechanisms that are evolutionarily conserved from nematode to human. Lastly, different cilia display structural and functional differences that specialize them for particular tasks, despite the fact that virtually all cilia are built by a conserved Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) mechanism and share some basic structural features. Comparative analysis of the male

  4. The actin gene ACT1 is required for phagocytosis, motility, and cell separation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Norman E; Tsao, Che-Chia; Bowen, Josephine; Hehman, Gery L; Williams, Ruth J; Frankel, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    A previously identified Tetrahymena thermophila actin gene (C. G. Cupples and R. E. Pearlman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5160-5164, 1986), here called ACT1, was disrupted by insertion of a neo3 cassette. Cells in which all expressed copies of this gene were disrupted exhibited intermittent and extremely slow motility and severely curtailed phagocytic uptake. Transformation of these cells with inducible genetic constructs that contained a normal ACT1 gene restored motility. Use of an epitope-tagged construct permitted visualization of Act1p in the isolated axonemes of these rescued cells. In ACT1Delta mutant cells, ultrastructural abnormalities of outer doublet microtubules were present in some of the axonemes. Nonetheless, these cells were still able to assemble cilia after deciliation. The nearly paralyzed ACT1Delta cells completed cleavage furrowing normally, but the presumptive daughter cells often failed to separate from one another and later became reintegrated. Clonal analysis revealed that the cell cycle length of the ACT1Delta cells was approximately double that of wild-type controls. Clones could nonetheless be maintained for up to 15 successive fissions, suggesting that the ACT1 gene is not essential for cell viability or growth. Examination of the cell cortex with monoclonal antibodies revealed that whereas elongation of ciliary rows and formation of oral structures were normal, the ciliary rows of reintegrated daughter cells became laterally displaced and sometimes rejoined indiscriminately across the former division furrow. We conclude that Act1p is required in Tetrahymena thermophila primarily for normal ciliary motility and for phagocytosis and secondarily for the final separation of daughter cells.

  5. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  6. Dynamics of self-oscillating cilia designed from active polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Using theory and simulations, we design active synthetic surfaces which are capable of replicating functionalities of biological cilia. In order to design such exquisite biomimetic systems we harness unique properties of polymer gels that undergo photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Powered by internalized BZ reaction these polymer gels swell and de-swell autonomously by chemo-mechanical transduction and therefore are ideal materials for designing our system. In order to simulate the dynamics of the BZ cilia in surrounding fluid we have developed a nonlinear hybrid 3D model which captures elasto-dynamics of polymer gel and diffusive exchange of BZ reagents between the gel and the fluid. Here we show that the geometrical arrangement of cilia and the distribution of BZ activator in the fluid determine the dynamic response of the cilia. We further show that using light as an external stimulus we can sequentially modulate height of individual cilium and thereby create the ``piano effect''. Finally, we demonstrate that synchronized oscillations in the cilia result from the distribution of BZ-activator in the surrounding fluid. Our findings can be used to design active surfaces which can be remotely tuned depending upon the magnitude of external stimuli.

  7. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  8. CCTα and CCTδ Chaperonin Subunits Are Essential and Required for Cilia Assembly and Maintenance in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, Cecilia; Cruto, Teresa; Tavares, Alexandra; Gaertig, Jacek; Soares, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin CCT is a hetero-oligomeric complex formed by two rings connected back-to-back, each composed of eight distinct subunits (CCTα to CCTζ). CCT complex mediates the folding, of a wide range of newly synthesised proteins including tubulin (α, β and γ) and actin, as quantitatively major substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings We disrupted the genes encoding CCTα and CCTδ subunits in the ciliate Tetrahymena. Cells lacking the zygotic expression of either CCTα or CCTδ showed a loss of cell body microtubules, failed to assemble new cilia and died within 2 cell cycles. We also show that loss of CCT subunit activity leads to axoneme shortening and splaying of tips of axonemal microtubules. An epitope-tagged CCTα rescued the gene knockout phenotype and localized primarily to the tips of cilia. A mutation in CCTα, G346E, at a residue also present in the related protein implicated in the Bardet Biedel Syndrome, BBS6, also caused defects in cilia and impaired CCTα localization in cilia. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the CCT subunits are essential and required for ciliary assembly and maintenance of axoneme structure, especially at the tips of cilia. PMID:20502701

  9. Functional aspects of primary cilia in signaling, cell cycle and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional cilia underlie a broad range of cellular and tissue phenotypes and can eventually result in the development of ciliopathies: pathologically diverse diseases that range from clinically mild to highly complex and severe multi-organ failure syndromes incompatible with neonatal life. Given that virtually all cells of the human body have the capacity to generate cilia, it is likely that clinical manifestations attributed to ciliary dysfunction will increase in the years to come. Disputed but nevertheless enigmatic is the notion that at least a subset of tumor phenotypes fit within the ciliopathy disease spectrum and that cilia loss may be required for tumor progression. Contending for the centrosome renders ciliation and cell division mutually exclusive; a regulated tipping of balance promotes either process. The mechanisms involved, however, are complex. If the hypothesis that tumorigenesis results from dysfunctional cilia is true, then why do the classic ciliopathies only show limited hyperplasia at best? Although disassembly of the cilium is a prerequisite for cell proliferation, it does not intrinsically drive tumorigenesis per se. Alternatively, we will explore the emerging evidence suggesting that some tumors depend on ciliary signaling. After reviewing the structure, genesis and signaling of cilia, the various ciliopathy syndromes and their genetics, we discuss the current debate of tumorigenesis as a ciliopathy spectrum defect, and describe recent advances in this fascinating field. PMID:23628112

  10. Primary cilia regulate mTORC1 activity and cell size through Lkb1.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Patel, Vishal; Braeg, Simone; Voelker, Henriette; Bredt, Saskia; Beyer, Theresa; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Gödel, Markus; Müller, Klaus; Herbst, Martin; Hornung, Miriam; Doerken, Mara; Köttgen, Michael; Nitschke, Roland; Igarashi, Peter; Walz, Gerd; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    The mTOR pathway is the central regulator of cell size. External signals from growth factors and nutrients converge on the mTORC1 multi-protein complex to modulate downstream targets, but how the different inputs are integrated and translated into specific cellular responses is incompletely understood. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway occurs in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), where cilia (filiform sensory organelles) fail to sense urine flow because of inherited mutations in ciliary proteins. We therefore investigated if cilia have a role in mTOR regulation. Here, we show that ablation of cilia in transgenic mice results in enlarged cells when compared with control animals. In vitro analysis demonstrated that bending of the cilia by flow is required for mTOR downregulation and cell-size control. Surprisingly, regulation of cell size by cilia is independent of flow-induced calcium transients, or Akt. However, the tumour-suppressor protein Lkb1 localises in the cilium, and flow results in increased AMPK phosphorylation at the basal body. Conversely, knockdown of Lkb1 prevents normal cell-size regulation under flow conditions. Our results demonstrate that the cilium regulates mTOR signalling and cell size, and identify the cilium-basal body compartment as a spatially restricted activation site for Lkb1 signalling. PMID:20972424

  11. Mammalian airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Aalberse, Rob C

    2014-01-01

    Historically, horse dandruff was a favorite allergen source material. Today, however, allergic symptoms due to airborne mammalian allergens are mostly a result of indoor exposure, be it at home, at work or even at school. The relevance of mammalian allergens in relation to the allergenic activity of house dust extract is briefly discussed in the historical context of two other proposed sources of house dust allergenic activity: mites and Maillard-type lysine-sugar conjugates. Mammalian proteins involved in allergic reactions to airborne dust are largely found in only 2 protein families: lipocalins and secretoglobins (Fel d 1-like proteins), with a relatively minor contribution of serum albumins, cystatins and latherins. Both the lipocalin and the secretoglobin family are very complex. In some instances this results in a blurred separation between important and less important allergenic family members. The past 50 years have provided us with much detailed information on the genomic organization and protein structure of many of these allergens. However, the complex family relations, combined with the wide range of post-translational enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications, make a proper qualitative and quantitative description of the important mammalian indoor airborne allergens still a significant proteomic challenge. PMID:24925404

  12. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  13. A novel serotonin-secreting cell type regulates ciliary motility in the mucociliary epidermis of Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Walentek, Peter; Bogusch, Susanne; Thumberger, Thomas; Vick, Philipp; Dubaissi, Eamon; Beyer, Tina; Blum, Martin; Schweickert, Axel

    2014-04-01

    The embryonic skin of Xenopus tadpoles serves as an experimental model system for mucociliary epithelia (MCE) such as the human airway epithelium. MCEs are characterized by the presence of mucus-secreting goblet and multiciliated cells (MCCs). A third cell type, ion-secreting cells (ISCs), is present in the larval skin as well. Synchronized beating of MCC cilia is required for directional transport of mucus. Here we describe a novel cell type in the Xenopus laevis larval epidermis, characterized by serotonin synthesis and secretion. It is termed small secretory cell (SSC). SSCs are detectable at early tadpole stages, unlike MCCs and ISCs, which are specified at early neurulation. Subcellularly, serotonin was found in large, apically localized vesicle-like structures, which were entirely shed into the surrounding medium. Pharmacological inhibition of serotonin synthesis decreased the velocity of cilia-driven fluid flow across the skin epithelium. This effect was mediated by serotonin type 3 receptor (Htr3), which was expressed in ciliated cells. Knockdown of Htr3 compromised flow velocity by reducing the ciliary motility of MCCs. SSCs thus represent a distinct and novel entity of the frog tadpole MCE, required for ciliary beating and mucus transport across the larval skin. The identification and characterization of SSCs consolidates the value of the Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for human MCEs, which have been known for serotonin-dependent regulation of ciliary beat frequency. PMID:24598162

  14. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  15. Protonmotive force and motility of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shioi, J I; Imae, Y; Oosawa, F

    1978-01-01

    Motility of Bacillus subtilis was inhibited within a few minutes by a combination of valinomycin and a high concentration of potassium ions in the medium at neutral pH. Motility was restored by lowering the concentration of valinomycin or potassium ions. The valinomycin concentration necessary for motility inhibition was determined at various concentrations of potassium ions and various pH's. At pH 7.5, valinomycin of any concentration did not inhibit the motility, when the potassium ion concentration was lower than 9 mM. In the presence of 230 mM potassium ion, the motility inhibition by valinomycin was not detected at pH lower than 6.1. These results are easily explained by the idea that the motility of B. subtilis is supported by the electrochemical potential difference of the proton across the membrane, or the protonmotive force. The electrochemical potential difference necessary for motility was estimated to be about -90 mV. PMID:25261

  16. Effect of very low doses of gamma radiation on motility of gill ciliated epithelia of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Ivanovsky YuA

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of gamma radiation on the motility of mussel gill ciliated epithelia was conducted using dose rates of 0.9 and 2 mGy/h. There was a definite decrease in the beat frequency and a distortion of the metachronal wave by 20-30 min after irradiation with 0.9 Gy/h. With a total dose of 0.9 mGy, the beat frequency was decreased 2- to 2.5-fold. In the period after irradiation a restoration of the metachronal wave was observed, but the beat frequency was about 50% of the control level. Gamma irradiation completely stopped the beating of the cilia when given at a dose rate of 2 mGy/h.

  17. Sperm-activating peptides in the regulation of ion fluxes, signal transduction and motility.

    PubMed

    Darszon, Alberto; Guerrero, Adán; Galindo, Blanca E; Nishigaki, Takuya; Wood, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Echinoderm sperm use cyclic nucleotides (CNs) as essential second messengers to locate and swim towards the egg. Sea urchin sperm constitute a rich source of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase (mGC), which was first cloned from sea urchin testis by the group of David Garbers. His group also identified speract, the first sperm-activating peptide (SAP) to be isolated from the egg investment (or egg jelly). This decapeptide stimulates sperm mGC causing a fast transient increase in cGMP that triggers an orchestrated set of physiological responses including: changes in: membrane potential, intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and cAMP levels. Evidence from several groups indicated that cGMP activation of a K+ selective channel was the first ion permeability change in the signaling cascade induced by SAPs, and recently the candidate gene was finally identified. Each of the 4 repeated, 6 trans-membrane segments of this channel contains a cyclic nucleotide binding domain. Together they comprise a single polypeptide chain like voltage-gated Na+ or Ca2+ channels. This new type of channel, named tetraKCNG, appears to belong to the exclusive club of novel protein families expressed only in sperm and its progenitors. SAPs also induce fluctuations in flagellar [Ca2+]i that correlate with changes in flagellar form and regulate sperm trajectory. The motility changes depend on [Ca2+]i influx through specific Ca2+ channels and not on the overall [Ca2+]i in the sperm flagellum. All cilia and flagella have a conserved axonemal structure and thus understanding how Ca2+ regulates cilia and flagella beating is a fundamental question. PMID:18649273

  18. Auxin transport inhibitors impair vesicle motility and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in diverse eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Grigoriev, Ilya; Fischer, Rainer; Tominaga, Motoki; Robinson, David G.; Hašek, Jiří; Paciorek, Tomasz; Petrášek, Jan; Seifertová, Daniela; Tejos, Ricardo; Meisel, Lee A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ueda, Takashi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Akhmanova, Anna; Brock, Roland; Spang, Anne; Friml, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Many aspects of plant development, including patterning and tropisms, are largely dependent on the asymmetric distribution of the plant signaling molecule auxin. Auxin transport inhibitors (ATIs), which interfere with directional auxin transport, have been essential tools in formulating this concept. However, despite the use of ATIs in plant research for many decades, the mechanism of ATI action has remained largely elusive. Using real-time live-cell microscopy, we show here that prominent ATIs such as 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and 2-(1-pyrenoyl) benzoic acid (PBA) inhibit vesicle trafficking in plant, yeast, and mammalian cells. Effects on micropinocytosis, rab5-labeled endosomal motility at the periphery of HeLa cells and on fibroblast mobility indicate that ATIs influence actin cytoskeleton. Visualization of actin cytoskeleton dynamics in plants, yeast, and mammalian cells show that ATIs stabilize actin. Conversely, stabilizing actin by chemical or genetic means interferes with endocytosis, vesicle motility, auxin transport, and plant development, including auxin transport-dependent processes. Our results show that a class of ATIs act as actin stabilizers and advocate that actin-dependent trafficking of auxin transport components participates in the mechanism of auxin transport. These studies also provide an example of how the common eukaryotic process of actin-based vesicle motility can fulfill a plant-specific physiological role. PMID:18337510

  19. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions. PMID:22406282

  20. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-01-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger. PMID:3656188

  1. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-07-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger.

  2. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting. PMID:24612344

  3. Role for primary cilia as flow detectors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Kim; Egorova, Anastasia D; Poelmann, Robert E; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Hierck, Beerend P

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular system is exposed to biochemical and biomechanical signals. Various sensors for these signals have been described and they contribute to cardiovascular development, maintenance of vessel integrity during adult life, and to pathogenesis. In the past 10years, primary cilia, membrane-covered, rod-like cellular protrusions, were discovered on multiple cell types of the cardiovascular system. Primary cilia are sensory organelles involved in several key (developmental) signaling pathways and in chemo- and mechanosensing on a myriad of cell types. In the embryonic and adult cardiovascular system, they have been demonstrated to function as shear stress sensors on endothelial cells and could act as strain sensors on smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and as chemosensors on fibroblasts. This review will cover their occurrence and elaborate on established and possible functions of primary cilia in the cardiovascular system.

  4. A Group of ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids Inhibit Hedgehog Signaling and Induce Cilia Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shiyou; Du, Jiacheng; Kong, Qinghua; Li, Chaocui; Li, Yan; Sun, Handong; Pu, Jianxin; Mao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays important roles in the tumorigenesis of multiple cancers and is a key target for drug discovery. In a screen of natural products extracted from Chinese herbs, we identified eight ent-Kaurane diterpenoids and two triterpene dilactones as novel Hh pathway antagonists. Epistatic analyses suggest that these compounds likely act at the level or downstream of Smoothened (Smo) and upstream of Suppressor of Fused (Sufu). The ent-Kauranoid-treated cells showed elongated cilia, suppressed Smo trafficking to cilia, and mitotic defects, while the triterpene dilactones had no effect on the cilia and ciliary Smo. These ent-Kaurane diterpenoids provide new prototypes of Hh inhibitors, and are valuable probes for deciphering the mechanisms of Smo ciliary transport and ciliogenesis. PMID:26439749

  5. Microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in the regulation of assembly, disassembly, and length of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangfeng; Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Wang, Liang; Pan, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Defects in ciliary assembly, maintenance, and signaling are associated with various human diseases and developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Eukaryotic flagella and cilia (interchangeable terms) are microtubule-based organelles. Thus, microtubule dynamics and microtubule-dependent transport are predicted to affect the structural integrity and functionality of cilia profoundly. Kinesin-2 is well known for its role in intraflagellar transport to transport ciliary precursors and signaling molecules. Recently, microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins found in kinesin-8, -13, and -14A families have emerged as regulators of cilia. We first discuss ciliary kinesins identified in the flagellar or ciliary proteome, and then focus on the function and regulation of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins. Lastly, we review the recent advances of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in controlling ciliary assembly, disassembly, and length.

  6. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions.

  7. Extracellular Regulation of Sperm Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclase by a Forward Motility Stimulating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Roy, Debarun; Majumder, Gopal C.; Bhattacharyya, Debdas

    2014-01-01

    of progressive motility by a physiologic extracellular factor in a mammalian species. PMID:25350397

  8. Primary cilia are critical for Sonic hedgehog-mediated dopaminergic neurogenesis in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Gazea, Mary; Tasouri, Evangelia; Tolve, Marianna; Bosch, Viktoria; Kabanova, Anna; Gojak, Christian; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Novikov, Orna; Spatz, Joachim; Pereira, Gislene; Hübner, Wolfgang; Brodski, Claude; Tucker, Kerry L; Blaess, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons modulate various motor and cognitive functions, and their dysfunction or degeneration has been implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Both Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt signaling pathways have been shown to be essential for normal development of mDA neurons. Primary cilia are critical for the development of a number of structures in the brain by serving as a hub for essential developmental signaling cascades, but their role in the generation of mDA neurons has not been examined. We analyzed mutant mouse lines deficient in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88, which is critical for primary cilia function. Conditional inactivation of Ift88 in the midbrain after E9.0 results in progressive loss of primary cilia, a decreased size of the mDA progenitor domain, and a reduction in mDA neurons. We identified Shh signaling as the primary cause of these defects, since conditional inactivation of the Shh signaling pathway after E9.0, through genetic ablation of Gli2 and Gli3 in the midbrain, results in a phenotype basically identical to the one seen in Ift88 conditional mutants. Moreover, the expansion of the mDA progenitor domain observed when Shh signaling is constitutively activated does not occur in absence of Ift88. In contrast, clusters of Shh-responding progenitors are maintained in the ventral midbrain of the hypomorphic Ift88 mouse mutant, cobblestone. Despite the residual Shh signaling, the integrity of the mDA progenitor domain is severely disturbed, and consequently very few mDA neurons are generated in cobblestone mutants. Our results identify for the first time a crucial role of primary cilia in the induction of mDA progenitors, define a narrow time window in which Shh-mediated signaling is dependent upon normal primary cilia function for this purpose, and suggest that later Wnt signaling-dependent events act independently of primary cilia.

  9. Electrophoretic control of actomyosin motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Kristi L.; Solana, Gerardin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of DC electric field strength on in vitro actomyosin motility was examined. Rabbit skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin (HMM) was adsorbed to nitrocellulose-coated glass, and the myosin driven movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments was recorded in the presence of 0 to 9000 V m-1 applied DC voltage. The applied electric field resulted in increased filament velocity and oriented actin movement, with leading heads of filaments directed towards the positive electrode. Velocity (v) was found to increase moderately with electric field strength at applied fields up to ~ 4500 V m-1 (Δv/ΔE = 0.037 μm2 V-1sec-1), and then increased at a more rapid rate (Δv/ΔE = 0.100 μm2 V-1sec-1) at higher field strengths up to 9000 V m-1. The electrophoretic effect caused up to 70% of actin motion to be oriented within 30 degrees of the positive electrode, with the largest effect observed using an applied field of 6000 V m-1. Higher electric field strengths caused filament breakage.

  10. Regulation of Eukaryotic Flagellar Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David R.

    2005-03-01

    The central apparatus is essential for normal eukaryotic flagellar bend propagation as evidenced by the paralysis associated with mutations that prevent central pair (CP) assembly. Interactions between doublet-associated radial spokes and CP projections are thought to modulate spoke-regulated protein kinases and phosphatases on outer doublets, and these enzymes in turn modulate dynein activity. To better understand CP control mechanisms, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CP complex and analyzed CP orientation during formation and propagation of flagellar bending waves. We show that a single CP microtubule, C1, is near the outermost doublet in curved regions of the flagellum, and this orientation is maintained by twists between successive principal and reverse bends. The Chlamydomonas CP is inherently twisted; twists are not induced by bend formation, and do not depend on forces or signals transmitted through spoke-central pair interactions. We hypothesize that CP orientation passively responds to bend formation, and that bend propagation drives rotation of the CP and maintains a constant CP orientation in bends, which in turn permits signal transduction between specific CP projections and specific doublet-associated dyneins through radial spokes. The central pair kinesin, Klp1, although essential for normal motility, is therefore not the motor that drives CP rotation. The CP also acts as a scaffold for enzymes that maintain normal intraflagellar ATP concentration.

  11. Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2015-03-01

    Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. The velocity field increases due to the increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the center of the channel. Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid.

  12. Metachronal beating of cilia under influence of Hartmann layer and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sher Akbar, Noreen; Khan, Z. H.; Nadeem, S.

    2014-08-01

    The propulsion system of cilia motion is investigated considering a viscous fluid model. The problem of the two-dimensional fluid motion in a symmetric channel with ciliated walls is considered. The features of ciliary structures are resolved by the supremacy of viscosity effects over inertial control by the long-wavelength and low-Reynolds-number approximation. Exact solutions for the longitudinal pressure gradient, temperature and velocities are obtained. The pressure gradient and volume flow rate for different values of the flow parameters are also predicted. The flow possessions for the viscous fluid are solved as a function of the cilia and metachronal wave velocity.

  13. Mammalian touch catches up

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Carolyn M.; Bautista, Diana M.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    An assortment of touch receptors innervate the skin and encode different tactile features of the environment. Compared with invertebrate touch and other sensory systems, our understanding of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of mammalian touch lags behind. Two recent breakthroughs have accelerated progress. First, an arsenal of cell-type-specific molecular markers allowed the functional and anatomical properties of sensory neurons to be matched, thereby unraveling a cellular code for touch. Such markers have also revealed key roles of non-neuronal cell types, such as Merkel cells and keratinocytes, in touch reception. Second, the discovery of Piezo genes as a new family of mechanically activated channels has fueled the discovery of molecular mechanisms that mediate and mechanotransduction in mammalian touch receptors. PMID:26100741

  14. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  15. Motility in the epsilon-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan

    2015-12-01

    The epsilon-proteobacteria are a widespread group of flagellated bacteria frequently associated with either animal digestive tracts or hydrothermal vents, with well-studied examples in the human pathogens of Helicobacter and Campylobacter genera. Flagellated motility is important to both pathogens and hydrothermal vent members, and a number of curious differences between the epsilon-proteobacterial and enteric bacterial motility paradigms make them worthy of further study. The epsilon-proteobacteria have evolved to swim at high speed and through viscous media that immobilize enterics, a phenotype that may be accounted for by the molecular architecture of the unusually large epsilon-proteobacterial flagellar motor. This review summarizes what is known about epsilon-proteobacterial motility and focuses on a number of recent discoveries that rationalize the differences with enteric flagellar motility. PMID:26590774

  16. How substrate rigidity regulates the cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates has been recognized as a major regulator of cell motility. We present a simple physical model to study the crawling locomotion of a contractile cell on a soft elastic substrate. The mechanism of rigidity sensing is accounted for using Schwarz's two spring model (Schwarz et al. (2006) BioSystems 83, 225-232). The predicted dependency between the speed of motility and substrate stiffness is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The model demonstrates that the rigidity dependent motility of cells is rooted in the regulation of actomyosin contractile forces by substrate deformation at each anchorage point. On stiffer substrates, the traction forces required for cell translocation acquire larger magnitude but show weaker asymmetry which leads to slower cell motility. On very soft substrates, the model predicts a biphasic relationship between the substrate rigidity and the speed of locomotion, over a narrow stiffness range, which has been observed experimentally for some cell types.

  17. Implications of altered gastrointestinal motility in obesity.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, T K; Geoghegan, J G; Baird, A W; Winter, D C

    2007-10-01

    The onset of obesity occurs as a result of an imbalance between nutrient consumption/absorption and energy expenditure. Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a critical role in the rate of consumption of foods, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Various segments of the GI tract coordinate in a complex yet precise way, to control the process of food consumption, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. GI motility not only regulates the rates at which nutrients are processed and absorbed in the gut, but also, via mechanical and neurohormonal methods, participates in the control of appetite and satiety. Altered GI motility has frequently been observed in obese patients, the significance of which is incompletely understood. However, these alterations can be considered as potential contributing factors in the development and maintenance of obesity and changed eating behavior. Therapies aimed at regulating or counteracting the observed changes in GI motility are being actively explored and applied clinically in the management of obese patients. PMID:18098402

  18. Flagellum Density Regulates Proteus mirabilis Swarmer Cell Motility in Viscous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Copeland, Matthew F.; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming—increases in cell length and flagellum density—and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD4C2, the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters. PMID:23144253

  19. Evolutionarily Divergent, Unstable Filamentous Actin Is Essential for Gliding Motility in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Skillman, Kristen M.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Khan, Asis; Tang, Keliang; Sept, David; Sibley, L. David

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites rely on a novel form of actin-based motility called gliding, which depends on parasite actin polymerization, to migrate through their hosts and invade cells. However, parasite actins are divergent both in sequence and function and only form short, unstable filaments in contrast to the stability of conventional actin filaments. The molecular basis for parasite actin filament instability and its relationship to gliding motility remain unresolved. We demonstrate that recombinant Toxoplasma (TgACTI) and Plasmodium (PfACTI and PfACTII) actins polymerized into very short filaments in vitro but were induced to form long, stable filaments by addition of equimolar levels of phalloidin. Parasite actins contain a conserved phalloidin-binding site as determined by molecular modeling and computational docking, yet vary in several residues that are predicted to impact filament stability. In particular, two residues were identified that form intermolecular contacts between different protomers in conventional actin filaments and these residues showed non-conservative differences in apicomplexan parasites. Substitution of divergent residues found in TgACTI with those from mammalian actin resulted in formation of longer, more stable filaments in vitro. Expression of these stabilized actins in T. gondii increased sensitivity to the actin-stabilizing compound jasplakinolide and disrupted normal gliding motility in the absence of treatment. These results identify the molecular basis for short, dynamic filaments in apicomplexan parasites and demonstrate that inherent instability of parasite actin filaments is a critical adaptation for gliding motility. PMID:21998582

  20. ATPases, ion exchangers and human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Arias, Rubén D; Vívenes, Carmen Y; Camejo, María I; Piñero, Sandy; Proverbio, Teresa; Martínez, Elizabeth; Marín, Reinaldo; Proverbio, Fulgencio

    2015-05-01

    Human sperm has several mechanisms to control its ionic milieu, such as the Na,K-ATPase (NKA), the Ca-ATPase of the plasma membrane (PMCA), the Na(+)/Ca(2) (+)-exchanger (NCX) and the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE). On the other hand, the dynein-ATPase is the intracellular motor for sperm motility. In this work, we evaluated NKA, PMCA, NHE, NCX and dynein-ATPase activities in human sperm and investigated their correlation with sperm motility. Sperm motility was measured by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis. It was found that the NKA activity is inhibited by ouabain with two Ki (7.9 × 10(-9) and 9.8 × 10(-5) M), which is consistent with the presence of two isoforms of α subunit of the NKA in the sperm plasma membranes (α1 and α4), being α4 more sensitive to ouabain. The decrease in NKA activity is associated with a reduction in sperm motility. In addition, sperm motility was evaluated in the presence of known inhibitors of NHE, PMCA and NCX, such as amiloride, eosin, and KB-R7943, respectively, as well as in the presence of nigericin after incubation with ouabain. Amiloride, eosin and KB-R7943 significantly reduced sperm motility. Nigericin reversed the effect of ouabain and amiloride on sperm motility. Dynein-ATPase activity was inhibited by acidic pH and micromolar concentrations of Ca(2) (+). We explain our results in terms of inhibition of the dynein-ATPase in the presence of higher cytosolic H(+) and Ca(2) (+), and therefore inhibition of sperm motility. PMID:25820902

  1. Novel mechanisms power bacterial gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R

    2016-07-01

    For many bacteria, motility is essential for survival, growth, virulence, biofilm formation and intra/interspecies interactions. Since natural environments differ, bacteria have evolved remarkable motility systems to adapt, including swimming in aqueous media, and swarming, twitching and gliding on solid and semi-solid surfaces. Although tremendous advances have been achieved in understanding swimming and swarming motilities powered by flagella, and twitching motility powered by Type IV pili, little is known about gliding motility. Bacterial gliders are a heterogeneous group containing diverse bacteria that utilize surface motilities that do not depend on traditional flagella or pili, but are powered by mechanisms that are less well understood. Recently, advances in our understanding of the molecular machineries for several gliding bacteria revealed the roles of modified ion channels, secretion systems and unique machinery for surface movements. These novel mechanisms provide rich source materials for studying the function and evolution of complex microbial nanomachines. In this review, we summarize recent findings made on the gliding mechanisms of the myxobacteria, flavobacteria and mycoplasmas. PMID:27028358

  2. Flagellar motility in eukaryotic human parasites.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Timothy; Engstler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A huge variety of protists rely on one or more motile flagella to either move themselves or move fluids and substances around them. Many of these flagellates have evolved a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle. Several of the parasites have adapted to human hosts, and include agents of prevalent and serious diseases. These unicellular parasites have become specialised in colonising a wide range of biological niches within humans. They usually have diverse transmission cycles, and frequently manifest a variety of distinct morphological stages. The motility of the single or multiple flagella plays important but understudied roles in parasite transmission, host invasion, dispersal, survival, proliferation and pathology. In this review we provide an overview of the important human pathogens that possess a motile flagellum for at least part of their life cycle. We highlight recently published studies that aim to elucidate motility mechanisms, and their relevance for human disease. We then bring the physics of swimming at the microscale into context, emphasising the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for a full understanding of flagellate motility - especially in light of the parasites' microenvironments and population dynamics. Finally, we summarise some important technological aspects, describing challenges for the field and possibilities for motility analyses in the future.

  3. Flagellar motility in eukaryotic human parasites.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Timothy; Engstler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A huge variety of protists rely on one or more motile flagella to either move themselves or move fluids and substances around them. Many of these flagellates have evolved a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle. Several of the parasites have adapted to human hosts, and include agents of prevalent and serious diseases. These unicellular parasites have become specialised in colonising a wide range of biological niches within humans. They usually have diverse transmission cycles, and frequently manifest a variety of distinct morphological stages. The motility of the single or multiple flagella plays important but understudied roles in parasite transmission, host invasion, dispersal, survival, proliferation and pathology. In this review we provide an overview of the important human pathogens that possess a motile flagellum for at least part of their life cycle. We highlight recently published studies that aim to elucidate motility mechanisms, and their relevance for human disease. We then bring the physics of swimming at the microscale into context, emphasising the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for a full understanding of flagellate motility - especially in light of the parasites' microenvironments and population dynamics. Finally, we summarise some important technological aspects, describing challenges for the field and possibilities for motility analyses in the future. PMID:26523344

  4. The Effect of Alcohol on Gastrointestinal Motility.

    PubMed

    Grad, Simona; Abenavoli, Ludovico; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2016-01-01

    The Gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most affected systems by alcohol consumption. Alcohol can affect the esophagus in several ways: induces mucosal inflammation, increases the risk for Barrett esophagus and esophageal cancer, and also impairs the esophageal motility. Numerous studies have reported an increased prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) or erosive esophagitis in alcoholics. Some alcoholics exhibit an abnormality of esophageal motility known as a "nutcracker esophagus". Alcohol effect on gastric motility depends on the alcohol concentration. In general, beverages with high alcohol concentrations (i.e., above 15 percent) appear to inhibit gastric motility and low alcohol doses (wine and beer) accelerate gastric emptying. Also, acute administration of ethanol inhibits the gastric emptying, while chronic administration of a large dose of alcohol accelerates gastric motility. The effect of alcohol on small bowel motility differs according to the type of consumption (acute or chronic). Acute administration of alcohol has been found to inhibit small bowel transit and chronic administration of a large dose of alcohol accelerates small bowel transit. This article reviews some of the below findings. PMID:27527893

  5. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Hierarchy of Interactions between Polycystin-Encoding Genes and Genes Controlling Cilia Function during Left-Right Determination.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Daniel T; Keynton, Jennifer L; Buenavista, Maria T; Jin, Xingjian; Patel, Saloni H; Kyosuke, Shinohara; Vibert, Jennifer; Williams, Debbie J; Hamada, Hiroshi; Hussain, Rohanah; Nauli, Surya M; Norris, Dominic P

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian development, left-right (L-R) asymmetry is established by a cilia-driven leftward fluid flow within a midline embryonic cavity called the node. This 'nodal flow' is detected by peripherally-located crown cells that each assemble a primary cilium which contain the putative Ca2+ channel PKD2. The interaction of flow and crown cell cilia promotes left side-specific expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Whilst the PKD2-interacting protein PKD1L1 has also been implicated in L-R patterning, the underlying mechanism by which flow is detected and the genetic relationship between Polycystin function and asymmetric gene expression remains unknown. Here, we characterize a Pkd1l1 mutant line in which Nodal is activated bilaterally, suggesting that PKD1L1 is not required for LPM Nodal pathway activation per se, but rather to restrict Nodal to the left side downstream of nodal flow. Epistasis analysis shows that Pkd1l1 acts as an upstream genetic repressor of Pkd2. This study therefore provides a genetic pathway for the early stages of L-R determination. Moreover, using a system in which cultured cells are supplied artificial flow, we demonstrate that PKD1L1 is sufficient to mediate a Ca2+ signaling response after flow stimulation. Finally, we show that an extracellular PKD domain within PKD1L1 is crucial for PKD1L1 function; as such, destabilizing the domain causes L-R defects in the mouse. Our demonstration that PKD1L1 protein can mediate a response to flow coheres with a mechanosensation model of flow sensation in which the force of fluid flow drives asymmetric gene expression in the embryo. PMID:27272319

  6. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Hierarchy of Interactions between Polycystin-Encoding Genes and Genes Controlling Cilia Function during Left-Right Determination

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Daniel T.; Keynton, Jennifer L.; Buenavista, Maria T.; Jin, Xingjian; Patel, Saloni H.; Kyosuke, Shinohara; Williams, Debbie J.; Hamada, Hiroshi; Hussain, Rohanah; Nauli, Surya M.; Norris, Dominic P.

    2016-01-01

    During mammalian development, left-right (L-R) asymmetry is established by a cilia-driven leftward fluid flow within a midline embryonic cavity called the node. This ‘nodal flow’ is detected by peripherally-located crown cells that each assemble a primary cilium which contain the putative Ca2+ channel PKD2. The interaction of flow and crown cell cilia promotes left side-specific expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Whilst the PKD2-interacting protein PKD1L1 has also been implicated in L-R patterning, the underlying mechanism by which flow is detected and the genetic relationship between Polycystin function and asymmetric gene expression remains unknown. Here, we characterize a Pkd1l1 mutant line in which Nodal is activated bilaterally, suggesting that PKD1L1 is not required for LPM Nodal pathway activation per se, but rather to restrict Nodal to the left side downstream of nodal flow. Epistasis analysis shows that Pkd1l1 acts as an upstream genetic repressor of Pkd2. This study therefore provides a genetic pathway for the early stages of L-R determination. Moreover, using a system in which cultured cells are supplied artificial flow, we demonstrate that PKD1L1 is sufficient to mediate a Ca2+ signaling response after flow stimulation. Finally, we show that an extracellular PKD domain within PKD1L1 is crucial for PKD1L1 function; as such, destabilizing the domain causes L-R defects in the mouse. Our demonstration that PKD1L1 protein can mediate a response to flow coheres with a mechanosensation model of flow sensation in which the force of fluid flow drives asymmetric gene expression in the embryo. PMID:27272319

  7. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells. PMID:21734285

  8. Hyperglycemia in the absence of cilia accelerates cystogenesis and induces renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Saigusa, Takamitsu; Funk, Jason; Bunni, Marlene A.; Siegal, Gene P.; Siroky, Brian J.; Bissler, John J.; Bell, P. Darwin

    2015-01-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the rate of cyst formation and disease progression is highly variable. The lack of predictability in disease progression may be due to additional environmental factors or pathophysiological processes called “third hits.” Diabetes is a growing epidemic, and recent studies suggest that PKD patients may be at an increased risk for this disease. We sought to determine if hyperglycemia enhances the initiation and rate of cystogenesis. Tamoxifen was administered to adult Ift88 conditional floxed allele mice to induce cilia loss in the presence of Cre. Subsequent administration of streptozotocin resulted in equivalent hyperglycemia in cilia+ and cilia− mice. Hyperglycemia with loss of cilia increased the rate of cyst formation and cell proliferation. Structural and functional alterations in the kidney, including focal glomerular foot process effacement, interstitial inflammation, formation of primitive renal tubules, polyuria, and increased proteinuria, were also observed in hyperglycemic cilia− mice. Gene array analysis indicated enhanced Wnt and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signaling in the kidney of hyperglycemic cilia− mice. These data show that hyperglycemia, in the absence of cilia, results in renal structural and functional damage and accelerates cystogenesis, suggesting that diabetes is a risk factor in the progression of PKD. PMID:25904703

  9. Exact solution of cilia induced flow of a Jeffrey fluid in an inclined tube.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, K; Shaheen, S; Mann, A B

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cilia induced flow of MHD Jeffrey fluid through an inclined tube. This study is carried out under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Exact solutions for the velocity profile, pressure rise, pressure gradient, volume flow rate and stream function are obtained. Effects of pertinent physical parameters on the computational results are presented graphically. PMID:27610298

  10. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells.

  11. A Cilia Independent Role of Ift88/Polaris during Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Powelske, Christian; Mergen, Miriam; Herbst, Henriette; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ift88 is a central component of the intraflagellar transport (Ift) complex B, essential for the building of cilia and flagella from single cell organisms to mammals. Loss of Ift88 results in the absence of cilia and causes left-right asymmetry defects, disordered Hedgehog signaling, and polycystic kidney disease, all of which are explained by aberrant ciliary function. In addition, a number of extraciliary functions of Ift88 have been described that affect the cell-cycle, mitosis, and targeting of the T-cell receptor to the immunological synapse. Similarly, another essential ciliary molecule, the kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a, which transports Ift-B in the cilium, affects microtubule (MT) dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells independently of cilia. We now show that loss of Ift88 impairs cell migration irrespective of cilia. Ift88 is required for the polarization of migrating MDCK cells, and Ift88 depleted cells have fewer MTs at the leading edge. Neither MT dynamics nor MT nucleation are dependent on Ift88. Our findings dissociate the function of Ift88 from Kif3a outside the cilium and suggest a novel extraciliary function for Ift88. Future studies need to address what unifying mechanism underlies the different extraciliary functions of Ift88. PMID:26465598

  12. Heat transfer analysis of Rabinowitsch fluid flow due to metachronal wave of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Butt, Adil Wahid

    The present investigation concerns with the mechanical properties of a Rabinowitsch fluid model and the effects of thermal conductivity over it. Flow is considered to be occurring due to metachronal wave produced as a result of constant beating of cilia at the walls of a horizontal circular tube. The expressions for flow characteristics have been derived results are analyzed graphically and discussed briefly.

  13. Distinctive features of cilia in metazoans and their significance for systematics.

    PubMed

    Tyler, S

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of epidermal cilia in the Turbellaria and Nemertea has revealed features in these organelles that are specific to certain taxonomic groups. Turbellarians of the order Acoela, in particular, have a characteristic pattern of axonemal filament termination in the distal tips of their cilia and a characteristic ciliary rootlet system that is not seen in other turbellarian orders nor in other metazoans. Each epidermal cilium in acoels has a typical 9 + 2 axonemal pattern through the main part of its length, but near its distal tip there is an abrupt shelf-life narrowing at which filaments 4-7 terminate; filaments 1, 2, 8 and 9 continue into the thinner distal-most part of the shaft along with singlet microtubules from the axonemal center. The rootlet system in acoel cilia involves an interconnecting pattern with lateral connectives. The unique structure of these cilia has systematic and phylogenetic significance for the Acoela, and it is argued that ultrastructural characters in general, including characters of organelles, can be validly applied to the phylogeny and systematics of the Metazoa.

  14. Dynamics of Individual cilia to external loading- A simple one dimensional picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Vinay; Hill, David; Superfine, R.

    2008-10-01

    From being called the cellular janitors to swinging debauchers, cilia have captured the fascinations of researchers for over 200 years. In cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where the cilia loses it's function, the protective mucus layer in the lung thickens and mucociliary clearance breaks down, leading to inflammation along the airways and an increased rate of infection. The mechanistic understanding of mucus clearance depends on a quantitative assessment of the axoneme dynamics and the maximum force the cilia are capable of generating and imparting to the mucus layer. Similar to the situation in molecular motors, detailed quantitative measurements of dynamics under applied load conditions are expected to be essential in developing predictive models. Based on our measurements of the dynamics of individual ciliary motion in the human bronchial epithelial cell under the application of an applied load, we present a simple one dimensional model for the axoneme dynamics and quantify the axoneme stiffness, the internal force generated by the axoneme, the stall force and show how the dynamics sheds insight on the time dependence of the internal force generation. The internal force generated by the axoneme is related to the ability of cilia to propel fluids and to their potential role in force sensing.

  15. A Cilia Independent Role of Ift88/Polaris during Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Christoph; Powelske, Christian; Mergen, Miriam; Herbst, Henriette; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ift88 is a central component of the intraflagellar transport (Ift) complex B, essential for the building of cilia and flagella from single cell organisms to mammals. Loss of Ift88 results in the absence of cilia and causes left-right asymmetry defects, disordered Hedgehog signaling, and polycystic kidney disease, all of which are explained by aberrant ciliary function. In addition, a number of extraciliary functions of Ift88 have been described that affect the cell-cycle, mitosis, and targeting of the T-cell receptor to the immunological synapse. Similarly, another essential ciliary molecule, the kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a, which transports Ift-B in the cilium, affects microtubule (MT) dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells independently of cilia. We now show that loss of Ift88 impairs cell migration irrespective of cilia. Ift88 is required for the polarization of migrating MDCK cells, and Ift88 depleted cells have fewer MTs at the leading edge. Neither MT dynamics nor MT nucleation are dependent on Ift88. Our findings dissociate the function of Ift88 from Kif3a outside the cilium and suggest a novel extraciliary function for Ift88. Future studies need to address what unifying mechanism underlies the different extraciliary functions of Ift88. PMID:26465598

  16. Prickle3 synergizes with Wtip to regulate basal body organization and cilia growth

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Ossipova, Olga; Ioannou, Andriani; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2016-01-01

    PCP proteins maintain planar polarity in many epithelial tissues and have been implicated in cilia development in vertebrate embryos. In this study we examine Prickle3 (Pk3), a vertebrate homologue of Drosophila Prickle, in Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate (GRP). GRP is a tissue equivalent to the mouse node, in which cilia-generated flow promotes left-right patterning. We show that Pk3 is enriched at the basal body of GRP cells but is recruited by Vangl2 to anterior cell borders. Interference with Pk3 function disrupted the anterior polarization of endogenous Vangl2 and the posterior localization of cilia in GRP cells, demonstrating its role in PCP. Strikingly, in cells with reduced Pk3 activity, cilia growth was inhibited and γ-tubulin and Nedd1 no longer associated with the basal body, suggesting that Pk3 has a novel function in basal body organization. Mechanistically, this function of Pk3 may involve Wilms tumor protein 1-interacting protein (Wtip), which physically associates with and cooperates with Pk3 to regulate ciliogenesis. We propose that, in addition to cell polarity, PCP components control basal body organization and function. PMID:27062996

  17. Qilin Is Essential for Cilia Assembly and Normal Kidney Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jade; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the cilium, a once thought vestigial organelle, have recently been implicated in many human diseases, including a number of cystic kidney diseases such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD), Bardet Bieldl Syndrome, and Meckel-Gruber Syndrome. In a forward genetic screen, qilin was identified as a novel gene important in the pathogenesis of kidney cysts in zebrafish. In this paper we characterized qilinhi3959A mutant's phenotypes in detail, investigated cilia formation in this mutant and performed structural and functional analysis of the Qilin protein. Results reveal Qilin's essential role in cilia assembly and maintenance in multiple organs, including the kidney, the lateral line organ, and the outer segment of the photoreceptor cell. In addition, rescue experiments suggest that defective pronephric cilia correlate with the formation of kidney cysts in qilinhi3959A mutants. Further, genetic analysis suggests that qilin interacts with multiple intraflagellar transport (IFT) complex B genes, which is supported by the striking phenotypic similarities between qilinhi3959A and IFT complex B mutants. Finally, through deletion analysis we provide evidence that the well-conserved N-terminus and the coiled-coil domain of Qilin are both essential and sufficient for its function. Taken all the observations together, we propose that Qilin acts in a similar role as IFT complex B proteins in cilia assembly, maintenance and kidney development in zebrafish. PMID:22102889

  18. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  19. Mammalian glycosylation in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Jamey D.; Grewal, Prabhjit K.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosylation produces a diverse and abundant repertoire of glycans, which are collectively known as the glycome. Glycans are one of the four fundamental macromolecular components of all cells, and are highly regulated in the immune system. Their diversity reflects their multiple biological functions that encompass ligands for proteinaceous of receptors known as lectins. Since the discovery that selectins and their glycan ligands are important for the regulation of leukocyte trafficking, it has been shown that additional features of the vertebrate immune system are also controlled by endogenous cellular glycosylation. This Review focuses on the emerging immunological roles of the mammalian glycome. PMID:18846099

  20. Cellular Motility--Experiments on Contractile and Motile Mechanisms in the Slime Mould, Physarum Polycephalum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, R. P.; Stewart, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Actin and myosin have now been demonstrated to be important constituents of many eukaryotic cells. Their role is primarily that of a contractile system underlying all aspects of cellular motility. Described here is a simple experimental system to demonstrate quantitatively aspects of motility and its regulation in a slime mold. (Author/MA)

  1. Galectin-7 modulates the length of the primary cilia and wound repair in polarized kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rondanino, Christine; Poland, Paul A; Kinlough, Carol L; Li, Hui; Rbaibi, Youssef; Myerburg, Michael M; Al-bataineh, Mohammad M; Kashlan, Ossama B; Pastor-Soler, Nuria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Weisz, Ora A; Apodaca, Gerard; Hughey, Rebecca P

    2011-09-01

    Galectins (Gal) are β-galactoside-binding proteins that function in epithelial development and homeostasis. An overlapping role for Gal-3 and Gal-7 in wound repair was reported in stratified epithelia. Although Gal-7 was thought absent in simple epithelia, it was reported in a proteomic analysis of cilia isolated from cultured human airway, and we recently identified Gal-7 transcripts in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells (Poland PA, Rondanino C, Kinlough CL, Heimburg-Molinaro J, Arthur CM, Stowell SR, Smith DF, Hughey RP. J Biol Chem 286: 6780-6790, 2011). We now report that Gal-7 is localized exclusively on the primary cilium of MDCK, LLC-PK(1) (pig kidney), and mpkCCD(c14) (mouse kidney) cells as well as on cilia in the rat renal proximal tubule. Gal-7 is also present on most cilia of multiciliated cells in human airway epithelia primary cultures. Interestingly, exogenous glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Gal-7 bound the MDCK apical plasma membrane as well as the cilium, while the lectin Ulex europeaus agglutinin, with glycan preferences similar to Gal-7, bound the basolateral plasma membrane as well as the cilium. In pull-down assays, β1-integrin isolated from either the basolateral or apical/cilia membranes of MDCK cells was similarly bound by GST-Gal-7. Selective localization of Gal-7 to cilia despite the presence of binding sites on all cell surfaces suggests that intracellular Gal-7 is specifically delivered to cilia rather than simply binding to surface glycoconjugates after generalized secretion. Moreover, depletion of Gal-7 using tetracycline-induced short-hairpin RNA in mpkCCD(c14) cells significantly reduced cilia length and slowed wound healing in a scratch assay. We conclude that Gal-7 is selectively targeted to cilia and plays a key role in surface stabilization of glycoconjugates responsible for integrating cilia function with epithelial repair. PMID:21677144

  2. Current topics of functional links between primary cilia and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Ichiro; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia, microtubule-based sensory structures, orchestrate various critical signals during development and tissue homeostasis. In view of the rising interest into the reciprocal link between ciliogenesis and cell cycle, we discuss here several recent advances to understand the molecular link between the individual step of ciliogenesis and cell cycle control. At the onset of ciliogenesis (the transition from centrosome to basal body), distal appendage proteins have been established as components indispensable for the docking of vesicles at the mother centriole. In the initial step of axonemal extension, CP110, Ofd1, and trichoplein, key negative regulators of ciliogenesis, are found to be removed by a kinase-dependent mechanism, autophagy, and ubiquitin-proteasome system, respectively. Of note, their disposal functions as a restriction point to decide that the axonemal nucleation and extension begin. In the elongation step, Nde1, a negative regulator of ciliary length, is revealed to be ubiquitylated and degraded by CDK5-SCF(Fbw7) in a cell cycle-dependent manner. With regard to ciliary length control, it has been uncovered in flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas that cilia itself transmit a ciliary length signal to cytoplasm. At the ciliary resorption step upon cell cycle re-entry, cilia are found to be disassembled not only by Aurora A-HDAC6 pathway but also by Nek2-Kif24 and Plk1-Kif2A pathways through their microtubule-depolymerizing activity. On the other hand, it is becoming evident that the presence of primary cilia itself functions as a structural checkpoint for cell cycle re-entry. These data suggest that ciliogenesis and cell cycle intimately link each other, and further elucidation of these mechanisms will contribute to understanding the pathology of cilia-related disease including cancer and discovering targets of therapeutic interventions. PMID:26719793

  3. Mechanisms of cilia-driven transport in the airways in the absence of mucus.

    PubMed

    Bermbach, Saskia; Weinhold, Karina; Roeder, Thomas; Petersen, Frank; Kugler, Christian; Goldmann, Torsten; Rupp, Jan; König, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Airway mucus is thought to be required for the clearance of inhaled particles by mucociliary transport, but this view has recently been challenged. To test if mucus is necessary for cilia-driven particle transport, we removed mucus from murine and human ex vivo airway preparations by thorough rinsing with buffer with or without additional dithiothreitol washing. The transport of particles with diameters of 4.5 μm, 200 nm, and 40 nm and of bacteria was analyzed by video microscopy. Complete removal of mucus was verified by wheat germ agglutinin staining and by scanning electron microscopy. In the absence of mucus, we observed efficient transport of particles and bacteria by direct cilia-mediated propulsion or via fluid flow generated by ciliary beating. Virus-sized particles had the tendency to attach to cilia. Because direct contact of particles with ciliated cells occurs in the absence of mucus, we examined if this direct interaction changes epithelial function. Neither bacteria- nor LPS-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in ciliated cells occurred, indicating that mere contact between ciliated cells and bacteria during transport does not activate the epithelium. Attachment of virus-sized particles to cilia could induce mucus release and/or increase the ciliary beat frequency. Our results indicate that cilia-driven transport of particles with various sizes is possible in murine and human airways without the presence of mucus. If mucus-free transport fails, the epithelium can react by releasing mucus or increasing the ciliary beat frequency to maintain particle transport.

  4. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  5. Competency based medical education in gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, R; Keswani, R N; Pandolfino, J E

    2016-10-01

    Traditional apprenticeship-based medical education methods focusing on subjective evaluations and case-volume requirements do not reliably produce clinicians that provide high-quality care in unsupervised practice. Consequently, training approaches are shifting towards competency based medical education, which incorporates robust assessment methods and credible standards of physician proficiency. However, current gastroenterology and hepatology training in the US continues to utilize procedural volume and global impressions without standardized criteria as markers of competence. In particular, efforts to optimize competency based training in gastrointestinal (GI) motility are not underway, even though GI motility disorders account for nearly half of outpatient gastroenterology visits. These deficiencies compromise the quality of patient care. Thus, there is a great need and opportunity to shift our focus in GI motility training towards a competency based approach. First, we need to clarify the variable rates of learning for individual diagnostic tests. We must develop integrated systems that standardize training and monitor physician competency for GI motility diagnostics. Finally, as a profession and society, we must create certification processes to credential competent physicians. These advances are critical to optimizing the quality of GI motility diagnostics in practice.

  6. Mitochondria and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Santos, João; Amaral, Sandra

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles with crucial roles in ATP synthesis, metabolic integration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and management, the regulation of apoptosis (namely via the intrinsic pathway), among many others. Additionally, mitochondria in different organs or cell types may have distinct properties that can decisively influence functional analysis. In terms of the importance of mitochondria in mammalian reproduction, and although there are species-specific differences, these aspects involve both energetic considerations for gametogenesis and fertilization, control of apoptosis to ensure the proper production of viable gametes, and ROS signaling, as well as other emerging aspects. Crucially, mitochondria are the starting point for steroid hormone biosynthesis, given that the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone (a common precursor for all steroid hormones) takes place via the activity of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) on the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, mitochondrial activity in reproduction has to be considered in accordance with the very distinct strategies for gamete production in the male and female. These include distinct gonad morpho-physiologies, different types of steroids that are more prevalent (testosterone, estrogens, progesterone), and, importantly, the very particular timings of gametogenesis. While spermatogenesis is complete and continuous since puberty, producing a seemingly inexhaustible pool of gametes in a fixed environment; oogenesis involves the episodic production of very few gametes in an environment that changes cyclically. These aspects have always to be taken into account when considering the roles of any common element in mammalian reproduction.

  7. Visual versus cinemicrographic evaluation of human sperm motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Freund, M; Oliveira, N

    1987-01-01

    Ratings of human sperm motility by visual estimation through the microscope remain important measures of semen quality and of male fertility. More objective methods, including cinemicrography, time lapse photography, and videomicrography, are advocated. Subjective (visual) and objective (cinemicrographic) ratings of motility were compared. Sixty workers in 30 laboratories rated motilities of 40 specimens on motion picture film, and motilities were also measured by cinephotomicrographic methods. The morphology of each of the motile and immotile sperm was rated. In 34 of 40 specimens visual ratings were higher (range = +2 to +31%) than actual percentage motility. Specimens with both high sperm concentration and forward progression received the highest overestimations by visual rating. This was especially apparent in specimens with the highest motility. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between sperm motility and morphology rated on a one-by-one basis, but the relationship was too small to influence the visual rating of human sperm motility.

  8. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation. PMID:25269514

  9. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation.

  10. Trimebutine as a modulator of gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Byung Joo

    2011-06-01

    Trimebutine has been used for treatment of both hypermotility and hypomotility disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, such as irritable bowel syndrome. In this issue, Tan et al. (2011) examined the concentration-dependent dual effects of trimebutine on colonic motility in guinea pig. The authors suggested that trimebutine attenuated colonic motility mainly through the inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels at higher concentrations, whereas, at lower concentrations, it depolarized membrane potentials by reducing BK(ca) currents, resulting in the enhancement of the muscle contractions. Trimebutine might be a plausible modulator of GI motility, which gives an insight in developing new prokinetic agents. Further studies to elucidate the effects of trimebutine on the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker in GI muscles would promote the therapeutic benefits as a GI modulator. PMID:21725804

  11. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  12. Motor domain-based motility system and motile properties of alpha heavy chain in Tetrahymena outer arm dynein.

    PubMed

    Edamatsu, Masaki

    2014-10-24

    Axonemal dynein plays an essential role in ciliary motility, and impaired ciliary motility causes human diseases such as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The motor domain of axonemal dynein powers ciliary motility and its function is regulated by several accessary proteins bound to the tail region. Therefore, to understand the essential properties of dynein motility, examining the motile properties of the motor domain without the tail is necessary. In this study, the functional motor domain of the alpha heavy chain in Tetrahymena outer arm dynein was purified, and its motile properties were examined using an in vitro motility system. The purified protein caused microtubules to glide at a velocity of 5.0μm/s with their minus-end trailing, and motility was inhibited in an ATP concentration-dependent manner, which is in contrast with kinesin1. This method could be applicable to other axonemal dyneins and will enable further molecular studies on diverse axonemal dyneins and ciliary motility.

  13. Synthetic control of mammalian-cell motility by engineering chemotaxis to an orthogonal bioinert chemical signal.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason S; Rhau, Benjamin; Hermann, Aynur; McNally, Krista A; Zhou, Carmen; Gong, Delquin; Weiner, Orion D; Conklin, Bruce R; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2014-04-22

    Directed migration of diverse cell types plays a critical role in biological processes ranging from development and morphogenesis to immune response, wound healing, and regeneration. However, techniques to direct, manipulate, and study cell migration in vitro and in vivo in a specific and facile manner are currently limited. We conceived of a strategy to achieve direct control over cell migration to arbitrary user-defined locations, independent of native chemotaxis receptors. Here, we show that genetic modification of cells with an engineered G protein-coupled receptor allows us to redirect their migration to a bioinert drug-like small molecule, clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). The engineered receptor and small-molecule ligand form an orthogonal pair: The receptor does not respond to native ligands, and the inert drug does not bind to native cells. CNO-responsive migration can be engineered into a variety of cell types, including neutrophils, T lymphocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. The engineered cells migrate up a gradient of the drug CNO and transmigrate through endothelial monolayers. Finally, we demonstrate that T lymphocytes modified with the engineered receptor can specifically migrate in vivo to CNO-releasing beads implanted in a live mouse. This technology provides a generalizable genetic tool to systematically perturb and control cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In the future, this type of migration control could be a valuable module for engineering therapeutic cellular devices.

  14. Synthetic control of mammalian-cell motility by engineering chemotaxis to an orthogonal bioinert chemical signal

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason S.; Rhau, Benjamin; Hermann, Aynur; McNally, Krista A.; Zhou, Carmen; Gong, Delquin; Weiner, Orion D.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2014-01-01

    Directed migration of diverse cell types plays a critical role in biological processes ranging from development and morphogenesis to immune response, wound healing, and regeneration. However, techniques to direct, manipulate, and study cell migration in vitro and in vivo in a specific and facile manner are currently limited. We conceived of a strategy to achieve direct control over cell migration to arbitrary user-defined locations, independent of native chemotaxis receptors. Here, we show that genetic modification of cells with an engineered G protein-coupled receptor allows us to redirect their migration to a bioinert drug-like small molecule, clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). The engineered receptor and small-molecule ligand form an orthogonal pair: The receptor does not respond to native ligands, and the inert drug does not bind to native cells. CNO-responsive migration can be engineered into a variety of cell types, including neutrophils, T lymphocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. The engineered cells migrate up a gradient of the drug CNO and transmigrate through endothelial monolayers. Finally, we demonstrate that T lymphocytes modified with the engineered receptor can specifically migrate in vivo to CNO-releasing beads implanted in a live mouse. This technology provides a generalizable genetic tool to systematically perturb and control cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In the future, this type of migration control could be a valuable module for engineering therapeutic cellular devices. PMID:24711398

  15. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26799266

  16. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  17. Neonatal seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol or kainic acid disrupt primary cilia growth on developing mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander K; Le, Megan M; Smith, Tyler S; Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Atkinson, Eric W; Ugartemendia, George; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Coleman, Jason E; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal or early-life seizures (ELS) are often associated with life-long neurophysiological, cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the underlying mechanisms contributing to these deficits remain poorly understood. Newborn, post-migratory cortical neurons sprout ciliary buds (procilia) that mature into primary cilia. Disruption of the growth or signaling capabilities of these cilia has been linked to atypical neurite outgrowth from neurons and abnormalities in neuronal circuitry. Here, we tested the hypothesis that generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or kainic acid (KA) during early postnatal development impair neuronal and/or glial ciliogenesis. Mice received PTZ (50 or 100mg/kg), KA (2mg/kg), or saline either once at birth (P0), or once daily from P0 to P4. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the cilia of neurons and glia were examined at P7, P14, and P42. A total of 83 regions were analyzed, representing 13 unique neocortical and hippocampal regions. Neuronal cilia were identified by co-expression of NeuN and type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII) or somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), while glial cilia were identified by co-expression of GFAP, Arl13b, and gamma-tubulin. We found that PTZ exposure at either P0 or from P0 to P4 induced convulsive behavior, followed by acute and lasting effects on neuronal cilia lengths that varied depending on the cortical region, PTZ dose, injection frequency, and time post-PTZ. Both increases and decreases in neuronal cilia length were observed. No changes in the length of glial cilia were observed under any of the test conditions. Lastly, we found that a single KA seizure at P0 led to similar abnormalities in neuronal cilia lengths. Our results suggest that seizure(s) occurring during early stages of cortical development induce persistent and widespread changes in neuronal cilia length. Given the impact neuronal cilia have on neuronal differentiation, ELS-induced changes in ciliogenesis may

  18. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Heather D; Higgins, Darren E

    2011-08-01

    Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C) with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable). Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as a thermo

  19. Motility, viability, and calcium in the sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Sperm cells are complicated in vitro models. Their viability is limited, and physiology is complex. The study of their properties is of great application in the animal production as viable and functional gametes are essential. It has been shown that the decrease of sperm cell viability parallels an increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reactive oxygen species is secondary to normal metabolic processes of the cell-like flagellar movement. There is evidence of strategies that reduce ROS levels by using exogenous or endogenous antioxidants with the intention that seminal plasma protects the sperm cells and increases viability. Perhaps viability can increase by reducing that flagellar movement which is regulated by calcium. The phenomenon has not been fully characterized, but it is established that in certain mammalian models, the entrance of calcium via specific channels such as CATsper or voltage-dependent channels, signals flagellar movement. Previous reports have indicated that a change in the concentration of calcium or if the temperature is altered, the function of mammal sperm cells is reduced or blocked and viability prolonged. Fish sperm can remain immobile for several weeks but when activated the number of mobile and viable sperm is reduced at a faster rate. However, if the cells are not mobilized the semen can be preserved for longer periods. As presented in this paper, this supports the notion that by modulating calcium channels to reduce motility the viability of these cells can increase.

  20. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M.; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈0.8–5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈0.01–0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈0.1–12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5–15 µm in media with 1–7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens. PMID:25359514

  1. A continuous roll-pulling approach for the fabrication of magnetic artificial cilia with microfluidic pumping capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; den Toonder, Jaap; Cardinaels, Ruth; Anderson, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    Magnetic artificial cilia are micro-hairs covering a surface that can be actuated using a time-dependent magnetic field to pump or mix fluids in microfluidic devices. This paper presents a novel fabrication method to realize magnetic artificial cilia using a roll-pulling process, in which a cylinder decorated with micro-pillars rolls over a liquid precursor film that contains magnetic particles at a speed up to 1 m s(-1), while a magnetic field is applied. Due to the interaction between the pillars and the liquid film, micro-hairs are pulled out of the film. In this way, surfaces with slender cone-shaped magnetic artificial cilia were produced. When integrated in a closed-loop channel, the artificial cilia were shown to be capable of generating substantial microfluidic pumping using external magnetic actuation. The spatial arrangement of the cilia can be varied by altering the layout of the micro-pillars on the roll surface. In addition, the final geometry of the individual cilia depends on the rheological properties of the precursor material in combination with the processing parameters of the roll-pulling process. A rheological study and fabrication tests were carried out for a range of precursor material compositions to obtain insight into the relation between precursor rheology and processing conditions on the one hand, and cilia geometry on the other hand. The development of this cleanroom-free, high speed and potentially large area method of production of artificial cilia is another step towards their implementation in real-life applications. PMID:27210071

  2. A continuous roll-pulling approach for the fabrication of magnetic artificial cilia with microfluidic pumping capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; den Toonder, Jaap; Cardinaels, Ruth; Anderson, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    Magnetic artificial cilia are micro-hairs covering a surface that can be actuated using a time-dependent magnetic field to pump or mix fluids in microfluidic devices. This paper presents a novel fabrication method to realize magnetic artificial cilia using a roll-pulling process, in which a cylinder decorated with micro-pillars rolls over a liquid precursor film that contains magnetic particles at a speed up to 1 m s(-1), while a magnetic field is applied. Due to the interaction between the pillars and the liquid film, micro-hairs are pulled out of the film. In this way, surfaces with slender cone-shaped magnetic artificial cilia were produced. When integrated in a closed-loop channel, the artificial cilia were shown to be capable of generating substantial microfluidic pumping using external magnetic actuation. The spatial arrangement of the cilia can be varied by altering the layout of the micro-pillars on the roll surface. In addition, the final geometry of the individual cilia depends on the rheological properties of the precursor material in combination with the processing parameters of the roll-pulling process. A rheological study and fabrication tests were carried out for a range of precursor material compositions to obtain insight into the relation between precursor rheology and processing conditions on the one hand, and cilia geometry on the other hand. The development of this cleanroom-free, high speed and potentially large area method of production of artificial cilia is another step towards their implementation in real-life applications.

  3. Early endosome motility spatially organizes polysome distribution.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Ashwin, Peter; Roger, Yvonne; Steinberg, Gero

    2014-02-01

    Early endosomes (EEs) mediate protein sorting, and their cytoskeleton-dependent motility supports long-distance signaling in neurons. Here, we report an unexpected role of EE motility in distributing the translation machinery in a fungal model system. We visualize ribosomal subunit proteins and show that the large subunits diffused slowly throughout the cytoplasm (Dc,60S = 0.311 µm(2)/s), whereas entire polysomes underwent long-range motility along microtubules. This movement was mediated by "hitchhiking" on kinesin-3 and dynein-driven EEs, where the polysomes appeared to translate EE-associated mRNA into proteins. Modeling indicates that this motor-driven transport is required for even cellular distribution of newly formed ribosomes. Indeed, impaired EE motility in motor mutants, or their inability to bind EEs in mutants lacking the RNA-binding protein Rrm4, reduced ribosome transport and induced ribosome aggregation near the nucleus. As a consequence, cell growth was severely restricted. Collectively, our results indicate that polysomes associate with moving EEs and that "off- and reloading" distributes the protein translation machinery.

  4. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  5. Integrin Molecular Tension within Motile Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Sun, Jie; Xu, Qian; Chowdhury, Farhan; Roein-Peikar, Mehdi; Wang, Yingxiao; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-12-01

    Forces transmitted by integrins regulate many important cellular functions. Previously, we developed tension gauge tether (TGT) as a molecular force sensor and determined the threshold tension across a single integrin-ligand bond, termed integrin tension, required for initial cell adhesion. Here, we used fluorescently labeled TGTs to study the magnitude and spatial distribution of integrin tension on the cell-substratum interface. We observed two distinct levels of integrin tension. A >54 pN molecular tension is transmitted by clustered integrins in motile focal adhesions (FAs) and such force is generated by actomyosin, whereas the previously reported ∼40 pN integrin tension is transmitted by integrins before FA formation and is independent of actomyosin. We then studied FA motility using a TGT-coated surface as a fluorescent canvas, which records the history of integrin force activity. Our data suggest that the region of the strongest integrin force overlaps with the center of a motile FA within 0.2 μm resolution. We also found that FAs move in pairs and that the asymmetry in the motility of an FA pair is dependent on the initial FA locations on the cell-substratum interface.

  6. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  7. Effect of some permeating cryoprotectants on CASA motility results in cryopreserved bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Awad, M M

    2011-02-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analyzers (CASA) have become the standard tool for evaluating sperm motility because they provide objective results for thousands of mammalian spermatozoa. Mammalian spermatozoa experience osmotic stress when the glycerol is added to the cells prior to freezing and removal from the cells after thawing. In order to minimize osmotic damage, cryoprotectants having lower molecular weights and greater membrane permeability than glycerol, were evaluated to determine their effectiveness for cryopreserving bull spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to compare the cryopreservation effects of low molecular weight cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol and methanol) to glycerol, on post-thaw CASA sperm parameters. Bull semen was diluted with tris-egg yolk extender containing 3% glycerol, 3, 2 and 1% ethylene glycol or 3, 2 and 1% methanol. Bull semen was frozen in 0.5 straws. Bull spermatozoa exhibited higher percentages (p<0.01) for total (Mot, 72.4%) and progressively (Prog, 29.5%) motilities when frozen in extender containing 3% glycerol compared to 3, 2 and 1% ethylene glycol or 3, 2 and 1% methanol. In conclusion, no advantages were found in using ethylene glycol or methanol to replace glycerol in bull semen freezing. Glycerol provided the best sperm characteristics for bull spermatozoa after freezing and thawing. The possibility of using ethylene glycol or methanol as permeating cryoprotectants for bull semen deserves further investigation, and these cryoprotectants should also be evaluated in extenders that contain disaccharides or cholesterol.

  8. Determining the Relative Contribution and Hierarchy of hha and qseBC in the Regulation of Flagellar Motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Casey, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent studies, we demonstrated that a deletion of hha caused increased secretion of locus of enterocyte encoded adherence proteins and reduced motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. In addition to the importance of hha in positive regulation of motility, a two-component quorum sensing pathway encoded by the qseBC genes has been shown to activate bacterial motility in response to mammalian stress hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as bacterially produced autoinducer-3. In this study, we compared regulatory contribution and hierarchy of hha, a member of the Hha/YmoA family of nucleoid-associated proteins, to that of qseBC in the expression of EHEC O157:H7 motility. Since norepinephrine affects motility of EHEC O157:H7 through a qseBC-encoded two-component quorum sensing signaling, we also determined whether the hha-mediated regulation of motility is affected by norepinephrine and whether this effect is qseBC dependent. We used single (Δhha or ΔqseC) and double (Δhha ΔqseC) deletion mutants to show that hha exerts a greater positive regulatory effect in comparison to qseBC on the expression of motility by EHEC O157:H7. We also show that Hha is hierarchically superior in transcriptional regulation of motility than QseBC because transcription of qseC was significantly reduced in the hha deletion mutant compared to that in the parental and the hha-complemented mutant strains. These results suggest that hha regulates motility of EHEC O157:H7 directly as well as indirectly by controlling the transcription of qseBC. PMID:24465756

  9. A Smoothened-Evc2 complex transduces the Hedgehog signal at primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Karolin V; Hughes, Casey E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-10-16

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies.

  10. A molecular ruler determines the repeat length in eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Kamiya, Ritsu; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2014-11-14

    Existence of cellular structures with specific size raises a fundamental question in biology: How do cells measure length? One conceptual answer to this question is by a molecular ruler, but examples of such rulers in eukaryotes are lacking. In this work, we identified a molecular ruler in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using cryo-electron tomography, we found that FAP59 and FAP172 form a 96-nanometer (nm)-long complex in Chlamydomonas flagella and that the absence of the complex disrupted 96-nm repeats of axonemes. Furthermore, lengthening of the FAP59/172 complex by domain duplication resulted in extension of the repeats up to 128 nm, as well as duplication of specific axonemal components. Thus, the FAP59/172 complex is the molecular ruler that determines the 96-nm repeat length and arrangements of components in cilia and flagella.

  11. Katanin p80 Regulates Human Cortical Development by Limiting Centriole and Cilia Number

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen F.; Pomp, Oz; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Kodani, Andrew; Henke, Katrin; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Woodworth, Mollie B.; Bonnard, Carine; Raj, Grace Selva; Tan, Thong Teck; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Shboul, Mohammad; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Alazami, Anas; Alowain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Harris, Matthew P.; Reversade, Bruno; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Katanin is a microtubule-severing complex whose catalytic activities are well characterized, but whose in vivo functions are incompletely understood. Human mutations in KATNB1, which encodes the noncatalytic regulatory p80 subunit of katanin, cause severe microlissencephaly. Loss of Katnb1 in mice confirms essential roles in neurogenesis and cell survival, while loss of zebrafish katnb1 reveals specific roles for katnin p80 in early and late developmental stages. Surprisingly, Katnb1 null mutant mouse embryos display hallmarks of aberrant Sonic hedgehog signaling, including holoprosencephaly. KATNB1-deficient human cells show defective proliferation and spindle structure, while Katnb1 null fibroblasts also demonstrate a remarkable excess of centrioles, with supernumerary cilia but deficient Hedgehog signaling. Our results reveal unexpected functions for KATNB1 in regulating overall centriole, mother centriole, and cilia number, and as an essential gene for normal Hedgehog signaling during neocortical development. PMID:25521379

  12. Katanin p80 regulates human cortical development by limiting centriole and cilia number.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen F; Pomp, Oz; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Kodani, Andrew; Henke, Katrin; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Yu, Timothy W; Woodworth, Mollie B; Bonnard, Carine; Raj, Grace Selva; Tan, Thong Teck; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Shboul, Mohammad; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N; Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Alazami, Anas; Alowain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reiter, Jeremy F; Harris, Matthew P; Reversade, Bruno; Walsh, Christopher A

    2014-12-17

    Katanin is a microtubule-severing complex whose catalytic activities are well characterized, but whose in vivo functions are incompletely understood. Human mutations in KATNB1, which encodes the noncatalytic regulatory p80 subunit of katanin, cause severe microlissencephaly. Loss of Katnb1 in mice confirms essential roles in neurogenesis and cell survival, while loss of zebrafish katnb1 reveals specific roles for katnin p80 in early and late developmental stages. Surprisingly, Katnb1 null mutant mouse embryos display hallmarks of aberrant Sonic hedgehog signaling, including holoprosencephaly. KATNB1-deficient human cells show defective proliferation and spindle structure, while Katnb1 null fibroblasts also demonstrate a remarkable excess of centrioles, with supernumerary cilia but deficient Hedgehog signaling. Our results reveal unexpected functions for KATNB1 in regulating overall centriole, mother centriole, and cilia number, and as an essential gene for normal Hedgehog signaling during neocortical development.

  13. Active stochastic stress fluctuations in the cell cytoskeleton stir the cell and activate primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Fakhri, Nikta; Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Wessel, Alok D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2015-03-01

    Cells are active systems with molecular force generation that drives complex dynamics at the supramolecular scale. Much of cellular dynamics is driven by myosin motors interacting with the actin cytoskeleton. We discovered active random ``stirring'' driven by cytoplasmic myosin as an intermediate mode of transport, different from both thermal diffusion and directed motor activity. We found a further manifestation of cytoskeletal dynamics in the active motion patterns of primary cilia generated by epithelial cells. These cilia were thought to be immotile due to the absence of dynein motors, but it turns out that their anchoring deeper inside the cell in combination with the strongly fluctuating cortex results in clearly measurable non-equilibrium fluctuations.

  14. Maintenance of motility bias during cyanobacterial phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Ursell, Tristan; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Bhaya, Devaki

    2015-04-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is complex, ranging across scales from molecular signal detectors and effectors to cellular and community responses to stimuli. The unicellular, photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 transduces a light stimulus into directional movement known as phototaxis. This response occurs via a biased random walk toward or away from a directional light source, which is sensed by intracellular photoreceptors and mediated by Type IV pili. It is unknown how quickly cells can respond to changes in the presence or directionality of light, or how photoreceptors affect single-cell motility behavior. In this study, we use time-lapse microscopy coupled with quantitative single-cell tracking to investigate the timescale of the cellular response to various light conditions and to characterize the contribution of the photoreceptor TaxD1 (PixJ1) to phototaxis. We first demonstrate that a community of cells exhibits both spatial and population heterogeneity in its phototactic response. We then show that individual cells respond within minutes to changes in light conditions, and that movement directionality is conferred only by the current light directionality, rather than by a long-term memory of previous conditions. Our measurements indicate that motility bias likely results from the polarization of pilus activity, yielding variable levels of movement in different directions. Experiments with a photoreceptor (taxD1) mutant suggest a supplementary role of TaxD1 in enhancing movement directionality, in addition to its previously identified role in promoting positive phototaxis. Motivated by the behavior of the taxD1 mutant, we demonstrate using a reaction-diffusion model that diffusion anisotropy is sufficient to produce the observed changes in the pattern of collective motility. Taken together, our results establish that single-cell tracking can be used to determine the factors that affect motility bias, which can then be coupled with

  15. Induction of focal adhesions and motility in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Susana A; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Vale, Ronald D

    2014-12-01

    Focal adhesions are dynamic structures that interact with the extracellular matrix on the cell exterior and actin filaments on the cell interior, enabling cells to adhere and crawl along surfaces. We describe a system for inducing the formation of focal adhesions in normally non-ECM-adherent, nonmotile Drosophila S2 cells. These focal adhesions contain the expected molecular markers such as talin, vinculin, and p130Cas, and they require talin for their formation. The S2 cells with induced focal adhesions also display a nonpolarized form of motility on vitronectin-coated substrates. Consistent with findings in mammalian cells, the degree of motility can be tuned by changing the stiffness of the substrate and was increased after the depletion of PAK3, a p21-activated kinase. A subset of nonmotile, nonpolarized cells also exhibited focal adhesions that rapidly assembled and disassembled around the cell perimeter. Such cooperative and dynamic fluctuations of focal adhesions were decreased by RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of myosin II and focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that this behavior requires force and focal adhesion maturation. These results demonstrate that S2 cells, a cell line that is well studied for cytoskeletal dynamics and readily amenable to protein manipulation by RNAi, can be used to study the assembly and dynamics of focal adhesions and mechanosensitive cell motility.

  16. Influence of fluorescent tag on the motility properties of kinesin-1 in single-molecule assays.

    PubMed

    Norris, Stephen R; Núñez, Marcos F; Verhey, Kristen J

    2015-03-10

    Molecular motors such as kinesin and dynein use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to walk processively along microtubule tracks and transport various cargoes inside the cell. Recent advancements in fluorescent protein (FP) research enable motors to be fluorescently labeled such that single molecules can be visualized inside cells in multiple colors. The performance of these fluorescent tags can vary depending on their spectral properties and a natural tendency for oligomerization. Here we present a survey of different fluorescent tags fused to kinesin-1 and studied by single-molecule motility assays of mammalian cell lysates. We tested eight different FP tags and found that seven of them display sufficient fluorescence intensity and photostability to visualize motility events. Although none of the FP tags interfere with the enzymatic properties of the motor, four of the tags (EGFP, monomeric EGFP, tagRFPt, and mApple) cause aberrantly long motor run lengths. This behavior is unlikely to be due to electrostatic interactions and is probably caused by tag-dependent oligomerization events that appear to be facilitated by fusion to the dimeric kinesin-1. We also compared the single-molecule performance of various fluorescent SNAP and HALO ligands. We found that although both green and red SNAP ligands provide sufficient fluorescent signal, only the tetramethyl rhodamine (TMR) HALO ligand provides sufficient signal for detection in these assays. This study will serve as a valuable reference for choosing fluorescent labels for single-molecule motility assays. PMID:25762325

  17. Influence of Fluorescent Tag on the Motility Properties of Kinesin-1 in Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Stephen R.; Núñez, Marcos F.; Verhey, Kristen J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin and dynein use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to walk processively along microtubule tracks and transport various cargoes inside the cell. Recent advancements in fluorescent protein (FP) research enable motors to be fluorescently labeled such that single molecules can be visualized inside cells in multiple colors. The performance of these fluorescent tags can vary depending on their spectral properties and a natural tendency for oligomerization. Here we present a survey of different fluorescent tags fused to kinesin-1 and studied by single-molecule motility assays of mammalian cell lysates. We tested eight different FP tags and found that seven of them display sufficient fluorescence intensity and photostability to visualize motility events. Although none of the FP tags interfere with the enzymatic properties of the motor, four of the tags (EGFP, monomeric EGFP, tagRFPt, and mApple) cause aberrantly long motor run lengths. This behavior is unlikely to be due to electrostatic interactions and is probably caused by tag-dependent oligomerization events that appear to be facilitated by fusion to the dimeric kinesin-1. We also compared the single-molecule performance of various fluorescent SNAP and HALO ligands. We found that although both green and red SNAP ligands provide sufficient fluorescent signal, only the tetramethyl rhodamine (TMR) HALO ligand provides sufficient signal for detection in these assays. This study will serve as a valuable reference for choosing fluorescent labels for single-molecule motility assays. PMID:25762325

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N.; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility. PMID:25970615

  19. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  20. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    PubMed

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  1. Occurrence of autoantibodies to cilia in lambs with a 'coughing syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Andrews, J J; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1998-07-31

    A respiratory disease of lambs that has been termed the 'coughing syndrome' has been observed in the mid-western region of the United States of America. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) and Mycoplasma arginini (M. arginini) were routinely isolated from the respiratory tract of lambs with this disease. A high level of antibodies reactive with ovine cilia of the upper respiratory tract was detected in the sera from many of the lambs in affected flocks but not in sera of lambs from unaffected flocks. The reactivity of these antibodies with cilia was demonstrated by ELISA and confirmed by indirect immunofluorescent staining and western immunoblotting. These antibodies were predominantly of the IgG isotype. They were distinct from cold or warm agglutinins and could be absorbed from the sera with cilia but not with antigens of common bacterial pathogens of the sheep respiratory tract including M. ovipneumoniae, M. arginini, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida or Neisseria ovis. In addition, their occurrence appeared to be independent of the specific antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae and M. arginini. Western immunoblotting indicated that the antibodies were directed primarily against an antigen with apparent molecular weight of 50 kDa. In one flock from which serial serum samples were collected from the same lambs over a 10-month period, antibodies to ovine cilia developed before the onset of the clinical disease and persisted for a period of several months until most of the lambs had apparently recovered. However, colonization of the respiratory tract of the lambs by M. ovipneumoniae preceded the production of these antibodies. Sequential serum samples taken from another flock, with no known history of this coughing, showed no such antibodies throughout the sampling period. It is suggested that an immunopathologic mechanism involving production of autoantibodies directed against a ciliary antigen of the lambs could be a contributing factor to the

  2. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia.

  3. Global genetic analysis in mice unveils central role for cilia in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Klena, Nikolai T; Gabriel, George C; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kim, Andrew J; Lemke, Kristi; Chen, Yu; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Devine, William; Damerla, Rama Rao; Chang, Chienfu; Yagi, Hisato; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Thahir, Mohamed; Anderton, Shane; Lawhead, Caroline; Vescovi, Anita; Pratt, Herbert; Morgan, Judy; Haynes, Leslie; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T; Reinholdt, Laura; Francis, Richard; Leatherbury, Linda; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Tobita, Kimimasa; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2015-05-28

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent birth defect, affecting nearly 1% of live births; the incidence of CHD is up to tenfold higher in human fetuses. A genetic contribution is strongly suggested by the association of CHD with chromosome abnormalities and high recurrence risk. Here we report findings from a recessive forward genetic screen in fetal mice, showing that cilia and cilia-transduced cell signalling have important roles in the pathogenesis of CHD. The cilium is an evolutionarily conserved organelle projecting from the cell surface with essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Using echocardiography, we ultrasound scanned 87,355 chemically mutagenized C57BL/6J fetal mice and recovered 218 CHD mouse models. Whole-exome sequencing identified 91 recessive CHD mutations in 61 genes. This included 34 cilia-related genes, 16 genes involved in cilia-transduced cell signalling, and 10 genes regulating vesicular trafficking, a pathway important for ciliogenesis and cell signalling. Surprisingly, many CHD genes encoded interacting proteins, suggesting that an interactome protein network may provide a larger genomic context for CHD pathogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the potential Mendelian genetic contribution to CHD in the fetal population, a segment of the human population not well studied. We note that the pathways identified show overlap with CHD candidate genes recovered in CHD patients, suggesting that they may have relevance to the more complex genetics of CHD overall. These CHD mouse models and >8,000 incidental mutations have been sperm archived, creating a rich public resource for human disease modelling. PMID:25807483

  4. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners. PMID:27178716

  5. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia. PMID:15838839

  6. Global genetic analysis in mice unveils central role for cilia in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Klena, Nikolai T; Gabriel, George C; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kim, Andrew J; Lemke, Kristi; Chen, Yu; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Devine, William; Damerla, Rama Rao; Chang, Chienfu; Yagi, Hisato; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Thahir, Mohamed; Anderton, Shane; Lawhead, Caroline; Vescovi, Anita; Pratt, Herbert; Morgan, Judy; Haynes, Leslie; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T; Reinholdt, Laura; Francis, Richard; Leatherbury, Linda; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Tobita, Kimimasa; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2015-05-28

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent birth defect, affecting nearly 1% of live births; the incidence of CHD is up to tenfold higher in human fetuses. A genetic contribution is strongly suggested by the association of CHD with chromosome abnormalities and high recurrence risk. Here we report findings from a recessive forward genetic screen in fetal mice, showing that cilia and cilia-transduced cell signalling have important roles in the pathogenesis of CHD. The cilium is an evolutionarily conserved organelle projecting from the cell surface with essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Using echocardiography, we ultrasound scanned 87,355 chemically mutagenized C57BL/6J fetal mice and recovered 218 CHD mouse models. Whole-exome sequencing identified 91 recessive CHD mutations in 61 genes. This included 34 cilia-related genes, 16 genes involved in cilia-transduced cell signalling, and 10 genes regulating vesicular trafficking, a pathway important for ciliogenesis and cell signalling. Surprisingly, many CHD genes encoded interacting proteins, suggesting that an interactome protein network may provide a larger genomic context for CHD pathogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the potential Mendelian genetic contribution to CHD in the fetal population, a segment of the human population not well studied. We note that the pathways identified show overlap with CHD candidate genes recovered in CHD patients, suggesting that they may have relevance to the more complex genetics of CHD overall. These CHD mouse models and >8,000 incidental mutations have been sperm archived, creating a rich public resource for human disease modelling.

  7. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners.

  8. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... include signal conditioning, amplifying, and recording equipment. This generic type of device includes...

  9. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  10. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart. PMID:27593162

  11. The intraflagellar transport protein IFT80 is required for cilia formation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuying; Wang, Changdong

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia, which play important roles in development and homeostasis. IFT80 is a newly defined IFT protein. Partial mutation of IFT80 in humans causes diseases such as Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and short rib polydactyly (SRP) type III with abnormal skeletal development. However, the role and mechanism of IFT80 in osteogenesis is unknown. Here, we first detected IFT80 expression pattern and found that IFT80 was highly expressed in mouse long bone, skull, and during osteoblast differentiation. By using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) technology to silence IFT80 in murine mesenchymal progenitor cell line-C3H10T1/2 and bone marrow derived stromal cells, we found that silencing IFT80 led to either shortening or loss of cilia and the decrease of Arl13b expression - a small GTPase that is localized in cilia. Additionally, silencing IFT80 blocked the expression of osteoblast markers and significantly inhibited ALP activity and cell mineralization. We further found that IFT80 silencing inhibited the expression of Gli2, a critical transcriptional factor in the hedgehog signaling pathway. Overexpression of Gli2 rescued the deficiency of osteoblast differentiation from IFT80-silenced cells, and dramatically promoted osteoblast differentiation. Moreover, introduction of Smo agonist (SAG) promotes osteoblast differentiation, which was partially inhibited by IFT80 silencing. Thus, these results suggested that IFT80 plays an important role in osteogenesis through regulating Hedgehog/Gli signal pathways. PMID:22771375

  12. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote osteoblast mineralization and maturation needing the existence of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Juan-Li; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Hui-Ping; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Shi, Wen-Gui; Fang, Qing-Qing; Ren, Qian; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2015-03-15

    Although pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) have been approved as a therapy for osteoporosis, action mechanisms and optimal parameters are elusive. To determine the optimal intensity, exposure effects of 50 Hz PEMFs of 0.6-3.6 mT (0.6 interval at 90 min/day) were investigated on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cultured calvarial osteoblasts. All intensity groups stimulated proliferation significantly with the highest effect at 0.6 mT. The 0.6 mT group also obtained the optimal osteogenic effect as demonstrated by the highest ALP activity, ALP(+) CFU-f colony formation, nodule mineralization, and expression of COL-1 and BMP-2. To verify our hypothesis that the primary cilia are the cellular sensors for PEMFs, osteoblasts were also transfected with IFT88 siRNA or scrambled control, and osteogenesis-promoting effects of 0.6 mT PEMFs were found abrogated when primary cilia were inhibited by IFT88 siRNA. Thus primary cilia of osteoblasts play an indispensable role in mediating PEMF osteogenic effect in vitro.

  14. Primary cilia regulate Shh activity in the control of molar tooth number.

    PubMed

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Haycraft, Courtney J; Seppala, Maisa; Blackburn, James; Ghafoor, Sarah; Cobourne, Martyn; Martinelli, David C; Fan, Chen-Ming; Peterkova, Renata; Lesot, Herve; Yoder, Bradley K; Sharpe, Paul T

    2009-03-01

    Primary cilia mediate Hh signalling and mutations in their protein components affect Hh activity. We show that in mice mutant for a cilia intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88/polaris, Shh activity is increased in the toothless diastema mesenchyme of the embryonic jaw primordia. This results in the formation of ectopic teeth in the diastema, mesial to the first molars. This phenotype is specific to loss of polaris activity in the mesenchyme since loss of Polaris in the epithelium has no detrimental affect on tooth development. To further confirm that upregulation of Shh activity is responsible for the ectopic tooth formation, we analysed mice mutant for Gas1, a Shh protein antagonist in diastema mesenchyme. Gas1 mutants also had ectopic diastema teeth and accompanying increased Shh activity. In this context, therefore, primary cilia exert a specific negative regulatory effect on Shh activity that functions to repress tooth formation and thus determine tooth number. Strikingly, the ectopic teeth adopt a size and shape characteristic of premolars, a tooth type that was lost in mice around 50-100 million years ago. PMID:19211681

  15. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study.

  16. A Computational Model of Dynein Activation Patterns that Can Explain Nodal Cilia Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duanduan; Zhong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Normal left-right patterning in vertebrates depends on the rotational movement of nodal cilia. In order to produce this ciliary motion, the activity of axonemal dyneins must be tightly regulated in a temporal and spatial manner; the specific activation pattern of the dynein motors in the nodal cilia has not been reported. Contemporary imaging techniques cannot directly assess dynein activity in a living cilium. In this study, we establish a three-dimensional model to mimic the ciliary ultrastructure and assume that the activation of dynein proteins is related to the interdoublet distance. By employing finite-element analysis and grid deformation techniques, we simulate the mechanical function of dyneins by pairs of point loads, investigate the time-variant interdoublet distance, and simulate the dynein-triggered ciliary motion. The computational results indicate that, to produce the rotational movement of nodal cilia, the dynein activity is transferred clockwise (looking from the tip) between the nine doublet microtubules, and along each microtubule, the dynein activation should occur faster at the basal region and slower when it is close to the ciliary tip. Moreover, the time cost by all the dyneins along one microtubule to be activated can be used to deduce the dynein activation pattern; it implies that, as an alternative method, measuring this time can indirectly reveal the dynein activity. The proposed protein-structure model can simulate the ciliary motion triggered by various dynein activation patterns explicitly and may contribute to furthering the studies on axonemal dynein activity. PMID:26153700

  17. Depletion of primary cilia from mature dentate granule cells impairs hippocampus-dependent contextual memory

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soyoung; Kirschen, Gregory W.; Gu, Yan; Ge, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory organelle, regulates cell proliferation and neuronal development of dentate granule cells in the hippocampus. However, its role in the function of mature dentate granule cells remains unknown. Here we specifically depleted and disrupted ciliary proteins IFT20 and Kif3A (respectively) in mature dentate granule cells and investigated hippocampus-dependent contextual memory and long-term plasticity at mossy fiber synapses. We found that depletion of IFT20 in these cells significantly impaired context-dependent fear-related memory. Furthermore, we tested synaptic plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in area CA3 and found increased long-term potentiation upon depletion of IFT20 or disruption of Kif3A. Our findings suggest a role of primary cilia in the memory function of mature dentate granule cells, which may result from abnormal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity. A direct link between the primary cilia of mature dentate granule cells and behavior will require further investigation using independent approaches to manipulate primary cilia. PMID:27678193

  18. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart.

  19. A computational model of dynein activation patterns that can explain nodal cilia rotation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duanduan; Zhong, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Normal left-right patterning in vertebrates depends on the rotational movement of nodal cilia. In order to produce this ciliary motion, the activity of axonemal dyneins must be tightly regulated in a temporal and spatial manner; the specific activation pattern of the dynein motors in the nodal cilia has not been reported. Contemporary imaging techniques cannot directly assess dynein activity in a living cilium. In this study, we establish a three-dimensional model to mimic the ciliary ultrastructure and assume that the activation of dynein proteins is related to the interdoublet distance. By employing finite-element analysis and grid deformation techniques, we simulate the mechanical function of dyneins by pairs of point loads, investigate the time-variant interdoublet distance, and simulate the dynein-triggered ciliary motion. The computational results indicate that, to produce the rotational movement of nodal cilia, the dynein activity is transferred clockwise (looking from the tip) between the nine doublet microtubules, and along each microtubule, the dynein activation should occur faster at the basal region and slower when it is close to the ciliary tip. Moreover, the time cost by all the dyneins along one microtubule to be activated can be used to deduce the dynein activation pattern; it implies that, as an alternative method, measuring this time can indirectly reveal the dynein activity. The proposed protein-structure model can simulate the ciliary motion triggered by various dynein activation patterns explicitly and may contribute to furthering the studies on axonemal dynein activity.

  20. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Wax monoesters are synthesized by the esterification of fatty alcohols and fatty acids. A mammalian enzyme that catalyzes this reaction has not been isolated. We used expression cloning to identify cDNAs encoding a wax synthase in the mouse preputial gland. The wax synthase gene is located on the X chromosome and encodes a member of the acyltransferase family of enzymes that synthesize neutral lipids. Expression of wax synthase in cultured cells led to the formation of wax monoesters from straight chain saturated, unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty alcohols and acids. Polyisoprenols also were incorporated into wax monoesters by the enzyme. The wax synthase had little or no ability to synthesize cholesteryl esters, diacylglycerols, or triacylglycerols, whereas other acyltransferases, including the acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes and the acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes, exhibited modest wax monoester synthesis activities. Confocal light microscopy indicated that the wax synthase was localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Wax synthase mRNA was abundant in tissues rich in sebaceous glands such as the preputial gland and eyelid and was present at lower levels in other tissues. Coexpression of cDNAs specifying fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 and wax synthase led to the synthesis of wax monoesters. The data suggest that wax monoester synthesis in mammals involves a two step biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by fatty acyl-CoA reductase and wax synthase enzymes. PMID:15220349

  1. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols is required for the synthesis of wax monoesters and ether lipids. The mammalian enzymes that synthesize fatty alcohols have not been identified. Here, an in silico approach was used to discern two putative reductase enzymes designated FAR1 and FAR2. Expression studies in intact cells showed that FAR1 and FAR2 cDNAs encoded isozymes that reduced fatty acids to fatty alcohols. Fatty acyl-CoA esters were the substrate of FAR1, and the enzyme required NADPH as a cofactor. FAR1 preferred saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of 16 or 18 carbons as substrates, whereas FAR2 preferred saturated fatty acids of 16 or 18 carbons. Confocal light microscopy indicated that FAR1 and FAR2 were localized in the peroxisome. The FAR1 mRNA was detected in many mouse tissues with the highest level found in the preputial gland, a modified sebaceous gland. The FAR2 mRNA was more restricted in distribution and most abundant in the eyelid, which contains wax-laden meibomian glands. Both FAR mRNAs were present in the brain, a tissue rich in ether lipids. The data suggest that fatty alcohol synthesis in mammals is accomplished by two fatty acyl-CoA reductase isozymes that are expressed at high levels in tissues known to synthesize wax monoesters and ether lipids. PMID:15220348

  2. Mammalian Gut Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T.; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a “love–hate relationship.” Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases. PMID:25163502

  3. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  4. Evidence of 5-HT components in human sperm: implications for protein tyrosine phosphorylation and the physiology of motility

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trejo, Francisco; Tapia-Rodríguez, Miguel; Cerbón, Marco; Kuhn, Donald M; Manjarrez-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Mendoza-Rodríguez, C Adriana; Picazo, Ofir

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; C10H12N2O (5-HT)) is produced in the CNS and in some cells of peripheral tissues. In the mammalian male reproductive system, both 5-HT and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) have been described in Leydig cells of the testis and in principal cells of the caput epididymis. In capacitated hamster sperm, it has been shown that 5-HT promotes the acrosomal reaction. The aim of this work was to explore the existence of components of the serotoninergic system and their relevance in human sperm physiology. We used both immunocytochemistry and western blot to detect serotoninergic markers such as 5-HT, TPH1, MAOA, 5-HT1B, 5-HT3, and 5HTT; HPLC for TPH enzymatic activity; Computer Assisted Semen Analysis assays to measure sperm motility parameters and pharmacological approaches to show the effect of 5-HT in sperm motility and tyrosine phosphorylation was assessed by western blot. We found the presence of serotoninergic markers (5-HT, TPH1, MAOA, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, 5-HTT, and TPH enzymatic activity) in human sperm. In addition, we observed a significant increase in tyrosine phosphorylation and changes in sperm motility after 5-HT treatment. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the existence of components of a serotoninergic system in human sperm and support the notion for a functional role of 5-HT in mammalian sperm physiology, which can be modulated pharmacologically. PMID:23028123

  5. The alveolin IMC1h is required for normal ookinete and sporozoite motility behaviour and host colonisation in Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Katrin; Pfander, Claudia; Burstroem, Charlotte; Ahras, Malika; Goulding, David; Rayner, Julian C; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Billker, Oliver; Brochet, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Alveolins, or inner membrane complex (IMC) proteins, are components of the subpellicular network that forms a structural part of the pellicle of malaria parasites. In Plasmodium berghei, deletions of three alveolins, IMC1a, b, and h, each resulted in reduced mechanical strength and gliding velocity of ookinetes or sporozoites. Using time lapse imaging, we show here that deletion of IMC1h (PBANKA_143660) also has an impact on the directionality and motility behaviour of both ookinetes and sporozoites. Despite their marked motility defects, sporozoites lacking IMC1h were able to invade mosquito salivary glands, allowing us to investigate the role of IMC1h in colonisation of the mammalian host. We show that IMC1h is essential for sporozoites to progress through the dermis in vivo but does not play a significant role in hepatoma cell transmigration and invasion in vitro. Colocalisation of IMC1h with the residual IMC in liver stages was detected up to 30 hours after infection and parasites lacking IMC1h showed developmental defects in vitro and a delayed onset of blood stage infection in vivo. Together, these results suggest that IMC1h is involved in maintaining the cellular architecture which supports normal motility behaviour, access of the sporozoites to the blood stream, and further colonisation of the mammalian host.

  6. MOTILITY, AGGRESSION, AND THE BODILY I: AN INTERPRETATION OF WINNICOTT.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    Among the central ideas associated with the name of Winnicott, scant mention is made of motility. This is largely attributable to Winnicott himself, who never thematized motility and never wrote a paper specifically devoted to the topic. This paper suggests both that the idea of motility is nonetheless of central significance in Winnicott's thought, and that motility is of central importance in the development and constitution of the bodily I. In elaborating both these suggestions, the paper gives particular attention to the connections between motility, continuity, aggression, and creativity in Winnicott's work. PMID:26443951

  7. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. Polysome analysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    He, Shan L; Green, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    To assess the global translational level of mammalian cells (see similar protocols for bacteria and yeast on Analysis of polysomes from bacteria, Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast and Polysome analysis for determining mRNA and ribosome association in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  9. Maturation of the mammalian secretome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy C; Mateos, Alvaro; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A recent use of quantitative proteomics to determine the constituents of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex is discussed in the light of other available methodologies for cataloging the proteins associated with the mammalian secretory pathway. PMID:17472737

  10. PP2A in the regulation of cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sunanda

    2011-02-01

    Cell motility is a very critical phenomenon that plays an important role in the development of eukaryotic organisms. One of the well studied cell motility phenomena is chemotaxis, which is described as a directional movement of cell in response to changes in external chemotactic gradient. Numerous studies conducted both in unicellular organism and in mammalian cells have demonstrated the importance of phosphatidylionositol-3 kinase (PI3K) in this process. In addition, it is now well established that although PI3K plays an activation role in chemotaxis, the role of phosphatases is also critical to maintain this dynamic cyclical process. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that is a key player in regulating PI3K signaling. PP2A is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed and has been highly conserved during the evolution of eukaryotes. PP2A is composed of three protein subunits, A, B, and C. Subunit 'A' is a 60-65 kDa structural component, 'C' is a 36-38 kDa catalytic subunit, and 'B' is a 54-130 kDa regulatory subunit. The core complex of PP2A is comprised of the A and C subunits, which are tightly associated and this dimeric core complexes with the regulatory B subunit. The B subunit determines the substrate specificity as well as the spatial and temporal functions of PP2A. PP2A plays an important role in regulating multiple signal transduction pathways, including cell-cycle regulation, cell-growth and development, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell motility. This review focuses on the role of PP2A in regulating motility of normal and transformed cells.

  11. PKCα-Mediated Signals Regulate the Motile Responses of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Channy; Kalinec, Federico

    2015-05-01

    There is strong evidence that changes in the actin/spectrin-based cortical cytoskeleton of outer hair cells (OHCs) regulate their motile responses as well as cochlear amplification, the process that optimizes the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian inner ear. Since a RhoA/protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway is known to inhibit the actin-spectrin interaction in other cell models, we decided to investigate whether this signaling cascade could also participate in the regulation of OHC motility. We used high-speed video microscopy and confocal microscopy to explore the effects of pharmacological activation of PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, PKCδ, PKCε, and PKCζ with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and their inhibition with bisindolylmaleimide I, as well as inhibition of RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) with C3 and Y-27632, respectively. Motile responses were induced in isolated guinea pig OHCs by stimulation with an 8 V/cm external alternating electrical field as 50 Hz bursts of square wave pulses (100 ms on/off). We found that LPA increased expression of PKCα and PKCζ only, with PKCα, but not PKCζ, phosphorylating the cytoskeletal protein adducin of both Ser-726 and Thr-445. Interestingly, however, inhibition of PKCα reduced adducin phosphorylation only at Ser-726. We also determined that LPA activation of a PKCα-mediated signaling pathway simultaneously enhanced OHC electromotile amplitude and cell shortening, and facilitated RhoA/ROCK/LIMK1-mediated cofilin phosphorylation. Altogether, our results suggest that PKCα-mediated signals, probably via adducin-mediated inhibition of actin-spectrin binding and cofilin-mediated depolymerization of actin filaments, play an essential role in the homeostatic regulation of OHC motility and cochlear amplification. PMID:25954875

  12. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  13. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  14. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  15. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J.; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-07-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  16. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, Alfred; Athanassiou, Charalambos; Koebler, Douglas; Qian, Lei; Shun, Tongying; Shields, Donna; Yu, Hui; Wang, Hong; Goff, Julie; Cheng, Tao; Houck, Raymond; Cowsert, Lex

    2005-01-01

    Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non-cell objects, and uncertainty in the

  17. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers. PMID:27447088

  18. Hydroxyapatite motility implants in ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cowper, T R

    1995-03-01

    For the past 5 years, an increasing number of ophthalmologists have been using hydroxyapatite (HA) motility implants after uncomplicated enucleation or evisceration of the eye. Unlike previous implant materials, HA promotes fibrovascular ingrowth and seemingly true integration of the motility implant to the residual ocular structures. As a result, a more stable defect and greater movement of the overlying prosthesis is produced. In addition, the problems of long-term orbital implant migration and the vexing postenucleation socket syndrome are thought to be minimized. This article briefly reviews the history and development of orbital implants and HA implant surgical and prosthetic procedures. It is concluded that HA implant rehabilitation is indicated after most uncomplicated enucleations or eviscerations where there is small likelihood of complication.

  19. Structural and immunocytochemical characterization of the Ginkgo biloba L. sperm motility apparatus.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, K C; Renzaglia, K S

    2006-05-01

    Ginkgo biloba and the cycads are the only extant seed plants with motile sperm cells. However, there has been no immunocytochemical characterization of these gametes to determine if they share characteristics with the flagellated sperm found in bryophytes and pteridophytes or might give clues as to the relationships to nonflagellated sperm in all other seed plants. To determine characteristics of proteins associated with the motility apparatus in these motile sperm, we probed thin sections of developing spermatogenous cells of Ginkgo biloba with antibodies to acetylated and tyrosinated tubulin and monoclonal antibodies that recognize mammalian centrosomes and centrin. The blepharoplast that occurs as a precursor to the motility apparatus consists of an amorphous core, pitted with cavities containing microtubules and a surface studded with probasal bodies. The probasal bodies and microtubules within the blepharoplast cavities are labeled with antibodies specific to acetylated tubulin. Positive but weak reactions of the blepharoplast core occur with the centrosomereactive antibodies MPM-2 and C-9. Reactions to centrin antibodies are negative at this developmental stage. From this pre-motility apparatus structure, an assemblage of about 1,000 flagella and associated structures arises as the precursor to the motility apparatus for the sperm. The flagellar apparatus consists of a three-layered multilayered structure that subtends a layer of spline microtubules, a zone of amorphous material similar to that in the blepharoplast, and the flagellar band. Centrin antibodies react strongly with the multilayered structure, the transition zone of the flagella, and fibrillar material near the flagellar base at the surface of the amorphous material. Both the spline microtubules and all of the tubules in the flagella react strongly with the antibodies to acetylated tubulin. These localizations are consistent with the localizations of these components in pteridophyte and bryophyte

  20. [Gastrointestinal motility and possibilities of influencing it].

    PubMed

    Duris, I; Payer, J; Huorka, M; Randus, V; Ondrejka, P

    1994-06-01

    The authors discuss factors which influence the motility of the smooth muscles in the pancreatobiliary region. They investigated some clinical and laboratory parameters after administration of the selective antagonist of calcium influx-Pineverium bromide-Dicetel. The drug influenced significantly in a positive way nausea, flatulence, pain and chronically elevated amylases. The authors mention a cycle of possible neurohumoral changes with which specific calcium channel antagonists could interfere. PMID:8073641