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Sample records for motor conduction velocity

  1. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity In Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Asif, Naiyer; Singh, Paras Nath; Hossain, Mohd Mobarak

    2016-12-01

    The post-menopausal phase is characterized by a decline in the serum oestrogen and progesterone levels. This phase is also associated with higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy. To explore the relationship between the peripheral motor nerve status and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels through assessment of Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity (MNCV) in post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College during 2011-2013. The study included 30 post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy (age: 51.4±7.9) and 30 post-menopausal women without peripheral neuropathy (control) (age: 52.5±4.9). They were compared for MNCV in median, ulnar and common peroneal nerves and serum levels of oestrogen and progesterone estimated through enzyme immunoassays. To study the relationship between hormone levels and MNCV, a stepwise linear regression analysis was done. The post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy had significantly lower MNCV and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels as compared to control subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed oestrogen with main effect on MNCV. The findings of the present study suggest that while the post-menopausal age group is at a greater risk of peripheral neuropathy, it is the decline in the serum estrogen levels which is critical in the development of peripheral neuropathy.

  2. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity In Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Singh, Paras Nath; Hossain, Mohd Mobarak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The post-menopausal phase is characterized by a decline in the serum oestrogen and progesterone levels. This phase is also associated with higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy. Aim To explore the relationship between the peripheral motor nerve status and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels through assessment of Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity (MNCV) in post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College during 2011-2013. The study included 30 post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy (age: 51.4±7.9) and 30 post-menopausal women without peripheral neuropathy (control) (age: 52.5±4.9). They were compared for MNCV in median, ulnar and common peroneal nerves and serum levels of oestrogen and progesterone estimated through enzyme immunoassays. To study the relationship between hormone levels and MNCV, a stepwise linear regression analysis was done. Results The post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy had significantly lower MNCV and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels as compared to control subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed oestrogen with main effect on MNCV. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that while the post-menopausal age group is at a greater risk of peripheral neuropathy, it is the decline in the serum estrogen levels which is critical in the development of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28208850

  3. Normal maximal and minimal motor nerve conduction velocities in adults determined by a collision method.

    PubMed

    Arasaki, K; Iijima, M; Nakanishi, T

    1991-07-01

    Using a new collision method, we measured motor nerve conduction velocities of the ulnar nerve in the forearm and the action potential amplitude of the abductor digiti minimi muscle on 60 adults, ages 20 to 82 years and apparently free from diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Both maximal and minimal motor nerve conduction velocities were linear functions of age; 64.42-0.05 age and 60.45-0.12 age, respectively. The percentage of the minimal to the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities was expressed as 94.45-0.13 age. The maximum amplitude of evoked muscle action potentials was also correlated with age. This novel method may be useful in detecting pathology of motor nerve fibers which results in a decrease in submaximal conduction velocities.

  4. Assessment of temporal dispersion in motor nerves with normal conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Mattler, W J; Jakob, M; Zierz, S

    1999-04-01

    Demyelinated nerves attenuate high-frequency components of propagating action potentials. In order to study if there is diagnostic use of this in motor nerves, the spectral energy above 49 Hz, amplitude, area, and duration of the compound muscle action potentials were measured; values after distal and proximal stimulation of posterior tibial nerves were compared. Normative data were collected in 48 control subjects. The same measurements were made in 20 patients with polyneuropathy and reduced motor nerve conduction velocity, in 21 patients with mild polyneuropathy but normal motor nerve conduction velocity, and in 8 patients with myasthenia gravis. Overall, high-frequency attenuation was closely correlated with amplitude decay (r = 0.63, P<10(-19)) and with increase of action potential duration (r = 0.34, P = 10(-5)). In the group of patients with normal NCV, high-frequency attenuation was abnormal in 9 (43%), amplitude decay was abnormal in two (10%), and area decay was abnormal in one (5%) patient. The action potential duration was normal in all of these patients. High-frequency attenuation was not influenced by stimulus intensity, thus it is not changed by conduction block, and it was not influenced by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Hence, high-frequency attenuation, both sensitively and specifically does indicate abnormal temporal dispersion. In conclusion, the simple measurement of high-frequency attenuation markedly improves detection and characterization of demyelination of human motor fibers.

  5. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  6. Effect of chronic renal failure, dialysis and transplantation on motor nerve conduction velocity in children.

    PubMed Central

    Arbus, G. S.; Barnor, N. A.; Hsu, A. C.; Murphy, E. G.; Radde, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    Ulnar and peroneal motor nerve conduction volocities (MNCVs) were measured in 47 children in a dialysis-transplantation program. Mean peroneal MNCV was significantly decreased from normal in children with mild renal failure (serum creatinine concentration, 1.5 to 2.9 mg/dl), whereas ulnar MNCV was significantly decreased only when the serum creatinine value was at least 9 mg/dl. Both ulnar and peroneal MNCVs remained unchanged during long-term hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis; however, after individual dialyses ulnar MNCV increased. After renal transplantation ulnar MNCV returned to normal within a year and peroneal MNCV within 3 years. Before dialysis was required and during long-term dialysis most plasma magnesium values were elevated; ionized calcium activity was decreased in about 50% of determinations. After transplantation and the concentration of divalent cations rapidly returned to normal. These children differed from adults studied in that (a) there was no correlation between severity of renal failure and MNCV, (b) long-term dialysis did not improve MNCV and (c) peroneal velocities did not recover for 3 years after transplantation. PMID:1098759

  7. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity Depends on Stimuli Frequency in the Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Ma C.; Cruz, Elizabeth; Caudillo, Cipriana; Sosa, Modesto; Gamiño, Sergio M.

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of frequency and duration of stimuli on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in the rat. MNCV was evaluated in two separate series of records. In the first the frequency of stimuli was varied between 1.0 and 10.0 Hz, by 1 Hz steps, keeping the duration of the pulses constant at 0.1 ms. In a second experimental trial, the frequency of the stimuli was kept at 10.0 Hz, while duration increased from 0.05 to 1.00 ms, at customized steps. Supramaximal stimulation pulses were always used. Measures were performed in the right pelvic limb of 12 anesthetized rats. The active needle electrode was inserted in the second interosseus space of the paw, while a subcutaneous reference electrode was inserted in the third toe. The ground electrode was placed on dorsal surface of the limb. The proximal stimuli site was identified at the sciatic notch and the distal one at the ankle. Surface stimulation was used. Latency, duration, area under the curve and amplitude of the muscular action potential were also measured. MNCV was estimated by dividing distal to proximal latency difference by the distance between stimuli sites. MNCV exhibited an increase to a plateu with stimulus frequency growth. Duration also showed the same behavior.

  8. A method of monitoring function in corticospinal pathways during scoliosis surgery with a note on motor conduction velocities.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, S G; Rothwell, J C; Cowan, J M; Webb, P J; Morley, T; Asselman, P; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    Spinal cord potentials produced by high voltage electrical stimulation of the scalp over the motor cortex were recorded intraoperatively from bipolar electrodes inserted into the epidural space of eleven patients undergoing corrective surgery for scoliosis. Responses to single stimuli could be recorded from the cord at all levels from cervical to low thoracic regions. The potentials were larger in the cervical than in the thoracic region and sometimes were followed by later waves at high stimulation intensities. Conduction velocity in large corticomotoneuron fibres was estimated to be between 50-74 ms-1 in different patients. This technique for monitoring motor tract function may be a useful adjunct to conventional monitoring of the sensory pathways during surgery. PMID:3958738

  9. Pycnogenol efficiency on glycaemia, motor nerve conduction velocity and markers of oxidative stress in mild type diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Jankyova, S; Kucera, P; Goldenberg, Z; Yaghi, D; Navarova, J; Kyselova, Z; Stolc, S; Klimas, J; Racanska, E; Matyas, S

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effects of Pycnogenol at various doses on preprandial and postprandial glucose levels, the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGA) and on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Pycnogenol treatment (10, 20, 50 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) lasted for 8 weeks after induction of diabetes. Pycnogenol significantly decreased elevated levels of preprandial glycaemia in treated animals at all doses. At doses of 10 mg/kg b.w./day and 20 mg/kg b.w./day it significantly decreased elevated levels of postprandial glycaemia compared with diabetic non-treated animals. Pycnogenol failed to induce a significant decrease of postprandial glycaemia at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w./day. Pycnogenol improved significantly the impaired MNCV at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w./day compared with non-treated animals. The levels of TBARs were elevated in diabetic rats. The levels of NAGA increased gradually despite the treatment. Pycnogenol failed to affect the increased levels of TBARs and NAGA. Pycnogenollowered the elevated levels of glycaemia and reduced the decline in motor nerve conduction velocity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effect of Pycnogenol on postprandial glycaemic levels and MNCV was not dose-dependent.

  10. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  11. Longitudinal changes of nerve conduction velocity, distal motor latency, compound motor action potential duration, and skin temperature during prolonged exposure to cold in a climate chamber.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Zscheile, Julia; Gabor, Kai-Steffen; Lindemann, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Changes of nerve conduction velocity (NCV), distal motor latency (DML), compound motor action potential (CMAP) duration, and skin temperature with regard to cold have been investigated by use of ice packs or cold water baths, but not after cooling of environmental temperature which has higher ecological validity. The aim of this study was to investigate these parameters during cooled room temperature. NCV, DML, and CMAP duration of the common fibular nerve, and skin temperature were measured in 20 healthy young females during exposure to 15°C room temperature, coming from 25°C room. We found that NCV decreased and DML increased linearly during 45 min observation time, in contrast to CMAP duration and skin temperature which changes followed an exponential curve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating changes of these parameters during exposure to environmental cold. The results may pilot some new hypotheses and studies on physiological and pathological changes of the peripheral nervous system and skin to environmental cold, e.g., in elderly with peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Can motor nerve conduction velocity predict foot problems in diabetic subjects over a 6-year outcome period?

    PubMed

    Carrington, Anne L; Shaw, Jonathan E; Van Schie, Carine H M; Abbott, Caroline A; Vileikyte, Loretta; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2002-11-01

    This study examined motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and other peripheral nerve and vascular tests as predictors for foot ulceration, amputation, and mortality in diabetes over a 6-year follow-up period. We recruited 169 diabetic subjects (without significant peripheral vascular disease with an ankle brachial pressure index [ABPI] >/=0.75) for the study and separated them into groups (to ensure diversity of nerve function). The control group consisted of 22 nondiabetic people. At baseline, all subjects underwent assessment of MNCV; vibration, pressure, and temperature perception thresholds; peripheral vascular function; and other diabetes assessments. Over the 6-year outcome period, 37.3% of the diabetic subjects developed at least one new ulcer, 11.2% had a lower-limb amputation (LLA) (minor or major), and 18.3% died. Using multivariate Cox's regression analysis (RR [95% CI] and removing previous ulcers as a confounding variable, MNCV was found to be the best predictor of new ulceration (0.90 [0.84-0.96], P = 0.001) and the best predictors of amputation were pressure perception threshold (PPT) (5.18 [1.96-13.68], P = 0.001) and medial arterial calcification (2.88 [1.13-7.35], P = 0.027). Creatinine (1.01 [1.00-1.01], P < 0.001), MNCV (0.84 [0.73-0.97], P = 0.016), and skin oxygen levels (14.32 [3.04-67.52], P = 0.001) were the best predictors of mortality. This study shows that MNCV, which is often assessed in clinical trials of neuropathy, can predict foot ulceration and death in diabetes. In addition, tests of PPT and medial arterial calcification can be used in the clinic to predict LLA in diabetic subjects.

  13. Distribution of muscle fiber conduction velocity for representative samples of motor units in the full recruitment range of the tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Negro, Francesco; Felici, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2017-08-01

    Motor units are recruited in an orderly manner according to the size of motor neurons. Moreover, because larger motor neurons innervate fibers with larger diameters than smaller motor neurons, motor units should be recruited orderly according to their conduction velocity (MUCV). Because of technical limitations, these relations have been previously tested either indirectly or in small motor unit samples that revealed weak associations between motor unit recruitment threshold (RT) and MUCV. Here we analyze the relation between MUCV and RT for large samples of motor units. Ten healthy volunteers completed a series of isometric ankle dorsiflexions at forces up to 70% of the maximum. Multi-channel surface electromyographic signals recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle were decomposed into single motor unit action potentials, from which the corresponding motor unit RT, MUCV, and action potential amplitude were estimated. Established relations between muscle fiber diameter and CV were used to estimate the fiber size. Within individual subjects, the distributions of MUCV and fiber diameters were unimodal and did not show distinct populations. MUCV was strongly correlated with RT (mean (SD) R(2) = 0.7 (0.09), p<0.001; 406 motor units), which supported the hypothesis that fiber diameter is associated to RT. The results provide further evidence for the relations between motor neuron and muscle fiber properties for large samples of motor units. The proposed methodology for motor unit analysis has also the potential to open new perspectives in the study of chronic and acute neuromuscular adaptations to ageing, training, and pathology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    PubMed

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  15. A Simulation Study to Investigate the Sensitivity of the Electromyogram to Conduction Velocity Changes of Individual Motor Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    C . Signal Analysis The most popular frequency analysis method used on EMG’s, is the Fourier Transform. One issue arising with its use is...applied ischemia,” Eur. J. Appl. Physiol., vol.56, pp.212-216, 1987. [6] R. Merletti, M. Knaflitz and C . De Luca, “Myoelectric manifestations of...conduction velocity,” IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., vol.8, no.3, pp.353-361, Sept. 2000. [10 ] E. Henneman , G. Somjen and D. Carpenter, “Excitability and

  16. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats.

    PubMed

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties.

  17. Tuning Multiple Motor Travel Via Single Motor Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-based molecular motors often work in small groups to transport cargos in cells. A key question in understanding transport (and its regulation in vivo) is to identify the sensitivity of multiple-motor-based motion to various single molecule properties. Whereas both single-motor travel distance and microtubule binding rate have been demonstrated to contribute to cargo travel, the role of single-motor velocity is yet to be explored. Here, we recast a previous theoretical study, and make explicit a potential contribution of velocity to cargo travel. We test this possibility experimentally, and demonstrate a strong negative correlation between single-motor velocity and cargo travel for transport driven by two motors. Our study thus discovers a previously unappreciated role of single-motor velocity in regulating multiple-motor transport. PMID:22672518

  18. Ranirestat (AS-3201), a potent aldose reductase inhibitor, reduces sorbitol levels and improves motor nerve conduction velocity in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Ono, Yoshiyuki; Kurono, Masuo; Kuromiya, Akemi; Nakamura, Keiji; Bril, Vera

    2008-07-01

    Ranirestat (AS-3201) is a novel aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor with potentially beneficial effects on diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. In this study, we performed a kinetic analysis to determine the mode of inhibition of ranirestat on AR and investigated the effects of ranirestat on sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerves and lens of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. We also evaluated the effects on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in STZ-diabetic rats. Kinetic analyses revealed that the ranirestat inhibition of AR is uncompetitive and reversible. In the sciatic nerve and lens of STZ-diabetic rats, single oral administration of ranirestat slightly reduced sorbitol levels. However, repeated oral administration of ranirestat for 5, 21, or 60 days enhanced the reducing effect of the ranirestat on sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerves and lens of STZ-diabetic rats with maximum effects after 21 days of treatment. Finally, repeated oral administration of ranirestat for 21 or 42 days dose-dependently improved the STZ-induced decrease in MNCV in STZ-diabetic rats. These findings demonstrate that repeated oral administration of ranirestat reduces sorbitol accumulation and improves MNCV in STZ-diabetic rats, indicating that ranirestat is an agent for the management of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy.

  19. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  20. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  1. Force-Velocity Curves of Motor Proteins Cooperating In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shtridelman, Yuri; Cahyuti, Thomas; Townsend, Brigitte; DeWitt, David; Macosko, Jed C.

    2008-01-01

    Motor proteins convert chemical energy into work, thereby generating persistent motion of cellular and subcellular objects. The velocities of motor proteins as a function of opposing loads have been previously determined in vitro for single motors. These single molecule “force-velocity curves” have been useful for elucidating motor kinetics and for estimating motor performance under physiological loads due to, for example, the cytoplasmic drag force on transported organelles. Here we report force-velocity curves for single and multiple motors measured in vivo. Using motion enhanced differential interference contrast (MEDIC) movies of living NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma) cells at 37°C, three parameters were measured—velocity (v), radius (a), and effective cytoplasmic viscosity (η′)—as they applied to moving vesicles. These parameters were combined in Stokes' equation, F = 6πaη′v, to determine the force, F, required to transport a single intracellular particle at velocity, v. In addition, the number of active motors was inferred from the multimodal pattern seen in a normalized velocity histogram. Using this inference, the resulting in vivo force-velocity curve for a single motor agrees with previously reported in vitro single motor force-velocity curves. Interestingly, however, the curves for two and three motors lie significantly higher in both measured velocity and computed force, which suggests that motors can work cooperatively to attain higher transport forces and velocities. PMID:18696014

  2. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  7. Aldose reductase-deficient mice are protected from delayed motor nerve conduction velocity, increased c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation, depletion of reduced glutathione, increased superoxide accumulation, and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eric C M; Lam, Karen S L; Chen, Yuk Shan; Yip, Johnny C W; Arvindakshan, Meena; Yamagishi, Shin-Ichiro; Yagihashi, Soroku; Oates, Peter J; Ellery, Craig A; Chung, Stephen S M; Chung, Sookja K

    2006-07-01

    The exaggerated flux through polyol pathway during diabetes is thought to be a major cause of lesions in the peripheral nerves. Here, we used aldose reductase (AR)-deficient (AR(-/-)) and AR inhibitor (ARI)-treated mice to further understand the in vivo role of polyol pathway in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, there were no obvious differences in the innervation patterns between wild-type AR (AR(+/+)) and AR(-/-) mice. Under short-term diabetic conditions, AR(-/-) mice were protected from the reduction of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities observed in diabetic AR(+/+) mice. Sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerves of diabetic AR(+/+) mice were increased significantly, whereas sorbitol levels in the diabetic AR(-/-) mice were significantly lower than those in diabetic AR(+/+) mice. In addition, signs of oxidative stress, such as increased activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), depletion of reduced glutathione, increase of superoxide formation, and DNA damage, observed in the sciatic nerves of diabetic AR(+/+) mice were not observed in the diabetic AR(-/-) mice, indicating that the diabetic AR(-/-) mice were protected from oxidative stress in the sciatic nerve. The diabetic AR(-/-) mice also excreted less 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine than diabetic AR(+/+) mice. The structural abnormalities observed in the sural nerve of diabetic AR(+/+) mice were less severe in the diabetic AR(-/-) mice, although it was only mildly protected by AR deficiency under short-term diabetic conditions. Signs of oxidative stress and functional and structural abnormalities were also inhibited by the ARI fidarestat in diabetic AR(+/+) nerves, similar to those in diabetic AR(-/-) mice. Taken together, increased polyol pathway flux through AR is a major contributing factor in the early signs of diabetic neuropathy, possibly through depletion of glutathione, increased superoxide accumulation, increased JNK activation, and DNA damage.

  8. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  9. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  10. Motor conduction measurement in myelopathy hand

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Ryoichi; Wada, Eiji; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Summary We studied the relationship between intramedullary high signal intensity (IMHSI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and motor conduction in the spinal cords of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients. There was no significant difference between the biceps or triceps central motor conduction times (CMCTs) of the patients who did and did not exhibit IMHSI, whereas the abductor pollicis brevis CMCT was significantly longer in the patients who exhibited IMHSI (p<0.05) than in those who did not. The CMCT of the abductor pollicis brevis is sensitive to the degree of damage in the cervical spinal cord. Hand dysfunction is a characteristic of CSM regardless of the cervical level affected by the condition. The motor fibers innervating the intrinsic muscles of the hand in the long tract of the cervical spinal cord are more sensitive than other motor fibers. For this reason, we consider that myelopathy hand is a characteristic impairment of CSM. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the hand motor cortex is useful for the evaluation of cervical myelopathy. PMID:25473737

  11. Nerve conduction velocities and hair concentrations of trace elements in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, I; Nakada, T; Sawamura, T; Kato, T; Hashimoto, T; Ishigooka, M; Izumiya, K

    1993-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocities and hair concentrations of trace elements were studied in 19 male patients with chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis. Both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were significantly lower in haemodialysis patients as compared to controls (p < 0.001). Calcium and aluminium concentrations were significantly higher in patients (p < 0.01), however, vanadium and arsenic levels were significantly lower in patients (p < 0.01). In concentrations of copper and zinc there was no significant difference between patients and controls. There were no significant correlations between hair concentrations of trace elements and nerve conduction velocities except between calcium concentration and sensory nerve conduction velocity. These facts suggest that nerve conduction velocities are not influenced by changes of trace element concentrations in hair in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis.

  12. Brushless DC Motors, Velocity and Position Control of the Brushless DC Motor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    DC motor was designed using the Hall effect sensors. In addition, the position control of the brushless DC motor was developed using an optical encoder to sense angular position changes and a microprocessor to provide the desired position control. A Pittman 5111 wdg 1 brushless DC motor was used for this study. The design of the digital tachometer and pulse width modulator for velocity control and the design of the Z-80 based microprocessor controller and software design are described in

  13. Method for quantifiying conduction velocity during ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourad, Ayman; Nash, Martyn P.

    2007-01-01

    Velocity of propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is important for the understanding of complex arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF). In this paper, we present a method to estimate the conduction velocity of electrical activation wavefronts that are defined to be a particular isovalue of any scalar field, such as electrical activation times, electrical phase, or indeed any other quantity that can be used to determine excitation wavefronts. This general method is based on tracking trajectories of material points that are assumed to be embedded within the wavefronts, whilst the direction of propagation is assumed to be perpendicular to the wavefront. We have derived an explicit expression for the conduction velocity in terms of the spatiotemporal gradients of the scalar field used to define wavefronts. Moreover, although it is often difficult to use activation times to compute conduction velocities during complex VF, we show that other scalar fields such as detrended voltage or electrical phase, which can faithfully represent the electrical activity during fibrillatory conduction, can be used to determine conduction velocities. We demonstrate the application of our method to determine conduction velocities from contact mapping recordings over the entire epicardial surface of the fibrillating pig heart.

  14. Adaptive H∞ nonlinear velocity tracking using RBFNN for linear DC brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ching-Chih; Chan, Cheng-Kain; Li, Yi Yu

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an adaptive H ∞ nonlinear velocity control for a linear DC brushless motor. A simplified model of this motor with friction is briefly recalled. The friction dynamics is described by the Lu Gre model and the online tuning radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used to parameterise the nonlinear friction function and un-modelled errors. An adaptive nonlinear H ∞ control method is then proposed to achieve velocity tracking, by assuming that the upper bounds of the ripple force, the changeable load and the nonlinear friction can be learned by the RBFNN. The closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly bounded using the Lyapunov stability theory. The feasibility and the efficacy of the proposed control are exemplified by conducting two velocity tracking experiments.

  15. Peroneal nerve conduction velocity: the importance of temperature correction.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Brozovich, F V

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between skin surface temperature, near nerve temperature and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of the peroneal nerve was studied in normal and diabetic subjects to determine a peroneal NCV-treatment correction factor and to investigate whether temperature correction of NCV reduces its variability. Twenty normal subjects (age 21 to 72 years, mean 44, SD 17) were tested for peroneal NCV, skin and near nerve temperatures bilaterally at ambient temperature (mean 26.6C). Tests were repeated after cooling the lower extremity to a skin temperature of 26C, and at skin temperatures of 28 and 29C as the legs were allowed to gradually warm. An additional 20 normal and 20 diabetic subjects were tested weekly at ambient temperature for peroneal NCV and skin temperature, measured at 15cm above the lateral malleolus. The results showed a linear relationship between skin temperature, near nerve temperature and peroneal NCV (p less than 0.001). Peroneal NCV was altered 2.0 meters per second per degree (C) change in skin and near nerve temperature (p less than 0.001). When using our formula, peroneal motor NCV corrected = 2.0 [32 - skin temp(C)] + NCV (m/sec), for correction of peroneal NCV to a standard skin temperature of 32C, it was found that temperature corrected NCV were less variable (p less than 0.05) than noncorrected NCV in the same diabetic subjects. These results indicate that temperature corrected NCV should be calculated routinely during clinical NCV examinations of patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  16. [Central motor conduction evaluation in glycogenosis type III].

    PubMed

    Alaejos Fuentes, J A; López-Alburquerque, T; De Portugal Alvarez, J

    1997-05-01

    We report a 20-year-old man affected by glycogenosis type III with distal muscle weakness, more severe in distal leg muscles. The electromyogram showed myopathic features. Nerve conduction studies and central motor conduction after magnetic stimulation of the brain were normal. Our results suggest that there is no involvement of central motor pathways in this disease.

  17. Comparison of umbo velocity in air and bone conduction

    PubMed Central

    Röösli, Christof; Chhan, David; Halpin, Chris; Rosowski, John J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the ossicular motion produced by bone-conducted (BC) sound in live human ears. Laser Doppler Vibrometry was used to measure air conduction (AC) and BC induced umbo velocity (Vu) in both ears of 10 subjects, 20 ears total. Sound pressure in the ear canal (PEC) was measured simultaneously. For air conduction, Vu at threshold was calculated. For BC, ΔV was defined as the difference between Vu and the tympanic ring velocity (an estimate of the skull velocity measured in the ear canal). ΔV and PEC at BC threshold were calculated and compared to the corresponding air conduction measurements. ΔV at BC threshold was significantly smaller than Vu at AC threshold between 500 Hz and 2000 Hz. Ear canal pressure at BC threshold tended to be smaller than for AC below 3000 Hz (with significant differences at 1000 Hz and 2000 Hz). Our results are most consistent with inertia of the ossicles and cochlear fluid driving BC hearing below 500 Hz, but with other mechanisms playing a significant role at higher frequencies. Sound radiated into the external ear canal might contribute to BC hearing at 3000 Hz and above. PMID:22609771

  18. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin level and nerve conduction velocity in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    London, G M; Nordmann, Y; Safar, M E; Métral, S; Milliez, P

    1975-01-01

    Increased free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and depressed motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV) were observed in 45 patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Neither of these findings could be correlated with age, duration or frequency of dialysis, or the degree of uraemia present. A strong negative correlation (r=--0-53; P less than 0-001), however, existed between the free erythrocyte protoporphyrin level and the MNCV, which suggested either (a) a direct effect of iron status on nerve function, or (b) a toxic factor in "uraemia" that depresses both nerve conduction and haemsynthetase activity. PMID:1192049

  19. Scaling law of velocity and conductivity in EK turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Wang, Guiren

    2014-11-01

    In microfluidics, when electrokinetic (EK) flow is applied with sufficiently high electric Rayleigh number (Rae) , turbulence can be achieved, and there can even be an universal equilibrium range of conductivity field. In this flow, a new scaling law region of velocity and conductivity structures where the energy cascade is dominated by electric body force (EBF) can be found. This is similar to the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling law (BO59) in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection. By both directly analyzing Navier-Stokes (N-S) equation and dimensional analysis, the scaling exponent of the second order moment of velocity structure function is 2/5, while that of conductivity structures is 4/5. Compared to the buoyancy in RB convection which decreases with decreasing length scale, EBF actually increases with decreasing spatial scales. This leads to two different microscales depending on the strength of EBF. The scaling law of velocity fluctuation is verified experimentally in a micro-EK turbulent flow. Although due to the restriction of geometry of our microchannel, the bandwidth of the EBF dominant subrange is narrow. By adjusting Rae and other parameters, a wider EBF dominant subrange is predicable. The work was supported by NSF under Grant No. CAREER CBET-0954977 and MRI CBET-1040227, respectively.

  20. Bifurcation of velocity distributions in cooperative transport of filaments by fast and slow motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-02-05

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport.

  1. Bifurcation of Velocity Distributions in Cooperative Transport of Filaments by Fast and Slow Motors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport. PMID:23442917

  2. [Behavioral development and nerve conduction velocity during recovery from malnutrition].

    PubMed

    Vega-Franco, L; Margarita Aguilar, E; Meza Camacho, C; Sánchez-Flores, A

    1990-02-01

    To research if the improvement in psychomotor development observed during the treatment of malnutrition, is related to favorable changes in the speed of nerve conduction and in the excretion of hydroxy-indole acetic acid (indole). DESIGNED OF THE STUDY: Prospective, of a descriptive type, includes the follow-up of children during the first month of treatment. To better know the impact which malnutrition has on mental development. Nine children, ranging from three to 15 months of age, gravely undernourished. The neurological development, the speed of nerve conduction and the excretion of indole were evaluated at 10 day intervals. Using the Gesell technique in order to evaluate the development, the measurement of conduction through the medial and external popliteal sciatic nerves and indole excreted in 24 hours, a quantitative increase of all of these variables was seen in 24 hours. At the beginning the conduction speed was slow (less than 30 m/s) and the excretion of indole was very low (0.28 mg/24 h). After the tenth day these measurements returned to normal, although the development coefficient was found to still below at the end of the study (63.9 +/- 21.0). Simultaneous to the neurological deficit, there is a reduced speed of conduction, which returns to normal after the tenth day without a positive correlation with motor functions and development. Neither does the disponibility of serotonin (judged by the excretion of indole) correlate with the speed of conduction.

  3. Intramuscular fiber conduction velocity, isometric force and explosive performance.

    PubMed

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Terzis, Gerasimos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Conduction of electrical signals along the surface of muscle fibers is acknowledged as an essential neuromuscular component which is linked with muscle force production. However, it remains unclear whether muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is also linked with explosive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between vastus lateralis MFCV and countermovement jumping performance, the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Fifteen moderately-trained young females performed countermovement jumps as well as an isometric leg press test in order to determine the rate of force development and maximum isometric force. Vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes at rest on a different occasion. Maximum MFCV was significantly correlated with maximum isometric force (r = 0.66, p < 0.01), nevertheless even closer with the leg press rate of force development at 100 ms, 150 ms, 200 ms, and 250 ms (r = 0.85, r = 0.89, r = 0.91, r = 0.92, respectively, p < 0.01). Similarly, mean MFCV and type II MFCV were better correlated with the rate of force development than with maximum isometric leg press force. Lower, but significant correlations were found between mean MFCV and countermovement jump power (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). These data suggest that muscle fiber conduction velocity is better linked with the rate of force development than with isometric force, perhaps because conduction velocity is higher in the larger and fastest muscle fibers which are recognized to contribute to explosive actions.

  4. Arc Conductance and Flow Velocity Affected by Transient Recovery Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Reo; Ishikawa, Yuya; Ono, Seisui; Sato, Ken; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the stable supply of electric power is indispensable. The GCB (Gas Circuit Breaker) can prevent the spread of the fault current. However, it should have the reliability more. Therefore the GCB has been researched for performance improvement of the arc interruption of abnormal fault current without the fail. Therefore, it is important to prevent the breakdown such as the re-ignition and thermal re-ignition of arc after the arc interruption. It is necessary to reduce the arc conductance in order to prevent the re-ignition of arc. The arc conductance is derived from the temperature distribution and the volume of the arc. The temperature distribution of the arc is formed by convection. In this research, the arc conductance and flow velocity affected by transient recovery voltage are elucidated. The flow rate and temperature distribution of the arc is calculated with changing transient recovery voltage. In addition, the arc conductance is calculated in order to know the extinguish arc ability. As a result, when the transient recovery voltage increases, the probability of re-ignition increases. Therefore, the arc temperature and the arc conductance were increased.

  5. Robust transport by multiple motors with nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Mogilner, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Transport by processive molecular motors plays an important role in many cell biological phenomena. In many cases, motors work together to transport cargos in the cell, so it is important to understand the mechanics of the multiple motors. Based on earlier modeling efforts, here we study effects of nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing on multiple motor transport. We find that when two or three motors transport the cargo, then the nonlinear and stochastic effects compensate so that the mechanical properties of the transport are robust. Similarly, the transport is insensitive to compliance of the cargo-motor links. Furthermore, the rate of movement against moderate loads is not improved by increasing the small number of motors. When the motor number is greater than 4, correlations between the motors become negligible, and the earlier analytical mean-field theory of the multiple motor transport holds. We predict that the effective diffusion of the cargo driven by the multiple motors under load increases by an order of magnitude compared to that for the single motor. Finally, our simulations predict that the stochastic effects are responsible for a significant dispersion of velocities generated by the 'tug-of-war' of the multiple opposing motors.

  6. Robust transport by multiple motors with nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Mogilner, Alexander

    2010-02-10

    Transport by processive molecular motors plays an important role in many cell biological phenomena. In many cases, motors work together to transport cargos in the cell, so it is important to understand the mechanics of the multiple motors. Based on earlier modeling efforts, here we study effects of nonlinear force-velocity relations and stochastic load sharing on multiple motor transport. We find that when two or three motors transport the cargo, then the nonlinear and stochastic effects compensate so that the mechanical properties of the transport are robust. Similarly, the transport is insensitive to compliance of the cargo-motor links. Furthermore, the rate of movement against moderate loads is not improved by increasing the small number of motors. When the motor number is greater than 4, correlations between the motors become negligible, and the earlier analytical mean-field theory of the multiple motor transport holds. We predict that the effective diffusion of the cargo driven by the multiple motors under load increases by an order of magnitude compared to that for the single motor. Finally, our simulations predict that the stochastic effects are responsible for a significant dispersion of velocities generated by the 'tug-of-war' of the multiple opposing motors.

  7. Robust transport by multiple motors with nonlinear force–velocity relations and stochastic load sharing

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Mogilner, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Transport by processive molecular motors plays an important role in many cell biological phenomena. In many cases, motors work together to transport cargos in the cell, so it is important to understand the mechanics of the multiple motors. Based on earlier modeling efforts, here we study effects of nonlinear force–velocity relations and stochastic load sharing on multiple motor transport. We find that when two or three motors transport the cargo, then the nonlinear and stochastic effects compensate so that the mechanical properties of the transport are robust. Similarly, the transport is insensitive to compliance of the cargo-motor links. Furthermore, the rate of movement against moderate loads is not improved by increasing the small number of motors. When the motor number is greater than 4, correlations between the motors become negligible, and the earlier analytical mean-field theory of the multiple motor transport holds. We predict that the effective diffusion of the cargo driven by the multiple motors under load increases by an order of magnitude compared to that for the single motor. Finally, our simulations predict that the stochastic effects are responsible for a significant dispersion of velocities generated by the ‘tug-of-war’ of the multiple opposing motors. PMID:20147778

  8. System and method for determining velocity of electrically conductive fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Markusic, Thomas E. (Inventor); Stanojev, Boris Johann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A flowing electrically-conductive fluid is controlled between an upstream and downstream location thereof to insure that a convection timescale of the flowing fluid is less than a thermal diffusion timescale of the flowing fluid. First and second nodes of a current-carrying circuit are coupled to the fluid at the upstream location. A current pulse is applied to the current-carrying circuit so that the current pulse travels through the flowing fluid to thereby generate a thermal feature therein at the upstream location. The thermal feature is convected to the downstream location where it is monitored to detect a peak associated with the thermal feature so-convected. The velocity of the fluid flow is determined using a time-of-flight analysis.

  9. [Multifocal-motor neuropathy and motor neuropathy with multifocal conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Mamoli, B

    1995-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy, which mimics lower motor neuron disease, is a rare and curious demyelinating neuropathy characterised by slowly progressive, asymmetric limb weakness within the distribution of individual peripheral nerves, wasting, cramps, fasciculations and rare sensory involvement, but without upper motor neuron signs. The cardinal feature and primary pathophysiological basis for the weakness is the multifocal motor conduction block which remains stable for years at the same site and is confined to motor axons. It is defined as > 50% reduction in both the CMAP and the negative peak area on proximal stimulation, as compared with the distal stimulus response without any change in the negative peak duration. Nerves at the site of the conduction block show demyelination, endoneural edema, rudimentary onion bulbs and lymphocytic inflammation. Sensory nerves may show mild demyelination, axon loss and lymphocytic inflammation. The majority of patients shows elevated titers of anti-glycolipid antibodies, which may block the Na+ channels, produce demyelination or interfere with remyelination. However, their role in the pathogenesis of multifocal motor neuropathy remains uncertain. Multifocal motor neuropathy is regarded as the predominantly motor variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and can be treated best with immunoglobulins and cyclophosphamide.

  10. Velocity Fluctuations in Kinesin-1 Gliding Motility Assays Originate in Motor Attachment Geometry Variations.

    PubMed

    Palacci, Henri; Idan, Ofer; Armstrong, Megan J; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nitta, Takahiro; Hess, Henry

    2016-08-09

    Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin play a major role in cellular cargo transport, muscle contraction, cell division, and engineered nanodevices. Quantifying the collective behavior of coupled motors is critical to our understanding of these systems. An excellent model system is the gliding motility assay, where hundreds of surface-adhered motors propel one cytoskeletal filament such as an actin filament or a microtubule. The filament motion can be observed using fluorescence microscopy, revealing fluctuations in gliding velocity. These velocity fluctuations have been previously quantified by a motional diffusion coefficient, which Sekimoto and Tawada explained as arising from the addition and removal of motors from the linear array of motors propelling the filament as it advances, assuming that different motors are not equally efficient in their force generation. A computational model of kinesin head diffusion and binding to the microtubule allowed us to quantify the heterogeneity of motor efficiency arising from the combination of anharmonic tail stiffness and varying attachment geometries assuming random motor locations on the surface and an absence of coordination between motors. Knowledge of the heterogeneity allows the calculation of the proportionality constant between the motional diffusion coefficient and the motor density. The calculated value (0.3) is within a standard error of our measurements of the motional diffusion coefficient on surfaces with varying motor densities calibrated by landing rate experiments. This allowed us to quantify the loss in efficiency of coupled molecular motors arising from heterogeneity in the attachment geometry.

  11. The central motor conductivity of genioglossus in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kang, Jian; Kong, Delei

    2010-11-01

    During wakefulness, the electromyography (EMG) activities of upper airway dilator muscles are higher in OSA syndrome (OSAS) patients than those in normal subjects. This is believed to be related to central compensatory mechanisms. This study aimed to assess the central motor conductivity of genioglossus (GG) during wakefulness and to evaluate the compensatory site in OSAS patients. Twelve OSAS patients and 12 normal subjects were recruited to record motor evoked potential (MEP) of GG to transcranial magnetic stimulation applied at dominant-sided anterolateral area and GG response to magnetic stimulation at the third cervical level. Stimuli were delivered at the end of expiration and inspiration respectively. The central motor conduction time (CMCT) was calculated by the latency difference between cortical and cervical stimulations. The MEP latency and CMCT of GG in OSAS patients were shorter than those in normal subjects at the end of expiration (MEP latency: 6.08 ± 2.06 ms and 8.24 ± 2.66 ms, respectively, P < 0.05; CMCT: 2.41 ± 1.20 ms and 3.58 ± 1.53 ms, respectively, P < 0.05). However, only in normal subjects, GG MEP latency and CMCT showed significant decrease from the end of expiration to the end of inspiration. GG CMCT of OSAS patients at the end of expiration was closely correlated with AHI (r = -0.797, P = 0.002), the nadir oxygen saturation (r = 0.76, P = 0.003) and the longest apnoea time (r = -0.68, P = 0.02). OSAS patients have an increased central motor conductivity of GG than normal subjects. Furthermore, this increased central motor conductivity of GG is related to the severity of OSAS. © 2010 The Authors; Respirology © 2010 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  12. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems—the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32–125 motors per μm2), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track. PMID:25201964

  13. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M

    2014-09-23

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems--the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32-125 motors per μm(2)), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track.

  14. Sudomotor nerve conduction velocity and central processing time of the skin conductance response.

    PubMed

    Lim, C L; Seto-Poon, M; Clouston, P D; Morris, J G L

    2003-11-01

    To estimate the sudomotor nerve conduction velocity (CV), the central processing time (CPT) and habituation of the skin conductance response (SCR). SCRs in response to a single deep inspiratory breath, an electrical stimulus and a sound click were obtained from the fingers and toes of 30 healthy adults. Sudomotor nerve conduction velocities were determined after measuring extremity length and latency differences. CPT was estimated by subtracting the efferent time and the known afferent times and neuroeffector times from the onset latency. The inspiratory SCR habituated slower than the auditory or electrical SCRs. CVs of the 3 modalities did not differ statistically and their mean was 1.07 m s(-1) (95% CI: 1.01-1.13). The inspiratory SCR arrived at the fingers 1.26+/-0.09 s after the onset of chest wall movement. Electrical and auditory SCR onset latencies at the fingers were 1.60+/-0.03 and 1.75+/-0.04 s, respectively. Their CPTs were 140 and 160 ms, estimated from the electrical and auditory SCR onset latencies to the fingers. The CPT for inspiratory SCR was estimated to occur during the inspiratory CPT after the inspiratory decision and before chest movement. In contrast to the SCR following an electrical or auditory stimulus, initiation of deep inspiratory SCR occurs before the inspiratory act, precluding any possible input from respiratory afferent receptors and implicating a central generator. This study provides new insights into the origin of the SCR following inspiration.

  15. Ulnar nerve conduction velocity in injured baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Hwa; Jong, Yeu-Jeng; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2005-01-01

    To compare the ulnar nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of baseball pitchers without elbow injury to baseball pitchers with elbow injury and to persons who do not play baseball. Cross-sectional. Hospital rehabilitation department. Eight college baseball pitchers without elbow injury, 8 age-matched controls who did not play baseball, and 8 college baseball pitchers with a history of elbow injury with tenderness over the cubital tunnel area. Supramaximal electric stimulation was applied superficially to the ulnar nerve at the wrist, below the elbow, and above the elbow of both the dominant and nondominant arms of all subjects. M waves were recorded from the abductor digiti minimi muscles. The ulnar NCV was calculated separately for the across-elbow and below-elbow segments. The ulnar NCVs of both arms of the 3 groups were compared by using a 2-way (arm by group) analysis of variance, with a statistical significance level of P less than .05. The ulnar NCVs were 64.40+/-7.34m/s, 54.97+/-8.67m/s, and 59.18+/-4.10m/s for the pitchers without injury, pitchers with injury, and the subjects who were not pitchers, respectively. The pitchers without injury were significantly faster than the other 2 groups. For pitchers without injury, the ulnar NCVs of the dominant arm were significantly faster than those of the nondominant arm (56.26+/-2.63m/s). No significant difference was found between the dominant and nondominant arms for the group of injured pitchers and for the group of subjects who were not pitchers. The ulnar NCVs of the injured pitchers did not appear to be abnormal, but were suboptimal in comparison with the noninjured pitchers. The above-normal NCVs observed in the noninjured pitchers may be the result of an adaptation to trauma associated with ball throwing.

  16. Atrial Conduction Velocity Correlates with Frequency Content of Bipolar Signal.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Stefano; Grassi, Francesco; Galleani, Lorenzo; Bianchi, Francesca; Sibona Masi, Andrea; Conte, Maria Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Anisotropy in conduction velocity (CV) is a key substrate abnormality influencing atrial arrhythmias. In skeletal muscle fibers, CV and frequency content of the surface electromyogram signal are directly related. We hypothesized that in human atria the frequency content of the bipolar signal, recorded on the endocardial surface, is directly related to the local CV. In 15 patients submitted to ablation of supraventricular arrhythmias, incremental pacing was performed through an octapolar catheter inserted into the coronary sinus (CS), alternatively from both extremities in two different sequences: CS bipole 1-2 as the pacing site and CS bipole 7-8 as the detection site in the first, and vice versa in the second. The pacing cycle length (PCL) was stepwise decreased from 600 ms to 500 ms, 400 ms, 300 ms, until 250 ms. Estimation of the CV was performed as the ratio between the distance traveled by the propagating pulse and the propagation time. The frequency distribution of the signal energy was estimated using the fast Fourier transform, and the characteristic frequency (CF) was estimated as the barycenter of the frequency spectrum. A total of 2,496 bipolar signals were analyzed; CV and CF were estimated and compared. The single patient and group data analysis showed a significant direct correlation between CV and CF of the local bipolar signal. Comparing the degree of spectral compression among signals registered in different points of the endocardial cardiac surface in response to decreasing PCL enables to map local differences in CV, a useful arrhythmogenic substrate index. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Muscle Fiber Composition, and Power Performance.

    PubMed

    Methenitis, Spyridon; Karandreas, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Zaras, Nikolaos; Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV), fiber type composition, and power performance in participants with different training background. Thirty-eight young males with different training background participated: sedentary (n = 10), endurance runners (n = 9), power trained (n = 10), and strength trained (n = 9). They performed maximal countermovement jumps (CMJ) and maximal isometric leg press for the measurement of the rate of force development (RFD). Resting vastus lateralis MFCV was measured with intramuscular microelectrodes on a different occasion, whereas muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA) of vastus lateralis were evaluated through muscle biopsies 1wk later. MFCV, CMJ power, RFD, and % CSA of type II and type IIx fibers were higher for the power-trained group (P < 0.001). No difference was found between sedentary participants and endurance runners in these variables, but both of these groups performed worse than strength/power participants. Close correlations were found between MFCV and fiber CSA as well as the % CSA of all fiber types as well as with RFD and CMJ power (r = 0.712-0.943, P < 0.005). Partial correlations revealed that the % CSA of IIx fibers dictates a large part of the correlation between MFCV and RFD, power performance. Significant models for the prediction of the % CSA of type IIa and type II as well as the CSA of all muscle fibers based upon MFCV, RFD, and CMJ were revealed (P = 0.000). MFCV is closely associated with muscle fiber % CSA. RFD and jumping power are associated with the propagation of the action potentials along the muscle fibers. This link is regulated by the size and the distribution of type II, and especially type IIx muscle fibers.

  18. A velocity command stepper motor for CSI application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.

    1991-01-01

    The application of linear force actuators for vibration suppression of flexible structures has received much attention in recent years. A linear force actuator consists of a movable mass that is restrained such that its motion is linear. By application of a force to the mass, an equal and opposite reaction force can be applied to a structure. The use of an industrial linear stepper motor as a reaction mass actuator is described. With the linear stepper motor mounted on a simple test beam and the NASA Mini-Mast, output feedback of acceleration or displacement are used to augment the structural damping of the test articles. Significant increases in damping were obtained for both the test beam and the Mini-Mast.

  19. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy (Aman) With Motor Conduction Blocks In Childhood; Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Serhan; Adviye, Rahşan; Gül, Hakan Levent; Türk Börü, Ülkü

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), characterized with decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and absence of demyelinating findings in electrophysiological studies, is a subtype of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS). A 4 yr-old male patient presented with ascending weakness, dysarthria and dysphagia to İstanbul Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital Neurology outpatient for three days to in 2012. Dysphonia, restricted eye movements, flaccid tetraplegia and areflexia were found in neurological examination. There were motor conduction blocks in all peripheral nerves in electrophysiological studies.According to these findings the patient was diagnosed as Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP). Reduction of CMAP amplitudes in posterior tibial nerve, absence of CMAPs in median, ulnar and peroneal nerves and loss of motor conduction blocks were found in following electrophysiological studies. According to these findings, patient was diagnosed as AMAN. Motor conduction blocks may appear in early stage of AMAN and they disappear in later examinations. That’s why electrophysiological studies must be repeated in patients with GBS. PMID:27057191

  20. Perception of the color red enhances the force and velocity of motor output.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Andrew J; Aarts, Henk

    2011-04-01

    The present research examined whether perception of the color red influences basic motor functioning. Prior research on color and motor functioning has been guided by ill-defined theoretical statements, and has been plagued by methodological problems. Drawing on theoretical and empirical work on the threat-behavior link in human and nonhuman animals, we proposed and tested the prediction that perceiving red enhances the force and velocity of motor output. Experiment 1 demonstrated that red, relative to gray (matched to red on lightness), facilitates pinchgrip force. Experiment 2 demonstrated that red, relative to gray (matched to red on lightness) and blue (matched to red on lightness and chroma) facilitates handgrip force and the velocity of that force. These findings clearly establish a link between red and basic motor action, illustrate the importance of rigorous experimental methods when testing color effects, and highlight the need to attend to the functional, as well as aesthetic, value of color.

  1. Muscle fibre conduction velocity during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David; Farina, Dario; Shen, Chao; Macaluso, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Ten male volunteers (age 29.2 ± 5.2 years, mean ± SD) were recruited to test the hypothesis that muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV) would decrease with power output during a 30-s Wingate test on a mechanically-braked cycle ergometer. Prior to the main test, the optimal pre-fixed load corresponding to the highest power output was selected following a random series of six 10-s sprints. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the right vastus lateralis with linear adhesive arrays of eight electrodes. Power output decreased significantly from 6-s until the end of the test (860.9 ± 207.8 vs. 360.9 ± 11.4 W, respectively) and was correlated with MFCV (R=0.543, P<0.01), which also declined significantly by 26.8 ± 11% (P<0.05). There was a tendency for the mean frequency of the EMG power spectrum (MNF) to decrease, but average rectified values (ARV) remained unchanged throughout the test. The parallel decline of MFCV with power output suggests changes in fibre membrane properties. The unaltered ARV, together with the declined MFCV, would indicate either a decrease in discharge rate, de-recruitment of fatigued motor units or elongation of still present motor unit action potentials.

  2. Peripheral nerve ultrasound changes in CIDP and correlations with nerve conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, Antonella; Morino, Stefania; Loreti, Simona; Bucci, Elisabetta; Vanacore, Nicola; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-02-24

    To evaluate the ultrasound (US) characteristics of peripheral nerves in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and their correlations with electrodiagnostic (EDX) characteristics. Nineteen patients with CIDP and 19 healthy controls matched by age and body mass index were included in a blind case-control, observational study. All patients underwent a neurologic examination (including inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment [INCAT] and Medical Research Council [MRC] sum score) and an EDX study. Each patient and each control underwent a US study of 14 nerve segments, yielding a total number of 266 segments scanned in each group. US changes, characterized by an increased nerve cross-sectional area (NCSA), were detected in 53% of the 266 patient nerve segments. Mean NCSA was higher in nerve segments of patients than in those of controls (p < 0.001). Nerve segments with abnormal US belonged to patients with longer disease duration, lower MRC sum score, higher INCAT score, and progressive disease form (all p < 0.0001). All the aforementioned variables were independently associated with the occurrence of US changes. Motor nerve conduction was significantly lower in nerve segments with increased NCSA than in those with normal NCSA (p < 0.0001). NCSA in segments with prevalent myelin damage was higher than that in segments with prevalent axonal damage (p = 0.001) or in segments with normal EDX characteristics (p < 0.0001). NCSA and motor nerve conduction velocity were inversely correlated in nerve segments with EDX evidence of myelin damage (R = 0.599; p < 0.0001). Conduction blocks were associated with increased NCSA (p = 0.001). US may, similar to MRI, have a supporting role in the diagnosis of CIDP. US and EDX changes are correlated. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. An ultrasonic motor driven by the phase-velocity difference between two traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongzhe; Ishii, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Yonezawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Tomokazu

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents a new ultrasonic motor in which the rotor rotation speed is locked by the phase-velocity difference between the two traveling waves propagating on the stator and the rotor. First, the unique construction to excite two traveling waves both in the stator and the rotor is described. Then, the operation principle of the present motor is revealed by our careful experiments. Dynamics of the two traveling waves are measured by an in-plane laser Doppler vibrometer under various conditions, as well as the motor performances. Our experiments show that the rotation speed of the motor is equal to the phase-velocity difference between the two traveling waves on the contact surfaces of rotor and stator. It is confirmed that the rotor rotates so as to cancel the phase-velocity difference between the traveling vibrations along the circumferences of the rotor and stator. If the load does not exceed the maximum torque that is determined by the vibration amplitude, the rotation speed is subject only to the phase-velocity difference.

  4. Motor conduction block and high titres of anti-GM1 ganglioside antibodies: pathological evidence of a motor neuropathy in a patient with lower motor neuron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D; Kuntzer, T; Steck, A J; Lobrinus, A; Janzer, R C; Regli, F

    1993-01-01

    A patient with a progressive lower motor neuron syndrome and neurophysiological evidence of motor axon loss, multifocal proximal motor nerve conduction block, and high titres of anti-ganglioside GM1 antibodies. Neuropathological findings included a predominantly proximal motor radiculoneuropathy with multifocal IgG and IgM deposits on nerve fibres associated with a loss of spinal motor neurons. These findings support an autoimmune origin of this lower motor neuron syndrome with retrograde degeneration of spinal motor neurons and severe neurogenic muscular atrophy. Images PMID:8410039

  5. On the relationship between joint angular velocity and motor cortical discharge during reaching.

    PubMed

    Reina, G A; Moran, D W; Schwartz, A B

    2001-06-01

    Single-unit activity in area M1 was recorded in awake, behaving monkeys during a three-dimensional (3D) reaching task performed in a virtual reality environment. This study compares motor cortical discharge rate to both the hand's velocity and the arm's joint angular velocities. Hand velocity is considered a parameter of extrinsic space because it is measured in the Cartesian coordinate system of the monkey's workspace. Joint angular velocity is considered a parameter of intrinsic space because it is measured relative to adjacent arm/body segments. In the initial analysis, velocity was measured as the difference in hand position or joint posture between the beginning and ending of the reach. Cortical discharge rate was taken as the mean activity between these two times. This discharge rate was compared through a regression analysis to either an extrinsic-coordinate model based on the three components of hand velocity or to an intrinsic-coordinate model based on seven joint angular velocities. The model showed that velocities about four degrees-of-freedom (elbow flexion/extension, shoulder flexion/extension, shoulder internal/external rotation, and shoulder adduction/abduction) were those best represented in the sampled population of recorded activity. Patterns of activity recorded across the cortical population at each point in time throughout the task were used in a second analysis to predict the temporal profiles of joint angular velocity and hand velocity. The population of cortical units from area M1 matched the hand velocity and three of the four major joint angular velocities. However, shoulder adduction/abduction could not be predicted even though individual cells showed good correlation to movement on this axis. This was also the only major degree-of-freedom not well correlated to hand velocity, suggesting that the other apparent relations between joint angular velocity and neuronal activity may be due to intrinsic-extrinsic correlations inherent in

  6. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges

    PubMed Central

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na+–K+-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na+–K+-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10–300 μm) and carbamazepine (30–500 μm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10–80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na+–K+-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons. PMID:18096592

  7. Noninvasive estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity distribution using an electromyographic processing technique.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Ken; Chiba, Yu; Moriyama, Hideki; Hosoda, Masataka; Suzuki, Yosuke; Gomi, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is useful in investigating muscle activation; however, noninvasive evaluation of surface EMG is limited due to its complicated waveform. This study investigated muscle structure and activation using an analysis technique for surface EMG. Surface array electrodes were used in 17 healthy male subjects to record eight-channel EMGs from each biceps brachii muscle during voluntary isometric contraction with a 1-kg weight band with the subjects seated. The peaks detected by referenced EMGs were normalized and averaged as averaged pulses (APs) and the innervation zone (IZ) was estimated from the APs. Muscle fiber conduction velocities (MFCVs), estimated by the time difference of the peaks (method P) and by cross-correlation (method CC) by APs, were compared. Time periods with positive values around the central peak in AP (PP) were measured and the contribution of MFCVs by motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) was estimated. IZs were estimated in 12 subjects. Near the IZ, correlation between MFCVs by methods P and CC was lower than in other locations; MFCV was significantly larger by method P than by method CC in the vicinity of the IZ. PP of the comparison AP was significantly larger than that of the reference AP. The distribution of the MFCVs by different MUAPs was verified by computer simulation. Surface EMG was used to demonstrate the diversity of MFCVs, with some increased MFCVs, for several MUAPs in the vicinity of the IZ. This method could be applied to the evaluation of neuromuscular disorders.

  8. n-Hexane-induced changes in nerve conduction velocities and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Mutti, A; Ferri, F; Lommi, G; Lotta, S; Lucertini, S; Franchini, I

    1982-01-01

    Fifteen women from a shoe factory were examined clinically and their cerebral evoked responses to 256 electrical stimulations of the median nerve were averaged. Neurophysiological investigations included maximal motor (MCV) and distal sensory (dSCV) nerve conduction velocity measurement on ulnar, median, and peroneal nerves. A referent group was composed of 15 age-matched women without exposure to neurotoxic chemicals. MCVs and dSCVs of the exposed workers were significantly reduced vs referents, while P15 and N20 components of the somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) showed an increased latency. A negative linear relationship was found between dSCV and P15 latency. However, two subjects with an abnormally low dSCV showed normal SEP latency, and two other subjects displayed abnormal SEP latency, while their dSCV was in the normal range. Therefore, SEP investigation may give additional information on nervous system function, even in subjects with peripheral neuropathy. The later SEP components were much flatter in the exposed than in the referent group, suggesting some neurotoxic effects of n-hexane on the central nervous system too.

  9. History dependence of human muscle-fiber conduction velocity during voluntary isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Lateva, Zoia C.

    2011-01-01

    The conduction velocity (CV) of a muscle fiber is affected by the fiber's discharge history going back ∼1 s. We investigated this dependence by measuring CV fluctuations during voluntary isometric contractions of the human brachioradialis muscle. We recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals simultaneously from multiple intramuscular electrodes, identified potentials belonging to the same motor unit using EMG decomposition, and estimated the CV of each discharge from the interpotential interval. In 12 of 14 subjects, CV increased by ∼10% during the first second after recruitment and then fluctuated by about ±2% in a way that mirrored the fluctuations in the instantaneous firing rate. The CV profile could be precisely described in terms of the discharge history by a simple mathematical model. In the other two subjects, and one subject retested after cooling the arm, the CV fluctuations were inversely correlated with instantaneous firing rate. In all subjects, CV was additionally affected by very short interdischarge intervals (<25 ms): it was increased in doublets at recruitment, but decreased in doublets during continuous firing and after short interdischarge intervals in doubly innervated fibers. CV also exhibited a slow trend of about −0.05%/s that did not depend on the immediate discharge history. We suggest that measurements of CV fluctuations during voluntary contractions, or during stimulation protocols that involve longer and more complex stimulation patterns than are currently being used, may provide a sensitive approach for estimating the dynamic characteristics of ion channels in the human muscle-fiber membrane. PMID:21565985

  10. Analysis and application of a velocity command motor as a reaction mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.

    1990-01-01

    A commercially available linear stepper motor is applied as a reaction mass (RM) actuator. With the actuator operating in the (RM) relative-velocity command mode, open-loop and closed-loop testing is performed to determine operational limits. With the actuator mounted on a simple beam structure, root strain, RM acceleration, or beam acceleration is used in the feedback loop to augment the structural damping. The RM relative position is also used as feedback to ensure that the RM remains centered.

  11. Effect of extracellular potassium accumulation on muscle fiber conduction velocity: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-10-01

    A progressive reduction in muscle fiber conduction velocity is typically observed during fatiguing muscle contraction. Although the exact causes of the conduction velocity decrease have not yet been fully established, increasing evidence suggests that changes in extracellular potassium concentration may be largely responsible. In this study, a mathematical model was developed to examine the effect of extracellular potassium concentration on the muscle fiber action potential and conduction velocity. The model was used to simulate changes in extracellular potassium concentration at a range of temperatures and extracellular potassium accumulation during repetitive stimulation of the muscle fiber at 37 degrees C. The action potential broadened, and its amplitude and conduction velocity decreased as extracellular potassium concentration increased. The potassium-induced changes in action potential shape and conduction velocity were eliminated when the inward rectifier channels were removed from the model. The results support the hypothesis that accumulation of extracellular potassium ions may be a major contributor to the reduction in muscle fiber conduction velocity and loss of membrane excitability during fatiguing contractions. They additionally suggest that inward rectifier currents play a critical role in potassium-induced membrane depolarization, leading to increased sodium inactivation and resulting in the observed reduction in conduction velocity and membrane excitability.

  12. Neural control of computer cursor velocity by decoding motor cortical spiking activity in humans with tetraplegia*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D; Hochberg, Leigh R; Donoghue, John P; Black, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Computer-mediated connections between human motor cortical neurons and assistive devices promise to improve or restore lost function in people with paralysis. Recently, a pilot clinical study of an intracortical neural interface system demonstrated that a tetraplegic human was able to obtain continuous two-dimensional control of a computer cursor using neural activity recorded from his motor cortex. This control, however, was not sufficiently accurate for reliable use in many common computer control tasks. Here, we studied several central design choices for such a system including the kinematic representation for cursor movement, the decoding method that translates neuronal ensemble spiking activity into a control signal and the cursor control task used during training for optimizing the parameters of the decoding method. In two tetraplegic participants, we found that controlling a cursor's velocity resulted in more accurate closed-loop control than controlling its position directly and that cursor velocity control was achieved more rapidly than position control. Control quality was further improved over conventional linear filters by using a probabilistic method, the Kalman filter, to decode human motor cortical activity. Performance assessment based on standard metrics used for the evaluation of a wide range of pointing devices demonstrated significantly improved cursor control with velocity rather than position decoding. PMID:19015583

  13. Neural control of computer cursor velocity by decoding motor cortical spiking activity in humans with tetraplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Black, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    Computer-mediated connections between human motor cortical neurons and assistive devices promise to improve or restore lost function in people with paralysis. Recently, a pilot clinical study of an intracortical neural interface system demonstrated that a tetraplegic human was able to obtain continuous two-dimensional control of a computer cursor using neural activity recorded from his motor cortex. This control, however, was not sufficiently accurate for reliable use in many common computer control tasks. Here, we studied several central design choices for such a system including the kinematic representation for cursor movement, the decoding method that translates neuronal ensemble spiking activity into a control signal and the cursor control task used during training for optimizing the parameters of the decoding method. In two tetraplegic participants, we found that controlling a cursor's velocity resulted in more accurate closed-loop control than controlling its position directly and that cursor velocity control was achieved more rapidly than position control. Control quality was further improved over conventional linear filters by using a probabilistic method, the Kalman filter, to decode human motor cortical activity. Performance assessment based on standard metrics used for the evaluation of a wide range of pointing devices demonstrated significantly improved cursor control with velocity rather than position decoding. Disclosure. JPD is the Chief Scientific Officer and a director of Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems (CYKN); he holds stock and receives compensation. JDS has been a consultant for CYKN. LRH receives clinical trial support from CYKN.

  14. The correlation between muscle and nerve fiber conduction velocities in thenar muscle is lost in case of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Dassouki, Mohamad; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in thenar muscle of 20 normal subjects and of 20 patients suffering from a moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. Our goal was to confirm the positive correlation between MFCV and MNCV and to assess the influence of carpal tunnel syndrome on this relationship. MFCV was calculated in voluntarily contracted thenar muscle using a multi-channel surface recording and a spike-triggered averaging technique. MFCV values ranged between 2.6 and 7.2 m/s (mean+/-SEM: 4.5+/-0.3) in normal subjects and between 3.5 and 6.9 m/s (4.7+/-0.2) in patients. Subjects and patients did not differ regarding MFCV values, but a correlation between MFCV and MNCV was found in normal subjects (P=0.0005) and not in patients (P=0.54). A correlation between muscle and nerve conduction velocities existed in healthy subjects but was lost in case of moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. MFCV appeared to be insensitive to focal nerve conduction slowing.

  15. A Study on High Thermal Conductive Insulation for Claw Teeth Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Yuichiro; Obata, Koji; Enomoto, Yuji; Okabe, Yoshiaki

    To increase the power density of motors in a wide range of fields from home appliance to power industry, we proposed two new high thermal conductive insulation systems for the motors. They were a glass cross insulation system and a resin coated insulation system without forced cooling devices such as a cooling fan. Their thermal and insulation characteristics were measured and analyzed, and optimum thermal conductive structures for claw teeth motors were discussed through robust design and thermal network analysis. Experiment on prototype motors with the highest thermal conductive epoxy resin (5 W/mK) and the proposed systems, revealed that the temperature rise of motor coils was decreased; their temperature reached 73 % of that of the motor coils with standard insulation and normal resin (0.6 W/mK). Furthermore, partial discharge inception voltage (PDIV) and breakdown voltage (BDV) were measured, and we verified that resin coated insulation motors could withstand as high a voltage as normal insulation motors.

  16. Unique charge distribution in surface loops confers high velocity on the fast motor protein Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Yanase, Kenji; Ichikawa, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2009-12-22

    Most myosins have a positively charged loop 2 with a cluster of lysine residues that bind to the negatively charged N-terminal segment of actin. However, the net charge of loop 2 of very fast Chara myosin is zero and there is no lysine cluster in it. In contrast, Chara myosin has a highly positively charged loop 3. To elucidate the role of these unique surface loops of Chara myosin in its high velocity and high actin-activated ATPase activity, we have undertaken mutational analysis using recombinant Chara myosin motor domain. It was found that net positive charge in loop 3 affected V(max) and K(app) of actin activated ATPase activity, while it affected the velocity only slightly. The net positive charge in loop 2 affected K(app) and the velocity, although it did not affect V(max). Our results suggested that Chara myosin has evolved to have highly positively charged loop 3 for its high ATPase activity and have less positively charged loop 2 for its high velocity. Since high positive charge in loop 3 and low positive charge in loop 2 seem to be one of the reasons for Chara myosin's high velocity, we manipulated charge contents in loops 2 and 3 of Dictyostelium myosin (class II). Removing positive charge from loop 2 and adding positive charge to loop 3 of Dictyostelium myosin made its velocity higher than that of the wild type, suggesting that the charge strategy in loops 2 and 3 is widely applicable.

  17. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  18. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  19. Motor patterns of the small intestine explained by phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities: the critical importance of propagation velocity.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, Jan D; Parsons, Sean P; Chen, Ji-Hong; Pawelka, Andrew; Pistilli, Marc; Li, Chunpei; Yu, Yuanjie; Ye, Pengfei; Liu, Qing; Tong, Mengting; Zhu, Yong Fang; Wei, Defei

    2015-09-15

    Phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities of the small intestine, the omnipresent slow wave activity generated by interstitial cells of Cajal of the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and the stimulus-dependent rhythmic transient depolarizations generated by ICC of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), was recently hypothesized to underlie the orchestration of the segmentation motor pattern. The aim of the present study was to increase our understanding of phase-amplitude coupling through modeling. In particular the importance of propagation velocity of the ICC-DMP component was investigated. The outcome of the modeling was compared with motor patterns recorded from the rat or mouse intestine from which propagation velocities within the different patterns were measured. The results show that the classical segmentation motor pattern occurs when the ICC-DMP component has a low propagation velocity (<0.05 cm/s). When the ICC-DMP component has a propagation velocity in the same order of magnitude as that of the slow wave activity (∼1 cm/s), cluster type propulsive activity occurs which is in fact the dominant propulsive activity of the intestine. Hence, the only difference between the generation of propagating cluster contractions and the Cannon-type segmentation motor pattern is the propagation velocity of the low-frequency component, the rhythmic transient depolarizations originating from the ICC-DMP. Importantly, the proposed mechanism explains why both motor patterns have distinct rhythmic waxing and waning of the amplitude of contractions. The hypothesis is brought forward that the velocity is modulated by neural regulation of gap junction conductance within the ICC-DMP network.

  20. Motor patterns of the small intestine explained by phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities: the critical importance of propagation velocity

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sean P.; Chen, Ji-Hong; Pawelka, Andrew; Pistilli, Marc; Li, Chunpei; Yu, Yuanjie; Ye, Pengfei; Liu, Qing; Tong, Mengting; Zhu, Yong Fang; Wei, Defei

    2015-01-01

    Phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities of the small intestine, the omnipresent slow wave activity generated by interstitial cells of Cajal of the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and the stimulus-dependent rhythmic transient depolarizations generated by ICC of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), was recently hypothesized to underlie the orchestration of the segmentation motor pattern. The aim of the present study was to increase our understanding of phase-amplitude coupling through modeling. In particular the importance of propagation velocity of the ICC-DMP component was investigated. The outcome of the modeling was compared with motor patterns recorded from the rat or mouse intestine from which propagation velocities within the different patterns were measured. The results show that the classical segmentation motor pattern occurs when the ICC-DMP component has a low propagation velocity (<0.05 cm/s). When the ICC-DMP component has a propagation velocity in the same order of magnitude as that of the slow wave activity (∼1 cm/s), cluster type propulsive activity occurs which is in fact the dominant propulsive activity of the intestine. Hence, the only difference between the generation of propagating cluster contractions and the Cannon-type segmentation motor pattern is the propagation velocity of the low-frequency component, the rhythmic transient depolarizations originating from the ICC-DMP. Importantly, the proposed mechanism explains why both motor patterns have distinct rhythmic waxing and waning of the amplitude of contractions. The hypothesis is brought forward that the velocity is modulated by neural regulation of gap junction conductance within the ICC-DMP network. PMID:26135802

  1. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  2. AC motor controller with 180 degree conductive switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oximberg, Carol A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An ac motor controller is operated by a modified time-switching scheme where the switches of the inverter are on for electrical-phase-and-rotation intervals of 180.degree. as opposed to the conventional 120.degree.. The motor is provided with three-phase drive windings, a power inverter for power supplied from a dc power source consisting of six switches, and a motor controller which controls the current controlled switches in voltage-fed mode. During full power, each switch is gated continuously for three successive intervals of 60.degree. and modulated for only one of said intervals. Thus, during each 60.degree. interval, the two switches with like signs are on continuously and the switch with the opposite sign is modulated.

  3. Discrete Kinetic Models for Molecular Motors: Asymptotic Velocity and Gaussian Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, Alessandra; Silvestri, Vittoria

    2014-12-01

    We consider random walks on quasi one dimensional lattices, as introduced in Faggionato and Silvestri (Random Walks on Quasi One Dimensional Lattices: Large Deviations and Fluctuation Theorems, 2014). This mathematical setting covers a large class of discrete kinetic models for non-cooperative molecular motors on periodic tracks. We derive general formulas for the asymptotic velocity and diffusion coefficient, and we show how to reduce their computation to suitable linear systems of the same degree of a single fundamental cell, with possible linear chain removals. We apply the above results to special families of kinetic models, also catching some errors in the biophysics literature.

  4. Portable Conduction Velocity Experiments Using Earthworms for the College and High School Neuroscience Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities…

  5. Portable Conduction Velocity Experiments Using Earthworms for the College and High School Neuroscience Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities…

  6. Diagnostic value of the muscle fiber conduction velocity for evaluation of muscle hypotrophy.

    PubMed

    Gechev, Antonin G; Ilieva, Elena M; Marinkev, Marin D; Hadjigeorgiev, Georgi H

    2004-01-01

    To find an objective method of evaluation of the thigh muscle hypothrophy in gonarthrosis. The subjects of the study were 24 patients with gonarthrosis (mean age 58.4 +/- 2.6 years). Of these 8 (33%) were males and 16 (67%) females. The following methods of examination were used: computed tomography (CT) of the thigh musculature--linear measurement and area of the cross-section of the vastus medialis muscle; electromyography--muscle fiber conduction velocity; and measurement of thigh girth. Significant reduction of the cross-section area and linear measurement of the vastus medialis muscle and significant delay of the muscle fiber conduction velocity was found in the symptomatic side compared with the asymptomatic side. No correlation was found between the tape measure of the thigh and cross-section area of the muscle. A significant correlation was found between the cross-section area of the muscle and the fast fiber conduction velocity as well as between the linear measurement of the vastus medialis muscle cross-section and fast fiber conduction velocity. The correlation between the macromorphological changes of the vastus medialis muscle assessed by computed tomography and the functional changes detected by electromyography allows the conclusion that the muscle fiber conduction velocity can be used as an objective method of evaluation of muscle atrophy in degenerative joint diseases.

  7. Field-tracing approach to determine flow velocity and hydraulic conductivity in saturated peat soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gafni, A.

    1986-01-01

    A tracing methodology based on the point dilution concept was developed to quantify groundwater velocities in saturated peat soils. Groundwater velocity was measured in four different peatlands. The steepest hydraulic gradient and the dominant direction of groundwater flow were determined for each peatland. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of selected peat layers was estimated from measured groundwater velocity and hydraulic gradient using Darcy's equation. The effective porosity of three peat layers was determined using the pressure plate technique. The estimated hydraulic parameters of one of the bags were further evaluated by analyzing a rainfall-runoff event that exhibited groundwater discharge.

  8. Automatic versus Voluntary Motor Imitation: Effect of Visual Context and Stimulus Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Ambra; Stucchi, Natale; Jacono, Marco; Fadiga, Luciano; Pozzo, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Automatic imitation is the tendency to reproduce observed actions involutarily. Though this topic has been widely treated, at present little is known about the automatic imitation of the kinematic features of an observed movement. The present study was designed to understand if the kinematics of a previously seen stimulus primes the executed action, and if this effect is sensitive to the kinds of stimuli presented. We proposed a simple imitation paradigm in which a dot or a human demonstrator moved in front of the participant who was instructed either to reach the final position of the stimulus or to imitate its motion with his or her right arm. Participants' movements were automatically contaminated by stimulus velocity when it moved according to biological laws, suggesting that automatic imitation was kinematic dependent. Despite that the performance, in term of reproduced velocity, improved in a context of voluntary imitation, subjects did not replicate the observed motions exactly. These effects were not affected by the kind of stimuli used, i.e., motor responses were influenced in the same manner after dot or human observation. These findings support the existence of low-level sensory-motor matching mechanisms that work on movement planning and represent the basis for higher levels of social interaction. PMID:20976006

  9. Portable conduction velocity experiments using earthworms for the college and high school neuroscience teaching laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kyle M; Gage, Gregory J; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C

    2014-03-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities that can be easily measured by manipulating electrode placement and the tactile stimulus. Here, we present a portable and robust experimental setup that allows students to perform conduction velocity measurements within a 30-min to 1-h laboratory session. Our improvement over this well-known preparation is the combination of behaviorally relevant tactile stimuli (avoiding electrical stimulation) with the invention of minimal, low-cost, and portable equipment. We tested these experiments during workshops in both a high school and college classroom environment and found positive learning outcomes when we compared pre- and posttests taken by the students.

  10. Portable conduction velocity experiments using earthworms for the college and high school neuroscience teaching laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities that can be easily measured by manipulating electrode placement and the tactile stimulus. Here, we present a portable and robust experimental setup that allows students to perform conduction velocity measurements within a 30-min to 1-h laboratory session. Our improvement over this well-known preparation is the combination of behaviorally relevant tactile stimuli (avoiding electrical stimulation) with the invention of minimal, low-cost, and portable equipment. We tested these experiments during workshops in both a high school and college classroom environment and found positive learning outcomes when we compared pre- and posttests taken by the students. PMID:24585472

  11. A variant of multifocal motor neuropathy with acute, generalised presentation and persistent conduction blocks

    PubMed Central

    Lefaucheur, J; Gregson, N; Gray, I; von Raison, F; Bertocchi, M; Creange, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective:Multifocal motor neuropathy with persistent conduction blocks is classically described as a chronic neuropathy with progressive onset, and acute forms have not previously been characterised. We report four cases of severe motor impairment with acute and generalised onset and with persistent motor conduction blocks. Patients and results:An acute tetraparesis with diffuse areflexia but little or no sensory disturbance was the clinical picture. Serial electrophysiological tests showed persistent multifocal motor conduction blocks with absent F waves in most tested motor nerves. No or minor abnormalities of the sensory nerve action potentials were observed. Cerebrospinal fluid contained normal or mildly increased protein levels (<1 g/l) without cells. Campylobacter jejuni serology was negative in three patients and consistent with past infection in one patient. Anti-ganglioside antibodies were positive in three patients. A five day course of intravenous immunoglobulins produced nearly complete symptom resolution in three patients and was ineffective in one patient. Conclusion:Because of the persistence of multifocal motor conduction blocks for several weeks or months as the isolated electrophysiological feature, these cases could not be consistent with Guillain–Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. They suggest an original variant of multifocal motor neuropathy with an acute and generalised initial presentation and persistent motor conduction blocks affecting all four limbs. PMID:14617715

  12. BEM formulation for steady-state conduction-convection problems with variable velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Chan, C.L.; Chandra, A. . Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Development of a boundary-element method (BEM) for steady-state conduction-convection problems with an arbitrary velocity field is the principal focus of this article. The steady-state fundamental solution for a moving heat source is used in the present approach. An arbitrary velocity field is decomposed into a constant part and a variable part. In addition to the boundary integrals for the constant-velocity case, variable velocity requires a domain integral in the BEM formulation. Both iterative and noniterative schemes have been used to solve the BEM equation including the domain integral term. Numerical results obtained from the proposed formulation are first validated against analytical results. Other example problems are then investigated and a detailed parametric study is conducted to understand the effects of the decomposition level and mesh refinement. The proposed BEM formulation is found to produce stable and accurate solutions under a variety of conditions for steady-state conduction-convection problems with arbitrary velocity fields.

  13. Serum levels of TGF-β1 in patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its correlation with nerve conduction velocity in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Gauhar; Rizvi, S Aijaz Abbas; Singhal, Sangeeta; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    To correlate serum levels of TGF-β1 with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus The study was conducted in diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients which were divided in patients with clinically detectable peripheral neuropathy of shorter duration (n=37) and longer duration (n=27). They were compared with patients without clinical neuropathy (n=22). Clinical diagnosis was based on neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and Neuropathy disability score (NDS) for signs. Blood samples were collected for baseline investigations and estimation of serum TGF-β1. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in both upper and lower limbs. Median, Ulnar, Common Peroneal and Posterior Tibial nerves were selected for motor nerve conduction study and Median and Sural nerves were selected for sensory nerve conduction study In patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus with clinically detectable and serum TGF-β1 showed positive correlation with nerve conduction velocities High level of TGF-β1 in serum of T2DM patients with neuropathy show possible contribution in development of neuropathy. Due to its independent association this cytokine might be used as biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimum number of myosin motors accounting for shortening velocity under zero load in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Luca; Percario, Valentina; Brunello, Elisabetta; Caremani, Marco; Bianco, Pasquale; Powers, Joseph D; Reconditi, Massimo; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2017-02-15

    Myosin filament mechanosensing determines the efficiency of the contraction by adapting the number of switched ON motors to the load. Accordingly, the unloaded shortening velocity (V0 ) is already set at the end of latency relaxation (LR), ∼10 ms after the start of stimulation, when the myosin filament is still in the OFF state. Here the number of actin-attached motors per half-myosin filament (n) during V0 shortening imposed either at the end of LR or at the plateau of the isometric contraction is estimated from the relation between half-sarcomere compliance and force during the force redevelopment after shortening. The value of n decreases progressively with shortening and, during V0 shortening starting at the end of LR, is 1-4. Reduction of n is accounted for by a constant duty ratio of 0.05 and a parallel switching OFF of motors, explaining the very low rate of ATP utilization found during unloaded shortening. The maximum velocity at which a skeletal muscle can shorten (i.e. the velocity of sliding between the myosin filament and the actin filament under zero load, V0 ) is already set at the end of the latency relaxation (LR) preceding isometric force generation, ∼10 ms after the start of electrical stimulation in frog muscle fibres at 4°C. At this time, Ca(2+) -induced activation of the actin filament is maximal, while the myosin filament is in the OFF state characterized by most of the myosin motors lying on helical tracks on the filament surface, making them unavailable for actin binding and ATP hydrolysis. Here, the number of actin-attached motors per half-thick filament during V0 shortening (n) is estimated by imposing, on tetanized single fibres from Rana esculenta (at 4°C and sarcomere length 2.15 μm), small 4 kHz oscillations and determining the relation between half-sarcomere (hs) compliance and force during the force development following V0 shortening. When V0 shortening is superimposed on the maximum isometric force T0 , n decreases

  15. Dynamic Modulation of Myelination in Response to Visual Stimuli Alters Optic Nerve Conduction Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Etxeberria, Ainhoa; Hokanson, Kenton C.; Dao, Dang Q.; Mayoral, Sonia R.; Mei, Feng; Redmond, Stephanie A.; Ullian, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin controls the time required for an action potential to travel from the neuronal soma to the axon terminal, defining the temporal manner in which information is processed within the CNS. The presence of myelin, the internodal length, and the thickness of the myelin sheath are powerful structural factors that control the velocity and fidelity of action potential transmission. Emerging evidence indicates that myelination is sensitive to environmental experience and neuronal activity. Activity-dependent modulation of myelination can dynamically alter action potential conduction properties but direct functional in vivo evidence and characterization of the underlying myelin changes is lacking. We demonstrate that in mice long-term monocular deprivation increases oligodendrogenesis in the retinogeniculate pathway but shortens myelin internode lengths without affecting other structural properties of myelinated fibers. We also demonstrate that genetically attenuating synaptic glutamate neurotransmission from retinal ganglion cells phenocopies the changes observed after monocular deprivation, suggesting that glutamate may constitute a signal for myelin length regulation. Importantly, we demonstrate that visual deprivation and shortened internodes are associated with a significant reduction in nerve conduction velocity in the optic nerve. Our results reveal the importance of sensory input in the building of myelinated fibers and suggest that this activity-dependent alteration of myelination is important for modifying the conductive properties of brain circuits in response to environmental experience. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oligodendrocyte precursor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes and are capable of ensheathing axons with myelin without molecular cues from neurons. However, this default myelination process can be modulated by changes in neuronal activity. Here, we show, for the first time, that experience-dependent activity modifies the length of myelin

  16. Regulation of conduction velocity in axons from near-field receptors of the crayfish antennule.

    PubMed

    Mellon, DeForest

    2010-11-15

    The antennular flagella of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii each possess a linear array of near-field receptors, termed standing feathered sensilla, that are extremely sensitive to movement of the surrounding water. Previously it had been shown that, within each flagellum, the axonal conduction velocity of the sensory neuron pair associated with each feathered sensillum was linearly related to the position of the sensillum along the flagellar axis. In the current studies I show that the conduction velocity of axons within the proximal three segments of the antennules, between the flagellum and the brain, is somewhat higher than the corresponding conduction velocity of the same axons in the flagellum, especially for those whose flagellar conduction velocity is between 1 and 3 m s(-1), even though there is no net change in axonal diameter within this part of the afferent pathway. One consequence of this change in axonal conduction properties is an effective compression of the temporal spread - potentially by as much as tenfold - which otherwise would occur in arrival times of initial spikes from each sensillum following a mechanical stimulus to the antennule. Furthermore, the pattern signature of initial spike volleys at the brain following a global hydrodynamic stimulus to the flagellum is remarkably consistent and conceivably could be recognized as such by central processing centers. I conclude that conduction velocity adjustments improve temporal summation and resolution from input volleys that originate in the highly sensitive and, hence, inherently noisy near-field receptors, thereby more effectively triggering startle response circuitry at the approach of potential predators.

  17. Mapping conduction velocity of early embryonic hearts with a robust fitting algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shi; Wang, Yves T; Ma, Pei; Werdich, Andreas A; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac conduction maturation is an important and integral component of heart development. Optical mapping with voltage-sensitive dyes allows sensitive measurements of electrophysiological signals over the entire heart. However, accurate measurements of conduction velocity during early cardiac development is typically hindered by low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements of action potentials. Here, we present a novel image processing approach based on least squares optimizations, which enables high-resolution, low-noise conduction velocity mapping of smaller tubular hearts. First, the action potential trace measured at each pixel is fit to a curve consisting of two cumulative normal distribution functions. Then, the activation time at each pixel is determined based on the fit, and the spatial gradient of activation time is determined with a two-dimensional (2D) linear fit over a square-shaped window. The size of the window is adaptively enlarged until the gradients can be determined within a preset precision. Finally, the conduction velocity is calculated based on the activation time gradient, and further corrected for three-dimensional (3D) geometry that can be obtained by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We validated the approach using published activation potential traces based on computer simulations. We further validated the method by adding artificially generated noise to the signal to simulate various SNR conditions using a curved simulated image (digital phantom) that resembles a tubular heart. This method proved to be robust, even at very low SNR conditions (SNR = 2-5). We also established an empirical equation to estimate the maximum conduction velocity that can be accurately measured under different conditions (e.g. sampling rate, SNR, and pixel size). Finally, we demonstrated high-resolution conduction velocity maps of the quail embryonic heart at a looping stage of development. PMID:26114034

  18. Confirmation of Correlation between Brain Nerve Conduction Velocity and Intelligence Level in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Vernon, Philip A.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, Reed and Jensen ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 259-272] reported a positive correlation (0.26; "p"= 0.002; 0.37 after correcting for restricted intelligence range) between a brain nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and intelligence level in 147 normal male students. In the first follow-up of their study, we report on a study…

  19. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  20. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  1. Conduction Velocity in a Brain Nerve Pathway of Normal Adults Correlates with Intelligence Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Jensen, Arthur R.

    1992-01-01

    A correlation between intelligence level (IQ) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was demonstrated for 147 undergraduate students in the eastern San Francisco (California) Bay area. Recent studies of retarded subjects support the findings, explainable by positive correlations among NCV, speed of information processing, and IQ. (Author/SLD)

  2. Arm Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV), Brain NCV, Reaction Time, and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Jensen, Arthur R.

    1991-01-01

    Correlations among peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV), brain NCV, simple and choice reaction times, and a standard measure of intelligence were investigated for 200 male college students. No correlation was found between any arm NCV and the intelligence score. Neurophysiological bases of human information processing and intelligence are…

  3. Confirmation of Correlation between Brain Nerve Conduction Velocity and Intelligence Level in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Vernon, Philip A.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, Reed and Jensen ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 259-272] reported a positive correlation (0.26; "p"= 0.002; 0.37 after correcting for restricted intelligence range) between a brain nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and intelligence level in 147 normal male students. In the first follow-up of their study, we report on a study…

  4. Velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity profiles in hydrogen-oxygen MHD duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional duct flow computations for radial distributions of velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity are reported. Calculations were carried out for the flow conditions representative of a hydrogen-oxygen combustion driven MHD duct. Results are presented for: profiles of developing flow in a smooth duct, and for profiles of fully developed pipe flow with a specified streamwise shear stress distribution. The predicted temperature and electrical conductivity profiles for the developing flows compare well with available experimental data.

  5. Electrical conductivity and velocity of highly ionized plasma flows - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendell, E. W.; Park, C.; Posch, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an immersible, three-coil, magnetic-induction probe, previously tested in a low-density supersonic argon jet, to measure electrical conductivity and velocity profiles of a highly ionized high-density nitrogen jet in the continuum flow regime where effects due to probe bow shocks and boundary layers might not be negligible. Measured centerline values of electrical conductivity and velocity were compared with predictions based on a theoretical analysis previously developed to study the gas as it expanded adiabatically and inviscidly from an equilibrium sonic state to the nozzle exit. The resulting numerical exit plane values for electron density and electron temperature were then substituted into the Spitzer-Haerm conductivity formula to compute a theoretical conductivity which agreed within 40% of the measured conductivity, while the calculated and experimental velocity values differed by as much as 50%. The lack of agreement was attributed to the possible use of invalid assumptions and boundary conditions in the computer analysis or to the unknown effects of shocks on the probe data.

  6. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  7. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, C D; Roney, C H; Ng, F S; Siggers, J H; Sherwin, S J; Peters, N S

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Conduction velocities in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres exposed to hyperosmotic extracellular solutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbo; Hothi, Sandeep S; Xu, Wei; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2007-01-01

    Early quantitative analyses of conduction velocities in unmyelinated nerve studied in a constantly iso-osmotic volume conductor were extended to an analysis of the effects of varying extracellular osmolarities on conduction velocities of surface membrane action potentials in Rana esculenta skeletal muscle fibres. Previous papers had reported that skeletal muscle fibres exposed to a wide range of extracellular sucrose concentrations resemble perfect osmometers with increased extracellular osmolarity proportionally decreasing fibre volume and therefore diminishing fibre radius, a. However, classical electrolyte theory (Robinson and Stokes 1959, Electrolyte solutions 2nd edn. Butterworth & Co. pp 41-42) would then predict that the consequent increases in intracellular ionic strength would correspondingly decrease sarcoplasmic resistivity, R(i). An extension of the original cable analysis then demonstrated that the latter would precisely offset its expected effect of alterations in a on the fibre axial resistance, r(i), and leave action potential conduction velocity constant. In contrast, other reports (Hodgkin and Nakajima J Physiol 221:105-120, 1972) had suggested that R(i) increased with extracellular osmolarity, owing to alterations in cytosolic viscosity. This led to a prediction of a decreased conduction velocity. These opposing hypotheses were then tested in muscle fibres subject to just-suprathreshold stimulation at a Vaseline seal at one end and measuring action potentials and their first order derivatives, dV/dt, using 5-20 MOmega, 3 M KCl glass microelectrodes at defined distances away from the stimulus sites. Exposures to hyperosmotic, sucrose-containing, Ringer solutions then reversibly reduced both conduction velocity and maximum values of dV/dt. This was compatible with an increase in R(i) in the event that conduction depended upon a discharge of membrane capacitance by propagating local circuit currents through initially passive electrical elements

  9. Preliminary study on the lesion location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome by motor nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei

    2015-05-05

    To study lesions' location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) by routine motor nerve conduction studies (MNCSs) and short-segment nerve conduction studies (SSNCSs, inching test). Thirty healthy subjects were included and 60 ulnar nerves were studied by inching studies for normal values. Sixty-six patients who diagnosed CubTS clinically were performed bilaterally by routine MNCSs and SSNCSs. Follow-up for 1-year, the information of brief complaints, clinical symptoms, and physical examination were collected. Sixty-six patients were included, 88 of nerves was abnormal by MNCS, while 105 was abnormal by the inching studies. Medial epicondyle to 2 cm above medial epicondyle is the most common segment to be detected abnormally (59.09%), P < 0.01. Twenty-two patients were followed-up, 17 patients' symptoms were improved. Most of the patients were treated with drugs and modification of bad habits. (1) SSNCSs can detect lesions of compressive neuropathy in CubTS more precisely than the routine motor conduction studies. (2) SSNCSs can diagnose CubTS more sensitively than routine motor conduction studies. (3) In this study, we found that medial epicondyle to 2 cm above the medial epicondyle is the most vulnerable place that the ulnar nerve compressed. (4) The patients had a better prognosis who were abnormal in motor nerve conduction time only, but not amplitude in compressed lesions than those who were abnormal both in velocity and amplitude. Our study suggests that SSNCSs is a practical method in detecting ulnar nerve compressed neuropathy, and sensitive in diagnosing CubTS. The compound muscle action potentials by SSNCSs may predict prognosis of CubTS.

  10. Preliminary Study on the Lesion Location and Prognosis of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome by Motor Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhu; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: To study lesions’ location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) by routine motor nerve conduction studies (MNCSs) and short-segment nerve conduction studies (SSNCSs, inching test). Methods: Thirty healthy subjects were included and 60 ulnar nerves were studied by inching studies for normal values. Sixty-six patients who diagnosed CubTS clinically were performed bilaterally by routine MNCSs and SSNCSs. Follow-up for 1-year, the information of brief complaints, clinical symptoms, and physical examination were collected. Results: Sixty-six patients were included, 88 of nerves was abnormal by MNCS, while 105 was abnormal by the inching studies. Medial epicondyle to 2 cm above medial epicondyle is the most common segment to be detected abnormally (59.09%), P < 0.01. Twenty-two patients were followed-up, 17 patients’ symptoms were improved. Most of the patients were treated with drugs and modification of bad habits. Conclusions: (1) SSNCSs can detect lesions of compressive neuropathy in CubTS more precisely than the routine motor conduction studies. (2) SSNCSs can diagnose CubTS more sensitively than routine motor conduction studies. (3) In this study, we found that medial epicondyle to 2 cm above the medial epicondyle is the most vulnerable place that the ulnar nerve compressed. (4) The patients had a better prognosis who were abnormal in motor nerve conduction time only, but not amplitude in compressed lesions than those who were abnormal both in velocity and amplitude. Our study suggests that SSNCSs is a practical method in detecting ulnar nerve compressed neuropathy, and sensitive in diagnosing CubTS. The compound muscle action potentials by SSNCSs may predict prognosis of CubTS. PMID:25947398

  11. Muscle fiber conduction velocity and fractal dimension of EMG during fatiguing contraction of young and elderly active men.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Beretta-Piccoli, Matteo; Cescon, Corrado; Coratella, Giuseppe; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Barbero, Marco; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, linear and nonlinear surface electromyography (EMG) variables highlighting different components of fatigue have been developed. In this study, we tested fractal dimension (FD) and conduction velocity (CV) rate of changes as descriptors, respectively, of motor unit synchronization and peripheral manifestations of fatigue. Sixteen elderly (69  ±  4 years) and seventeen young (23  ±  2 years) physically active men (almost 3-5 h of physical activity per week) executed one knee extensor contraction at 70% of a maximal voluntary contraction for 30 s. Muscle fiber CV and FD were calculated from the multichannel surface EMG signal recorded from the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles. The main findings were that the two groups showed a similar rate of change of CV, whereas FD rate of change was higher in the young than in the elderly group. The trends were the same for both muscles. CV findings highlighted a non-different extent of peripheral manifestations of fatigue between groups. Nevertheless, FD rate of change was found to be steeper in the elderly than in the young, suggesting a greater increase in motor unit synchronization with ageing. These findings suggest that FD analysis could be used as a complementary variable providing further information on central mechanisms with respect to CV in fatiguing contractions.

  12. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Braking of a magnetic dipole moving with an arbitrary velocity through a conducting pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazev, B. A.; Kotel'nikov, Igor A.; Tyutin, A. A.; Cherkasskiĭ, Valerii S.

    2006-09-01

    Lectures introducing students to electromagnetic induction phenomena often feature the popular experiment in which a small magnet falling down a long conducting pipe is markedly decelerated by the retarding force due to Foucault eddy currents arising in the pipe. In this paper, a formula for the retarding force, valid both for low velocities (when the force is proportional to the velocity v of magnet motion) and high velocities (when it first decreases as v-1 and then as v-1/2), is derived. The last two regimes are analogous to the collisionless (and hence unbounded) acceleration of plasma electrons and have not been previously described in the literature. The calculation of the retarding force in the presence of a longitudinal cut in the pipe wall is carried out, and experiments to measure this force are discussed.

  13. Quantum beats in conductance oscillations in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity wells and electrostatic wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Tao; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-14

    The transport properties in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity well (Fermi velocity inside the well less than that outside the well) and electrostatic well structures are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The results show that quantum beats occur in the oscillations of the conductance for asymmetric double velocity wells. The beating effect can also be found in asymmetric double electrostatic wells, but only if the widths of the two wells are different. The beat frequency for the asymmetric double well is exactly equal to the frequency difference between the oscillation rates in two isolated single wells with the same structures as the individual wells in the double well structure. A qualitative interpretation is proposed based on the fact that the resonant levels depend upon the sizes of the quantum wells. The beating behavior can provide a new way to identify the symmetry of double well structures.

  14. Influence of flow velocity on motor behavior of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Libin; Lin, Chenggang; Sun, Jiamin; Kan, Rentao; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-05-15

    The influence of flow velocity on the motor behavior of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus was investigated in the laboratory. Cameras were used to record sea cucumber movements and behavior analysis software was used to measure the distance traveled, time spent, upstream or downstream of the start position and the speed of movements. In general, the mean velocity of A. japonicus was below 0.7mms(-1). The maximum velocity recorded for all the sea cucumbers tested was for a large individual (89.25±17.11g), at a flow rate of 4.6±0.5cms(-1). Medium sized (19.68±5.53g) and large individuals moved significantly faster than small individuals (2.65±1.24g) at the same flow rate. A. japonicus moved significantly faster when there was a moderate current (4.6±0.5cms(-1) and 14.7±0.3cms(-1)), compared with the fast flow rate (29.3±3.7cms(-1)) and when there was no flow (0cms(-1)). Sea cucumbers did not show positive rheotaxis in general, but did move in a downstream direction at faster current speeds. Large, medium and small sized individuals moved downstream at the fastest current speed tested, 29.3±3.7cms(-1). When there was no water flow, sea cucumbers tended to move in an irregular pattern. The movement patterns show that the sea cucumber, A. japonicus can move across the direction of flow, and can move both upstream and downstream along the direction of flow.

  15. Dynamic Modulation of Myelination in Response to Visual Stimuli Alters Optic Nerve Conduction Velocity.

    PubMed

    Etxeberria, Ainhoa; Hokanson, Kenton C; Dao, Dang Q; Mayoral, Sonia R; Mei, Feng; Redmond, Stephanie A; Ullian, Erik M; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-06-29

    Myelin controls the time required for an action potential to travel from the neuronal soma to the axon terminal, defining the temporal manner in which information is processed within the CNS. The presence of myelin, the internodal length, and the thickness of the myelin sheath are powerful structural factors that control the velocity and fidelity of action potential transmission. Emerging evidence indicates that myelination is sensitive to environmental experience and neuronal activity. Activity-dependent modulation of myelination can dynamically alter action potential conduction properties but direct functional in vivo evidence and characterization of the underlying myelin changes is lacking. We demonstrate that in mice long-term monocular deprivation increases oligodendrogenesis in the retinogeniculate pathway but shortens myelin internode lengths without affecting other structural properties of myelinated fibers. We also demonstrate that genetically attenuating synaptic glutamate neurotransmission from retinal ganglion cells phenocopies the changes observed after monocular deprivation, suggesting that glutamate may constitute a signal for myelin length regulation. Importantly, we demonstrate that visual deprivation and shortened internodes are associated with a significant reduction in nerve conduction velocity in the optic nerve. Our results reveal the importance of sensory input in the building of myelinated fibers and suggest that this activity-dependent alteration of myelination is important for modifying the conductive properties of brain circuits in response to environmental experience. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes and are capable of ensheathing axons with myelin without molecular cues from neurons. However, this default myelination process can be modulated by changes in neuronal activity. Here, we show, for the first time, that experience-dependent activity modifies the length of myelin internodes along axons

  16. Seasonal variation in conduction velocity of action potentials in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J J; Bezanilla, F

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether the electrical properties of the squid giant axon are seasonally acclimated, action potentials, recorded at different temperatures, were compared between giant axons isolated from Loligo pealei caught in May, from relatively cold waters (approximately 10 degrees-12 degrees C), and in August, from relatively warm waters (approximately 20 degrees C). Parameters relating to the duration of the action potential (e.g., maximum rate of rise, maximum rate of fall, and duration at half-peak) did not change seasonally. The relationship between conduction velocity and temperature remained constant between seasons as well, in spite of the fact that May axons were significantly larger than August axons. When normalized to the fiber diameter, mean May conduction velocities were 83% of the August values at all temperatures tested, and analysis of the rise time of the action potential foot suggested that a change in the axoplasmic resistivity was responsible for this difference. Direct measurements of axoplasmic resistance further supported this hypothesis. Thus seasonal changes in the giant axon's size and resistivity are not consistent with compensatory thermal acclimation, but instead serve to maintain a constant relationship between conduction velocity and temperature.

  17. Conductivity, electric field and electron drift velocity within the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Chandra, H.

    2006-08-01

    Rocket-borne in-situ measurements of electron density and current density made from Thumba, India, on four occasions between 1966 and 1973 and on one flight from Peru in 1965 are studied along with the corresponding ground magnetometer data. The Cowling conductivity is computed using the yearly mean magnetic field values of 1965 and the atmospheric density values from the MSIS 1986 model. The rocket-borne measurements from Thumba cover different geophysical conditions of strong, moderate and partial counter-electrojet events. The vertical profiles of the measured current density and electron density are presented along with the computed Cowling conductivity, electron drift velocity and electric field. The peak current density occurred at 106-107 km over Thumba and at 109 km over Peru compared to 104 km over Brazil. Cowling conductivity peaks occurred at 102 km over Huancayo and 101 km over Thumba, while electron drift velocity and electric field peaks occurred at approximately 105-107 km over Thumba, 108 and 110 km over Huancayo and 104 km over Brazil, respectively. While the electron density near the level of peak current density shows some variability, electron drift velocity and electric field show large variability. We conclude that the local electric field plays an important role in the spatial and temporal variability of the strength of the electrojet.

  18. Comparisons of computed and measured three-dimensional velocity fields in a motored two-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Butler, T.D. ); Meintjes, K.; Fansler, T.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations are compared with measurements of the three-dimensional, unsteady scavenging flows of a motored two-stroke engine. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements were made on a modified Suzuki DT-85 ported engine. Calculations were performed using KIVA-3, a computer program that efficiently solves the intake and exhaust port flows along with those in the cylinder. Measured and computed cylinder pressures and velocities are compared. Pressures agree well over the cycle as do the velocities at the intake ports. In-cylinder velocities differ in detail, but the tumbling motion in the cylinder is well replicated in vertical plane passing through the cylinder axis. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  20. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  1. Velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity profiles in hydrogen-oxygen MHD duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents results of two-dimensional duct flow computations for radial distributions of velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity. Calculations were carried out for the flow conditions representative of NASA Lewis hydrogen-oxygen combustion driven MHD duct. Results are presented for two sets of computations: (1) profiles of developing flow in a smooth duct, and (2) profiles of fully developed pipe flow with a specified streamwise shear stress distribution. The predicted temperature and electrical conductivity profiles for the developing flows compared well with available experimental data.

  2. Consideration of Conductive Motor Winding Materials at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Groh, Henry C., III

    2015-01-01

    A brief history of conductive motor winding materials is presented, comparing various metal motor winding materials and their properties in terms of conductivity, density and cost. The proposed use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and composites incorporating CNTs is explored as a potential way to improve motor winding conductivity, density, and reduce motor size which are important to electric aircraft technology. The conductivity of pure Cu, a CNT yarn, and a dilute Cu-CNT composite was measured at room temperature and at several temperatures up to 340 C. The conductivity of the Cu-CNT composite was about 3 percent lower than pure copper's at all temperatures measured. The conductivity of the CNT yarn was about 200 times lower than copper's, however, the yarn's conductivity dropped less with increasing temperature compared to Cu. It is believed that the low conductivity of the yarn is due primarily to high interfacial resistances and the presence of CNTs with low, semiconductor like electrical properties (s-CNT). It is believed the conductivity of the CNT-Cu composite could be improved by not using s-CNT, and instead using only CNTs with high, metallic like electrical properties (m-CNT); and by increasing the vol% m-CNTs.

  3. Thermal conductivity and sound velocity of antigorite at high pressure using time-domain thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Y. H.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity of antigorite at room temperature and up to 13 GPa. Antigorite is a serpentine mineral (Mg6Si4O10(OH)8) of high-temperature form having a wavy structure and it has a wide stability field (e.g., up to 720°C at 2 GPa or 620°C at 5 GPa), which is a key material for understanding slab subduction, deep earthquake and volcanic processes in the mantle wedge where fluids from the dehydrating oceanic crust interact with the mantle. The mineral phases, chemical compositions, and crystal orientations of the antigorite were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and electron backscattered diffraction, respectively. The measurements of thermal conductivities and sound velocities of antigorite with different crystal orientations were carried out by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). At P<7 GPa, thermal conductivity becomes more anisotropic with increasing pressure but becomes more isotropic in elastic property between b and c-axis. We also discuss the lattice internal rearrangement may induce over three times increase in thermal conductivity at 7 GPa ( 210 km depth) which would enhance larger heat flux along b-axis in the serpentinized slab. Thus, it gives new insights into the potential influence of thermal conductivity anisotropy on the mineral dehydration processes in the subduction zone.

  4. Dexmedetomidine augments the effect of lidocaine: power spectrum and nerve conduction velocity distribution study.

    PubMed

    Dalkilic, Nizamettin; Tuncer, Seckin; Burat, Ilksen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the individual and combined inhibitory effects of dexmedetomidine and lidocaine on the conduction group of isolated nerve were investigated by determining conduction velocity distribution (CVD) and power spectrum. Electrophysiological compound action potential (CAP) recordings were conducted on isolated rat sciatic nerve before (Con) and 20 minutes after exposure to 1 mM lidocaine (Lido), 21pM dexmedetomidine (Dex) and their combination (Lido + Dex). Then for CVD, mathematical model and for power spectrum Fast Fourier analysis were conducted. Dexmedetomidine alone made no significant difference in shape and duration of CAPs as compared to Con, on the other hand lidocaine depresses amplitude and prolongs the duration of CAPs, but not more than combination of dexmedetomidine and lidocaine can do. Lidocaine caused a shift in the CVD histogram to relatively slower conducting group significantly while dexmedetomidine did not cause any significant change as compared to Control. Lidocaine, when combined with dexmedetomidine revealed a remarkable effect on the whole CVD histogram by causing almost complete blockage of fast conducting nerve fibers. The relative number of fibers in CVD is conserved for separate applications of anesthetics, but not for their combination. As in CVD, power spectrum shifted from higher to lower frequency region by lidocaine and significantly for lidocaine combined with dexmedetomidine application. Shifts for dexmedetomidine applied group were seen beggarly. We have concluded that dexmedetomidine alone did not influence nerve conduction, but when it is used with lidocaine it augments neural conduction blockage effect, especially on fast conducting nerve fibers.

  5. Motor and sensory nerve conduction are affected differently by ice pack, ice massage, and cold water immersion.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Esperanza; Sandoval, Maria C; Camargo, Diana M; Salvini, Tania F

    2010-04-01

    It is well known that reducing tissue temperature changes sensory and motor nerve conduction. However, few studies have compared the effect of different cold modalities on nerve conduction parameters. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of ice pack, ice massage, and cold water immersion on the conduction parameters of the sural (sensorial) and tibial motor nerves. An experimental study was conducted in which the participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 intervention groups (n=12 per group). Independent variables were cold modality and pre- and post-cooling measurement time. Dependent variables were skin temperature and nerve conduction parameters. Thirty-six people who were healthy, with a mean (SD) age of 20.5 (1.9) years, participated in the study. Each group received 1 of the 3 cold modalities, applied to the right calf region for 15 minutes. Skin temperature and nerve conduction parameters were measured before and immediately after cooling. All 3 modalities reduced skin temperature (mean=18.2 degrees C). There also was a reduction in amplitude and an increase in latency and duration of the compound action potential. Ice massage, ice pack, and cold water immersion reduced sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) by 20.4, 16.7, and 22.6 m/s and motor NCV by 2.5, 2.1, and 8.3 m/s, respectively. Cold water immersion was the most effective modality in changing nerve conduction parameters. The cooling area of the ice massage and ice pack was smaller than that of the cold water immersion. The examiner was not blinded to the treatment group. The population included only participants who were healthy and young. All 3 modalities were effective in reducing skin temperature and changing sensory conduction at a physiological level that is sufficient to induce a hypoalgesic effect. The results suggest that cold water immersion, as applied in this study, is the most indicated modality for inducing therapeutic effects associated with the reduction of motor

  6. Conduction velocities and membrane properties of different classes of rat septohippocampal neurons recorded in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth A; Norris, Sarah K; Henderson, Zaineb

    1999-01-01

    The membrane properties and conduction velocities of antidromically activated medial septum-diagonal band (MS-DB) neurons were examined using whole-cell recordings in a longitudinally cut rat brain slice preparation containing the MS-DB and the dorsal fornix. MS-DB neurons were divided into three groups according to their action potential characteristics and firing properties. Slow firing neurons displayed a broad action potential followed by a prominent after-hyperpolarization. Burst firing neurons, when depolarized from hyperpolarized holding potentials, exhibited a high-frequency burst of spikes on the crest of a slow depolarizing potential. Fast firing neurons did not fire bursts of spikes when depolarized from hyperpolarized holding potentials. Eighteen MS-DB neurons were identified as septohippocampal by antidromic activation. Of the septohippocampal neurons, four were slow firing neurons, five were burst firing neurons and nine were fast firing neurons. The mean axon conduction velocities of these neurons fell into two significant groups, termed slow conducting and fast conducting. Slow firing septohippocampal neurons had significantly slower conduction velocities than either fast firing or burst firing neurons (P < 0.05), being 0.7 ± 0.5 ms−1 for slow firing neurons and 2.9 ± 2.0 and 2.0 ± 1.4 ms−1 for burst firing and fast firing neurons, respectively. On the basis of previous evidence which has linked firing properties with the neurochemical identities of the neurons, we propose that the slow firing septohippocampal neurons are cholinergic whereas the burst firing and fast firing septohippocampal neurons are GABAergic. PMID:10358125

  7. Synergistic plasticity of intrinsic conductance and electrical coupling restores synchrony in an intact motor network.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brian J; Samarth, Pranit; Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2016-08-23

    Motor neurons of the crustacean cardiac ganglion generate virtually identical, synchronized output despite the fact that each neuron uses distinct conductance magnitudes. As a result of this variability, manipulations that target ionic conductances have distinct effects on neurons within the same ganglion, disrupting synchronized motor neuron output that is necessary for proper cardiac function. We hypothesized that robustness in network output is accomplished via plasticity that counters such destabilizing influences. By blocking high-threshold K(+) conductances in motor neurons within the ongoing cardiac network, we discovered that compensation both resynchronized the network and helped restore excitability. Using model findings to guide experimentation, we determined that compensatory increases of both GA and electrical coupling restored function in the network. This is one of the first direct demonstrations of the physiological regulation of coupling conductance in a compensatory context, and of synergistic plasticity across cell- and network-level mechanisms in the restoration of output.

  8. An Electromagnetic Gauge Technique for Measuring Shocked Particle Velocity in Electrically Conductive Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, David; Yoshinaka, Akio

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic velocity (EMV) gauges are a class of film gauges which permit the direct in-situ measurement of shocked material flow velocity. The active sensing element, typically a metallic foil, requires exposure to a known external magnetic field in order to produce motional electromotive force (emf). Due to signal distortion caused by mutual inductance between sample and EMV gauge, this technique is typically limited to shock waves in non-conductive materials. In conductive samples, motional emf generated in the EMV gauge has to be extracted from the measured signal which results from the combined effects of both motional emf and voltage changes from induced currents. An electromagnetic technique is presented which analytically models the dynamics of induced current between a copper disk moving as a rigid body with constant 1D translational velocity toward an EMV gauge, where both disk and gauge are exposed to a uniform external static magnetic field. The disk is modelled as a magnetic dipole loop where its Foucault current is evaluated from the characteristics of the fields, whereas the EMV gauge is modelled as a circuit loop immersed in the field of the magnetic dipole loop, the intensity of which is calculated as a function of space and, implicitly, time. Equations of mutual induction are derived and the current induced in the EMV gauge loop is solved, allowing discrimination of the motional emf. Numerical analysis is provided for the step response of the induced EMV gauge current with respect to the Foucault current in the moving copper sample.

  9. An Electromagnetic Gauge Technique for Measuring Shocked Particle Velocity in Electrically Conductive Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, David; Yoshinaka, Akio

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic velocity (EMV) gauges are a class of film gauges which permit the direct in-situ measurement of shocked material flow velocity. The active sensing element, typically a metallic foil, requires exposure to a known external magnetic field in order to produce motional electromotive force (emf). Due to signal distortion caused by mutual inductance between sample and EMV gauge, this technique is typically limited to shock waves in non-conductive materials. In conductive samples, motional emf generated in the EMV gauge has to be extracted from the measured signal which results from the combined effects of both motional emf and voltage changes from induced currents. An electromagnetic technique is presented which analytically models the dynamics of induced current between a copper disk moving as a rigid body with constant 1D translational velocity toward an EMV gauge, where both disk and gauge are exposed to a uniform external static magnetic field. The disk is modelled as a magnetic dipole loop where its Foucault current is evaluated from the characteristics of the fields, whereas the EMV gauge is modelled as a circuit loop immersed in the field of the magnetic dipole loop, the intensity of which is calculated as a function of space and, implicitly, time. Equations of mutual induction are derived and the current induced in the EMV gauge loop is solved, allowing discrimination of the motional emf. Numerical analysis is provided for the step response of the induced EMV gauge current with respect to the Foucault current in the moving copper sample.

  10. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}j\\equiv {p}\\perp ,j-{p}\\parallel ,j\\gt 0, if the magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} is amplified ({p}\\perp ,j and {p}\\parallel ,j denote the pressure of species j (electron, ion) perpendicular and parallel to {\\boldsymbol{B}}). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, IC, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime 1≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated electron pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}{{e}}/{p}\\parallel ,{{e}}, is determined mainly by the (electron-lengthscale) whistler marginal stability condition, with a modest factor of ˜1.5-2 decrease due to the trapping of electrons into ion-lengthscale mirrors. We explicitly calculate the mean free path of the electrons and ions along the mean magnetic field and provide a simple physical prescription for the mean free path and thermal conductivity in low-collisionality β j ≳ 1 plasmas. Our results imply that velocity-space instabilities likely decrease the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters. We also discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, including Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  11. Knee muscle strength at varying angular velocities and associations with gross motor function in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n=17) or level II (n=16) according to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels. All children underwent curl-up test and isokinetic tests of the knee extensor and flexor muscle. Children with CP underwent the gross motor function assessments, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) and the gross motor subtests of Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). The hamstring-quadriceps ratio (HQ ratio) was calculated as 100%×(isokinetic peak torque of hamstring (knee flexor)/isokinetic peak torque of quadriceps (knee extensor)). Children with GMFCS level II had lower BOTMP and GMFM-66 scores, curl-up scores, HQ ratio, and knee muscle strength, especially knee flexor, compared to those with GMFCS level I. The regression analysis showed that knee flexor torques at 60 and 90°/s are mainly related to balance (r(2)=0.167, p=0.011) and strength (r(2)=0.243, p=0.002) while knee flexor torques at 120°/s mainly contribute to running speed and agility (r(2)=0.372, p<0.001). These findings suggest that children with CP had knee strength deficits, especially knee flexor. Postural muscle (knee flexor) strength dominated gross motor function than antigravity muscle strength (knee extensor). The knee flexor strength at different angular velocities was associated with various gross motor tasks. The HQ ratio may be used as a potential biomarker to probe the therapeutic effectiveness for muscle strengthening in these children. These data may allow clinician for formulating effective muscle strengthening strategies for these children.

  12. Symptoms, signs and nerve conduction velocities in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To inform the clinical management of patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and case definition for CTS in epidemiological research, we explored the relation of symptoms and signs to sensory nerve conduction (SNC) measurements. Methods Patients aged 20–64 years who were referred to a neurophysiology service for investigation of suspected CTS, completed a symptom questionnaire (including hand diagrams) and physical examination (including Tinel’s and Phalen’s tests). Differences in SNC velocity between the little and index finger were compared according to the anatomical distribution of symptoms in the hand and findings on physical examination. Results Analysis was based on 1806 hands in 908 patients (response rate 73%). In hands with numbness or tingling but negative on both Tinel’s and Phalen’s tests, the mean difference in SNC velocities was no higher than in hands with no numbness or tingling. The largest differences in SNC velocities occurred in hands with extensive numbness or tingling in the median nerve sensory distribution and both Tinel’s and Phalen’s tests positive (mean 13.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6-15.0 m/s). Hand pain and thumb weakness were unrelated to SNC velocity. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in the absence of other objective evidence of median nerve dysfunction, there is little value in referring patients of working age with suspected CTS for nerve conduction studies if they are negative on both Tinel’s and Phalen’s tests. Alternative case definitions for CTS in epidemiological research are proposed according to the extent of diagnostic information available and the relative importance of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23947775

  13. The electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low velocity zone

    PubMed Central

    Sifré, David; Gardés, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    A low viscosity layer in the upper mantle, the Asthenosphere, is a requirement for plate tectonics1. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the Asthenosphere are attributed either to sub-solidus water-related defects in olivine minerals2-4 or to a few volume percents of partial melt5-8 but these two interpretations have shortcomings: (1) The amount of H2O stored in olivine is not expected to be higher than 50 ppm due to partitioning with other mantle phases9, including pargasite amphibole at moderate temperatures10, and partial melting at high temperatures9; (2) elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the too cold temperatures prevailing in the Asthenosphere and by the high melt mobility that can lead to gravitational segregation11,12. Here we determined the electrical conductivity of CO2-H2O-rich melts, typically produced at the onset of mantle melting. Electrical conductivity modestly increases with moderate amounts of H2O and CO2 but it dramatically increases as CO2 content exceeds 6 wt% in the melt. Incipient melts, long-expected to prevail in the asthenosphere10,13-15, can therefore trigger its high electrical conductivities. Considering depleted and enriched mantle abundances in H2O and CO2 and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the Asthenosphere for various plate ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. In moderately aged plates (>5Ma), incipient melts most likely trigger both the seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities in the upper part of the asthenosphere, whereas for young plates4, where seamount volcanism occurs6, higher degree of melting is expected. PMID:24784219

  14. Electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low-velocity zone.

    PubMed

    Sifré, David; Gardés, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    The low-viscosity layer in the upper mantle, the asthenosphere, is a requirement for plate tectonics. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the asthenosphere are attributed either to subsolidus, water-related defects in olivine minerals or to a few volume per cent of partial melt, but these two interpretations have two shortcomings. First, the amount of water stored in olivine is not expected to be higher than 50 parts per million owing to partitioning with other mantle phases (including pargasite amphibole at moderate temperatures) and partial melting at high temperatures. Second, elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the temperatures prevailing in the asthenosphere, which are too low, and by the melt mobility, which is high and can lead to gravitational segregation. Here we determine the electrical conductivity of carbon-dioxide-rich and water-rich melts, typically produced at the onset of mantle melting. Electrical conductivity increases modestly with moderate amounts of water and carbon dioxide, but it increases drastically once the carbon dioxide content exceeds six weight per cent in the melt. Incipient melts, long-expected to prevail in the asthenosphere, can therefore produce high electrical conductivities there. Taking into account variable degrees of depletion of the mantle in water and carbon dioxide, and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the asthenosphere for various tectonic plate ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. In moderately aged plates (more than five million years old), incipient melts probably trigger both the seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities in the upper part of the asthenosphere, whereas in young plates, where seamount volcanism occurs, a higher degree of melting is expected.

  15. Tidal reversal and flow velocities using temperature and specific conductance in a small wetland creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Timothy T.

    2016-11-01

    Characterizing flow dynamics in very small tidal creeks is complicated and not well suited to methods developed for upland streams or coastal estuaries, due to low flows, bidirectionality and shallow waters. Simple instrumentation enables thermal and salinity signals to be used to observe flow directions and estimate velocities in these settings. Using multiple inexpensive sensors over 500 m along a tidally influenced wetland creek, I demonstrate how advection of temperature and specific conductance pulses reveal flood and ebb tides and the temporary reversal of flow by warmer, estuarine water from the receiving embayment. The sequential rise of temperature upstream was most evident under hot and dry conditions, after daily peak air temperatures of 25 °C or above, and was subdued or disrupted under cooler or rainy conditions in summertime. Changes in specific conductance at successive sites upstream were less susceptible to environmental influences and confirm tidal flood velocity of between 0.07 and 0.37 m/s. The tidally-induced flow reversal suggests that periodic high tide conditions can interfere with rapid dispersal of pollution discharges, such as from the combined sewer overflow (CSO) located upstream of the studied creek reach. This low-cost approach of temperature and specific conductance sensing in vegetated coastal wetlands where access, precise elevation control and creek discharge measurements are difficult, provides a simple way of tracking water masses when sufficient contrast exists between water sources.

  16. Mechanical muscle fibre conduction velocity of the biceps as measured by a new seismic technique.

    PubMed

    Journée, H L; de Jonge, A B; van Calker, R; Gräler, G

    1995-01-01

    A recently-developed technique, called seismic myography (SMG) has the characteristic of recording fast micro-mechanical response times. These times can be determined with sub-millisecond accuracy. The response times can be compared to response times of EMG recordings. The "muscular electro-seismic response" (MESR) latencies, due to direct electrical stimulation of the biceps muscle, are used for explorative measurements of the mechanical conduction velocity of the muscle fibres. The measurements are performed by means of a general-purpose physiological multimeter which is equiped with the micro-seismic function. Measurements are performed on two healthy subjects, aged 22 years. The MESR-latencies are measured along a medial and a lateral trajectory on their biceps muscles. The MESR-latencies at stimulus-cathodal to seismic transducer distances of 2,0-3,5 cm, are in the range of 2.0-3.8 ms, while at distances in the range of 7.5-8.9 cm the MESR-latencies varied between 3.4 and 4.7 ms. The calculated mechanical muscle fibre conduction velocities (MMFCV) are in the range between 36 and 89 m/s. There is a reproducability error of maximum 20%. The MMFCV's of the lateral and medial trajectory do not differ within the accuracy of the present method. However, the MMFCV's are considerably higher than the electrical muscle fibre conduction velocities of MUAPS ((E)MFCV). Some aspects of the MMFCV and possible consequences to surface EMG recordings are discussed. It is concluded that this seismic method for measuring MMFCV is a new accessible and simple to handle tool for the description of muscle function, and offers an interesting new contribution in experimental muscular research.

  17. Displacement of plasma protein and conduction velocity in rats under action of acceleration forces and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranski, S.; Edelwejn, Z.; Wojtkowiak, M.

    1980-01-01

    The permeability of capillary vessels was investigated in order to determine if acceleration alone or following prolonged hypokinesia would induce changes in the vascular wall leading to the penetration by l-albumins and/or proteins with larger molecules. In rats undergoing action of +5 Gz accelerations, no increase in vascular permeability, as tested with the use of (Cr-5k)-globulin, was demostrated. In rats immobilized for 4 weeks before centrifugation, rather weak migration of (Cr-51)-globulin from the vessels was observed. Immobilization resulted also in lowering of conduction velocity in the sciatic nerve.

  18. Comparison of Ear-Canal Reflectance and Umbo Velocity in Patients with Conductive Hearing Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Gabrielle R.; Nakajima, Hideko H.; Pisano, Dominic V.; Röösli, Christof; Hamade, Mohamad A.; Mafoud, Lorice; Halpin, Christopher F.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.

    2011-11-01

    Patients who present at hearing clinics with a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in the presence of an intact, healthy tympanic membrane create a unique challenge for otologists. While patient counseling, treatment options, and outcome vary with differing middle-ear pathologies, a non-invasive diagnostic that can differentiate between these pathologies does not currently exist. We evaluated the clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of two non-invasive measures of middle-ear mechanics: ear-canal reflectance (ECR) and umbo velocity (VU).

  19. Arsenic in drinking water and peripheral nerve conduction velocity among residents of a chronically arsenic-affected area in Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Guo, Xiaojuan; Shirane, Kiyoyumi; Liu, Jun; Wu, Kegong; Miyatake, Munetoshi; Tanabe, Kimiko; Kusuda, Tetsuya; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2006-09-01

    It remains unclear whether chronic ingestion of arsenic in drinking water affects the peripheral nervous system. We examined the effects of arsenic exposure on nerve conduction velocity using electromyography. A cross-sectional study was conducted of a population living in an arsenic-affected village in Hetao Plain, Inner Mongolia, China. A total of 134 (93.7%) of 143 inhabitants took part in the study, and 36 (76.6%) of 47 inhabitants in a low-arsenic exposed village were recruited as a control group. Of the participants, 109 inhabitants in the arsenic-affected village and 32 in the low-arsenic exposed village aged > or =18 years were used for the analyses. An expert physician performed skin examinations, and median nerve conduction velocity was examined by electromyography. Arsenic levels in tube-well water and urine were measured. A mean level of arsenic in tube-well water in the arsenic-affected village was 158.3 microg/L, while that in the low-arsenic exposed village was 5.3 microg/L. No significant differences in the means of the motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) were observed in relation to arsenic levels in tube wells, urine, and the duration of tube-well use. Further, no differences in mean MCV or SCV were found between the subjects with and without arsenic dermatosis, with mean SCV of 52.8 m/s (SD 6.3) in those without and 54.6 m/s (5.2) in subjects with arsenic dermatosis (p=0.206). These findings suggest that chronic arsenic poisoning from drinking water is unlikely to affect nerve conduction velocity, at least within the range of arsenic in drinking water examined in the present study.

  20. Prediction of rocks thermal conductivity from elastic wave velocities, mineralogy and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimienta, Lucas; Sarout, Joel; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle

    2014-05-01

    While knowledge on Thermal Conductivity (TC) of rocks is of interest in many fields, determining this property remains challenging. In this paper, a modelling approach for TC prediction from Elastic Wave Velocity (EWV) measurements is reported. To this end, a new effective TC model for a typical sedimentary rock is introduced that explicitly accounts for the presence of pores, pressure-sensitive microcracks (or grain contacts) and formation fluids. A model of effective elasticity is also devised for this same rock that links its microstructural characteristics to the velocity of elastic waves. The two models are based on the same effective medium approach and involve the same microstructural parameters. A workflow based on this explicit modelling approach is devised that allows for the prediction of the TC of a reservoir rock using (i) the elastic waves velocities, (ii) the dominant mineral content and (iii) the bulk porosity. This workflow is validated using experimental data reported in the literature for dry and water-saturated Fontainebleau and Berea sandstones. The datasets include measurements of TC and EWV as a function of effective pressure. In addition, it is shown that the dependence of TC on the rock microstructure is formally and practically similar to that of EWV. It is also demonstrated that the accuracy of TC predictions from EWV increases with effective pressure (burial depth). The underlying assumptions and limitations of the present approach together with the effect of burial are discussed.

  1. Effect of pioglitazone on nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudip; Sanyal, Debmalya; Das Choudhury, Sourav; Bandyopadhyay, Mili; Chakraborty, Suraj; Mukherjee, Arabinda

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of pioglitazone pharmacotherapy in median nerve electrophysiology in the carpal tunnel among type 2 diabetes patients. The study was executed in patients with type 2 diabetes, treated with oral drugs, categorized under pioglitazone or non-pioglitazone group (14 in each group), and who received electrophysiological evaluation by nerve conduction velocity at baseline and 3 mo. At 3 mo, pioglitazone-category had inferior amplitude in sensory median nerve [8.5 interquartile range (IQR) = 6.5 to 11.5) vs non-pioglitazone 14.5 (IQR 10.5 to 18.75)] (P = 0.002). Non-pioglitazone category displayed amelioration in amplitude in the sensory median nerve [baseline 13 (IQR = 9 to 16.25) vs 3 mo 8.5 (IQR = 6.5 to 11.5)] (P = 0.01) and amplitude in motor median nerve [baseline 9 (IQR = 4.75 to 11) vs 3 mo 6.75 (IQR = 4.75 to 10.25)] (P = 0.049); and deterioration of terminal latency of in motor ulnar nerve [baseline 2.07 (IQR = 1.92 to 2.25) vs 3 mo 2.16 (IQR = 1.97 to 2.325)] (P = 0.043). There was amelioration of terminal latency in sensory ulnar nerve [baseline 2.45 (IQR = 2.315 to 2.88) vs 3 mo 2.37 (IQR = 2.275 to 2.445) for pioglitazone group (P = 0.038). Treatment with pioglitazone accentuates probability of compressive neuropathy. In spite of comparable glycemic control over 3 mo, patients treated with pioglitazone showed superior electrophysiological parameters for the ulnar nerve. Pioglitazone has favourable outcome in nerve electrophysiology which was repealed when the nerve was subjected to compressive neuropathy.

  2. Effects of the diacylglycerol complexing agent, cremophor, on nerve-conduction velocity and perfusion in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jack, A M; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of diacylglycerol (DAG) and protein kinase C (PKC) to diabetic complications has been the subject of debate. In vascular tissues, diabetes increases DAG content, which activates PKC and causes abnormal tissue perfusion. Reduced nerve blood flow has been implicated in the development of neuropathy. However, nerve DAG/PKC activity is not increased and may even be reduced by diabetes, which has also been implicated in neuropathy. The aim was to test whether 2 weeks of treatment with cremophor, an agent that complexes DAG and prevents PKC activation, could correct nerve-conduction velocity (NCV) deficits in rats with 6 weeks of untreated diabetes, as predicted on a vascular hypothesis, or whether this worsened the deficits, as predicted for a direct effect on nerve fibers. Diabetes caused 17.9 +/- 0.9% (+/- SEM) and 15.5 +/- 1.6% reductions in sciatic motor and saphenous sensory NCV, respectively, that were largely (79.6 +/- 6.3% and 57.8 +/- 11.5%) corrected by 100 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) cremophor treatment. The effects of cremophor on motor and sensory NCV were completely attenuated by co-treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine. In contrast, co-treatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, had no effect on NCV. Sciatic nutritive and total endoneurial perfusion were 49.7 +/- 3.4% and 51.8 +/- 4.2% reduced by diabetes, respectively, and these deficits were 69.5 +/- 7.4% and 79.0 +/- 11.6% corrected by cremophor treatment. Thus the data suggest that an increased DAG/PKC vascular mechanism, perhaps linked to the nitric oxide system, contributes to the etiology of diabetic nerve dysfunction.

  3. Effect of pioglitazone on nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sudip; Sanyal, Debmalya; Das Choudhury, Sourav; Bandyopadhyay, Mili; Chakraborty, Suraj; Mukherjee, Arabinda

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of pioglitazone pharmacotherapy in median nerve electrophysiology in the carpal tunnel among type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS The study was executed in patients with type 2 diabetes, treated with oral drugs, categorized under pioglitazone or non-pioglitazone group (14 in each group), and who received electrophysiological evaluation by nerve conduction velocity at baseline and 3 mo. RESULTS At 3 mo, pioglitazone-category had inferior amplitude in sensory median nerve [8.5 interquartile range (IQR) = 6.5 to 11.5) vs non-pioglitazone 14.5 (IQR 10.5 to 18.75)] (P = 0.002). Non-pioglitazone category displayed amelioration in amplitude in the sensory median nerve [baseline 13 (IQR = 9 to 16.25) vs 3 mo 8.5 (IQR = 6.5 to 11.5)] (P = 0.01) and amplitude in motor median nerve [baseline 9 (IQR = 4.75 to 11) vs 3 mo 6.75 (IQR = 4.75 to 10.25)] (P = 0.049); and deterioration of terminal latency of in motor ulnar nerve [baseline 2.07 (IQR = 1.92 to 2.25) vs 3 mo 2.16 (IQR = 1.97 to 2.325)] (P = 0.043). There was amelioration of terminal latency in sensory ulnar nerve [baseline 2.45 (IQR = 2.315 to 2.88) vs 3 mo 2.37 (IQR = 2.275 to 2.445) for pioglitazone group (P = 0.038). CONCLUSION Treatment with pioglitazone accentuates probability of compressive neuropathy. In spite of comparable glycemic control over 3 mo, patients treated with pioglitazone showed superior electrophysiological parameters for the ulnar nerve. Pioglitazone has favourable outcome in nerve electrophysiology which was repealed when the nerve was subjected to compressive neuropathy. PMID:27895823

  4. Relation of distribution of conduction velocities to nerve biopsy findings in n-hexane poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, K; Feldman, R G; Sax, D S; Salzsider, B T; Kucera, J

    1990-04-01

    Distribution of conduction velocities (DCV) of sensory fibers in sural nerve was investigated in three patients with n-hexane poisoning. Measurements were made at 1-2 months, 4-9 months, and at 11, 23, and 36 months after ending exposure. A sural nerve biopsy was obtained from one of the patients. The results indicated the characteristic changes of n-hexane toxicity: myelinated nerve fiber degeneration and paranodal swelling, resulting in changes in the fiber diameter distribution. The DCV documented these changes. After removal from toxic exposure, varying degrees of recovery were studied clinically and evaluated with nerve conduction parameters. The DCV reflects the pathological changes in nerve in toxic neuropathy due to n-hexane.

  5. Muscle-fiber conduction velocity during concentric and eccentric actions on a flywheel exercise device.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Marco; Alkner, Björn; Norrbrand, Lena; Farina, Dario; Tesch, Per A

    2006-08-01

    A gravity-independent flywheel exercise device (FWED) has been proven effective as a countermeasure to loss of strength and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity. This study assessed muscle-fiber conduction velocity (CV) and surface EMG instantaneous mean power spectral frequency (iMNF) during brief bouts of fatiguing concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) exercise on a FWED in order to identify electromyographic (EMG) variables that can be used to provide objective indications of muscle status when exercising with a FWED. Multichannel surface EMG signals were recorded from vastus lateralis and medialis muscles of nine men during: (1) isometric, 60-s action at 50% of maximum voluntary action (MVC); (2) two isometric, linearly increasing force ramps (0-100% MVC); and (3) dynamic CON/ECC coupled actions on the FWED. Muscle-fiber CV and iMNF were computed over time during the three tasks. During ramps, CV, but not iMNF, increased with force (P < 0.001). Conduction velocity and iMNF decreased with the same normalized rate of change in constant-force actions. During CON/ECC actions, the normalized rate of change over time was larger for CV than iMNF (P < 0.05). These results suggest that, during fatiguing, dynamic, variable-force tasks, changes in CV cannot be indirectly inferred by EMG spectral analysis. This underlines the importance of measuring both CV and spectral variables for muscle assessment in dynamic tasks.

  6. Synthesis of a correcting filter with phase stabilization of the angular velocity of a synchronous motor by the feedback system method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazlauskas, K. A.; Kurlavichus, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a synchronous electric motor are discussed. A system of phase stabilization of the instantaneous angular velocity of rotation of a synchronous-reaction motor is diagrammed. A mathematical model is developed to show the parameters which affect the operation of the motor. The selection of a correcting filter to use with the motor in order to reduce the reaction of the system to interference is explained.

  7. Evaluation of Central and Peripheral Fatigue in the Quadriceps Using Fractal Dimension and Conduction Velocity in Young Females

    PubMed Central

    Beretta-Piccoli, Matteo; D’Antona, Giuseppe; Barbero, Marco; Fisher, Beth; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M.; Clijsen, Ron; Cescon, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, linear and non-linear surface electromyography descriptors for central and peripheral components of fatigue have been developed. In the current study, we tested fractal dimension (FD) and conduction velocity (CV) as myoelectric descriptors of central and peripheral fatigue, respectively. To this aim, we analyzed FD and CV slopes during sustained fatiguing contractions of the quadriceps femoris in healthy humans. Methods A total of 29 recreationally active women (mean age±standard deviation: 24±4 years) and two female elite athletes (one power athlete, age 24 and one endurance athlete, age 30 years) performed two knee extensions: (1) at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 30 s, and (2) at 60% MVC held until exhaustion. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis using bidimensional arrays. Results Central and peripheral fatigue were described as decreases in FD and CV, respectively. A positive correlation between FD and CV (R=0.51, p<0.01) was found during the sustained 60% MVC, probably as a result of simultaneous motor unit synchronization and a decrease in muscle fiber CV during the fatiguing task. Conclusions Central and peripheral fatigue can be described as changes in FD and CV, at least in young, healthy women. The significant correlation between FD and CV observed at 60% MVC suggests that a mutual interaction between central and peripheral fatigue can arise during submaximal isometric contractions. PMID:25880369

  8. Evaluation of central and peripheral fatigue in the quadriceps using fractal dimension and conduction velocity in young females.

    PubMed

    Beretta-Piccoli, Matteo; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Barbero, Marco; Fisher, Beth; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Clijsen, Ron; Cescon, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, linear and non-linear surface electromyography descriptors for central and peripheral components of fatigue have been developed. In the current study, we tested fractal dimension (FD) and conduction velocity (CV) as myoelectric descriptors of central and peripheral fatigue, respectively. To this aim, we analyzed FD and CV slopes during sustained fatiguing contractions of the quadriceps femoris in healthy humans. A total of 29 recreationally active women (mean age±standard deviation: 24±4 years) and two female elite athletes (one power athlete, age 24 and one endurance athlete, age 30 years) performed two knee extensions: (1) at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 30 s, and (2) at 60% MVC held until exhaustion. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis using bidimensional arrays. Central and peripheral fatigue were described as decreases in FD and CV, respectively. A positive correlation between FD and CV (R=0.51, p<0.01) was found during the sustained 60% MVC, probably as a result of simultaneous motor unit synchronization and a decrease in muscle fiber CV during the fatiguing task. Central and peripheral fatigue can be described as changes in FD and CV, at least in young, healthy women. The significant correlation between FD and CV observed at 60% MVC suggests that a mutual interaction between central and peripheral fatigue can arise during submaximal isometric contractions.

  9. Association of Left Atrial Local Conduction Velocity With Late Gadolinium Enhancement on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kotaro; Habibi, Mohammadali; Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Zahid, Sohail; Khurram, Irfan M; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Spragg, David; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Trayanova, Natalia; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Rickard, John; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2016-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated regional left atrial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) heterogeneity on magnetic resonance imaging. Heterogeneity in regional conduction velocities is a critical substrate for functional reentry. We sought to examine the association between left atrial conduction velocity and LGE in patients with atrial fibrillation. LGE imaging and left atrial activation mapping were performed during sinus rhythm in 22 patients before pulmonary vein isolation. The locations of 1468 electroanatomic map points were registered to the corresponding anatomic sites on 469 axial LGE image planes. The local conduction velocity at each point was calculated using previously established methods. The myocardial wall thickness and image intensity ratio defined as left atrial myocardial LGE signal intensity divided by the mean left atrial blood pool intensity was calculated for each mapping site. The local conduction velocity and image intensity ratio in the left atrium (mean ± SD) were 0.98 ± 0.46 and 0.95 ± 0.26 m/s, respectively. In multivariable regression analysis, clustered by patient, and adjusting for left atrial wall thickness, conduction velocity was associated with the local image intensity ratio (0.20 m/s decrease in conduction velocity per increase in unit image intensity ratio, P<0.001). In this clinical in vivo study, we demonstrate that left atrial myocardium with increased gadolinium uptake has lower local conduction velocity. Identification of such regions may facilitate the targeting of the substrate for reentrant arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Motor, Emotional, and Cognitive Empathy in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bons, Danielle; van den Broek, Egon; Scheepers, Floor; Herpers, Pierre; Rommelse, Nanda; Buitelaaar, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear which aspects of empathy are shared and which are uniquely affected in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and conduct disorder (CD) as are the neurobiological correlates of these empathy impairments. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the overlap and specificity of motor, emotional, and cognitive aspects of empathy in…

  11. Motor, Emotional, and Cognitive Empathy in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bons, Danielle; van den Broek, Egon; Scheepers, Floor; Herpers, Pierre; Rommelse, Nanda; Buitelaaar, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear which aspects of empathy are shared and which are uniquely affected in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and conduct disorder (CD) as are the neurobiological correlates of these empathy impairments. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the overlap and specificity of motor, emotional, and cognitive aspects of empathy in…

  12. Relationship of neonatal cerebral blood flow velocity asymmetry with early motor, cognitive and language development in term infants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Chin; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Hung, Han-Yang; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Wei J; Jeng, Suh-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of Doppler cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) asymmetry measures with developmental outcomes in term infants. Doppler CBFV parameters (peak systolic velocity [PSV] and mean velocity [MV]) of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries of 52 healthy term infants were prospectively examined on postnatal days 1-5, and then their motor, cognitive and language development was evaluated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition, at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. The left CBFV asymmetry measure (PSV or MV) was calculated by subtracting the right-side value from the left-side value. Left CBFV asymmetry measures were significantly positively related to motor scores at 6 (r = 0.3-0.32, p < 0.05) and 12 (r = 0.35, p < 0.05) months of age, but were not related to cognitive or language outcome. Thus, the leftward hemodynamic status of the middle cerebral arteries, as measured by cranial Doppler ultrasound in the neonatal period, predicts early motor outcome in term infants.

  13. Intraflagellar transport velocity is governed by the number of active KIF17 and KIF3AB motors and their motility properties under load.

    PubMed

    Milic, Bojan; Andreasson, Johan O L; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2017-08-15

    Homodimeric KIF17 and heterotrimeric KIF3AB are processive, kinesin-2 family motors that act jointly to carry out anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), ferrying cargo along microtubules (MTs) toward the tips of cilia. How IFT trains attain speeds that exceed the unloaded rate of the slower, KIF3AB motor remains unknown. By characterizing the motility properties of kinesin-2 motors as a function of load we find that the increase in KIF3AB velocity, elicited by forward loads from KIF17 motors, cannot alone account for the speed of IFT trains in vivo. Instead, higher IFT velocities arise from an increased likelihood that KIF3AB motors dissociate from the MT, resulting in transport by KIF17 motors alone, unencumbered by opposition from KIF3AB. The rate of transport is therefore set by an equilibrium between a faster state, where only KIF17 motors move the train, and a slower state, where at least one KIF3AB motor on the train remains active in transport. The more frequently the faster state is accessed, the higher the overall velocity of the IFT train. We conclude that IFT velocity is governed by (i) the absolute numbers of each motor type on a given train, (ii) how prone KIF3AB is to dissociation from MTs relative to KIF17, and (iii) how prone both motors are to dissociation relative to binding MTs.

  14. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. I. Destination, axonal conduction velocity, and recruitment threshold.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A; Sugano, N

    1987-02-01

    Fine flexible wire microelectrodes chronically implanted in the fifth lumbar ventral root (L5 VR) of 17 cats rendered stable records of the natural discharge patterns of 164 individual axons during locomotion on a treadmill. Fifty-one out of 164 axons were identified as motoneurons projecting to the anterior thigh muscle group. For these axons, the centrifugal propagation of action potentials was demonstrated by the technique of spike-triggered averaging using signals recorded from cuff electrodes implanted around the femoral nerve. The axonal conduction velocity was measured from the femoral nerve cuff records. For 43/51 motoneurons, the corresponding target muscle was identified by spike-triggered averaging of signals recorded from bipolar EMG electrodes implanted in each of the anterior thigh muscles: vastus intermedius, medialis and lateralis, sartorius anterior and medialis, and rectus femoris. For 32/51 motoneurons, the recruitment threshold during locomotion was determined from the mean value of the rectified digitally smoothed EMG of the target muscle measured at the time when the motoneuron fired its first spike for each step. The recruitment threshold of every motoneuron was relatively constant for a given speed of walking, but for some units there were small systematic variations as a function of treadmill speed (range: 0.1-1.3 m/s). Recruitment thresholds were standardized with respect to the mean value of peak EMG activity of the target muscle during 16 s of walking at 0.5 m/s. For 28/51 motoneurons recorded in nine cats, recruitment thresholds (range: 3-93% of peak target muscle EMG) were linearly correlated (r = 0.51, P less than 0.02) to axonal conduction velocities (range: 57-117 m/s). In addition, for seven recorded pairs of motoneurons that projected to the same muscle in the same cat, the recruitment thresholds were ordered by relative conduction velocities. Taken together, these results are consistent with the notion that, in normal cat

  15. [Physiological approach to peripheral neuropathy. Conventional nerve conduction studies and magnetic motor root stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, I first show some points we should mind in the conventional peripheral nerve conduction studies and later present clinical usefulness of motor root stimulation for peripheral neuropathy. CONVENTIONAL NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES (NCS): The most important point revealed by the conventional NCSs is whether neuropathy is due to axonal degeneration or demyelinating process. Precise clinical examination with this neurophysiological information leads us to a diagnosis and treatment. Poor clinical examination makes these findings useless. Long standing axonal degeneration sometimes induces secondary demyelination at the most distal part of involved nerves. On the other hand, severe segmental demyelination often provokes secondary axonal degeneration at distal parts to the site of demyelination. These secondary changes show the same abnormal neurophysiological findings as those of the primary involvement. We should be careful of this possibility when interpreting the results of NCS. NCS of sensory nerves is not good at revealing demyelinating process. Mild temporal dispersion of potentials often reduces an amplitude of SNAP or loss of responses, which usually suggests axonal degeneration, because of short duration of sensory nerve potentials. MOTOR ROOT STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: Magnetic stimulation with a coil placed over the spine activates motor roots and evokes EMG responses from upper and lower limb muscles. The site of activation with this method was determined to be where the motor roots exit from the spinal canal (intervertebral foramina) (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52 (9): 1025-1032, 1989) because induced currents are very dense at such a foramen made by electric resistant bones. In several kinds of peripheral neuropathy, this method has been used to detect a lesion at a proximal part of the peripheral nerves which can not be detected by the conventional NCSs. I present a few cases in whom motor root stimulation had a clinical

  16. Ultrafast Optical Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Sound Velocity of Amorphous SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, Donald; Olasov, Lauren; Daly, Brian; King, Sean; Bielefeld, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    We present ultrafast optical measurements of longitudinal sound velocity and thermal transport in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-SiC:H) films. The films were grown on Si wafers by PECVD using combinations of methylsilanes and H2 and He diluent gases. The films were well characterized and found to have densities (1.0 -- 2.5 g cm-3) and dielectric constants (2.8 -- 7.2) that spanned a wide range of values. Prior to their measurement, the a-SiC:H films were coated with 40-70 nm of polycrystalline Al. The pump-probe measurements were performed at room temperature using a modelocked Ti:sapphire laser. Transient reflectivity changes that are associated with very high frequency sound waves (picosecond ultrasonics) and the cooling rate of the SiC sample (Time Domain Thermorerflectance (TDTR)) were measured. We extract values for the thermal conductivity and sound velocity of the SiC films, and analyze the results in terms of rigidity percolation effects within the SiC layers. This work was supported by NSF award DMR-0906753.

  17. Determining the relationship of thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity of common rock types as a basis for reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, P.; Bär, K.; Sass, I.

    2017-05-01

    A comprehensive dataset detailing thermal conductivity and acoustic (compressional) wave velocity of 1430 oven-dry rock samples from clastic sedimentary (sandstone, arkose, greywacke), carbonatic (limestone, marl, dolomite, marble, coquina), plutonic (gabbro, gabbrodiorite, diorite, granodiorite, granite) and volcanic (basalt, andesite, rhyolite) rock types is presented. Correlation of thermal conductivity, compressional wave velocity and porosity are discussed in detail for each tested rock type. The study confirms that thermal conductivity of dry rocks can be predicted from acoustic velocity for porous rock types such as volcanites and sandstones, while non- and low-porous rocks show no to minor trends. With a prediction accuracy ± 0.5 W m- 1 K- 1 and a confidence of > 80% for sediments and mafic volcanites the calculated data is far more comprehensive than data collected from literature, and is likely accurate enough for most first exploration approaches or geoscientific models before detailed site-scale investigation or modelling is conducted. To investigate the effect of water saturation on thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity 118 sedimentary samples (arkose and fine-, medium- and coarse sandstones) were saturated in de-aired water and the heat conduction and acoustic velocity were remeasured. The obtained data shows that both thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity of saturated samples markedly increase in contrast to dry samples. The extent of the thermal conductivity and compressional wave velocity gain is mainly controlled by porosity. Thermal conductivity of saturated samples increases twice as much for higher porous samples than for low porous fine and medium sandstones. In contrast, the gain of compressional wave velocity of saturated sandstones decreases with increasing porosity.

  18. Central motor and sensory conduction in adrenoleukomyeloneuropathy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy and tabes dorsalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ugawa, Y; Kohara, N; Shimpo, T; Mannen, T

    1988-01-01

    Central motor and sensory conduction was studied by percutaneous electrical stimulation of brain and spinal cord and by somatosensory evoked potential techniques respectively, in patients with adrenoleukomyeloneuropathy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1-associated myelopathy and tabes dorsalis. The results were all consistent with clinical and neuropathological findings in these disorders. Conductions in the corticospinal tract and posterior column could be evaluated separately with these two techniques. Percutaneous electrical stimulation technique would be useful for investigating conduction in the corticospinal tract in patients with spinal cord disorders. PMID:2851031

  19. Noninvasive Peroneal Sensory and Motor Nerve Conduction Recordings in the Rabbit Distal Hindlimb: Feasibility, Variability and Neuropathy Measure

    PubMed Central

    Hotson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The peroneal nerve anatomy of the rabbit distal hindlimb is similar to humans, but reports of distal peroneal nerve conduction studies were not identified with a literature search. Distal sensorimotor recordings may be useful for studying rabbit models of length-dependent peripheral neuropathy. Surface electrodes were adhered to the dorsal rabbit foot overlying the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and the superficial peroneal nerve. The deep and superficial peroneal nerves were stimulated above the ankle and the common peroneal nerve was stimulated at the knee. The nerve conduction studies were repeated twice with a one-week intertest interval to determine measurement variability. Intravenous vincristine was used to produce a peripheral neuropathy. Repeat recordings measured the response to vincristine. A compound muscle action potential and a sensory nerve action potential were evoked in all rabbits. The compound muscle action potential mean amplitude was 0.29 mV (SD ± 0.12) and the fibula head to ankle mean motor conduction velocity was 46.5 m/s (SD ± 2.9). The sensory nerve action potential mean amplitude was 22.8 μV (SD ± 2.8) and the distal sensory conduction velocity was 38.8 m/s (SD ± 2.2). Sensorimotor latencies and velocities were least variable between two test sessions (coefficient of variation  =  2.6–5.9%), sensory potential amplitudes were intermediate (coefficient of variation  =  11.1%) and compound potential amplitudes were the most variable (coefficient of variation  = 19.3%). Vincristine abolished compound muscle action potentials and reduced sensory nerve action potential amplitudes by 42–57% while having little effect on velocity. Rabbit distal hindlimb nerve conduction studies are feasible with surface recordings and stimulation. The evoked distal sensory potentials have amplitudes, configurations and recording techniques that are similar to humans and may be valuable for measuring large sensory fiber function in chronic

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyl poisoning: correlation of sensory and motor nerve conduction, neurologic symptoms, and blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, quaterphenyls, and dibenzofurans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.C.; Tang, S.Y.; Miyata, H.; Kashimoto, T.; Chang, Y.C.; Chang, K.J.; Tung, T.C.

    1985-08-01

    In 1979 in Taiwan, more than 2000 people were poisoned with rice cooking oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). One hundred ten patients were studied within one year of the exposure. The blood PCB levels were 39.3 +/- 16.6 ppb. The blood levels of the PCB derivatives, polychlorinated quaterphenyls (PCQ) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), were 8.6 +/- 4.8 and 0.076 +/- 0.038 ppb, respectively. Both the sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) of the patients were significantly lower than the control. Abnormal slowing of sensory NCV was found in 43.6% and abnormal slowing of motor NCV was seen in 21.8%. Patients who had higher PCQ blood levels has significantly slower median nerve sensory NCV than those with lower PCQ levels. Patients with higher PCB blood levels had significantly slower peroneal nerve motor NCV than those with lower PCB levels.

  1. Synergistic plasticity of intrinsic conductance and electrical coupling restores synchrony in an intact motor network

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Brian J; Samarth, Pranit; Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2016-01-01

    Motor neurons of the crustacean cardiac ganglion generate virtually identical, synchronized output despite the fact that each neuron uses distinct conductance magnitudes. As a result of this variability, manipulations that target ionic conductances have distinct effects on neurons within the same ganglion, disrupting synchronized motor neuron output that is necessary for proper cardiac function. We hypothesized that robustness in network output is accomplished via plasticity that counters such destabilizing influences. By blocking high-threshold K+ conductances in motor neurons within the ongoing cardiac network, we discovered that compensation both resynchronized the network and helped restore excitability. Using model findings to guide experimentation, we determined that compensatory increases of both GA and electrical coupling restored function in the network. This is one of the first direct demonstrations of the physiological regulation of coupling conductance in a compensatory context, and of synergistic plasticity across cell- and network-level mechanisms in the restoration of output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16879.001 PMID:27552052

  2. Serum levels of TNF-α in peripheral neuropathy patients and its correlation with nerve conduction velocity in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Gauhar; Rizvi, S Aijaz Abbas; Singhal, Sangeeta; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    To compare serum levels of TNF-α in patients of peripheral neuropathy and patients without neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This cross sectional study was conducted in diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. They were divided in groups, Group I (n=37) with clinically detectable diabetic peripheral neuropathy of shorter duration and Group II (n=27) with clinically detectable diabetic peripheral neuropathy of longer duration. They were compared with patients without clinical neuropathy (n=22), clinical diagnosis was based on neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and neuropathy disability score (NDS) for signs. Blood samples were collected for baseline investigations and estimation of serum TNF-α. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in both upper and lower limbs. Median, Ulnar, Common Peroneal and Posterior Tibial nerves were selected for motor nerve conduction study and Median and Sural nerves were selected for sensory nerve conduction study. The comparisons were done between various clinical and biochemical parameters in clinically detectable and undetectable peripheral neuropathy groups of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study showed raised serum levels of TNF-α in peripheral neuropathy patients and significant correlation with nerve conduction velocity. High level of TNF-α in serum of T2DM patients with neuropathy shows possible contribution in development of neuropathy. Due to its independent association this cytokine might be used as biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Harmonic force spectroscopy reveals a force-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-03-01

    A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound (force producing) state and a weakly bound (relaxed) state. Huxley et al. have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by a load. We use a new method we call ``harmonic force spectroscopy'' to extract a load-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor. With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a myosin molecule anchored to the microscope stage that oscillates sinusoidally. Upon binding, the motor experiences an oscillatory load with a mean that is directed forward or backward, depending on binding location We find that the bound time at saturating [ATP] is exponentially correlated with the mean load, which is explained by Arrhenius transition theory. With a stroke size measurement, we obtained a load-velocity curve from a single myosin. We compare the curves for wild-type motors with mutants that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, to understand the effects on the contractile cycle

  4. Distribution of muscle fiber conduction velocity of m. masseter during voluntary isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Mito, K; Sakamoto, K

    2000-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) is the velocity of an interference wave due to muscle fiber action potentials. In general, it has been reported that the value of MFCV in m. masseter is larger than that in limb and trunk muscles. But the values of MFCV in the reports were measured in part of the muscle, and the distribution of MFCV in the whole muscle including the end-plate and the tendon has not been measured. In this study, surface myoelectric signals are recorded in m. masseter during voluntary isometric contractions of 20, 30, and 40% MVC (maximum voluntary contraction) in eleven healthy male subjects with the use of array electrodes. The value of MFCV is found directly using an averaging method. The end-plate zone is concentrated in the lower quarter of the muscle. The distribution of MFCV depends on the location of the measured electrode. The largest value of MFCV of more than 20.0 m/s is obtained in the locations of the end-plate and the tendon. The minimum value of MFCV is obtained at the location of 10 mm measured from the end-plate along the direction of the muscle fiber to the tendon of the upper side. The mean values with the standard deviations during 20, 30, and 40% MVC are 10.3 +/- 0.7, 11.6 +/- 0.7, and 12.2 +/- 0.8 m/s, respectively. The MFCVs between the different neighboring locations are compared and found to be significant by a level of 1% for each contraction level. The MFCVs increase depending on the contraction levels for various electrode locations on the muscle.

  5. The electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low velocity zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Sifre, David; Gardes, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier Majumder, Saswata

    2014-05-01

    A low viscosity layer at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is certainly a requirement for plate tectonics but the nature of the rocks presents in this boundary remains controversial. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the LAB are attributed either to sub-solidus water-related defects in olivine minerals or to a few volume percents of partial melt but these two interpretations have shortcomings: (1) The amount of H2O stored in olivine is not expected to be high enough due to several mineralogical processes that have been sometimes ignored; (2) elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the too cold temperatures prevailing in the LAB and by the high melt mobility that can lead to gravitational segregation. All this has in fact been partly settled 30 years ago, when a petrological LAB has been defined as a region of the upper mantle impregnated by incipient melts; that is small amounts of melt caused by small amount of CO2 and H2O. We show here that incipient melting is a melting regime that is allowed in the entire P-T-fO2 region of the LVZ. The top of the oceanic LVZ (LAB) is then best explained by a melt freezing layer due to a decarbonation reaction, whereas the bottom of the LVZ matches the depth at which redox melting defines the lower boundary of stability of incipient melts. Based on new laboratory measurements, we show here that incipient melts must be the cause of the high electrical conductivities in the oceanic LVZ. Considering relevant mantle abundances of H2O and CO2 and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the LAB for various ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. We conclude that incipient melts prevail in the LAB, what else?

  6. Acute Motor Conduction Block Neuropathy: Another Distinct Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ERDOĞMUŞ İNCE, Nilüfer; ÖZTEKİN, M. Fevzi; ÖZTEKİN, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who developed progressive weakness in all limbs without sensory symptoms 4 weeks after upper respiratory system infection. Electrophysiological findings suggested a new variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome named “acute motor conduction block neuropathy”. Electrophysiological studies were performed at admission, 12th and 28th weeks. At the 28th week, the clinical examination and electrophysiological findings showed complete recovery.

  7. The usefulness of proximal radial motor conduction in acute compressive radial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Hyun; Park, Kee Duk; Chung, Pil Wook; Moon, Heui Soo; Kim, Yong Bum; Yoon, Won Tae; Park, Hyung Jun; Suh, Bum Chun

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine diagnostic and prognostic values of proximal radial motor conduction in acute compressive radial neuropathy. Thirty-nine consecutive cases of acute compressive radial neuropathy with radial conduction studies-including stimulation at Erb's point-performed within 14 days from clinical onset were reviewed. The radial conduction data of 39 control subjects were used as reference data. Thirty-one men and eight women (age, 45.2±12.7 years, mean±SD) were enrolled. All 33 patients in whom clinical follow-up data were available experienced complete recovery, with a recovery time of 46.8±34.3 days. Partial conduction block was found frequently (17 patients) on radial conduction studies. The decrease in the compound muscle action potential area between the arm and Erb's point was an independent predictor for recovery time. Proximal radial motor conduction appears to be a useful method for the early detection and prediction of prognosis of acute compressive radial neuropathy.

  8. Recovery from distal ulnar motor conduction block injury: serial EMG studies.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Liliana; Felice, Kevin J

    2002-07-01

    Acute conduction block injuries often result from nerve compression or trauma. The temporal pattern of clinical, electrophysiologic, and histopathologic changes following these injuries has been extensively studied in experimental animal models but not in humans. Our recent evaluation of a young man with an injury to the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve following nerve compression from weightlifting exercises provided the opportunity to follow the course and recovery of a severe conduction block injury with sequential nerve conduction studies. The conduction block slowly and completely resolved, as did the clinical deficit, over a 14-week period. The reduction in conduction block occurred at a linear rate of -6.1% per week. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Multifocal motor neuropathy: pathologic alterations at the site of conduction block.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Engelstad, JaNean; Gruener, Gregory; Grant, Ian; Dyck, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The pathologic changes of nerves in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), a rare neuropathy with selective focal conduction block of motor fibers in mixed nerves, remain essentially unstudied. Fascicular nerve biopsy of 8 forearm or arm nerves in 7 patients with typical MMN was undertaken for diagnostic reasons at the site of the conduction block. Abnormalities were seen in 7 of 8 nerves, including a varying degree of multifocal fiber degeneration and loss, an altered fiber size distribution with fewer large fibers, an increased frequency of remyelinated fiber profiles, and frequent and prominent regenerating fiber clusters. Small epineurial perivascular inflammatory infiltrates were observed in 2 nerves. We did not observe overt segmental demyelination or onion bulb formation. We hypothesize that an antibody-mediated attack directed against components of axolemma at nodes of Ranvier could cause conduction block, transitory paranodal demyelination and remyelination, and axonal degeneration and regeneration. Alternatively, the antibody attack could be directed at components of paranodal myelin. We favor the first hypothesis because in nerves studied by us, axonal pathological alteration predominated over myelin pathology. Irrespective of which mechanism is involved, we conclude that the unequivocal multifocal fiber degeneration and loss and regenerative clusters at sites of conduction block explains the observed clinical muscle weakness and atrophy and alterations of motor unit potentials. The occurrence of conduction block and multifocal fiber degeneration and regeneration at the same sites suggests that the processes of conduction block and fiber degeneration and regeneration are linked. Finding discrete multifocal fiber degeneration may also provide an explanation for why the functional abnormalities remain unchanged over long periods of time at discrete proximal to distal levels of nerve and may emphasize a need for early intervention (assuming that efficacious

  10. The role of ECoG magnitude and phase in decoding position, velocity, and acceleration during continuous motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Jiri; Fischer, Jörg; Ruescher, Johanna; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Ball, Tonio

    2013-01-01

    In neuronal population signals, including the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocorticogram (ECoG), the low-frequency component (LFC) is particularly informative about motor behavior and can be used for decoding movement parameters for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications. An idea previously expressed, but as of yet not quantitatively tested, is that it is the LFC phase that is the main source of decodable information. To test this issue, we analyzed human ECoG recorded during a game-like, one-dimensional, continuous motor task with a novel decoding method suitable for unfolding magnitude and phase explicitly into a complex-valued, time-frequency signal representation, enabling quantification of the decodable information within the temporal, spatial and frequency domains and allowing disambiguation of the phase contribution from that of the spectral magnitude. The decoding accuracy based only on phase information was substantially (at least 2 fold) and significantly higher than that based only on magnitudes for position, velocity and acceleration. The frequency profile of movement-related information in the ECoG data matched well with the frequency profile expected when assuming a close time-domain correlate of movement velocity in the ECoG, e.g., a (noisy) “copy” of hand velocity. No such match was observed with the frequency profiles expected when assuming a copy of either hand position or acceleration. There was also no indication of additional magnitude-based mechanisms encoding movement information in the LFC range. Thus, our study contributes to elucidating the nature of the informative LFC of motor cortical population activity and may hence contribute to improve decoding strategies and BMI performance. PMID:24198757

  11. Alterations of cortical excitability and central motor conduction time in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Prashanth, D K; Netravathi, M; Nagaraju, B C; Pal, Pramod Kr

    2013-10-11

    Wilson's disease (WD) leads to widespread structural alterations of central nervous system and our objectives were to determine the cortical excitability changes in WD by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Thirteen patients with WD, diagnosed by the presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring and biochemical tests, were studied. TMS was performed using a figure-of-eight coil attached to Magstim 200 stimulator. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from right first dorsal interosseous at rest. Resting motor threshold (RMT) was determined using standard techniques and central motor conduction time (CMCT) by 'F' wave method. Comparison was made with control data of our laboratory. Dysarthria was the presenting symptom in 5 patients (38.5%) and chorea, tremors, dystonia and abnormal gait in 2 patients each (15.4%). RMT was recordable in 10 patients and not recordable in 3. Compared to controls, patients in whom RMT was recordable, had significantly higher mean RMT (80.9 ± 14.8 vs. 41.1 ± 7, p<0.0001) and CMCT (6.7 ± 0.5 ms vs. 4.8 ± 0.6 ms; p<0.0001). In 2 of the 3 patients with non-recordable RMT, MEP could be obtained with active contraction. CMCT in these 2 patients was also prolonged. Patients with WD have reduced cortical excitability and prolonged CMCT which may be due to the intracortical presynaptic motor dysfunction.

  12. Low-Cost Timer to Measure the Terminal Velocity of a Magnet Falling through a Conducting Pipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish R.; Huli, Saurabhee; Lahane, Rohan; Sawant, Sumedh

    2014-01-01

    Dropping a magnet into a conductive pipe (made up of copper or brass or aluminum) is a very popular demonstration in many physics classrooms and laboratories. In this paper we present an inexpensive timer that can be used to measure the terminal velocity of the magnet falling through a conducting pipe. The timer assembly consists of Hall effect…

  13. Low-Cost Timer to Measure the Terminal Velocity of a Magnet Falling through a Conducting Pipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish R.; Huli, Saurabhee; Lahane, Rohan; Sawant, Sumedh

    2014-01-01

    Dropping a magnet into a conductive pipe (made up of copper or brass or aluminum) is a very popular demonstration in many physics classrooms and laboratories. In this paper we present an inexpensive timer that can be used to measure the terminal velocity of the magnet falling through a conducting pipe. The timer assembly consists of Hall effect…

  14. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients.

  15. Relationship between innervation zone width and mean muscle fiber conduction velocity during a sustained isometric contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X.; Beck, T.W.; Wages, N.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between the biceps brachii muscle innervation zone (IZ) width and the mean muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during a sustained isometric contraction. Methods: Fifteen healthy men performed a sustained isometric elbow flexion exercise at their 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) until they could not maintain the target force. Mean MFCV was estimated through multichannel surface electromyographic recordings from a linear electrode array. Before exercise, IZ width was quantified. Separate non-parametric one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to examine whether there was a difference in each mean MFCV variable among groups with different IZ width. In addition, separate bivariate correlations were also performed to examine the relationships between the IZ width and the mean MFCV variables during the fatiguing exercise. Results: There was a significant difference in the percent decline of mean MFCV (%ΔMFCV) among groups with different IZ width (χ2 (3)=11.571, p=0.009). In addition, there was also a significant positive relationship between the IZ width and the %ΔMFCV (Kendall’s tau= 0.807; p<0.001). Conclusions: We believe that such relationship is likely influenced by both muscle fiber size and the muscle fiber type composition. PMID:25730657

  16. Effects of muscle fiber type and size on EMG median frequency and conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Kupa, E J; Roy, S H; Kandarian, S C; De Luca, C J

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes an in vitro method for comparing surface-detected electromyographic median frequency (MF) and conduction velocity (CV) parameters with histochemical measurements of muscle fiber type composition and cross-sectional area (CSA). Electromyographic signals were recorded during electrically elicited tetanic contractions from rat soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscles placed in an oxygenated Krebs bath. Fibers were typed as slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic, and fast glycolytic based on histochemical enzyme stains. Muscles with a greater percentage of fast glycolytic and fast oxidative glycolytic fibers exhibited greater initial values of MF and CV as well as a greater reduction in these variables over the course of the contraction. Regression indicated that fiber type composition could be predicted based on two MF parameters. A weighted measure of muscle fiber CSA was found to be linearly related to both initial MF and CV. The results of this study suggest that MF and CV parameters recorded during a muscular contraction are related to muscle fiber type composition and muscle fiber CSA.

  17. Towards Real-Time Estimation of Muscle-Fiber Conduction Velocity using Delay-Locked Loop.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Rabotti, Chiara; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-11-24

    Decrease in muscle-fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during sustained contraction has been widely accepted as myoelectric manifestation of muscle fatigue. Several methods have been proposed in the literature for MFCV estimation by analysing surface electromyography (EMG), e.g., cross-correlation (CC) function and maximum likelihood (ML). However, for all the available methods, windowing of the EMG signal and computationally demanding calculations are required, limiting the possibility to continuously monitor muscle fatigue in real time. In the present study, an adaptive scheme is proposed that permits real-time estimation of MFCV. The proposed scheme is based on a delay-locked loop (DLL). A second-order loop is adopted to track the delay variation over time. An error filter is employed to approximate a ML estimation in case of colored noise. Furthermore, the DLL system is extended for multichannel CV estimation. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by both dedicated simulations and real EMG signals. Our results show the accuracy of the proposed method to be comparable to that of the ML method for much lower (1/40) computational complexity, especially suited for real-time MFCV measurements. Use of this method can enable new studies on myoelectric fatigue, possibly leading to new insight on the underlying physiological processes.

  18. Muscle conduction velocity, strength, neural activity, and morphological changes after eccentric and concentric training.

    PubMed

    Cadore, E L; González-Izal, M; Pallarés, J G; Rodriguez-Falces, J; Häkkinen, K; Kraemer, W J; Pinto, R S; Izquierdo, M

    2014-10-01

    This study compared the effects of concentric and eccentric training on neuromuscular adaptations in young subjects. Twenty-two men and women were assigned to one of two groups: concentric (CON, n = 11) and eccentric (ECC, n = 11) training. Training consisted of 6 weeks of isokinetic exercise, performed twice weekly, starting with two sets of eight repetitions, and progressing to five sets of 10 repetitions. Subjects were tested in strength variables [concentric, eccentric, and isometric peak torque (PT), and rate of force development (RFD)], muscle conduction velocity (CV), neuromuscular activity, vastus lateralis (VL) muscle thickness, and echo intensity as determined by ultrasonography. There were similar increases in the concentric and eccentric PTs in both the CON and ECC groups (P < 0.01), but only the ECC group showed an increase in isometric PT (P < 0.001). Similarly, both groups exhibited increased VL muscle thickness, CV, and RFD, and reduced VL echo intensity (P < 0.05). Significant correlations were observed among the relative changes in the neuromuscular outcomes and training variables (e.g., total work, average PT) (r = 0.68-0.75, P < 0.05). The results showed that both training types similarly improved dynamic PT, CV, RFD, and muscle thickness and quality during the early weeks of training.

  19. Decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity correlates with strength loss after an endurance run.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Rosso, Valeria; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring surface electromyographic (EMG) signals can provide useful insights for characterizing muscle fatigue, which is defined as an exercise-induced strength loss. This experiment investigated the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) changes induced by an endurance run. The day before and immediately after a half-marathon run (21.097 km) 11 amateur runners performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of knee extensor muscles. During the MVC, multichannel EMG was recorded from the vastus lateralis and EMG amplitude and CV were calculated. After the run, knee extensors showed a decreased strength (-13  ±  9%, p  =  0.001) together with a reduction in EMG amplitude (-13  ±  10%, p  =  0.003) and in CV (-6  ±  8%, p  =  0.032). Knee extensor strength loss positively correlated with vastus lateralis CV differences (r  =  0.76, p  =  0.006). Thus, the exercises-induced muscle fatigue was associated not only with a decrease in EMG amplitude, but also with a reduction in CV. This finding suggests that muscle fibers with higher CV (i.e. those with greater fiber size) were the most impaired during strength production after an endurance run.

  20. Responses to circulatory pressures, and conduction velocity, of pulmocutaneous baroreceptors in Bufo marinus.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vliet, B N; West, N H

    1987-01-01

    1. Baroreceptor activity was recorded within the recurrent laryngeal branch of the toad vagus in forty-four preparations. The receptive fields of the receptors were located in the pulmocutaneous artery (p.c.a.), generally within 5 mm of its separation from the truncus. However, the most easily recorded afferents in this nerve were mechanoreceptors which responded to punctate stimulation of the lip of the glottis. 2. The conduction velocities of p.c.a. baroreceptor and mechanoreceptive glottal afferents recorded in the recurrent laryngeal nerve ranged from 0.3-0.7 (0.5 +/- 0.1) m s-1 and 2.2-14.0 (6.8 +/- 0.8) m s-1 respectively, which suggests that baroreceptor afferent fibres are non-myelinated and that glottal afferent fibres are myelinated. 3. The p.c.a. baroreceptor discharge was largely confined to a period of systole in which systemic and p.c.a. arterial pressure profiles were identical. The maximum discharge frequency, number of spikes per cycle, and the duration of discharge increased, and the discharge latency decreased, as p.c.a. pressures were elevated. The latency of the discharge was pronounced at low p.c.a. pressures, and could be partially accounted for by the conduction time of the baroreceptor afferents to the electrodes (up to 100 ms). 4. Carotid and aortic arterial baroreceptor and pharyngeal afferents were recorded in two pharyngeal branches of the vagus nerve which were closely associated with the carotid and aortic arterial arches. 5. It is suggested that baroreceptor populations with their receptive fields in the third- (carotid) and sixth- (p.c.a. or pulmonary) arch arteries should be considered homologous in anurans and mammals, but that those of the fourth- (aorta) arch artery should not, since the vagal branches in which their afferents are carried do not appear to be equivalent in anurans and mammals. Images Fig. 8 PMID:3116216

  1. Analysis of of Injection-Velocity Effects on Rocket Motor Dynamics and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurrell, Herbert G.

    1959-01-01

    A concept of combustion time lag that includes dependency on injection velocity is introduced. The concept is used in the formulation of chamber transfer functions and in an analysis of low-frequency combustion instability. Theoretical frequency responses and stability boundaries are compared with those obtained when the injection-velocity effect on the time lag to be an important consideration, in the theory of chamber dynamics and combustion instability

  2. Relation between muscle fiber conduction velocity and exerted dynamic characteristics of muscular tension in patients with hemiplegia caused by stroke

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kenichi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Kentaro; Abe, Chie

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among muscle fiber conduction velocity, time-force characteristics of muscle force production, and voluntary movement in patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in the present study were 13 patients with hemiplegia. Muscle fiber conduction velocity, deep temperature of muscles and muscle thickness were measured for the tibialis anterior, and a time force curve was obtained from dorsiflexion of the ankle and lower thigh girth (maximum, minimum) for both sides. The maximum torque rate of change and maximum torque were calculated from the force-time curve. In addition, Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was used to evaluate the function of the hemiplegic side. [Results] In all the measurement items, significant differences were observed between the hemiplegic side and the healthy side. The maximum torque rate of change and Brunnstrom Recovery Stage showed a high degree of correlation. The muscle fiber conduction velocity and maximum torque rate of change or maximum torque showed a medium degree of correlation. However, muscle fiber conduction velocity was not significantly correlated with Brunnstrom Recovery Stage. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was good as a determination factor for the maximum torque rate of change. In addition, in patients with hemiplegia, it became clear that relationship is between muscle fiber conduction velocity and time-force characteristics of muscle force production as in healthy persons. PMID:27821946

  3. Relation between muscle fiber conduction velocity and exerted dynamic characteristics of muscular tension in patients with hemiplegia caused by stroke.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenichi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Kentaro; Abe, Chie

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among muscle fiber conduction velocity, time-force characteristics of muscle force production, and voluntary movement in patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in the present study were 13 patients with hemiplegia. Muscle fiber conduction velocity, deep temperature of muscles and muscle thickness were measured for the tibialis anterior, and a time force curve was obtained from dorsiflexion of the ankle and lower thigh girth (maximum, minimum) for both sides. The maximum torque rate of change and maximum torque were calculated from the force-time curve. In addition, Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was used to evaluate the function of the hemiplegic side. [Results] In all the measurement items, significant differences were observed between the hemiplegic side and the healthy side. The maximum torque rate of change and Brunnstrom Recovery Stage showed a high degree of correlation. The muscle fiber conduction velocity and maximum torque rate of change or maximum torque showed a medium degree of correlation. However, muscle fiber conduction velocity was not significantly correlated with Brunnstrom Recovery Stage. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was good as a determination factor for the maximum torque rate of change. In addition, in patients with hemiplegia, it became clear that relationship is between muscle fiber conduction velocity and time-force characteristics of muscle force production as in healthy persons.

  4. Repetitive activity slows axonal conduction velocity and concomitantly increases mechanical activation threshold in single axons of the rat cranial dura.

    PubMed

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2012-02-15

    The passage of an action potential along a peripheral axon modulates the conduction velocity of subsequent action potentials. In C-neurones with unmyelinated axons repetitive activity progressively slows axonal conduction velocity and in microneurographic recordings from healthy human subjects the magnitude of this slowing can be used to predict the receptive properties of individual axons. Recently, a reduction in the number of available voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)) through inactivation has been implicated as the predominant factor responsible for the slowing of axonal conduction. Since Na(V)s are also responsible for the initiation of action potentials in sensory nerve terminals, changes in their availability may be expected to affect activation threshold for sensory stimuli. To examine this proposal, dynamic mechanical stimuli were used to make precise estimates of activation threshold in single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial dura mater. Decreases in axonal conduction velocity induced by repetitive electrical stimulation were paralleled by an increase in mechanical activation threshold. Application of TTX (10-20 nM) also slowed axonal conduction velocity in all 11 fibres examined and in 9 of these this resulted in a parallel increase in mechanical activation threshold. We interpret this as indicating that a reduction in available Na(V) number contributes to both axonal conduction velocity slowing and the observed parallel increase in mechanical activation threshold. The slowing of axonal conduction velocity observed during repetitive activity thus represents a form of accommodation, i.e. self inhibition, which is likely to be decisive in limiting peripheral input to the spinal dorsal horn and thereby regulating processes that could otherwise lead to central sensitization.

  5. [The influence of frequency and blockade of the autonomic nervous system on the functional behaviour of the human conduction system. Part A: Conduction velocity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Runge, M; Luckmann, E; Narula, O S

    1976-01-01

    32 patients were studied by His-bundle recordings to examine the extent to which frequency and autonomic nervous system influence the conduction velocity in the subdivisions (atrium, AV-node, His-Purkinje system) of the normal PR-interval. The measurements were performed during sinus rhythm and three electrically induced atrial frequencies before and after intravenous administration of 1 mg Atropine (15 patients) and 0.4 mg Visken (17 patients). In influencing the atrial conduction velocity frequency dominates the blockade of both components of the autonomic nervous system. Increase in frequency lengthens the intraatrial conduction time. Blockade of parasympathicus and sympathicus does not significantly influence the changes in intraatrial conduction velocity induced by increase of frequency. Patients with prolonged intraatrial conduction respond in the same way to cycle length shortening and blockade of the autonomic tone as patients with normal conduction. The results are discussed with respect to acetylcholine and catecholamine influence on the electrophysiological properties of the atrial myocardium. The AV-node is the part of the conduction system most sensitive to the influence of both cycle length shortening and blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Artificially induced cycle length shortening prolongs the intranodal conduction time to a different individual level for each patient. Blockade of the parasympathicus not only shortens this interval but also reduces the steepness of the AH-time induced by atrial pacing. Blockade of the sympathicus has the opposite effect. The most likely explanation for these results is the abolishing of the functional dissociation within the AV-node by blocking the autonomic influence on this structure. The conduction velocity in the His-Purkinje system is influenced neither by atrial pacing nor by blockade of both components of the autonomic nervous system.

  6. Experimental validation of the nerve conduction velocity selective recording technique using a multi-contact cuff electrode.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kurstjens, G A M; Hennings, K

    2009-12-01

    The earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) is presented as an in vitro model of a peripheral nerve containing only two fibers each with distinctly different conduction velocities, the median and lateral giant fibers (MGF and LGF). The worm model is used with a multi-contact cuff electrode to validate the spatial-temporal filtering effect of different electrode contact configurations and the effect of applying a delay adder and matched filter tuned to either the MGF or LGF action potential (AP) to extract conduction direction and velocity from the recording. The results confirmed the known effect of inter-electrode spacing and bipolar and tripolar recording configuration on the AP amplitude. It also demonstrates a crossover point where the amplitude of the tripolar recording is larger than the monopolar recording, an effect of the slower action potential conduction velocities in the worm. The delay adder was found to be an effective velocity sensitive filter, able to discriminate units based on conduction velocity. The matched filter to be an effective means to eliminate artifact and increase signal to noise ratios, however was not found to improve selectivity.

  7. Do surface electromyograms provide physiological estimates of conduction velocity from the medial gastrocnemius muscle?

    PubMed

    Gallina, Alessio; Ritzel, Cintia H; Merletti, Roberto; Vieira, Taian M M

    2013-04-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) is commonly estimated from surface electromyograms (EMGs) collected with electrodes parallel to muscle fibers. If electrodes and muscle fibers are not located in parallel planes, CV estimates are biased towards values far over the physiological range. In virtue of their pinnate architecture, the fibers of muscles such as the gastrocnemius are hardly aligned in planes parallel to surface electrodes. Therefore, in this study we investigate whether physiological CV estimates can be obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle. Specifically, with a large grid of 16×8 electrodes we map CV estimates over the whole gastrocnemius muscle while eleven subjects exerted isometric plantar flexions at three different force levels. CV was estimated for couples of single differential EMGs and estimate locations (i.e., channels) were classified as physiological and non-physiological, depending on whether CV estimates were within the physiological range (3-6ms(-1)) or not. Physiological CV values could be estimated from a markedly small muscle region for eight participants; channels providing physiological CV estimates corresponded to about 5% of the total number of channels. As expected, physiological and non-physiological channels were clustered in distinct regions. CV estimates within the physiological range were obtained for the most distal gastrocnemius portion (ANOVA, P<0.001), where occurrences of propagating potentials were often verified through visual analysis. For the first time, this study shows that CV might be reliably assessed from surface EMGs collected from the most distal gastrocnemius region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extracellular sodium dependence of the conduction velocity-calcium relationship: evidence of ephaptic self-attenuation

    PubMed Central

    George, Sharon A.; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Zeitz, Michael; Davalos, Rafael V.; Smyth, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory previously demonstrated that perfusate sodium and potassium concentrations can modulate cardiac conduction velocity (CV) consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic coupling (EpC). EpC depends on the ionic currents and intercellular separation in sodium channel rich intercalated disk microdomains like the perinexus. We suggested that perinexal width (WP) correlates with changes in extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o). Here, we test the hypothesis that increasing [Ca2+]o reduces WP and increases CV. Mathematical models of EpC also predict that reducing WP can reduce sodium driving force and CV by self-attenuation. Therefore, we further hypothesized that reducing WP and extracellular sodium ([Na+]o) will reduce CV consistent with ephaptic self-attenuation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that increasing [Ca2+]o (1 to 3.4 mM) significantly decreased WP. Optically mapping wild-type (WT) (100% Cx43) mouse hearts demonstrated that increasing [Ca2+]o increases transverse CV during normonatremia (147.3 mM), but slows transverse CV during hyponatremia (120 mM). Additionally, CV in heterozygous (∼50% Cx43) hearts was more sensitive to changes in [Ca2+]o relative to WT during normonatremia. During hyponatremia, CV slowed in both WT and heterozygous hearts to the same extent. Importantly, neither [Ca2+]o nor [Na+]o altered Cx43 expression or phosphorylation determined by Western blotting, or gap junctional resistance determined by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Narrowing WP, by increasing [Ca2+]o, increases CV consistent with enhanced EpC between myocytes. Interestingly, during hyponatremia, reducing WP slowed CV, consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic self-attenuation. This study suggests that serum ion concentrations may be an important determinant of cardiac disease expression. PMID:26945081

  9. Extracellular sodium dependence of the conduction velocity-calcium relationship: evidence of ephaptic self-attenuation.

    PubMed

    George, Sharon A; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Zeitz, Michael; Davalos, Rafael V; Smyth, James W; Poelzing, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Our laboratory previously demonstrated that perfusate sodium and potassium concentrations can modulate cardiac conduction velocity (CV) consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic coupling (EpC). EpC depends on the ionic currents and intercellular separation in sodium channel rich intercalated disk microdomains like the perinexus. We suggested that perinexal width (WP) correlates with changes in extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o). Here, we test the hypothesis that increasing [Ca(2+)]o reduces WP and increases CV. Mathematical models of EpC also predict that reducing WP can reduce sodium driving force and CV by self-attenuation. Therefore, we further hypothesized that reducing WP and extracellular sodium ([Na(+)]o) will reduce CV consistent with ephaptic self-attenuation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that increasing [Ca(2+)]o (1 to 3.4 mM) significantly decreased WP Optically mapping wild-type (WT) (100% Cx43) mouse hearts demonstrated that increasing [Ca(2+)]o increases transverse CV during normonatremia (147.3 mM), but slows transverse CV during hyponatremia (120 mM). Additionally, CV in heterozygous (∼50% Cx43) hearts was more sensitive to changes in [Ca(2+)]o relative to WT during normonatremia. During hyponatremia, CV slowed in both WT and heterozygous hearts to the same extent. Importantly, neither [Ca(2+)]o nor [Na(+)]o altered Cx43 expression or phosphorylation determined by Western blotting, or gap junctional resistance determined by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Narrowing WP, by increasing [Ca(2+)]o, increases CV consistent with enhanced EpC between myocytes. Interestingly, during hyponatremia, reducing WP slowed CV, consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic self-attenuation. This study suggests that serum ion concentrations may be an important determinant of cardiac disease expression. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Conduction Velocity of the Uterine Contraction in Serial Magnetomyogram (MMG) Data: Event Based Simulation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Preissl, Hubert; Lowery, Curtis L.; Eswaran, Hari; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to calculate the conduction velocity (CV) of the uterine contraction bursts in magnetomyogram (MMG) signals measured using a multichannel SQUID array. For this purpose, we partition the sensor coordinates into four different quadrants and identify the contractile bursts using a previously proposed Hilbert-wavelet transform approach. If contractile burst is identified in more than one quadrant, we calculate the center of gravity (CoG) in each quadrant for each time point as the sum of the product of the sensor coordinates with the Hilbert amplitude of the MMG signals normalized by the sum of the Hilbert amplitude of the signals over all sensors. Following this we compute the delay between the CoGs of all (six) possible quadrant pairs combinations. As a first step, we validate this approach by simulating a stochastic model based on independent second-order autoregressive processes (AR2) and we divide them into 30 second disjoint windows and insert burst activity at specific time instances in preselected sensors. Also we introduce a lag of 5 ± 1 seconds between different quadrants. Using our approach we calculate the CoG of the signals in a quadrant. To this end, we compute the delay between CoGs obtained from different quadrants and show that our approach is able to reliably capture the delay incorporated in the model. We apply the proposed approach to 19 serial MMG data obtained from two subjects and show an increase in the CV as the subjects approached labor. PMID:22255713

  11. QRS duration reflects underlying changes in conduction velocity during increased intraventricular pressure and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Jorge G; Moreno, Javier; Archondo, Tamara; Alfonso-Almazán, José Manuel; Lillo-Castellano, José María; Usandizaga, Elena; García-Torrent, María Jesús; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; González, Pablo; Borrego, Luis; Cañadas-Godoy, Victoria; González-Ferrer, Juan J; Pérez-Castellano, Nicasio; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Filgueiras-Rama, David

    2017-08-09

    Pressure overload and heart failure electrophysiological remodeling (HF-ER) in pigs are associated with decreased conduction velocity (CV) and dispersion of repolarization, which lead to higher risk of ventricular arrhythmia. This work aimed to establish the correlation between QRS complex duration and underlying changes in CV during increased intraventricular pressure (IVP) and/or HF-ER ex-vivo, and to determine whether QRS duration could be sensitive to an acute increase in left ventricular (LV) afterload in-vivo. HF-ER was induced in 7 pigs by high-rate ventricular pacing. Seven weight-matched animals were used as controls. Isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts underwent programmed ventricular stimulation to study QRS complex duration and CV under low/high IVP, using volume-conducted ECG and epicardial optical mapping, respectively. Four additional pigs underwent open-chest surgery to increase LV afterload by partially clamping the ascending aorta, while measuring QRS complex duration during sinus rhythm (SR). In 13 hearts included for analysis, both HF-ER and increased IVP showed significantly slower epicardial CV (-40% and -15%, p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively), which correlated with similar widening of the QRS complex (+41% and +17%, p = 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). HF-ER hearts shower larger prolongation of the QRS complex than controls upon increasing the IVP (+21% vs. +12%, respectively. HF-ER*IVP interaction: p = 0.004). QRS complex widened after increasing LV afterload in-vivo (n=3), with correlation between QRS duration and aortic diastolic pressures (R = 0.58, p < 0.001). In conclusion, high IVP and/or HF-ER significantly decrease CV, which correlates with QRS widening on the ECG during ventricular pacing. Increased myocardial wall stress also widens the QRS complex during SR in-vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of the Fermi velocity renormalization in a graphene sheet by the presence of a conducting plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Braga, Alessandra N.; Pires, Wagner P.; Alves, Van Sérgio; Alves, Danilo T.; Marino, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the renormalization of the Fermi velocity in a plane graphene sheet in the presence of a parallel conducting plate. We use the pseudo-quantum electrodynamics to describe the Coulombian interaction between the electrons, but taking into account that this interaction is changed by the conducting plate. Incorporating the influence of the plate into the gauge field, we obtain the correspondent photon propagator and electron self-energy, showing that the logarithmic renormalization of the Fermi velocity is inhibited by the presence of the plate. Our result may be useful as an alternative way to control the electronic properties of graphene.

  13. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 1. Conduction velocity from digit to palm, from palm to wrist, and across the elbow, as a function of age.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Gutiérrez, A M

    1978-01-01

    The sensory conduction velocity from digit to palm and from palm to wrist was determined in median (digit 3) and ulnar (digit 5) nerves in 47 healthy subjects with age range from 21 to 77 years. The decrement of the sensory conduction as a function of age was more marked in the palm to wrist than in the digit to palm segment. Sensory conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve across the elbow was also studied. Irregularities in the shape of the sensory evoked potential recorded above the cubital sulcus were found in 12.76% of cases, especially in subjects over 50 years of age. These results suggest that aging causes decrement in sensory conduction and changes in the shape of the evoked potentials, especially at points where the nerves are more frequently compressed. Images PMID:731254

  14. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 1. Conduction velocity from digit to palm, from palm to wrist, and across the elbow, as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Gutiérrez, A M

    1978-12-01

    The sensory conduction velocity from digit to palm and from palm to wrist was determined in median (digit 3) and ulnar (digit 5) nerves in 47 healthy subjects with age range from 21 to 77 years. The decrement of the sensory conduction as a function of age was more marked in the palm to wrist than in the digit to palm segment. Sensory conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve across the elbow was also studied. Irregularities in the shape of the sensory evoked potential recorded above the cubital sulcus were found in 12.76% of cases, especially in subjects over 50 years of age. These results suggest that aging causes decrement in sensory conduction and changes in the shape of the evoked potentials, especially at points where the nerves are more frequently compressed.

  15. A new method to measure caudal motor conduction time using magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Tai Ryoon; Paik, Nam Jong; Lee, Seong Jae; Kwon, Bum Sun

    2004-12-01

    Although central motor conduction time (CMCT) has been used for the diagnosis of lumbosacral spinal stenosis (LSSS), its diagnostic value is limited due to the short length of the involved segment compared to the long length of the total conduction distance. To overcome this, we introduce a new method to measure the caudal motor conduction time (caudal MCT) using magnetic stimulation. Magnetic stimulation was applied to the vertex and the T12 and S1 spinous processes for transcortical, thoracic, and sacral stimulation, respectively, and compound muscle action potentials were recorded simultaneously from the rectus abdominis (RA) and the right and left abductor hallucis (AH) muscles using three channels. CMCT was calculated by the latency difference in the AH response between transcortical and sacral stimulation, and between transcortical and thoracic stimulation for RA. Caudal MCT was calculated by subtracting CMCT for RA from that for AH. Caudal MCT was delayed in patients with LSSS compared to normal persons. We suggest that measuring caudal MCT may be useful for the diagnosis of LSSS, but its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity requires prospective study.

  16. Motor, emotional, and cognitive empathy in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and conduct disorder.

    PubMed

    Bons, Danielle; van den Broek, Egon; Scheepers, Floor; Herpers, Pierre; Rommelse, Nanda; Buitelaar, Jan K; Buitelaaar, Jan K

    2013-04-01

    It is unclear which aspects of empathy are shared and which are uniquely affected in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and conduct disorder (CD) as are the neurobiological correlates of these empathy impairments. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the overlap and specificity of motor, emotional, and cognitive aspects of empathy in children and adolescents with ASD or CD. Motor and cognitive empathy impairments are found in both ASD and CD, yet the specificity seems to differ. In ASD facial mimicry and emotion recognition may be impaired for all basic emotions, whereas in CD this is only the case for negative emotions. Emotional empathy and the role of attention to the eyes therein need further investigation. We hypothesize that impaired motor and cognitive empathy in both disorders are a consequence of lack of attention to the eyes. However, we hypothesize major differences in emotional empathy deficits between ASD and CD, probably due to emotional autonomic and amygdala hyper-responsivity in ASD versus hypo-responsivity in CD, both resulting in lack of attention to the eyes.

  17. Solid-propellant motors for high-incremental-velocity low-acceleration maneuvers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    The applicability of solid-propellant rockets into a regime of high-performance long-burning tasks beyond the capability of existing motors is discussed. Successful static test firings have demonstrated the feasibility of: (1) utilizing fully case-bonded end-burning propellant charges without mechanical stress relief; (2) using an all-carbon radiative nozzle markedly lighter than the flight-weight ablative nozzle it replaces, and (3) producing low spacecraft acceleration rates during the thrust transient through a controlled-flow igniter that promotes operation below the previous combustion limit.

  18. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  19. Motor carrier safety evaluation conducted at University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory (UC/LANL), Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, R.F.

    1992-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration (DOT) conducts motor carrier safety evaluations for the purpose of determining a motor carrier`s safety fitness rating. Because it was believed that DOT or the State of New Mexico may not recognize UC/LANL exempt status and desire to inspect its transportation system and evaluate compliance with applicable laws and regulations, the lab contracted Garrison Associates to conduct a simulated motor carrier safety evaluation. This report enumerates the goals of this evaluation relevant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act (HMTUSA) of 1990. The report describes the methodology of the evaluation and lists observations in order of importance.

  20. The effect of conduction velocity slowing in left ventricular midwall on the QRS complex morphology: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Szathmary, Vavrinec; Svehlikova, Jana; Mateasik, Anton; Gyhagen, Julia; Tysler, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Midwall fibrosis is a frequent finding in different types of left ventricular hypertrophy. Fibrosis presents a local conduction block that can create a substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and lead to the continuous generation of reentry. Having also impact on the sequence of ventricular activation it can modify the shape of QRS complex. In this study we simulated the effects of slowed conduction velocity in the midwall in the left ventricle and in its anteroseptal region on the QRS morphology using a computer model. The model defines the geometry of cardiac ventricles analytically as parts of ellipsoids; the left ventricular wall is represented by five layers. The impulse propagation velocity was decreased by 50% in one and two midwall layers, respectively, in the whole left ventricle and in LV anterior region. The effects of slowed conduction velocity on the QRS complex of the 12-lead electrocardiogram are presented as 12-lead electrocardiograms and corresponding values of ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH criteria): Gubner criterion, Sokolow-Lyon index (SLI) and Cornell voltage. All simulated situations led to increased R wave amplitude in the lead I and of S wave in the lead III, showing a leftward shift of the electrical axis and increased values of ECG-LVH criteria based on limb leads alone or in combination with precordial leads (Gubner criterion, Cornell voltage). The slowed conduction velocity in the whole LV influenced the QRS complex voltage in precordial leads, having an impact on the SLI and Cornell voltage. The changes were pronounced if two layers were involved. Using computer modeling we showed that the midwall slowing in conduction velocity modified the QRS complex morphology. The QRS complex changes were consistent with ECG-LVH criteria, i.e. QRS patterns usually interpreted as the effect of left ventricular hypertrophy (the increased left ventricular mass). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Influences of Current Propagation Velocity of CG Lightning Return Stroke and Propagation Medium Conductivity on Lightning Horizontal Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunjun

    2017-04-01

    Influences of current propagation velocity of CG lightning return stroke and propagation medium conductivity on lightning horizontal electric fields are very evident and also complicated. The influences have been analyzed by utilizing 3D FDTD at different positions relative to the return channel of CG lightning with not more than 100m of the height and horizontal distance.to the CG lightning channel. The main results are as follows. As the height is 0m, the peak values of lightning horizontal electric field increase with the increase of current propagation velocity for the horizontal distances within 100m. As the horizontal distance is 0m, the absolute value of average minimum value of lightning horizontal electric field at the height from 20m to 100m decrease with the increase of current propagation velocity. As the horizontal distance is 40m, the absolute value of the minimum value of horizontal electric field decreases with the increase of current propagation velocity at the height from 20m to 100m. While the horizontal distance is 80m, the difference of the absolute value of the minimum value of horizontal electric field for three velocities is not evident at the height from 20m to 100m. The maximum values of horizontal electric field increase with the decrease of the soil conductivity at the height of 0m within the horizontal distance of 100m.

  2. Fractional order sliding-mode control based on parameters auto-tuning for velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, BiTao; Pi, YouGuo; Luo, Ying

    2012-09-01

    A fractional order sliding mode control (FROSMC) scheme based on parameters auto-tuning for the velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is proposed in this paper. The control law of the proposed F(R)OSMC scheme is designed according to Lyapunov stability theorem. Based on the property of transferring energy with adjustable type in F(R)OSMC, this paper analyzes the chattering phenomenon in classic sliding mode control (SMC) is attenuated with F(R)OSMC system. A fuzzy logic inference scheme (FLIS) is utilized to obtain the gain of switching control. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed FROSMC not only achieve better control performance with smaller chatting than that with integer order sliding mode control, but also is robust to external load disturbance and parameter variations.

  3. Diagnostic value of cauda equina motor conduction time in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Seçil, Yaprak; Ekinci, Ayşen Süzen; Bayram, Korhan Barış; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Tokuçoğlu, Figen; Gürgör, Nevin; Özdemirkıran, Tolga; Başoğlu, Mustafa; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2012-09-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a chronic degenerative disease with pain in the back, buttocks and legs aggrevated by walking and relieved after rest without associated vascular disease of lower extremities observed in patients between 50 and 60 years. Several studies, using different methods indicated an association between slowing or blocking of root-nerve conduction and LSS. None of the previous research had applied the more conceivable methods such as recording the cauda equina potentials from the lumbar level or stimulating the spinal roots within the canal using either leg nerves or muscles. In this study, electrical lumbar laminar stimulation was used to demonstrate prolongation of cauda equina motor conduction time in lumbar spinal stenosis. Twenty-one LSS patients and age matched 15 normal control subjects were included in the study. Lumbar laminar electrical stimulation from L1 and L5 vertebra levels were applied by needle electrodes. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from gastrocnemius muscles were recorded bilaterally. Latency difference of CMAPs obtained from L1 and L5 spine levels were accepted as the cauda equina motor conduction time (CEMCT). CEMCT was significantly longer in patient group when compared to normal controls. Mean latency difference was 3.59 ± 1.07 msec on the right side, 3.49 ± 1.07 msec on the left side in LSS group, it was 1.45 ± 0.65 msec on the right side, 1.35 ± 0.68 msec on the left side on normal control group (p<0.0001). The prolongation of CEMCT was statistically and individually significant in patient group. This may indicate that lower lumbosacral motor roots were locally and chronically compressed due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis may have induced local demyelination at the cauda equina level. Since the prolongation of CEMCT was found only in patients with LSS, the method of laminar stimulation can be chosen for patients with uncertain diagnosis of LSS. Copyright © 2012 International

  4. Influence of Pore-Fluid Pressure on Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity in Water-Saturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pore-fluid pressure in seismogenic zones can play a key role in the occurrence of earthquakes (e.g., Sibson, 2009). Its evaluation via geophysical observations can lead to a good understanding of seismic activities. The evaluation requires a thorough understanding of the influence of the pore-fluid pressure on geophysical observables like seismic velocity and electrical conductivity. We have studied the influence of pore-fluid pressure on elastic wave velocity and electrical conductivity in water-saturated rocks. Fine grained (100-500μm) biotite granite (Aji, Kagawa pref., Japan) was used as rock samples. The density is 2.658-2.668 g/cm3, and the porosity 0.68-0.87%. The sample is composed of 52.8% plagioclase, 36.0% Quartz, 3.0% K-feldspar, 8.2% biotite. SEM images show that a lot of grain boundaries are open. Few intracrystalline cracks were observed. Following the method proposed by David and Zimmerman (2012), the distribution function of crack aspect ratio was evaluated from the pressure dependence of compressional and shear wave velocities in a dry sample. Cylindrical sample has dimensions of 25 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, and saturated with 0.01 mol/l KCl aqueous solution. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured with the pulse transmission technique (PZT transducers, f=2 MHz), and electrical conductivity the two-electrode method (Ag-AgCl electrodes, f=1 Hz-100 kHz). Simultaneous measurements of velocities and conductivity were made using a 200 MPa hydrostatic pressure vessel, in which confining and pore-fluid pressures can be separately controlled. The pore-fluid is electrically insulated from the metal work of the pressure vessel by using a newly designed plastic device (Watanabe and Higuchi, 2013). The confining pressure was progressively increased up to 25 MPa, while the pore-fluid pressure was kept at 0.1 MPa. It took five days or longer for the electrical conductivity to become stationary after increasing the confining pressure

  5. Evaluation of Specific Heat, Sound Velocity and Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Strained Nanocrystalline Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, D.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.; Takashiri, M.

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of strain on specific heat, sound velocity and lattice thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline bismuth antimony telluride thin films, we performed both experimental study and modeling. The nanocrystalline thin films had mostly preferred crystal orientation along c-axis, and strains in the both directions of c-axis and a- b-axis. It was found that the thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline thin films decreased greatly as compared with that of bulk alloys. To gain insight into the thermal transport in the strained nanocrystalline thin films, we estimated the lattice thermal conductivity based on the phonon transport model of full distribution of mean free paths accounting for the effects of grain size and strain which was influenced to both the sound velocity and the specific heat. As a result, the lattice thermal conductivity was increased when the strain was shifted from compressive to tensile direction. We also confirmed that the strain was influenced by the lattice thermal conductivity but the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity of thin films can be mainly attributed to the nano-size effect rather than the strain effect. Finally, it was found that the measured lattice thermal conductivities were in good agreement with modeling.

  6. Three-dimensional correction of conduction velocity in the embryonic heart using integrated optical mapping and optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical mapping (OM) of cardiac electrical activity conventionally collects information from a three-dimensional (3-D) surface as a two-dimensional (2-D) projection map. When applied to measurements of the embryonic heart, this method ignores the substantial and complex curvature of the heart surface, resulting in significant errors when calculating conduction velocity, an important electrophysiological parameter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of imaging the 3-D structure of the embryonic heart and accurately characterizing the surface topology. We demonstrate an integrated OCT/OM imaging system capable of simultaneous conduction mapping and 3-D structural imaging. From these multimodal data, we obtained 3-D activation maps and corrected conduction velocity maps of early embryonic quail hearts. 3-D correction eliminates underestimation bias in 2-D conduction velocity measurements, therefore enabling more accurate measurements with less experimental variability. The integrated system will also open the door to correlate the structure and electrophysiology, thereby improving our understanding of heart development. PMID:24996663

  7. The starting transient of solid propellant rocket motors with high internal gas velocities. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, A.; Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Summerfield, M.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model which considers time and space development of the flow field in solid propellant rocket motors with high volumetric loading density is described. The gas dynamics in the motor chamber is governed by a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations, that are coupled with the ignition and flame spreading events, and with the axial variation of mass addition. The flame spreading rate is calculated by successive heating-to-ignition along the propellant surface. Experimental diagnostic studies have been performed with a rectangular window motor (50 cm grain length, 5 cm burning perimeter and 1 cm hydraulic port diameter), using a controllable head-end gaseous igniter. Tests were conducted with AP composite propellant at port-to-throat area ratios of 2.0, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.06, and head-end pressures from 35 to 70 atm. Calculated pressure transients and flame spreading rates are in very good agreement with those measured in the experimental system.

  8. Assembly of the translocase motor onto the preprotein-conducting channel

    PubMed Central

    Karamanou, Spyridoula; Bariami, Vassiliki; Papanikou, Efrosyni; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2008-01-01

    Summary Bacterial protein secretion is catalyzed by the SecYEG protein-conducting channel complexed with the SecA ATPase motor. To gain insight into the SecA-SecYEG interaction we used peptide arrays, thermodynamic quantitation, mutagenesis and functional assays. Our data reveal that: a. SecA binds with low affinity on several, peripheral, exposed SecYEG sites. This largely electrostatic association is modulated by temperature and nucleotides. b. Binding sites cluster in five major binding “regions”: three that are exclusively cytoplasmic and two that reach the periplasm. c. Both the aminoterminal and carboxyterminal regions of SecA participate in binding interactions and share some sites. d. Several of these sites are essential for translocase catalysis. Our data provide residue-level dissection of the SecYEG-SecA interaction. Two models of assembly of SecA on dimeric SecYEG are discussed. PMID:18761620

  9. Assembly of the translocase motor onto the preprotein-conducting channel.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, Spyridoula; Bariami, Vassiliki; Papanikou, Efrosyni; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial protein secretion is catalysed by the SecYEG protein-conducting channel complexed with the SecA ATPase motor. To gain insight into the SecA-SecYEG interaction we used peptide arrays, thermodynamic quantification, mutagenesis and functional assays. Our data reveal that: (i) SecA binds with low affinity on several, peripheral, exposed SecYEG sites. This largely electrostatic association is modulated by temperature and nucleotides. (ii) Binding sites cluster in five major binding 'regions': three that are exclusively cytoplasmic and two that reach the periplasm. (iii) Both the N-terminal and c-terminal regions of SecA participate in binding interactions and share some sites. (iv) Several of these sites are essential for translocase catalysis. Our data provide residue-level dissection of the SecYEG-SecA interaction. Two models of assembly of SecA on dimeric SecYEG are discussed.

  10. Conducted EMI Modeling and Mitigation for Power Converters and Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.

    2012-05-01

    The increasing use of power electronics in aircraft power systems to enable new, more-electric aircraft (MEA) functions has also led to increasing EMI emission. EMI filters may account for more than 50% of the overall volume and weight of high-power converters such as variable-speed motor drives. The traditional approach to mitigating EMI requires functional prototypes and EMI measurements before filter design can start. Such an empirical, EMI-last approach results in designs that are suboptimal at best and is a major cause for schedule delay and disruption. This paper reviews recent research on EMI modeling and system solutions to EMI, empha- sizing conducted emission of three-phase converters and variable-speed drives that dominate system EMI filtering requirements. The goal is to enable a concurrent-EMI design approach and to develop optimal system solutions that minimize the overall volume and size.

  11. Motor nerve conduction study in cauda equina with high-voltage electrical stimulation in multifocal motor neuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Miho; Kanouchi, Tadashi; Inaba, Akira; Numasawa, Yoshiyuki; Irioka, Takashi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2011-02-01

    In this study we aim to establish a motor nerve conduction study (NCS) for the cauda equina and examine its usefulness in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NCS of the tibial nerve proximal to the knee was performed with an optimized high-voltage electrical stimulation (HV-ES) method in 21 normal subjects, 5 with MMN, and 11 with ALS. HV-ES, but not magnetic stimulation, could supramaximally stimulate the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction time determined by HV-ES, but not that with F-waves, correlated well with cauda equina length on magnetic resonance imaging. HV-ES revealed proximal lesions in 4 MMN patients but in none of the ALS patients. Importantly, 1 patient with "MMN without conduction block (CB)" had a CB in the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction is better evaluated by HV-ES than with F-wave study or magnetic stimulation. HV-ES can help to distinguish MMN and "MMN without CB" from ALS.

  12. Power Stroke Angular Velocity Profiles of Archaeal A-ATP Synthase Versus Thermophilic and Mesophilic F-ATP Synthase Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Martin, James; Singh, Dhirendra; Biuković, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Frasch, Wayne D

    2016-12-02

    The angular velocities of ATPase-dependent power strokes as a function of the rotational position for the A-type molecular motor A3B3DF, from the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase, and the thermophilic motor α3β3γ, from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly known as Bacillus PS3) F-ATP synthase, are resolved at 5 μs resolution for the first time. Unexpectedly, the angular velocity profile of the A-type was closely similar in the angular positions of accelerations and decelerations to the profiles of the evolutionarily distant F-type motors of thermophilic and mesophilic origins, and they differ only in the magnitude of their velocities. M. mazei A3B3DF power strokes occurred in 120° steps at saturating ATP concentrations like the F-type motors. However, because ATP-binding dwells did not interrupt the 120° steps at limiting ATP, ATP binding to A3B3DF must occur during the catalytic dwell. Elevated concentrations of ADP did not increase dwells occurring 40° after the catalytic dwell. In F-type motors, elevated ADP induces dwells 40° after the catalytic dwell and slows the overall velocity. The similarities in these power stroke profiles are consistent with a common rotational mechanism for A-type and F-type rotary motors, in which the angular velocity is limited by the rotary position at which ATP binding occurs and by the drag imposed on the axle as it rotates within the ring of stator subunits.

  13. Velocity measurement inside a motored internal combustion engine using three-component laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S. S.; Turner, J. T.

    2000-10-01

    A three-component laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been employed to investigate the structure of the flow inside the cylinder of a motored internal combustion engine. This model engine was reasonably representative of a typical, single cylinder, spark ignition engine although it did not permit firing. It was equipped with overhead valve gear and optical access was provided in the top and side walls of the cylinder. A principal objective was to study the influence of the inlet port design on the flow within the cylinder during the induction and compression strokes of the engine. Here, it can be noted that results obtained in an unfired engine are believed to be representative of the flow behaviour before combustion occurs in a fired engine (see P.O. Witze, Measurements of the spatial distribution and engine speed dependence of turbulent air motion in an i.c. engine, SAE Paper No. 770220, 1977; Witze, Sandia Laboratory Energy Report, SAND 79-8685, Sandia Laboratories, USA, 1979). Experimental data presented for an inclined inlet port configuration reveal the complex three-dimensional nature of the flow inside the model engine cylinder. Not surprisingly, the results also show that the inclined inlet port created flow conditions more favourable to mixing in the cylinder. Specifically, the inclined inlet flow was found to generate a region with a relatively high shear and strong recirculation zones in the cylinder. Inclining the inlet port also produced a more nearly homogeneous flow structure at top dead centre during the compression stroke. The paper identifies the special difficulties encountered in making the LDA measurements. The experimental findings are examined and the problems that arise in presenting time-varying three-dimensional data of this type are discussed. Finally, the future potential of this experimental approach is explored.

  14. [Investigation of maximal motor nerve conductivity and distal latency before and after galvanic cell bath (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Trnavsky, G

    1982-04-30

    Measurements about maximal motor nerve conductivity of ulnaris and medianus were carried out before and after constant galvanisation from neck to hand. Significant results of conductivity, distal latency and amplitude of summation potential could not be registered neither by plus nor by minus pole at the hand.

  15. The influence of hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and formation factor on P-wave velocities in granitic rock matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosna, K.; Najser, J.; Havlova, V.; Vecernik, P.; Zaruba, J.

    2012-12-01

    This laboratory study of the hydraulic and physical properties of granite rocks focuses on granitic rock matrix. The investigation specifically relates to the planned disposal of radioactive waste in the Czech Republic. 118 samples from nine granitic rock massifs were subjected to hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and P-wave velocity measurements. Hydraulic conductivity was measured in pressure cells. The constant hydraulic head was applied by pressure controllers and the volume of water that passed through the specimen was recorded. Open porosity was obtained by weighing saturated and dry specimens. P-wave velocities were measured in oven dried specimens using an apparatus that consisted of two pairs of piezosensors (Olympus V103 and V153) used as transmitter and receiver, a precise impulse generator, and an oscilloscope. The formation factor was calculated from forty-five through-diffusion experiments, measured using 3H tracers. The activities in both input and output reservoirs were regularly monitored using liquid scintillation spectrometry. Hydraulic conductivities of different granitic rocks varied from 2.29×10-9 to 1×10-14 m.s-1. Open porosities were determined between 11.89 and 0.23%. Formation factors were calculated between 1.14×10-2 and 1.65×10-4 while the P-wave velocities ranged from 2.26 to 5.91 km.s-1. The tests results show that increasing hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and formation factor correlates with decreasing P-wave velocities in the laboratory specimens. Ultrasonic measurements of the oven dried laboratory specimens are able to predict anomalies in the hydraulic and physical parameters of the granitic rock.

  16. Analysis of muscle fiber conduction velocity enables reliable detection of surface EMG crosstalk during detection of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Alberto Biurrun; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2013-03-26

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex that induces complex muscle synergies to withdraw a limb from a potential noxious stimulus. Several studies indicate that assessment of the NWR is a valuable objective tool in relation to investigation of various pain conditions. However, existing methodologies for NWR assessment evaluate standard surface electromyography (sEMG) measured over just one muscle and do not consider the possible interference of crosstalk originating from adjacent active muscles. The present study had two aims: firstly, to investigate to which extent the presence of crosstalk may affect NWR detection using a standardized scoring criterion (interval peak z-score) that has been validated without taking crosstalk into consideration. Secondly, to investigate whether estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity can help identifying the propagating and non-propagating nature of genuine reflexes and crosstalk respectively, thus allowing a more valid assessment of the NWR. Evaluation of interval peak z-score did apparently allow reflex detection with high sensitivity and specificity (0.96), but only if the influence of crosstalk was ignored. Distinction between genuine reflexes and crosstalk revealed that evaluation of interval peak z-score incorporating a z-score threshold of 12 was associated with poor reflex detection specificity (0.26-0.62) due to the presence of crosstalk. Two different standardized methods for estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity were employed to demonstrate that significantly different muscle fiber conduction velocities may be estimated during genuine reflexes and crosstalk, respectively. This discriminative feature was used to develop and evaluate a novel methodology for reflex detection from sEMG that is robust with respect to crosstalk. Application of this conduction velocity analysis (CVA) entailed reflex detection with excellent sensitivity (1.00 and 1.00) and specificity (1.00 and 0

  17. Analysis of muscle fiber conduction velocity enables reliable detection of surface EMG crosstalk during detection of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex that induces complex muscle synergies to withdraw a limb from a potential noxious stimulus. Several studies indicate that assessment of the NWR is a valuable objective tool in relation to investigation of various pain conditions. However, existing methodologies for NWR assessment evaluate standard surface electromyography (sEMG) measured over just one muscle and do not consider the possible interference of crosstalk originating from adjacent active muscles. The present study had two aims: firstly, to investigate to which extent the presence of crosstalk may affect NWR detection using a standardized scoring criterion (interval peak z-score) that has been validated without taking crosstalk into consideration. Secondly, to investigate whether estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity can help identifying the propagating and non-propagating nature of genuine reflexes and crosstalk respectively, thus allowing a more valid assessment of the NWR. Results Evaluation of interval peak z-score did apparently allow reflex detection with high sensitivity and specificity (0.96), but only if the influence of crosstalk was ignored. Distinction between genuine reflexes and crosstalk revealed that evaluation of interval peak z-score incorporating a z-score threshold of 12 was associated with poor reflex detection specificity (0.26-0.62) due to the presence of crosstalk. Two different standardized methods for estimation of muscle fiber conduction velocity were employed to demonstrate that significantly different muscle fiber conduction velocities may be estimated during genuine reflexes and crosstalk, respectively. This discriminative feature was used to develop and evaluate a novel methodology for reflex detection from sEMG that is robust with respect to crosstalk. Application of this conduction velocity analysis (CVA) entailed reflex detection with excellent sensitivity (1.00 and 1.00) and

  18. Phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragmatic motor evoked potentials: evaluation of respiratory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; Tang, X; Huang, X

    1998-06-01

    To investigate preliminarily the value of phrenic nerve conduction (PNC) and diaphragmatic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the evaluation of various respiratory dysfunction (RDF). Thirty-four patients with various RDF, (19 patients with neurogenical diseases and 15 patients with respiratory disorders) were investigated. Fifty healthy volunteers served as controls. The phrenic nerve was cutaneously stimulated by electrical pulse current at the midpoint of the posterior border of the sternomastoid muscle, and the diaphragmatic muscle compound action potentials (DCAP) were recorded between the 7th and 8th intercostal space and xiphoid process. When the magnetic transcranial stimulation (MTS) of the cortex was given, the recordings were made under the condition of maximal deep inspiration. All patients with myopathies had normal PNC. The patients with Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) and myasthenic crisis had abnormal PNC. The findings in PNC studies remarkably correlated with RDF, while serial examinations were performed in the patients with GBS and myasthenia gravis (MG). In 7 patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), 4 had abnormal PNC, and 2 of 3 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), and 1 of 5 patients with chest tightness or breathlessness on the supine position showed decreased amplitude. When MEPs were recorded, 3 of 5 patients showed abnormal SAS (1 had no response, 2 lower amplitude). Three patients with COPD had normal MEP. PNC studies could not only evaluate neuromuscular RDF and predict the outcome of diseases, but also supply additional information about diaphragmatic dysfunction for the RDF caused by respiratory disorders. The results of PNC and diaphragmatic MEP may differentiate the types of SAS.

  19. Modeling and inversion of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity in clastic formations with structural and dispersed shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-López, A.; Mousatov, A.; Markov, M.; Kazatchenko, E.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for simulating P- and S-wave velocities, and electrical conductivity in shaly-sand rocks and determining the shale spatial distribution (dispersed and/or structural shales). In this approach, we used the effective medium method and hierarchical model for clastic formations. We treat shaly-sand formations as porous natural-composite materials containing: solid grains (such as quartz, feldspars and structural shale) and pores completely filled with a mixture of hydrocarbon, water and dispersed shale. For calculating the effective elastic properties and electrical conductivity of this composite, we have applied the multi-component self-consistent effective media approximation (EMA) method. We simulate the elastic velocities and electrical conductivity for clastic formations in two steps. Firstly, we calculate the effective properties of mixture (combination of water, hydrocarbon and dispersed shale) filling the pores. Then we find the effective elastic and electrical conductivity properties of formation constituted of solid grains (quartz and structural shale) and pores with the effective properties determined in the previous step. We considered that all components are represented by ellipsoids. The aspect ratios (shapes) of grains and pores; are defined as a porosity function obtained for the model of clean sand formations. Modeling results have demonstrated that the shapes of both shale components (dispersed and structural) weakly affect the effective elastic velocities and electrical conductivity of shaly-sand formation and can be approximated by flatted ellipsoids. The model proposed has been used to determine the volumes of dispersed and structural shales for two sets of published experimental data obtained from the cores. For determining the shale distribution, we have performed the joint inversion of the following physical properties: P-, S-wave velocities, total porosity, and total shale volume. Additionally, we have

  20. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M

    2013-01-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of experimentally acquired morphological and electrical properties of small CNS axons and oligodendrocytes prompted us to incorporate these data into a computer model, with the aim of simulating the effects of focal axon swelling on action potential conduction. A single swelling on an otherwise intact axon, as occurs in optic nerve axons of Cnp1 null mice caused a small decrease in conduction velocity. The presence of single swellings on multiple contiguous internodal regions (INR), as likely occurs in advanced disease, caused qualitatively similar results, except the dimensions of the swellings required to produce equivalent attenuation of conduction were significantly decreased. Our simulations of the consequences of metabolic insult to axons, namely, the appearance of multiple swollen regions, accompanied by perturbation of overlying myelin and increased axolemmal permeability, contained within a single INR, revealed that conduction block occurred when the dimensions of the simulated swellings were within the limits of those measured experimentally, suggesting that multiple swellings on a single axon could contribute to axonal dysfunction, and that increased axolemmal permeability is the decisive factor that promotes conduction block. PMID:24303138

  1. Characterization of Copper Coatings Deposited by High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray for Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Aghaee, M.; Salehi, M.; Garcia, E.

    2017-08-01

    Copper coatings were deposited on steel substrates by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying. The microstructure of the feedstock copper powders and free-standing coatings were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to determine phase compositions of powders and coatings. Oxygen content was determined by a LECO-T300 oxygen determiner. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured in two directions, through-thickness and in-plane by laser flash apparatus. The electrical resistivity of the coatings was measured by the four-point probe method. Oxygen content of the coatings was two times higher than that of the initial powders (0.35-0.37%). The thermal and electrical conductivities of the coatings were different depending on the direction of the measurement. The thermal and electrical conductivity of the coatings improved after annealing for 6 h at a temperature of 600°C.

  2. Flow velocity, water temperature, and conductivity in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida: June 2002-July 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2004-01-01

    The data described in this report were collected in the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Priority Ecosystems Science project investigating Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades. Data collected at five locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 2002-2003 wet season are documented in the report. Methods used to process the data are described. Daily mean flow velocities, water temperatures, and specific conductance values are presented in the appendices. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) website http://sofia.usgs.gov.

  3. A comparison of propagated action potentials from tropical and temperate squid axons: different durations and conduction velocities correlate with ionic conductance levels.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2002-06-01

    To determine which physiological properties contribute to temperature adaptation in the squid giant axon, action potentials were recorded from four species of squid whose habitats span a temperature range of 20 degrees C. The environments of these species can be ranked from coldest to warmest as follows: Loligo opalescens>Loligo pealei>Loligo plei>Sepioteuthis sepioidea. Action potential conduction velocities and rise times, recorded at many temperatures, were equivalent for all Loligo species, but significantly slower in S. sepioidea. By contrast, the action potential's fall time differed among species and correlated well with the thermal environment of the species ('warmer' species had slower decay times). The biophysical underpinnings of these differences were examined in voltage-clamped axons. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the activation kinetics or voltage-dependence of Na(+) and K(+) currents. Conductance levels, however, did vary. Maximum Na(+) conductance (g(Na)) in S. sepiodea was significantly less than in the Loligo species. K(+) conductance (gK) was highest in L. pealei, intermediate in L. plei and smallest in S. sepiodea. The time course and magnitude of g(K) and g(Na) were measured directly during membrane action potentials. These data reveal clear species-dependent differences in the amount of g(K) and g(Na) recruited during an action potential.

  4. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  5. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  6. Superresolution imaging reveals activity-dependent plasticity of axon morphology linked to changes in action potential conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Chéreau, Ronan; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Angibaud, Julie; Cattaert, Daniel; Nägerl, U Valentin

    2017-02-07

    Axons convey information to nearby and distant cells, and the time it takes for action potentials (APs) to reach their targets governs the timing of information transfer in neural circuits. In the unmyelinated axons of hippocampus, the conduction speed of APs depends crucially on axon diameters, which vary widely. However, it is not known whether axon diameters are dynamic and regulated by activity-dependent mechanisms. Using time-lapse superresolution microscopy in brain slices, we report that axons grow wider after high-frequency AP firing: synaptic boutons undergo a rapid enlargement, which is mostly transient, whereas axon shafts show a more delayed and progressive increase in diameter. Simulations of AP propagation incorporating these morphological dynamics predicted bidirectional effects on AP conduction speed. The predictions were confirmed by electrophysiological experiments, revealing a phase of slowed down AP conduction, which is linked to the transient enlargement of the synaptic boutons, followed by a sustained increase in conduction speed that accompanies the axon shaft widening induced by high-frequency AP firing. Taken together, our study outlines a morphological plasticity mechanism for dynamically fine-tuning AP conduction velocity, which potentially has wide implications for the temporal transfer of information in the brain.

  7. The diagnostic value of ultrasound compared with nerve conduction velocity in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azami, Ahad; Maleki, Nasrollah; Anari, Hassan; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammadreza; Tavosi, Zahra

    2014-07-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common form of peripheral entrapment neuropathy. The use of sonography for investigation and diagnosis of musculoskeletal conditions has been rapidly increasing over the past few decades. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sonography can be an alternative method to nerve conduction study (NCS) in the diagnosis of CTS. Individuals with electrodiagnostically proven CTS and healthy control subjects were enrolled prospectively. Median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and flattening ratio (FR) at three different levels, proximal to tunnel inlet, at tunnel inlet and tunnel outlet, and flexor retinaculum thickness, were measured. Then, comparisons between ultrasonography and NCS were made. We assessed 180 wrists, of which 120 were electrophysiologically confirmed as CTS diseased hands and 60 nondiseased hands in 90 patients (83 women and seven men). The mean median nerve CSA at the tunnel inlet was 13.31 ± 3.23 mm(2) in CTS diseased hands and 8.57 ± 0.82 mm(2) in nondiseased hands. Post hoc comparisons between the diseased and nondiseased hands demonstrated that the CSA at various levels of the median nerve were significantly greater in the CTS diseased hands than the nondiseased hands (P = 0.001). CSA at the tunnel inlet with a threshold of 9.15 mm(2) gave the best diagnostic accuracy with a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2% and 88.3%, respectively. The difference in cross-sectional area of the median nerve in mild, moderate and severe CTS was statistically significant. Ultrasonographic measurement of the CSA of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet is useful in diagnosing and grading CTS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Performance of a combined three-hole conductivity probe for void fraction and velocity measurement in air-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, João Eduardo; Pereira, Nuno H. C.; Matos, Jorge; Frizell, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a three-hole pressure probe with back-flushing combined with a conductivity probe, used for measuring simultaneously the magnitude and direction of the velocity vector in complex air-water flows, is described in this paper. The air-water flows envisaged in the current work are typically those occurring around the rotors of impulse hydraulic turbines (like the Pelton and Cross-Flow turbines), where the flow direction is not known prior to the data acquisition. The calibration of both the conductivity and three-hole pressure components of the combined probe in a rig built for the purpose, where the probe was placed in a position similar to that adopted for the flow measurements, will be reported. After concluding the calibration procedure, the probe was utilized in the outside region of a Cross-Flow turbine rotor. The experimental results obtained in the present study illustrate the satisfactory performance of the combined probe, and are encouraging toward its use for characterizing the velocity field of other complex air-water flows.

  9. Conduction velocity of nerve and muscle fiber action potentials after a space mission or a bed rest.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, Dieter G; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Gabriel, Jean-Pierre; Bennefeld, Monica

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the readaptation of a human muscle after a prolonged stay in microgravity and after a bed rest of several months. The surface electromyogram of the soleus muscle was recorded in 6 cosmonauts and 6 bed rest subjects at 5 different torque levels and, in addition, the direct muscle responses (M responses) to supramaximal stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve were also recorded in the bed rest subjects. In a supplementary experiment in normal subjects, M response was recorded with an array of electrodes. The median frequency (MF) of the power spectrum of the surface electromyogram was reduced, at all torque levels, immediately after the test period. In the bed rest subjects, the latency of the M response peaks and the inter-peak interval increased during the test period. Recovery to normal occurred within about 10 days. In the normal subjects, the peaks of the M response were conducted along the muscle with a velocity between 21 and 30 m/s. All these results point to a reduction of the conduction velocity in the branching axon terminals and in the muscle fibers during space missions and bed rest.

  10. Dynamic weakening of fault gouge affected by thermal conductivity of host specimen: implications for the high-velocity weakening mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Niemeijer, André

    2015-04-01

    Since many high-velocity weakening mechanisms are thermal in origin, we study the effects of thermal conductivity of host specimen on fault gouge friction behavior at seismic slip rates. By using host specimens made of brass, stainless steel, Ti-Al-V alloy and gabbro with thermal conductivities of 123, 15, 5.8 and 3.25 W/m/K, respectively, the experiments in this study produce completely different temperature conditions within the same gouge under the same slip rates and normal stresses. Fault gouges used in the experiments are a natural illite- and quartz-rich gouge from Longmenshan fault zone and pure periclase (MgO) nanopowder. High-velocity weakening of gouges were more pronounced with decreasing thermal conductivity of the specimens. Particularly, almost no dynamic weakening was observed in the tests performed with brass host specimens, while tests with specimens of gabbro and Ti-Al-V alloy exhibits quite similar dramatic weakening behaviors. Such differences in gouge frictional behavior cannot be explained by original flash heating model, since asperity contacts within the slip zone and experimental conditions are still same, even though host specimens are different. Microstructure observations under scanning and transmission electron microscopes reveal that slip zone materials tend to change from individual ultrafine nanograins to larger sintered grains or aggregates, with decreasing thermal conductivities of host specimens. Calculated temperature together with observed microstructure indicate that bulk temperature rise may be also play an important role in fault weakening, as predicted by a recent theoretical analysis of the role of flash heating within the gouge zone [Proctor et al., 2014]. Current results demonstrate the importance of frictional heating in causing the dynamic weakening of gouge, and the powder lubrication hypothesis is not consistent with our experimental data.

  11. Restoration of axon conduction and motor deficits by therapeutic treatment with glatiramer acetate.

    PubMed

    Moore, Spencer; Khalaj, Anna J; Patel, Rhusheet; Yoon, JaeHee; Ichwan, Daniel; Hayardeny, Liat; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K

    2014-12-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone) is an approved drug for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The underlying multifactorial anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective effect of GA is in the induction of reactive T cells that release immunomodulatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors at the injury site. These GA-induced cytokines and growth factors may have a direct effect on axon function. Building on previous findings that suggest a neuroprotective effect of GA, we assessed the therapeutic effects of GA on brain and spinal cord pathology and functional correlates using the chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. Therapeutic regimens were utilized based on promising prophylactic efficacy. More specifically, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 2 mg/mouse/day GA for 8 days beginning at various time points after EAE post-induction day 15, yielding a thorough, clinically relevant assessment of GA efficacy within the context of severe progressive disease. Therapeutic treatment with GA significantly decreased clinical scores and improved rotorod motor performance in EAE mice. These functional improvements were supported by an increase in myelinated axons and fewer amyloid precursor protein-positive axons in the spinal cords of GA-treated EAE mice. Furthermore, therapeutic GA decreased microglia/macrophage and T cell infiltrates and increased oligodendrocyte numbers in both the spinal cord and corpus callosum of EAE mice. Finally, GA improved callosal axon conduction and nodal protein organization in EAE. Our results demonstrate that therapeutic GA treatment has significant beneficial effects in a chronic mouse model of MS, in which its positive effects on both myelinated and non-myelinated axons results in improved axon function. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Restoration of Axon Conduction and Motor Deficits by Therapeutic Treatment with Glatiramer Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Spencer; Khalaj, Anna J; Patel, Rhusheet; Yoon, JaeHee; Ichwan, Daniel; Hayardeny, Liat; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K

    2014-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone) is an approved drug for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The underlying multifactorial anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective effect of GA is in the induction of reactive T cells that release immunomodulatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors at the injury site. These GA-induced cytokines and growth factors may have a direct effect on axon function. Building on previous findings that suggest a neuroprotective effect of GA, we assessed the therapeutic effects of GA on brain and spinal cord pathology and functional correlates using the chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. Therapeutic regimens were utilized based on promising prophylactic efficacy. More specifically, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 2 mg/mouse/day GA for 8 days beginning at various time points after EAE post-induction day 15, yielding a thorough, clinically relevant assessment of GA efficacy within the context of severe progressive disease. Therapeutic treatment with GA significantly decreased clinical scores and improved rotorod motor performance in EAE mice. These functional improvements were supported by an increase in myelinated axons and fewer amyloid precursor protein-positive axons in the spinal cords of GA-treated EAE mice. Furthermore, therapeutic GA decreased microglia/macrophage and T cell infiltrates and increased oligodendrocyte numbers in both the spinal cord and corpus callosum of EAE mice. Finally, GA improved callosal axon conduction and nodal protein organization in EAE. Our results demonstrate that therapeutic GA treatment has significant beneficial effects in a chronic mouse model of MS, in which its positive effects on both myelinated and non-myelinated axons results in improved axon function. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24989965

  13. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J; Fildes, Brian N

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997-2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000-2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990-1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03-1.04, p<0.001; adjusted for other variables); one-half for belted compared to unbelted occupants (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.37-0.61, p<0.001); nearside, then far-side had significantly higher odds than frontal, and no difference by gender or position (front-left, front-right). Similar crash- and occupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation.

  14. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J.; Fildes, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997–2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000–2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990–1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03–1.04, p<0.001; adjusted for other variables); one-half for belted compared to unbelted occupants (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.37–0.61, p<0.001); nearside, then far-side had significantly higher odds than frontal, and no difference by gender or position (front-left, front-right). Similar crash- and occupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation. PMID:22105402

  15. Relevance of nerve conduction velocity in the assessment of balance performance in older adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Yun; Chen, Shih-Ching; Peng, Chih-Wei; Kang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Luen; Chen, Chun-Lung; Chou, Yi-Lin; Lai, Chien-Hung

    2017-03-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and balance performance in older adults with diabetes. Methods Twenty older adults with diabetes were recruited to evaluate the NCV of their lower limbs and balance performance. The balance assessments comprised the timed up and go (TUG) test, Berg balance scale (BBS), unipedal stance test (UST), multidirectional reach test (MDRT), maximum step length (MSL) test and quiet standing with eyes open and closed. The relationship between NCV and balance performance was evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficients, and the balance performances of the diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy were compared by using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results The NCV in the lower limbs exhibited a moderate to strong correlation with most of the balance tests including the TUG (r = -0.435 to -0.520, p < 0.05), BBS (r = 0.406-0.554, p < 0.05), UST (r = 0.409-0.647, p < 0.05) and MSL (r = 0.399-0.585, P < 0.05). In addition, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy had a poorer TUG (p < 0.05), BBS (p < 0.01), UST (p < 0.05) and MSL performance (p < 0.05) compared with those without peripheral neuropathy (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our findings revealed that a decline in peripheral nerve conduction in the lower limb is not only an indication of nerve dysfunction, but may also be related to the impairment of balance performance in patients with diabetes. Implications for Rehabilitation Nerve conduction velocity in the lower limbs of diabetic older adults showed moderate to strong correlations with most of the results of balance tests, which are commonly used in clinics. Decline in nerve conduction velocity of the lower limbs may be related to the impairment of balance control in patients with diabetes. Diabetic older adults with peripheral neuropathy exhibited greater postural instability than those without peripheral

  16. Scaling factor relating conduction velocity and diameter for myelinated afferent nerve fibres in the cat hind limb.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, I A; Kalu, K U

    1979-01-01

    1. Compound action potentials were recorded from certain muscle and cutaneous nerves in normal and chronically de-efferentated hind limbs of cats during stimulation of the appropriate dorsal spinal roots, 2. The peaks for groups I, II and III in the compound action potential were correlated with the corresponding peaks in the fibre-diameter histograms of the same de-efferentated nerve after processing it for light microscopy. 3. The scaling factor (ratio of conduction velocity in m/sec to total diameter in micrometer) was not constant for all sizes of fibre nor did it increase progressively with fibre size. Evidence is presented that a logarithmic relation between conduction velocity and fibre diameter is not appropriate. 4. In muscle nerves the scaling factor for fibres fixed by glutaraldehyde perfusion and embedded in Epon was 5.7 for group I afferent fibres and 4.6 for myelinated fibres in both group II and group III. 5. In cutaneous nerves the scaling factor was 5.6 for large fibres (group I or Abeta) and 4.6 for small fibres (group III or Adelta). 6. The scaling factor for group I fibres is the same as was found previously for alpha-efferent fibres, and that for groups II and III is the same as for gamma-efferent fibres (Boyd & Davey, 1968). 7. The possibility that there is a clear discontinuity in scaling factor between fibres in groups I and alpha, and those in other functional groups, is discussed. 8. It is concluded that there must be some structural feature of alpha and group I fibres which differs from that of smaller myelinated fibres. It is likely that a difference in the relative thickness of the myelin sheath is involved and possibly also in the conductances responsible for generating the action potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:458657

  17. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  18. Flow Velocity, Water Temperature, and Conductivity in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida: August 2001-June 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2003-01-01

    The data-collection effort described in this report is in support of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Place-Based Studies project investigating 'Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades.' Data collected at four locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 2001-2002 wet season are documented in the report and methods used to process the data are described. Daily mean flow velocities, water temperatures, and specific conductance values are presented in the appendices of the report. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) website http://sofia.usgs.gov.

  19. Relations among threshold, spike height, electrode distance, and conduction velocity in electrical stimulation of certain medullospinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hentall, I D; Zorman, G; Kansky, S; Fields, H L

    1984-05-01

    This report describes how the threshold for extracellular, electrical stimulation of cell bodies in the rat's rostromedial medulla depends on the distance to the stimulating electrode. A monopolar microelectrode both delivered current pulses near medullospinal neurons and, after decay of the stimulus artifact, detected whether an orthodromic spike had occurred by collision of that spike with a suitably timed antidromic spike initiated at the thoracic spinal cord. The liminal current and the height of antidromic spikes were noted at a series of vertical electrode positions. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether threshold and the inverse of peak-to-peak spike height varied more as the radial distance or its square. The square relationship provided a much better fit for threshold and a marginally better fit for the inverse of spike height. The spatial decline in excitability (K2) averaged 859 microA/mm2, falling within the range of values found for fibers and cell bodies in other studies. The constant of spatial decline in spike height (C2) in millivolts per square millimeter was positively correlated with K2. Both C2 and K2 were negatively correlated with conduction velocity. From threshold distance curves fitted by regression analysis, the mean separation of sites of spike maxima and threshold minima along each electrode path was 16 micron; the estimated distance from these sites to, respectively, the loci of spike generation and spike excitation were positively correlated and similar. The variation of C2 and K2 with conduction velocity may be due either to an influence of the size and shape of the dendritic tree on the spatial decrement of excitability and spike height or to a confounding in the studied equations of the space-independent effect of the size of a cell body on spike height and excitability.

  20. Assessment of in vivo spinal cord conduction velocity in rats in an experimental model of ischemic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Basoglu, H; Kurtoglu, T; Cetin, N K; Bilgin, M D; Kiylioglu, N

    2013-08-01

    Experimental laboratory investigation of spinal cord conductivity alterations in a rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). To observe the epidural spinal cord stimulation-induced electromyography responses, and to investigate the possible alterations of spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) after ischemic SCI in rats. Adnan Menderes University, Institute of Health Science, Aydin, Turkey. SCI was induced by transient occlusion of the abdominal aorta in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Spinal cord histopathology was examined to determine neuronal damage and Tarlov scale was used to grade locomotor functions. Epidural electrical stimulation of spinal cord was performed by monopolar needle electrodes sequentially at L1-L2 and L5-L6 levels, and CMAPs were recorded from the left gastrocnemius muscle by surface electrodes. Amplitudes and durations of CMAPs were evaluated and SCCVs were calculated by analyzing the latency difference of CMAPs. Ischemia-induced SCI resulted in significant reduction of Tarlov scores and a significant decline in number of viable neurons. Similarly, a significant decrement was observed in SCCV following spinal cord ischemia. This study demonstrated that measurement of SCCV via epidural electrical stimulation is possible and displays a significant decline after spinal cord ischemia in rats. We suggest that this method can be beneficial to quantify neuronal damage after experimental ischemic SCI.

  1. [Surgical treatment of eloquent brain area tumors using neurophysiological mapping of the speech and motor areas and conduction tracts].

    PubMed

    Zuev, A A; Korotchenko, E N; Ivanova, D S; Pedyash, N V; Teplykh, B A

    To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative neurophysiological mapping in removing eloquent brain area tumors (EBATs). Sixty five EBAT patients underwent surgical treatment using intraoperative neurophysiological mapping at the Pirogov National Medical and Surgical Center in the period from 2014 to 2015. On primary neurological examination, 46 (71%) patients were detected with motor deficits of varying severity. Speech disorders were diagnosed in 17 (26%) patients. Sixteen patients with concomitant or isolated lesions of the speech centers underwent awake surgery using the asleep-awake-asleep protocol. Standard neurophysiological monitoring included transcranial stimulation as well as motor and, if necessary, speech mapping. The motor and speech areas were mapped with allowance for the preoperative planning data (obtained with a navigation station) synchronized with functional MRI. In this case, a broader representation of the motor and speech centers was revealed in 12 (19%) patients. During speech mapping, no speech disorders were detected in 7 patients; in 9 patients, stimulation of the cerebral cortex in the intended surgical area induced motor (3 patients), sensory (4), and amnesic (2) aphasia. In the total group, we identified 11 patients in whom the tumor was located near the internal capsule. Upon mapping of the conduction tracts in the internal capsule area, the stimulus strength during tumor resection was gradually decreased from 10 mA to 5 mA. Tumor resection was stopped when responses retained at a stimulus strength of 5 mA, which, when compared to the navigation data, corresponded to a distance of about 5 mm to the internal capsule. Completeness of tumor resection was evaluated (contrast-enhanced MRI) in all patients on the first postoperative day. According to the control MRI data, the tumor was resected totally in 60% of patients, subtotally in 24% of patients, and partially in 16% of patients. In the early postoperative period, the development or

  2. The effect of local corticosteroid injection on F-wave conduction velocity and sympathetic skin response in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Orhan; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Ozdemir, Gökhan; Odabaş, Faruk Omer; Kaya, M Dursun; Ulvi, Hızır

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection for the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with F-wave parameters and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Seventeen hands of 10 women patients were treated with local steroid injection with 2-month follow-up. All patients underwent single injection into the carpal tunnel. Response to injection was measured nerve conduction studies (NCSs), median nerve F waves, and SSR before and after treatment. To determine the normal values, 42 hands of 21 healthy women were also studied. There was a significant improvement of sensory and motor nerve conduction values when compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). At the end of follow-up period, the median sensory distal latency and the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar nerve were improved 35 and 65%, respectively. The maximum, mean F-wave amplitudes and chronodispersion showed a slight improvement with respect to baseline values and controls, but statistical significance was not achieved after treatment. Although no statistically significant improvements were observed in SSR parameters, slightly decreased amplitudes and increased habituation of SSR were noted at the end of the treatment. The present study shows that the local steroid injection results in improvement in NCSs values, but the F-wave parameters were not effectual in short-term outcome of CTS treatment. These findings suggest that the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar wrist-to-digit 4 are better parameters in the median nerve recovery after treatment than the median sensory distal latency. Furthermore, the SSR does not seem to be a sensitive method in follow-up of CTS treatment.

  3. Association of antibodies to ganglioside complexes and conduction blocks in axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute motor conduction block neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Créange, Alain; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Salhi, Hayet; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-01

    A close relationship between acute motor conduction block neuropathy and antibodies against the complex of GM1 and GalNAc-GD1a has been reported. This study investigates the hypothesis that conduction block at the early phase of axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is also associated with such ganglioside complexes. Sera were obtained from seven French patients with initial evidence of isolated conduction blocks that resolved or progressed to acute motor axonal neuropathy. Serum IgG to asialo-GM1 and gangliosides of LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, GT1a, GT1b, and GQ1b as well as their complexes were measured. Five of seven patients progressed within the first month of disease to AMAN. One patient had IgG antibodies against the complex of asialo-GM1 and each of the other ganglioside antigens. Another patient carried IgG antibodies against GM1 complex with GM1b, GD1a, and GT1a as well as asialo-GM1 complex with GD1a and GT1a. None had IgG antibodies against GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex. Six patients had IgG against single antigens GM1, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, and asialo-GM1. In three patients, a reduced reaction against GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex was observed. The presence of conduction block in axonal GBS is not always associated with anti-GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex antibodies.

  4. The sawtooth EKG pattern of typical atrial flutter is not related to slow conduction velocity at the cavotricuspid isthmus.

    PubMed

    Sau, Arunashis; Sikkel, Markus B; Luther, Vishal; Wright, Ian; Guerrero, Fernando; Koa-Wing, Michael; Lefroy, David; Linton, Nicholas; Qureshi, Norman; Whinnett, Zachary; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Peters, Nicholas S; Davies, D Wyn

    2017-08-22

    We hypothesized that very high-density mapping of typical atrial flutter (AFL) would facilitate a more complete understanding of its circuit. Such very high-density mapping was performed with the Rhythmia(TM) (Boston Scientific) mapping system using its 64 electrode basket catheter. Data were acquired from 13 patients in AFL. Functional anatomy of the right atrium (RA) was readily identified during mapping including the Crista Terminalis and Eustachian ridge. The leading edge of the activation wavefront was identified without interruption and its conduction velocity (CV) was calculated. CV was not different at the cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) compared to the remainder of the RA (1.02 vs. 1.03 m/s, P = 0.93). The sawtooth pattern of the surface electrocardiogram (EKG) flutter waves was compared to the position of the dominant wavefront. The downslope of the surface EKG flutter waves represented on average 73% ± 9% of the total flutter cycle length. During the downslope, the activation wavefront traveled significantly further than during the upslope (182 ± 21 milliseconds vs. 68 ± 29 milliseconds, P < 0.0001) with no change in CV between the two phases (0.88 vs. 0.91 m/s, P = 0.79). CV at the CTI is not slower than other RA regions during typical AFL. The gradual downslope of the sawtooth EKG  is not due to slow conduction at the CTI suggesting that success of ablation at this site relates to anatomical properties rather than the presence of a "slow isthmus." © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Surface Conductive Graphene-Wrapped Micromotors Exhibiting Enhanced Motion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Katuri, Jaideep; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Surface-conductive Janus spherical motors are fabricated by wrapping silica particles with reduced graphene oxide capped with a thin Pt layer. These motors exhibit a 100% enhanced velocity as compared to standard SiO2 -Pt motors. Furthermore, the versatility of graphene may open up possibilities for a diverse range of applications from active drug delivery systems to water remediation.

  6. Influence of muscle fibre shortening on estimates of conduction velocity and spectral frequencies from surface electromyographic signals.

    PubMed

    Schulte, E; Farina, D; Merletti, R; Rau, G; Disselhorst-Klug, C

    2004-07-01

    The study of surface electromyographic (EMG) signals under dynamic contractions is becoming increasingly important. However, knowledge of the methodological issues that may affect such analysis is still limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of fibre shortening on estimates of conduction velocity (CV) and mean power spectral frequency (MNF) from surface EMG signals. Single fibre action potentials were simulated, as detected by commonly used spatial filters, for different fibre lengths. No physiological modifications were included with changes in fibre length, and thus only geometrical artifacts related to fibre shortening were investigated. The simulation results showed that the dependence of CV and MNF on fibre shortening is affected by the fibre location, electrode position and the spatial filter applied. With shortening of up to 50% for a fibre of 50 mm semi-length, the variations in CV and MNF estimates with shortening in bipolar recordings were 0.5% (CV) and 0.7% (MNF) for superficial fibres, and 3.6% and 5.1% for deeper fibres. Using the longitudinal double differential filter, under the same conditions, the percent variation was 0% and 0.2%, and 24.7% and 15.8%, respectively. The main conclusions were, first, muscle fibre shortening can significantly affect estimates of CV and MNF, especially for short fibre lengths. However, for long (semi-length >50 mm) and superficial fibres, this effect is limited for shortenings of up to 50% of the initial fibre length. Secondly, CV and MNF are almost equally affected by changes in muscle length; and, thirdly, sensitivity to fibre shortening depends on the spatial filter applied for signal detection.

  7. A Dual Conductance Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Void Fraction and Structure Velocity of Downward Two-Phase Flow in a Slightly Inclined Pipe

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon-Gun; Won, Woo-Youn; Lee, Bo-An; Kim, Sin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new and improved electrical conductance sensor is proposed for application not only to a horizontal pipe, but also an inclined one. The conductance sensor was designed to have a dual layer, each consisting of a three-electrode set to obtain two instantaneous conductance signals in turns, so that the area-averaged void fraction and structure velocity could be measured simultaneously. The optimum configuration of the electrodes was determined through numerical analysis, and the calibration curves for stratified and annular flow were obtained through a series of static experiments. The fabricated conductance sensor was applied to a 45 mm inner diameter U-shaped downward inclined pipe with an inclination angle of 3° under adiabatic air-water flow conditions. In the tests, the superficial velocities ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 m/s for water and from 0.1 to 18 m/s for air. The obtained mean void fraction and the structure velocity from the conductance sensor were validated against the measurement by the wire-mesh sensor and the cross-correlation technique for the visualized images, respectively. The results of the flow regime classification and the corresponding time series of the void fraction at a variety of flow velocities were also discussed. PMID:28481308

  8. A Dual Conductance Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Void Fraction and Structure Velocity of Downward Two-Phase Flow in a Slightly Inclined Pipe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Gun; Won, Woo-Youn; Lee, Bo-An; Kim, Sin

    2017-05-08

    In this study, a new and improved electrical conductance sensor is proposed for application not only to a horizontal pipe, but also an inclined one. The conductance sensor was designed to have a dual layer, each consisting of a three-electrode set to obtain two instantaneous conductance signals in turns, so that the area-averaged void fraction and structure velocity could be measured simultaneously. The optimum configuration of the electrodes was determined through numerical analysis, and the calibration curves for stratified and annular flow were obtained through a series of static experiments. The fabricated conductance sensor was applied to a 45 mm inner diameter U-shaped downward inclined pipe with an inclination angle of 3° under adiabatic air-water flow conditions. In the tests, the superficial velocities ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 m/s for water and from 0.1 to 18 m/s for air. The obtained mean void fraction and the structure velocity from the conductance sensor were validated against the measurement by the wire-mesh sensor and the cross-correlation technique for the visualized images, respectively. The results of the flow regime classification and the corresponding time series of the void fraction at a variety of flow velocities were also discussed.

  9. Repeated ischaemic isometric exercise increases muscle fibre conduction velocity in humans: involvement of Na+-K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Rongen, G A; van Dijk, J P; van Ginneken, E E; Stegeman, D F; Smits, P; Zwarts, M J

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed to test two hypotheses: (1) ischaemic preconditioning (development of tolerance to ischaemia) influences muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV) during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise and (2) the increase in MFCV to supranormal levels during recovery from ischaemic exercise is caused by activation of Na+−K+-ATPase. For this purpose, MFCV was measured with surface electromyography (sEMG) during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise of the brachioradial muscle (2 min at 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction). The involvement of ischaemic preconditioning was tested by changing the duration of ischaemia and by intra-arterial infusion of adenosine (brachial artery, 50 μg min−1 dl−1). The role of Na+−K+-ATPase was explored using ouabain (0.2 μg min−1 dl−1). During the exercise, MFCV decreased from 4.4 ± 0.2 m s−1 to 3.7 ± 0.2 m s−1 (P < 0.01, n = 13). Similar reductions in MFCV were observed during repeated exercise, irrespective of the reperfusion time (10 min vs. 18 min) or duration of the ischaemia (2 vs. 10 min). However, initial MFCV gradually increased for each subsequent contraction when contractions were repeated at 10 min intervals (4.4 ± 0.2 m s−1vs. 4.9 ± 0.2 m s−1 for the first and fourth contraction respectively; P < 0.01; n = 13). This increase was not observed when contractions were performed at 18 min intervals, nor when additional ischaemia was applied. Intra-arterial adenosine did not affect MFCV. Intra-arterial ouabain did not affect the reduction in MFCV during exercise but completely prevented the increase in MFCV during recovery: from 4.7 ± 0.2 m s−1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 m s−1vs. 4.5 ± 0.1 m s−1 to 4.5 ± 0.1 m s−1 in the absence and presence of ouabain respectively (P < 0.05 for ouabain effect; n = 6). In conclusion, ischaemic preconditioning is not involved in changes in MFCV during repeated ischaemic isometric exercise. The increase in MFCV during recovery from repeated ischaemic

  10. Effect of Enriched (Complex) Environment on Nerve Conduction Velocity: New Data and Review of Implications for the Speed of Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward

    1993-01-01

    Results with 54 mice confirm that increased stimulation or usage, as would be provided by environmental enrichment (EE), increases peripheral nerve conduction velocity. These results suggest a role at the physiological level for EE (or deprivation) in affecting measured intelligence. (SLD)

  11. Evening primrose oil treatment corrects reduced conduction velocity but not depletion of arachidonic acid in nerve from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, R; Peterson, R G; Kincaid, J C; Eichberg, J

    1998-09-01

    The effects of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment, a source of gamma-linolenic acid, on the proportions of arachidonoyl-containing molecular species (ACMS) in sciatic nerve phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were determined in conjunction with alterations in nerve conduction velocity. Normal and diabetic rats were either untreated or fed a dietary supplement containing isocalorically equivalent amounts of either EPO or corn oil for the duration of the experiment. After 8 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, nerve conduction velocity was reduced 16% and this deficit was prevented by either EPO or corn oil treatment. Neither EPO nor corn oil supplementation significantly increased the depressed proportions of ACMS. The level of the linoleoyl-containing molecular species, 16:0/18:2, was elevated in the phospholipids from untreated diabetic rats and was further increased by EPO treatment. These results are consistent with decreased activity of the delta6 desaturase that is required for arachidonic acid synthesis in vivo, but suggests that an accompanying deficit in the subsequent delta5 desaturase-catalyzed reaction may be rate-limiting. These findings indicate that maintenance of normal ACMS levels is not required for prevention of diminished nerve conduction velocity and suggest that other factors influenced by an altered polyunsaturated fatty acid pattern, such as metabolites of linoleic acid or gamma-linolenic acid other than arachidonic acid, the energy state of the nerve or the degree of membrane fluidity may contribute to impaired nerve conduction velocity in diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Choice Reaction Time and Visual Pathway Nerve Conduction Velocity Both Correlate with Intelligence but Appear Not to Correlate with Each Other: Implications for Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Jensen, Arthur R.

    1993-01-01

    Choice reaction time and simple reaction time were measured for 147 young adults for whom significant positive correlation between nerve conduction velocity in a brain nerve pathway and nonverbal intelligence was previously found. Results suggest that two largely independent neurophysiological processes affect intelligence. Differences in choice…

  13. Muscle architecture and force-velocity characteristics of cat soleus and medial gastrocnemius: implications for motor control.

    PubMed

    Spector, S A; Gardiner, P F; Zernicke, R F; Roy, R R; Edgerton, V R

    1980-11-01

    1. Isometric and isotonic contractile parameters of the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles of seven adult cats were studied. In addition, architectural characteristics of six contralateral pairs of these ankle extensors were determined. 2. The in situ peak isometric tetanic tension developed by the MG at the Achilles tendon is nearly 5 times (9,846 vs 2,125 g) that of the SOL muscle. However, when differences between the MG and SOL in fiber length (2.01 vs 3.66 cm), muscle mass (9.80 vs. 3.31 g), and angle of pinnation (21.4 vs. 6.4 degrees) are considered, the specific tensions of these muscles are similar (approximately 2.3 kg x cm-2). 3. When the effects of muscle architecture are eliminated, the nearly threefold greater maximum isotonic shortening velocity (Vmax) of sarcomeres of the MG (38.2 micron/s) relative to the SOL (13.4 micron/s) is presumably due to intrinsic differences in the biochemical properties of these muscle. However, the Vmax developed by the MG at the Achilles tendon (258.6 mm/s) during a shortening contraction is only 1.5 times that of the SOL (176.3 mm/s) due to the influence of these muscles' specific architectures. 4. Variations in geometrical characteristics of the SOL and MG are consonant with the relative amounts of participation of these muscles during posture, locomotion, and jumping. Posture requires the development of low forces for prolonged periods for which the SOL seems best suited both architecturally and physiologically. The MG, relatively inactive during quiet standing, becomes responsible for a greater percentage of tension and shortening speed during plantar flexion (E3) as gait speeds increase, which is consistent with this muscle's greater tension- and velocity-generating capacity. 5. At high speeds of locomotion (3.0 m/s) and jumping, the shortening velocities developed at the end of E3 (approximately 20-40 ms before paw off) exceed Vmax of the SOL. Consequently, the SOL, although electrically active

  14. Tibial motor nerve conduction studies: an investigation into the mechanism for amplitude drop of the proximal evoked response.

    PubMed

    Barkhaus, Paul E; Kincaid, John C; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D

    2011-11-01

    The amplitude of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of abductor hallucis (AH) shows the largest drop with proximal stimulation of any routinely studied motor nerves. The cause has not been established. Four experiments of tibial motor nerve conduction in several healthy control subjects were performed using far-field recordings, collision, H-reflex, and intramuscular recordings of foot muscles. The proximal CMAP showed a mean peak-peak amplitude of 66% (range 57-79%) compared with the distal response. Collision and H-reflex recordings in AH did not show evidence of a contribution from the tibial-innervated calf muscle. Needle electrode recordings of CMAPs showed consistently different latencies between different foot muscles. Our experiments indicate that temporal dispersion and phase cancellation between the distal tibial-innervated foot muscles recorded by the E2 (i.e., reference) electrode can explain the drop in amplitude between the proximal and distal tibial evoked CMAP. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: High-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Churazov, E.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-09-01

    Exploring the power spectrum of fluctuations and velocities in the intracluster medium (ICM) can help us to probe the gas physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its intimate relation with the ICM thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (related to density, entropy, or pressure fluctuations) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For a low 3D Mach number M ~ 0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, which are traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M> 0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute and pass the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, which are associated with isotropic (or slightly radial) turbulence. Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting toward isotropic velocities. Remarkably, regardless of the regime, the variance of density perturbations is comparable to the 1D Mach number, M1D ~ δρ/ρ. This linear relation allows us to easily convert between gas motions and ICM perturbations (δρ/ρ< 1), which can be exploited by the available Chandra, XMM data and by the forthcoming Astro-H mission. At intermediate and small scales (10-100 kpc), the turbulent velocities develop a tight Kolmogorov cascade. The thermodynamic perturbations (which can be generally described by log-normal distributions) act as effective tracers of the velocity field, in broad agreement with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin advection theory. The cluster radial gradients and compressive features induce a flattening in the cascade of the perturbations. Thermal conduction, on the other hand, acts to damp the thermodynamic

  16. Relationship between the velocity of illusory hand movement and strength of MEG signals in human primary motor cortex and left angular gyrus.

    PubMed

    Casini, Laurence; Roll, Jean-Pierre; Romaiguère, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    We studied the relationship between the velocity of movement illusion and the activity level of primary motor area (M1) and of the left angular gyrus (AG) in humans. To induce illusory movement perception, we applied co-vibration at different frequencies on tendons of antagonistic muscle groups. Since it is well established that the velocity of illusory movement is related to the difference in vibration frequency applied to two antagonistic muscles, we compared magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals recorded in two conditions of co-vibration: in the "fast illusion" condition a frequency difference of 80 Hz was applied on the tendons of the right wrist extensor and flexor muscle groups, whereas in the "slow illusion" condition a frequency difference of 40 Hz was applied on the same muscle groups. The dipole strength, reflecting the activity level of structures, was measured over M1 and the left AG in two different time-periods: 0-400 and 400-800 ms in each condition. Our results showed that the activity level of the AG was similar in both conditions whatever the time-period, whereas the activity level of M1 was higher in the "fast illusion" condition compared to the "slow illusion" condition from 400 ms after the vibration onset only. The data suggest that the two structures differently contributed to the perception of illusory movements. Our hypothesis is that M1 would be involved in the coding of cinematic parameters of the illusory movement but not the AG.

  17. Design and geometry optimization of a conductivity probe with a vertical multiple electrode array for measuring volume fraction and axial velocity of two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, N. D.; Xin, Z.; Wang, J.; Wang, Z. Y.; Jia, X. H.; Chen, W. P.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents the design and geometry optimization of a conductivity probe with a vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA), which can be used to measure the volume fraction and axial velocity of two-phase flow. The designed VMEA electrodes are axially flush mounted on the inside wall of an insulating duct. On the basis of a finite element analysis method, some new sensor optimization concepts of the electric field such as uniform degree, spatial sensitivity and effective information content are proposed. The designed VMEA measurement system has been tested through the multiphase flow loop and shows that the optimized VMEA can be used to measure cross-correlation velocity and predict volume fraction in vertical upward gas-water two-phase flow with satisfactory accuracy. The proposed optimization method of VMEA can also be useful in investigating other types of conductivity probes.

  18. Conduction Mechanisms in CVD-Grown Monolayer MoS2 Transistors: From Variable-Range Hopping to Velocity Saturation.

    PubMed

    He, G; Ghosh, K; Singisetti, U; Ramamoorthy, H; Somphonsane, R; Bohra, G; Matsunaga, M; Higuchi, A; Aoki, N; Najmaei, S; Gong, Y; Zhang, X; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Bird, J P

    2015-08-12

    We fabricate transistors from chemical vapor deposition-grown monolayer MoS2 crystals and demonstrate excellent current saturation at large drain voltages (Vd). The low-field characteristics of these devices indicate that the electron mobility is likely limited by scattering from charged impurities. The current-voltage characteristics exhibit variable range hopping at low Vd and evidence of velocity saturation at higher Vd. This work confirms the excellent potential of MoS2 as a possible channel-replacement material and highlights the role of multiple transport phenomena in governing its transistor action.

  19. Flow velocity, water temperature, and conductivity at selected locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, Florida; July 1999 - July 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Riscassi, Ami L.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-velocity, water-temperature, and conductivity data were collected at five locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, from 1999 to 2003. The data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Priority Ecosystems Science Initiative in support of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. This report contains digital files and graphical plots of the processed, quality-checked, and edited data. Information pertinent to the locations and monitoring strategy also is presented.

  20. Neuro-fuzzy estimation of passive robotic joint safe velocity with embedded sensors of conductive silicone rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah; Petković, Dalibor; Danesh, Amir Seyed; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Issa, Mirna; Zentner, Lena

    2016-05-01

    Robotic operations need to be safe for unpredictable contacts. Joints with passive compliance with springs can be used for soft robotic contacts. However the joints cannot measure external collision forces. In this investigation was developed one passive compliant joint which have soft contacts with external objects and measurement capabilities. To ensure it, conductive silicone rubber was used as material for modeling of the compliant segments of the robotic joint. These compliant segments represent embedded sensors. The conductive silicone rubber is electrically conductive by deformations. The main task was to obtain elastic absorbers for the external collision forces. These absorbers can be used for measurement in the same time. In other words, the joint has an internal measurement system. Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was used to estimate the safety level of the robotic joint by head injury criteria (HIC).

  1. A model for compound action potentials and currents in a nerve bundle. III: A comparison of the conduction velocity distributions calculated from compound action currents and potentials.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, R S; Gielen, F L; Wikswo, J P

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we present the experimentally measured Compound Action Current (CACs) and Compound Action Potentials (CAPs) from frog sciatic nerves and earthworm nerve cords. We used histologically prepared cross sections of these nerve bundles to determine the distribution of fiber diameters. A modified volume conduction model that includes frequency-dependent conductivities was used to compute the Single Fiber Action Signals (SFASs). The recorded CACs and CAPs are used to predict the Conduction Velocity Distributions (CVDs) from the nerve bundles. The predicted CVDs are then compared with the histological CVDs. Analysis of Compound Action Signals from the three giant axons in the earthworm nerve cord and microelectrode data for the transmembrane action potential demonstrate the validity of our mathematical model. We found that the CVDs predicted from the recorded CACs and CAPs differ from the histological CVD for a variety of reasons. The validity of the assumption of a linear relationship between axon diameter and conduction velocity of a propagating action signal was investigated using CVDs from both the CAC and CAP. Variations of the CVDs with the propagation distance of the CASs and the recording temperature were investigated.

  2. TMEM43 mutation p.S358L alters intercalated disc protein expression and reduces conduction velocity in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Siragam, Vinayakumar; Cui, Xuezhi; Masse, Stephane; Ackerley, Cameron; Aafaqi, Shabana; Strandberg, Linn; Tropak, Michael; Fridman, Michael D; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Liu, Jun; Sun, Yu; Su, Bin; Wang, Caroline; Liu, Xiaoru; Yan, Yuqing; Mendlowitz, Ariel; Hamilton, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a myocardial disease characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of myocardium in the right ventricular free wall and frequently results in life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. A heterozygous missense mutation in the transmembrane protein 43 (TMEM43) gene, p.S358L, has been genetically identified to cause autosomal dominant ARVC type 5 in a founder population from the island of Newfoundland, Canada. Little is known about the function of the TMEM43 protein or how it leads to the pathogenesis of ARVC. We sought to determine the distribution of TMEM43 and the effect of the p.S358L mutation on the expression and distribution of various intercalated (IC) disc proteins as well as functional effects on IC disc gap junction dye transfer and conduction velocity in cell culture. Through Western blot analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence (IF), and electrophysiological analysis, our results showed that the stable expression of p.S358L mutation in the HL-1 cardiac cell line resulted in decreased Zonula Occludens (ZO-1) expression and the loss of ZO-1 localization to cell-cell junctions. Junctional Plakoglobin (JUP) and α-catenin proteins were redistributed to the cytoplasm with decreased localization to cell-cell junctions. Connexin-43 (Cx43) phosphorylation was altered, and there was reduced gap junction dye transfer and conduction velocity in mutant TMEM43-transfected cells. These observations suggest that expression of the p.S358L mutant of TMEM43 found in ARVC type 5 may affect localization of proteins involved in conduction, alter gap junction function and reduce conduction velocity in cardiac tissue.

  3. Differentiating Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Learning Disabilities and Autistic Spectrum Disorders by Means of Their Motor Behavior Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efstratopoulou, Maria; Janssen, Rianne; Simons, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the discriminant validity of the Motor Behavior Checklist (MBC) for distinguishing four group of children independently classified with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, (ADHD; N = 22), Conduct Disorder (CD; N = 17), Learning Disabilities (LD; N = 24) and Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD; N = 20).…

  4. Differentiating Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Learning Disabilities and Autistic Spectrum Disorders by Means of Their Motor Behavior Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efstratopoulou, Maria; Janssen, Rianne; Simons, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the discriminant validity of the Motor Behavior Checklist (MBC) for distinguishing four group of children independently classified with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, (ADHD; N = 22), Conduct Disorder (CD; N = 17), Learning Disabilities (LD; N = 24) and Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD; N = 20).…

  5. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Strutz, Tessa J; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe(0)in) of 0.6, 10, and 17g/L. Concentrations of Fe(0) in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe(0) distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe(0) concentrations of about 14-18g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  6. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutz, Tessa J.; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2 m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1 m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe0in) of 0.6, 10, and 17 g/L. Concentrations of Fe0 in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe0 distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe0 concentrations of about 14-18 g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  7. The renin-angiotensin system mediates the effects of stretch on conduction velocity, connexin43 expression and redistribution in intact ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Wajid; Patel, Pravina M; Chowdury, Rasheda; Cabo, Candido; Ciaccio, Edward J.; Lab, Max J; Duffy, Heather S; Wit, Andrew L; Peters, Nicholas S

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In disease states such as heart failure, myocardial infarction and hypertrophy, changes in the expression and location of Connexin43 (Cx43) occur (Cx43 remodeling), and may predispose to arrhythmias. Stretch may be an important stimulus to Cx43 remodeling; however, it has only been investigated in neonatal cell cultures, which have different physiological properties to adult myocytes. We hypothesized that localized stretch in vivo causes Cx43 remodeling, with associated changes in conduction, mediated by the renin/angiotensin system (RAS). Methods and Results In an open-chest canine model a device was used to stretch part of the right ventricle (RV) by 22% for 6 hours. Activation mapping using a 312-electrode array was performed before and after stretch. Regional stretch did not change longitudinal conduction velocity (post-stretch vs. baseline: 51.5±5.2 vs. 55.3±8.1cm/s p=0.24, n=11), but significantly reduced transverse conduction velocity (28.7±2.5 vs. 35.4±5.4cm/s, p<0.01). It also reduced total Cx43 expression, by Western blotting, compared to a nonstretched area RV of the same animal (86.1±32.2 vs. 100±19.4%, p<0.02, n=11). Cx43 labeling redistributed to the lateral cell borders. Stretch caused a small but significant increase in the proportion of the dephosphorylated form of Cx43 (stretch 9.95±1.4% vs. control 8.74±1.2%, p<0.05). Olmesartan, an angiotensin-II blocker, prevented the stretch induced changes in Cx43 levels, localization and conduction. Conclusion Myocardial stretch in vivo has opposite effects to that in neonatal myocytes in vitro. Stretch in vivo causes conduction changes associated with Cx43 remodeling that are likely caused by local stretch-induced activation of the RAS. PMID:20487124

  8. Differentiating children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, learning disabilities and autistic spectrum disorders by means of their motor behavior characteristics.

    PubMed

    Efstratopoulou, Maria; Janssen, Rianne; Simons, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the discriminant validity of the Motor Behavior Checklist (MBC) for distinguishing four group of children independently classified with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, (ADHD; N=22), Conduct Disorder (CD; N=17), Learning Disabilities (LD; N=24) and Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD; N=20). Physical education teachers used the MBC for children to rate their pupils based on their motor related behaviors. A multivariate analysis revealed significant differences among the groups on different problem scales. The results indicated that the MBC for children may be effective in discriminating children with similar disruptive behaviors (e.g., ADHD, CD) and autistic disorders, based on their motor behavior characteristics, but not children with Learning Disabilities (LD), when used by physical education teachers in school settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of electrode to nerve fiber distance and nerve conduction velocity through spectral analysis of the extracellular action potentials recorded from earthworm giant fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaoyu; Odoemene, Onyekachi; Yoshida, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Microneurography and the use of selective microelectrodes that can resolve single-unit nerve activity have become a tool to understand the coding within the nervous system and a clinical diagnostic tool to assess peripheral neural pathologies. Central to these techniques is the use of the differences in the shape of the extracellular action potential (AP) waveform to identify and discriminate units from one another. Theoretical modeling of the origins of these shape differences has shown that the position of the nerve fiber relative to the electrode and the conduction velocity of the unit contribute to these differences giving rise to the hypothesis that more information about the fiber and its relationship to the electrode could be extracted given further analysis of the AP waveform. This paper addresses this question by exploring the electrical coupling between the electrode and nerve fiber. Idealized models and the literature indicate that two parameters, the electrode-fiber distance and the unit conduction velocity, contribute to the amplitude of the extracellular AP detected by the electrode, which confounds the quantification of coupling using the spike amplitude alone. To resolve this, we develop a method that enables differential quantification of these two parameters using spectral analysis of the single-unit AP waveform and demonstrate that the two parameters could be effectively decoupled in an in vitro earthworm model. The method could open the way forward toward micro-scale in situ monitoring of the interaction of nerve fiber and neural interface.

  10. The Expanded Bead Size of Corneal C-Nerve Fibers Visualized by Corneal Confocal Microscopy Is Associated with Slow Conduction Velocity of the Peripheral Nerves in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish the corneal nerve fiber (CNF) morphological alterations in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the association between the bead size, a novel parameter representing composite of accumulated mitochondria, glycogen particles, and vesicles in CNF, and the neurophysiological dysfunctions of the peripheral nerves. 162 type 2 diabetic patients and 45 healthy control subjects were studied in detail with a battery of clinical and neurological examinations and corneal confocal microscopy. Compared with controls, patients had abnormal CNF parameters. In particular the patients had reduced density and length of CNF and beading frequency and increased bead size. Alterations in CNF parameters were significant even in patients without neuropathy. The HbA1c levels were tightly associated with the bead size, which was inversely related to the motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and to the distal latency period of the median nerve positively. The CNF density and length positively correlated with the NCV and amplitude. The hyperglycemia-induced expansion of beads in CNF might be a predictor of slow NCV in peripheral nerves in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27563679

  11. Comparison of the duration and power spectral changes of monopolar and bipolar M waves caused by alterations in muscle fibre conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Navallas, Javier; Malanda, Armando; Rodriguez-Martin, Olivia

    2014-08-01

    The muscle compound action potential (M wave) recorded under monopolar configuration reflects both the propagation of the action potentials along the muscle fibres and their extinction at the tendon. M waves recorded under a bipolar configuration contain less cross talk and noise than monopolar M waves, but they do not contain the entire informative content of the propagating potential. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of changes in muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV) on monopolar and bipolar M waves and how this effect depends on the distance between the recording electrodes and tendon. The study was based on a simulation approach and on an experimental investigation of the characteristics of surface M waves evoked in the vastus lateralis during 4-s step-wise isometric contractions in knee extension at 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% MVC. The peak-to-peak duration (Durpp) and median frequency (Fmedian) of the M waves were calculated. For monopolar M waves, changes in Durpp and Fmedian produced by MFCV depended on the distance from the electrode to the tendon, whereas, for bipolar M waves, changes in Durpp and Fmedian were largely independent of the electrode-to-tendon distance. When the distance between the detection point and tendon lay between approximately 15 and 40mm, changes in Durpp of bipolar M waves were more pronounced than those of distal monopolar M waves but less marked than those of proximal monopolar M waves, and the opposite occurred for Fmedian. Since, for bipolar M waves, changes in duration and power spectral features produced by alterations in MFCV are not influenced by the electrode-to-tendon distance, the bipolar electrode configuration is a preferable choice over monopolar arrangements to estimate changes in conduction velocity.

  12. The tissue velocity imaging and strain rate imaging in the assessment of interatrial electromechanical conduction in patients with sick sinus syndrome before and after pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhi; Ji, Ping; Mao, Hongwei; Hu, Jianqun

    2011-05-01

    Tissue velocity imaging (TVI) and strain rate imaging (SRI) were recently introduced to quantify myocardial mechanical activity in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. To clear whether atrial-demand-based (AAI) (R) atrial pacing can fully simulate the electromechanical conduction of physiological state and to clarify which one is more appropriate for the assessment of electromechanical activity of the heart between TVI and SRI, 30 normal subjects and 31 patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS) before and after AAI(R) pacemaker implantation (PI) were investigated in this study. The results showed that the time intervals (ms), P-SRa assessed by SRI (not P-Va assessed by TVI) prolonged step by step from the lateral wall of the right atrium (RA), the interatrial septum (IAS) and the left atrium (LA) in normal subjects(5.01±0.62, 17.05±3.54 and 45.09±12.26, p<0.01). P-Va and P-SRa did not differ at the RA, IAS and LA in patients with SSS before PI (p>0.05), and they were significant longer than those of normal subjects (p<0.01). However, they shortened to normal levels in patients with SSS after PI and P-SRa showed again the trend of gradually prolonging from the RA, IAS to LA. At the same time, the peak velocities and the peak strain rates during atrial contraction also returned to normal values from lower levels. These data suggested that AAI(R) atrial pacing can successfully reverse the abnormal interatrial electromechanical conduction in patients with SSS, and SRI is more appropriate for the assessment of the electromechanical activity of atrial wall than TVI.

  13. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity for the evaluation of the infraspinatus muscle and the suprascapular nerve in professional beach volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Lajtai, Georg; Wieser, Karl; Ofner, Michael; Raimann, Gustav; Aitzetmüller, Gernot; Jost, Bernhard

    2012-10-01

    Beach volleyball is an overhead sport with a high prevalence of infraspinatus muscle atrophy of the hitting shoulder. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy seems to be caused by a repetitive traction injury of the suprascapular nerve. Early pathological findings might be assessed with surface electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measurements. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fully competitive professional beach volleyball players were assessed with a structured interview, shoulder examination, strength measurements (external rotation and elevation), and neurophysiological examination (surface EMG and NCV of the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles and the suprascapular nerve, respectively) during the Beach Volleyball Grand Slam tournament 2010 in Klagenfurt, Austria. Thirty-five men with an average age of 28 years were examined. Visible infraspinatus atrophy was found in 12 players (34%), of which 8 (23%) had slight atrophy and 4 (11%) had severe atrophy. External rotation (90%; P < .006) and elevation strength (93%; P = .03) were significantly lower in the hitting shoulder. Electromyography revealed a higher activation pattern in the infraspinatus muscle of the hitting arm in players with no or slight atrophy (P = .001) but a significantly lower activation pattern in players with severe atrophy (P = .013). Nerve conduction velocity measurements showed a significant higher latency and lower amplitude in the hitting shoulder of the total study group and the subgroup with infraspinatus atrophy. Professional beach volleyball players have a high frequency of infraspinatus atrophy (34%) and significantly reduced shoulder strength of the hitting shoulder. These findings are not associated with demographic factors. Electromyography and NCV measurements suggest a suprascapular nerve involvement caused by repetitive strain injuries of the nerve. External rotation strength measurements and NCV measurements can detect a side-to-side difference

  14. A Study of Cortical Excitability, Central Motor Conduction, and Cortical Inhibition Using Single Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Early Frontotemporal and Alzheimer's Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Nagaraju, B C; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT), central motor conduction time (CMCT), and silent period (SP) were evaluated. Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD.

  15. A Study of Cortical Excitability, Central Motor Conduction, and Cortical Inhibition Using Single Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Early Frontotemporal and Alzheimer's Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Nagaraju, B. C.; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients and Methods: Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT), central motor conduction time (CMCT), and silent period (SP) were evaluated. Results: Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. Conclusion: The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD. PMID:27011398

  16. Preliminary results of thermal conductivity and elastic wave velocity measurements of various rock samples collected from outcrops in hanging wall of the Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Tadai, O.; Shigematsu, N.; Nishikawa, O.; Mori, H.; Townend, J.; Capova, L.; Saito, S.; Kinoshita, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is a mature active fault zone likely to rupture in the near future and DFDP aims to measure physical and chemical conditions within the fault. DFDP-2B borehole was drilled into hanging wall of the Alpine Fault. Downhole temperature measurements carried out in DFDP-2B borehole showed that the geothermal gradient in the hanging wall of the fault is very high, likely reaching to 130-150 °C/km (Sutherland et al., 2015 AGU Fall Meeting). To explain this abnormal feature, the determination of thermal properties of all the rock types in the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault is essential. To measure thermal properties and elastic wave velocities, we collected six typical rock block samples from outcrops in Stony creek and Gaunt creek. These include ultramylonite, mylonite, muscovite schist, garnet amphibolite, protomylonite and schist, which are representative of the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault. Their wet bulk densities are 2.7 - 2.8 g/cm3, and porosities are 1.4 - 3.0%. We prepared a pair of 4 cm cube specimens of each rock type with one flat plane parallel to the foliation. First, we measured thermal conductivity by the transient plane heat source (hot disc) method in a bulk mode, i.e. to deal with the rock as an isotropic material. However, several samples have clearly visible foliation and are likely to be anisotropic. Thus, the data measured in bulk mode provided an average value of the rocks in the range of approximately 2.4 - 3.2 W/mK. The next step will be to measure thermal conductivity in an anisotropic mode. We also measured P wave velocity (Vp) using the same samples, but in two directions, i.e. parallel and perpendicular to the foliation, respectively. Our preliminary results suggested that Vp is anisotropic in all the six rocks. Generally, Vp parallel to foliation is higher than that in the perpendicular direction. Vp in the parallel direction ranged in 5.5 - 6.0 km/s, whereas in the perpendicular direction it was 4.4 - 5.5 km/s. We

  17. MOTOR SKILLS AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OUTCOMES FROM A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION IN SHORT BREAKS ON PRESCHOOL CHILDREN CONDUCTED BY THEIR EDUCATORS: A PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Monsalves-Alvarez, Matias; Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio; Zapata-Lamana, Rafael; Rosales-Soto, Giovanni; Salazar, Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern. For this issue different intervention have being planned to increase physical activity patterns and reduce the excess of weight in children with limited or no success. the aim of this study is to evaluate the results of a pilot intervention consisting in three 15-minute breaks conducted by educators and supervised by physical education teachers on motor skills and nutritional status in preschool children. sample was 70 preschool children (32 boys and 38 girls), age 4 ± 0,6 years. The physical activity classes were performed three times a week, 45 minutes daily, distributed in three 15 minutes breaks. The circuits were planned to have; jumps, sprints, carrying medicinal balls, gallops and crawling. Motor skill tests that were performed Standing long jump (SLJ) and Twelve meter run. with the intervention no significant differences in nutritional status where found on mean Z score (boys p = 0.49, girls p = 0.77). An increment on weight and height was fount after the intervention (p < 0.0001). Regarding the 12 meter run test, we found significant changes after the intervention when we normalize by weight in boys (p = 0.002) and girls (p < 0.0001). Our results have shown than boys significantly increased their SLJ and SLJ normalized by weight (p < 0.0001); a similar result was found in girls after the intervention (p < 0.0001) suggesting the increment of power independent of weight gain. in conclusion, this pilot study found that an intervention with more intense activities in small breaks (15 minutes), and guided by the educators could improve essential motor skills (running and jumping) in preschool children of a semi-rural sector independent of nutritional status. This gaining in motor skills is the first step to increase physical activity levels in preschool children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. AB310. SPR-37 Cholinergic excitatory motor responses in the colon are mediated through the calcium-activated chloride conductance Ano1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Jin; Blair, Peter J.; Rock, Jason; Pardo, David; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a growing body of evidence that gastrointestinal smooth muscle excitability is regulated by several different classes of interstitial cells [interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells] that are electrically coupled to SMC. Thus, ‘myogenic’ activity results from the integrated behavior of the SMC/ICC/PDGFRα(+) cell (SIP) syncytium. Inputs from excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons are required to produce the complex motor patterns of the gut and coordinate GI motility. Motor neurons innervate these three cell types in the SIP syncytium, and receptors, second messenger pathways, and ion channels in these cells mediate postjunctional responses. Cholinergic neurotransmission in GI muscles from several species has long been thought to be dependent upon activation of a non-selective cation conductance in smooth muscle cells and the molecular candidates for mediating cholinergic excitation have been reported to be the transient receptor protein channels Trpc4 and Trpc6. However, we have shown that cholinergic responses in the GI tract involve ICC and in their absence these motor responses are greatly diminished or absent. We sought to determine the conductance(s) responsible for cholinergic motor responses in the colon. Methods Cre-LoxP recombinase technology was utilized to determine the role of the calcium-activated chloride conductance, Ano1 in post-junctional motor responses in the mouse colon in a cell-specific manner (Kit+ ICC). c-KitCreERT2/+ (Kit-Cre) mice and Ano f/f mice were crossed to generate c-KitCreERT2/+; Ano1f/f (mutants) and c-KitCreERT2/+; Ano1f/+ (controls) animals that were subsequently treated with tamoxifen to induce Cre recombinase expression in ICC. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the cell type Cre expression was switched on. Intracellular microelectrode recordings were performed to determine changes in post-junctional neural responses to nerve stimulation in c-KitCreERT2/+ (Kit-Cre) mice and Anof

  19. Regulation of Conduction Time along Axons

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Armin H.

    2013-01-01

    Timely delivery of information is essential for proper function of the nervous system. Precise regulation of nerve conduction velocity is needed for correct exertion of motor skills, sensory integration and cognitive functions. In vertebrates, the rapid transmission of signals along nerve fibers is made possible by the myelination of axons and the resulting saltatory conduction in between nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is a specialization of glia cells and is provided by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Myelination not only maximizes conduction velocity, but also provides a means to systematically regulate conduction times in the nervous system. Systematic regulation of conduction velocity along axons, and thus systematic regulation of conduction time in between neural areas, is a common occurrence in the nervous system. To date, little is understood about the mechanism that underlies systematic conduction velocity regulation and conduction time synchrony. Node assembly, internode distance (node spacing) and axon diameter - all parameters determining the speed of signal propagation along axons - are controlled by myelinating glia. Therefore, an interaction between glial cells and neurons has been suggested. This review summarizes examples of neural systems in which conduction velocity is regulated by anatomical variations along axons. While functional implications in these systems are not always clear, recent studies in the auditory system of birds and mammals present examples of conduction velocity regulation in systems with high temporal precision and a defined biological function. Together these findings suggest an active process that shapes the interaction between axons and myelinating glia to control conduction velocity along axons. Future studies involving these systems may provide further insight into how specific conduction times in the brain are established and maintained in development. Throughout the text, conduction velocity is used for the

  20. Regulation of conduction time along axons.

    PubMed

    Seidl, A H

    2014-09-12

    Timely delivery of information is essential for proper functioning of the nervous system. Precise regulation of nerve conduction velocity is needed for correct exertion of motor skills, sensory integration and cognitive functions. In vertebrates, the rapid transmission of signals along nerve fibers is made possible by the myelination of axons and the resulting saltatory conduction in between nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is a specialization of glia cells and is provided by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Myelination not only maximizes conduction velocity, but also provides a means to systematically regulate conduction times in the nervous system. Systematic regulation of conduction velocity along axons, and thus systematic regulation of conduction time in between neural areas, is a common occurrence in the nervous system. To date, little is understood about the mechanism that underlies systematic conduction velocity regulation and conduction time synchrony. Node assembly, internode distance (node spacing) and axon diameter - all parameters determining the speed of signal propagation along axons - are controlled by myelinating glia. Therefore, an interaction between glial cells and neurons has been suggested. This review summarizes examples of neural systems in which conduction velocity is regulated by anatomical variations along axons. While functional implications in these systems are not always clear, recent studies on the auditory system of birds and mammals present examples of conduction velocity regulation in systems with high temporal precision and a defined biological function. Together these findings suggest an active process that shapes the interaction between axons and myelinating glia to control conduction velocity along axons. Future studies involving these systems may provide further insight into how specific conduction times in the brain are established and maintained in development. Throughout the text, conduction velocity is used for the

  1. Conduction Aphasia, Sensory-Motor Integration, and Phonological Short-term Memory – an Aggregate analysis of Lesion and fMRI data

    PubMed Central

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F.; Dronkers, Nina; D’Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways, recent advances in lesions reconstruction methodology applied to groups of patients have implicated left temporoparietal zones. Parallel work using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pinpointed a region in the posterior most portion of the left planum temporale, area Spt, which is critical for phonological working memory. Here we show that the region of maximal lesion overlap in a sample of 14 patients with conduction aphasia perfectly circumscribes area Spt, as defined in an aggregate fMRI analysis of 105 subjects performing a phonological working memory task. We provide a review of the evidence supporting the idea that Spt is an interface site for the integration of sensory and vocal tract-related motor representations of complex sound sequences, such as speech and music and show how the symptoms of conduction aphasia can be explained by damage to this system. PMID:21256582

  2. Conduction aphasia, sensory-motor integration, and phonological short-term memory - an aggregate analysis of lesion and fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F; Dronkers, Nina; D'Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways, recent advances in lesions reconstruction methodology applied to groups of patients have implicated left temporoparietal zones. Parallel work using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pinpointed a region in the posterior most portion of the left planum temporale, area Spt, which is critical for phonological working memory. Here we show that the region of maximal lesion overlap in a sample of 14 patients with conduction aphasia perfectly circumscribes area Spt, as defined in an aggregate fMRI analysis of 105 subjects performing a phonological working memory task. We provide a review of the evidence supporting the idea that Spt is an interface site for the integration of sensory and vocal tract-related motor representations of complex sound sequences, such as speech and music and show how the symptoms of conduction aphasia can be explained by damage to this system. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduction of Common-Mode Conducted Noise Emissions in PWM Inverter-fed AC Motor Drive Systems using Optimized Passive EMI Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jettanasen, C.; Ngaopitakkul, A.

    2010-10-01

    Conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by PWM inverter-fed induction motor drive systems, which are currently widely used in many industrial and/or avionic applications, causes severe parasitic current problems, especially at high frequencies (HF). These restrict power electronic drive's evolution. In order to reduce or minimize these EMI problems, several techniques can be applied. In this paper, insertion of an optimized passive EMI filter is proposed. This filter is optimized by taking into account real impedances of each part of a considered AC motor drive system contrarily to commercial EMI filters designed by considering internal impedance of disturbance source and load, equal to 50Ω. Employing the latter EMI filter would make EMI minimization less effective. The proposed EMI filter optimization is mainly dedicated to minimize common mode (CM) currents due to its most dominant effects in this kind of system. The efficiency of the proposed optimization method using two-port network approach is deduced by comparing the minimized CM current spectra to an applied normative level (ex. DO-160D in aeronautics).

  4. Gap junction modifier rotigaptide decreases the susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia by enhancing conduction velocity and suppressing discordant alternans during therapeutic hypothermia in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Jiunn-Cherng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Shien-Fong; Yeh, Hung-I; Huang, Jin-Long; Lo, Chu-Pin; Haugan, Ketil; Larsen, Bjarne D; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) may increase the susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias by decreasing ventricular conduction velocity (CV) and facilitating arrhythmogenic spatially discordant alternans (SDA). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that rotigaptide, a gap junction enhancer, can increase ventricular CV, delay the onset of SDA, and decrease the susceptibility to pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation (PIVF) during TH. Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts were subjected to 30-minute moderate hypothermia (33°C) followed by 20-minute treatment with rotigaptide (300 nM, n = 8) or vehicle (n = 5). The same protocol was also performed at severe hypothermia (30°C; n = 8 for rotigaptide, n = 5 for vehicle). Using an optical mapping system, epicardial CV and SDA threshold were evaluated by S1 pacing. Ventricular fibrillation inducibility was evaluated by burst pacing for 30 seconds at the shortest pacing cycle length (PCL) that achieved 1:1 ventricular capture. Rotigaptide increased ventricular CV during 33°C (PCL 300 ms, from 76 ± 6 cm/s to 84 ± 7 cm/s, P = .039) and 30°C (PCL 300 ms, from 62 ± 6 cm/s to 68 ± 4 cm/s, P = .008). Rotigaptide decreased action potential duration dispersion at 33°C (P = .01) and 30°C (P = .035). During 30°C, SDA thresholds (P = .042) and incidence of premature ventricular complexes (P = .025) were decreased by rotigaptide. PIVF inducibility was decreased by rotigaptide at 33°C (P = .039) and 30°C (P = .042). Rotigaptide did not change connexin43 expressions and distributions during hypothermia. Rotigaptide protects the hearts against ventricular arrhythmias by increasing ventricular CV, delaying the onset of SDA, and reducing repolarization heterogeneity during TH. Enhancing cell-to-cell coupling by rotigaptide might be a novel approach to prevent ventricular arrhythmias during TH. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Position-and Velocity- Sensorless Control of Cylindrical Brushless DC Motors Driven by Sinusoidal Current at Low Speed Using Eddy Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Tomita, Mutuwo; Chen, Zhiqian; Satoh, Mitsuhiko; Doki, Shinji; Okuma, Shigeru

    This paper proposes to paste non-magnetic materials on the rotor surface of a cylindrical brushless DC motor and to use the model including the extended e.m.f. for sensorless control. In the proposed method, the inductance changes depending on the rotor position because of eddy currents, which flow on the non-magnetic material at high frequency. The rotor position can be estimated at standstill and at low speeds. The simulation results show that the proposed method is very useful.

  6. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit; Højlund, Dorthe; Selmar, Peter E; Sindrup, Søren H

    2014-08-01

    The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg. Peroneal nerve distal motor latency, motor conduction velocity, and compound motor action potential amplitude; sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and sensory conduction velocity; and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency were examined in 51 healthy subjects, aged 40 to 67 years. They were reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve conduction studies have a high reproducibility, and variables are mainly unaltered during 6 months. This study provides a solid basis for the planning of future clinical trials assessing changes in nerve conduction.

  7. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies').

  8. Motor unit activity after eccentric exercise and muscle damage in humans.

    PubMed

    Semmler, J G

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that unaccustomed eccentric exercise leads to muscle damage and soreness, which can produce long-lasting effects on muscle function. How this muscle damage influences muscle activation is poorly understood. The purpose of this brief review is to highlight the effect of eccentric exercise on the activation of muscle by the nervous system, by examining the change in motor unit activity obtained from surface electromyography (EMG) and intramuscular recordings. Previous research shows that eccentric exercise produces unusual changes in the EMG–force relation that influences motor performance during isometric, shortening and lengthening muscle contractions and during fatiguing tasks. When examining the effect of eccentric exercise at the single motor unit level, there are substantial changes in recruitment thresholds, discharge rates, motor unit conduction velocities and synchronization, which can last for up to 1 week after eccentric exercise. Examining the time course of these changes suggests that the increased submaximal EMG after eccentric exercise most likely occurs through a decrease in motor unit conduction velocity and an increase in motor unit activity related to antagonist muscle coactivation and low-frequency fatigue. Furthermore, there is a commonly held view that eccentric exercise produces preferential damage to high-threshold motor units, but the evidence for this in humans is limited. Further research is needed to establish whether there is preferential damage to high-threshold motor units after eccentric exercise in humans, preferably by linking changes in motor unit activity with estimates of motor unit size using selective intramuscular recording techniques.

  9. Enhanced robust fractional order proportional-plus-integral controller based on neural network for velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bitao; Pi, YouGuo

    2013-07-01

    The traditional integer order proportional-integral-differential (IO-PID) controller is sensitive to the parameter variation or/and external load disturbance of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). And the fractional order proportional-integral-differential (FO-PID) control scheme based on robustness tuning method is proposed to enhance the robustness. But the robustness focuses on the open-loop gain variation of controlled plant. In this paper, an enhanced robust fractional order proportional-plus-integral (ERFOPI) controller based on neural network is proposed. The control law of the ERFOPI controller is acted on a fractional order implement function (FOIF) of tracking error but not tracking error directly, which, according to theory analysis, can enhance the robust performance of system. Tuning rules and approaches, based on phase margin, crossover frequency specification and robustness rejecting gain variation, are introduced to obtain the parameters of ERFOPI controller. And the neural network algorithm is used to adjust the parameter of FOIF. Simulation and experimental results show that the method proposed in this paper not only achieve favorable tracking performance, but also is robust with regard to external load disturbance and parameter variation.

  10. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  11. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  12. A quantitative electrophysiological study of motor neurone disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, S; Ballantyne, J P

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-two patients with motor neurone disease were investigated using quantitative electrophysiological techniques. Estimates of the number of surviving motor units in the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and measurements of the electrophysiological parameters of these units are present along with the values for motor nerve conduction velocities. The results indicate that reinnervation in motor neurone disease is sufficient to compensate completely for the loss of up to 50% of the motor neurone pool supplying the muscle. The capacity for reinnervation is greater than we have found in a number of neuropathies but the efficiency of reinnervation decreases as the number of surviving motor units falls. Reinnervation appears to cease when 5% or less of the motor units remain viable. There is no electrophysiological evidence of a preferential loss of fast conducting axons, of pathological slowing of conduction nor of a dying-back process affecting the motor axon. Comparison of the electrophysiological parameters in progressive muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis shows no significant differences. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed in terms of the results. PMID:690647

  13. Palmar skin conductance variability and the relation to stimulation, pain and the motor activity assessment scale in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many intensive care unit (ICU) patients describe pain and other adverse feelings that may impact long-term psychological morbidity. Sympathetically mediated palmar skin conductance variability is related to emotionally induced perspiration and correlates with pain levels in the perioperative setting but has not been studied in ICU patients. Methods Twenty non-intubated and 20 intubated general ICU patients were included in this observational study. Patients were monitored with the MED-STORM Pain Monitoring System®. The number of skin conductance fluctuations per second (NSCF) was measured in parallel with bedside observation during one hour of intensive care, including rest, procedures and patient-staff interactions. Arousal-agitation level was monitored with the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS). Pain was monitored with the numeric rating scale (0 to 10) in patients able to communicate or by observation in patients unable to communicate. Results In non-intubated patients, NSCF increased with increasing stimulation/pain but also with higher MAAS (P = 0.002). An interaction effect was found, with increased NSCF response to stimulation/pain with increasing MAAS (P < 0.001). In intubated patients, NSCF increased significantly with increasing stimulation/pain (P < 0.001). In contrast to non-intubated patients, no difference in NSCF between MAAS levels was found for any given degree of stimulation in intubated patients. Conclusions In critically ill patients, NSCF may be more useful evaluating emotional distress rather than pain alone. It needs to be assessed whether NSCF monitoring is clinically useful and whether controlling emotional distress with the aid of such monitoring may impact on patient care and outcomes. PMID:23510014

  14. Behavioral and electromyographic assessment of oxaliplatin-induced motor dysfunctions: Evidence for a therapeutic effect of allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Taleb, O; Bouzobra, F; Tekin-Pala, H; Meyer, L; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Patte-Mensah, C

    2017-03-01

    The antineoplastic oxaliplatin (OXAL) is pivotal for metastatic cancer treatments. However, OXAL evokes sensory and motor side-effects including pain, muscle weakness, motor nerve fiber dysfunctions/neuropathies that significantly impact patients' lives. Therefore, preclinical investigations are struggling to characterize effective analgesics against OXAL-induced painful/sensory symptoms but surprisingly, OXAL-evoked motor dysfunctions received little attention although these neurological symptoms are also disabling for patients. Here, we validated a rat model of OXAL-induced motor neuropathy by using (i) behavioral methods as the wire suspension and balance beam tests to assess muscle weakness and (ii) electrophysiological techniques to record the gastrocnemius electromyography (EMG). The conductance velocity of motor fibers was reduced and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) duration increased in OXAL-treated rats, leading to CMAP dispersion with no modification of the area under the curve, reflecting a heterogeneous demyelination of motor fibers. Functional motor unit analysis revealed a 50 % decrease of their estimated number which was compensated by a motor unit size increase. OXAL-induced motor weakness appeared as a combined consequence of motor fiber demyelination and motor axonopathy. Because we previously observed that allopregnanolone (AP) counteracted OXAL-evoked painful/sensory symptoms, we evaluated its action against OXAL-induced motor neurological dysfunctions. AP treatment successfully corrected motor behaviors, conductance velocity, CMAP duration, motor unit number (MUN) and motor unit size altered by OXAL-chemotherapy. These results, which are the first to show that AP efficiently rescues OXAL-induced motor neuropathy, consolidate the idea that AP-based therapy may be relevant for the treatment of both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Summary of a study to determine low-velocity impact damage and residual tension strength for a thick graphite/epoxy motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Impacters of various shapes and masses were dropped from various heights onto 36 mm (1.4 in.) thick graphite/epoxy cylinders, which represented filament wound cases (FWC) for the booster motors of the Space Shuttle. Insert solid propellant was cast into some of the cylinders. The cylinders were impacted numerous times around the circumference and then cut into 51 mm (2.0 in.) wide tension specimens, each containing an impact site. Four indenters were used: a sharp corner, two hemispheres, and a bolt-like rod. The diameters of the hemispheres were 12.7 mm mm (0.5 in.) and 25.4 mm (1.0 in.), and the diameter of the rod was 6.3 mm (0.25 in.). Impacts with the rod were simulated by pressing the rod against the face of specimens. For the hemispheres, the damage initiated beneath the surface at a critical contact pressure and was not visible on the surface until an even larger pressure was exceeded. The damage consisted of matrix cracking and broken fiber. The rod an corner made visible surface damage in all tests. For the hemispheres, the tension strength was reduced considerably before the damage was visible on the surface, 30 percent for the 25.4 mm (1.0 in.) diameter hemisphere and 10 percent for the 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) diameter hemisphere. Analytical methods were used to predict the damage and residual tension strength. A factor of safety to account for nonvisible damage was determined.

  16. Specific changes in conduction velocity recovery cycles of single nociceptors in a patient with erythromelalgia with the I848T gain-of-function mutation of Nav1.7.

    PubMed

    Namer, Barbara; Ørstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Kleggetveit, Inge-Petter; Weidner, Christian; Mørk, Cato; Kvernebo, Mari Skylstad; Kvernebo, Knut; Salter, Hugh; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Segerdahl, Märta; Quiding, Hans; Waxman, Stephen George; Handwerker, Hermann Otto; Torebjörk, Hans Erik; Jørum, Ellen; Schmelz, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Seven patients diagnosed with erythromelalgia (EM) were investigated by microneurography to record from unmyelinated nerve fibers in the peroneal nerve. Two patients had characterized variants of sodium channel Nav1.7 (I848T, I228M), whereas no mutations of coding regions of Navs were found in 5 patients with EM. Irrespective of Nav1.7 mutations, more than 50% of the silent nociceptors in the patients with EM showed spontaneous activity. In the patient with mutation I848T, all nociceptors, but not sympathetic efferents, displayed enhanced early subnormal conduction in the velocity recovery cycles and the expected late subnormality was reversed to supranormal conduction. The larger hyperpolarizing shift of activation might explain the difference to the I228M mutation. Sympathetic fibers that lack Nav1.8 did not show supranormal conduction in the patient carrying the I848T mutation, confirming in human subjects that the presence of Nav1.8 crucially modulates conduction in cells expressing EM mutant channels. The characteristic pattern of changes in conduction velocity observed in the patient with the I848T gain-of function mutation in Nav1.7 could be explained by axonal depolarization and concomitant inactivation of Nav1.7. If this were true, activity-dependent hyperpolarization would reverse inactivation of Nav1.7 and account for the supranormal CV. This mechanism might explain normal pain thresholds under resting conditions.

  17. Flow-Velocity, Water-Temperature and Conductivity Data Collected in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, During 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 Wet Seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riscassi, Ami L.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A project within the U. S. Geological Survey Place- Based Studies Program is focused on investigation of ?Forcing Effects on Flow Structure in Vegetated Wetlands of the Everglades.? Data-collection efforts conducted within this project at three locations in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park, during the 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 wet seasons are described in this report. Techniques for collecting and processing the data and summaries of daily mean flowvelocity, water-temperature, and conductivity data are presented. The quality-checked and edited data have been compiled and stored on the USGS South Florida Information Access website.

  18. Motor unit firing rates and synchronisation affect the fractal dimension of simulated surface electromyogram during isometric/isotonic contraction of vastus lateralis muscle.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Dardanello, Davide; Rainoldi, Alberto; Boccia, Gennaro

    2016-12-01

    During fatiguing contractions, many adjustments in motor units behaviour occur: decrease in muscle fibre conduction velocity; increase in motor units synchronisation; modulation of motor units firing rate; increase in variability of motor units inter-spike interval. We simulated the influence of all these adjustments on synthetic EMG signals in isometric/isotonic conditions. The fractal dimension of the EMG signal was found mainly influenced by motor units firing behaviour, being affected by both firing rate and synchronisation level, and least affected by muscle fibre conduction velocity. None of the calculated EMG indices was able to discriminate between firing rate and motor units synchronisation. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Beneficial Effect on Cardiac Resynchronization From Left Ventricular Endocardial Pacing Is Mediated by Early Access to High Conduction Velocity Tissue: Electrophysiological Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Eoin R; Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Lee, Angela W C; Remme, Espen W; Sohal, Manav; Plank, Gernot; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Niederer, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) delivered via left ventricular (LV) endocardial pacing (ENDO-CRT) is associated with improved acute hemodynamic response compared with LV epicardial pacing (EPI-CRT). The role of cardiac anatomy and physiology in this improved response remains controversial. We used computational electrophysiological models to quantify the role of cardiac geometry, tissue anisotropy, and the presence of fast endocardial conduction on myocardial activation during ENDO-CRT and EPI-CRT. Cardiac activation was simulated using the monodomain tissue excitation model in 2-dimensional (2D) canine and human and 3D canine biventricular models. The latest activation times (LATs) for LV endocardial and biventricular epicardial tissue were calculated (LVLAT and TLAT), as well the percentage decrease in LATs for endocardial (en) versus epicardial (ep) LV pacing (defined as %dLV=100×(LVLATep-LVLATen)/LVLATep and %dT=100×(TLATep-TLATen)/TLATep, respectively). Normal canine cardiac anatomy is responsible for %dLV and %dT values of 7.4% and 5.5%, respectively. Concentric and eccentric remodeled anatomies resulted in %dT values of 15.6% and 1.3%, respectively. The 3D biventricular-paced canine model resulted in %dLV and %dT values of -7.1% and 1.5%, in contrast to the experimental observations of 16% and 11%, respectively. Adding fast endocardial conduction to this model altered %dLV and %dT to 13.1% and 10.1%, respectively. Our results provide a physiological explanation for improved response to ENDO-CRT. We predict that patients with viable fast-conducting endocardial tissue or distal Purkinje network or both, as well as concentric remodeling, are more likely to benefit from reduced ATs and increased synchrony arising from endocardial pacing. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  1. Particle deposition in a realistic geometry of the human conducting airways: Effects of inlet velocity profile, inhalation flowrate and electrostatic charge.

    PubMed

    Koullapis, P G; Kassinos, S C; Bivolarova, M P; Melikov, A K

    2016-07-26

    Understanding the multitude of factors that control pulmonary deposition is important in assessing the therapeutic or toxic effects of inhaled particles. The use of increasingly sophisticated in silico models has improved our overall understanding, but model realism remains elusive. In this work, we use Large Eddy Simulations (LES) to investigate the deposition of inhaled aerosol particles with diameters of dp=0.1,0.5,1,2.5,5 and 10μm (particle density of 1200kg/m(3)). We use a reconstructed geometry of the human airways obtained via computed tomography and assess the effects of inlet flow conditions, particle size, electrostatic charge, and flowrate. While most computer simulations assume a uniform velocity at the mouth inlet, we found that using a more realistic inlet profile based on Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements resulted in enhanced deposition, mostly on the tongue. Nevertheless, flow field differences due to the inlet conditions are largely smoothed out just a short distance downstream of the mouth inlet as a result of the complex geometry. Increasing the inhalation flowrate from sedentary to activity conditions left the mean flowfield structures largely unaffected. Nevertheless, at the higher flowrates turbulent intensities persisted further downstream in the main bronchi. For dp>2.5μm, the overall Deposition Fractions (DF) increased with flowrate due to greater inertial impaction in the oropharynx. Below dp=1.0μm, the DF was largely independent of particle size; it also increased with flowrate, but remained significantly lower. Electrostatic charge increased the overall DF of smaller particles by as much as sevenfold, with most of the increase located in the mouth-throat. Moreover, significant enhancement in deposition was found in the left and right lung sub-regions of our reconstructed geometry. Although there was a relatively small impact of inhalation flowrate on the deposition of charged particles for sizes dp<2.5μm, impaction prevailed over

  2. Dynamic instability of collective myosin II motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fang; Wang, Zi-Qing; Li, Qi-Kun; Xing, Jian-Jun; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Some kinds of muscles can oscillate spontaneously, which is related to the dynamic instability of the collective motors. Based on the two-state ratchet model and with consideration of the motor stiffness, the dynamics of collective myosin II motors are studied. It is shown that when the motor stiffness is small, the velocity of the collective motors decreases monotonically with load increasing. When the motor stiffness becomes large, dynamic instability appears in the force-velocity relationship of the collective-motor transport. For a large enough motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies in the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motor system becomes unstable before the motion is stopped, so spontaneous oscillations can be generated if the system is elastically coupled to its environment via a spring. The oscillation frequency is related to the motor stiffness, motor binding rate, spring stiffness, and the width of the ATP excitation interval. For a medium motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies outside the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motion will be stopped before the instability occurs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11205123).

  3. Acute motor axonal neuropathy cases in Van region.

    PubMed

    Sayin, R; Tombul, T; Gulec, T C; Anlar, O; Akbayram, S; Caksen, H

    2011-01-01

    Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is a form of Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS) seen in summer months in Northern China to cause epidemics. This form of the disease, which is also sporadically observed in other countries, constitutes less than 5% of GBS in Western countries. It usually develops with motor findings. No sensory findings are observed. In some of the cases, the severe impairments in tissues improve however slowly and inadequately. In the motor conduction studies of cases with AMAN, motor action potential values are lowered. On needle electromyography (EMG), motor unit potential (MUP) activity is diminished with spontaneous denervation findings. Investigations were conducted on nerve conduction of patients with GBS aged from 1 to 77 years. AMAN was detected in 25 of these patients. In our investigation, AMAN as a GBS variant was detected in 39.7% of the patients. The conduction velocities of motor nerves were in normal ranges whereas combined muscle action potentials were significantly lower. No F response could be obtained. Although AMAN is a rare variant of GBS and shows different clinical courses, it has been brought under intense scrutiny since there is high prevalance of acute inflammatory neuropathies in our region (Tab. 1, Ref. 7).

  4. Phrenic nerve conduction time in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gourie-Devi, M; Ganapathy, G R

    1985-01-01

    Phrenic nerve conduction was studied in 28 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Conduction time was prolonged in 18 (64.3%) patients and serial studies showed progressive improvement with restoration of normal values in the majority by 12 weeks. The conduction abnormalities had a positive correlation with the extent of the disease, morbidity and mortality. Phrenic nerve conduction time was found to be a more sensitive parameter than vital capacity or median nerve motor conduction velocity in assessing the severity of the disease and predicting impending ventilatory failure. Images PMID:3981193

  5. Molecular Motors and Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    The behavior of single molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin V, which move on linear filaments, involves a nontrivial coupling between the biochemical motor cycle and the stochastic movement. This coupling can be studied in the framework of nonuniform ratchet models which are characterized by spatially localized transition rates between the different internal states of the motor. These models can be classified according to their functional relationships between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecules. The simplest such relationship applies to two subclasses of models for dimeric kinesin and agrees with experimental observations on this molecular motor.

  6. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Piezoceramic Ultrasonic Motor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.S.

    1999-02-24

    The objective of this project was to team Aerotech and AlliedSignal FM and T (AS) to develop a cost-efficient process for small-batch, high performance PZT motor production. Aerotech would acquire the basic process expertise in motor fabrication, assembly, and testing from AS. Together, Aerotech and AS were to identify appropriate process improvements, focusing on raw material quality, manufacturing processes, and durability assessment. Aerotech would then design and build a motor in consultation with AS. Aerotech engineering observed motor manufacturing in the AS piezo lab and worked side by side with AS personnel to build and test a prototype motor to facilitate learning the technology. Using information from AS and hands-on experience with the AS motor drive system enabled Aerotech to design and build its own laboratory drive system to operate motors. The team compiled information to establish a potential piezo motor users' list, and an intellectual property search was conducted to understand current patent and IP (intellectual property) status of motor design. Work was initiated to identify and develop an American source for piezo motor elements; however, due to manpower restraints created by the resignation of the AS Ph.D. ceramist responsible for these tasks, the project schedule slipped. The project was subsequently terminated before significant activities were accomplished. AS did, however, provide Aerotech with contacts in Japanese industry that are willing and capable of supplying them with special design motor elements.

  8. Motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

    1986-04-15

    An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

  9. Shock wave over hand muscles: a neurophysiological study on peripheral conduction nerves in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Manganotti, Paolo; Amelio, Ernesto; Guerra, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and purpose: shock waves are defined as a sequence of single sonic pulses largely used in the treatment of bone and tendon diseases and recently on muscular hypertonia in stroke patients. Our purpose is to investigate the short and long term effect of extra-corporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the peripheral nerve conduction and central conductions from the treated muscles in normal human subjects in order to define safety criteria. Methods: we studied 10 patients normal subjects. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and F response from right ipothenar eminence (abductor digiti minimi) of the hand was recorded. Furthermore MEP latency and amplitude and central conduction from the same muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation was evaluated. In all subjects each neurophysiological measures were monitored before, immediately after, 15 minutes and after 30 minutes from the active ESWT treatment (1600 shots with an energy applied of 0.030 mj/mm2). Results: no significant short or long term changes were noted in sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction in all the subjects evaluated after ESWT. Conclusions: the ESWT has no effect on sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction. The ESWT using low level of energy represent a safety method for treating the muscles in human subjects without involvement of motor or sensory nervous trunks. Different mechanisms of action of ESWT are discussed. PMID:23738282

  10. Multimotor Driven Cargos: From Single Motor under Load to the Role of Motor-Motor Coupling.

    PubMed

    Peker, Itay; Granek, Rony

    2016-07-07

    Motor proteins constitute an essential part of the cellular machinery. They have been the subject of intensive studies in the past two decades. Yet, when several motors simultaneously carry a single cargo, the effect of motor-motor coupling, such as mutual stalling and jamming, remains unclear. We commence by constructing a general model for single motor motion, which is a product of a derived load-dependent expression and a phenomenological motor specific function. Forming the latter according to recent single molecule measurements for a given load, the model correctly predicts the motor full step-size distribution for all other measured loads. We then use our proposed model to predict transport properties of multimotor complexes, with particular attention to 1-dimensional constructs with variable flexibility, motor density, and number of motors: (i) a chain of motors connected by springs, a recently studied construction of a pair, and (ii) an array of motors all connected by identical springs to a stiff rod, which is essentially a mirror image of standard gliding motility assays. In both systems, and for any number of carrying motors, we find that, while low flexibility results in a strongly damped velocity, increased flexibility renders an almost single motor velocity. Comparing our model based simulations to recent gliding assays we find remarkable qualitative agreement. We also demonstrate consistency with other multimotor motility assays. In all cases, the characteristic spring constant, that controls the crossover behavior between high and low velocity regimes, is found to be the stalling force divided by the mean step size. We conjecture that this characteristic spring constant can serve as a tool for engineering multimotor complexes.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other motor neuron diseases.

    PubMed

    Krivickas, Lisa S

    2003-05-01

    The anterior horn cell diseases, with the exception of polio, are progressive degenerative diseases of the motor neurons. These disorders include SMA types I to III in children and familial and sporadic ALS and its variants (PMA, PLS, and PBP), Kennedy's disease, and SMA type IV in adults. The electrodiagnostic study is a crucial step in the diagnostic process for all of these disorders. In general, motor NCS may be normal or reveal low CMAP amplitudes with relatively normal conduction velocities. Sensory NCS, except in the case of Kennedy's disease, are normal. The NEE is notable for the often abundant presence of abnormal spontaneous activity, including fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves, fasciculation potentials, and complex repetitive discharges. Motor unit morphology is abnormal, with polyphasic motor units and large amplitude and duration MUAPs when the disease is slowly progressive. Recruitment in affected muscles is reduced with abnormally rapidly firing motor units. To diagnose a widespread disorder of the motor neurons, abnormalities must be present in multiple muscles with different nerve root and peripheral nerve innervation in multiple limbs. The Lambert Criteria and the El Escorial Criteria are the two most widely accepted sets of electrodiagnostic criteria for ALS. The electrodiagnostic diagnosis must be supported by appropriate history and physical examination findings and the exclusion, via neuroimaging and laboratory testing, of other diseases that may mimic a generalized disorder of the motor neurons.

  12. Conduction Aphasia, Sensory-Motor Integration, and Phonological Short-Term Memory--An Aggregate Analysis of Lesion and fMRI Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F.; Dronkers, Nina; D'Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways,…

  13. Conduction Aphasia, Sensory-Motor Integration, and Phonological Short-Term Memory--An Aggregate Analysis of Lesion and fMRI Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F.; Dronkers, Nina; D'Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways,…

  14. Transport efficiency of membrane-anchored kinesin-1 motors depends on motor density and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Rahul; Fischer, Janine; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Walter, Wilhelm J; Schwille, Petra; Diez, Stefan

    2016-11-15

    In eukaryotic cells, membranous vesicles and organelles are transported by ensembles of motor proteins. These motors, such as kinesin-1, have been well characterized in vitro as single molecules or as ensembles rigidly attached to nonbiological substrates. However, the collective transport by membrane-anchored motors, that is, motors attached to a fluid lipid bilayer, is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the influence of motors' anchorage to a lipid bilayer on the collective transport characteristics. We reconstituted "membrane-anchored" gliding motility assays using truncated kinesin-1 motors with a streptavidin-binding peptide tag that can attach to streptavidin-loaded, supported lipid bilayers. We found that the diffusing kinesin-1 motors propelled the microtubules in the presence of ATP. Notably, we found the gliding velocity of the microtubules to be strongly dependent on the number of motors and their diffusivity in the lipid bilayer. The microtubule gliding velocity increased with increasing motor density and membrane viscosity, reaching up to the stepping velocity of single motors. This finding is in contrast to conventional gliding motility assays where the density of surface-immobilized kinesin-1 motors does not influence the microtubule velocity over a wide range. We reason that the transport efficiency of membrane-anchored motors is reduced because of their slippage in the lipid bilayer, an effect that we directly observed using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Our results illustrate the importance of motor-cargo coupling, which potentially provides cells with an additional means of regulating the efficiency of cargo transport.

  15. N10 potential as an antidromic motor evoked potential in a median nerve short-latency somatosensory evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken; Mimori, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Shigenobu

    2002-01-01

    When stimulating the mixed nerve to record evoked potential, both sensory and motor fibers are activated before entering the spinal cord. The N10 potential has been described as an antidromic motor evoked potential based on results obtained by recording at the anterior midneck. In the present study, we examined the changes in latencies of Erb's potential, N10, and N13 by stimulating the median nerve distally at the wrist and proximally at the elbow. The conduction velocity of N10 calculated by the difference between N10 latencies at the two stimulation points was consistent with motor conduction velocity, although N13 conduction velocity estimated by the same method reflected a sensory conduction velocity. A positive relation was also observed between the indirect latency from the stimulation point to the anterior root as calculated using the equation (F - M - 1) / 2 (ms) and the direct latency to the negative peak of the N10 potential. Our data support the notion that N10 represents antidromic motor potential originating in the spinal entry zone of the anterior root.

  16. The effects of dietary treatment with essential fatty acids on sciatic nerve conduction and activity of the Na+/K+ pump in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, M. J.; Tomlinson, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    1. This study examined the effects of dietary essential fatty acid supplementation (5% (w/w) evening primrose oil) upon sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and 86Rb+ pumping in sciatic nerve endoneurial preparations in rats with 4 to 5 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. 2. Control diabetic rats (dietary supplementation with 5% (w/w) hydrogenated coconut oil) exhibited a reduction in motor nerve conduction velocity (16%; P less than 0.05) compared to similarly-fed non-diabetic controls, but there was no significant alteration in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ pumping, a parameter reflecting activity of the Na+/K+ pump. 3. Treatment of diabetic rats with evening primrose oil prevented completely the development of the motor nerve conduction velocity deficit without affecting the severity of diabetes. Evening primrose oil treatment did not significantly affect motor nerve conduction velocity of non-diabetic animals. 4. Evening primrose oil treatment caused a significant reduction in activity of the Na+/K+ pump in sciatic nerves of diabetic animals (45%; P less than 0.05). 5. These results suggest that the acute conduction velocity defect arising in streptozotocin-diabetic rats, and the actions of evening primrose oil upon this, are independent of any effect on activity of the Na+/K+ pump. Other putative mechanisms are discussed. PMID:1313726

  17. Prediction of Pseudo relative velocity response spectra at Yucca Mountain for underground nuclear explosions conducted in the Pahute Mesa testing area at the Nevada testing site; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), managed by the Office of Geologic Disposal of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for commercial, high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This work, intended to extend our understanding of the ground motion at Yucca Mountain resulting from testing of nuclear weapons on the NTS, was funded by the Yucca Mountain project and the Military Applications Weapons Test Program. This report summarizes one aspect of the weapons test seismic investigations conducted in FY88. Pseudo relative velocity response spectra (PSRV) have been calculated for a large body of surface ground motions generated by underground nuclear explosions. These spectra have been analyzed and fit using multiple linear regression techniques to develop a credible prediction technique for surface PSRVs. In addition, a technique for estimating downhole PSRVs at specific stations is included. A data summary, data analysis, prediction development, prediction evaluation, software summary and FORTRAN listing of the prediction technique are included in this report.

  18. Motor and cognitive aspects of motor retardation in depression.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P; Ellwanger, J

    2000-01-01

    Motor retardation is a common feature of major depressive disorder having potential prognostic and etiopathological significance. According to DSM-IV, depressed patients who meet criteria for psychomotor retardation, must exhibit motor slowing of sufficient severity to be observed by others. However, overt presentations of motor slowing cannot distinguish slowness due to cognitive factors from slowness due to neuromotor disturbances. We examined cognitive and neuromotor aspects of motor slowing in 36 depressed patients to test the hypothesis that a significant proportion of patients exhibit motor programming disturbances in addition to psychomotor impairment. A novel instrumental technique was used to assess motor programming in terms of the subject's ability to program movement velocity as a function of movement distance. A traditional psychomotor battery was combined with an instrumental measure of reaction time to assess the cognitive aspects of motor retardation. The depressed patients exhibited significant impairment on the velocity scaling measure and longer reaction times compared with nondepressed controls. Approximately 40% of the patients demonstrated abnormal psychomotor function as measured by the traditional battery; whereas over 60% exhibited some form of motor slowing as measured by the instruments. Approximately 40% of the patients exhibited parkinsonian-like motor programming deficits. A five-factor model consisting of motor measures predicted diagnosis among bipolar and unipolar depressed patients with 100% accuracy. The ability of motor measures to discriminate bipolar from unipolar patients must be viewed with caution considering the relatively small sample size of bipolar patients. These findings suggest that a subgroup of depressed patients exhibit motor retardation that is behaviorally similar to parkinsonian bradykinesia and may stem from a similar disruption within the basal ganglia.

  19. Design of a velocity and position control laboratory servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Michael A.

    1987-09-01

    In support of a course in automatic control theory, a velocity and position control laboratory servo system was designed for use in laboratory exercises. The system is constructed using a commercially available DC motor and power amplifier, which are interfaced to a student control panel. All system changes and measurements are conducted with the control panel. The system can be operated open or closed loop, in a position or velocity control mode, and has several adjustable compensators incorporated in the signal path. This thesis provides detailed construction, wiring, and system testing steps, along with the required scale drawings, necessary to perform the hardware integration. A set of laboratory procedures, example laboratory reports, and advanced servo control problems are included for instructional purposes.

  20. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-02-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs.

  1. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs. PMID:10653770

  2. Occupational exposure to pesticides and nerve conduction studies among Korean farmers.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Kyeong; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Gyu Taek; Lee, Won Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether occupational exposure to pesticides was associated with decreased nerve conduction studies among farmers. On 2 separate occasions, the authors performed a cross-sectional study of a group of 31 male farmers who periodically applied pesticides. The study included questionnaire interviews and nerve conduction studies on the median, ulnar, posterior tibial, peroneal, and sural nerves. Although all mean values remained within laboratory normal limits, significant differences between the first and second tests were found in sensory conduction velocities on the median and sural nerves, and motor conduction velocities on the posterior tibial nerve. Lifetime days of pesticide application was negatively associated with nerve conduction velocities at most nerves after adjusting for potential confounders. These findings may reflect a link between occupational pesticide exposure and peripheral neurophysiologic abnormality that deserves further evaluation.

  3. Locomotion of chemically powered autonomous nanowire motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Longqiu; Li, Tianlong; Zhang, Guangyu; Sun, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Physical insights on the hydrodynamics and locomotion of self-propelled nanowire motor under nonequilibrium steady state are investigated using finite element method in accordance with hybrid molecular dynamics/multiparticle collision dynamics and rigid body dynamics. Nanowire motor is discretized into finite segments, and forces of solvent molecule acting on the motor are assumed to be the sum of forces acting on all segments of the motor. We show that the locomotion of nanowire motor is mainly determined by the imbalance forces acting on the catalytic and noncatalytic segments. The average velocity along the axis increases significantly as a function of time prior to reaching equilibrium. The length of nanowire motor shows negligible effect on the velocity of the motor. Preliminary experimental results are provided to validate the current model.

  4. Motor function and incident dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Jacqueline Kathleen; Speechley, Mark; Lingum, Navena Rebecca; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    cognitive and mobility decline are interrelated processes, whereby mobility decline coincides or precedes the onset of cognitive decline. to assess whether there is an association between performance on motor function tests and incident dementia. electronic database, grey literature and hand searching identified studies testing for associations between baseline motor function and incident dementia in older adults. of 2,540 potentially relevant documents, 37 met the final inclusion criteria and were reviewed qualitatively. Three meta-analyses were conducted using data from 10 studies. Three main motor domains-upper limb motor function, parkinsonism and lower limb motor function-emerged as associated with increased risk of incident dementia. Studies including older adults without neurological overt disease found a higher risk of incident dementia associated with poorer performance on composite motor function scores, balance and gait velocity (meta-analysis pooled HR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.41, 2.65). Mixed results were found across different study samples for upper limb motor function, overall parkinsonism (meta-analysis pooled OR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.31, 7.08), bradykinesia and rigidity. Studies restricted to older adults with Parkinson's Disease found weak or no association with incident dementia even for motor domains highly associated in less restrictive samples. Tremor was not associated with an increased risk of dementia in any population (meta-analysis pooled HR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.31, 2.03). lower limb motor function was associated with increased risk of developing dementia, while tremor and hand grip strength were not. Our results support future research investigating the inclusion of quantitative motor assessment, specifically gait velocity tests, for clinical dementia risk evaluation.

  5. Normative Data for Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Young Adults from Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjinder; Gupta, Sharat; Singh, Kamal Dev; Kumar, Avnish

    2017-08-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCSs) are essential for diagnosing various kinds of focal and diffuse neuropathies. Due to the paucity of local NCS data, electrodiagnostic laboratories in Punjab rely on values from Western and other Indian studies. This study was conducted to provide normative data for median nerve conduction parameters (motor and sensory) in Punjabi populace. A cross-sectional study was done on 290 participants (150 males and 140 females), aged 17-21 years, as per standardized protocol. The data were analyzed separately for both genders using SPSS version 20. It consisted of distal latencies and conduction velocities of motor and sensory divisions of median nerve. Student's unpaired t-test was used for statistical analysis. There was no effect of gender on any of the median nerve conduction parameters. Height and weight had nonsignificant negative and positive correlation, respectively (P > 0.05), with conduction velocity in both motor and sensory median nerves. For median motor nerve, the values of distal latency and conduction velocity in males were 2.9 ± 0.16 ms and 60.25 ± 2.99 m/s, respectively, whereas, in females, they were 2.6 ± 0.43 ms and 59.83 ± 2.82 m/s. Similarly, for median sensory nerve, the latency and velocity values in males were 2.8 ± 0.56 ms and 54.81 ± 3.70 m/s, whereas, in females, they were 2.4 ± 0.33 ms and 54.56 ± 3.65 m/s, respectively. The data in this study compared favorably with already existing data. It would help the local electrodiagnostic laboratories in assessing the median nerve abnormalities with greater accuracy in this population subset.

  6. Distinct transport regimes for two elastically coupled molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2012-05-18

    Cooperative cargo transport by two molecular motors involves an elastic motor-motor coupling, which can reduce the motors' velocity and/or enhance their unbinding from the filament. We show theoretically that these interference effects lead, in general, to four distinct transport regimes. In addition to a weak coupling regime, kinesin and dynein motors are found to exhibit a strong coupling and an enhanced unbinding regime, whereas myosin motors are predicted to attain a reduced velocity regime. All of these regimes, which we derive by explicit calculations and general time scale arguments, can be explored experimentally by varying the elastic coupling strength.

  7. Theta-burst stimulation over primary motor cortex degrades early motor learning.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Ennio; Suppa, Antonio; Conte, Antonella; Agostino, Rocco; Nardella, Andrea; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2010-02-01

    Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) is currently used for inducing long-lasting changes in primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. More information is needed on how M1 is involved in early motor learning (practice-related improvement in motor performance, motor retention and motor consolidation). We investigated whether inhibitory continuous TBS (cTBS) is an effective experimental approach for modulating early motor learning of a simple finger movement in healthy humans. In a short task, 11 subjects practised 160 movements, and in a longer task also testing motor consolidation ten subjects practised 600 movements. During both experiments subjects randomly received real or sham cTBS over the left M1. Motor evoked potentials were tested at baseline and 7 min after cTBS. In the 160-movement experiment to test motor retention, 20 movements were repeated 30 min after motor practice ended. In the 600-movement experiment motor retention was assessed 15 and 30 min after motor practice ended, motor consolidation was tested by performing 20 movements 24 h after motor practice ended. Kinematic variables - movement amplitude, peak velocity and peak acceleration - were measured. cTBS significantly reduced the practice-related improvement in motor performance of finger movements in the experiment involving 160 movements and in the first part of the experiment involving 600 movements. After cTBS, peak velocity and peak acceleration of the 20 movements testing motor retention decreased whereas those testing motor consolidation remained unchanged. cTBS over M1 degrades practice-related improvement in motor performance and motor retention, but not motor consolidation of a voluntary finger movement.

  8. Twitch and tetanic properties of human thenar motor units paralyzed by chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Häger-Ross, C K; Klein, C S; Thomas, C K

    2006-07-01

    Little is known about how human motor units respond to chronic paralysis. Our aim was to record surface electromyographic (EMG) signals, twitch forces, and tetanic forces from paralyzed motor units in the thenar muscles of individuals (n = 12) with chronic (1.5-19 yr) cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Each motor unit was activated by intraneural stimulation of its motor axon using single pulses and trains of pulses at frequencies between 5 and 100 Hz. Paralyzed motor units (n = 48) had small EMGs and weak tetanic forces (n = 32 units) but strong twitch forces, resulting in half-maximal force being achieved at a median of only 8 Hz. The distributions for cumulative twitch and tetanic forces also separated less for paralyzed units than for control units, indicating that increases in stimulation frequency made a smaller relative contribution to the total force output in paralyzed muscles. Paralysis also induced slowing of conduction velocities, twitch contraction times and EMG durations. However, the elevated ratios between the twitch and the tetanic forces, but not contractile speed, correlated significantly with the extent to which unit force summated in response to different frequencies of stimulation. Despite changes in the absolute values of many electrical and mechanical properties of paralyzed motor units, most of the distributions shifted uniformly relative to those of thenar units obtained from control subjects. Thus human thenar muscles paralyzed by SCI retain a population of motor units with heterogeneous contractile properties because chronic paralysis influenced all of the motor units similarly.

  9. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  10. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  11. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP],…), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  12. Student Conduct and Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    To aid Oregon's school districts in developing policies and procedures for student conduct and discipline, this document suggests guidelines for district preparation and distribution of student conduct codes, including formal and informal student assembly, dress and grooming, use of motor vehicles, search and seizure, attendance, freedom of…

  13. Is Conductive Education Transplantable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bairstow, Phillip; Cochrane, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    This article highlights difficulties in replicating the Andras Peto Institute for Motor Disorders in Hungary by establishing the Birmingham (England) Institute for Conductive Education, for children with cerebral palsy. Difficulties included a lack of conductive education principles in clear English, failure to properly identify children who could…

  14. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  15. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  16. Motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  17. Immunity to nerve growth factor and the effect on motor unit reinnervation in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, D I; Luff, A R; Schuijers, J A

    1992-05-01

    The trophic effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on sympathetic, peripheral afferent, and other neural crest-derived cells have been intensively investigated. More recently, NGF has been shown to have an influence on motoneurons. This study was undertaken to investigate whether NGF had any influence on the mechanical or histological properties of reinnervated motor units. Three groups of rabbits were used: normal rabbits, rabbits in which the nerve to medial gastrocnemius (MG) was cut and allowed to reinnervate for 56 days, and rabbits in which the MG nerve reinnervated in the presence of immunity to NGF. Immunity to NGF did not affect the ability of motor axons to reinnervate a muscle, nor were the contractile characteristics of the motor units altered. The size of horseradish peroxidase-labeled motoneurons was not influenced by immunization against NGF; however, the distribution of afferent neuron sizes was altered. Conduction velocity of motor axons proximal to the neuroma was significantly faster after immunization against NGF. Transection and subsequent reinnervation by a peripheral nerve normally causes an increase in myelin thickness proximal to the neuroma. However, immunization against NGF appeared to decrease the magnitude of myelin thickening. It was concluded that immunization against NGF affects motor axonal conduction velocity via an influence on the neural crest-derived Schwann cells.

  18. Optimal working frequency of ultrasonic motors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weijia; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Jie; Yao, Yu

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the existence of the optimal working frequency for ultrasonic motors (USMs) is theoretically and experimentally verified for the first time, at which working point the power dissipation of the motors arrives at its minimum value. The mathematical model of the mechanical quality factor is initially deduced to evaluate the loss level, because it shows an opposite tendency with losses. The derivative of the mechanical quality factor can be subsequently arrived at with the aid of the phenomenon model of the phase of the admittance. The theoretical derivation infers that the maximum value of the mechanical quality factor exists almost around the average value of the frequency of maximum conductance and the frequency of maximum resistance. Then the input power of the USM is measured under the constant velocity condition, which is supposed to counteract the loss; that is, the loss can be therefore evaluated experimentally. Measurements infer that the power dissipation of the motor reaches the minimum value around the calculated optimal working frequency. In other word, it is proven that the USM maintains an optimal working frequency from the loss reduction view point.

  19. Dynamics of Motorized Vehicle Flow under Mixed Traffic Circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Wei; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Dong-Fan

    2011-04-01

    To study the dynamics of mixed traffic flow consisting of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, a car-following model based on the principle of collision free and cautious driving is proposed. Lateral friction and overlapping driving are introduced to describe the interactions between motorized vehicles and non-motorized vehicles. By numerical simulations, the flux-density relation, the temporal-spatial dynamics, and the velocity evolution are investigated in detail. The results indicate non-motorized vehicles have a significant impact on the motorized vehicle flow and cause the maximum flux to decline by about 13%. Non-motorized vehicles can decrease the motorized vehicle velocity and cause velocity oscillation when the motorized vehicle density is low. Moreover, non-motorized vehicles show a significant damping effect on the oscillating velocity when the density is medium and high, and such an effect weakens as motorized vehicle density increases. The results also stress the necessity for separating motorized vehicles from non-motorized vehicles.

  20. [An analysis of characteristics of nerve conduction in 154 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Y T; Cui, F; Yang, F; Chen, Z H; Ling, L; Huang, X S

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To analyze the features of nerve conduction in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and explore the correlation between compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and disease duration and revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R). Methods: Standard motor and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed in 154 patients with ALS. The following parameters were collected including CMAP amplitude, distal motor latency (DML), motor conduction velocity, sensory conduction velocity and sensory nerve action potential amplitude. Regression study was done to explore the correlation between CMAP amplitude and disease duration and ALSFRS-R. Results: Motor nerve conduction abnormalities were presented in a majority of the patients with prolonged DML in the tibial nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve as the most common form (61.06%-81.42%), followed by decreased CMAP amplitude (30.12%-53.98%), decreased MCV (12.05%-16.81%) and absence of CMAP (2.65%-9.73%). Sensory nerve conduction abnormalities were detected in a small proportion of patients and the decreased SCV, decreased SNAP amplitude and absence of SNAP in the sural nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve were found in 1.22%-2.73%, 0-1.82% and 0-1.22% patients respectively. No correlation was found between CMAP of the common peroneal nerve, tibial nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve and the disease duration (P>0.05), while significant positive correlation was established between CMAP amplitude of the median nerve and ulnar nerve and ALSFRS-R (r=0.273, P=0.016; r=0.357, P=0.001). Conclusions: Motor nerve conduction is abnormal in a majority of ALS patients with prolonged DML as the most common form, while abnormal sensory nerve conduction is only found in a few of ALS patients. CMAP amplitude of the median nerve and ulnar nerve might be of certain clinical value in evaluating the severity of ALS.

  1. Center of pressure velocity reflects body acceleration rather than body velocity during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Abe, Masaki O; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the center of pressure (COP) velocity reflects the center of mass (COM) acceleration due to a large derivative gain in the neural control system during quiet standing. Twenty-seven young (27.2±4.5 years) and twenty-three elderly (66.2±5.0 years) subjects participated in this study. Each subject was requested to stand quietly on a force plate for five trials, each 90 s long. The COP and COM displacements, the COP and COM velocities, and the COM acceleration were acquired via a force plate and a laser displacement sensor. The amount of fluctuation of each variable was quantified using the root mean square. Following the experimental study, a simulation study was executed to investigate the experimental findings. The experimental results revealed that the COP velocity was correlated with the COM velocity, but more highly correlated with the COM acceleration. The equation of motion of the inverted pendulum model, however, accounts only for the correlation between the COP and COM velocities. These experimental results can be meaningfully explained by the simulation study, which indicated that the neural motor command presumably contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity. In conclusion, the COP velocity fluctuation reflects the COM acceleration fluctuation rather than the COM velocity fluctuation, implying that the neural motor command controlling quiet standing posture contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity.

  2. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  3. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  4. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  5. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  6. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  7. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srikanteswara, Praveen Kumar; Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D; Agadi, Jagadish B; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-07-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson's classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel's and Phalen's sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had mild CTS, 25 (50%) had moderate CTS and 9 (18%) had

  8. Motor imagery facilitates force field learning.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Nabeel; Tomi, Naoki; Ito, Koji

    2011-06-13

    Humans have the ability to produce an internal reproduction of a specific motor action without any overt motor output. Recent findings show that the processes underlying motor imagery are similar to those active during motor execution and both share common neural substrates. This suggests that the imagery of motor movements might play an important role in acquiring new motor skills. In this study we used haptic robot in conjunction with motor imagery technique to improve learning in a robot-based adaptation task. Two groups of subjects performed reaching movements with or without motor imagery in a velocity-dependent and position-dependent mixed force field. The groups performed movements with motor imagery produced higher after effects and decreased muscle co-contraction with respect to no-motor imagery group. These results showed a positive influence of motor imagery on acquiring new motor skill and suggest that motor learning can be facilitated by mental practice and could be used to increase the rate of adaptation.

  9. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  10. Molecular Motors: Power Strokes Outperform Brownian Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Jason A; Dill, Ken A

    2016-07-07

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy (typically from ATP hydrolysis) to directed motion and mechanical work. Their actions are often described in terms of "Power Stroke" (PS) and "Brownian Ratchet" (BR) mechanisms. Here, we use a transition-state model and stochastic thermodynamics to describe a range of mechanisms ranging from PS to BR. We incorporate this model into Hill's diagrammatic method to develop a comprehensive model of motor processivity that is simple but sufficiently general to capture the full range of behavior observed for molecular motors. We demonstrate that, under all conditions, PS motors are faster, more powerful, and more efficient at constant velocity than BR motors. We show that these differences are very large for simple motors but become inconsequential for complex motors with additional kinetic barrier steps.

  11. Ultrasonic Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Nakamura, M. K. Kurosawa , and S. Ueha, "Characteristics of a Hybrid Transducer-Type Ultrasonic Motor," IEEE Trans. Ultrason.Ferroelec. Freq., vol. 44...pp. 823-828, 1997. [12] M. K. Kurosawa , T. Morita, and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Ultrasonic Micromotor Based on PZT Thin Film," IEEE Ultrasonics...Symposium, vol. 1, pp. 549-552, 1994. [13] T. Morita, M. K. Kurosawa , and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Using PZT Thin Film

  12. Optical Pickup Feeding Velocity Profile Design of Optical Disk Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Juhn Ho; Seo, Heui-Sik; Lee, Jung Joon; Min, Byunghoon; Son, Heuigi

    2001-03-01

    Residual vibrations and jerks of a pickup body caused by the flexibility of an optical pickup feeding system in optical disk storage may degrade the quality of reading and writing, and increase the track access time. In this study, a feeding velocity profile that suppresses the residual vibrations and jerks is calculated and applied to a stepping-motor-driven feeding system. The calculated feeding velocity profile shows good results compared to the conventional feeding velocity profile of trapezoidal shape.

  13. A sensory-motor control model of animal flight explains why bats fly differently in light versus dark.

    PubMed

    Bar, Nadav S; Skogestad, Sigurd; Marçal, Jose M; Ulanovsky, Nachum; Yovel, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    Animal flight requires fine motor control. However, it is unknown how flying animals rapidly transform noisy sensory information into adequate motor commands. Here we developed a sensorimotor control model that explains vertebrate flight guidance with high fidelity. This simple model accurately reconstructed complex trajectories of bats flying in the dark. The model implies that in order to apply appropriate motor commands, bats have to estimate not only the angle-to-target, as was previously assumed, but also the angular velocity ("proportional-derivative" controller). Next, we conducted experiments in which bats flew in light conditions. When using vision, bats altered their movements, reducing the flight curvature. This change was explained by the model via reduction in sensory noise under vision versus pure echolocation. These results imply a surprising link between sensory noise and movement dynamics. We propose that this sensory-motor link is fundamental to motion control in rapidly moving animals under different sensory conditions, on land, sea, or air.

  14. The Study of Diagnostic Efficacy of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin; Kashikar, Aditi; Shende, Vinod; Waghmare, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical Radiculopathy (CR) is a neurologic condition characterised by dysfunction of a cervical spinal nerve, the roots of the nerve, or both. Diagnostic criteria for CR are not well defined, and no universally accepted criteria for its diagnosis have been established. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation are the different modalities to diagnose CR. The incidence of Cervical Spondylosis and related conditions is increasing in the present scenario and the use of radiologic examination is time consuming and uneconomical for the common Indian setup. Thus, there is a definite need to establish a cost effective, reliable, and accurate means for establishing the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Electrodiagnostic tests are the closest to fulfill these criteria. Aim: To evaluate diagnostic utility of various motor and sensory nerve conduction study parameters in cervical radiculopathy. Setting and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted on 100 subjects of age > 40 years. Material and Methods: The consecutive patients clinically diagnosed to have cervical radiculopathy, referred from department of Orthopaedics were prospectively recruited for the motor and sensory nerve conduction study using RMS EMG EP Mark-II. Parameters studied were Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP), Distal Motor Latency (DML) and Conduction Velocity (CV) for motor nerves and Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) and CV for sensory nerves. Statistical Analysis: Study observations and results were analysed to find the Specificity, Sensitivity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value using SPSS 16.0. Results: Among various motor nerve conduction parameters CMAP was found to be more sensitive with high positive predicative value. CV was found to have greater specificity and DML had least negative predictive value. Sensory nerve conduction parameters were found to have less sensitivity but higher specificity as compared

  15. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  16. Motor Planning.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron L; Haith, Adrian M; Krakauer, John W

    2015-08-01

    Motor planning colloquially refers to any process related to the preparation of a movement that occurs during the reaction time prior to movement onset. However, this broad definition encompasses processes that are not strictly motor-related, such as decision-making about the identity of task-relevant stimuli in the environment. Furthermore, the assumption that all motor-planning processes require processing time, and can therefore be studied behaviorally by measuring changes in the reaction time, needs to be reexamined. In this review, we take a critical look at the processes leading from perception to action and suggest a definition of motor planning that encompasses only those processes necessary for a movement to be executed-that is, processes that are strictly movement related. These processes resolve the ambiguity inherent in an abstract goal by defining a specific movement to achieve it. We propose that the majority of processes that meet this definition can be completed nearly instantaneously, which means that motor planning itself in fact consumes only a small fraction of the reaction time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Universal aspects of the chemomechanical coupling for molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, R

    2000-11-13

    The directed movement of molecular motors is studied theoretically within a general class of nonuniform ratchet models in which the motor can attain M internal states and undergo transitions between these states at K spatial locations. The functional relationship between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecule is analyzed for arbitrary values of M and K. This relationship is found to exhibit universal features which depend on the number of unbalanced transitions per motor cycle arising from the enzymatic motor activity. This agrees with experimental results on dimeric kinesin and is predicted to apply to other cytoskeletal motors.

  18. Delineating cooperative responses of processive motors in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Artem K.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Tsao, David S.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Diehl, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the collective functions of cytoskeletal motors is critical to understanding mechanisms that regulate the internal organization of eukaryotic cells as well as the roles various transport defects play in human diseases. Though in vitro assays using synthetic motor complexes have generated important insights, dissecting collective motor functions within living cells still remains challenging. Here, we show that the protein heterodimerization switches FKBP-rapalog-FRB can be harnessed in engineered COS-7 cells to compare the collective responses of kinesin-1 and myosinVa motors to changes in motor number and cargo size. The dependence of cargo velocities, travel distances, and position noise on these parameters suggests that multiple myosinVa motors can cooperate more productively than collections of kinesins in COS-7 cells. In contrast to observations with kinesin-1 motors, the velocities and run lengths of peroxisomes driven by multiple myosinVa motors are found to increase with increasing motor density, but are relatively insensitive to the higher loads associated with transporting large peroxisomes in the viscoelastic environment of the COS-7 cell cytoplasm. Moreover, these distinctions appear to be derived from the different sensitivities of kinesin-1 and myosinVa velocities and detachment rates to forces at the single-motor level. The collective behaviors of certain processive motors, like myosinVa, may therefore be more readily tunable and have more substantial roles in intracellular transport regulatory mechanisms compared with those of other cytoskeletal motors. PMID:24402168

  19. Delineating cooperative responses of processive motors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem K; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Tsao, David S; Bookwalter, Carol S; Trybus, Kathleen M; Diehl, Michael R

    2014-01-21

    Characterizing the collective functions of cytoskeletal motors is critical to understanding mechanisms that regulate the internal organization of eukaryotic cells as well as the roles various transport defects play in human diseases. Though in vitro assays using synthetic motor complexes have generated important insights, dissecting collective motor functions within living cells still remains challenging. Here, we show that the protein heterodimerization switches FKBP-rapalog-FRB can be harnessed in engineered COS-7 cells to compare the collective responses of kinesin-1 and myosinVa motors to changes in motor number and cargo size. The dependence of cargo velocities, travel distances, and position noise on these parameters suggests that multiple myosinVa motors can cooperate more productively than collections of kinesins in COS-7 cells. In contrast to observations with kinesin-1 motors, the velocities and run lengths of peroxisomes driven by multiple myosinVa motors are found to increase with increasing motor density, but are relatively insensitive to the higher loads associated with transporting large peroxisomes in the viscoelastic environment of the COS-7 cell cytoplasm. Moreover, these distinctions appear to be derived from the different sensitivities of kinesin-1 and myosinVa velocities and detachment rates to forces at the single-motor level. The collective behaviors of certain processive motors, like myosinVa, may therefore be more readily tunable and have more substantial roles in intracellular transport regulatory mechanisms compared with those of other cytoskeletal motors.

  20. Brownian motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, P.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, F.

    2005-02-01

    In systems possessing a spatial or dynamical symmetry breaking, thermal Brownian motion combined with unbiased, non-equilibrium noise gives rise to a channelling of chance that can be used to exercise control over systems at the micro- and even on the nano-scale. This theme is known as the Brownian motor concept. The constructive role of (the generally overdamped) Brownian motion is exemplified for a noise-induced transport of particles within various set-ups. We first present the working principles and characteristics with a proof-of-principle device, a diffusive temperature Brownian motor. Next, we consider very recent applications based on the phenomenon of signal mixing. The latter is particularly simple to implement experimentally in order to optimize and selectively control a rich variety of directed transport behaviors. The subtleties and also the potential for Brownian motors operating in the quantum regime are outlined and some state-of-the-art applications, together with future roadways, are presented.

  1. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  2. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  3. Transport efficiency of membrane-anchored kinesin-1 motors depends on motor density and diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Rahul; Fischer, Janine; Schwarz, Friedrich W.; Walter, Wilhelm J.; Schwille, Petra; Diez, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, membranous vesicles and organelles are transported by ensembles of motor proteins. These motors, such as kinesin-1, have been well characterized in vitro as single molecules or as ensembles rigidly attached to nonbiological substrates. However, the collective transport by membrane-anchored motors, that is, motors attached to a fluid lipid bilayer, is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the influence of motors’ anchorage to a lipid bilayer on the collective transport characteristics. We reconstituted “membrane-anchored” gliding motility assays using truncated kinesin-1 motors with a streptavidin-binding peptide tag that can attach to streptavidin-loaded, supported lipid bilayers. We found that the diffusing kinesin-1 motors propelled the microtubules in the presence of ATP. Notably, we found the gliding velocity of the microtubules to be strongly dependent on the number of motors and their diffusivity in the lipid bilayer. The microtubule gliding velocity increased with increasing motor density and membrane viscosity, reaching up to the stepping velocity of single motors. This finding is in contrast to conventional gliding motility assays where the density of surface-immobilized kinesin-1 motors does not influence the microtubule velocity over a wide range. We reason that the transport efficiency of membrane-anchored motors is reduced because of their slippage in the lipid bilayer, an effect that we directly observed using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Our results illustrate the importance of motor–cargo coupling, which potentially provides cells with an additional means of regulating the efficiency of cargo transport. PMID:27803325

  4. Collective dynamics of interacting molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Campàs, O; Kafri, Y; Zeldovich, K B; Casademunt, J; Joanny, J-F

    2006-07-21

    The collective dynamics of N interacting processive molecular motors are considered theoretically when an external force is applied to the leading motor. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the force-velocity curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from those of a simple approach where the motors equally share the force. Moreover, they become essentially independent of the number of motors if N is large enough (N> or approximately 5 for conventional kinesin). We show that a two-state ratchet model has a very similar behavior to that of the coarse-grained lattice model with effective interactions. The general picture is unaffected by motor attachment and detachment events.

  5. Motor-operator gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, we compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators we tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  6. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-12-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  7. 48 CFR 945.570-8 - Reporting motor vehicle data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting motor vehicle... Reporting motor vehicle data. (a) Contractors conducting motor vehicle operations shall forward annually (on or before December 1) to the contracting officer their plan for acquisition of motor vehicles for...

  8. 48 CFR 945.570-8 - Reporting motor vehicle data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting motor vehicle... Reporting motor vehicle data. (a) Contractors conducting motor vehicle operations shall forward annually (on or before December 1) to the contracting officer their plan for acquisition of motor vehicles for...

  9. 48 CFR 945.570-8 - Reporting motor vehicle data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting motor vehicle... Reporting motor vehicle data. (a) Contractors conducting motor vehicle operations shall forward annually (on or before December 1) to the contracting officer their plan for acquisition of motor vehicles for...

  10. Failure analysis of solid rocket apogee motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis followed five selected motors through initial design, development, test, qualification, manufacture, and final flight reports. An audit was conducted at the manufacturing plants to complement the literature search with firsthand observations of the current philosophies and practices that affect reliability of the motors. A second literature search emphasized acquisition of spacecraft and satellite data bearing on solid motor reliability. It was concluded that present practices at the plants yield highly reliable flight hardware. Reliability can be further improved by new developments of aft-end bonding and initiator/igniter nondestructive test methods, a safe/arm device, and an insulation formulation. Minimum diagnostic instrumentation is recommended for all motor flights. Surplus motors should be used in margin testing. Criteria should be established for pressure and zone curing. The motor contractor should be represented at launch. New design analyses should be made of stretched motors and spacecraft/motor pairs.

  11. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  13. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  14. Three-dimensional velocity measurements using LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben

    The design requirements for and development of an LDA that measures the three components of the fluid velocity vector are described. The problems encountered in LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows, multivariate response, velocity bias, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and dynamic range, are discussed. The use of the fringe and/or the reference beam methods to measure the three velocity components, and the use of color, frequency shift, and polarization to separate three velocity projections are examined. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation, the presentation of three-dimensional LDA data, and the possibility of three-dimensional bias correction. Procedures for conducting three-dimensional LDA measurements are proposed.

  15. Ignition transient calculations in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  16. Ignition Transient Calculations in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  17. CAG repeat size correlates to electrophysiological motor and sensory phenotypes in SBMA.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yu; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Mizuki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Yamashita, Fumitada; Hori, Norio; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hirayama, Masaaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2008-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset, lower motor neuron disease caused by an aberrant elongation of a CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The main symptoms are weakness and atrophy of bulbar, facial and limb muscles, but sensory disturbances are frequently found in SBMA patients. Motor symptoms have been attributed to the accumulation of mutant AR in the nucleus of lower motor neurons, which is more profound in patients with a longer CAG repeat. We examined nerve conduction properties including F-waves in a total of 106 patients with genetically confirmed SBMA (mean age at data collection = 53.8 years; range = 31-75 years) and 85 control subjects. Motor conduction velocities (MCV), compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), sensory conduction velocities (SCV) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) were significantly decreased in all nerves examined in the SBMA patients compared with that in the normal controls, indicating that axonal degeneration is the primary process in both motor and sensory nerves. More profound abnormalities were observed in the nerves of the upper limbs than in those of the lower limbs. F-waves in the median nerve were absent in 30 of 106 cases (28.3%), but no cases of absent F-waves were observed in the tibial nerve. From an analysis of the relationship between CMAPs and SNAPs, patients were identified with different electrophysiological phenotypes: motor-dominant, sensory-dominant and non-dominant phenotypes. The CAG repeat size and the age at onset were significantly different among the patients with motor- and sensory-dominant phenotypes, indicating that a longer CAG repeat is more closely linked to the motor-dominant phenotype and a shorter CAG repeat is more closely linked to the sensory-dominant phenotype. Furthermore, when we classified the patients by CAG repeat size, CMAP values showed a tendency to be decreased in patients with a longer CAG repeat (> or =47), while SNAPs were significantly

  18. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  19. Solar-wind velocity decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geranios, A.

    1980-08-01

    A model is developed to account for the solar wind electron and proton temperature decreases observed following the passage of an interplanetary shock wave and during the velocity decrease of a solar wind stream. The equations of mass and energy conservation are solved for a fully ionized, electrically neutral plasma expanding radially and spherically symmetrically, taking into account the heat flux from the solor corona to the plasma along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron thermal conductivity. An analytical relationship between the temperature and the velocity of the solar wind plasma is obtained which is found to be in agreement with experimental measurements made by the Vela 5 and 6 and IMP 6 satellites from August 1969-May 1974. It is thus proposed that the observed low plasma temperatures are due to the fact that the temperature decrease of the expanding plasma exceeds the heat gain due to thermal conduction from the corona.

  20. High efficiency motor rewind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. K.; Spee, R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of performing this work was to evaluate a new technology used for rewinding electric motors. Motor performance evaluation was conducted at the motor test facility at Oregon State University. The test program consisted of comparing new high efficiency motor technology and standard rewind technology with the Unity-Plus system. The Unity-Plus configuration exhibited reduced efficiency over the complete load range compared to the other motors. Appropriately sized capacitors connected to the terminals of the conventional induction motor produced the same power factor improvement as the Unity-Plus system. Torque production and torque pulsation were very similar for all systems. The Unity-Plus configuration drew lower starting currents but the duration of the starting transient was increased. Motor temperature rise was about the same for all systems. Noise levels were about the same in all systems. Although determination of time to failure was not undertaken, the expected lifetime of the Unit-Plus system is probably less due to higher capacitor stress and higher insulation stress. The investigation concludes that a conventional induction motor with terminal capacitors is the most acceptable way of obtaining good efficiency and power factor and the Unity-Plus system cannot be recommended on the basis of any of the evaluation criteria used in this study.

  1. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P < 0.001). These results confirmed that patients with obstructive sleep apnea had significantly lower amplitudes of evoked action potentials of both motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  2. Analysis of Tiny Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Linear Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyun‑Phill; Lee, Kyong‑Jae; Yoo, Kyoung‑Ho; Kang, Chong‑Yun; Kim, Sangsig; Yoon, Seok‑Jin

    2006-05-01

    A modified structure for tiny ultrasonic linear motors has been developed, and various shaft materials have been tested in order to improve dynamic properties. The shaft material has a direct influence on efficiency, reliability, and quality of the motors and their dynamic properties. The shaft material is crucial to achieve high performance. Shafts of with various materials, such as a stainless steel, stainless steel coated with diamond like carbon (DLC), a Pyrex, and a graphite, can make it possible to improve dynamic properties of the motors over a wide range of tribological conditions. For the motor with a stainless steel shaft coated with DLC at 47 kHz, its velocity is 6.5 mm/s and its force is 110 mN. When the motor has a Pyrex shaft, a force of 140 mN is reached at 52 kHz. Accordingly, the maximum force produced by a motor with a graphite shaft is estimated as 97 mN. The velocity of this motor was 15 mm/s. We found that graphite has a fine surface and a directional texture which can help a moving element achieve linear motion. Finally, the use of a cap resulted in significantly improving stable operation. A motor with a graphite or a Pyrex shaft showed very stable operation and improved dynamic characteristics.

  3. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  4. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  5. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-15

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  6. A CFD study of Screw Compressor Motor Cooling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, S.

    2017-08-01

    Screw compressors use electric motors to drive the male screw rotor. They are cooled by the suction refrigerant vapor that flows around the motor. The thermal conditions of the motor can dramatically influence the performance and reliability of the compressor. The more optimized this flow path is, the better the motor performance. For that reason it is important to understand the flow characteristics around the motor and the motor temperatures. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to provide a detailed analysis of the refrigerant’s flow behavior and motor temperatures to identify the undesirable hot spots in the motor. CFD analysis can be used further to optimize the flow path and determine the reduction of hot spots and cooling effect. This study compares the CFD solutions of a motor cooling model to a motor installed with thermocouples measured in the lab. The compressor considered for this study is an R134a screw compressor. The CFD simulation of the motor consists of a detailed breakdown of the stator and rotor components. Orthotropic thermal conductivity material properties are used to represent the simplified motor geometry. In addition, the analysis includes the motor casings of the compressor to draw heat away from the motor by conduction. The study will look at different operating conditions and motor speeds. Finally, the CFD study will investigate the predicted motor temperature change by varying the vapor mass flow rates and motor speed. Recommendations for CFD modeling of such intricate heat transfer phenomenon have thus been proposed.

  7. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  8. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  9. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  10. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  11. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff electrodes. The timing of laminectomy was based on the presence of regenerating fibres along the nerve within the tibial cuff. Stimulation of unlesioned tibial nerves (n = 6) evoked the largest motor response in S1 ventral root and the largest sensory response in L7 dorsal root. Growth rates were compared by mapping the regenerating nerve fibres within the tibial nerve cuff to all ventral or dorsal roots and, regardless of the lesion type, the fastest growth was similar in sensory and motor fibres. Maturation was assessed as recovery of the maximum motor and sensory conduction velocities (CVs) within the tibial nerve cuff. Throughout the observation period the CV was approximately 14% faster in regenerated sensory fibres than in motor fibres in accordance with the difference observed in control nerves. Recovery of amplitude was only partial after section, whereas the root distribution pattern was restored. Our data suggest that the fastest growth and maturation rates that can be achieved during regeneration are similar for motor and sensory myelinated fibres.

  12. Motor units in cross-reinnervated fast and slow twitch muscle of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bagust, J; Lewis, D M; Westerman, R A

    1981-01-01

    1. Isometric contractile properties of motor units were measured in cross-reinnervated fast (flexor digitorum longus) and slow (soleus) twitch muscles of the cat. All but one cross was at least 95% pure. 2. There was a reduction in the number of motor units in all muscles, but totals remained about equal in cross-reinnervated soleus and flexor digitorum longus. 3. Motor unit tensions (mean and maximum values) were higher in cross-reinnervated soleus than in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, reversing the differences between normal muscles. This was due to increases in muscle mass and in the tension developed per unit cross-sectional area. There were motor unit tensions larger and smaller than those seen in normal muscle, but the range was comparable with that seen in self-reinnervated muscle. 4. The changes in twitch time to peak of whole muscle following cross-reinnervations resulted from a change over the whole range of motor units. The conversion of soleus was less complete than that of flexor digitorum longus, and the time to peak of its fastest motor unit was twice as long as any seen in normal flexor digitorum longus. 5. In neither of the cross-reinnervated muscles were the fast contracting motor units larger than the slow contracting ones, and in cross-reinnervated soleus they were smaller. 6. Axonal conduction velocity was correlated with motor unit tension in both muscles and with twitch time to peak in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, but in all cases less clearly than in normal muscles. 7. The ratio of twitch to tetanic tension increased with increasing twitch time to peak, as in normal muscles. PMID:7277217

  13. Ice crystal terminal velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and most any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The general equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The specific equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  14. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  15. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  16. Passive system with tunable group velocity for propagating electrical pulses from sub- to superluminal velocities.

    PubMed

    Haché, Alain; Essiambre, Sophie

    2004-05-01

    We report an observation of tunable group velocity from sub-luminal to superluminal in a completely passive system. Electric pulses are sent along a spatially periodic conducting medium containing a punctual nonlinearity, and the resulting amplitude-dependent phase shift allows us to control dispersion and the propagation velocity at the stop band frequency.

  17. Electronic cam motion generation with special reference to constrained velocity, acceleration, and jerk.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Shu; Jeng, Shyr-Long; Chieng, Wei-Hua

    2004-07-01

    Electronic cam motion involves velocity tracking control of the master motor and trajectory generation of the slave motor. Special concerns such as the limits of the velocity, acceleration, and jerk are beyond the considerations in the conventional electronic cam motion control. This study proposes the curve-fitting of a Lagrange polynomial to the cam profile, based on trajectory optimization by cubic B-spline interpolation. The proposed algorithms may yield a higher tracking precision than the conventional master-slaves control method does, providing an optimization problem is concerned. The optimization problem contains three dynamic constraints including velocity, acceleration, and jerk of the motor system.

  18. Molecular motors: thermodynamics and the random walk.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N.; Imafuku, Y.; Tawada, K.

    2001-01-01

    The biochemical cycle of a molecular motor provides the essential link between its thermodynamics and kinetics. The thermodynamics of the cycle determine the motor's ability to perform mechanical work, whilst the kinetics of the cycle govern its stochastic behaviour. We concentrate here on tightly coupled, processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and myosin V, which hydrolyse one molecule of ATP per forward step. Thermodynamics require that, when such a motor pulls against a constant load f, the ratio of the forward and backward products of the rate constants for its cycle is exp [-(DeltaG + u(0)f)/kT], where -DeltaG is the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis and u(0) is the motor's step size. A hypothetical one-state motor can therefore act as a chemically driven ratchet executing a biased random walk. Treating this random walk as a diffusion problem, we calculate the forward velocity v and the diffusion coefficient D and we find that its randomness parameter r is determined solely by thermodynamics. However, real molecular motors pass through several states at each attachment site. They satisfy a modified diffusion equation that follows directly from the rate equations for the biochemical cycle and their effective diffusion coefficient is reduced to D-v(2)tau, where tau is the time-constant for the motor to reach the steady state. Hence, the randomness of multistate motors is reduced compared with the one-state case and can be used for determining tau. Our analysis therefore demonstrates the intimate relationship between the biochemical cycle, the force-velocity relation and the random motion of molecular motors. PMID:11600075

  19. A general two-cycle network model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2009-09-01

    Molecular motors are single macromolecules that generate forces at the piconewton range and nanometer scale. They convert chemical energy into mechanical work by moving along filamentous structures. In this paper, we study the velocity of two-head molecular motors in the framework of a mechanochemical network theory. The network model, a generalization of the recently work of Liepelt and Lipowsky [Steffen Liepelt, Reinhard Lipowsky, Kinesins network of chemomechanical motor cycles, Physical Review Letters 98 (25) (2007) 258102], is based on the discrete mechanochemical states of a molecular motor with multiple cycles. By generalizing the mathematical method developed by Fisher and Kolomeisky for a single cycle motor [Michael E. Fisher, Anatoly B. Kolomeisky, Simple mechanochemistry describes the dynamics of kinesin molecules, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98 (14) (2001) 7748-7753], we are able to obtain an explicit formula for the velocity of a molecular motor.

  20. Indicators: Conductivity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conductivity is a measure of the ability of water to pass an electrical current. Because dissolved salts and other inorganic chemicals conduct electrical current, conductivity increases as salinity increases.

  1. Effects of the sulphydryl donor N-acetyl-L-cysteine on nerve conduction, perfusion, maturation and regeneration following freeze damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Love, A; Cotter, M A; Cameron, N E

    1996-08-01

    Peripheral nerve conduction velocity deficits in diabetic rats depend on decreased nerve perfusion, which may be related to increased free radical activity and impaired endogenous protection by the glutathione redox cycle. We studied the effect of treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl-L-cysteine on nerve conduction, blood flow, maturation and regeneration. Two months of diabetes in mature rats caused 20% and 48% deficits in sciatic motor conduction velocity and endoneurial blood flow, respectively, which were largely corrected by N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment during the second month. In young nondiabetic rats, sciatic motor conduction velocity increased by 31% over 6 weeks. Diabetes halved the conduction velocity maturation rate, however N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment allowed a normal pattern of development. After 1 month of treated or untreated diabetes, the sciatic nerve was lesioned by a liquid nitrogen-cooled probe. Myelinated fibre regeneration distance, determined electrophysiologically, was reduced by 12.2% with diabetes; this was prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. Thus, the data stress the importance of free radical-mediated changes in the aetiology of experimental diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  3. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  4. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  5. Maturation of corticospinal tracts assessed by electromagnetic stimulation of the motor cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, T H; Eyre, J A

    1988-01-01

    The motor cortex can be excited in adults using electromagnetic stimulation, and the latency to the evoked muscle action potential allows an assessment of the integrity of corticospinal tracts. We applied this technique in children to describe the maturation of corticospinal tracts. The latency from cortical stimulation to the onset of the evoked muscle action potentials and the subject's height were recorded. The subject's height was divided by the latency to the onset of the evoked muscle action potential to provide an index of the conduction velocity within descending motor pathways (VI). It is possible to evoke muscle action potentials after electromagnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in children including preterm babies and there is a stepwise increase in the sensitivity to stimulation between 8 and 11 years of age. In addition there is a progressive increase in VI with age; adult values are attained at about 11 years. The successful application of this technique in children suggests that electromagnetic stimulation of the motor cortex has the potential to allow detection of abnormality in motor pathways in newborn babies and young children. PMID:3202641

  6. A Preliminary Investigation on the Destruction of Solid-Propellant Rocket Motors by Impact from Small Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine whether solid-propellant rocket motors could be ignited and destroyed by small-particle impacts at particle velocities up to a approximately 10,940 feet per second. Spheres ranging from 1/16 to 7/32 inch in diameter were fired into simulated rocket motors containing T-22 propellant over a range of ambient pressures from sea level to 0.12 inch of mercury absolute. Simulated cases of stainless steel, aluminum alloy, and laminated Fiberglas varied in thickness from 1/50 to 1/8 inch. Within the scope of this investigation, it was found that ignition and explosive destruction of simulated steel-case rocket motors could result from impacts by steel spheres at the lowest attainable pressure.

  7. Nerve conduction studies in chronic arsenic poisoning patients.

    PubMed

    Supapong, Soontorn; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Srirattanaban, Jiruth

    2004-09-01

    To assess the nerve conduction functions among female patients with arsenical dermatoses compared with the controls. Cross-sectional analytic study Thirty females with skin lesions consistent with arsenical dermatoses and 27 controls who met the inclusion criteria were investigated by nerve conduction functions. Case findings resulted from a house-to-house survey in village 12, Ronphibun subdistrict and village 5, Saothong subdistrict, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand in 1995. Differences between the arsenic-exposed population and the reference group regarding nerve conduction velocities (NCVs), proximal and distal latencies and amplitudes of sensory and motor nerve action potentials were not found except for the absent response to the sural nerve stimulation in three subjects of the exposed group. The effects of arsenic toxicity on the peripheral nerves in the form of slow nerve conduction velocities were not found among female patients with arsenical dermatoses in Ronphibun. Some patients might have experienced arsenic neuropathy to some degree in the past (before 1987) but they had recovered to some degree at the time of the present investigation (1996) as most of the patients with chronic arsenic poisoning in the present study changed their sources of drinking water from arsenic-contaminated shallow-well water to other sources such as rainwater, tap water or commercial bottled water.

  8. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor–Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion. PMID:26694322

  9. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor-Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion.

  10. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  11. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  12. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  13. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  14. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  15. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  16. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  17. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  18. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  19. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  20. Selective recruitment of high-threshold human motor units during voluntary isotonic lengthening of active muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, A; Romanò, C; Schieppati, M

    1989-01-01

    threshold torque of recruitment among all the units. In addition, the amplitudes of both the action potential and the threshold torque were higher in the case of L units than in the case of S and S + L units. Most L units could be voluntarily recruited only in the case of ballistic isometric or isotonic contraction. 5. Occasionally, L units were directly activated by electrical stimulation of motor fibres and their conduction velocity was in the higher range for alpha-axons. In contrast, nerve stimulation could induce a reflex activation of S and S + L units.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2585297

  1. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  2. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  3. Extremely High Velocity Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minho; Evans, Neal J., II; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    1993-11-01

    Extremely high velocity (EHV) wings, with full widths of 72 to 140 km s-1, are seen on the CO J = 3 → 2 lines toward W3 IRS 5, GL 490, NGC 2071, W28 A2 (G05.89-0.39), GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. Observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 3 → 2 and J = 2 → 1 lines indicate that optical depth generally decreases with increasing velocity separation from the ambient cloud velocity. Maps of the extremely high velocity (|V-V0| ≳ 20 km s-1) and the high-velocity (5 ≲ |V-V0| ≲ 20 km s-1) CO emission components show that the morphology of the two components is similar in W3 IRS 5 and W28 A2 but may be different in GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. The results of our survey suggest that EHV wings are common around infrared sources of moderate to high luminosity [500 to (4 × 105) Lsun] in dense regions. Line ratios imply that the EHV gas is usually optically thin and warm. Characteristic velocities range from 20 to 40 km s-1, yielding timescales of 1600-4200 yr. Since most sources in this study are producing some ionizing photons, these short timescales suggest that neutral winds coexist with ionizing photons. We examined two possible sources for the extremely high velocity CO emission: a neutral stellar wind; and swept-up or entrained molecular gas. Neither can be ruled out. If the high-velocity (HV) gas is swept up by a momentum-conserving stellar wind traced by the extremely high velocity CO emission, most of the C in the winds from luminous objects cannot be in CO. If the EHV and HV forces are equal, the fraction of C in a form other than CO increases with source luminosity and with the production rate of ionizing photons. This trend is natural in the stellar wind hypothesis, but models of winds around such luminous objects are needed. We consider other possible chemical states for the carbon in the stellar wind.

  4. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  5. Solvent-driven chemical motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumata, Tetsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1998-10-01

    A solvent-driven chemical motor using amphiphilic polymer gel has been fabricated. The driving force of the gel originates from the surface tension of spreading organic fluid which is pumped out by osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in the gel. A tetrahydrofurane-swollen gel equipped with a spouting hole made a controlled translational motion with a velocity of 77 mm/s or rotational motion with a maximum speed of 400 rpm and a torque of 10-9-10-7 Nm on the water surface. A generator to produce an electric power with a maximum electromotive force of 15 mV and electric power of 0.2 μW has also been constructed. The successful fabrication of gel motor may produce a new era of soft machine systems which work without pollution and unnecessary intermediates.

  6. Collective Dynamics of Elastically Coupled Myosin V Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Efremov, Artem K.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Krementsova, Elena B.; Driver, Jonathan W.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Diehl, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the collective behaviors of different classes of processive motor proteins has become increasingly important to understand various intracellular trafficking and transport processes. This work examines the dynamics of structurally-defined motor complexes containing two myosin Va (myoVa) motors that are linked together via a molecular scaffold formed from a single duplex of DNA. Dynamic changes in the filament-bound configuration of these complexes due to motor binding, stepping, and detachment were monitored by tracking the positions of different color quantum dots that report the position of one head of each myoVa motor on actin. As in studies of multiple kinesins, the run lengths produced by two myosins are only slightly larger than those of single motor molecules. This suggests that internal strain within the complexes, due to asynchronous motor stepping and the resultant stretching of motor linkages, yields net negative cooperative behaviors. In contrast to multiple kinesins, multiple myosin complexes move with appreciably lower velocities than a single-myosin molecule. Although similar trends are predicted by a discrete state stochastic model of collective motor dynamics, these analyses also suggest that multiple myosin velocities and run lengths depend on both the compliance and the effective size of their cargo. Moreover, it is proposed that this unique collective behavior occurs because the large step size and relatively small stalling force of myoVa leads to a high sensitivity of motor stepping rates to strain. PMID:22718762

  7. Collective dynamics of elastically coupled myosin V motors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Efremov, Artem K; Bookwalter, Carol S; Krementsova, Elena B; Driver, Jonathan W; Trybus, Kathleen M; Diehl, Michael R

    2012-08-10

    Characterization of the collective behaviors of different classes of processive motor proteins has become increasingly important to understand various intracellular trafficking and transport processes. This work examines the dynamics of structurally-defined motor complexes containing two myosin Va (myoVa) motors that are linked together via a molecular scaffold formed from a single duplex of DNA. Dynamic changes in the filament-bound configuration of these complexes due to motor binding, stepping, and detachment were monitored by tracking the positions of different color quantum dots that report the position of one head of each myoVa motor on actin. As in studies of multiple kinesins, the run lengths produced by two myosins are only slightly larger than those of single motor molecules. This suggests that internal strain within the complexes, due to asynchronous motor stepping and the resultant stretching of motor linkages, yields net negative cooperative behaviors. In contrast to multiple kinesins, multiple myosin complexes move with appreciably lower velocities than a single-myosin molecule. Although similar trends are predicted by a discrete state stochastic model of collective motor dynamics, these analyses also suggest that multiple myosin velocities and run lengths depend on both the compliance and the effective size of their cargo. Moreover, it is proposed that this unique collective behavior occurs because the large step size and relatively small stalling force of myoVa leads to a high sensitivity of motor stepping rates to strain.

  8. Models of motor-assisted transport of intracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Simmons, R M

    2001-01-01

    One-dimensional models are presented for the macroscopic intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles by molecular motors on a network of aligned intracellular filaments. A motor-coated vesicle or organelle is described as a diffusing particle binding intermittently to filaments, when it is transported at the motor velocity. Two models are treated in detail: 1) a unidirectional model, where only one kind of motor is operative and all filaments have the same polarity; and 2) a bidirectional model, in which filaments of both polarities exist (for example, a randomly polarized actin network for myosin motors) and/or particles have plus-end and minus-end motors operating on unipolar filaments (kinesin and dynein on microtubules). The unidirectional model provides net particle transport in the absence of a concentration gradient. A symmetric bidirectional model, with equal mixtures of filament polarities or plus-end and minus-end motors of the same characteristics, provides rapid transport down a concentration gradient and enhanced dispersion of particles from a point source by motor-assisted diffusion. Both models are studied in detail as a function of the diffusion constant and motor velocity of bound particles, and their rates of binding to and detachment from filaments. These models can form the basis of more realistic models for particle transport in axons, melanophores, and the dendritic arms of melanocytes, in which networks of actin filaments and microtubules coexist and motors for both types of filament are implicated. PMID:11159382

  9. Effects of dance practice on functional mobility, motor symptoms and quality of life in people with Parkinson's disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Delabary, Marcela; Komeroski, Isabel Giovannini; Monteiro, Elren Passos; Costa, Rochelle Rocha; Haas, Aline Nogueira

    2017-10-04

    Patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) undergo motor injuries, which decrease their quality of life (QL). Dance, added to drug therapy, can help treating these patients AIMS: To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis with the aim to analyze the effects of dance classes in comparison to other interventions or to the absence of intervention, in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), on functional mobility, motor symptoms and QL of PD patients METHODS: The search was conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, Cochrane and PsycINFO (last searched in August 2017). RCTs analyzing dance effects in comparison to other physical training types or to no intervention, on functional mobility, motor symptoms and QL of PD patients were selected. The outcomes assessed were motor symptoms with Unified PD Rating Scale III (UPDRSIII), functional mobility with Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), endurance with 6 min walking test (6MWT), freezing of gait with Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG_Q), walking velocity with GAITRite and QL with PD Questionnaire (PDQ39). Two reviewers independently extracted methodological quality and studies data. Results are presented as weighted mean differences. Five RCTs were included, totaling 159 patients. Dance promoted significant improvements on UPDRSIII, and a decrease in TUG time when compared to other types of exercise. In comparison to the absence of intervention, dance practice also showed significant improvements in motor scores. Dance can improve motor parameters of the disease and patients' functional mobility.

  10. 48 CFR 945.570-3 - Reporting motor vehicle data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reporting motor vehicle... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Support Government Property Administration 945.570-3 Reporting motor vehicle data. (a) Contractors conducting motor vehicle operations shall forward annually to the contracting...

  11. 48 CFR 945.570-3 - Reporting motor vehicle data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reporting motor vehicle... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Support Government Property Administration 945.570-3 Reporting motor vehicle data. (a) Contractors conducting motor vehicle operations shall forward annually to the contracting...

  12. High-speed electrical motor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-03

    Under this task, MTI conducted a general review of state-of-the-art high-speed motors. The purpose of this review was to assess the operating parameters, limitations and performance of existing motor designs, and to establish commercial sources for a motor compatible with the requirements of the Brayton-cycle system. After the motor requirements were established, a list of motor types, manufacturers and designs capable of achieving the requisite performance was compiled. This list was based on an in-house evaluation of designs. Following the establishment of these options, a technical evaluation of the designs selected was conducted. In parallel with their evaluations, MTI focused on the establishment of commercial sources.

  13. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  14. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  15. Tetrodotoxic poisoning from ingestion of a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) in Papua New Guinea: nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Trevett, A J; Mavo, B; Warrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    Near Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea, three of four adult family members who ate a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) were severely poisoned. Within one hour of the meal, both the mother and her older daughter had developed paraesthesiae, ataxia, hypersalivation, sweating, and had collapsed and died. The younger daughter developed similar symptoms with progressive paralysis requiring mechanical ventilation for 24 hr, but she made a complete recovery 10 days after the poisoning. In this patient, nerve conduction studies showed reduced sensory and motor conduction velocities and evoked amplitudes with gradual improvement in parallel with the patient's clinical condition, consistent with the known action of tetrodotoxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

  16. Dual piezoelecttic actuators for the traveling wave ultrasonic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suybangdum, P.; Smithmaitrie, P.; Laoratanakul, P.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of a dual piezoelectric actuators ultrasonic linear motor is studied in this research. The two piezoelectric actuators are bonded with a linear elastic stator. The stator generates the traveling wave when the actuators are subjected to the harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are determined by using the finite element analysis, i.e., modal, harmonic and transient responses. In the experiment, the motor characteristics are tested, i.e., the maximum velocity, operating frequency and applied voltage. In addition, the relationship between the pre-load and velocity of the motor is reported. The result shows that the maximum velocity of the motor occurs at a specific per-load. The comparison of the operating frequency and harmonic response shows well agreement between the finite element and experimental results.

  17. Dual piezoelecttic actuators for the traveling wave ultrasonic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suybangdum, P.; Smithmaitrie, P.; Laoratanakul, P.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a dual piezoelectric actuators ultrasonic linear motor is studied in this research. The two piezoelectric actuators are bonded with a linear elastic stator. The stator generates the traveling wave when the actuators are subjected to the harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are determined by using the finite element analysis, i.e., modal, harmonic and transient responses. In the experiment, the motor characteristics are tested, i.e., the maximum velocity, operating frequency and applied voltage. In addition, the relationship between the pre-load and velocity of the motor is reported. The result shows that the maximum velocity of the motor occurs at a specific per-load. The comparison of the operating frequency and harmonic response shows well agreement between the finite element and experimental results.

  18. Mean velocity and moments of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the wake of a model ship propulsor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pêgo, J. P.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F.

    2007-08-01

    Pod drives are modern outboard ship propulsion systems with a motor encapsulated in a watertight pod, whose shaft is connected directly to one or two propellers. The whole unit hangs from the stern of the ship and rotates azimuthally, thus providing thrust and steering without the need of a rudder. Force/momentum and phase-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were performed for in line co-rotating and contra-rotating propellers pod drive models. The measurements permitted to characterize these ship propulsion systems in terms of their hydrodynamic characteristics. The torque delivered to the propellers and the thrust of the system were measured for different operation conditions of the propellers. These measurements lead to the hydrodynamic optimization of the ship propulsion system. The parameters under focus revealed the influence of distance between propeller planes, propeller frequency of rotation ratio and type of propellers (co- or contra-rotating) on the overall efficiency of the system. Two of the ship propulsion systems under consideration were chosen, based on their hydrodynamic characteristics, for a detailed study of the swirling wake flow by means of laser Doppler anemometry. A two-component laser Doppler system was employed for the velocity measurements. A light barrier mounted on the axle of the rear propeller motor supplied a TTL signal to mark the beginning of each period, thus providing angle information for the LDA measurements. Measurements were conducted for four axial positions in the slipstream of the pod drive models. The results show that the wake of contra-rotating propeller is more homogeneous than when they co-rotate. In agreement with the results of the force/momentum measurements and with hypotheses put forward in the literature (see e.g. Poehls in Entwurfsgrundlagen für Schraubenpropeller, 1984; Schneekluth in Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf, 1988; Breslin and Andersen in Hydrodynamics of ship propellers, 1996

  19. Effect of kinesin velocity distribution on slow axonal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2012-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the effect that a distribution of kinesin motor velocities could have on cytoskeletal element (CE) concentration waves in slow axonal transport. Previous models of slow axonal transport based on the stop-and-go hypothesis (P. Jung, A. Brown, Modeling the slowing of neurofilament transport along the mouse sciatic nerve, Physical Biology 6 (2009) 046002) assumed that in the anterograde running state all CEs move with one and the same velocity as they are propelled by kinesin motors. This paper extends the aforementioned theoretical approach by allowing for a distribution of kinesin motor velocities; the distribution is described by a probability density function (PDF). For a two kinetic state model (that accounts for the pausing and running populations of CEs) an analytical solution describing the propagation of the CE concentration wave is derived. Published experimental data are used to obtain an analytical expression for the PDF characterizing the kinesin velocity distribution; this analytical expression is then utilized as an input for computations. It is demonstrated that accounting for the kinesin velocity distribution increases the rate of spreading of the CE concentration waves, which is a significant improvement in the two kinetic state model.

  20. The limit profile of a rapid movement velocity.

    PubMed

    Djioua, Moussa; Plamondon, Réjean

    2010-02-01

    In motor control, various theories and computational models have been developed to explain and model the stereotypical velocity profiles of skilled rapid movements. According to the fact that these theories aim at describing the same physical pattern (a velocity profile) with different mathematical expressions, some relationships between these various representation schemes should exist. This paper presents a comparative study of two motor control theories that have put forward analytical expressions to describe the stereotypical velocity profiles of rapid movements: the Kinematic Theory and the Minimization Theory. Among the various forms of the latter, the Minimum-Square-Derivatives (MSD) principle and the Minimum-Time model are analyzed. It is shown that their concepts are linked and describe, with different arguments, a paradigm similar to the one used in the Kinematic Theory to model a velocity profile with a Delta-Lognormal equation. This unifying paradigm represents the functioning of a neuromuscular system by the convolution product of an infinite number of subsystem impulse responses. A second finding emerging from the present study is that the analytical models of velocity profiles, as described by the minimum principles under study, correspond, with more or less accuracy, to an approximation of the Delta-Lognormal equation. Overall, the Kinematic Theory can be seen as relying on a general optimization principle and the use of the Minimization Theory in motor control gets new insights.

  1. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  5. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1984-02-07

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  6. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an interrotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal application

  7. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  8. The influence of direct motor-motor interaction in models for cargo transport by a single team of motors.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Sebastián; Falo, Fernando

    2010-11-22

    We analyze theoretically the effects of excluded-volume interactions between motors on the dynamics of a cargo driven by multiple motors. The model considered shares much in common with others recently proposed in the literature, with the addition of direct interaction between motors and motor back steps. The cargo is assumed to follow a continuum Langevin dynamics, while individual motors evolve following a Monte Carlo algorithm based on experimentally accessible probabilities for discrete forward and backward jumps, and attachment and detachment rates. The links between cargo and motors are considered as nonlinear springs. By means of numerical simulations we compute the relevant quantities characterizing the dynamical properties of the system, and we compare the results to those for noninteracting motors. We find that interactions lead to quite relevant changes in the force-velocity relation for cargo, with a considerable reduction of the stall force, and also cause a notable decrease of the run length. These effects are mainly due to traffic-like phenomena in the microtubule. The consideration of several parallel tracks for motors reduces such effects. However, we find that for realistic values of the number of motors and the number of tracks, the influence of interactions on the global parameters of transport of cargo are far from being negligible. Our studies also provide an analysis of the relevance of motor back steps on the modeling, and of the influence of different assumptions for the detachment rates. In particular, we discuss these two aspects in connection with the possibility of observing processive back motion of cargo at large load forces.

  9. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Monte—Carlo Simulation of Multiple-Molecular-Motor Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-Qing; Wang, Guo-Dong; Shen, Wei-Bo

    2010-10-01

    Multimotor transport is studied by Monte-Carlo simulation with consideration of motor detachment from the filament. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor numbers depending on the single motor force-velocity curve. The stall force and run-length reduced greatly compared to other models. Especially in the case of low ATP concentrations, the stall force of multi motor transport even smaller than the single motor's stall force.

  10. Motor transport of self-assembled cargos in crowded environments.

    PubMed

    Conway, Leslie; Wood, Derek; Tüzel, Erkan; Ross, Jennifer L

    2012-12-18

    Intracellular transport of cargo particles is performed by multiple motors working in concert. However, the mechanism of motor association to cargos is unknown. It is also unknown how long individual motors stay attached, how many are active, and how multimotor cargos would navigate a densely crowded filament with many other motors. Prior theoretical and experimental biophysical model systems of intracellular cargo have assumed fixed teams of motors transporting along bare microtubules or microtubules with fixed obstacles. Here, we investigate a regime of cargos transporting along microtubules crowded with free motors. Furthermore, we use cargos that are able to associate or dissociate motors as it translocates. We perform in vitro motility reconstitution experiments with high-resolution particle tracking. Our model system consists of a quantum dot cargo attached to kinesin motors, and additional free kinesin motors that act as traffic along the microtubule. Although high densities of kinesin motors hinder forward motion, resulting in a lower velocity, the ability to associate motors appears to enhance the run length and attachment time of the quantum dot, improving overall cargo transport. These results suggest that cargos that can associate new motors as they transport could overcome traffic jams.

  11. Investigation of fluctuations in angular velocity in magnetic memory devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkis, Y. A.; Potsyus, Z. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The fluctuations in the angular velocity of individual assemblies of a precision mechanical system were analyzed. The system was composed of an electric motor and a magnetic drum which were connected by a flexible coupling. A dynamic model was constructed which took into account the absence of torsion in the rigid shafts of the electric motor drive rotor and the magnetic drum. The motion was described by Lagrange differential equations of the second kind. Curves are developed to show the nature of amplitude fluctuation of the magnetic drum angular velocity at a specific excitation frequency. Additional curves show the amplitudes of fluctuation of the magnetic drum angular velocity compared to the quantity of damping at specific frequencies.

  12. Results of a 24-inch Hybrid Motor Performance Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Joseph D.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    The subscale (11 and 24-inch) hybrid motors at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been used as versatile and cost effective testbeds for developing new technology. Comparisons between motor configuration, ignition systems, feed systems, fuel formulations, and nozzle materials have been carried out without detailed consideration as to haw "good" the motor performance data were. For the 250,000 lb/thrust motor developed by the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program consortium, this shortcoming is particularly risky because motor performance will likely be used as put of a set of downselect criteria to choose between competing ignition and feed systems under development. This analysis directly addresses that shortcoming by applying uncertainty analysis techniques to the experimental determination of the characteristic velocity, theoretical characteristic velocity, and characteristic velocity efficiency for a 24-inch motor firing. With the adoption of fuel-lined headends, flow restriction, and aft mixing chambers, state of the an 24-inch hybrid motors have become very efficient However, impossibly high combustion efficiencies (some computed as high as 108%) have been measured in some tests with 11-inch motors. This analysis has given new insight into explaining how these efficiencies were measured to be so high, and into which experimental measurements contribute the most to the overall uncertainty.

  13. Electrodiagnosis of reversible conduction failure in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Cheun; Punzalan-Sotelo, Aubrey M; Kannan, Therimadasamy A; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Goh, Eunice J H; Fukami, Yuki; Wilder-Smith, Einar; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-17

    In this study we propose electrodiagnostic criteria for early reversible conduction failure (ERCF) in axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and apply them to a cohort of GBS patients. Serial nerve conduction studies (NCS) were retrospectively analyzed in 82 GBS patients from 3 centers. The criteria for the presence of ERCF in a nerve were: (i) a 50% increase in amplitude of distal compound muscle action potentials or sensory nerve action potentials; or (ii) resolution of proximal motor conduction block with an accompanying decrease in distal latencies or compound muscle action potential duration or increase in conduction velocities. Of 82 patients from 3 centers, 37 (45%) had ERCF, 21 (26%) had a contrasting evolution pattern, and 8 (10%) had both. Sixteen patients did not show an amplitude increase of at least 50%. Our proposed criteria identified a group of patients with a characteristic evolution of NCS abnormality that is consistent with ERCF. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  15. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  16. Effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation on sensory and motor transmission.

    PubMed

    Leung, Albert; Shukla, Shivshil; Lee, Jacquelyn; Metzger-Smith, Valerie; He, Yifan; Chen, Jeffrey; Golshan, Shahrokh

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injury diminishes fast conducting large myelinated afferent fibers transmission but enhances smaller pain transmitting fibers firing. This aberrant afferent neuronal behavior contributes to development of chronic post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain (PTP-NP). Non-invasive dynamic magnetic flux stimulation has been implicated in treating PTP-NP, a condition currently not adequately addressed by other therapies including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current study assessed the effect of low frequency transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (LFTMS) on peripheral sensory thresholds, nerve conduction properties, and TENS induced fast afferent slowing effect as measured by motor and sensory conduction studies in the ulnar nerve. Results indicated sham LFTMS with TENS (Sham + TENS) significantly (P = 0.02 and 0.007, respectively) reduces sensory conduction velocity (CV) and increases sensory onset latency (OL), and motor peak latency (PL) whereas, real LFTMS with TENS (Real + TENS) reverses effects of TENS on sensory CV and OL, and significantly (P = 0.036) increases the sensory PL. LFTMS alone significantly (P < 0.05) elevates sensory PL and onset-to-peak latency. LFTMS appears to reverse TENS slowing effect on fast conducting fibers and casts a selective peripheral modulatory effect on slow conducting pain afferent fibers.

  17. Motor force homeostasis in skeletal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Gao, Huajian

    2011-07-20

    In active biological contractile processes such as skeletal muscle contraction, cellular mitosis, and neuronal growth, an interesting common observation is that multiple motors can perform coordinated and synchronous actions, whereas individual myosin motors appear to randomly attach to and detach from actin filaments. Recent experiment has demonstrated that, during skeletal muscle shortening at a wide range of velocities, individual myosin motors maintain a force of ~6 pN during a working stroke. To understand how such force-homeostasis can be so precisely regulated in an apparently chaotic system, here we develop a molecular model within a coupled stochastic-elastic theoretical framework. The model reveals that the unique force-stretch relation of myosin motor and the stochastic behavior of actin-myosin binding cause the average number of working motors to increase in linear proportion to the filament load, so that the force on each working motor is regulated at ~6 pN, in excellent agreement with experiment. This study suggests that it might be a general principle to use catch bonds together with a force-stretch relation similar to that of myosin motors to regulate force homeostasis in many biological processes. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Motor neuropathies and lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, A

    2017-05-01

    Motor or motor-predominant neuropathies may arise from disease processes affecting the motor axon and/or its surrounding myelin. Lower motor neuron syndrome (LMNS) arises from a disease process affecting the spinal motor neuron itself. The term LMNS is more generally used, rather than motor neuronopathy, although both entities are clinically similar. Common features are muscle weakness (distal or proximal) with atrophy and hyporeflexia, but no sensory involvement. They can be acquired or hereditary. Immune-mediated neuropathies (multifocal motor neuropathy, motor-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy) are important to identify, as effective treatments are available. Other acquired neuropathies, such as infectious, paraneoplastic and radiation-induced neuropathies are also well known. Focal LMNS is an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-mimicking syndrome especially affecting young adults. The main hereditary LMNSs in adulthood are Kennedy's disease, late-onset spinal muscular atrophy and distal hereditary motor neuropathies. Motor neuropathies and LMNS are all clinical entities that should be better known, despite being rare diseases. They can sometimes be difficult to differentially diagnose from other diseases, particularly from the more frequent ALS in its pure LMN form. Nevertheless, correct identification of these syndromes is important because their treatment and prognoses are definitely different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for deficient motor planning in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Anat, Dahan; Miriam, Reiner

    2017-08-29

    We compare motor planning mechanisms of ADHD and control subjects based on their effect on later observed kinematic characteristics. We monitor hand movement following planning conditions that differ in preparation time, and evaluate the differences across conditions and participants with/without ADHD. Our findings show that when there is sufficient planning time, people without ADHD seem to have a motor plan ready, and immediately initiate a planned movement after a 'GO' cue, with a bell shaped velocity profile. When planning time is not sufficient, they start the movement in a delayed time, possibly indicating that they needed to complete a movement plan. However, people with ADHD, did not start movement immediately after the cue, even when provided with a long preparation time, possibly indicating that even for this planning interval they did not have a motion plan ready. The movement was not only delayed, its velocity profile was not bell shaped and had several peaks. We further found differences between control and ADHD participants in the velocity profile, variability and jitter of movements. Our results suggest that ADHD motion characteristics, are associated with an immature motor plan. Based on the results we propose a paradigm to evaluate deficiencies in motor planning.

  20. Myocardial Tissue Doppler Velocity in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Ha; Kim, Nam Kyun; Jung, Jo Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background In adults, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recommended component of routine echocardiography. However, TDI velocities are less accepted in pediatrics, due to their strong variability and age dependence in children. This study examines the distribution of myocardial tissue Doppler velocities in healthy children to assess the effect of age with cardiac growth on the various echocardiographic measurements. Methods Total 144 healthy children were enrolled in this study. They were recruited from the pediatric outpatient clinic for routine well-child visits. The statistical relationships between age and TDI values were analyzed. Also, the statistical relationships between body surface area (BSA) and TDI values, left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) and TDI values were analyzed. Also, we conducted multivariate analysis of cardiac growth parameters such as, age, BSA, LVEDD and TDI velocity data. Results All of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with deceleration time (DT), pressure half-time (PHT), peak early diastolic myocardial velocity, peak systolic myocardial velocity, and had negative correlations with peak late diastolic velocity (A) and the ratio of trans-mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic velocity of mitral annulus (E/E'). In the multivariate analysis, all of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with DT, PHT, and negative correlations with A and E/E'. Conclusion The cardiac growth parameters related alterations of E/E' may suggest that diastolic myocardial velocities are cardiac growth dependent, and diastolic function has positive correlation with cardiac growth in pediatric group. This cardiac growth related myocardial functional variation would be important for assessment of cardiac involvement either in healthy and sick child. PMID:27081443

  1. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  2. Nerve conduction studies in spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy (SPOAN) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Simone; Heise, Carlos Otto; Santos, Silvana; Macedo-Souza, Lúcia Ines; Zatz, Mayana; Kok, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    SPOAN (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy) syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder identified in a large consanguineous Brazilian family. Twenty-seven patients with SPOAN syndrome (20 women), aged 4-58 years, underwent nerve conduction studies (NCS) of the median, ulnar, tibial, and fibular nerves, and sensory NCS of the median, ulnar, radial, sural, and superficial fibular nerves. Sensory nerve action potentials were absent in the lower limbs and absent in >80% of upper limbs. Motor NCS had reduced amplitudes and borderline velocities in the upper limbs and absent compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) in the lower limbs. The neuropathy in SPOAN syndrome is a severe, early-onset sensory-motor axonal polyneuropathy. Normal NCS seem to rule-out this condition. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  4. A coin vibrational motor swimming at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Askari, Hesam; Kelley, Douglas H.; Friedmann, Tamar; Oakes, Patrick W.

    2016-12-01

    Low-cost coin vibrational motors, used in haptic feedback, exhibit rotational internal motion inside a rigid case. Because the motor case motion exhibits rotational symmetry, when placed into a fluid such as glycerin, the motor does not swim even though its oscillatory motions induce steady streaming in the fluid. However, a piece of rubber foam stuck to the curved case and giving the motor neutral buoyancy also breaks the rotational symmetry allowing it to swim. We measured a 1 cm diameter coin vibrational motor swimming in glycerin at a speed of a body length in 3 seconds or at 3 mm/s. The swim speed puts the vibrational motor in a low Reynolds number regime similar to bacterial motility, but because of the oscillations of the motor it is not analogous to biological organisms. Rather the swimming vibrational motor may inspire small inexpensive robotic swimmers that are robust as they contain no external moving parts. A time dependent Stokes equation planar sheet model suggests that the swim speed depends on a steady streaming velocity V stream Re s 1/2 U 0 where U 0 is the velocity of surface oscillations, and streaming Reynolds number Re s = U 0 2 /( ων) for motor angular frequency ω and fluid kinematic viscosity ν.

  5. Nerve conduction studies in upper extremities: skin temperature corrections.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Soine, T L

    1983-09-01

    The relationship of skin to near nerve (NN) temperature and to nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and distal latency (DL) was studied in 34 normal adult subjects before and after cooling both upper extremities. Median and ulnar motor and sensory NCV, DL, and NN temperature were determined at ambient temperature (mean X skin temp = 33 C) and after cooling, at approximately 26, 28, and 30 C of forearm skin temperature. Skin temperatures on the volar side of the forearm, wrist, palm, and fingers and NN temperature at the forearm, midpalm, and thenar or hypothenar eminence were compared with respective NCV and DL. Results showed a significant linear correlation between skin temperature and NN temperature at corresponding sites (r2 range, 0.4-0.84; p less than 0.005). Furthermore, both skin and NN temperatures correlated significantly with respective NCV and DL. Midline wrist skin temperature showed the best correlation to NCV and DL. Median motor and sensory NCV were altered 1.5 and 1.4m/sec/C degree and their DL 0.2 msec/C degree of wrist skin temperature change, respectively. Ulnar motor and sensory NCV were changed 2.1 and 1.6m/sec/C degree respectively, and 0.2 msec/C degree wrist temperature for motor and sensory DL. Average ambient skin temperature at the wrist (33 C) was used as a standard skin temperature in the temperature correction formula: NCV or DL(temp corrected) = CF(Tst degree - Tm degree) + obtained NCV or DL, where Tst = 33 C for wrist, Tm = the measured skin temperature, and CF = correction factor of tested nerve. Use of temperature correction formula for NCV and DL is suggested in patients with changed wrist skin temperature outside 29.6-36.4C temperature range.

  6. Magnetic-motor-root stimulation: review.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic stimulation can activate the human central and peripheral nervous systems non-invasively and virtually painlessly. Magnetic stimulation over the spinal enlargements can activate spinal nerves at the neuroforamina (magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation). This stimulation method provides us with information related to the latency of compound-muscle action potential (CMAP), which is usually interpreted as peripheral motor-conduction time (PMCT). However, this stimulation method has faced several problems in clinical applications. One is that supramaximal CMAPs were unobtainable. Another is that magnetic stimulation did not usually activate the spinal nerves in the spinal canal, i.e., the cauda equina, which prevented an evaluation of its conduction. For these reasons, magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation was rarely used to evaluate the conduction of peripheral nerves. It was mainly used to evaluate the conduction of the corticospinal tract using the parameter of central motor-conduction time (CMCT), which was calculated by subtracting PMCT from the latency of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex. Recently, supramaximal stimulation has been achieved in magnetic-neuroforamina stimulation, and this has contributed to the measurement of both CMAP size and latency. The achievement of supramaximal stimulation is ascribed to the increase in magnetic-stimulator output and a novel coil, the magnetic augmented translumbosacral stimulation (MATS) coil. The most proximal part of the cauda equina can be reliably activated using the MATS coil (magnetic-conus stimulation), thus contributing to the measurement of cauda equina conduction time (CECT) and cortico-conus motor-conduction time (CCCT). These recent developments in magnetic-motor-root stimulation enable us to more precisely evaluate the conduction of the proximal part of peripheral nerves and that of the corticospinal tract for lower-limb muscles

  7. Cold-Flow Study of Low Frequency Pressure Instability in Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1997-01-01

    Past experience with hybrid rockets has shown that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of low frequency pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor. Both past and present work in the hybrid propulsion community acknowledges deficiencies in the understanding of such behavior, though it seems probable that the answer lies in an interaction between the flow dynamics and the combustion heat release. Knowledge of the fundamental flow dynamics is essential to the basic understanding of the overall stability problem. A first step in this direction was a study conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), centered around a laboratory-scale two dimensional water flow model of a hybrid rocket motor. Principal objectives included: (1) visualization of flow and measurement of flow velocity distributions: (2) assessment of the importance of shear layer instabilities in driving motor pressure oscillations; (3) determination of the interactions between flow induced shear layers with the mainstream flow, the secondary (wall) throughflow, and solid boundaries; (4) investigation of the interactions between wall flow oscillations and the mainstream flow pressure distribution.

  8. Controlled wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, F.A.

    1983-12-27

    A mechanical sail including a rotatable mast, the mast including a top vane mount and a bottom vane mount, the mounts being spaced from each other on the mast and rotatable therewith, a series of rotatable vanes spaced from and surrounding the mast and supported by and between the mounts, cam operaters extending between the mounts and connected to the vanes for controlling the rotation of the vanes, a first controller associated with the mast below the bottom vane mount for controlling the cam operators, the first controller being movable vertically with respect to the mast, a second controller for moving the first controller vertically with respect to the mast, the vanes being flexible and bowed outwardly, the bottom vane mount being movable with respect to the mast and connected to the second controller whereby when the second controller is operated, the bottom vane mount will move toward the top vane mount causing the vanes to bow outwardly at a desired arc and whereby when the first controller is moved, the vanes are caused to rotate to the desired angle of attack with respect to wind velocity and direction. When the sail is connected to a motor drive, the vessel may be driven forward or rearward depending on the angle of attack of the vanes through 180/sup 0/.

  9. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  10. Conduct disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... activity. Causes Conduct disorder has been linked to: Child abuse Drug or alcohol abuse in the parents Family ... 2016:chap 23. Read More Antisocial personality disorder Child abuse - physical Review Date 3/4/2015 Updated by: ...

  11. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  12. Conduct Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain damage, child abuse or neglect, genetic vulnerability, school failure, and traumatic life experiences . Children or adolescents with conduct disorder may exhibit some of the following behaviors: Aggression to people and animals bullies , threatens or intimidates ...

  13. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  14. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  15. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  16. 40 CFR 85.1506 - Inspection and testing of imported motor vehicles and engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines § 85.1506 Inspection and testing of imported motor vehicles and... Enforcement Officers are authorized to conduct inspections and/or tests of vehicles or engines imported by the... authorized to proceed ex parte to seek warrants authorizing the inspection or testing of the motor...

  17. Energy Velocity Defined by Brillouin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hiroyuki; Hosono, Toshio

    The physical meaning of the energy velocity in lossy Lorentz media is clarified. First, two expressions for the energy velocity, one by Brillouin and another by Diener, are examined. We show that, while Diener's is disqualified, Brillouin's is acceptable as energy velocity. Secondly, we show that the signal velocity defined by Brillouin and Baerwald is exactly identical with the Brillouin's energy velocity. Thirdly, by using triangle-modulated harmonic wave, we show that the superluminal group velocity plays its role as a revelator only after the arrival of the signal traveling at the subluminal energy velocity. In short, nothing moves at the group velocity, and every frequency component of a signal propagates at its own energy velocity.

  18. Superconductor-Magnet Bearings With Inherent Stability and Velocity-Independent Drag Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Ma, Ki Bui; Wilson, Thomas L.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid superconductor magnet bearing system has been developed based on passive magnetic levitation and the flux pinning effect of high-temperature superconductivity. The rationale lies in the unique capability of a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) to enhance system stability passively without power consumption. Characterization experiments have been conducted to understand its dynamic behavior and to estimate the required motor torque for its driving system design. These experiments show that the hybrid HTS-magnet bearing system has a periodic oscillation of drag torque due mainly to the nonuniform magnetic field density of permanent magnets. Furthermore, such a system also suffers from a small superimposed periodic oscillation introduced by the use of multiple HTS disks rather than a uniform annulus of HTS material. The magnitude of drag torque is velocity independent and very small. These results make this bearing system appealing for high-speed application. Finally, design guidelines for superconducting bearing systems are suggested based on these experimental results.

  19. A Neural Circuit for Angular Velocity Computation

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Samuel B.; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob. PMID:21228902

  20. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  1. Teamwork in microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Roop; Rai, Arpan K; Barak, Pradeep; Rai, Ashim; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2013-11-01

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by the collective force from multiple motor proteins. Disease-causing mutations cause aberrant function of motors, but the impact is observed at a cellular level and beyond, therefore necessitating an understanding of cell mechanics at the level of motor molecules. One way to do this is by measuring the force generated by ensembles of motors in vivo at single-motor resolution. This has been possible for microtubule motor teams that transport intracellular organelles, revealing unexpected differences between collective and single-molecule function. Here we review how the biophysical properties of single motors, and differences therein, may translate into collective motor function during organelle transport and perhaps in other processes outside transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  3. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  4. Energy efficient motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This TechData Sheet is intended to help activity personnel identify cost effective energy projects for energy efficient motors. With this guide an energy manager can identify when an energy efficient induction motor should be used.

  5. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  6. High-resolution median nerve sonographic measurements: correlations with median nerve conduction studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Christina; Caldera, Franklin; Welty, Leah; Lai, Jean; Lento, Paul; Feldman, Eric; Sered, Heather; Sayeed, Yusef; Plastaras, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    To study relationships between median wrist and forearm sonographic measurements and median nerve conduction studies. The study population consisted of a prospective convenience sample of healthy adults. Interventions included high-resolution median nerve sonography and median motor and sensory nerve conduction studies. Main outcome measures included median motor nerve compound muscle action potential amplitude, distal latency, and conduction velocity; sensory nerve action potential amplitude and distal latency; and sonographic median nerve cross-sectional area. Median motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction studies of the index finger were performed using standard published techniques. A second examiner blinded to nerve conduction study results used a high-frequency linear array transducer to measure the cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the distal volar wrist crease (carpal tunnel inlet) and forearm (4 cm proximally), measured in the transverse plane on static sonograms. The outer margin of the median nerve was traced at the junction of the hypoechoic fascicles and adjacent outer connective tissue layer. Fifty median nerves were evaluated in 25 participants. The compound muscle action potential amplitude with wrist stimulation was positively related to the cross-sectional area, with the area increasing by 0.195 mm(2) for every millivolt increase in amplitude in the dominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.020, 0.370 mm(2); P < .05) and 0.247 mm(2) in the nondominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.035, 0.459 mm(2); P < .05). There was no significant linear association between the wrist median cross-sectional area and median motor and sensory distal latencies. Conduction velocity through the forearm was not significantly linearly associated with the forearm area or forearm-to-wrist area ratio (tapering ratio). The wrist area was inversely related to the sensory nerve action potential amplitude. Although associations were found between median nerve

  7. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  8. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaschek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are a new type of actuator. They are characterized by high torque at low rotational speed, simple mechanical design and good controllability. They also provide a high holding torque even if no power is applied. Compared to electromagnetic actuators the torque per volume ratio of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors can be higher by an order of magnitude. Recently various types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors have been developed for industrial applications. This paper describes several types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors.

  9. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  10. Epithelial Conduction in Hydromedusae

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, G. O.; Passano, L. M.

    1968-01-01

    Sarsia, Euphysa, and other hydromedusae have been studied by electrophysiological techniques and are found to have nonnervous conducting epithelia resembling those described earlier for siphonophores. Simple, non-muscular epithelia fire singly or repetitively following brief electrical stimuli. The pulses recorded with suction electrodes are biphasic, initially positive, and show amplitudes of 0.75–2.0 mv, durations of 5–15 msec, and velocities of 15–35 cm/sec with short refractory periods. In the swimming muscle (myoepithelium) 2.0–4.0 mv composite events lasting 150–300 msec are associated with contraction waves. Propagation in nonnervous epithelia is typically all-or-none, nondecremental, and unpolarized. The subumbrellar endoderm lamella conducts independently of the adjacent ectoderm. The lower regions of the tentacles do not show propagated epithelial events. The spread of excitation in conducting epithelia and associated effector responses are described. Examples are given of interaction between events seemingly conducted in the nervous system and those in nonnervous epithelia. Either system may excite the other. Spontaneous activity, however, appears to originate in the nervous system. Conduction in nonnervous tissues is unaffected by excess Mg++ in concentrations suppressing presumed nervous activity, although this may not be a wholly adequate criterion for distinguishing components of the two systems. Evidence from old work by Romanes is considered in the light of these findings and the general significance of epithelial conduction is discussed. PMID:4386662

  11. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianwei; Nakajima, Akira; Janssen, William G M; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Xiong, Xiaoli; Morrison, John H; Brorson, James R; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-02-27

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s) that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  12. James Webb Space Telescope Deployment Brushless DC Motor Characteristics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Ahn N.

    2016-01-01

    A DC motor's performance is usually characterized by a series of tests, which are conducted by pass/fail criteria. In most cases, these tests are adequate to address the performance characteristics under environmental and loading effects with some uncertainties and decent power/torque margins. However, if the motor performance requirement is very stringent, a better understanding of the motor characteri