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Sample records for motor inns

  1. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  2. Solar Hot Water for a Motor Inn -- Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar hot-water installation at motor inn in Las Vegas, Nevada is described in report containing descriptions of design, philosophy, operation of system and problems and solutions. Provides drawings of solar roof plan, operator's instructions, manufacturers' brochures and copy of acceptance report.

  3. 15. LOOKING WEST TOWARD OLD FAITHFUL INN. THE INN'S NAMESAKE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. LOOKING WEST TOWARD OLD FAITHFUL INN. THE INN'S NAMESAKE, OLD FAITHFUL GEYSER IS AT LEFT. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  4. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau from 2008 to 2014. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on site using a new filtration device for gentle filtration. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analysis provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of individual particles. As presented at EGU 2014, particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition. This general setting was validated in last year's sampling campaigns. An interesting change in on site parameters and hydrochemical composition was seen during all sampling campaigns at an inflow from the valley Kaunertal, Austria. Therefore

  5. Konocti Harbon Inn, Kelseyville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Konocti Harbor is a large resort complex, located on the shore of Clear Lake, in Kelseyville, California. A number of buildings on the property, including a 25,000 square foot lodge, 101 motel units and 48 apartment units are heated by the large water-to-water heat pumps, using water from the lake as a heat source. Due to low winter occupancy rates, these machines are run at very low capacity. In addition, a number of buildings are operated on electric resistance and propane backup boilers. This mode of operation results in a relatively high cost compared to the actual heating requirements. Since these systems were originally designed for low temperature water (125/sup 0/F supply 10/sup 0/..delta..t), a low temperature geothermal resource could potentially displace some of the conventional fuel currently used. The potential for geothermal use at the Konocti Harbor Inn is explored.

  6. Defect Doping of InN

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; van Genuchten, H.C.M.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Li, S.X.; A ger III, J.W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2007-07-22

    InN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been subjected to 2 MeV He{sup +} irradiation followed by thermal annealing. Theoretical analysis of the electron mobilities shows that thermal annealing removes triply charged donor defects, creating films with electron mobilities approaching those predicted for uncompensated, singly charged donors. Optimum thermal annealing of irradiated InN can be used to produce samples with electron mobilities higher than those of as grown films.

  7. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on-site. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analyses provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of indvidual particles. Particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition.

  8. The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 Past Issues / ... home …" for all families! What to Expect at The Children's Inn The Children's Inn enhances opportunities for ...

  9. Operational rules for the implementation of INN prescribing.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Elien; Wirtz, Veronika J; Azermai, Majda; De Loof, Geert; Christiaens, Thierry; Nicolas, Luc; Van Bortel, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to describe the process, principles and results of the International Nonproprietary Name (INN) prescribing project in Belgium. The purpose of this project was to operationalize electronic INN prescribing for outpatient care in daily medical practice and to develop a factual database which can be used in electronic INN prescribing applications. The operationalization process consisted of three phases: (1) expert consultation, (2) review by regulatory authorities and (3) test phase with stakeholders and end-users. The INN prescribing project resulted into (1) operational rules for electronic INN prescribing and (2) a reference database to be implemented in commercial medical software. The operational rules for electronic INN prescribing define valid INN groups as sets of equivalent medicinal products, described by three elements: the therapeutic moiety (the active part of the therapeutic ingredient) or combination of therapeutic moieties, the strength (with standardized denominators), and the method of administration (with simplified but standardized options). The operational rules also define two categories of exemptions for INN prescribing: INN groups where the first choice of treatment should be continued throughout the therapy period (NO SWITCH) and medicinal product groups not suitable for INN prescribing (NO INN). The reference database is the result of the virtual classification of the Belgian therapeutic arsenal into INN groups, according to the operational rules. Defining the operational rules for INN prescribing for and with different stakeholders was a difficult yet feasible assignment. The INN prescribing project resulted into explicit operational rules and a reference database. The Belgian experience may provide important information for other countries planning to operationalize or refine electronic INN prescribing. It can also be used for a thorough evaluation of the impact of the new concept of INN prescribing on daily practice and on

  10. 2. Contextual view southwest from hillside behind Inn, with corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Contextual view southwest from hillside behind Inn, with corner of 'Big Sur Inn' Building (HABS-CA-2611-A) at extreme right, State Highway 1 curving through middle ground. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, Hayloft Building, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  11. 3. View to southeast from hillside behind Inn. Roof of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View to southeast from hillside behind Inn. Roof of 'Big Sur Inn' Building (HABS-CA-2611-A) at lower center, State Highway 1 bridge across Castro Creek Canyon at upper center. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  12. 16. LOOKING WEST AT OLD FAITHFUL INN, MOST OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. LOOKING WEST AT OLD FAITHFUL INN, MOST OF THE EAST WING IS VISIBLE TO THE LEFT. THE EAST WING ADDITION WAS BUILT BY THE INN'S ORIGINAL ARCHITECT, ROBERT C. REAMER IN 1913-14. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  13. Taming transport in InN

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.; Miller, Nate R.

    2011-05-29

    The large electron affinity of InN, close to 6 eV and the largest of any III-V semiconductor, creates a strong driving force for native donor formation, both in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces. Moreover, all InN surfaces, regardless of crystal orientation or doping, have been observed to have a surface accumulation layer of electrons, which interferes with standard electrical measurements. For these reasons, until recently, it was uncertain whether or not compensation by donor defects would prevent “real” p-type activity (i.e. existence of sufficiently shallow acceptors and mobile holes). A coordinated experimental approach using a combination of electrical (Hall effect) and electrothermal (Seebeck coefficient) measurements will be described that allows definitive evaluation of carrier transport in InN. In Mg-doped InN films, the sensitivity of thermopower to bulk hole conduction, combined with modeling of the parallel conducting layers (surface/bulk/interface), enables quantitative measurement of the free hole concentration and mobility. In undoped (n-type) material, combined Hall and thermopower measurements, along with a considering of the scattering mechanisms, leads to a quantitative understanding of the crucial role of charged line defects in limiting electron transport.

  14. Rethinking the INN system for therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Jérémy; Chastang, Romane; Dumet, Christophe; Watier, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the context of a possible revision of the International Nonproprietary Names (INN) system of recombinant monoclonal antibodies, which is saturated, we propose several avenues of reflection driven by the primary goal of the INN, information of health-care professionals. Clinical considerations argue for an abandon of the substems A (target category) and B (origin category), which lengthen the INN without real added-value. On the contrary, new substems or suffixes are required to alert on the absence/presence of an Fc portion and/or multispecificity, which are essential from a pharmacological point of view. Moreover, we think it necessary to explicitly mention Fc variations since they could influence the pharmacology of these biopharmaceuticals, and hence their efficacy and side-effects. Besides indicating the subclass/isotype in the documents easily accessible to health care professionals, we propose to systematically describe both the natural variations (allotypes) by using the Gm (G marker) system, and the artificial variations by using a Ge (G engineering) system that is discussed here and could apply to all IgG constant domains (tentatively called the Fy portion). PMID:27808597

  15. Mg doped InN and confirmation of free holes in InN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Miller, N.; Mayer, M. A.; Haller, E. E.; Iwamoto, R.; Araki, T.; Nanishi, Y.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W. III

    2011-01-24

    We report a systematic investigation on Mg doped InN epilayers grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Electrolyte capacitance voltage (ECV) combined with thermopower measurements find p-type conduction over an Mg concentration range. For InN:Mg in this p-type 'window' the Seebeck coefficients dramatically change their signs from negative to positive when the thickness of undoped InN interlayer decreases to zero. This notable sign change of Seebeck coefficient explains the previous inconsistency between ECV and thermopower results and confirms the existence of mobile holes in the InN:Mg. Taking into account the undoped InN interlayer, the hole density and mobility are extracted.

  16. 1. View north from across State Highway 1 toward Inn. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View north from across State Highway 1 toward Inn. 'Big Sur Inn' Building (HABS-CA-2611-A) visible at left, 'Hayloft' Building (HABS-CA-2611-B at right center, and 'Antique' Building (HABS-CA-2611-C) and 'Champagne' Building (HABS-CA-2611-D) out of sight behind trees at right. - Deetjen's Big Sur Inn, East Side of State Highway 1, Big Sur, Monterey County, CA

  17. Investigation of gas sensing properties of InN nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Madapu, Kishore K. E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Prasad, A. K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dhara, S. E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in

    2015-06-24

    InN nanoparticles were grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using In{sub 2}O{sub 3} as precursor material. Raman spectroscopic studies show the presence of the wurtzite phase of as-grown InN. Size of the nanoparticles were in range from quantum dot (<8 nm) to larger sized particles (100 nm). We studied the gas sensing properties of InN nanoparticles with CH{sub 4} gas. Sensors substrates were fabricated with interdigitated Au electrodes. InN nanoparticles show high response towards CH{sub 4} with minimum detectable concentration of 50 ppm at 200 °C.

  18. The Children's Inn at NIH Anniversary Key Messages | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Anniversary Key Messages Playground and Park at The Children's Inn at NIH. Photo courtesy of Mahan ...

  19. 21. REAR OF OLD FAITHFUL INN, LOOKING NORTH. SEMICIRCULAR SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. REAR OF OLD FAITHFUL INN, LOOKING NORTH. SEMI-CIRCULAR SIDE DINING ROOM, NOW CALLED THE BEAR PIT WAS ADDED IN 1927. (TAKEN FROM CHERRY-PICKER) - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  20. 17. HIGHWAY 190 ROAD VIEW AT FURNACE CREEK INN. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. HIGHWAY 190 ROAD VIEW AT FURNACE CREEK INN. NOTE ABANDONED GAS STATION ON LEFT AND ROAD TO BADWATER AT LEFT IN BACKGROUND. LOOKING WSW. - Death Valley National Park Roads, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Optical properties of InN studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunya, Ye; Wei, Lin; Jin, Zhou; Shuping, Li; Li, Chen; Heng, Li; Xiaoxuan, Wu; Songqing, Liu; Junyong, Kang

    2016-10-01

    With recently developed InN epitaxy via a controlling In bilayer, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements had been carried out on the grown InN and the measured ellipsometric spectra were fitted with the Delta Psi2 software by using a suitable model and the dispersion rule. The thickness was measured by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Insight into the film quality of InN and the lattice constant were gained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). By fitting the SE, the thickness of the InN film is consistent with that obtained by SEM cross-sectional thickness measurement. The optical bandgap of InN was put forward to be 1.05 eV, which conforms to the experimental results measured by the absorption spectrum and cathodoluminescence (CL). The refractive index and the extinction coefficient of interest were represented for InN, which is useful to design optoelectronic devices. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2012CB619301), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2014AA032608), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11204254, 11404271), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. 2012121014, 20720150027).

  2. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim D; Carter, Paul J; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G E; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G; Parren, Paul W H I; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J; Clark, Michael R; Lowe, David C; Dahiyat, Bassil I; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A J; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Burton, Dennis R; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Chester, Kerry A; Glennie, Martin J; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a -mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies.

  3. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Carter, Paul J.; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J.; Clark, Michael R.; Lowe, David C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M.; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S.; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S.; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A.J.; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A.; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Chester, Kerry A.; Glennie, Martin J.; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a –mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  4. InN Quantum Dot Based Infra-Red Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Arjun; Kumar, Mahesh; Roull, Basanta; Vinoy, K J; Krupanidhj, S B

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled InN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si(111) substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN QDs was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The dot densities were varied by varying the indium flux. Variation of dot density was confirmed by FESEM images. Interdigitated electrodes were fabricated using standard lithog- raphy steps to form metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector devices. The devices show strong infrared response. It was found that the samples with higher density of InN QDs showed lower dark current and higher photo current. An explanation was provided for the observations and the experimental results were validated using Silvaco Atlas device simulator.

  5. The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Kristal Nemeroff—The Patient Kristal Nemeroff, age 2, at the Children's ...

  6. No Vacancy: Inn Provides Revenue Source for Financially Troubled Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Jerry G.; Brant, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    The Peabody Institute of Baltimore (Maryland), the Johns Hopkins University's music school, addressed its financial problems by converting four campus buildings into an inn used to house Elderhostel participants. Annual program revenues cover all costs and yield a financial reserve for the school. (MSE)

  7. Phonon lifetimes and phonon decay in InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Kuball, M.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W. J.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2005-05-01

    We report on the Raman analysis of A1(LO) (longitudinal optical) and E2 phonon lifetimes in InN and their temperature dependence from 80 to 700 K. Our experimental results show that among the various possible decay channels, the A1(LO) phonon decays asymmetrically into a high energy and a low energy phonon, whereas the E2 phonon predominantly decays into three phonons. Possible decay channels of the A1(LO) phonon may involve combinations of transverse optical and acoustic phonons. Phonon lifetimes of 1.3 and 4 ps were measured at 80 K for the A1(LO) and the E2 phonons, respectively. This rather long A1(LO) phonon lifetime suggests that hot phonon effects will play a role in InN for carrier relaxation.

  8. Temperature switching of cavity modes in InN microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanov, D. R. Kaibyshev, V. H.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Kuznetsova, N. V.; Kopiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Shubina, T. V.

    2015-11-15

    InN optical cavities supporting low-order whispering-gallery modes up to room temperature are formed by molecular-beam epitaxy on patterned substrates. The observed switching of the mode type with increasing temperature is explained in terms of changes in the optical parameters due to a shift of the absorption edge and modification of its shape. Modeling taking into account a variation in the refractive index reproduces the typical distributions of the electromagnetic-field intensity in the cavities.

  9. Lattice polarity detection of InN by circular photogalvanic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, X. Q.; He, X. W.; Yin, C. M.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.; Chen, Y. H.; Wang, Z. G.; Ishitani, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2009-07-20

    We report an effective and nondestructive method based on circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) to detect the lattice polarity of InN. Because of the lattice inversion between In- and N-polar InN, the energy band spin splitting is opposite for InN films with different polarities. Consequently under light irradiation with the same helicity, CPGE photocurrents in In- and N-polar layers will have opposite directions, thus the polarity can be detected. This method is demonstrated by our CPGE measurements in both n- and p-type InN films.

  10. Lattice polarity detection of InN by circular photogalvanic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, X. Q.; He, X. W.; Yin, C. M.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.; Chen, Y. H.; Wang, Z. G.; Ishitani, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2009-07-01

    We report an effective and nondestructive method based on circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) to detect the lattice polarity of InN. Because of the lattice inversion between In- and N-polar InN, the energy band spin splitting is opposite for InN films with different polarities. Consequently under light irradiation with the same helicity, CPGE photocurrents in In- and N-polar layers will have opposite directions, thus the polarity can be detected. This method is demonstrated by our CPGE measurements in both n- and p-type InN films.

  11. Prediction of rock salt structure of (InN)32 nanoparticles from first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhsharan; Sekhon, S S; Kumar, Vijay

    2013-03-21

    From first principles calculations, we show that (InN)32 nanoparticles favor rock salt structure compared with wurtzite structure in bulk. A phase transition from wurtzite to rock salt structure is known to occur in bulk InN at 12.1 GPa and higher values of pressure for AlN and GaN. However, at the nanoscale we show that this structural transition takes place in (InN)32 without applying pressure. The charge asymmetry value "g" and cation/anion size ratio in InN describe very well this behavior. Similar studies on nanoparticles of AlN and GaN as well as a few other binary compounds such as MgS, AgI, ZnO, and CdSe, however, do not show such a transition. Our results suggest (InN)32 to be a unique candidate as further calculations on a few larger size (InN)n nanoparticles show that a filled cage (two shells) (InN)12@(InN)48 structure of (InN)60 has higher binding energy compared with a rock salt structure of (InN)64 leading to the conclusion that other 3D structures are likely to become favorable over rock salt structure for larger sizes.

  12. Convergence of valence bands for high thermoelectric performance for p-type InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Zhu; Li, Ruo-Ping; Liu, Jun-Hui; Huang, Ming-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Band engineering to converge the bands to achieve high valley degeneracy is one of effective approaches for designing ideal thermoelectric materials. Convergence of many valleys in the valence band may lead to a high Seebeck coefficient, and induce promising thermoelectric performance of p-type InN. In the current work, we have systematically investigated the electronic structure and thermoelectric performance of wurtzite InN by using the density functional theory combined with semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory. Form the results, it can be found that intrinsic InN has a large Seebeck coefficient (254 μV/K) and the largest value of ZeT is 0.77. The transport properties of p-type InN are better than that of n-type one at the optimum carrier concentration, which mainly due to the large Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN, although the electrical conductivity of n-type InN is larger than that of p-type one. We found that the larger Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN may originate from the large valley degeneracy in the valence band. Moreover, the low minimum lattice thermal conductivity for InN is one key factor to become a good thermoelectric material. Therefore, p-type InN could be a potential material for further applications in the thermoelectric area.

  13. Applying the INN model to the MaxClique problem

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, T.

    1993-09-01

    Max-Clique is the problem of finding the largest clique in a given graph. It is not only NP-hard, but, as recent results suggest, even hard to approximate. Nevertheless it is still very important to develop and test practical algorithms that will find approximate solutions for the maximum clique problem on various graphs stemming from numerous applications. Indeed, many different types of algorithmic approaches are applied to that problem. Several neural networks and related algorithms were applied recently to combinatorial optimization problems in general and to the Max-Clique problem in particular. These neural nets are dynamical system which minimize a cost (or computational ``energy``) function that represents the optimization problem, the Max-Clique in our case. Therefore they all belong to the class of integer programming algorithms surveyed in the Pardalos and Xue review. The work presented here is a development and improvement of a neural network algorithm that was introduced recently. In the previous work, we have considered two Hopfield type neural networks, the INN and the HcN, and their application to the max-clique problem. In this paper, I concentrate on the INN network and present an improved version of the t-A algorithm that was introduced in. The rest of this paper is organized as follows: in section 2, I describe the INN model and how it implements a given graph. In section 3, it is characterized in terms of graph theory. In particular, the stable states of the network are mapped to the maximal cliques of its underling graph. In section 4, I present the t-Annealing algorithm and an improved version of it, the Adaptive t-Annealing. Several experiments done with these algorithms on benchmark graphs are reported in section 5, and the efficiency of the new algorithm is demonstrated. I conclude with a short discussion.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum,J.; Anderson, T.

    2006-07-13

    InN nanorods were grown on a, c-, and r-plane of sapphire and also on Si (111) and GaN (0001) by non-catalytic, template-free hydride metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. These nanocrystals have different shapes and different faceting depending on the substrate used and their crystallographic orientation. EELS measurements have confirmed the high purity of these crystals. The observed PL peak was in the range of 0.9-0.95 eV. The strongest PL intensity was observed for the nanocrystals with the larger diameters.

  15. Temperature sensitive photoconductivity observed in InN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xinqiang; Feng, Li; Zheng, Xiantong; Chen, Guang; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Lu, Liwu; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2013-02-01

    Photoconductivity has been systematically studied in unintentionally doped n-type InN film with super-bandgap excitation (1.53 eV) at temperatures varying in the range of 100-300 K. A negative photoconductivity is observed at room temperature, whereas it gradually changes to be positive with decreasing temperature. Transition temperature from negative to positive photoconductivity is found to be greatly related to the residual electron concentration as the higher the electron concentration, the lower the transition temperature. An energy band model including a donor state with large lattice relaxation as well as a recombination center is proposed, which explains the experimental observation well.

  16. The Little Inn at the Crossroads: A Spiritual Approach to the Design of a Leadership Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bento, Regina F.

    2000-01-01

    A course on spiritual dimensions of leadership was designed using the metaphor of an inn at a crossroads. The inn included a virtual library of Web-based texts and studio space for creativity and self-expression. Seven workshops explored the following themes: language of leadership and change, personal leadership qualities, vision and mission,…

  17. Electronic structures and work functions of InN(0001) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jung-Hwan; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2007-03-01

    InN films have attracted great attention with its recently discovered band gap, 0.7eV, and evidence for p-type doping. We have studied theoretically the electronic structures, surfaces, and work functions of InN films using the highly precise FLAPW method. The passivation with pseudo-hydrogens has also been applied to the surfaces of InN(0001) films for comparison with the electronic structure of the ideal InN(0001) films. We compare the work functions of InN films with other wurtzite materials such as ZnO, GaN, and AlN, which we have also calculated. We discuss the mechanism of the structural transition with layer thickness for the very thin InN(0001) films, for which we have found that the ideal InN(0001) films of the wurtzite structure, up to 4 bilayers, optimize to the graphitic- like structure. We then discuss the relationship between the dipoles and the surfaces (work functions) of the InN(0001) films, and the possibilities of their p-type doping. R.E. Jones, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett, 96, 125505 (2006). Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 24, 864 (1981). K. Shiraishi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn, 59, 3455 (1990) C. L. Freeman, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett, 96, 066102 (2006)

  18. NIH's "Family Inn" Lets Out-of-Town Youngsters Stay "Home."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Sylvia

    1993-01-01

    The Children's Inn, on the grounds of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) near Washington, DC, serves as a national model of the value of family-centered homes for pediatric patients and their families. When parents bring their child to NIH from a distant place, they can stay in the inn with their child while the child is receiving treatment.…

  19. Inn1 couples contraction of the actomyosin ring to membrane ingression during cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto; Marchesi, Vanessa; Murray, Stephen; Jones, Richard; Pereira, Gislene; Edmondson, Ricky; Allen, Terry; Labib, Karim

    2008-04-01

    By rapidly depleting each of the essential budding yeast proteins of unknown function, we identified a novel factor that we call Inn1, which associates with the contractile actomyosin ring at the end of mitosis and is needed for cytokinesis. We show that Inn1 has a C2 domain at the amino terminus of the protein that is required for ingression of the plasma membrane, whereas the remainder of the protein recruits Inn1 to the actomyosin ring. The lethal effects of deleting the INN1 gene can be suppressed by artificial fusion of the C2 domain to other components of the actomyosin ring, restoring membrane ingression on contraction of the actomyosin ring. Our data indicate that recruitment of the C2 domain of Inn1 to the contractile actomyosin ring is crucial for ingression of the plasma membrane during cytokinesis in budding yeast.

  20. Direct current magnetron sputtering deposition of InN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xing-Min; Hao, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, InN thin films were deposited on Si (1 0 0) and K9 glass by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering. The target was In metal with the purity of 99.999% and the gases were Ar (99.999%) and N 2 (99.999%). The properties of InN thin films were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the film surface is very rough and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) shows that the film contains In, N and very little O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering reveal that the film mainly contains hexagonal InN. The four-probe measurement shows that InN film is conductive. The transmission measurement demonstrates that the transmission of InN deposited on K9 glass is as low as 0.5% from 400 nm to 800 nm.

  1. Geothermal heating facilities for Frontier Inn, Susanville, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A 38 unit motel composed of six major sections (coffee shop, A frame units, apartments, back units, two story units and office) was built over a number of years and exhibits widely varying types of construction. Space heating is provided by primarily electric resistance equipment with some propane use. Domestic hot water is provided primarily by propane with some electric resistance. The coffee shop uses fuel oil for both space and domestic hot water heating. A geothermal district heating system is being installed. Although the motel site is not located in the area of construction activity, it is expected that the pipeline will be extended. The potential of retrofitting the existing heating facilities at the inn to geothermal is studied.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN dots on nitrided sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Dengel, Radu-Gabriel; Stebounova, LarissaV.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-04-20

    A series of self-assembled InN dots are grown by radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) directly on nitrided sapphire. Initial nitridation of the sapphire substrates at 900 C results in the formation of a rough AlN surface layer, which acts as a very thin buffer layer and facilitates the nucleation of the InN dots according to the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode, with a wetting layer of {approx}0.9 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that well-confined InN nanoislands with the greatest height/width at half-height ratio of 0.64 can be grown at 460 C. Lower substrate temperatures result in a reduced aspect ratio due to a lower diffusion rate of the In adatoms, whereas the thermal decomposition of InN truncates the growth at T>500 C. The densities of separated dots vary between 1.0 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} and 2.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} depending on the growth time. Optical response of the InN dots under laser excitation is studied with apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, although no photoluminescence is observed from these samples. In view of the desirable implementation of InN nanostructures into photonic devices, the results indicate that nitrided sapphire is a suitable substrate for growing self-assembled InN nanodots.

  3. Intrinsic electronic properties of high-quality wurtzite InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, H.; Schuppang, J.; Schnedler, M.; Duchamp, M.; Nenstiel, C.; Portz, V.; Kure, T.; Bügler, M.; Lenz, A.; Dähne, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Gwo, S.; Choi, S.; Speck, J. S.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2016-12-01

    Recent reports suggested that InN is a highly unusual III-V semiconductor, whose behavior fundamentally differs from that of others. We therefore analyzed its intrinsic electronic properties on the highest available quality InN layers, demonstrating the absence of electron accumulation at the (10 1 ¯0 ) cleavage surface and in the bulk. The bulk electron density is governed solely by dopants. Hence, we conclude that InN acts similarly to the other III-V semiconductors and previously reported intriguing effects are related to low crystallinity, surface decomposition, nonstoichiometry, and/or In adlayers.

  4. Selective-Area Growth of Transferable InN Nanocolumns by Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide Nanotemplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Guozhen; Xu, Yang; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-02-01

    InN nanocolumn arrays were grown on c-plane sapphire with and without anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotemplates. The crystalline quality of InN nanocolumns was significantly improved by selective-area growth (SAG) using AAO templates, as verified by X-ray diffraction measurements. Then, InN nanocolumns were transferred onto p-type silicon substrates after etching off the AAO templates. Current-voltage characteristic of the transferred n-InN/p-Si heterojunctions shows on/off ratio as high as 4.65 × 103 at 2 V. This work offers a potential way to grow transferable devices with improving performances.

  5. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Wang, G. T.; Dimakis, E. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Moustakas, T. D.; Tsui, D. C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in a superlattice structure of 40 InN quantum wells consisting of one monolayer of InN embedded between 10 nm GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} (or 1.25 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} per InN quantum well, assuming all the quantum wells are connected by diffused indium contacts) and 420 cm{sup 2}/Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  6. Boron doped GaN and InN: Potential candidates for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S. W.; Huang, X. N.; Yao, K. L.

    2017-02-01

    The full potential linearized augmented plane wave method together with the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential is utilized to investigate the electronic structures and magnetism for boron doped GaN and InN. Calculations show the boron substituting nitrogen (BN defects) could induce the GaN and InN to be half-metallic ferromagnets. The magnetic moments mainly come from the BN defects, and each BN defect would produce the 2.00 μB total magnetic moment. The electronic structures indicate the carriers-mediated double exchange interaction plays a crucial role in forming the ferromagnetism. Positive chemical pair interactions imply the BN defects would form the homogeneous distribution in GaN and InN matrix. Moderate formation energies suggest that GaN and InN with BN defects could be fabricated experimentally.

  7. InN Based Water Condensation Sensors on Glass and Flexible Plastic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Viorel; Costea, Stefan; Brezeanu, Mihai; Stan, George E.; Besleaga, Cristina; Galca, Aurelian C.; Ionescu, Gabriela; Ionescu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the realization and characterization of a condensation sensor based on indium nitride (InN) layers deposited by magnetron sputtering on glass and flexible plastic substrates, having fast response and using potentially low cost fabrication technology. The InN devices work as open gate thin film sensitive transistors. Condensed water droplets, formed on the open gate region of the sensors, deplete the electron accumulation layer on the surface of InN film, thus decreasing the current of the sensor. The current increases back to its initial value when water droplets evaporate from the exposed InN film surface. The response time is as low as 2 s.

  8. Ambient pressure, low-temperature synthesis and characterization of colloidal InN nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Yun, Dong Soo; Hu, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Highly soluble, non-aggregated colloidal wurtzite InN nanocrystals were obtained through an ambient pressure, low-temperature method followed by post-synthesis treatment with nitric acid. PMID:25484524

  9. An investigation of electronic and optical properties of InN nanosheet by first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, M.; Elahi, S. M.; Salehi, H.; Abolhassani, M. R.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we investigated electronic and optical properties of InN nanosheet using density function theory (DFT) implemented in Wien2k code. We calculated the dielectric function, absorption coefficient, optical conductivity, refraction index, extinction index, reflectivity, and energy loss function of the InN nanosheet within GGA (PBE) and Engel-Vosko (E.V) approximation in two directions E||x (electric field parallel to nanosheet) and E||z (electric field perpendicular to nanosheet), we also calculated the band gap energy within GGA (PBE) and E.V approximations. Optical conductivity in directions to x and z shows that InN nanosheet has semiconductor properties. At the end, we calculated electronic and optical properties, and elastic constant of InN Bulk (wurtzite).

  10. Accommodation mechanism of InN nanocolumns grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Luna, E.; Trampert, A.

    2007-07-09

    High quality InN nanocolumns have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on bare and AlN-buffered Si(111) substrates. The accommodation mechanism of the InN nanocolumns to the substrate was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Samples grown on AlN-buffered Si(111) show abrupt interfaces between the nanocolumns and the buffer layer, where an array of periodically spaced misfit dislocations develops. Samples grown on bare Si(111) exhibit a thin Si{sub x}N{sub y} at the InN nanocolumn/substrate interface because of Si nitridation. The Si{sub x}N{sub y} thickness and roughness may affect the nanocolumn relative alignment to the substrate. In all cases, InN nanocolumns grow strain- and defect-free.

  11. Polarity and microstructure in InN thin layers grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, N.; Nakahara, Y.; Amano, H.

    2006-06-01

    Microstructures in InN grown on sapphire (0001) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) (111) by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to clarify the growth process. Special attention was paid to the selectivity of the crystal polarity of InN. The InN thin films grown on sapphire after nitridation has a flat surface while those grown on YSZ has hillocks on the surface. The crystal polarity was determined by comparing the experimentally observed intensity distribution in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) disks with those simulated by the Broch-wave method. It was found that the InN grown on the sapphire has a nitrogen-polarity and the one on YSZ has a mixture of In- and N-polarities. The effect of surface-nitridation of sapphire on the growth process is also discussed

  12. Synthesis and characterization of InP and InN colloidal quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Osinski, Marek; Greenberg, Melisa; Bunge, Scott D.; Chen, Weiliang; Smolyakov, G. A.; Pulford, B. N.; Jiang, Ying-Bing

    2005-04-01

    InP quantum dots (QDs) with zinc blende structure and InN QDs with hexagonal structure were synthesized from appropriate organometallic precursors in a noncoordinating solvent using myristic acid as a ligand. The QDs were characterized by TEM, the associated energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron diffraction, and steady state UV-VIS optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. To our best knowledge, this paper reports synthesis of InN colloidal quantum dots for the first time.

  13. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, J.; Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A.

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  14. First-principles study of optical properties of InN nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmazdeh, Masoud Majidiyan; Mendi, Roohallah Taghavi; Zelati, Amir; Boochani, Arash; Nofeli, Fariba

    2016-05-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT), some optical properties of InN nanosheet, such as dielectric function, energy loss function, refractive index, reflectivity and absorption coefficient, have been calculated using the modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) exchange-correlation potential and full potential-linearized augmented plane waves (FP-LAPW) method. The study of dielectric function show that optical properties of InN nanosheet are anisotropic and important energy range in the optical process is between low energies to 20 eV. The results indicate the plasmon energy of InN nanosheet occurs in the lower energy than bulk InN and in addition the plasmon energy in the in-plane direction is different from that perpendicular to the in-plane direction. The obtained optical gaps are 1.2 eV and 3.6 eV in perpendicular and parallel to c-axis, respectively. Study of refractive index and optical reflectivity shows that the superluminal phenomena occur in the several energy ranges for the InN nanosheet and this nanosheet has high transparency in a wide energy range. The results propose that the InN nanosheet is a good candidate for the optical communications applications, optoelectronics devices and transparent coatings.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of InN nanocrystals on glass substrate by plasma assisted reactive evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Alizadeh, M.; Shuhaimi, A.; Sundaram, S.; Hakim, K. M.; Goh, B. T.; Rahman, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    InN nanocrystals were grown on glass substrate by plasma assisted reactive evaporation technique and the quality was compared with InN on Si (111) substrate. Single phase InN was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and micro Raman analysis on both the substrates. Agglomerated and Hexagonal faceting nanocrystals observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis shows InN nanocrystals are nearly stochiometric. Photoluminescence reveals a broad emission near bandedge at 2 .04 eV and defect band at 1.07 eV. The Hall measurement on both the substrates reveals high electron carrier concentration. These encouraging results obtained suggested that high quality single crystalline InN can be obtained on glass substrate further optimizing the growth parameters. This novel growth of InN nanocrystals on glass substrate is an important step towards the development of monolithic, high efficiency low-cost InGaN-based renewable energy sources.

  16. RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Properties of InN and Related Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanishi, Yasushi; Saito, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro

    2003-05-01

    The fundamental band gap of InN has been thought to be about 1.9 eV for a long time. Recent developments of metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and RF-molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE) growth technologies have made it possible to obtain high-quality InN films. A lot of experimental results have been presented very recently, suggesting that the true band-gap energy of InN should be less than 1.0 eV. In this paper, we review the results of the detailed study of RF-MBE growth conditions for obtaining high-quality InN films. The full widths at half maximum (FWHMs) of ω-mode X-ray diffraction (XRD), ω-2θ mode XRD and E2 (high-frequency)-phonon-mode peaks in the Raman scattering spectrum of the grown layer were 236.7 arcsec, 28.9 arcsec and 3.7 cm-1, respectively. The carrier concentration and room temperature electron mobility were 4.9× 1018 cm-3 and 1130 cm2/Vs, respectively. Photoluminescence and optical absorption measurements of these high-quality InN films have clearly demonstrated that the fundamental band gap of InN is about 0.8 eV. Studies on the growth and characterization of InGaN alloys over the entire alloy composition further supported that the fundamental band gap of InN is about 0.8 eV.

  17. The electronic structures of AlN and InN wurtzite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wen; Li, Dong-Xiao

    2017-07-01

    We derive the relations between the analogous seven Luttinger-Kohn parameters and six Rashba-Sheka-Pikus parameters for wurtzite semiconductors, which can be used to investigate the electronic structures of some wurtzite semiconductors such as AlN and InN materials, including their low-dimensional structures. As an example, the electronic structures of AlN and InN nanowires are calculated by using the derived relations and six-band effective-mass k · p theory. Interestingly, it is found that the ground hole state of AlN nanowires is always a pure S state whether the radius R is small (1 nm) or large (6 nm), and the ground hole state only contains | Z > Bloch orbital component. Therefore, AlN nanowires is the ideal low-dimensional material for the production of purely linearly polarized π light, unlike ZnO nanowires, which emits plane-polarized σ light. However, the ground hole state of InN nanowires can be tuned from a pure S state to a mixed P state when the radius R is larger than 2.6 nm, which will make the polarized properties of the lowest optical transition changes from linearly polarized π light to plane-polarized σ light. Meanwhile, the valence band structures of InN nanowires will present strong band-crossings when the radius R increases to 6 nm, and through the detail analysis of possible transitions of InN nanowires at the Γ point, we find some of the neighbor optical transitions are almost degenerate, because the spin-orbit splitting energy of InN material is only 0.001 eV. Therefore, it is concluded that the electronic structures and optical properties of InN nanowires present great differences with that of AlN nanowires.

  18. Relation Between Structural and Optical Properties of InN and InxGa1-xN Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Keywords: InN InGaN structural and optical properties Abstract: <p>Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and optical measurements obtained from InN and...In1-xGaxNfilms (0 < x < 0.54) grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy are presented. Energy gaps measured byabsorption, PR, and PL for InN films grown on c...and optical measurements obtained from InN and In1-xGaxN films (0 < x < 0.54) grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy are presented. Energy gaps measured by

  19. Raman scattering study of anharmonic phonon decay in InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech-Amador, Núria; Cuscó, Ramon; Artús, Luis; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2011-06-01

    We present Raman scattering measurements on wurtzite InN over a temperature range from 80 to 660 K. To investigate all phonon modes of the wurtzite structure, measurements were performed on c and m faces of high-quality InN epilayers. High-resolution measurements of the low-frequency E2 mode reveal a slight anharmonic broadening of such a long-lived phonon due to up-conversion processes and a substantial contribution of background impurity broadening in the determination of its linewidth. An analysis of the anharmonicity and lifetimes of the InN phonons is carried out. Possible decay channels including up-conversion processes and four-phonon processes are discussed on the basis of density functional theory calculations.

  20. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series. PMID:26289498

  1. Anomalous magnetism of superconducting Mg-doped InN film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P. H.; Hong, S. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Guo, Y. X.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the Meissner effect of Mg-doped InN film with superconducting transition onset temperature Tc,onset of 5 K. Mg-doped InN is magnetically ordered and exhibits a simultaneous first-order magnetic and electric transition near 50 K. Its behavior is similar to that of iron-based superconductors. A strong correlation is proposed to exist between structural distortion and superconductivity when Mg is doped into InN. The suppression of magnetic ordering close to Tc by doping is further demonstrated by anisotropic magnetoresistance and M-H measurements. The findings suggest that the superconducting mechanism in the system may not be conventional BCS.

  2. Stopping Power Of He, C And O In InN

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Siketic, Z.; Radovic, I. Bogdanovic

    2011-06-01

    Group III nitrides such as InN, GaN, and their alloys are increasingly important in a host of optoelectronic and electronic devices. The presence of unintentional impurities is one of the factors that can strongly affect the electronic properties of these materials, and thus ion beam analysis techniques can play a fundamental role, in particular heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis tracing and quantifying these contaminations. However, stopping powers in InN and GaN have not yet been measured, and data analysis relies on using the Bragg rule, which is often inaccurate. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of several ions in InN. The results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented.

  3. Large area InN terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Jan Grumber, Christian; Walther, Markus; Polyakov, Vladimir; Iannucci, Robert; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-09-14

    Large area terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect in InN (indium nitride) are presented. The formation of lateral photo-Dember currents is induced by laser-illumination through a microstructured metal cover processed onto the InN substrate, causing an asymmetry in the lateral photogenerated charge carrier distribution. Our design uses simple metal structures, which are produced by conventional two-dimensional micro-structuring techniques. Having favoring properties as a photo-Dember material InN is particularly well-suited as a substrate for our emitters. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of the emitters can be significantly influenced by the structure of the metal cover leaving room for improvement by optimizing the masking structures.

  4. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series.

  5. Surface charge accumulation of InN films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.; Eastman, Lester F.; Stutz, C. E.

    2003-03-01

    A series of thin InN films down to 10 nm in thickness were prepared by molecular-beam epitaxy on either AlN or GaN buffers under optimized growth conditions. By extrapolating the fitted curve of sheet carrier density versus film thickness to zero film thickness, a strong excess sheet charge was derived, which must come from either the surface or the interface between InN and its buffer layer. Since metal contacts, including Ti, Al, Ni, and a Hg probe, can always form an ohmic contact on InN without any annealing, it is determined that at least part of the excess charge is surface charge, which was also confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements.

  6. Anomalous surface potential behavior observed in InN by photoassisted Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Jiandong; Wang, Xinqiang; Wang, Ping; Li, Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Lattice-polarity dependence of InN surface photovoltage has been identified by an anomalous surface potential behavior observed via photoassisted Kelvin probe force microscopy. Upon above bandgap light illumination in the ambient atmosphere, the surface photovoltage of the In-polar InN shows a pronounced decrease, while that of the N-polar one keeps almost constant. Those different behaviors between N-polar and In-polar surfaces are attributed to a polarity-related surface reactivity, which is found not to be influenced by Mg-doping. These findings provide a simple and non-destructive approach to determine the lattice polarity and allow us to suggest that the In-polar InN, especially that with buried p-type conduction, should be chosen for sensing application.

  7. Selective-Area Growth of Transferable InN Nanocolumns by Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide Nanotemplates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Guozhen; Xu, Yang; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-12-01

    InN nanocolumn arrays were grown on c-plane sapphire with and without anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotemplates. The crystalline quality of InN nanocolumns was significantly improved by selective-area growth (SAG) using AAO templates, as verified by X-ray diffraction measurements. Then, InN nanocolumns were transferred onto p-type silicon substrates after etching off the AAO templates. Current-voltage characteristic of the transferred n-InN/p-Si heterojunctions shows on/off ratio as high as 4.65 × 10(3) at 2 V. This work offers a potential way to grow transferable devices with improving performances.

  8. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  9. Hydrogen adsorbed at N-polar InN: Significant changes in the surface electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhardt, A.; Krischok, S.; Himmerlich, M.

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen and ammonia with as-grown N-polar InN surfaces is investigated using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy. Changes in the surface electronic properties, including the band alignment and work function, as well as the chemical bonding states of the substrate and adsorbates are characterized. Ammonia molecules are dissociating at the InN surface, resulting in adsorption of hydrogen species. Consequently, the considerable changes of the chemical and electronic properties of the InN surface during ammonia interaction are almost identical to those found for adsorption of atomic hydrogen. In both cases, hydrogen atoms preferentially bond to surface nitrogen atoms, resulting in the disappearance of the nitrogen dangling-bond-related occupied surface state close to the valence band edge at ˜1.6 eV binding energy and the formation of new occupied electron states at the conduction band edge. Furthermore, a decrease in work function during adsorption from 4.7 to 3.7-3.8 eV, as well as an increase in the surface downward band bending by 0.3 eV, confirm that hydrogen is acting as electron donor at InN surfaces and therefore has to be considered as one main reason for the surface electron accumulation observed at N-polar InN samples exposed to ambient conditions, for example as the dissociation product of molecules. The measured formation and occupation of electronic states above the conduction band minimum occur in conjunction with the observed increase in surface electron concentration and underline the relationship between the energy position of occupied electron states and surface band alignment for InN as a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  10. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; ...

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  11. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  12. Sulfur passivation of surface electrons in highly Mg-doped InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, W. M.; Chai, J.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.; Veal, T. D.

    2013-09-01

    Electron accumulation with a sheet density greater than 1013 cm-2 usually occurs at InN surfaces. Here, the effects of treatment with ammonium sulfide ((NH4)2Sx) on the surface electronic properties of highly Mg-doped InN (>4×1018 cm-3) have been investigated with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The valence band photoemission spectra show that the surface Fermi level decreases by approximately 0.08 eV with (NH4)2Sx treatment, resulting in a decrease of the downward band bending and up to a 70% reduction in the surface electron sheet density.

  13. Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantawongrit, P.; Sanorpim, S.; Yaguchi, H.; Orihara, M.; Limsuwan, P.

    2015-08-01

    InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ∼5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and anti-phase domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors g=11\\bar{2}0 and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of anti-phase domains. Project supported by the Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP) and the King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi under The National Research University Project. One of the authors (S. Sanorpim) was supported by the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT) and the Thai Government Stimulus Package 2 (TKK2555), under the Project for Establishment of Comprehensive Center for Innovative Food, Health Products and Agriculture.

  14. Study of InN epitaxial films and nanorods grown on GaN template by RF-MOMBE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on high-quality InN materials prepared on a GaN template using radio-frequency metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy. We also discuss the structural and electro-optical properties of InN nanorods/films. The X-ray diffraction peaks of InN(0002) and InN(0004) were identified from their spectra, indicating that the (0001)-oriented hexagonal InN was epitaxially grown on the GaN template. Scanning electron microscopic images of the surface morphology revealed a two-dimensional growth at a rate of approximately 0.85 μm/h. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images identified a sharp InN/GaN interface and a clear epitaxial orientation relationship of [0001]InN // [0001]GaN and ( 2¯110)InN // ( 2¯110)GaN. The optical properties of wurtzite InN nanorods were determined according to the photoluminescence, revealing a band gap of 0.77 eV. PMID:22908859

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Tetragonal Distortion of InN Thin Films by RBS/Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Fa, Tao; Yao, Shu-De

    2009-08-01

    Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) are used to identify the crystalline quality (χ min = 4.87%) of an InN thin film as a function of depth, and make a non-destructive quantitative analysis of the structure, in order to analyze the tetragonal distortion of the InN thin film at the depth determined.

  16. Growth mechanism and microstructure of low defect density InN (0001) In-face thin films on Si (111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kehagias, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Adikimenakis, A.

    2013-10-28

    Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to analyze the direct nucleation and growth, by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, of high quality InN (0001) In-face thin films on (111) Si substrates. Critical steps of the heteroepitaxial growth process are InN nucleation at low substrate temperature under excessively high N-flux conditions and subsequent growth of the main InN epilayer at the optimum conditions, namely, substrate temperature 400–450 °C and In/N flux ratio close to 1. InN nucleation occurs in the form of a very high density of three dimensional (3D) islands, which coalesce very fast into a low surface roughness InN film. The reduced reactivity of Si at low temperature and its fast coverage by InN limit the amount of unintentional Si nitridation by the excessively high nitrogen flux and good bonding/adhesion of the InN film directly on the Si substrate is achieved. The subsequent overgrowth of the main InN epilayer, in a layer-by-layer growth mode that enhances the lateral growth of InN, reduces significantly the crystal mosaicity and the density of threading dislocations is about an order of magnitude less compared to InN films grown using an AlN/GaN intermediate nucleation/buffer layer on Si. The InN films exhibit the In-face polarity and very smooth atomically stepped surfaces.

  17. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  18. Self-assembled InN micro-mushrooms by upside-down pendeoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Yang, Fan; Esser, Bryan D.; Kent, Thomas F.; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly of hexagonal InN micro-mushrooms on Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals hexagonal mushroom caps with smooth top surfaces and a step-like morphology at the bottom surface. A detailed growth study along with SEM measurements reveals that an upside-down pendeoepitaxy mechanism underlies the formation of these structures. Cryogenic temperature photoluminescence measurements on the InN disks show a dominant band-to-acceptor recombination peak at 0.68 eV. Cross-section annular bright field (ABF-) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) reveals that the growth of these structures occurs along the [ 000 1 bar ] crystallographic orientation (N-face). Plan-view high angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM in the center of the micro-disks reveals a hexagonal lattice indicative of stacking faults. However, at the outskirt of the micro-disk, surprisingly, a honeycomb lattice is observed in plan view STEM indicating a perfect freestanding Wurtzite InN disk that is free of stacking faults. This result opens a pathway for realizing strain-free, freestanding InN substrates.

  19. Dopants and Defects in InN and InGaN Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.; Jones, R.E.; Li, S.X.; Yu, K.M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2005-04-01

    We have performed systematic studies of the effects of high-energy particle irradiation on the properties of InGaN alloys. In agreement with the amphoteric defect model, irradiation of InN produces donor-like defects. The electron concentration increases with increasing radiation dose and saturates at 4 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} at very high doses. We find that the increase of the electron concentration causes a large blue-shift of the absorption edge, which is well-explained by the Burstein-Moss effect. The maximum electron concentration decreases with increasing Ga fraction in irradiated In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloys as the conduction band edge approaches the Fermi level stabilization energy (E{sub FS}). For x > 0.66 the conduction band edge moves above E{sub FS} and the irradiation of n-type films produces acceptor-like defects, resulting in a reduced free electron concentration. An analysis of the concentration dependence of the electron mobility in InN indicates that the dominant defects in irradiated InN are triply-charged donors. Finally, we show that InN films doped with Mg acceptors behave like undoped films above a threshold radiation dose.

  20. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  1. Effect of interfacial lattice mismatch on bulk carrier concentration and band gap of InN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2012-10-15

    The issue of ambiguous values of the band gap (0.6 to 2 eV) of InN thin film in literature has been addressed by a careful experiment. We have grown wurtzite InN films by PA-MBE simultaneously on differently modified c-plane sapphire substrates and characterized by complementary structural and chemical probes. Our studies discount Mie resonances caused by metallic In segregation at grain boundaries as the reason for low band gap values ( Almost-Equal-To 0.6 eV) and also the formation of Indium oxides and oxynitrides as the cause for high band gap value ( Almost-Equal-To 2.0 eV). It is observed that polycrystallinity arising from azimuthal miss-orientation of c-oriented wurtzite InN crystals increases the carrier concentration and the band gap values. We have reviewed the band gap, carrier concentration, and effective mass of InN in literature and our own measurements, which show that the Moss-Burstein relation with a non-parabolic conduction band accounts for the observed variation of band gap with carrier concentration.

  2. Nanostructural and electronic properties of polytypes in InN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Kioseoglou, J.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Kehagias, Th.; Georgakilas, A.; Androulidaki, M.

    2013-08-21

    Transmission electron microscopy techniques and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the nanostructural and electronic properties of InN polytypes observed in InN nanocolumns, grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. Moiré fringes and alternating hexagonal and cubic lattice stacking sequences along the c-axis, observed among the wurtzite layers, implied the presence of different structures embedded in the basic 2H structure of the nanocolumns. Quantitative electron diffraction analysis and high-resolution image simulations verified the coexistence of the wurtzite structure with the 4H, 6H, and the 3C zinc-blende structural polytypes. Total energies calculations established the 2H wurtzite structure as the most stable polytype. The band gap of all polytypes was found direct with the energies and the band gaps of the 4H (E{sub g} = 0.64 eV) and 6H (E{sub g} = 0.60 eV) structures calculated between the corresponding values of the 2H (E{sub g} = 0.75 eV) and 3C (E{sub g} = 0.49 eV) basic structures. Theoretical and experimental analysis showed that at the initial stages of growth InN nanocolumns were under tensile strain along both the basal plane and growth direction. Structural polytypes were then introduced in the form of embedded inclusions to accommodate the excess tensile strain along the growth direction, allowing the entire process of polymorphism to be the dominant strain relaxation mechanism of InN nanocolumns. Moreover, the lattice and energetic properties and band gap values of InN polytypes showed a linear dependence on hexagonality, while the presence of polytypes led to a characteristic broadening of the photoluminescence emission peak toward lower emission energies.

  3. Role of nitridation on polarity and growth of InN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Skuridina, D.; Solopow, S.; Pristovsek, M.; Vogt, P.; Kneissl, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report on metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of (0001)InN layers simultaneously grown on a-plane (112¯0) and c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates. The substrates were nitridated at temperatures from 500 °C to 1050 °C prior to the growth of c-plane InN layers. Nitridation determined the polarity, the crystallinity, and the surface morphology of the InN layers. Nitridation temperatures above 800 °C lead to N-polar InN layers, while nitridation temperatures from 700 °C to 750 °C produce mixed-polar InN layers, and nitridation temperatures from 500 °C to 650 °C produce In-polar InN layers. The roughness and crystallinity of the InN layers are correlated with the changes of polarity. The incorporation of nitrogen into the nitridation layers at different nitridation temperatures was measured. A strong N-Al bond signal after nitridation is correlated with N-polarity layers after overgrowth.

  4. In induced reconstructions of Si(1 1 1) as superlattice matched epitaxial templates for InN growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel growth method to form InN at low growth temperatures. ► Use of Si reconstruction as a growth template for group III nitrides. ► Band gap variation of InN – Moss–Burstein shift – non-parabolic conduction band for InN. ► Super lattice matching epitaxy of metal induced reconstructions with III–V unit cell. -- Abstract: Indium induced surface reconstructions of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 are used as templates to grow high quality InN. We grow InN on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7, Si(1 1 1)-4 × 1-In and Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstructed surfaces and study the quality of the films formed using complementary characterization tools. InN grown on Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstruction shows superior film quality with lowest band-edge emission having a narrow full width at half maximum, intense and narrow 0 0 0 2 X-ray diffraction, low surface roughness and carrier concentration an order lower than other samples. We attribute the high quality of the film formed at 300 °C to the integral matching of InN and super lattice dimensions, we also study the reasons for the band gap variation of InN in the literature. Present study demonstrates the proposed Superlattice Matched Epitaxy can be a general approach to grow good quality InN at much lower growth temperature on compatible In induced reconstructions of the Si surface.

  5. InN thin-film transistors fabricated on polymer sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Khe Shin; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Indium nitride (InN) is potentially suitable for the fabrication of high performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) because of its high electron mobility and peak electron velocity. However, InN is usually grown using a high temperature growth process, which is incompatible with large-area and lightweight TFT substrates. In this study, we report on the room temperature growth of InN films on flexible polyimide sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition. In addition, we report on the fabrication of InN-based TFTs on flexible polyimide sheets and the operation of these devices.

  6. Electrically injected near-infrared light emission from single InN nanowire p-i-n diode

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Binh Huy; Zhao, Songrui; Tran, Nhung Hong; Mi, Zetian

    2014-12-08

    We report on the achievement of electroluminescence emission of single InN p-i-n nanowire devices. InN p-i-n nanowire structures were grown directly on Si substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently transferred to foreign substrate for the fabrication of single nanowire light emitting diodes. Electroluminescence emission with a peak energy of 0.71 eV (1.75 μm) was observed at 77 K. The measurement of near-bandgap electroluminescence provides unambiguous evidence for the achievement of p-type conduction of InN.

  7. InN thin-film transistors fabricated on polymer sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Khe Shin; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-07-18

    Indium nitride (InN) is potentially suitable for the fabrication of high performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) because of its high electron mobility and peak electron velocity. However, InN is usually grown using a high temperature growth process, which is incompatible with large-area and lightweight TFT substrates. In this study, we report on the room temperature growth of InN films on flexible polyimide sheets using pulsed sputtering deposition. In addition, we report on the fabrication of InN-based TFTs on flexible polyimide sheets and the operation of these devices.

  8. Growth of InN nanorods prepared by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with varying Cr thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. W.; Young, S. J.; Chang, S. J.; Hsueh, T. H.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chen, K. J.; Hung, H.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates how the thickness of Cr deposited on the Si substrate after the nitridation process influences the AIN buffer layer and the InN nanorods. Atomic force microscopy results reveal that different thicknesses of Cr form varying sizes of CrN nanoislands. The results of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that a Cr deposition thickness of 10 nm results in CrN nanoislands after the nitridation process, improving the quality and density of InN nanorods. A Cr layer that was too thick led to polycrystalline InN growth. The results of transmission electron microscopy indicate a baseball bat-like InN nanorod growth mechanism.

  9. High-phase-purity zinc-blende InN on r-plane sapphire substrate with controlled nitridation pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ching-Lien; Liu, Ting-Wei; Wu, Chien-Ting; Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; Hsu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Li-Chyong; Shiao, Wen-Yu; Yang, C. C.; Gällström, Andreas; Holtz, Per-Olof; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2008-03-01

    High-phase-purity zinc-blende (zb) InN thin film has been grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire substrate pretreated with nitridation. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the phase of the InN films changes from wurtzite (w) InN to a mixture of w-InN and zb-InN, to zb-InN with increasing nitridation time. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals an ultrathin crystallized interlayer produced by substrate nitridation, which plays an important role in controlling the InN phase. Photoluminescence emission of zb-InN measured at 20K shows a peak at a very low energy, 0.636eV, and an absorption edge at ˜0.62eV is observed at 2K, which is the lowest bandgap reported to date among the III-nitride semiconductors.

  10. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  11. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  12. Epitaxial relationship of semipolar s-plane (1101) InN grown on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrakopulos, G. P.

    2012-07-02

    The heteroepitaxy of semipolar s-plane (1101) InN grown directly on r-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. The epitaxial relationship is determined to be (1101){sub InN} Parallel-To (1102){sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, [1120]{sub InN} Parallel-To [2021]{sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, [1102]{sub InN}{approx} Parallel-To [0221]{sub Al{sub 2O{sub 3}}}, which ensures a 0.7% misfit along [1120]{sub InN}. Two orientation variants are identified. Proposed geometrical factors contributing to the high density of basal stacking faults, partial dislocations, and sphalerite cubic pockets include the misfit accommodation and reduction, as well as the accommodation of lattice twist.

  13. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Days Inn Motel (120 rooms), I-35/2276 Valley View Lane, Dallas, Texas is described. The solar system was designed by ILI Incorporated to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. The Solar Energy Products, model CU-30WW liquid (water) flat plate collector (1000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. This system is one of eleven systems planned. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers. The operation of this system was begun March 11, 1980. The solar components were partly funded ($15,000 of 30,000 cost) by a Department of Energy grant.

  14. Circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, R.; Liu, B.; Xie, Z. L.; Xiu, X. Q.; Han, P.; Lu, H.; Zheng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. H.; Tang, C. G.; Wang, Z. G.

    2008-01-01

    The circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) is observed in InN at inter-band excitation. The function of the CPGE induced current on laser helicity is experimentally demonstrated and illustrated with the microscopic model. A spin-dependent current obtained in InN is one order larger than in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures at inter-band excitation. The dependence of CPGE current amplitude on light power and incident angle can be well evaluated with phenomenological theory. This sizeable spin-dependent current not only provides an opportunity to realize spin polarized current at room temperature, but also can be utilized as a reliable tool of spin splitting investigation in semiconductors.

  15. Reconstruction of an inn fire scene using the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) program.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    An inn fire occurring in the middle of the night usually causes a great deal more injuries and deaths. This article examines the case study of an inn fire accident that resulted in the most serious casualties in Taiwan's history. Data based on the official fire investigation report and NFPA921 regulations are used, and the fire scenes are reconstructed using the latest Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) program from NIST. The personnel evacuation time and time variants for various fire hazard factors of reconstructive analysis clarify the reason for such a high number of casualties. It reveals that the FDS program has come to play an essential role in fire investigation. The close comparison between simulation result and the actual fire scene also provides fire prevention engineers, a possible utilization of FDS to examine the effects of improved schemes for fire safety of buildings.

  16. Morphology Controlled Fabrication of InN Nanowires on Brass Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Growth of semiconductor nanowires on cheap metal substrates could pave the way to the large-scale manufacture of low-cost nanowire-based devices. In this work, we demonstrated that high density InN nanowires can be directly grown on brass substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It was found that Zn from the brass substrates is the key factor in the formation of nanowires by restricting the lateral growth of InN. The nanowire morphology is highly dependent on the growth temperature. While at a lower growth temperature, the nanowires and the In droplets have large diameters. At the elevated growth temperature, the lateral sizes of the nanowires and the In droplets are much smaller. Moreover, the nanowire diameter can be controlled in situ by varying the temperature in the growth process. This method is very instructive to the diameter-controlled growth of nanowires of other materials. PMID:28335323

  17. Conservation of the Sinclair Inn Museum, and the Painted Room Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaftel, A.; Ward, J.

    2017-08-01

    Conservation of the historic 18thC. Sinclair Inn Museum, and of the recently discovered late 18th/early 19thC. unique panoramic wall paintings located in an upstairs room, are co-dependent. This project was carried out with Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) staff, and Conservator in Private Practice Ann Shaftel. This paper will introduce the Sinclair Inn Museum, outline the CCI murals and building investigations of 2011-15, the mural investigation of 2015-16, which confirmed that the mural extended to all four walls of the function room, now referred to as the Painted Room, and to describe how it has been revealed and conserved to date.

  18. Nitrogen ion beam synthesis of InN in InP(100) at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dhara, S.; Magudapathy, P.; Kesavamoorthy, R.; Kalavathi, S.; Sastry, V.S.; Nair, K.G.M.; Hsu, G.M.; Chen, L.C.; Chen, K.H.; Santhakumar, K.; Soga, T.

    2006-06-12

    The InN phase is grown in crystalline InP(100) substrates by 50 keV N{sup +} implantation at an elevated temperature of 400 deg. C followed by annealing at 525 deg. C in N{sub 2} ambient. Crystallographic structural and Raman scattering studies are performed for the characterization of grown phases. Temperature- and power-dependent photoluminescence studies show direct band-to-band transition peak {approx}1.06 eV at temperatures {<=}150 K. Implantations at an elevated temperature with a low ion beam current and subsequent low temperature annealing step are found responsible for the growth of high-quality InN phase.

  19. BN, AlN, GaN, InN: Charge Neutrality Level, Surface, Interfaces, Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnyi, V. N.

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of the charge neutrality concept, the analysis is fulfilled of the experimental data on the electron properties of the defective semiconductors after the radiation exposure, the electronic parameters of interfaces, surface work function and efficiency of doping with the impurities of high solubility in the nitrides of the group wz-III-N (BN, AlN, GaN, InN). The numerical evaluations of the charge neutrality levels in these compounds are presented.

  20. Growth modes of InN (000-1) on GaN buffer layers on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Kitajima, Takeshi; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the surface morphologies of epitaxial InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with intervening GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates. On smooth GaN buffer layers, nucleation and evolution of three-dimensional InN islands at various coverages and growth temperatures are investigated. The shapes of the InN islands are observed to be predominantly mesalike with large flat (000-1) tops, which suggests a possible role of indium as a surfactant. Rough GaN buffer layers composed of dense small GaN islands are found to significantly improve uniform InN wetting of the substrates, on which atomically smooth InN films are obtained that show the characteristics of step-flow growth. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals the defect-mediated surface morphology of smooth InN films, including surface terminations of screw dislocations and a high density of shallow surface pits with depths less than 0.3 nm. The mechanisms of the three-dimensional island size and shape evolution and formation of defects on smooth surfaces are considered.

  1. Epitaxial growth, electrical and optical properties of a-plane InN on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Ajagunna, A. O.; Iliopoulos, E.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Georgakilas, A.

    2010-01-15

    The heteroepitaxy of a-plane (1120) InN films on r-plane (1102) sapphire substrates, by nitrogen radio frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, has been investigated and compared to that of c-plane (0001) InN. The epitaxial growth of a-plane InN proceeded through the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of three-dimensional islands, resulting in surface roughness that increased monotonically with epilayer thickness. The full width at half maximum of (1120) x-ray diffraction rocking curves decreased significantly with increasing InN thickness, characteristic of structural improvement, and it reached the value of 24 arcmin for a 1 {mu}m thick film. Hall-effect measurements exhibited a similar dependence of electron concentration and mobility on thickness for both the a- and c-plane InN films. The analysis of the Hall-effect measurements, by considering the contribution of two conducting layers, indicates a similar accumulation of low mobility electrons with N{sub s}>10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} at the films' surface/interfacial region for both the a- and c-plane InN films. From optical transmittance measurements, the absorption edge of 0.768 eV was determined for the 1 {mu}m a-plane film, consistent with the expected Burstein-Moss effect. Photoluminescence spectra exhibited a lower energy peak at 0.631 eV, suggesting defect-related transitions.

  2. First principles study of effects of vacancies on electronic, magnetic and optical properties of InN nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, M.; Elahi, S. M.; Abolhassani, M. R.; Salehi, H.

    2017-05-01

    Based on the first principle study within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in the density functional theory (DFT) implemented in Wien2k code, the effects of vacancies on electronic, magnetic and optical properties of InN nanosheet were investigated. We found that the vacancies in InN nanosheet induce spin polarized states in the band gap, and VN-defect, VIn-defect and VIn&N-defect induce local magnetic moments of (-0.01)μB , 3.0μB and 2.0μB , respectively. Also, we calculated the dielectric function, refraction index, extinction index, reflectivity, absorption coefficient, optical conductivity and energy loss function of the perfect InN nanosheet and VN-defect, VIn-defect and VIn&N-defect of InN nanosheet for both polarization directions of light, i.e. E||x (electric field parallel to nanosheet) and E||z (electric field perpendicular to nanosheet). Our results show that InN nanosheet is a semiconductor which is dependent on the type of vacancies and that the optical properties of perfect and defective InN nanosheets are anisotropic for both polarization states.

  3. Photoelectrochemical properties of InN nanowire photoelectrodes for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, J.; Bogdanoff, P.; Ramsteiner, M.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2016-07-01

    InN nanowires were grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectroscopy showed that the nanowires were strain-free and allowed the deduction of a free carrier concentration of 1-2 × 1018 cm-3. This value was confirmed by a Mott-Schottky analysis of electrolyte-based capacitance-voltage measurements. In addition, these measurements directly revealed the existence of a surface accumulation layer in the InN nanowires. In cyclic voltammetry measurements under irradiation from a Xe lamp with about 100 mW cm-2, high photocurrents of about 4 and 11 mA cm-2 were observed at 1.23 and 1.63 V bias potential versus reversible hydrogen electrode, respectively, using H2O2 as a hole scavenger. By comparing the photocurrent with and without H2O2, the main limiting factor in the performance of InN nanowire photoanodes was identified to be the poor catalytic efficiency for water oxidation at the surface, followed by parasitic bulk recombination.

  4. Ab initio study of MOCVD synthesis of InN and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkosz, Weronika; Zapol, Peter; Highland, Matthew J.; Fuoss, Paul H.; Stephenson, Gregory B.

    2011-03-01

    A detailed understanding of MOCVD growth of group III nitrides is important for improved control over their properties and performance in a wide range of applications. Because of the relative instability of InN, chemically active precursors such as NH3 are typically used to provide the high nitrogen activity needed for growth. Our goal is to understand the mechanism and species involved in active nitrogen formation on the growth surface. Here we present results of density functional theory calculations for the decomposition of NH3 on InN and GaN (0001) surfaces through reaction intermediates such as adsorbed NH2 and NH. The calculated equilibrium surface structures along with the reaction barriers for the dissociation pathways of NH3 on these surfaces are described. Kinetic modeling based on the calculated barriers to determine reaction mechanisms and effective nitrogen activities is discussed. The results will be used to elucidate chemical kinetics on GaN and InN (0001) surfaces under MOCVD growth conditions with the aim to optimize synthesis conditions and precursors for effective growth of metastable nitrides. Work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Low-temperature self-limiting atomic layer deposition of wurtzite InN on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report on self-limiting growth of InN thin films at substrate temperatures as low as 200 °C by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). The precursors used in growth experiments were trimethylindium (TMI) and N2 plasma. Process parameters including TMI pulse time, N2 plasma exposure time, purge time, and deposition temperature have been optimized for self-limiting growth of InN with in ALD window. With the increase in exposure time of N2 plasma from 40 s to 100 s at 200 °C, growth rate showed a significant decrease from 1.60 to 0.64 Å/cycle. At 200 °C, growth rate saturated as 0.64 Å/cycle for TMI dose starting from 0.07 s. Structural, optical, and morphological characterization of InN were carried out in detail. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure of the grown InN films. Refractive index of the InN film deposited at 200 °C was found to be 2.66 at 650 nm. 48 nm-thick InN films exhibited relatively smooth surfaces with Rms surface roughness values of 0.98 nm, while the film density was extracted as 6.30 g/cm3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements depicted the peaks of indium, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen on the film surface and quantitative information revealed that films are nearly stoichiometric with rather low impurity content. In3d and N1s high-resolution scans confirmed the presence of InN with peaks located at 443.5 and 396.8 eV, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) further confirmed the polycrystalline structure of InN thin films and elemental mapping revealed uniform distribution of indium and nitrogen along the scanned area of the InN film. Spectral absorption measurements exhibited an optical band edge around 1.9 eV. Our findings demonstrate that HCPA-ALD might be a promising technique to grow crystalline wurtzite InN thin films at low substrate temperatures.

  6. Low-temperature self-limiting atomic layer deposition of wurtzite InN on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Ali E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Kizir, Seda; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we report on self-limiting growth of InN thin films at substrate temperatures as low as 200 °C by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). The precursors used in growth experiments were trimethylindium (TMI) and N{sub 2} plasma. Process parameters including TMI pulse time, N{sub 2} plasma exposure time, purge time, and deposition temperature have been optimized for self-limiting growth of InN with in ALD window. With the increase in exposure time of N{sub 2} plasma from 40 s to 100 s at 200 °C, growth rate showed a significant decrease from 1.60 to 0.64 Å/cycle. At 200 °C, growth rate saturated as 0.64 Å/cycle for TMI dose starting from 0.07 s. Structural, optical, and morphological characterization of InN were carried out in detail. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure of the grown InN films. Refractive index of the InN film deposited at 200 °C was found to be 2.66 at 650 nm. 48 nm-thick InN films exhibited relatively smooth surfaces with Rms surface roughness values of 0.98 nm, while the film density was extracted as 6.30 g/cm{sup 3}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements depicted the peaks of indium, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen on the film surface and quantitative information revealed that films are nearly stoichiometric with rather low impurity content. In3d and N1s high-resolution scans confirmed the presence of InN with peaks located at 443.5 and 396.8 eV, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) further confirmed the polycrystalline structure of InN thin films and elemental mapping revealed uniform distribution of indium and nitrogen along the scanned area of the InN film. Spectral absorption measurements exhibited an optical band edge around 1.9 eV. Our findings demonstrate that HCPA-ALD might be a promising technique to grow crystalline wurtzite InN thin films at low substrate

  7. High Cubic-Phase Purity InN on MgO (001) Using Cubic-Phase GaN as a Buffer Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanorpim, S.; Kuntharin, S.; Parinyataramas, J.; Yaguchi, H.; Iwahashi, Y.; Orihara, M.; Hijikata, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-12-23

    High cubic-phase purity InN films were grown on MgO (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with a cubic-phase GaN buffer layer. The cubic phase purity of the InN grown layers has been analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction, {mu}-Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy. It is evidenced that the hexagonal-phase content in the InN overlayer much depends on hexagonal-phase content in the cubic-phase GaN buffer layer and increases with increasing the hexagonal-phase GaN content. From Raman scattering measurements, in addition, the InN layer with lowest hexagonal component (6%), only Raman characteristics of cubic TO{sub InN} and LO{sub InN} modes were observed, indicating a formation of a small amount of stacking faults, which does not affect on vibrational property.

  8. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang-Wei; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Young, Sheng-Joue; Hsueh, Tao-Hung; Hung, Hung; Mai, Yu-Chun; Wang, Shih-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Wu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yue-Zhang

    2011-07-01

    The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111) substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods.

  9. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Vertically Aligned InN Nanorods by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tessarek, C; Fladischer, S; Dieker, C; Sarau, G; Hoffmann, B; Bashouti, M; Göbelt, M; Heilmann, M; Latzel, M; Butzen, E; Figge, S; Gust, A; Höflich, K; Feichtner, T; Büchele, M; Schwarzburg, K; Spiecker, E; Christiansen, S

    2016-06-08

    Vertically aligned hexagonal InN nanorods were grown mask-free by conventional metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy without any foreign catalyst. The In droplets on top of the nanorods indicate a self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid growth mode. A systematic study on important growth parameters has been carried out for the optimization of nanorod morphology. The nanorod N-polarity, induced by high temperature nitridation of the sapphire substrate, is necessary to achieve vertical growth. Hydrogen, usually inapplicable during InN growth due to formation of metallic indium, and silane are needed to enhance the aspect ratio and to reduce parasitic deposition beside the nanorods on the sapphire surface. The results reveal many similarities between InN and GaN nanorod growth showing that the process despite the large difference in growth temperature is similar. Transmission electron microscopy, spatially resolved energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been performed to analyze the structural properties. Spatially resolved cathodoluminescence investigations are carried out to verify the optical activity of the InN nanorods. The InN nanorods are expected to be the material of choice for high-efficiency hot carrier solar cells.

  10. Adsorption of gas molecules on graphene-like InN monolayer: A first-principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Yang, Qun; Meng, Ruishen; Tan, Chunjian; Liang, Qiuhua; Jiang, Junke; Ye, Huaiyu; Chen, Xianping

    2017-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation within density functional theory (DFT), we study the gas (CO, NH3, H2S, NO2, NO, SO2) adsorption properties on the surface of single-layer indium nitride (InN). Four different adsorption sites (Bridge, In, N, Hollow) are chosen to explore the most sensitive adsorption site. On the basis of the adsorption energy, band gap and charge transfer, we find that the most energetic favourable site is changeable between In site and N site for different gases. Moreover, our results reveal that InN is sensitive to NH3, SO2, H2S and NO2, by a physisorption or a chemisorption nature. We also perform a perpendicular electric field to the system and find that the applied electric field has a significant effect for the adsorption process. Besides, we also observed the desorption effects on NH3 adsorbed at the hollow site of InN when the electric field applied. In addition, the optical properties of InN monolayer affected by different gases are also discussed. Most of the gas adsorptions will cause the inhibition of light adsorption while the others can reduce the work function or enhance the adsorption ability in visible region. Our theoretical results indicate that monolayer InN is a promising candidate for gas sensing applications.

  11. Fundamental optical properties of InN grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth method

    SciTech Connect

    Kametani, Tatsuma; Kamimura, Jumpei; Inose, Yuta; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kishino, Katsumi; Ema, Kazuhiro

    2013-12-04

    Optical properties of InN grown by the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method have been studied using photoluminescence (PL) and excitation-correlation (EC) measurements. The PL spectrum is analyzed by free-electron recombination band (FERB) model, which shows that the ELO sample has a very low background carrier concentration (n=5.5*10{sup 16}[cm{sup −3]}). EC measurements show that the dependences of the band gap renormalization and Auger effect on the carrier concentrations are similar in spite of the different physical origins.

  12. Infrared analysis of hole properties of Mg-doped p-type InN films

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Ishitani, Yoshihiro; Wang Xinqiang; Che, Song-Bek; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2008-12-08

    Mg-doped InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were characterized by infrared reflectance. Signatures of p-type conductivity in the spectra were obtained in the same doping density range where the existence of net acceptors was found by electrolyte capacitance-voltage measurements. Numerical spectrum analysis, which takes into account the large broadening factor of the normal mode energies of longitudinal optical phonon-plasmon coupling yielded high hole densities in the range of (0.1-1.2)x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and optical mobilities in the range of 25-70 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  13. Structural Differences in Mg-doped InN - Indication of Polytypism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    accumulation layer over- come by using electrolyte-based capacitance-voltage ( ECV ) measurements [6,7] and a combination of Hall ef- fect, photoluminescence...and ECV analysis [8]. Mg doped InN thin films were confirmed to be p-type. However, there are only few reports on structural properties of this...an increase of Mg concentration above 1.8x1020 cm-3 using ECV measure- ments leads to a change from p-conductivity to n-type. This concentration

  14. Nqrs Data for C10H12Br5Cl2InN2O [C10H10Br5Cl2InN2·H2O] (Subst. No. 1254)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C10H12Br5Cl2InN2O [C10H10Br5Cl2InN2·H2O] (Subst. No. 1254)

  15. Near-infrared InN quantum dots on high-In composition InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D.; Gomez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Calleja, Enrique; Noetzel, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We report the growth of InN quantum dots (QDs) on thick InGaN layers with high In composition (>50%) by molecular beam epitaxy. Optimized growth conditions are identified for the InGaN layers at reduced growth temperature and increased active N flux resulting in minimized phase separation and defect generation. The InN QDs grown on top of the optimized InGaN layer exhibit small size, high density, and photoluminescence up to room temperature. The InN/InGaN QDs reveal excellent potential for intermediate band solar cells with the InGaN and InN QD bandgap energies tuned to the best match of absorption to the solar spectrum.

  16. A comparative investigation on sub-micrometer InN and GaN Gunn diodes working at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin'an; Long, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Hao, Yue

    2012-05-01

    We report on a simulation for wurtzite-InN and GaN Gunn diodes with notch-doping and uniform-doping structural transit regions. Results show that 0.3-1.0 μm Gunn diodes with a diode area of 500 μm2 can generate fundamental frequencies of around 0.2-0.8 THz and rf currents of several hundred mA. InN diodes exhibit more stable oscillations, whereas GaN diodes generate higher oscillation frequencies at both dipole-domain mode and accumulation-domain mode due to different negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics of high-field transport. The sharp NDR region of InN makes it more suitable for short transit region Gunn diode. Higher Irf/Iav and lower bias voltage in InN Gunn diode imply its conversion efficiency significantly higher than GaN diode.

  17. Valence band offset of MgO /InN heterojunction measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P. F.; Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Q.; Fan, H. B.; Song, H. P.; Wei, H. Y.; Jiao, C. M.; Yang, S. Y.; Zhu, Q. S.; Wang, Z. G.

    2008-01-01

    MgO may be a promising gate dielectric and surface passivation film for InN based devices and the valence band offset of MgO /InN heterojunction has been measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band offset is determined to be 1.59±0.23eV. Given the experimental band gap of 7.83 for the MgO, a type-I heterojunction with a conduction band offset of 5.54±0.23eV is found. The accurate determination of the valence and conduction band offsets is important for use of MgO /InN electronic devices.

  18. From Amateur Astronomer to Observatory Director: The Curious Case of R. T. A. Innes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Robert Innes was one of a select band of amateur astronomers who made the transition to professional ranks towards the end of the nineteenth century. Initially he had a passion for mathematical astronomy, but after settling in Sydney he developed a taste for observational astronomy, specialising in the search for new double stars. He quickly became known for his success in this field and for his publications on solar system perturbations, and with John Tebbutt's patronage managed to secure a clerical position at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope. Once there he continued to observe in his spare time and to publish, and, with strong support from Sir David Gill, was appointed founding Director of the Transvaal Observatory. By the time he died in 1933, Innes had received an honorary D.Sc. from Leiden University, and had established an international reputation as a positional astronomer. This paper provides an interesting case study of a well-known `amateur-turned-professional', and an example of the ways in which patronage played a key role in nineteenth and early twentieth century Australian and South African astronomy.

  19. Planar n +-in-n silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS IBL upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goessling, C.; Klingenberg, R.; Muenstermann, D.; Rummler, A.; Troska, G.; Wittig, T.

    2011-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is planning to upgrade its pixel detector by the installation of a 4th pixel layer, the insertable b-layer IBL with a mean sensor radius of only 32 mm from the beam axis. Being very close to the beam, the radiation damage of the IBL sensors might be as high as 5×10 15 n eq cm -2 at their end-of-life. To investigate the radiation hardness and suitability of the current ATLAS pixel sensors for IBL fluences, n +-in-n silicon pixel sensors from the ATLAS Pixel production have been irradiated by reactor neutrons to the IBL design fluence and been tested with pions at the SPS and with electrons from a 90Sr source in the laboratory. The collected charge was found to exceed 10 000 electrons per MIP at 1 kV of bias voltage which is in agreement with data collected with strip sensors. With an expected threshold of 3000-4000 electrons, this result suggests that planar n +-in-n pixel sensors are radiation hard enough to be used as IBL sensor technology.

  20. Growth kinetics and island evolution during double-pulsed molecular beam epitaxy of InN

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, A.; Hein, C.; Bremers, H.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.

    2016-06-21

    The kinetic processes of InN growth using alternating source fluxes with sub-monolayer In pulses in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. Growth at various temperatures reveals the existence of two growth regimes. While growth at low temperatures is solely governed by surface diffusion, a combination of decomposition, desorption, and diffusion becomes decisive at growth temperatures of 470 °C and above. At this critical temperature, the surface morphology changes from a grainy structure to a structure made of huge islands. The formation of those islands is attributed to the development of an indium adlayer, which can be observed via reflection high energy electron diffraction monitoring. Based on the growth experiments conducted at temperatures below T{sub Growth} = 470 °C, an activation energy for diffusion of 0.54 ± 0.02 eV has been determined from the decreasing InN island density. A comparison between growth on metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy GaN templates and pseudo bulk GaN indicates that step edges and dislocations are favorable nucleation sites. Based on the results, we developed a growth model, which describes the main mechanisms of the growth.

  1. Growth of wurtzite InN on bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofev, Sergey; Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Erwin, Steven C.; Galazka, Zbigniew; Korytov, Maxym; Albrecht, Martin; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-10-22

    A single phase InN epitaxial film is grown on a bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafer by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The InN/In{sub 2}O{sub 3} orientation relationship is found to be (0001) parallel (111) and [1100] parallel [112]. High quality of the layer is confirmed by the small widths of the x-ray rocking curves, the sharp interfaces revealed by transmission electron microscopy, the narrow spectral width of the Raman E{sub 2}{sup h} vibrational mode, and the position of the photoluminescence band close to the fundamental band gap of InN.

  2. Band alignment of InN/6H-SiC heterojunction determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Qiang; Wu, Guoguang; Zhang, Yuantao; Gao, Fubin; Cai, Xupu; Zhao, Yang; Li, Wancheng Du, Guotong

    2014-08-11

    The valence band offset (VBO) of InN/6H-SiC heterojunction has been directly measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The VBO is determined to be −0.10 ± 0.23 eV and the conduction band offset is deduced to be −2.47 ± 0.23 eV, indicating that the heterojunction has a type-II band alignment. The accurate determination of the valence and conduction band offsets is important for applications and analysis of InN/6H-SiC optoelectronic devices.

  3. A Dance Class, a Drag King, & the Pedagogical Possibilities of Performative Hip-Hop: An Interview with Carmen Morrison & Alex U. Inn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schönfeldt-Aultman, Scott M.; Morrison, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Alex U. Inn is the co-founder and one of the two MCs of the hip-hop drag king group, Momma's Boyz. Momma's Boyz celebrated their tenth anniversary in 2014. Carmen Morrison is the offstage name of Alex U. Inn, though "Carmen" now goes by Alex offstage, as well. Within this interview, the names "Carmen" and "Alex" are…

  4. Growth of InN Nanowires with Uniform Diameter on Si(111) Substrates: Competition Between Migration and Desorption of In Atoms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fangliang; Wen, Lei; Xu, Zhenzhu; Han, Jinglei; Yu, Yuefeng; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-04-06

    The effects of the growth parameters on the uniformity and the aspect ratio of InN nanowires grown on Si(111) substrates have been studied systematically, and a modified quasi-equilibrium model is proposed. The growth temperature is of great importance for both the nucleation of the nanowires and the migration of In and N atoms, thus affecting the uniformity of the InN nanowires. In order to improve the uniformity of the InN nanowires, both traditional substrate nitridation and pre-In-droplet deposition have been implemented. It is found that the substrate nitridation is favorable for the nucleation of InN nanowires. However, the initial In atoms adhered to the substrate are insufficient to sustain the uniform growth of the InN nanowires. We have found that the initial In droplet on the substrate is not only advantageous for the nucleation of the InN nanowire, but also favorable for the In atom equilibrium between the initial In droplets and the direct In flux. Therefore, InN nanowires with a uniform aspect ratio and optimal diameter can be achieved. The results reported herein provide meaningful insights to understanding the growth kinetics during the InN nanowires growth, and open up great possibilities of developing high-performance group III-nitride-based devices.

  5. A Dance Class, a Drag King, & the Pedagogical Possibilities of Performative Hip-Hop: An Interview with Carmen Morrison & Alex U. Inn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schönfeldt-Aultman, Scott M.; Morrison, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Alex U. Inn is the co-founder and one of the two MCs of the hip-hop drag king group, Momma's Boyz. Momma's Boyz celebrated their tenth anniversary in 2014. Carmen Morrison is the offstage name of Alex U. Inn, though "Carmen" now goes by Alex offstage, as well. Within this interview, the names "Carmen" and "Alex" are…

  6. Periodic supply of indium as surfactant for N-polar InN growth by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Zhao; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Ohgaki, Takeshi; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohashi, Naoki; Okuno, Hanako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the self-surfactant effect of In for N-polar InN growth by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. We found that InN quality was significantly improved if a thin In coverage (about 1.8 ML) was introduced before InN growth. However, this In coverage was slowly consumed during subsequent InN growth under N-rich condition. Periodically restoring In coverage for thick InN growth was proposed to solve this consumption problem. We suggest that the effect of In surfactant is to terminate the surface N dangling bonds and form an In adlayer, under which an efficient diffusion channel for lateral N adatom transport is created.

  7. Initial exploration of growth of InN by electrochemical solution growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    This report summarizes a brief and unsuccessful attempt to grow indium nitride via the electrochemical solution growth method and a modification thereof. Described in this report is a brief effort using a $50,000 LDRD award to explore the possibilities of applying the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) technique to the growth of indium nitride (InN). The ability to grow bulk InN would be exciting from a scientific perspective, and a commercial incentive lies in the potential of extending the ESG technique to grow homogeneous, bulk alloys of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for light emitting diodes (LEDs) operating in the green region of the spectrum. Indium nitride is the most difficult of the III-nitrides to grow due to its very high equilibrium vapor pressure of nitrogen1. It is several orders of magnitude higher than for gallium nitride or aluminum nitride. InN has a bandgap energy of 0.7eV, and achieving its growth in bulk for large area, high quality substrates would permit the fabrication of LEDs operating in the infrared. By alloying with GaN and AlN, the bulk material used as substrates would enable high efficiency emission wavelengths that could be tailored all the way through the deep ultraviolet. In addition, InN has been shown to have very high electronic mobilities (2700 cm{sup 2}/V s), making it a promising material for transistors and even terahertz emitters. Several attempts at synthesizing InN have been made by several groups. It was shown that metallic indium does not interact with unactivated nitrogen even at very high temperatures. Thus sets up an incompatibility between the precursors in all growth methods: a tradeoff between thermally activating the nitrogen-containing precursor and the low decomposition temperature of solid InN. We have been working to develop a novel growth technique that circumvents the difficulties of other bulk growth techniques by precipitating the column III nitrides from a solvent, such as a molten chloride salt, that

  8. INSPECTION MEANS FOR INDUCTION MOTORS

    DOEpatents

    Williams, A.W.

    1959-03-10

    an appartus is descripbe for inspcting electric motors and more expecially an appartus for detecting falty end rings inn suqirrel cage inductio motors while the motor is running. In its broua aspects, the mer would around ce of reference tedtor means also itons in the phase ition of the An electronic circuit for conversion of excess-3 binary coded serial decimal numbers to straight binary coded serial decimal numbers is reported. The converter of the invention in its basic form generally coded pulse words of a type having an algebraic sign digit followed serially by a plurality of decimal digits in order of decreasing significance preceding a y algebraic sign digit followed serially by a plurality of decimal digits in order of decreasing significance. A switching martix is coupled to said input circuit and is internally connected to produce serial straight binary coded pulse groups indicative of the excess-3 coded input. A stepping circuit is coupled to the switching matrix and to a synchronous counter having a plurality of x decimal digit and plurality of y decimal digit indicator terminals. The stepping circuit steps the counter in synchornism with the serial binary pulse group output from the switching matrix to successively produce pulses at corresponding ones of the x and y decimal digit indicator terminals. The combinations of straight binary coded pulse groups and corresponding decimal digit indicator signals so produced comprise a basic output suitable for application to a variety of output apparatus.

  9. MBE Growth of InN/GaN(0001) and Shape Transitions of InN islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongge; Xie, Maohai; Liu, Ying; Ng, Y. F.

    2003-03-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of InN on GaN(0001) is investigated. Both layer-by-layer and Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth modes are observed under different growth windows. Strain relaxation is studied by real-time recording of the in-plane lattice spacing evolutions on RHEED pattern, which suggest a gradual relaxation of the strain in InN film commenced during the first bilayer (BL) deposition and almost completed after 2-4 BLs. For SK growth, 3D islanding initiates after the strain has mostly been relieved, presumably by dislocations. Based on statistical analysis, the shape transitions of 3D islands are firstly observed in the III-nitrides system. The InN islands transform gradually from pyramids to platelets with increasing of In flux. Under In-rich growth condition, the reverse trend of island shape evolution dependence on volume size, compared with Equilibrium Crystal Shape (ECS) theory, is induced by the Indium self-surfactant effects, in which Indium adlayer on the top surface of InN islands will depress the thermodynamic driving force for the vertical growth of 3D islands. Lateral growth of 3D islands is not only the result of kinetic process but also favored by thermodynamics while Indium self-surfactant exist.

  10. Formation of polar InN with surface Fermi level near the valence band maximum by means of ammonia nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, J.; Kuzmin, M.; Adell, J.; Balasubramanian, T.; Laukkanen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Development of InN films for devices is hindered due to metallic In clusters, formed readily during growth, and unintentional n-type conductivity of the nominally undoped films, including surface electron-accumulation layers via the Fermi level pinning into the conduction band. Plasma nitridation eliminates even large In clusters from the surface by changing them to two-dimensional InN [Yamaguchi and Nanishi, Appl. Phys. Expr.10.1143/APEX.2.051001 2, 051001 (2009)]. Here we utilized a similar approach, that is, nitridation of In-covered surfaces with ammonia (NH3) to grow thin, up to 25 nm thick polar InN films on Si(111) and GaN(0001) substrates. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, as well as photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that this simple NH3 nitridation provides the hitherto not reported formation of polar InN(000-1) films with the surface Fermi level close to the valence band maximum, as recent calculations [Belabbes , Phys. Rev. B10.1103/PhysRevB.84.205304 84, 205304 (2011)] predict.

  11. Generation of ultra-small InN nanocrystals by pulsed laser ablation of suspension in organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurşungöz, Canan; Uzcengiz Şimşek, Elif; Tuzaklı, Refik; Ortaç, Bülend

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructures of InN have been extensively investigated since nano-size provides a number of advantages allowing applications in nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. It is quite important to obtain pure InN nanocrystals (InN-NCs) to reveal the characteristic features, which gain interest in the literature. Here, we proposed a new approach for the synthesis of ultra-small hexagonal InN-NCs by using suspension of micron-sized InN powder in ethanol with pulsed laser ablation method. The liquid environment, laser energy and ablation time were optimized and a post-synthesis treatment, centrifugation, was performed to achieve InN-NCs with the smallest size. Besides, the micron-sized InN powder suspension, as a starting material, enabled us to obtain InN-NCs having diameters smaller than 5 nm. We also presented a detailed characterization of InN-NCs and demonstrated that the formation mechanism mainly depends on the fragmentation due to laser irradiation of the suspension.

  12. Site-controlled crystalline InN growth from the V-pits of a GaN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chien-Ting; Hsu, Lung-Hsing; Lai, Yung-Yu; Cheng, Shan-Yun; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Chien-Chung; Cheng, Yuh-Jen

    2017-05-01

    A site-controlled crystalline InN growth from the V-pits of a GaN substrate was investigated. The V- pits were fabricated by epitaxial lateral growth of GaN over SiO2 disks patterned on a sapphire substrate. InN crystals were found to preferably grow on the inclined {10-11} crystal planes of the V-pits. A V-pit size of 1 μm or less can provide precise site-controlled InN nucleation at the V-pit bottom, while no InN was grown on the rest of the exposed GaN surfaces. The site-controlled nucleation is attributed to the low surface energy point created by the converging six {10-11} crystal facets at the V-pit bottom. When In source supply is below a certain value, this V-pit bottom is the only location able to aggregate enough active sources to start nucleation, thereby providing site-controlled crystal growth.

  13. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmík, J. Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E.; Adikimenakis, A.; Mičušík, M.; Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  14. Giant Reduction of InN Surface Electron Accumulation: Compensation of Surface Donors by Mg Dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, W. M.; Chai, J.; Morris, R. J. H.; Dowsett, M. G.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.; Veal, T. D.

    2012-12-01

    Extreme electron accumulation with sheet density greater than 1013cm-2 is almost universally present at the surface of indium nitride (InN). Here, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry are used to show that the surface Fermi level decreases as the Mg concentration increases, with the sheet electron density falling to below 108cm-2. Surface space-charge calculations indicate that the lowering of the surface Fermi level increases the density of unoccupied donor-type surface states and that these are largely compensated by Mg acceptors in the near-surface hole depletion region rather than by accumulated electrons. This is a significant step towards the realization of InN-based optoelectronic devices.

  15. Tunable surface electron spin splitting with electric double-layer transistors based on InN.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunming; Yuan, Hongtao; Wang, Xinqiang; Liu, Shitao; Zhang, Shan; Tang, Ning; Xu, Fujun; Chen, Zhuoyu; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Chen, Yonghai; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2013-05-08

    Electrically manipulating electron spins based on Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is a key pathway for applications of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. Two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs) offer a particularly important SOC platform, where spin polarization can be tuned with an electric field perpendicular to the 2DES. Here, by measuring the tunable circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE), we present a room-temperature electric-field-modulated spin splitting of surface electrons on InN epitaxial thin films that is a good candidate to realize spin injection. The surface band bending and resulting CPGE current are successfully modulated by ionic liquid gating within an electric double-layer transistor configuration. The clear gate voltage dependence of CPGE current indicates that the spin splitting of the surface electron accumulation layer is effectively tuned, providing a way to modulate the injected spin polarization in potential spintronic devices.

  16. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure InN Compact Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Chiang; Chen, Lung-Chien; Kuo, Shu-Jung

    2013-05-01

    This study presents a dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with a nanostructured InN compact layer (InN-CPL). The effect of a nanostructured InN-CPL in a DSSC structure prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering was examined. The InN-CPL effectively reduces the back reaction at the interface between the indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC. DSSCs fabricated on ITO/InN-CPL/TiO2/D719 exhibited a short-circuit current density (JSC), open-circuit voltage (VOC), and power conversion efficiency (η) of 23.2 mA/cm2, 0.7 V, and 8.9%, respectively.

  17. Electron Accumulation Layers in InN Nanocolumns Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, E.; Lazic, S.; Calleja, J. M.; Agullo-Rueda, F.; Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2010-01-04

    Inelastic light scattering measurements on single crystal InN nanocolumns grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on both Si(001) and Si(111) substrates reveal the existence of a surface electron accumulation layer in the lateral non-polar sidewalls of the nanocolumns. Small and reversible electron density variations of this surface layer has been induced by chemical treatments of the nanocolumns, which can be accurately determined from the frequency of the LO phonon-plasmon coupled mode L{sub -}. The L{sub -} to E{sub 1}(LO) phonon intensity ratio dependence on the column diameter and the excitation wavelength is interpreted in terms of the inhomogeneous electron distribution in the nanocolumns volume and the presence of strong elastic light scattering by the nanocolumns. The TO modes fail to obey conventional selection rules, a fact that is also observed in GaN nanocolumns.

  18. Optical properties of InN with stoichoimetry violation and indium clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Glazov, M. M.; Kalvarskii, A. P.; Tkachman, M. G.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Kavokin, A.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.; Butcher, K. S. A.; Guo, Q.; Monemar, B.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    2005-02-01

    We demonstrate that nonstoichiometry is one of the main reason of strong deviation of the InN optical gap in the 0.7-2 eV range, with N/In < 1 and N/In > 1 corresponding to the lower and higher energies, respectively. The phenomenon is discussed in terms of atomic orbital energies, which are strongly different for indium and nitrogen, therefore both excess atom incorporation and elimination could change the optical gap. We estimate such trends using the approximation of the empirical nearest-neighbor tight binding theory. It is also demonstrated that resonant absorption in In-enriched regions is an additional factor lowering an effective absorption edge.

  19. Strain Relief Analysis of InN Quantum Dots Grown on GaN

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We present a study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the strain state of individual InN quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaN substrates. Moiré fringe and high resolution TEM analyses showed that the QDs are almost fully relaxed due to the generation of a 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN/GaN interface. By applying the Geometric Phase Algorithm to plan-view high-resolution micrographs, we show that this network consists of three essentially non-interacting sets of misfit dislocations lying along the directions. Close to the edge of the QD, the dislocations curve to meet the surface and form a network of threading dislocations surrounding the system. PMID:21794190

  20. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-04-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 square feet of flat plate collector, two 500 gallon storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in forty percent fuel savings.

  1. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 square feet of flat plate collector, two 500 gallon storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in forty percent fuel savings.

  2. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings, is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50% of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collector, two 500 gal storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in 40% fuel savings.

  3. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    SciTech Connect

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kapitanchuk, L. M.; Konakova, R. V. Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  4. Optical studies of MBE-grown InN nanocolumns: Evidence of surface electron accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Vertically self-aligned InN nanocolumns have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Different nanocolumn morphologies corresponding to different molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions have been studied. Raman spectra revealed strain-free nanocolumns with high crystalline quality for the full set of samples studied. Longitudinal optical modes both uncoupled and coupled to an electron plasma coexist in the Raman spectra pointing to the existence of two distinctive regions in the nanocolumn: a surface layer of degenerated electrons and a nondegenerated inner core. The characteristics of the low-temperature photoluminescence and its dependence on temperature and excitation power can be explained by a model considering localized holes recombining with degenerated electrons close to the nonpolar surface. The differences observed in the optical response of different samples showing similar crystalline quality have been attributed to the variation in the electron accumulation layer with the growth conditions.

  5. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Christofilos, D.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ves, S.

    2015-02-01

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 20 ) and semipolar s-plane ( 10 1 ¯ 1 ) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A1(TO), E1(TO), and E2 h on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al2O3) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E1(TO) and E2 h Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  6. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  7. Influence of hydrogen input partial pressure on the polarity of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hisashi; Eriguchi, Ken-ichi; Torii, Jun-ichi; Cho, Hyun-Chol; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2008-04-01

    Influences of hydrogen input partial pressure in the carrier gas ( F=PHo/(PHo+PNo)) on the crystalline quality and polarities of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A surfaces were investigated by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). It was found that the polarity of the InN was affected by the hydrogen gas in the system regardless of the polarity of GaAs starting substrate. The polarity of InN layer grown with the hydrogen partial pressure of Fo=0.004 was a mixture of In-polarity and N-polarity, while that grown with Fo=0 was In-polarity. Degradation of the crystalline quality of InN grown with Fo=0.004 occurred due to the polarity inversion during the growth. The reason why the polarity of InN was influenced by the hydrogen carrier gas could be explained by the preferential growth of N-polarity InN in the H 2 contained ambient and/or the limiting reaction of InN decomposition.

  8. Role of Inn1 and its interactions with Hof1 and Cyk3 in promoting cleavage furrow and septum formation in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nishihama, Ryuichi; Schreiter, Jennifer H; Onishi, Masayuki; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Hanna, Julia; Moravcevic, Katarina; Lippincott, Margaret F; Han, Haesun; Lemmon, Mark A; Pringle, John R; Bi, Erfei

    2009-06-15

    Cytokinesis requires coordination of actomyosin ring (AMR) contraction with rearrangements of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, new membrane, the chitin synthase Chs2 (which forms the primary septum [PS]), and the protein Inn1 are all delivered to the division site upon mitotic exit even when the AMR is absent. Inn1 is essential for PS formation but not for Chs2 localization. The Inn1 C-terminal region is necessary for localization, and distinct PXXP motifs in this region mediate functionally important interactions with SH3 domains in the cytokinesis proteins Hof1 (an F-BAR protein) and Cyk3 (whose overexpression can restore PS formation in inn1Delta cells). The Inn1 N terminus resembles C2 domains but does not appear to bind phospholipids; nonetheless, when overexpressed or fused to Hof1, it can provide Inn1 function even in the absence of the AMR. Thus, Inn1 and Cyk3 appear to cooperate in activating Chs2 for PS formation, which allows coordination of AMR contraction with ingression of the cleavage furrow.

  9. Structural properties of InN films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Kaganer, Vladimir M.; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Riechert, Henning; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-09

    We study the impact of substrate temperature and layer thickness on the morphological and structural properties of InN films directly grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing substrate temperature, an interfacial reaction between InN and ZnO takes place that eventually results in the formation of cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and voids. The properties of the InN films, however, are found to be unaffected by this reaction for substrate temperatures less than 550 deg. C. In fact, both the morphological and the structural quality of InN improve with increasing substrate temperature in the range from 350 to 500 deg. C. High quality films with low threading dislocation densities are demonstrated.

  10. Dislocation reduction via selective-area growth of InN accompanied by lateral growth by rf-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Kishino, Katsumi; Kikuchi, Akihiko

    2010-10-04

    We investigated the selective-area growth (SAG) of InN by rf-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using molybdenum (Mo)-mask-patterned sapphire (0001) substrates, which resulted in the formation of regularly arranged N-polar InN microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy observation confirmed that the laterally grown side areas were nearly dislocation-free, although many threading dislocations (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}) were generated at the InN/sapphire interface and propagated into the center of the InN microcrystals along the crystal c-axis. The laterally grown InN microcrystals exhibited narrow near-IR emission spectra with a peak photon energy of 0.627 eV and a linewidth of 39 meV at room temperature.

  11. Dynamic atomic layer epitaxy of InN on/in +c-GaN matrix: Effect of “In+N” coverage and capping timing by GaN layer on effective InN thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Hwang, Eun-Sook; Itoi, Takaomi

    2016-01-11

    The growth front in the self-organizing and self-limiting epitaxy of ∼1 monolayer (ML)-thick InN wells on/in +c-GaN matrix by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied in detail, with special attention given to the behavior and role of the N atoms. The growth temperatures of interest are above 600 °C, far higher than the typical upper critical temperature of 500 °C in MBE. It was confirmed that 2 ML-thick InN wells can be frozen/inserted in GaN matrix at 620 °C, but it was found that N atoms at the growth front tend to selectively re-evaporate more quickly than In atoms at temperatures higher than 650 °C. As a result, the effective thickness of inserted InN wells in the GaN matrix at 660–670 °C were basically 1 ML or sub-ML, even though they were capped by a GaN barrier at the time of 2 ML “In+N” coverage. Furthermore, it was found that the N atoms located below In atoms in the dynamic atomic layer epitaxy growth front had remarkably weaker bonding to the +c-GaN surface.

  12. Time-integrated photoluminescence and pump-probe reflection spectroscopy of Si doped InN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Jang, Der-Jun Wang, Ming-Sung; Tu, L. W.

    2014-01-28

    Temperature and excitation power dependent time-integrated photoluminescence of Si doped InN thin films are investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra at low temperatures are described by single emission peak ensued due to “free-to-bound” recombination; whereas PL spectra at higher temperatures above 150 K are characterized by both “band-to-band” and “free-to-bound” transition. Carrier dynamics of Si doped InN thin films is studied using pump-probe reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The hot electron cooling process is well described by electron-electron scattering. The dependence of the hot electron cooling rate on total electron density shows sublinear to linear behavior with increase of background electron density. The variation of the carrier recombination lifetime with total electron density implicates the dominance of the defect-related nonradiative recombination channel over other recombination processes.

  13. Role of native defects in nitrogen flux dependent carrier concentration of InN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    We address the carrier concentration, strain, and bandgap issue of InN films grown on c-sapphire at different N-flux by molecular beam epitaxy using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the strain in InN films arises due to point defects like nitrogen interstitials and nitrogen antisites. We report minimal biaxial strain due to relaxed growth morphology and a minimal hydrostatic strain arising due to interstitial nitrogen atoms being partially compensated by nitrogen antisites. We find that the variation in absorption edge can be attributed to defect induced carrier concentration and that nitrogen interstitials and nitrogen antisites act as donors that yield the respective absorption edge and Moss-Burstein shift. Our studies are a step towards the ability to form low carrier concentration strain-relaxed films and to determine the intrinsic band gap value for this technologically important material.

  14. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy of InN on GaN using tertiary-butylhydrazine as nitrogen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremzow, Raimund; Pristovsek, Markus; Stellmach, Joachim; Savaş, Özgür; Kneissl, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The growth of InN on GaN/sapphire by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using tertiary-butylhydrazine (tBHy) was studied by varying temperature, V/III-ratio, growth time and carrier gas between nitrogen and hydrogen. The growth was characterized in-situ by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ex-situ by high resolution X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to ammonia, it was predicted that tBHy should allow InN growth for a much wider growth window and low V/III-ratios with growth temperatures below 600C. However, over a wide range of growth parameters only growth of metallic indium droplets was observed.

  15. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Ananta R. E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com; Thoms, Brian D.; Nepal, Neeraj; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  16. Polarity control and transport properties of Mg-doped (0001) InN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soojeong; Wu Feng; Bierwagen, Oliver; Speck, James S.

    2013-05-15

    The authors report on the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth and carrier transport of Mg-doped In-face (0001) InN. The 1.2 {mu}m thick InN films were grown on GaN:Fe templates under metal rich conditions with Mg concentration from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3}. A morphological transition, associated with the formation of V-shape polarity inversion domains, was observed at Mg concentration over 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Seebeck measurements indicated p-type conductivity for Mg-concentrations from 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, i.e., as it exceeded the compensating (unintentional) donor concentration.

  17. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  18. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  19. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  20. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  1. Growth and Characterization of Single Crystalline InN Grown on GaN by RF Sputtering for Robust Schottky Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harotoonian, Vache; Woodall, Jerry M.

    2016-12-01

    High-quality, single crystal wurtzite InN films were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron reactive sputtering on GaN templates. The sputtered InN films in this study were about 100 nm thick. Atomic force microscopy analysis revealed the sputtered InN film had root-mean-square surface roughness of about 0.4 nm, which is comparable to the underlying GaN template. Coupled x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements confirmed the (0001) preferred growth orientation and ω-rocking curve full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) = 0.85° for the symmetrical (0002) diffraction peak. The present InN film has the best crystal quality in terms of narrower FWHM of XRD rocking curve among reported sputtered InN thin films. In-plane and out-of-plane XRD measurements revealed a relaxed film. Room temperature Hall Effect measurements showed mobility of 110 cm2/V.s and electron concentration of 1-2 × 1020/cm3. The feasibility of utilizing a cost effective and productive method of sputtering to form robust Schottky contacts to GaN using InN, an immiscible and metallic-like semiconductor, was explored.

  2. Current transport in W and WSI{sub x} ohmic contacts to InGaN and InN

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.

    1997-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the specific contact resistance of W and WSi{sub 0.44} contacts on n{sup +} In{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 0.35}N and InN was measured in the range -50 {degrees}C to 125 {degrees}C. The results were compared to theoretical values for different conduction mechanisms, to further elucidate the conduction mechanism in these contact schemes for all but as-deposited metal to InN where thermionic emission appears to be the dominant mechanism. The contacts were found to produce low specific resistance ohmic contacts to InGaN at room temperature, e{sup c} {approximately} 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for W and e{sub c} of 4x 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for WSi{sub x}. InN metallized with W produced ohmic contacts with e{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup -7} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and e{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup -6} {Omega} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} for WSi{sub x} at room temperature.

  3. Morphology and arrangement of InN nanocolumns deposited by radio-frequency sputtering: Effect of the buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteagudo-Lerma, L.; Valdueza-Felip, S.; Núñez-Cascajero, A.; Ruiz, A.; González-Herráez, M.; Monroy, E.; Naranjo, F. B.

    2016-01-01

    We present the structural and optical properties of (0001)-oriented nanocolumnar films of InN deposited on c-sapphire substrates by radio-frequency reactive sputtering. It is observed that the column density and dimensions are highly dependent on the growth parameters of the buffer layer. We investigate four buffer layers consisting of (i) 30 nm of low-growth-rate InN, (ii) 30 nm of AlN deposited on the unbiased substrate (us), (iii) 30 nm of AlN deposited on the reverse-biased substrate (bs), and (iv) a 60-nm-thick bilayer consisting of 30-nm-thick bs-AlN deposited on top of 30-nm-thick us-AlN. Differences in the layer nucleation process due to the buffer layer induce variations of the column density in the range of (2.5-16)×109 cm-2, and of the column diameter in the range of 87-176 nm. Best results in terms of mosaicity are obtained using the bs-AlN buffer layer, which leads to a full width at half-maximum of the InN(0002) rocking curve of 1.2°. A residual compressive strain is still present in the nanocolumns. All samples exhibit room temperature photoluminescence emission at ~1.6 eV, and an apparent optical band gap at ~1.7 eV estimated from linear optical transmittance measurements.

  4. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  5. Superconductivity of Ca2 InN with a layered structure embedding an anionic indium chain array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sehoon; Matsuishi, Satoru; Lee, Kimoon; Toda, Yoshitake; Wng Kim, Sung; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-05-01

    We report the emergence of superconductivity in Ca2InN consisting of a two-dimensional (2D) array of zigzag indium chains embedded between Ca2N layers. A sudden drop of resistivity and a specific heat (Cp) jump attributed to the superconducting transition were observed at 0.6 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ = 4.24 mJ mol-1K-2 and Debye temperature ΘD = 322 K were determined from the Cp of the normal conducting state and the superconducting volume fraction was estimated to be ˜80% from the Cp jump, assuming a BCS-type weak coupling. Density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the electronic bands near the Fermi level (EF) are mainly derived from In 5p orbitals with π and σ bonding states and the Fermi surface is composed of cylindrical parts, corresponding to the quasi-2D electronic state of the In-chain array. By integrating the projected density of states of the In-p component up to EF, a valence electron population of ˜1.6 electrons/In was calculated, indicating that partially anionic state of In. The In 3d binding energies observed in Ca2InN by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy were negatively shifted from that in In metal. The superconductivity of Ca2InN is associated with the p-p bonding states of the anionic In layer.

  6. Electrical transport properties of single undoped and n-type doped InN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Richter, T; Lüth, H; Schäpers, Th; Meijers, R; Jeganathan, K; Estévez Hernández, S; Calarco, R; Marso, M

    2009-10-07

    Electrical transport properties of undoped and n-type doped InN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied by current-voltage and back-gate field-effect transistor measurements. The current-voltage characteristics show ohmic behavior in the temperature range between 4 and 300 K. Down to about 120 K a linear decrease in resistance with temperature is observed. The investigation of a large number of nanowires revealed for undoped as well as doped wires an approximately linear relation between the normalized conductance and diameter for wires with a diameter below 100 nm. This shows that the main conduction takes place in the tubular surface accumulation layer of the wires. In contrast, for doped wires with a diameter larger than 100 nm a quadratic dependence of conduction on the diameter was found, which is attributed to bulk conductance as the main contribution. The successful doping of the wires is confirmed by an enhanced conduction and by the results of the back-gate field-effect transistor measurements.

  7. Hole transport and photoluminescence in Mg-doped InN

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.; Ager III, J. W.; Smith III, H. M.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Schaff, W. J.; Gallinat, C.; Koblmuller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2010-03-24

    Hole conductivity and photoluminescence were studied in Mg-doped InN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Because surface electron accumulation interferes with carrier type determination by electrical measurements, the nature of the majority carriers in the bulk of the films was determined using thermopower measurements. Mg concentrations in a"window" from ca. 3 x 1017 to 1 x 1019 cm-3 produce hole-conducting, p-type films as evidenced by a positive Seebeck coecient. This conclusion is supported by electrolyte-based capacitance voltage measurements and by changes in the overall mobility observed by Hall effect, both of which are consistent with a change from surface accumulation on an n-type film to surface inversion on a p-type film. The observed Seebeck coefficients are understood in terms of a parallel conduction model with contributions from surface and bulk regions. In partially compensated films with Mg concentrations below the window region, two peaks are observed in photoluminescence at 672 meV and at 603 meV. They are attributed to band-to-band and band-to-acceptor transitions, respectively, and an acceptor binding energy of ~;;70 meV is deduced. In hole-conducting films with Mg concentrations in the window region, no photoluminescence is observed; this is attributed to electron trapping by deep states which are empty for Fermi levels close to the valence band edge.

  8. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  9. Molten Salt-Based Growth of Bulk GaN and InN for Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2006-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The technique described herein relies on the production of the nitride precursor (N3-) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (July 2004-September 2005) focused on the initial measurement of the solubility of GaN in molten LiCl as a function of temperature, the construction of electrochemical cells, the modification of a commercial glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and on securing intellectual property for the technique.

  10. An investigation into the conversion of In2O3 into InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Polina; Zervos, Matthew; Othonos, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Straight In2O3 nanowires (NWs) with diameters of 50 nm and lengths ≥2 μm have been grown on Si(001) via the wet oxidation of In at 850°C using Au as a catalyst. These exhibited clear peaks in the X-ray diffraction corresponding to the body centred cubic crystal structure of In2O3 while the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum at 300 K consisted of two broad peaks, centred around 400 and 550 nm. The post-growth nitridation of In2O3 NWs was systematically investigated by varying the nitridation temperature between 500 and 900°C, flow of NH3 and nitridation times between 1 and 6 h. The NWs are eliminated above 600°C while long nitridation times at 500 and 600°C did not result into the efficient conversion of In2O3 to InN. We find that the nitridation of In2O3 is effective by using NH3 and H2 or a two-step temperature nitridation process using just NH3 and slower ramp rates. We discuss the nitridation mechanism and its effect on the PL.

  11. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and optical properties of InN compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graine, R.; Chemam, R.; Gasmi, F. Z.; Nouri, R.; Meradji, H.; Khenata, R.

    2015-11-01

    We carried out ab initio calculations of structural, electronic and optical properties of Indium nitride (InN) compound in both zinc blende and wurtzite phases, using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW), within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). For the exchange and correlation potential, local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) were used. Moreover, the alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko (EV-GGA) and modified Becke-Johnson schemes (mBJ) were also applied for band structure calculations. Ground state properties such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are calculated. Results obtained for band structure of these compounds have been compared with experimental results as well as other first principle computations. Our results show good agreement with the available data. The calculated band structure shows a direct band gap Γ → Γ. In the optical properties section, several optical quantities are investigated; in particular we have deduced the interband transitions from the imaginary part of the dielectric function.

  12. Evaluation of testing strategies for the radiation tolerant ATLAS n +-in-n pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas M.; Atlas Pixel Collaboration

    2003-10-01

    The development of particle tracker systems for high fluence environments in new high-energy physics experiments raises new challenges for the development, manufacturing and reliable testing of radiation tolerant components. The ATLAS pixel detector for use at the LHC, CERN, is designed to cover an active sensor area of 1.8 m2 with 1.1×10 8 read-out channels usable for a particle fluence up to 10 15 cm-2 ( 1 MeV neutron equivalent) and an ionization dose up to 500 kGy of mainly charged hadron radiation. To cope with such a harsh environment the ATLAS Pixel Collaboration has developed a radiation hard n +-in-n silicon pixel cell design with a standard cell size of 50×400 μm2. Using this design on an oxygenated silicon substrate, sensor production has started in 2001. This contribution describes results gained during the development of testing procedures of the ATLAS pixel sensor and evaluates quality assurance procedures regarding their relevance for detector operation in the ATLAS experiment. The specific set of tests discussed in detail measures sensor depletion, interface generation velocity, p-spray dose and biasing by punch-through mechanism and is designed to give insights into effects of irradiation with ionizing particles.

  13. Optical characterization of free electron concentration in heteroepitaxial InN layers using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 transfer-matrix algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Katsidis, C. C.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2013-02-21

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been implemented as a non-destructive, non-invasive, tool for the optical characterization of a set of c-plane InN single heteroepitaxial layers spanning a wide range of thicknesses (30-2000 nm). The c-plane (0001) InN epilayers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on GaN(0001) buffer layers which had been grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is shown that for arbitrary multilayers with homogeneous anisotropic layers having their principal axes coincident with the laboratory coordinates, a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 matrix algebra based on a general transfer-matrix method (GTMM) is adequate to interpret their optical response. Analysis of optical reflectance in the far and mid infrared spectral range has been found capable to discriminate between the bulk, the surface and interface contributions of free carriers in the InN epilayers revealing the existence of electron accumulation layers with carrier concentrations in mid 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at both the InN surface and the InN/GaN interface. The spectra could be fitted with a three-layer model, determining the different electron concentration and mobility values of the bulk and of the surface and the interface electron accumulation layers in the InN films. The variation of these values with increasing InN thickness could be also sensitively detected by the optical measurements. The comparison between the optically determined drift mobility and the Hall mobility of the thickest sample reveals a value of r{sub H} = 1.49 for the Hall factor of InN at a carrier concentration of 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 300 Degree-Sign {Kappa}.

  14. risk factor Inn (INNrisk) - transdisciplinary analysis of the 2005 flood in the province of Tyrol, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleewein, Klaus; Pfurtscheller, Clemens; Borsdorf, Axel

    2010-05-01

    The transdisciplinary project INNrisk, in collaboration with public risk and disaster management, investigates the severe floods of 22nd and 23rd of August, 2005, and their effects within the federal province of Tyrol. The inundation and accompanying processes (e.g. debris flows, log jams, underwashing of infrastructure) caused by the river Inn and its tributaries created a dangerous situation for Tyrol. The overall economic loss of direct assets is said to amount to ca. 500 million Euros. Climate change has basically been causing a statistical increase of damaging floods within the Alpine Space in recent decades while increasing vulnerability at the same time. The expansion of settlements is one factor in the threat to large numbers of people and growing economic losses. However, the disasters of the last decade provide an opportunity for analysing the flood process in terms of natural-science and geographical aspects as well as in terms of economic and statistical ones. This should lead to a better understanding of triggers and effects in those areas where humans are active and form the basis for mitigation and adaptation strategies. The results of such analyses represent valuable information for public risk and disaster management, particularly in presenting the effects on public and private households. The INNrisk project primarily aims to assess the framework conditions in systemic-legal terms and to analyse human actions during the floods in relation to various plans and the damage potentials resulting from them. The assessed losses depend to a great extent on the actions taken during the emergency and on flood operations by the public emergency management and local fire departments, which are in charge of floods and related processes in the case of Austria. Assessment will be carried out by analysing a database of series of human actions for the duration of the emergeny and increased risk. The project also strives to arrive at a macro- and mesoeconomic

  15. Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome: an intellectual disability syndrome with characteristic facies.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian; Jenkinson, Allan; Magee, Alex; Ennis, Sean; Monavari, Ahmad; Green, Andrew; Lynch, Sally A; Crushell, Ellen; Hughes, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    We report a female child from an Irish Traveller family presenting with severe intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, renal anomalies, dental caries and cyclical vomiting. Current health issues include global developmental delay, mild concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, dental malocclusion and caries and a single duplex left kidney. The proband and her mother also have multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause. DNA from the proband was enriched with the Agilent Sure Select v5 Exon array and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq. Rare homozygous variants were prioritized. Whole-exome sequencing identified three linked homozygous missense variants in THOC6 (c.298T>A, p.Trp100Arg; c.700G>C, p.Val234Leu; c.824G>A, p.Gly275Asp) as the likely cause of this child's intellectual disability syndrome, resulting in a molecular diagnosis of Beaulieu-Boycott-Innes syndrome (BBIS). This is the first report of BBIS in Europe. BBIS has been reported previously in two Hutterite families and one Saudi family. A review of all patients to date shows a relatively homogenous phenotype. Core clinical features include low birth weight with subsequent growth failure, short stature, intellectual disability with language delay, characteristic facies, renal anomalies and dental malocclusion with caries. Some patients also have cardiac defects. All patients show characteristic dysmorphic facial features including a tall forehead with high anterior hairline and deep-set eyes with upslanting palpebral fissures. The coexistence of intellectual disability together with these characteristic facies should provide a diagnostic clue for BBIS during patient evaluation.

  16. Radiation hardness studies of n + -in-n planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenheiner, S.; Goessling, C.; Jentzsch, J.; Klingenberg, R.; Muenstermann, D.; Rummler, A.; Troska, G.; Wittig, T.

    2011-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is planning upgrades of its pixel detector to cope with the luminosity increase foreseen in the coming years within the transition from LHC to Super-LHC (SLHC/HL-LHC). Associated with the increase in instantaneous luminosity is a rise of the target integrated luminosity from 730 to about 3000 fb -1 which directly translates into significantly higher radiation damage. These upgrades consist of the installation of a 4th pixel layer, the insertable b-layer IBL, with a mean sensor radius of only 32 mm from the beam axis, before 2016/17. In addition, the complete pixel detector will be exchanged before 2020/21. Being very close to the beam, the radiation damage of the IBL sensors might be as high as 5×1015 neq cm-2 at their end-of-life. The total fluence of the innermost pixel layer after the SLHC upgrade might even reach 2×1016 neq cm-2. To investigate the radiation hardness and suitability of the current ATLAS pixel sensors for these fluences, n +-in-n silicon pixel sensors from the ATLAS Pixel production have been irradiated by reactor neutrons to the IBL design fluence and been tested with pions at the SPS and with electrons from a 90Sr source in the laboratory. The collected charge after IBL fluences was found to exceed 10 000 electrons per MIP at 1 kV of bias voltage which is in agreement with data collected with strip sensors. After SLHC fluences, still reliable operation of the devices could be observed with a collected charge of more than 5000 electrons per MIP.

  17. Direct growth of hexagonal InN films on 6H-SiC by radio-frequency metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Chun; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Tsai, Din Ping

    2011-01-15

    Wurtzite InN films were prepared on a 6H-SiC substrate by a self-designed plasma-assisted metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy system without a buffer layer. In this article, the authors investigate the structural and optical properties of InN films grown on a 6H-SiC substrate. The crystallinity and microstructure of the thin film were further characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning-electron microscopy, and transmission-electron microscopy. Electrical and optical properties were evaluated by Hall and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. XRD results indicate that InN film grown at 500 deg. C is epitaxially grown along the c-axis orientation. The two-dimensional growth mode is clearly shown in scanning-electron microscope images. Room-temperature PL spectra show that the emission peak is located at {approx}0.83 eV due to the Burstein-Moss effect. In addition, the crystalline InN samples crack and peel away from the substrate at elevated growth temperature. This phenomenon may be attributed to lattice mismatch and grain coalescence while increasing the growth temperature. The narrow window of the growth temperature plays an important role in engineering the InN epitaxial growth.

  18. Current conduction mechanism and electrical break-down in InN grown on GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmik, J.; Fleury, C.; Adikimenakis, A.; Gregušová, D.; Ťapajna, M.; Dobročka, E.; Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Androulidaki, M.; Pogany, D.; Georgakilas, A.

    2017-06-01

    Current conduction mechanism, including electron mobility, electron drift velocity (vd) and electrical break-down have been investigated in a 0.5 μm-thick (0001) InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a GaN/sapphire template. Electron mobility (μ) of 1040 cm2/Vs and a free electron concentration (n) of 2.1 × 1018 cm-3 were measured at room temperature with only a limited change down to 20 K, suggesting scattering on dislocations and ionized impurities. Photoluminescence spectra and high-resolution X-ray diffraction correlated with the Hall experiment showing an emission peak at 0.69 eV, a full-width half-maximum of 30 meV, and a dislocation density Ndis ˜ 5.6 × 1010 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V) characterization was done in a pulsed (10 ns-width) mode on InN resistors prepared by plasma processing and Ohmic contacts evaporation. Resistors with a different channel length ranging from 4 to 15.8 μm obeyed the Ohm law up to an electric field intensity Eknee ˜ 22 kV/cm, when vd ≥ 2.5 × 105 m/s. For higher E, I-V curves were nonlinear and evolved with time. Light emission with a photon energy > 0.7 eV has been observed already at modest Erad of ˜ 8.3 kV/cm and consequently, a trap-assisted interband tunneling was suggested to play a role. At Eknee ˜ 22 kV/cm, we assumed electron emission from traps, with a positive feed-back for the current enhancement. Catastrophic break-down appeared at E ˜ 25 kV/cm. Reduction of Ndis was suggested to fully exploit InN unique prospects for future high-frequency devices.

  19. Motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  20. Advances in modeling semiconductor epitaxy: Contributions of growth orientation and surface reconstruction to InN metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, Akira; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kempisty, Pawel; Shiraishi, Kenji; Kakimoto, Koichi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2016-12-01

    We propose a newly improved thermodynamic analysis method that incorporates surface energies. The new theoretical approach enables us to investigate the effects of the growth orientation and surface reconstruction. The obtained knowledge would be indispensable for examining the preferred growth conditions in terms of the contribution of the surface state. We applied the theoretical approach to study the growth processes of InN(0001) and (000\\bar{1}) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Calculation results reproduced the difference in optimum growth temperature. That is, we successfully developed a new theoretical approach that can predict growth processes on various growth surfaces.

  1. Direct immobilization of enzymes in GaN and InN nanocolumns: The urease case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofikiti, N.; Chaniotakis, N.; Grandal, J.; Utrera, M.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Iliopoulos, E.; Georgakilas, A.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the development of potentiometric urea biosensors through the entrapment of urease enzyme within the cavities of nanocolumnar GaN and InN wurtzite semiconductor substrates, is being described. The biosensing capabilities of these materials are compared with biosensors based on the corresponding flat surfaces, in order to check the increased sensitivity and enzyme stabilization properties expected from the nanocolumns. The obtained results proved that the electrochemically active nanocolumns serve both as highly sensitive transducer, as well as stabilizing nanoenvironment within which urease retains its catalytic activity for a prolonged period of time.

  2. Systematic study on dynamic atomic layer epitaxy of InN on/in +c-GaN matrix and fabrication of fine-structure InN/GaN quantum wells: Role of high growth temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Hwang, Eun-Sook; Imai, Daichi; Itoi, Takaomi

    2016-12-01

    The growth kinetics and properties of nominally 1-ML (monolayer)-thick InN wells on/in +c-GaN matrix fabricated using dynamic atomic layer epitaxy (D-ALEp) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were systematically studied, with particular attention given to the effects of growth temperature. Attention was also given to how and where the ˜1-ML-thick InN layers were frozen or embedded on/in the +c-GaN matrix. The D-ALEp of InN on GaN was a two-stage process; in the 1st stage, an "In+N" bilayer/monolayer was formed on the GaN surface, while in the 2nd, this was capped by a GaN barrier layer. Each process was monitored in-situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The target growth temperature was above 620 °C and much higher than the upper critical epitaxy temperature of InN (˜500 °C). The "In+N" bilayer/monolayer tended to be an incommensurate phase, and the growth of InN layers was possible only when they were capped with a GaN layer. The InN layers could be coherently inserted into the GaN matrix under self-organizing and self-limiting epitaxy modes. The growth temperature was the most dominant growth parameter on both the growth process and the structure of the InN layers. Reflecting the inherent growth behavior of D-ALEp grown InN on/in +c-GaN at high growth temperature, the embedded InN layers in the GaN matrix were basically not full-ML in coverage, and the thickness of sheet-island-like InN layers was essentially either 1-ML or 2-ML. It was found that these InN layers tended to be frozen at the step edges on the GaN and around screw-type threading dislocations. The InN wells formed type-I band line-up heterostructures with GaN barriers, with exciton localization energies of about 300 and 500 meV at 15 K for the 1-ML and 2-ML InN wells, respectively.

  3. Reduction of electron accumulation at InN(0001) surfaces via saturation of surface states by potassium and oxygen as donor- or acceptor-type adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Reiß, S.; Krischok, S. Himmerlich, M.

    2014-01-28

    The influence of selected donor- and acceptor-type adsorbates on the electronic properties of InN(0001) surfaces is investigated implementing in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The changes in work function, surface band alignment, and chemical bond configurations are characterized during deposition of potassium and exposure to oxygen. Although an expected opponent charge transfer characteristic is observed with potassium donating its free electron to InN, while dissociated oxygen species extract partial charge from the substrate, a reduction of the surface electron accumulation occurs in both cases. This observation can be explained by adsorbate-induced saturation of free dangling bonds at the InN resulting in the disappearance of surface states, which initially pin the Fermi level and induce downward band bending.

  4. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  5. Growth of InN and In rich InGaN by ``High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition'' (HPCVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buegler, Max; Alevli, Mustafa; Atalay, Ramazan; Durkaya, Goksel; Wang, Jielei; Senevirathna, Indika; Jamil, Muhammad; Ferguson, Ian; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    We present the growth of III-nitrides under elevated nitrogen pressure to stabilize the growth surface at elevated temperatures. The achievable growth temperatures are significantly higher than in conventional low pressure MOCVD systems. With this the integration of In-rich materials into GaN and GaAlN becomes possible. In addition we present structural and optical properties of thin films grown by HPCVD at a reactor pressure of 15bar and temperatures of 870^oC. The Samples have been analyzed by Raman, optical absorption, IR reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy and by XRD. The growth of single phase layers of high crystalline quality has been proven by XRD with InN (0002) Bragg reflex FWHM's of 200arcsec (2θ-φ-scan) and 1600arcsec (rocking curves). These is backed up by Raman spectra with InN E2(high) peak FWHM's of below 10cm-1. Free carrier concentrations in the mid 10^18 cm-3 to low 10^19cm-3 have been calculated from IR reflection spectra. Photoluminescence spectroscopy showed luminescence at 0.77eV.

  6. InGaN nanowires with high InN molar fraction: growth, structural and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Meuret, Sophie; Kociak, Mathieu; Haas, Benedikt; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bougerol, Catherine; Auzelle, T; Jalabert, D; Biquard, Xavier; Gayral, Bruno; Daudin, Bruno

    2016-05-13

    The structural and optical properties of axial GaN/InGaN/GaN nanowire heterostructures with high InN molar fractions grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied at the nanoscale by a combination of electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and nano-cathodoluminescence techniques. InN molar fractions up to 50% have been successfully incorporated without extended defects, as evidence of nanowire potentialities for practical device realisation in such a composition range. Taking advantage of the N-polarity of the self-nucleated GaN NWs grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111), the N-polar InGaN stability temperature diagram has been experimentally determined and found to extend to a higher temperature than its metal-polar counterpart. Furthermore, annealing of GaN-capped InGaN NWs up to 800 °C has been found to result in a 20 times increase of photoluminescence intensity, which is assigned to point defect curing.

  7. Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-26

    The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

  8. InGaN nanowires with high InN molar fraction: growth, structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Meuret, Sophie; Kociak, Mathieu; Haas, Benedikt; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bougerol, Catherine; Auzelle, T.; Jalabert, D.; Biquard, Xavier; Gayral, Bruno; Daudin, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The structural and optical properties of axial GaN/InGaN/GaN nanowire heterostructures with high InN molar fractions grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied at the nanoscale by a combination of electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and nano-cathodoluminescence techniques. InN molar fractions up to 50% have been successfully incorporated without extended defects, as evidence of nanowire potentialities for practical device realisation in such a composition range. Taking advantage of the N-polarity of the self-nucleated GaN NWs grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111), the N-polar InGaN stability temperature diagram has been experimentally determined and found to extend to a higher temperature than its metal-polar counterpart. Furthermore, annealing of GaN-capped InGaN NWs up to 800 °C has been found to result in a 20 times increase of photoluminescence intensity, which is assigned to point defect curing.

  9. Effects of substrate nitridation and buffer layer on the crystalline improvements of semi-polar InN(101¯3) crystal on GaAs(110) by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. C.; Togashi, R.; Murakami, H.; Kumagai, Y.; Koukitu, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this report, effects of ammonia nitridation and low temperature InN buffer growth were investigated to improve the crystalline quality of InN(101¯3) grown on GaAs(110) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). InN(101¯3) single crystal including less than 0.1% of differently oriented domains was successfully grown by inserting low temperature InN buffer layer. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) values of InN(101¯3) epitaxial layer were drastically decreased from 89 arcmin to 55 arcmin after processing ammonia nitridation of GaAs(110) substrate surface. Furthermore, the FWHM value was decreased to 38 arcmin by increasing growth time, and the mechanism of dislocation annihilation happened during epitaxial growth was discussed.

  10. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  11. Ultrasonic Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Nakamura, M. K. Kurosawa , and S. Ueha, "Characteristics of a Hybrid Transducer-Type Ultrasonic Motor," IEEE Trans. Ultrason.Ferroelec. Freq., vol. 44...pp. 823-828, 1997. [12] M. K. Kurosawa , T. Morita, and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Ultrasonic Micromotor Based on PZT Thin Film," IEEE Ultrasonics...Symposium, vol. 1, pp. 549-552, 1994. [13] T. Morita, M. K. Kurosawa , and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Using PZT Thin Film

  12. The daytime boundary layer in the Inn Valley - A model evaluation study with high-quality turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goger, Brigitta; Rotach, Mathias W.; Gohm, Alexander; Fuhrer, Oliver; Stiperski, Ivana

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric processes associated with complex terrain include various phenomena on the meso- and microscale, which contribute significantly to the local weather in mountainous areas of the Earth. One of the most prominent and well-known boundary-layer phenomena in mountainous terrain is the daytime valley wind circulation, which is very pronounced on clear-sky days with weak synoptic forcing. We use several chosen "valley wind days" in the Inn Valley, Austria, as case studies for the evaluation of the performance of the NWP model COSMO on a horizontal resolution of 1.1 km with a focus on boundary-layer processes and turbulent exchange. The overall goal is to evaluate the model setup and to investigate whether the model's physics schemes (initially developed for horizontally homogeneous and flat surroundings) are suitable for truly complex terrain. We evaluate the model by using measurements from the so-called "i-Box" located in the Inn Valley. The i-Box consists of six core sites that are located at representative locations in the Inn Valley, and two remote sensing systems (wind Lidar and HATPRO passive T/RH profiler) in the city of Innsbruck. The long-term data set provides a data pool of high-resolution velocity variances, turbulence variables, radiation, soil moisture, and vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and wind in the lower troposphere, which allows a process-oriented analysis. A special focus is laid on the daytime valley boundary layer and its interaction with the developing up-valley wind. Vertical cross-sections show that the valley wind has an asymmetric structure, hence, the i-Box stations show a high spatial variability. While the station on the valley bottom and on the south-facing slope are clearly under the strong influence of the valley wind, the two stations on the north-facing slope are rather dominated by slope flows. We find that the valley wind has a strong (indirect) influence on the development of the local turbulence kinetic

  13. Influence of In-N Clusters on Band Gap Energy of Dilute Nitride In x Ga1-x N y As1-y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Guo, Heng-Fei; Chen, Li-Ying; Tang, Chun-Xiao; Lu, Ke-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The In-N clusters form in the dilute nitride InxGa1-xNyAs1-y alloys after annealing. It is found that the formation of the In-N clusters not only raises the N levels lying above the conduction band minimum (CBM) of InGaAs, but also raises the N levels below the CBM of InGaAs, leading to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. The blueshift of the band gap energy is relative to the variation of the impurity-host interaction. In order to describe the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the formation of the In-N clusters, a model is developed. It is found that the model can describe the blueshift of the band gap energy well. In addition, it is found the blueshift of the band gap energy due to the atom interdiffusion at the interface can be larger than that due to the formation of the In-N clusters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61504094, Tinjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology under No. 15JCYBJC16300, and Tianjin City High School Science and Technology Fund Planning Project No. 20120609

  14. Temperature dependence of the A1(LO) and E2 (high) phonons in hexagonal InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Jian, J. K.; Wang, G.; Bao, H. Q.; Chen, X. L.

    2007-06-01

    The frequencies and dampings of the zone-center optical phonon modes of A1(LO) (longitudinal-optical) and E2 (high) in wurtzite InN nanowires have been investigated by micro-Raman scattering in the temperature range from 80 to 300 K. Our results reveal that the phonon frequencies decrease and the linewidths broaden with increasing temperature. The obtained experimental data of the frequencies and linewidths at various temperatures can be well described by an empirical model which takes into account the contribution of the thermal expansion of lattice and symmetric decay of phonons into two and three identical phonons with lower energy. The results show that decay into two phonons is the probable channel for the A1(LO) mode and three-phonon decay dominates the E2 (high) mode.

  15. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, P. D. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu; Scolfaro, L. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu

    2014-12-14

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  16. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    SciTech Connect

    Barick, B. K. E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Dhar, S. E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; Cantarero, Andres

    2015-05-15

    Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [112{sup -}0] direction (a-plane) to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  17. Characterization of high quality InN grown on production-style plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy system

    SciTech Connect

    Gherasoiu, I.; O'Steen, M.; Bird, T.; Gotthold, D.; Chandolu, A.; Song, D. Y.; Xu, S. X.; Holtz, M.; Nikishin, S. A.; Schaff, W. J.

    2008-05-15

    In this work, the authors report step-flow growth mode of InN on [0001] oriented GaN templates, using a production-style molecular beam epitaxy system, Veeco GEN200 registered , equipped with a plasma source. Using adaptive growth conditions, they have obtained a surface morphology that exhibits the step-flow features. The root mean squared roughness over an area of 5x5 {mu}m{sup 2} is 1.4 nm with monolayer height terrace steps (0.281 nm), based on atomic force microscopy. It has been found that the presence of In droplets leads to defective surface morphology. From x-ray diffraction, they estimate edge and screw dislocation densities. The former is dominant over the latter. Micro-Raman spectra reveal narrow E{sub 2}{sup 2} phonon lines consistent with excellent crystalline quality of the epitaxial layers. The Hall mobility of 1 {mu}m thick InN layers, grown in step-flow mode, is slightly higher than 1400 cm{sup 2}/V s, while for other growth conditions yielding a smooth surface with no well-defined steps, mobility as high as 1904 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature has been measured. The samples exhibit high intensity photoluminescence (PL) with a corresponding band edge that shifts with free carrier concentration. For the lowest carrier concentration of 5.6x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, they observe PL emission at {approx}0.64 eV.

  18. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  19. Motor Planning.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron L; Haith, Adrian M; Krakauer, John W

    2015-08-01

    Motor planning colloquially refers to any process related to the preparation of a movement that occurs during the reaction time prior to movement onset. However, this broad definition encompasses processes that are not strictly motor-related, such as decision-making about the identity of task-relevant stimuli in the environment. Furthermore, the assumption that all motor-planning processes require processing time, and can therefore be studied behaviorally by measuring changes in the reaction time, needs to be reexamined. In this review, we take a critical look at the processes leading from perception to action and suggest a definition of motor planning that encompasses only those processes necessary for a movement to be executed-that is, processes that are strictly movement related. These processes resolve the ambiguity inherent in an abstract goal by defining a specific movement to achieve it. We propose that the majority of processes that meet this definition can be completed nearly instantaneously, which means that motor planning itself in fact consumes only a small fraction of the reaction time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices on +c-GaN template in dynamic atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Itoi, Takaomi; Wang, Ke; Imai, Daichi; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    The growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices (SPSs) were investigated with their application to ordered alloys in mind. The SPSs were grown on +c-GaN template at 650 °C by dynamic atomic layer epitaxy in conventional plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that coherent structured InN/GaN SPSs could be fabricated when the thickness of the GaN barrier was 4 ML or above. Below 3 ML, the formation of SPSs was quite difficult owing to the increased strain in the SPS structure caused by the use of GaN as a template. The effective or average In composition of the (InN)1/(GaN)4 SPSs was around 10%, and the corresponding InN coverage in the ˜1 ML-thick InN wells was 50%. It was found that the effective InN coverage in ˜1 ML-thick InN wells could be varied with the growth conditions. In fact, the effective In composition could be increased up to 13.5%, i.e., the corresponding effective InN coverage was about 68%, by improving the capping/freezing speed by increasing the growth rate of the GaN barrier layer.

  1. Brownian motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, P.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, F.

    2005-02-01

    In systems possessing a spatial or dynamical symmetry breaking, thermal Brownian motion combined with unbiased, non-equilibrium noise gives rise to a channelling of chance that can be used to exercise control over systems at the micro- and even on the nano-scale. This theme is known as the Brownian motor concept. The constructive role of (the generally overdamped) Brownian motion is exemplified for a noise-induced transport of particles within various set-ups. We first present the working principles and characteristics with a proof-of-principle device, a diffusive temperature Brownian motor. Next, we consider very recent applications based on the phenomenon of signal mixing. The latter is particularly simple to implement experimentally in order to optimize and selectively control a rich variety of directed transport behaviors. The subtleties and also the potential for Brownian motors operating in the quantum regime are outlined and some state-of-the-art applications, together with future roadways, are presented.

  2. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  3. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  4. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  5. Effects of Ga on the growth of InN on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Riechert, Henning; Brandt, Oliver; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-07-30

    We compare the structural properties of InN and In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates at different temperatures. The small amount of Ga results in dramatic changes in the morphology and structural properties of InN. In particular, inversion domains start to appear at higher temperatures in the In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N film. This process is a consequence of the chemical reaction of ZnO with Ga which can be prevented by choosing the substrate temperature to be 450{sup Degree-Sign }C or below.

  6. Real-Time Optical Monitoring and Simulations of Gas Phase Kinetics in InN Vapor Phase Epitaxy at High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Nikolaus; Woods, Vincent; McCall, Sonya D.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics of nucleation and coalescence of heteroepitaxial thin films is a crucial step in controlling a chemical vapor deposition process, since it defines the perfection of the heteroepitaxial film both in terms of extended defect formation and chemical integrity of the interface. The initial nucleation process also defines the film quality during the later stages of film growth. The growth of emerging new materials heterostructures such as InN or In-rich Ga(x)In(1-x)N require deposition methods operating at higher vapor densities due to the high thermal decomposition pressure in these materials. High nitrogen pressure has been demonstrated to suppress thermal decomposition of InN, but has not been applied yet in chemical vapor deposition or etching experiments. Because of the difficulty with maintaining stochiometry at elevated temperature, current knowledge regarding thermodynamic data for InN, e.g., its melting point, temperature-dependent heat capacity, heat and entropy of formation are known with far less accuracy than for InP, InAs and InSb. Also, no information exists regarding the partial pressures of nitrogen and phosphorus along the liquidus surfaces of mixed-anion alloys of InN, of which the InN(x)P(1-x) system is the most interesting option. A miscibility gap is expected for InN(x)P(1-x) pseudobinary solidus compositions, but its extent is not established at this point by experimental studies under near equilibrium conditions. The extension of chemical vapor deposition to elevated pressure is also necessary for retaining stoichiometric single phase surface composition for materials that are characterized by large thermal decomposition pressures at optimum processing temperatures.

  7. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (-In2O3) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal ()-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although -In2O3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N2-annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N2-annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]0.5%). Although [O]1% could be estimated by investigating In2O3 grains formed in N2-annealed InN films, [O]0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In2O3 grains formed by H2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O2, using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films.

  8. High-quality InN films on MgO (100) substrates: The key role of 30° in-plane rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Compeán García, V. D.; López Luna, E.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A.; Orozco Hinostroza, I. E.; Escobosa Echavarría, A.

    2014-05-12

    High crystalline layers of InN were grown on MgO(100) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Good quality films were obtained by means of an in-plane rotation process induced by the annealing of an InN buffer layer to minimize the misfit between InN and MgO. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction showed linear streaky patterns along the [011{sup ¯}0] azimuth and a superimposed diffraction along the [112{sup ¯}0] azimuth, which correspond to a 30° α-InN film rotation. This rotation reduces the mismatch at the MgO/InN interface from 19.5% to less than 3.5%, increasing the structural quality, which was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Only the (0002) c plane diffraction of α-InN was observed and was centered at 2θ = 31.4°. Raman spectroscopy showed two modes corresponding to the hexagonal phase: E1(LO) at 591 cm{sup −1} and E2(high) at 488 cm{sup −1}. Hall effect measurements showed a carrier density of 9 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and an electron Hall mobility of 340 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for a film thickness of 140 nm.

  9. In-situ cyclic pulse annealing of InN on AlN/Si during IR-lamp-heated MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akira; Bungi, Yu; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi; Mori, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    To improve crystal quality of InN, an in-situ cyclic rapid pulse annealing during growth was carried out using infrared-lamp-heated molecular beam epitaxy. A cycle of 4 min growth of InN at 400 °C and 3 s pulse annealing at a higher temperature was repeated 15 times on AlN on Si substrate. Annealing temperatures were 550, 590, 620, and 660 °C. The back of Si was directly heated by lamp irradiation through a quartz rod. A total InN film thickness was about 200 nm. With increasing annealing temperature up to 620 °C, crystal grain size by scanning electron microscope showed a tendency to increase, while widths of X-ray diffraction rocking curve of (0 0 0 2) reflection and E 2 (high) mode peak of Raman scattering spectra decreased. A peak of In (1 0 1) appeared in X-ray diffraction by annealing higher than 590 °C, and In droplets were found on the surface by annealing at 660 °C.

  10. Validation of a simple distributed sediment delivery approach in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Kittlaus, Steffen; Scherer, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    For large areas without highly detailed data the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is widely used to quantify soil loss. The problem though is usually the quantification of actual sediment influx into the rivers. As the USLE provides long-term mean soil loss rates, it is often combined with spatially lumped models to estimate the sediment delivery ratio (SDR). But it gets difficult with spatially lumped approaches in large catchment areas where the geographical properties have a wide variance. In this study we developed a simple but spatially distributed approach to quantify the sediment delivery ratio by considering the characteristics of the flow paths in the catchments. The sediment delivery ratio was determined using an empirical approach considering the slope, morphology and land use properties along the flow path as an estimation of travel time of the eroded particles. The model was tested against suspended solids measurements in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area in Germany and Austria, ranging from the high alpine south to the Molasse basin in the northern part.

  11. Optimal geometrical design of inertial vibration DC piezoelectric nanogenerators based on obliquely aligned InN nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nai-Jen; Liu, Guocheng; Wang, Chao-Hung; Gupta, Kapil; Liao, Wei-Shun; Ban, Dayan; Liu, Chuan-Pu

    2017-09-28

    Piezoelectric nanogenerators have been investigated to generate electricity from environmental vibrations due to their energy conversion capabilities. In this study, we demonstrate an optimal geometrical design of inertial vibration direct-current piezoelectric nanogenerators based on obliquely aligned InN nanowire (NW) arrays with an optimized oblique angle of ∼58°, and driven by the inertial force of their own weight, using a mechanical shaker without any AC/DC converters. The nanogenerator device manifests potential applications not only as a unique energy harvesting device capable of scavenging energy from weak mechanical vibrations, but also as a sensitive strain sensor. The maximum output power density of the nanogenerator is estimated to be 2.9 nW cm(-2), leading to an improvement of about 3-12 times that of vertically aligned ZnO NW DC nanogenerators. Integration of two nanogenerators also exhibits a linear increase in the output power, offering an enormous potential for the creation of self-powered sustainable nanosystems utilizing incessantly natural ambient energy sources.

  12. Proceedings of the Navy Symposium on Aeroballistics (10th) Held at the Sheraton Motor Inn Fredericksburg, Virginia on 15-16-17 July 1975. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-17

    parameters on the particle condi- tions at impact. In addition to particle encapsulation, the effects of particle size , initial velocity and range...dimensional, the spherical particle was initially transformed to a cubic particle of equivalent volume. The initial width of the particle (to) was...the rate of deformation of the particle through the shock layer is independent of the initial size of the particle. The size independence shows that

  13. Proceedings of the Navy Symposium on Aeroballistics (10th) Held at the Sheraton Motor Inn, Fredericksburg, Virginia on 15-16-17 July 1975. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-17

    question raised by the 1974 Nicolet tests was whether even this yaw level would be sufficient to result in a short at the launch Mach numbers, from 0.919...of trimming a missile to large angles of attack and producing high levels of maneuverability. As an example, these features are very attractive for...which neglects compressibility. Tne results of this study should yield more accurate methods of determining vortex trajectories, a question of prime

  14. Proceedings of the Navy Symposium on Aeroballistics (10th) Held at the Sheraton Motor Inn, Fredericksburg, Virginia, on 15-16-17 July 1975. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-17

    White Oak Laboratory Silver Spring, Maryland i 1 ~ i. I. *This work was supported by the Naval Air Systems Command, AIR 320 : 425 ~ A 10th Navy Symposlum... Air Force, Army, other government agjincics. ivertz’ mt d from industry. It is our hope that wr can provide a pleasant atmospheie for you ’mIn ng lou - 1 ...663-7646 KALIVRETENOS, C. A. KUSTER, F. A. Naval Surface Weapons Center Advanced Missile Project Office White Oak Laboratory Naval Air Development

  15. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  16. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  17. A new perspective on soil erosion: exploring a thermodynamic approach in a small area of the River Inn catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Scherer, Ulrike; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion modeling has always struggled with compensating for the difference in time and spatial scale between model, data and the actual processes involved. This is especially the case with non-event based long-term models based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), yet USLE based soil erosion models are among the most common and widely used for they have rather low data requirements and can be applied to large areas. But the majority of mass from soil erosion is eroded within short periods of times during heavy rain events, often within minutes or hours. Advancements of the USLE (eg. the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) allow for a daily time step, but still apply the same empirical methods derived from the USLE. And to improve the actual quantification of sediment input into rivers soil erosion models are often combined with a Sediment Delivery Ratio (SDR) to get results within the range of measurements. This is still a viable approach for many applications, yet it leaves much to be desired in terms of understanding and reproducing the processes behind soil erosion and sediment input into rivers. That's why, instead of refining and retuning the existing methods, we explore a more comprehensive, physically consistent description on soil erosion. The idea is to describe soil erosion as a dissipative process (Kleidon et al., 2013) and test it in a small sub-basin of the River Inn catchment area in the pre-Alpine foothills. We then compare the results to sediment load measurements from the sub-basin and discuss the advantages and issues with the application of such an approach.

  18. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  19. Motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

    1986-04-15

    An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

  20. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  1. Growth of InN films by radical-enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition at a low temperature of 200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Shinnosuke; Lu, Yi; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-06-01

    The InN films were deposited on GaN surfaces at a low temperature of 200 °C by radical-enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD). The REMOCVD system can provide N radicals from the plasma of a N2-H2 mixture gas without using ammonia. Two types of GaN substrate, bulk GaN and GaN on Si(111), were used. The growth mode was modeled as a step flow on the basis of surface morphology observation by atomic force microscopy.

  2. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  3. Probabilistic retrospective forecasts of snow accumulation for the upcoming winter season in the Inn headwaters catchment (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Kristian; Hanzer, Florian; Stoll, Elena; Schöber, Johannes; Scaife, Adam A.; MacLachlan, Craig; Huttenlau, Matthias; Achleitner, Stefan; Strasser, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal predictions aim at forecasting meteorological quantities for the upcoming months and are analysed as monthly data in many cases due to the uncertainties involved. The skill of seasonal predictions is, however, not distributed homogeneously in space and time. While good model skill measures can be achieved for El Niño and the tropics, the skill of seasonal predictions for Europe is generally lower, which limits the applicability of this kind of predictions. This contribution deals with a systematic analysis of re-forecast data obtained from two coupled atmosphere-ocean climate models (Met Office GloSea5 and NCEP CFSv2). In contrast to some other studies, the focus is on the prediction of hydrologic storages rather than on hydrologic fluxes such as precipitation or runoff. This approach acknowledges the persistence in time of storages which makes predictions more skilful. The study area is the snow- and ice-melt dominated Inn headwaters catchment upstream of Kirchbichl gauging station (9 310 km2) located in the Austrian Alps. Building on wintertime re-forecasts of the climate models and a subsequent rev-ESP experiment (reverse Ensemble Streamflow Prediction), water balance simulations have been carried out using the Alpine Water balance And Runoff Estimation model (AWARE). Simulations of accumulated runoff depth in the subsequent spring season are compared to observations. This comparison of preliminary results reveals that the ensemble means of computed anomalies of accumulated runoff depth compare well with observations. The model chain GloSea5-AWARE correctly predicted the tendency of anomalies for 9 of 13 years, while the corresponding CFSv2-AWARE simulations result in only 5 of 13 correctly predicted years. The results suggest that some seasonal predictions may be capable of predicting tendencies of hydrologic model storages, although the skill of these predictions is in many cases low in Europe. As the number of correctly predicted winters does not

  4. Post-growth thermal oxidation of wurtzite InN thin films into body-center cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} for chemical/gas sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.F.; Yakovlev, N.L.; Chi, D.Z.; Liu, W.

    2014-06-01

    Post-growth thermal oxidations of InN have been studied using high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and secondary ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The InN thin films, having relative high crystal quality, were grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on c-sapphire substrates using InGaN/GaN buffer layers. HRXRD reveals that oxidation of wurtzite InN into body-center cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred at elevated temperatures. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} encapsulation improves the crystal quality of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxidized by using conventional rapid thermal annealing (RTA) but it results in the presence of undesired metallic indium. Cycle-RTA not only improves the crystal quality but also avoids the byproduct of metallic indium. SIMS depth profile, using contaminate elements as the ‘interface markers,’ provide evidence that the oxidation of InN is dominated by oxygen inward diffusion mechanism. Together with the HRXRD results, we conclude that the crystal quality of the resultant In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructure is mainly controlled by the balance between the speeds of oxygen diffusion and InN thermal dissociation, which can be effectively tuned by cycle-RTA. The obtained In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructures can be fundamental materials for studying high speed chemical/gas sensing devices. - Graphical abstract: Oxidation of h-InN into bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been realized at elevated temperatures. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cap improves the crystal quality of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxidized by conventional RTA but it results in the presence of undesired metallic indium. Cycle-RTA not only improves the crystal quality but also avoids the byproduct of metallic indium. SIMS depth profiles provide evidence that the oxidation of InN is dominated by oxygen inward diffusion mechanism. The crystal quality of the resultant In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructure is mainly controlled by the balance between the speeds of oxygen diffusion and InN thermal

  5. Dependence of crystal orientation and bandgap on substrate temperature of molecular-beam epitaxy grown InN on bare Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    The issue of variable bandgap values for InN films grown on c-sapphire has been addressed in this work. {alpha}-InN films have been deposited in nitrogen rich condition at different substrate temperatures on bare Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). The results of several complementary characterization techniques show that single crystalline wurtzite InN is formed, but their orientation depends on the substrate temperature. The bandgap measured on these samples (1.78 eV) is explained by Moss-Burstein shift on these degenerately n-doped samples. Our results discount effects of crystal orientation, presence of oxygen at grain boundaries and In/N stoichiometry as factors that influence the measured band-gap values.

  6. Motor neuropathies and lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, A

    2017-05-01

    Motor or motor-predominant neuropathies may arise from disease processes affecting the motor axon and/or its surrounding myelin. Lower motor neuron syndrome (LMNS) arises from a disease process affecting the spinal motor neuron itself. The term LMNS is more generally used, rather than motor neuronopathy, although both entities are clinically similar. Common features are muscle weakness (distal or proximal) with atrophy and hyporeflexia, but no sensory involvement. They can be acquired or hereditary. Immune-mediated neuropathies (multifocal motor neuropathy, motor-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy) are important to identify, as effective treatments are available. Other acquired neuropathies, such as infectious, paraneoplastic and radiation-induced neuropathies are also well known. Focal LMNS is an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-mimicking syndrome especially affecting young adults. The main hereditary LMNSs in adulthood are Kennedy's disease, late-onset spinal muscular atrophy and distal hereditary motor neuropathies. Motor neuropathies and LMNS are all clinical entities that should be better known, despite being rare diseases. They can sometimes be difficult to differentially diagnose from other diseases, particularly from the more frequent ALS in its pure LMN form. Nevertheless, correct identification of these syndromes is important because their treatment and prognoses are definitely different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Raman scattering study of background electron density in InN: a hydrodynamical approach to the LO-phonon-plasmon coupled modes.

    PubMed

    Cuscó, R; Alarcón-Lladó, E; Ibáñez, J; Yamaguchi, T; Nanishi, Y; Artús, L

    2009-10-14

    We use a hydrodynamical approach to analyse the long-wavelength LO-phonon-plasmon coupled modes observed in a set of high-quality MBE-grown InN epilayers with electron densities varying over one order of magnitude, from ∼2 × 10(18) to ∼2 × 10(19)  cm(-3). The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Hall measurements. The correlation observed between the E(2)(high) mode frequency, and hence residual strain, and the electron density measured in the layers indicates that the differences in background electron density may be associated with threading dislocations. Owing to the low Raman signal, only the L(-) branch of the coupled modes can be unambiguously observed. The frequency of the L(-) Raman peak is, however, sensitive enough to the free electron density to allow its determination from lineshape fits to the spectra. These were carried out using an extended hydrodynamical model. Given the small bandgap energy and large conduction band nonparabolicity of InN, suitable expressions for the optical effective mass and mean square velocity that enter the hydrodynamical model were derived. Electron density values extracted from L(-) lineshape fits agree reasonably well with Hall determinations.

  8. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  9. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  10. SpaceInn hare-and-hounds exercise: Estimation of stellar properties using space-based asteroseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, D. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Miglio, A.; Antia, H. M.; Ball, W. H.; Basu, S.; Buldgen, G.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Coelho, H. R.; Hekker, S.; Houdek, G.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazumdar, A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; Verma, K.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Detailed oscillation spectra comprising individual frequencies for numerous solar-type stars and red giants are either currently available, e.g. courtesy of the CoRoT, Kepler, and K2 missions, or will become available with the upcoming NASA TESS and ESA PLATO 2.0 missions. The data can lead to a precise characterisation of these stars thereby improving our understanding of stellar evolution, exoplanetary systems, and the history of our galaxy. Aims: Our goal is to test and compare different methods for obtaining stellar properties from oscillation frequencies and spectroscopic constraints. Specifically, we would like to evaluate the accuracy of the results and reliability of the associated error bars, and to see where there is room for improvement. Methods: In the context of the SpaceInn network, we carried out a hare-and-hounds exercise in which one group, the hares, simulated observations of oscillation spectra for a set of ten artificial solar-type stars, and a number of hounds applied various methods for characterising these stars based on the data produced by the hares. Most of the hounds fell into two main groups. The first group used forward modelling (i.e. applied various search/optimisation algorithms in a stellar parameter space) whereas the second group relied on acoustic glitch signatures. Results: Results based on the forward modelling approach were accurate to 1.5% (radius), 3.9% (mass), 23% (age), 1.5% (surface gravity), and 1.8% (mean density), as based on the root mean square difference. Individual hounds reached different degrees of accuracy, some of which were substantially better than the above average values. For the two 1M⊙ stellar targets, the accuracy on the age is better than 10% thereby satisfying the requirements for the PLATO 2.0 mission. High stellar masses and atomic diffusion (which in our models does not include the effects of radiative accelerations) proved to be sources of difficulty. The average accuracies for the

  11. Teamwork in microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Roop; Rai, Arpan K; Barak, Pradeep; Rai, Ashim; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2013-11-01

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by the collective force from multiple motor proteins. Disease-causing mutations cause aberrant function of motors, but the impact is observed at a cellular level and beyond, therefore necessitating an understanding of cell mechanics at the level of motor molecules. One way to do this is by measuring the force generated by ensembles of motors in vivo at single-motor resolution. This has been possible for microtubule motor teams that transport intracellular organelles, revealing unexpected differences between collective and single-molecule function. Here we review how the biophysical properties of single motors, and differences therein, may translate into collective motor function during organelle transport and perhaps in other processes outside transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  13. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  14. Energy efficient motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This TechData Sheet is intended to help activity personnel identify cost effective energy projects for energy efficient motors. With this guide an energy manager can identify when an energy efficient induction motor should be used.

  15. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaschek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are a new type of actuator. They are characterized by high torque at low rotational speed, simple mechanical design and good controllability. They also provide a high holding torque even if no power is applied. Compared to electromagnetic actuators the torque per volume ratio of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors can be higher by an order of magnitude. Recently various types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors have been developed for industrial applications. This paper describes several types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors.

  16. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  17. Role of nanoscale AlN and InN for the microwave characteristics of AlGaN/(Al,In)N/GaN-based HEMT

    SciTech Connect

    Lenka, T. R. Panda, A. K.

    2011-09-15

    A new AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is proposed and its micro-wave characteristics are discussed by introducing a nanoscale AlN or InN layer to study the potential improvement in their high frequency performance. The 2DEG transport mechanism including various sub-band calculations for both (Al,In) N-based HEMTs are also discussed in the paper. Apart from direct current characteristics of the proposed HEMT, various microwave parameters such as transconductance, unit current gain (h{sub 21} = 1) cut-off frequency (f{sub t}), high power-gain frequency (f{sub max}). Masons available/stable gain and masons unilateral gain are also discussed for both devices to understand its suitable deployment in microwave frequency range.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of InN epitaxial layer grown on c-plane sapphire by chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Barick, Barun Kumar Prasad, Nivedita; Saroj, Rajendra Kumar; Dhar, Subhabrata

    2016-09-15

    Growth of InN epilayers on c-plane sapphire substrate by chemical vapor deposition technique using pure indium metal and ammonia as precursors has been systematically explored. It has been found that [0001] oriented indium nitride epitaxial layers with smooth surface morphology can be grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by optimizing the growth conditions. Bandgap of the film is observed to be Burstein–Moss shifted likely to be due to high background electron concentration. It has been found that the concentration of this unintentional doping decreases with the increase in the growth temperature and the ammonia flux. Epitaxial quality on the other hand deteriorates as the growth temperature increases. Moreover, the morphology of the deposited layer has been found to change from flat top islands to faceted mounds as the flow rate of ammonia increases. This phenomenon is expected to be related to the difference in surface termination character at low and high ammonia flow rates.

  19. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-04-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

  20. Adiabatic quantum motors.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Marún, Raúl; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-08-09

    When parameters are varied periodically, charge can be pumped through a mesoscopic conductor without applied bias. Here, we consider the inverse effect in which a transport current drives a periodic variation of an adiabatic degree of freedom. This provides a general operating principle for adiabatic quantum motors which we discuss here in general terms. We relate the work performed per cycle on the motor degree of freedom to characteristics of the underlying quantum pump and discuss the motors' efficiency. Quantum motors based on chaotic quantum dots operate solely due to quantum interference, and motors based on Thouless pumps have ideal efficiency.

  1. A Reconfigurable Stepping Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Charles; Selvaggi, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Multiphase brushless actuators, commonly known as the stepper motors, are ubiquitous for many precision control applications. Developments in the microelectronics have lead to their use as efficient drive motors for modern electric vehicles. Understanding the physics and the control logic for interfacing these transducers continues to be important for scientists and engineers. An overview of the stepping motor principles and interfacing requirements is presented and a simple working model used to teach the concepts of stepper motors is described and demonstrated. This model was used to design a much larger stepper motor required to precisely rotate a massive optical system in the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory.

  2. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale [Glasford, IL

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  3. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  4. Thermal stability of W, WSi{sub {ital x}}, and Ti/Al ohmic contacts to InGaN, InN, and InAlN

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Hagerott-Crawford, M.

    1996-11-01

    W, WSi{sub 0.44}, and Ti/Al contact properties were examined on {ital n}{sup +}In{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 0.35}N, InN, and In{sub 0.75}Al{sub 0.25}N. W was found to produce low specific contact resistance (d{sub {ital c}}{approximately}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega}cm{sup 2}) ohmic contacts to InGaN, with significant reaction between metal and semiconductor occurring at 900{degree}C mainly due to out diffusion of In and N. WSi{sub {ital x}} showed an as-deposited d{sub {ital c}} of 4{times}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega}cm{sup 2} but this degraded significantly with subsequent annealing at {ge}600{degree}C. Ti/Al contacts were stable to {approximately}600{degree}C (d{sub {ital c}}{approximately}4{times}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega}cm{sup 2} at {le}600{degree}C). The surfaces of these contacts remained smooth to 800{degree}C for W and WSi{sub {ital x}} and 650{degree}C for Ti/Al. InN contacted with W and Ti/Al produced ohmic contacts with d{sub {ital c}}{approximately}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega}cm{sup 2} and for WSi{sub {ital xd}}{sub {ital c}}{approximately}10{sup {minus}6} {Omega}cm{sup 2}. All remained smooth to {approximately}600{degree}C, but exhibited significant interdiffusion of In, N, W, and Ti, respectively, at higher temperatures. The contact resistances for all three metalization schemes were {ge}10{sup {minus}4} {Omega}cm{sup 2} on InAlN, and degraded with subsequent annealing. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  5. Piezoceramic Ultrasonic Motor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.S.

    1999-02-24

    The objective of this project was to team Aerotech and AlliedSignal FM and T (AS) to develop a cost-efficient process for small-batch, high performance PZT motor production. Aerotech would acquire the basic process expertise in motor fabrication, assembly, and testing from AS. Together, Aerotech and AS were to identify appropriate process improvements, focusing on raw material quality, manufacturing processes, and durability assessment. Aerotech would then design and build a motor in consultation with AS. Aerotech engineering observed motor manufacturing in the AS piezo lab and worked side by side with AS personnel to build and test a prototype motor to facilitate learning the technology. Using information from AS and hands-on experience with the AS motor drive system enabled Aerotech to design and build its own laboratory drive system to operate motors. The team compiled information to establish a potential piezo motor users' list, and an intellectual property search was conducted to understand current patent and IP (intellectual property) status of motor design. Work was initiated to identify and develop an American source for piezo motor elements; however, due to manpower restraints created by the resignation of the AS Ph.D. ceramist responsible for these tasks, the project schedule slipped. The project was subsequently terminated before significant activities were accomplished. AS did, however, provide Aerotech with contacts in Japanese industry that are willing and capable of supplying them with special design motor elements.

  6. Motorized support jack

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2003-05-13

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  7. Motorized support jack

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2001-01-01

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  8. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  9. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  10. Modularity for Motor Control and Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    d'Avella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    How the central nervous system (CNS) overcomes the complexity of multi-joint and multi-muscle control and how it acquires or adapts motor skills are fundamental and open questions in neuroscience. A modular architecture may simplify control by embedding features of both the dynamic behavior of the musculoskeletal system and of the task into a small number of modules and by directly mapping task goals into module combination parameters. Several studies of the electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from many muscles during the performance of different tasks have shown that motor commands are generated by the combination of a small number of muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific amplitude balances or activation waveforms, thus supporting a modular organization of motor control. Modularity may also help understanding motor learning. In a modular architecture, acquisition of a new motor skill or adaptation of an existing skill after a perturbation may occur at the level of modules or at the level of module combinations. As learning or adapting an existing skill through recombination of modules is likely faster than learning or adapting a skill by acquiring new modules, compatibility with the modules predicts learning difficulty. A recent study in which human subjects used myoelectric control to move a mass in a virtual environment has tested this prediction. By altering the mapping between recorded muscle activity and simulated force applied on the mass, as in a complex surgical rearrangement of the tendons, it has been possible to show that it is easier to adapt to a perturbation that is compatible with the muscle synergies used to generate hand force than to a similar but incompatible perturbation. This result provides direct support for a modular organization of motor control and motor learning.

  11. Piezoelectric Motors and Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, K.

    Piezoelectric ceramics forms a new field between electronic and structural ceramics [1-4]. Application fields are classified into three categories: positioners, motors, and vibration suppressors. From the market research result for 80 Japanese component industries in 1992, tiny motors in the range of 5-8 mm are required in large numbers for office and portable equipment; the conventional electromagnetic (EM) motors are rather difficult to produce in this size with sufficient energy efficiency, while Silicon MEMS actuators are too small to be used in practice. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors whose efficiency is insensitive to size are superior in the millimeter motor area. The manufacturing precision of optical instruments such as lasers and cameras, and the positioning accuracy for fabricating semiconductor chips are of the order of 0.1μm which is much smaller than the backlash of the EM motors. Vibration suppression in space structures and military vehicles also require compact but mighty piezoelectric actuators.

  12. Sensorless, online motor diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kliman, G.B.; Premerlani, W.J.; Yazici, B.; Koegl, R.A.; Mazereeuw, J.

    1997-04-01

    Electric motors play a very important role in the safe and efficient running of any industrial plant. Early detection of abnormalities in the motors will help avoid expensive failures. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) implemented in a computer-based motor monitor can contribute to such condition-based maintenance functions. Such a system may also detect an abnormality in the process as well as the motor. Extensive online monitoring of the motors can lead to greater plant availability, extended plant life, higher quality product, and smoother plant operation. With advances in digital technology over the last several years, adequate data processing capability is now available on cost-effective, microprocessor-based, protective-relay platforms to monitor motors for a variety of abnormalities in addition to the normal protection functions. Such multifunction monitors, first introduced by Multilin, are displacing the multiplicity of electromechanical devices commonly applied for many years. Following some background information on motor monitoring, this article features recent developments in providing tools for the diagnosis of faults or incipient faults in electric motor drives: Sensorless torque measurement, direct detection of turn-to-turn short circuits, detection of cracked or broken rotor bars, and detection of bearing deterioration.

  13. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  14. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  15. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  16. Heritability of motor control and motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Missitzi, Julia; Gentner, Reinhard; Misitzi, Angelica; Geladas, Nickos; Politis, Panagiotis; Klissouras, Vassilis; Classen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relative contribution of genes and environment on individual differences in motor control and acquisition of a force control task, in view of recent association studies showing that several candidate polymorphisms may have an effect on them. Forty‐four healthy female twins performed brisk isometric abductions with their right thumb. Force was recorded by a transducer and fed back to the subject on a computer screen. The task was to place the tracing of the peak force in a force window defined between 30% and 40% of the subject's maximum force, as determined beforehand. The initial level of proficiency was defined as the number of attempts reaching the force window criterion within the first 100 trials. The difference between the number of successful trials within the last and the first 100 trials was taken as a measure of motor learning. For motor control, defined by the initial level of proficiency, the intrapair differences in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins were 6.8 ± 7.8 and 13.8 ± 8.4, and the intrapair correlations 0.77 and 0.39, respectively. Heritability was estimated at 0.68. Likewise for motor learning intrapair differences in the increment of the number of successful trials in MZ and DZ twins were 5.4 ± 5.2 and 12.8 ± 7, and the intrapair correlations 0.58 and 0.19. Heritability reached 0.70. The present findings suggest that heredity accounts for a major part of existing differences in motor control and motor learning, but uncertainty remains which gene polymorphisms may be responsible. PMID:24744865

  17. "Pure" motor hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Rubino, F A

    1975-01-01

    Attenuation of cerebral evoked responses after stimulation of the median nerve in the hemiplegic limbs suggested that an apparently pure motor hemiplegia in some patients may not have pure involvement of the corticospinal system. Frontoparietal metastasis, infarction in basis pontis and medullary pyramid, and occlusion of internal carotid artery in the neck resulted in pure motor hemiplegia in some individuals. Images PMID:1185228

  18. Information on stepping motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fongarland, G.

    1982-04-01

    The principles of the stepping motors which are often used in servomechanisms are reviewed. Variable reluctance as well as permanent magnet stepping motors are considered. Their operation is explained which includes permanent rotation, starting, stopping, and resonance effects. Several application examples, drawn from problems in automation, are outlined.

  19. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  20. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  1. W, WSi{sub x} and Ti/Al low resistance OHMIC contacts to InGaN, InN and InAlN

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Hagerott-Crawford, M.

    1996-06-01

    W, WSi{sub 0.44} and Ti/Al contacts were examined on n{sup +} In{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 0.35}N, InN and In{sub 0.75}Al{sub 0.25}N. W was found to produce low specific contact resistance ({rho}{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}7} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2}) ohmic contacts to InGaN, with significant reaction between metal and semiconductor at 900 {degrees}C mainly due to out diffusion of In and N. WSi{sub x} showed an as-deposited {rho}{sub c} of 4{times}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2} but this degraded significantly with subsequent annealing. Ti/Al contacts were stable to {approximately} 600 {degrees}C ({rho}{sub c} {approximately} 4{times}10{sup {minus}7} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2} at {le}600 {degrees}C). The surfaces of these contacts remain smooth to 800 {degrees}C for W and WSi{sub x} and 650 {degrees}C for Ti/Al. InN contacted with W and Ti/Al produced ohmic contacts with {rho}{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}7} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2} and for WSi{sub x} {rho}{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}6} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2}. All remained smooth to {approximately} 600 {degrees}C, but exhibited significant interdiffusion of In, N, W and Ti respectively at higher temperatures. The contact resistances for all three metalization schemes were {ge} 10{sup {minus}4} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2} on InAlN, and degrades with subsequent annealing. The Ti/Al was found to react with the InAlN above 400 {degrees}C, causing the contact resistance to increase rapidly. W and WSi{sub x} proved to be more stable with {rho}{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} and 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega} {center_dot}cm{sup 2} up to 650 {degrees}C and 700 {degrees}C respectively.

  2. Induction motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  3. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  4. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly utilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilizes induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  5. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  6. High rate dry etching of GaN, AlN and InN in ECR Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Shul, R.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Crawford, M.H.; Howard, A.J.; Parmeter, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Etch rates for binary nitrides in ECR Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar are reported as a function of temperature, rf-bias, microwave power, pressure and relative gas proportions. GaN etch rates remain relatively constant from 30 to 125{degrees}C and then increase to a maximum of 2340 {angstrom}-min{sup {minus}1} at 170{degrees}C. The AlN etch rate decreases throughout the temperature range studied with a maximum of 960 {angstrom}-min{sup {minus}1} at 30{degrees}C. When CH{sub 4} is removed from the plasma chemistry, the GaN and InN etch rates are slightly lower, with less dramatic changes with temperature. The surface composition of the III-V nitrides remains unchanged over the temperatures studied. The GaN and InN rates increase significantly with rf power, and the fastest rates for all three binaries are obtained at 2 mTorr. Surface morphology is smooth for GaN over a wide range of conditions, whereas InN surfaces are more sensitive to plasma parameters.

  7. Tuning the effective band gap and finding the optimal growth condition of InN thin films on GaN/sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kankat; Rathore, Jaswant Singh; Laha, Apurba

    2017-01-01

    InN thin films are grown on GaN/sapphire substrates with varying the nitrogen plasma power in plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) system. In order to evaluate the effect of nitrogen plasma power on the different properties of the InN films, several characterization viz. x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence measurement, infra-red spectroscopy and Hall measurement were performed. Two interesting phenomena observed from the measurements are described in this paper. Firstly, it is found from both the photoluminescence and infrared spectroscopy that only by varying the nitrogen plasma power (thus the III/V ratio), one can fine tune the optical absorption edge, i.e., the effective band gap of InN from ∼0.72 eV to ∼ 0.77 eV. Secondly, it is inferred that the film grown with stoichiometric condition (III/V ∼ 1) exhibits the best structural and electrical properties.

  8. Improve Motor System Efficiency for a Broad Range of Motors with MotorMaster+ International

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    Available at no charge, MotorMaster+ International is designed to support motor systems improvement planning at industrial facilities by identifying the most cost-effective choice when deciding to repair or replace older motor models.

  9. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  10. Surface and bulk electronic structures of heavily Mg-doped InN epilayer by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Masataka; Tsuda, Shunsuke; Nagata, Takahiro; Banal, Ryan G.; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yang, AnLi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Koide, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Masamitsu; Uematsu, Nao; Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the polarity, energy band diagram, and oxygen (O) distribution of a heavily Mg-doped InN (InN:Mg+) epilayer with a Mg concentration of 1.0 ± 0.5 × 1020 cm-3, the core-level and valence band (VB) photoelectron spectra are investigated by angle-resolved soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The InN:Mg+ epilayers are grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. In this doping level, the polarity inversion from In-polar to N-polar occurs with the increase in the Mg flow rate under the same growth conditions, and the VB spectrum clearly indicates the direction of polarity of InN:Mg+, which is N-polar. The energy band diagram is considered to exhibit a two-step downward bending structure due to the coexistence of the n+ surface electron accumulation layer and heavily Mg-doped p+ layer formed in the bulk. The O concentration rapidly increases until ˜4 nm with respect to the surface, which is deduced to be one of the reasons of the formation of the anomalous two-step energy band profile.

  11. Intrinsic thermal conductivities and size effect of alloys of wurtzite AlN, GaN, and InN from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Li, Wu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact the alloys of wurtzite AlN, GaN, and InN are widely used in electronics, the studies on their thermal conductivities (κ) are inadequate, and the intrinsic limits are still unknown. In this work, the intrinsic κ of alloys and their films are calculated from first-principles within the virtual crystal treatment. The κ of alloys are strongly suppressed even by a small amount of alloying. For instance, with only 1% alloying of Al or In, κ of GaN decreases about 60%. At relatively high alloying, with concentration between 0.2 and 0.8, the κ of alloys are not significantly changed. At room temperature, the minimal a-axis κ are about 18, 22, and 8 W m-1 K-1, while the minimal c-axis κ are about 22, 27, and 10 W m-1 K-1 for AlxGa1-xN, InxGa1-xN, and InxAl1-xN, respectively. The size effect in films can persist up to a few tens of micrometers, and κ can be reduced by half in about 100 nm thick films.

  12. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  13. Point defects introduced by InN alloying into In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, A.; Tsutsui, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kimura, S.; Zhang, Y.; Lozac'h, M.; Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M.; Ishibashi, S.

    2013-03-28

    Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.06-0.14) grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation as a function of incident positron energy for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced with increasing InN composition, and the major defect species was identified as complexes between a cation vacancy and a nitrogen vacancy. The concentration of the divacancy, however, was found to be suppressed by Mg doping. The momentum distribution of electrons at the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface was close to that in defect-free GaN or In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, which was attributed to localization of positrons at the interface due to the built-in electric field, and to suppression of positron trapping by vacancy-type defects. We have also shown that the diffusion property of positrons is sensitive to an electric field near the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface.

  14. Motor Priming in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Priming is a type of implicit learning wherein a stimulus prompts a change in behavior. Priming has been long studied in the field of psychology. More recently, rehabilitation researchers have studied motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. For example, priming of the motor cortex is associated with changes in neuroplasticity that are associated with improvements in motor performance. Of the numerous motor priming paradigms under investigation, only a few are practical for the current clinical environment, and the optimal priming modalities for specific clinical presentations are not known. Accordingly, developing an understanding of the various types of motor priming paradigms and their underlying neural mechanisms is an important step for therapists in neurorehabilitation. Most importantly, an understanding of the methods and their underlying mechanisms is essential for optimizing rehabilitation outcomes. The future of neurorehabilitation is likely to include these priming methods, which are delivered prior to or in conjunction with primary neurorehabilitation therapies. In this Special Interest article we discuss those priming paradigms that are supported by the greatest amount of evidence including: (i) stimulation-based priming, (ii) motor imagery and action observation, (iii) sensory priming, (iv) movement-based priming, and (v) pharmacological priming. PMID:25415551

  15. Advanced motor and motor control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuertz, Kenneth L.; Beauchamp, Edward D.

    1988-08-01

    The capability of operating a high speed permanent magnet brushless dc motor with electronic controller over a wide load and speed range was demonstrated. A centrifugal pump was used as the loading mechanism and hydraulic fluid was pumped in simulation of an aircraft engine fuel pump requirement. A motor speed of 45,000 rpm was reached and a maximum output of 68.5 hp was demonstrated. The response of the system to step commands for speed change was established. Reduction of size and weight of electronic control was established as a primary future goal. The program system concept with minor rotating machine improvements is viable for high speed drive applications up to 100-hp level.

  16. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  17. Motor Vehicle Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... these crashes is one part of motor vehicle safety. Here are some things you can do to ... speed or drive aggressively Don't drive impaired Safety also involves being aware of others. Share the ...

  18. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  19. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  20. Fine motor control

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Parkinson disease have trouble speaking, eating, and writing because they have lost fine motor control. The ... Drawing lines or circles Folding clothes Holding and writing with a pencil Stacking blocks Zipping a zipper

  1. General Motors Goes Metric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Ted

    1976-01-01

    Describes the program to convert to the metric system all of General Motors Corporation products. Steps include establishing policy regarding employee-owned tools, setting up training plans, and making arrangements with suppliers. (MF)

  2. Piezoelectric Rotary Tube Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Badescu, Mircea; Braun, David F.; Culhane, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A custom rotary SQUIGGLE(Registered TradeMark) motor has been developed that sets new benchmarks for small motor size, high position resolution, and high torque without gear reduction. Its capabilities cannot be achieved with conventional electromagnetic motors. It consists of piezoelectric plates mounted on a square flexible tube. The plates are actuated via voltage waveforms 90 out of phase at the resonant frequency of the device to create rotary motion. The motors were incorporated into a two-axis postioner that was designed for fiber-fed spectroscopy for ground-based and space-based projects. The positioner enables large-scale celestial object surveys to take place in a practical amount of time.

  3. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  4. MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  5. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  6. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  7. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  8. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  9. Development Motor-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    One of the key tests in the effort to return the Space Shuttle to flight following the Challenger accident was testing the development Motor-8 (DM-8). The 126-foot long, 1.2-million-pound motor, designated DM-8, underwent a full-duration horizontal test firing for two minutes at the Thiokol test facility in Utah. It was fitted with more than 500 instruments to measure such things as acceleration, pressure, deflection thrust, strain, temperature, and electrical properties.

  10. Maintaining Motor Skill Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    trials eacb--ac--yIecon- ,, :;. - taed p- --d-t-trias,--P-t- rilk --r. expermenter-difie-d- ovementu con- strained by the stop. The distance between...processing in motor control-i ... and -laIg- e-rr--’- cae -clrsj--98 I Y. ag.L., K. A., & D5oWe-l, M. R. Serial-position effects in motor short-! term

  11. Motor maps and synergies.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Peter D; Neilson, Megan D

    2005-01-01

    Consider the process of raising and lowering the arm in the sagittal plane. Different parts of different muscles operate over different sectors of the angular range. How and why does the nervous system implement this differential muscle activation according to joint angle? We contend that such control depends on the adaptive formation of motor maps. These solve the problem of redundancy in the musculoskeletal system by connecting a relatively small number of cortical columns in the motor cortex to a large number of alpha motor neuron pools. We argue that motor maps are formed such that each functional muscle is activated in proportion to its moment arm about the movement. Because of this the required agonist and antagonist turning forces are generated with a minimum demand for metabolic energy. We know from biomechanical principles that, at any given posture, those muscle fibres that change length most in response to a small joint-angle change are those with the greatest moment arm. Likewise those that change least have the smallest. By establishing a model of the polynomial relationships between the lengths of functional muscles l and the corresponding changes in joint angles theta, the nervous system can generate signals partial differentiallj/ partial differentialthetai (where lj is the length of the jth functional muscle and thetai is the magnitude of the ith elemental movement). These signals create motor maps by modulating the gains of descending motor pathways. As a result, functional muscles are activated in proportion to their moment arms. This reduces the demand for metabolic energy to a minimum. Since moment arms change with joint angle, it also accounts for the experimental observations above. Such motor mapping effectively provides a minimum energy "wired-in" synergy. Established in utero, motor maps are the first stage of synergy formation and provide the basis for the development of subsequent task-dependent synergies.

  12. Development Motor-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    One of the key tests in the effort to return the Space Shuttle to flight following the Challenger accident was testing the development Motor-8 (DM-8). The 126-foot long, 1.2-million-pound motor, designated DM-8, underwent a full-duration horizontal test firing for two minutes at the Thiokol test facility in Utah. It was fitted with more than 500 instruments to measure such things as acceleration, pressure, deflection thrust, strain, temperature, and electrical properties.

  13. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  14. Engineering applications of biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry

    2011-08-15

    Biomolecular motors, in particular motor proteins from the kinesin and myosin families, can be used to explore engineering applications of molecular motors in general. Their outstanding performance enables the experimental study of hybrid systems, where bio-inspired functions such as sensing, actuation, and transport rely on the nanoscale generation of mechanical force. Scaling laws and theoretical studies demonstrate the optimality of biomolecular motor designs and inform the development of synthetic molecular motors.

  15. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  16. The effect of electrical properties for InGaN and InN by high-energy particle irradiation (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shao-guang; Fan, Guang-han

    2008-03-01

    This paper (SPIE Paper 68411H) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 8 August 2008 upon discovery that the paper has substantially plagiarized the following two papers: R.E. Jones, S.X. Li, L. Hsu, K.M. Yu, W. Walukiewicz, Z. Liliental-Weber, J.W. Ager III, E.E. Haller, H. Lu, and W.J. Schaff, "Native-defect-controlled n-type conductivity in InN," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 436-439 and S.X. Li, K.M. Yu, J. Wu, R.E. Jones, W. Walukiewicz, J.W. Ager III, W. Shan, E.E. Haller, Hai Lu, and William J. Schaff, "Native defects in InxGa1-xN alloys," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 432-435. As stated in the SPIE Publication Ethics Guidelines, "SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. Unauthorized use of another researcher's unpublished data or findings without permission is considered to be a form of plagiarism even if the source is attributed. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct." It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to provide citations to original sources so that interested readers can obtain the information directly from those sources. One of the authors, Shao-guang Dong, accepts full responsibility and apologizes for this plagiarism and has absolved the second author, Guang-han Fan, of any prior knowledge of or professional misconduct in this matter. Guang-han Fan also states that he had not previously seen the paper or given permission to include his name as an author.

  17. A versatile stepping motor controller for systems with many motors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A versatile system for controlling beamlines or complex experimental setups is described. The system as currently configured can control up to 32 motors, with all motors capable of full speed operation concurrently. There are 2 limit switch inputs for each motor, and a further input to accept a reference position marker. The motors can be controlled via a front panel keyboard with display, or by a host computer over an IEEE-488 interface. Both methods can be used together if required. There is an emergency stop'' key on the front panel keyboard to stop the motion of all motors without losing track of the motors' position. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Magnetostrictive direct drive motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Highly magnetostrictive materials such as Tb.3Dy.7Fe2, commercially known as TERFENOL-D, have been used to date in a variety of devices such as high power actuators and linear motors. The larger magnetostriction available in twinned single crystal TERFENOL-D, approx. 2000 ppm at moderate magnetic field strengths, makes possible a new generation of magnetomechanical devices. NASA researchers are studying the potential of this material as the basis for a direct microstepping rotary motor with torque densities on the order of industrial hydraulics and five times greater than that of the most efficient, high power electric motors. Such a motor would be a micro-radian stepper, capable of precision movements and self-braking in the power-off state. Innovative mechanical engineering techniques are juxtaposed on proper magnetic circuit design to reduce losses in structural flexures, inertias, thermal expansions, eddy currents, and magneto-mechanical coupling, thus optimizing motor performance and efficiency. Mathematical models are presented, including magnetic, structural, and both linear and nonlinear dynamic calculations and simulations. In addition, test results on prototypes are presented.

  19. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  20. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    Developing magnetostrictive direct drive research motors to power robot joints is discussed. These type motors are expected to produce extraordinary torque density, to be able to perform microradian incremental steps and to be self-braking and safe with the power off. Several types of motor designs have been attempted using magnetostrictive materials. One of the candidate approaches (the magnetostrictive roller drive) is described. The method in which the design will function is described as is the reason why this approach is inherently superior to the other approaches. Following this, the design will be modelled and its expected performance predicted. This particular candidate design is currently undergoing detailed engineering with prototype construction and testing scheduled for mid 1991.

  1. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.

    1998-01-01

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor.

  2. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.

    1998-05-05

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotatable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor. 11 figs.

  3. Motor stereotypy disorders.

    PubMed

    Muthugovindan, Deivasumathy; Singer, Harvey

    2009-04-01

    This review highlights recent advances in understanding the clinical features, prevalence, and outcomes of motor stereotypy disorders in typically developing children. Longitudinal data indicate that stereotypies in children with normal intelligence show an early age of onset, chronicity, and high prevalence of comorbid difficulties, including tics, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The underlying abnormality remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence for Mendelian inheritance and a neurobiological mechanism. Primary motor stereotypies are relatively common in childhood and can be subdivided into three groups (common, head nodding, and complex motor). Movements are similar to those seen in children with autistic spectrum disorders, mental retardation, and sensory deprivation. The role of pharmacotherapy is not established and behavioral therapy can be beneficial.

  4. Systematic study on dynamic atomic layer epitaxy of InN on/in +c-GaN matrix and fabrication of fine-structure InN/GaN quantum wells: Impact of excess In-atoms at high growth temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Imai, Daichi; Hwang, Eun-Sook

    2016-12-01

    The growth kinetics of nominally one-monolayer (˜1-ML)-thick InN wells on/in the +c-GaN matrix fabricated using dynamic atomic layer epitaxy (D-ALEp) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were systematically studied, with particular attention given to the impacts of excess In atoms and/or In droplets at a high growth temperature of 650 °C. Even at a constant growth temperature of 650 °C, the thickness of the sheet-island-like InN-well layers could be controlled/varied from 1-ML to 2-ML owing to the effect of excess In atoms and/or In droplets accumulated during growth. The possible growth mechanism is discussed based on the ring-shaped bright cathodoluminescence emissions introduced along the circumference of the In droplets during growth. The effective thermal stability of N atoms below the bilayer adsorbed In atoms was increased by the presence of In droplets, resulting in the freezing of 2-ML-thick InN wells into the GaN matrix. It therefore became possible to study the difference between the emission properties of 1-ML and 2-ML-thick InN wells/GaN matrix quantum wells (QWs) having similar GaN matrix crystallinity grown at the same temperature. InN/GaN QW-samples grown under widely different In + N* supply conditions characteristically separated into two groups with distinctive emission-peak wavelengths originating from 1-ML and 2-ML-thick InN wells embedded in the GaN matrix. Reflecting the growth mechanism inherent to the D-ALEp of InN on/in the +c-GaN matrix at high temperature, either 1-ML or 2-ML-thick "binary" InN well layers tended to be frozen into the GaN matrix rather InGaN random ternary-alloys. Both the structural quality and uniformity of the 1-ML InN well sample were better than those of the 2-ML InN well sample, essentially owing to the quite thin critical thickness of around 1-ML arising from the large lattice mismatch of InN and GaN.

  5. Peregrine Sustainer Motor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodell, Chuck; Franklin, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Peregrine sounding rocket is an in-house NASA design that provides approximately 15 percent better performance than the motor it replaces. The design utilizes common materials and well-characterized architecture to reduce flight issues encountered with the current motors. It engages NASA design, analysts, test engineers and technicians, ballisticians, and systems engineers. The in-house work and collaboration within the government provides flexibility to efficiently accommodate design and program changes as the design matures and enhances the ability to meet schedule milestones. It provides a valuable tool to compare industry costs, develop contracts, and it develops foundational knowledge for the next generation of NASA engineers.

  6. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  7. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  8. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training: a comparison between motor execution and motor imagery of sequential finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2011-03-01

    Motor imagery training, as an effective strategy, has been more and more applied to mental disorders rehabilitation and motor skill learning. Studies on the neural mechanism underlying motor imagery have suggested that such effectiveness may be related to the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery. However, as compared to the studies on motor imagery, the studies on motor imagery training are much fewer. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training and the effectiveness of motor imagery training on motor performance improvement still needs further investigation. Using fMRI, we employed a sequential finger tapping paradigm to explore the functional alterations associated with motor imagery training in both motor execution and motor imagery task. We hypothesized through 14 consecutive days motor imagery training, the motor performance could be improved and the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery would be sustained form pre-training phase to post-training phase. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of motor imagery training in improving motor performance and demonstrated in both pre and post-training phases, motor imagery and motor execution consistently sustained the congruence in functional neuroanatomy, including SMA (supplementary motor cortex), PMA (premotor area); M1( primary motor cortex) and cerebellum. Moreover, for both execution and imagery tasks, a similar functional alteration was observed in fusiform through motor imagery training. These findings provided an insight into the effectiveness of motor imagery training and suggested its potential therapeutic value in motor rehabilitation.

  9. Tuning Multiple Motor Travel Via Single Motor Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-based molecular motors often work in small groups to transport cargos in cells. A key question in understanding transport (and its regulation in vivo) is to identify the sensitivity of multiple-motor-based motion to various single molecule properties. Whereas both single-motor travel distance and microtubule binding rate have been demonstrated to contribute to cargo travel, the role of single-motor velocity is yet to be explored. Here, we recast a previous theoretical study, and make explicit a potential contribution of velocity to cargo travel. We test this possibility experimentally, and demonstrate a strong negative correlation between single-motor velocity and cargo travel for transport driven by two motors. Our study thus discovers a previously unappreciated role of single-motor velocity in regulating multiple-motor transport. PMID:22672518

  10. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  11. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  12. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  13. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  14. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  15. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  16. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives - Motor Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Alternating current electric motors rotate at a nearly constant speed that is determined by motor design and line frequency. Energy savings of 50% or more may be available when fixed speed systems are modified to allow the motor speed to match variable load requirements of a centrifugal fan or pump.

  17. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, J.D.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1997-03-18

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices is disclosed. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques. 15 figs.

  18. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, John D.; Otaduy, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques.

  19. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  20. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  1. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  2. Motorized recreation in Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    Bruce E. Lord

    2007-01-01

    Pennsylvania's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) has been developing management plans to deal with the growing popularity of motorized recreation in the Commonwealth. Two important segments of off-highway vehicle use in Pennsylvania involve all-terrain vehicles and snowmobile riding. A pair of needs studies for these recreationists provides a...

  3. Spherically Actuated Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A three degree of freedom (DOF) spherical actuator is proposed that will replace functions requiring three single DOF actuators in robotic manipulators providing space and weight savings while reducing the overall failure rate. Exploration satellites, Space Station payload manipulators, and rovers requiring pan, tilt, and rotate movements need an actuator for each function. Not only does each actuator introduce additional failure modes and require bulky mechanical gimbals, each contains many moving parts, decreasing mean time to failure. A conventional robotic manipulator is shown in figure 1. Spherical motors perform all three actuation functions, i.e., three DOF, with only one moving part. Given a standard three actuator system whose actuators have a given failure rate compared to a spherical motor with an equal failure rate, the three actuator system is three times as likely to fail over the latter. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory reliability studies of NASA robotic spacecraft have shown that mechanical hardware/mechanism failures are more frequent and more likely to significantly affect mission success than are electronic failures. Unfortunately, previously designed spherical motors have been unable to provide the performance needed by space missions. This inadequacy is also why they are unavailable commercially. An improved patentable spherically actuated motor (SAM) is proposed to provide the performance and versatility required by NASA missions.

  4. Motor Learning and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Hartmut

    Two recent conferences on the science of sport have focused on the topic of sports for older people. Investigations have been made on the special demand in motor learning, in table-tennis, family-tennis, gymnastics, and dancing. This paper summarizes some experiences and conclusions drawn from these studies, including special notes on isolated…

  5. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  6. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  7. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  8. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  9. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  10. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  11. Tandem motors reduce well costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, M.; Daigle, C.; Crowe, R.

    1995-10-01

    The new generation of tandem mud motors that recently appeared on the drilling scene is significantly affecting drilling efficiency worldwide. These motors provide drillers with increased horsepower at the bit, higher torque, and faster rates of penetration (ROP). With advanced engineering and more durable materials, motor life is being extended, thereby increasing the time between bit trips and reducing drilling costs. This article reviews the performance, design, and operation of these motors.

  12. Load-Responsive Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    New circuit controls voltage applied to a three-phase induction motor in response to magnitude of current, so as to reduce power consumption when the motor is idling or operating at less than full load. Control circuit decreases rms applied voltage to match decreases in motor load over entire torque range. This considerably decreases power consumption in motors operating at a fraction of their rated torques.

  13. Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2008-03-01

    Molecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. We seek to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work. I will overview our ongoing use of single molecule tracking and manipulation techniques to observe and perturb substeps in the mechanochemical cycles of individual motors, before concentrating on our recent efforts to dissect the structural basis of a ``reverse gear'' in myosin VI. The basic actomyosin motor has been embellished, altered, and re-used many times through the evolution of diverse members of the myosin superfamily. Class VI myosins are highly specialized (-) end directed motors involved in a growing list of functions in animal cells, including endocytosis, cell migration, and maintenance of stereociliar membrane tension. How does myosin VI achieve reverse directionality, despite sharing extensive sequence and structural conservation with (+) end directed myosins? We generated a series of truncated myosin VI constructs and characterized the size and direction of the power stroke for each construct using dual-labeled gliding filament assays and optical trapping. Motors truncated near the end of the converter domain generate (+) end directed motion, whereas longer constructs move toward the (-) end, confirming the importance of a class-specific insert that redirects the lever arm. Our quantitative results suggest a surprising model in which the lever arm rotates ˜180^o during the power stroke. We are currently studying the behavior of engineered myosin VI constructs with artificial lever arms, in order to further challenge and refine our power stroke model.

  14. Motor Vehicle Theft. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    Thirteen years of data from the National Crime Survey were analyzed to examine the characteristics of motor vehicle theft, to identify trends during the past 13 years, and to determine who are most likely to be victims of motor vehicle theft. All motor vehicle thefts reported to the National Crime Survey from 1973 through 1985 were examined.…

  15. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  16. Rehabilitation following motor nerve transfers.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B

    2008-11-01

    Cortical mapping and relearning are key factors in optimizing patient outcome following motor nerve transfers. To maximize function following nerve transfers, the rehabilitation program must include motor reeducation to initiate recruitment of the weak reinnervated muscles and to establish new motor patterns and cortical mapping. Patient education and a home program are essential to obtain the optimal functional result.

  17. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  18. Motor Education: Educational Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansley, A. E.

    This booklet presents educational programs and activities focusing on motor skills for 5- to 9-year-old children and older children with learning problems. The premise of the activities is that the acquisition of motor skills is essential to basic learning. The role of language as a mediator and controller of motor development is emphasized. The…

  19. Brushless direct-current motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, E. J.

    1970-01-01

    Survey results are presented on the use of unconventional motor windings and switching sequences to optimize performance of brushless dc motors. A motor was built, each coil terminal having a separate, accessible lead. With the shaft and all electronics excluded, length and outside diameter measured 1.25 and 0.75 in., respectively.

  20. Motor Education: Educational Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansley, A. E.

    This booklet presents educational programs and activities focusing on motor skills for 5- to 9-year-old children and older children with learning problems. The premise of the activities is that the acquisition of motor skills is essential to basic learning. The role of language as a mediator and controller of motor development is emphasized. The…

  1. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  2. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  3. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  4. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coordinated switching of bacterial flagellar motors: evidence for direct motor-motor coupling?

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-12

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors' response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  6. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Norris, Brian J; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved.

  7. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian J.; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved. PMID:24717348

  8. India Basin 900 Innes Remediation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lower Walnut Creek Restoration Project will restore and enhance coastal wetlands along southern shoreline of Suisun Bay from Suisun Bay upstream along Walnut Creek, improving habitat quality, diversity, and connectivity along three miles of creek channel.

  9. Motor technology for mining applications advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    AC motors are steadily replacing DC motors in mining and mineral processing equipment, requiring less maintenance. The permanent magnet rotor, or the synchronous motor, has enabled Blador to introduce a line of cooling tower motors. Synchronous motors are soon likely to take over from the induction motor. 1 photo.

  10. Molecular Motors and Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    The behavior of single molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin V, which move on linear filaments, involves a nontrivial coupling between the biochemical motor cycle and the stochastic movement. This coupling can be studied in the framework of nonuniform ratchet models which are characterized by spatially localized transition rates between the different internal states of the motor. These models can be classified according to their functional relationships between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecules. The simplest such relationship applies to two subclasses of models for dimeric kinesin and agrees with experimental observations on this molecular motor.

  11. Big Savings from Smart Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Chesebrough-Pond's operates 32 plants across the nation and in those plants are more than 10,000 electric motors. In an effort to cut down on waste of electrical power used by these motors, Chesebrough organized a Corporate Advanced Technology Group to devise ways of improving productivity and cut manufacturing costs. Chesebrough used NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Power Factor Controller technology as a departure point for development of their own computerized motor controller that enables motors to operate at maximum efficiency regardless of the motor's applications or operating condition.

  12. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  13. Ironless armature torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four iron-less armature torque motors, four Hall device position sensor assemblies, and two test fixtures were fabricated. The design approach utilized samarium cobalt permanent magnets, a large airgap, and a three-phase winding in a stationary ironless armature. Hall devices were employed to sense rotor position. An ironless armature torque motor having an outer diameter of 4.25 inches was developed to produce a torque constant of 65 ounce-inches per ampere with a resistance of 20.5 ohms. The total weight, including structural elements, was 1.58 pounds. Test results indicated that all specifications were met except for generated voltage waveform. It is recommended that investigations be made concerning the generated voltage waveform to determine if it may be improved.

  14. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  15. Dynamically Timed Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Ann M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A brushless DC motor including a housing having an end cap secured thereto. The housing encloses a rotor. a stator and a rotationally displaceable commutation board having sensors secured thereon and spaced around the periphery of the rotor. An external rotational force is applied to the commutation board for displacement of the sensors to various positions whereby varying feedback signals are generated by the positioning of the sensors relative to the rotating rotor. The commutation board is secured in a fixed position in response to feedback signals indicative of optimum sensor position being determined. The rotation of the commutation board and the securing of the sensors in the desired fixed position is accomplished without requiring the removal of the end cap and with the DC motor operating.

  16. Dynamically timed electric motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Ann M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention disclosed in this document is a brushless DC motor including a housing having an end cap secured thereto. The housing encloses a rotor, a stator and a rotationally displaceable commutation board having 5 sensors secured thereon and spaced around the periphery of the rotor. An external rotational force is applied to the commutation board for displacement of the sensors to various positions whereby varying feedback signals are generated by the positioning of the sensors relative to the rotating rotor. The commutation board is secured in a fixed position in response to feedback signals indicative of optimum sensor position being determined. The rotation of the commutation board and the securing of the sensors in the desired fixed position is accomplished without requiring the removal of the 5 end cap and with the DC motor operating.

  17. Prospective errors determine motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Ken; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse features of motor learning have been reported by numerous studies, but no single theoretical framework concurrently accounts for these features. Here, we propose a model for motor learning to explain these features in a unified way by extending a motor primitive framework. The model assumes that the recruitment pattern of motor primitives is determined by the predicted movement error of an upcoming movement (prospective error). To validate this idea, we perform a behavioural experiment to examine the model’s novel prediction: after experiencing an environment in which the movement error is more easily predictable, subsequent motor learning should become faster. The experimental results support our prediction, suggesting that the prospective error might be encoded in the motor primitives. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model has a strong explanatory power to reproduce a wide variety of motor-learning-related phenomena that have been separately explained by different computational models. PMID:25635628

  18. Energy efficient motors reference guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, N. D.; Eltom, A. H.

    1992-03-01

    The motor reference guide is the result of data and information collected and organized by the Industrial and Large Commercial staff of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The information was collected over several months from motor manufacturers, technical papers, textbooks, and files of former TVA engineers. Additionally, computer simulations were performed to develop data not currently available in literature. The guide is not intended to be a textbook on motors, but a quick and ready reference for the TVA field staff to assist in the technical and economic evaluation of energy-efficient motors versus standard motors. However, chapters on motor related topics such as rotating fields, power factor correction, and impact of power quality on motor performances have also been included to complement the text.

  19. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  20. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  1. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  2. Motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  3. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  4. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  5. The St. Louis Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-10-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock of them in the back room.

  6. Motor Fuel Excise Taxes

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

  7. Motor actuated vacuum door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-10-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  8. Dyspraxia, motor function and visual-motor integration in autism.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Chukoskie, L; Zinni, M; Townsend, J; Trauner, D

    2014-08-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis.

  9. Dyspraxia, Motor Function and Visual-Motor Integration in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.; Chukoskie, L.; Zinni, M.; Townsend, J.; Trauner, D.

    2014-01-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  10. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  11. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  12. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  13. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  14. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  15. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  16. Comparison of capabilities of reluctance synchronous motor and induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štumberger, Gorazd; Hadžiselimović, Miralem; Štumberger, Bojan; Miljavec, Damijan; Dolinar, Drago; Zagradišnik, Ivan

    2006-09-01

    This paper compares the capabilities of a reluctance synchronous motor (RSM) with those of an induction motor (IM). An RSM and IM were designed and made, with the same rated power and speed. They differ only in the rotor portion while their stators, housings and cooling systems are identical. The capabilities of both motors in a variable speed drive are evaluated by comparison of the results obtained by magnetically nonlinear models and by measurements.

  17. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  18. Motor and cognitive aspects of motor retardation in depression.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P; Ellwanger, J

    2000-01-01

    Motor retardation is a common feature of major depressive disorder having potential prognostic and etiopathological significance. According to DSM-IV, depressed patients who meet criteria for psychomotor retardation, must exhibit motor slowing of sufficient severity to be observed by others. However, overt presentations of motor slowing cannot distinguish slowness due to cognitive factors from slowness due to neuromotor disturbances. We examined cognitive and neuromotor aspects of motor slowing in 36 depressed patients to test the hypothesis that a significant proportion of patients exhibit motor programming disturbances in addition to psychomotor impairment. A novel instrumental technique was used to assess motor programming in terms of the subject's ability to program movement velocity as a function of movement distance. A traditional psychomotor battery was combined with an instrumental measure of reaction time to assess the cognitive aspects of motor retardation. The depressed patients exhibited significant impairment on the velocity scaling measure and longer reaction times compared with nondepressed controls. Approximately 40% of the patients demonstrated abnormal psychomotor function as measured by the traditional battery; whereas over 60% exhibited some form of motor slowing as measured by the instruments. Approximately 40% of the patients exhibited parkinsonian-like motor programming deficits. A five-factor model consisting of motor measures predicted diagnosis among bipolar and unipolar depressed patients with 100% accuracy. The ability of motor measures to discriminate bipolar from unipolar patients must be viewed with caution considering the relatively small sample size of bipolar patients. These findings suggest that a subgroup of depressed patients exhibit motor retardation that is behaviorally similar to parkinsonian bradykinesia and may stem from a similar disruption within the basal ganglia.

  19. Motor Maps for Nonlinear Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Bucolo, Maide; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2002-07-01

    In this paper the design of a motor map to control a chaotic system is presented. A feedback entrainment scheme is adopted: a system with different parameters is used to generate the reference trajectory for the chaotic system to be controlled, while the motor map provides the appropriate gain value of the feedback signal. As input of the motor map the state of the system to be controlled is considered. The motor map based adaptive controller offers high performances, specially in the case when the reference trajectory is switched into another one. In this case, a specialization of the neurons constituting the motor map is observed: while a group of neurons learns the appropriate control law for a reference trajectory, another group specializes itself to control the system when the other trajectory is used as reference. Moreover, a discrete components hardware implementation of the motor map has been realized.

  20. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  1. Sport expert's motor imagery: functional imaging of professional motor skills and simple motor skills.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gaoxia; Luo, Jing

    2010-06-23

    Numerous studies provide evidence that motor skill acquisition is associated with dynamic changes in cortical and subcortical regions. Athletes are a professional population who are engaged in extensive motor training for long periods. However, the neural substrates of extreme level motor performance have not been clarified. We used kinesthetic imagery task to induce the mental representation of sport expert's extraordinary performance in view of the shared substrates of executing movement and motor imagery. For the first time, we compared, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the pattern of cerebral activations in 12 professional divers and 12 normal people without extensive training, during imagery of professional skills and imagery of simple motor skills. The sport experts showed significant activation in the parahippocampus during imagery of professional skills relative to the novices, which might reflect the representation adapted to experience-related motor tasks. No significant difference was found between experts and novices when they imagined simple motor skills. These results indicated the experts might utilize their kinesthetic imagery more efficiently than novices, but only for the activity in which they had expertise. The sport experts also demonstrated more focused activation patterns in prefrontal areas in both of imagery tasks, which may be relevant to higher order of motor control during motor imagery. Moreover, this study suggested that the brains of sport experts could be regarded as the ideal subjects to explore the relationship between cerebral plasticity and learning of complex motor skills.

  2. Multimotor Driven Cargos: From Single Motor under Load to the Role of Motor-Motor Coupling.

    PubMed

    Peker, Itay; Granek, Rony

    2016-07-07

    Motor proteins constitute an essential part of the cellular machinery. They have been the subject of intensive studies in the past two decades. Yet, when several motors simultaneously carry a single cargo, the effect of motor-motor coupling, such as mutual stalling and jamming, remains unclear. We commence by constructing a general model for single motor motion, which is a product of a derived load-dependent expression and a phenomenological motor specific function. Forming the latter according to recent single molecule measurements for a given load, the model correctly predicts the motor full step-size distribution for all other measured loads. We then use our proposed model to predict transport properties of multimotor complexes, with particular attention to 1-dimensional constructs with variable flexibility, motor density, and number of motors: (i) a chain of motors connected by springs, a recently studied construction of a pair, and (ii) an array of motors all connected by identical springs to a stiff rod, which is essentially a mirror image of standard gliding motility assays. In both systems, and for any number of carrying motors, we find that, while low flexibility results in a strongly damped velocity, increased flexibility renders an almost single motor velocity. Comparing our model based simulations to recent gliding assays we find remarkable qualitative agreement. We also demonstrate consistency with other multimotor motility assays. In all cases, the characteristic spring constant, that controls the crossover behavior between high and low velocity regimes, is found to be the stalling force divided by the mean step size. We conjecture that this characteristic spring constant can serve as a tool for engineering multimotor complexes.

  3. Motor timing under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Semjen, A; Leone, G; Lipshits, M

    1998-01-01

    Five participants were tested on their ability to produce accurate and regular inter-response intervals in the 350 to 530 ms time range. Three of them were members of the French-Russian CASSIOPEE 96 spaceflight mission, and the other two were control subjects tested on the ground. During spaceflight, the target inter-response intervals were increasingly undershot and the timing became more variable (less regular). The increase in the timing variability was mostly attributable to the internal timekeeping processes rather than those involved in motor execution. The results are discussed with reference to the physiological mechanisms possibly underlying the timing of fast serial movements.

  4. Electric motor analysis at Dofasco

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.; Morgan, V.A.; Nicholas, J.R. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Initiatives adopted by Dofasco to enhance electric motor reliability and availability include: Enhancement of the electrical repair shop testing and repair capabilities; More stringent standards for motor repair service vendors; Application of predictive technologies to motors in service within manufacturing units; Training of personnel in electrical predictive condition monitoring and analysis methods; and Periodic audit and comparison of central support and operating unit predictive technology application and integration. The basis for the initiative is discussed together with illustrative case histories.

  5. Torque-Summing Brushless Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidya, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Torque channels function cooperatively but electrically independent for reliability. Brushless, electronically-commutated dc motor sums electromagnetic torques on four channels and applies them to single shaft. Motor operates with any combination of channels and continues if one or more of channels fail electrically. Motor employs single stator and rotor and mechanically simple; however, each of channels electrically isolated from other so that failure of one does not adversely affect others.

  6. Motor-operated valve (MOV) actuator motor and gearbox testing

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory tested the performance of electric motors and actuator gearboxes typical of the equipment installed on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plants. Using a test stand that simulates valve closure loads against flow and pressure, the authors tested five electric motors (four ac and one dc) and three gearboxes at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. They also monitored the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. All five motors operated at or above their rated starting torque during tests at normal voltages and temperatures. For all five motors, actual torque losses due to voltage degradation were greater than the losses calculated by methods typically used for predicting motor torque at degraded voltage conditions. For the dc motor the actual torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures were greater than the losses calculated by the typical predictive method. The actual efficiencies of the actuator gearboxes were generally lower than the running efficiencies published by the manufacturer and were generally nearer the published pull-out efficiencies. Operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency.

  7. Motor power control circuit for ac induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A motor power control of the type which functions by controlling the power factor wherein one of the parameters of power factor current on time is determined by the on time of a triac through which current is supplied to the motor. By means of a positive feedback circuit, a wider range of control is effected.

  8. 27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  9. Motor vehicle drivers' injuries in train-motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to: (1) identify a more suitable model for modeling injury severity of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at highway-rail grade crossings from among three commonly used injury severity models and (2) to investigate factors associated with injury severity levels of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at such crossings. The 2009-2013 highway-rail grade crossing crash data and the national highway-rail crossing inventory data were combined to produce the analysis dataset. Four-year (2009-2012) data were used for model estimation while 2013 data were used for model validation. The three injury severity levels-fatal, injury and no injury-were based on the reported intensity of motor-vehicle drivers' injuries at highway-rail grade crossings. The three injury severity models evaluated were: ordered probit, multinomial logit and random parameter logit. A comparison of the three models based on different criteria showed that the random parameter logit model and multinomial logit model were more suitable for injury severity analysis of motor vehicle drivers involved in crashes at highway-rail grade crossings. Some of the factors that increased the likelihood of more severe crashes included higher train and vehicle speeds, freight trains, older drivers, and female drivers. Where feasible, reducing train and motor vehicle speeds and nighttime lighting may help reduce injury severities of motor vehicle drivers.

  10. 76 FR 12792 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General Motors Corporation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic.... SUMMARY: This document grants in full the petition of General Motors Corporation's (GM) petition for...

  11. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    PubMed Central

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and motor imagery trials. Additionally, learning effects were compared between participants with an explicit motor imagery instruction and a control group. A Go/NoGo discrete sequence production (DSP) task was employed, wherein a five-stimulus sequence presented on each trial indicated the required sequence of finger movements after a Go signal. In the case of a NoGo signal, participants either had to imagine carrying out the response sequence (the motor imagery group), or the response sequence had to be withheld (the control group). Two practice days were followed by a final test day on which all sequences had to be executed. Learning effects were assessed by computing response times (RTs) and the percentages of correct responses (PCs). The electroencephalogram (EEG ) was additionally measured on this test day to examine whether motor preparation and the involvement of visual short term memory (VST M) depended on the amount of physical/mental practice. Accuracy data indicated strong learning effects. However, a substantial amount of physical practice was required to reach an optimal speed. EEG results suggest the involvement of VST M for sequences that had less or no physical practice in both groups. The absence of differences between the motor imagery and the control group underlines the possibility that motor preparation may actually resemble motor imagery. PMID:28154614

  12. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    PubMed

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and motor imagery trials. Additionally, learning effects were compared between participants with an explicit motor imagery instruction and a control group. A Go/NoGo discrete sequence production (DSP) task was employed, wherein a five-stimulus sequence presented on each trial indicated the required sequence of finger movements after a Go signal. In the case of a NoGo signal, participants either had to imagine carrying out the response sequence (the motor imagery group), or the response sequence had to be withheld (the control group). Two practice days were followed by a final test day on which all sequences had to be executed. Learning effects were assessed by computing response times (RTs) and the percentages of correct responses (PCs). The electroencephalogram (EEG ) was additionally measured on this test day to examine whether motor preparation and the involvement of visual short term memory (VST M) depended on the amount of physical/mental practice. Accuracy data indicated strong learning effects. However, a substantial amount of physical practice was required to reach an optimal speed. EEG results suggest the involvement of VST M for sequences that had less or no physical practice in both groups. The absence of differences between the motor imagery and the control group underlines the possibility that motor preparation may actually resemble motor imagery.

  13. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  14. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Hallett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that CD with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated 2-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Eleven CD patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula, and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system, which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation.

  15. Circuit changes in motor cortex during motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Papale, Andrew E; Hooks, Bryan M

    2017-09-14

    Motor cortex is important for motor skill learning, particularly the dexterous skills necessary for our favorite sports and careers. We are especially interested in understanding how plasticity in motor cortex contributes to skill learning. Although human studies have been helpful in understanding the importance of motor cortex in learning skilled tasks, animal models are necessary for achieving a detailed understanding of the circuitry underlying these behaviors and the changes that occur during training. We review data from these models to try to identify sites of plasticity in motor cortex, focusing on rodents asa model system. Rodent neocortex contains well-differentiated motor and sensory regions, as well as neurons expressing similar genetic markers to many of the same circuit components in human cortex. Furthermore, rodents have circuit mapping tools for labeling, targeting, and manipulating these cell types as circuit nodes. Crucially, the projection from rodent primary somatosensory cortex to primary motor cortex is a well-studied corticocortical projection and a model of sensorimotor integration. We first summarize some of the descending pathways involved in making dexterous movements, including reaching. We then describe local and long-range circuitry in mouse motor cortex, summarizing structural and functional changes associated with motor skill acquisition. We then address which specific connections might be responsible for plasticity. For insight into the range of plasticity mechanisms employed by cortex, we review plasticity in sensory systems. The similarities and differences between motor cortex plasticity and critical periods of plasticity in sensory systems are discussed. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pain in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newrick, P G; Langton-Hewer, R

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-seven of 42 patients with motor neuron disease had significant pain. The nature and duration of the pain are described along with an illustrative case-report. The aetiology and most effective treatment of this common complication of motor neuron disease remain unclear. PMID:4031936

  17. High efficiency motor rewind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. K.; Spee, R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of performing this work was to evaluate a new technology used for rewinding electric motors. Motor performance evaluation was conducted at the motor test facility at Oregon State University. The test program consisted of comparing new high efficiency motor technology and standard rewind technology with the Unity-Plus system. The Unity-Plus configuration exhibited reduced efficiency over the complete load range compared to the other motors. Appropriately sized capacitors connected to the terminals of the conventional induction motor produced the same power factor improvement as the Unity-Plus system. Torque production and torque pulsation were very similar for all systems. The Unity-Plus configuration drew lower starting currents but the duration of the starting transient was increased. Motor temperature rise was about the same for all systems. Noise levels were about the same in all systems. Although determination of time to failure was not undertaken, the expected lifetime of the Unit-Plus system is probably less due to higher capacitor stress and higher insulation stress. The investigation concludes that a conventional induction motor with terminal capacitors is the most acceptable way of obtaining good efficiency and power factor and the Unity-Plus system cannot be recommended on the basis of any of the evaluation criteria used in this study.

  18. Conical Bearingless Motor/Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, P.; Jansen, R.; Dever, T.

    2008-01-01

    Motor/generators based on conical magnetic bearings have been invented as an improved alternative to prior such machines based, variously, on radial and/or axial magnetic bearings. Both the present and prior machines are members of the class of so-called bearingless or self bearing (in the sense of not containing mechanical bearings) rotary machines. Each motor/generator provides both a torque and force allowing it to either function as a motor and magnetic bearing or a generator and magnetic bearing concurrently. Because they are not subject to mechanical bearing wear, these machines have potentially long operational lives and can function without lubrication and over wide ranges of speed and temperature that include conditions under which lubricants would become depleted, degraded, or ineffective and mechanical bearings would fail. The figure shows three typical configurations of conical bearingless motor/generators. The main elements of each motor/generator are concentric rotor and stator portions having conically tapered surfaces facing each other across a gap. Because a conical motor/generator imposes both radial and axial magnetic forces, it acts, in effect, as a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing. Therefore, only two conical motor/generators - one at each end of a rotor - are needed to effect complete magnetic leviation of the rotor, whereas previously, it was necessary to use a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing at each end of the rotor to achieve complete magnetic levitation and a separate motor to provide torque.

  19. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  20. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  1. Perceptual Aspects of Motor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallahue, David L.

    Perceptual-motor functioning is a cyclic process involving: (1) organizing incoming sensory stimuli with past or stored perceptual information; (2) making motor (internal) decisions based on the combination of sensory (present) and perceptual (past) information; (3) executing the actual movement (observable act) itself; and (4) evaluating the act…

  2. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  3. Open-Ended Electric Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Mauri

    1975-01-01

    Presents complete instructions for assembling an electric motor which does not require large amounts of power to operate and which is inexpensive as well as reliable. Several open-ended experiments with the motor are included as well as information for obtaining a kit of parts and instructions. (BR)

  4. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  5. Individualized Motor-Perceptual Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    This guide is being used in the Individualized Motor-Perceptual Study to determine whether working directly with kindergarten children to improve performance on motor-perceptual tasks will affect reading ability at the end of grades one, two, and three. The 5-year project involves six schools. In this guide, there are tips for teaching, suggested…

  6. Computational approaches to motor control.

    PubMed

    Flash, T; Sejnowski, T J

    2001-12-01

    New concepts and computational models that integrate behavioral and neurophysiological observations have addressed several of the most fundamental long-standing problems in motor control. These problems include the selection of particular trajectories among the large number of possibilities, the solution of inverse kinematics and dynamics problems, motor adaptation and the learning of sequential behaviors.

  7. Power control for ac motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A motor controller employing a triac through which power is supplied to a motor is described. The open circuit voltage appearing across the triac controls the operation of a timing circuit. This timing circuit triggers on the triac at a time following turn off which varies inversely as a function of the amplitude of the open circuit voltage of the triac.

  8. Motor Development: Core Curricular Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    Motor developmentalists study the processes that underlie change in behavior. There are at least two fundamental ways in which theory and data emanating from motor development are critical components of what undergraduate kinesiology majors should know. First is an emphasis on the lifespan. We are very different organisms as we progress through…

  9. Motors and Bulbs in Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    One of Paul Hewitt's "Figuring Physics" that appeared in this journal dealt with the heating of a motor. This phenomenon can be demonstrated with a miniature motor and a bulb as part of a series of activities with "batteries and bulbs." Students examine the effect on the brightness of a single bulb when a second, identical bulb is placed in series…

  10. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G.; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Methods: Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). Results: The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62–2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Conclusions: Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. PMID:28251916

  11. Torque control for electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  12. Open-Ended Electric Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Mauri

    1975-01-01

    Presents complete instructions for assembling an electric motor which does not require large amounts of power to operate and which is inexpensive as well as reliable. Several open-ended experiments with the motor are included as well as information for obtaining a kit of parts and instructions. (BR)

  13. Motors and Bulbs in Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    One of Paul Hewitt's "Figuring Physics" that appeared in this journal dealt with the heating of a motor. This phenomenon can be demonstrated with a miniature motor and a bulb as part of a series of activities with "batteries and bulbs." Students examine the effect on the brightness of a single bulb when a second, identical bulb is placed in series…

  14. Computational approaches to motor control

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Tamar; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-01-01

    New concepts and computational models that integrate behavioral and neurophysiological observations have addressed several of the most fundamental long-standing problems in motor control. These problems include the selection of particular trajectories among the large number of possibilities, the solution of inverse kinematics and dynamics problems, motor adaptation and the learning of sequential behaviors. PMID:11741014

  15. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or...

  16. Motor-operator gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, we compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators we tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  17. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-12-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  18. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP],…), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  19. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  20. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  1. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  2. Reciprocating linear motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  3. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  4. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  5. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  6. Activities for a Perceptual Motor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinning, Dorothy; And Others

    Perceptual motor activities for physically handicapped children are presented in the areas of fine and gross motor skills. Also detailed are activities to develop body image, visual motor skills, and tactile and auditory perception. (JD)

  7. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  8. Atypical motor neuron disease and related motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verma, A; Bradley, W G

    2001-06-01

    There is an imperative need for the early diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) in the current era of emerging treatments. When evaluating the patient with ALS/MND, the neurologist must consider a number of other motor neuron disorders and related motor syndromes that may have clinical features resembling ALS/MND. The revised Airlie House-El Escorial diagnostic criteria have been established through the consensus of experts meeting at workshops. However, by definition, using these criteria a patient is likely to have fairly advanced disease at the time of a definitive ALS/MND diagnosis. The reasons for the difficulty in making an early ALS/MND diagnosis are several. No surrogate diagnostic marker currently exists for ALS/MND. ALS/MND at its onset is heterogeneous in clinical presentation, its clinical course is variable, and several clinical variants are recognized. In addition, certain motor syndromes, such as monomelic amyotrophy, postpolio muscular atrophy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, can clinically mimic ALS/MND. Therefore, not only may the diagnosis of ALS/MND be clinically missed in the early stages, but worse, the patient may be wrongly labeled as having ALS/MND. The diagnosis of ALS/MND requires a combination of upper motor neuron (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement. Motor syndromes in which the deficit is restricted to the UMN or LMN through the entire course of the disease are described as atypical MND in this review. Approximately 5% of patients with ALS/MND have overt dementia with a characteristic frontal affect. ALS/MND with parkinsonism and dementia is rare outside the western Pacific region. The clinical course of motor disorder in these overlap syndromes does not differ from that in typical ALS/MND.

  9. Motor imagery in physical therapist practice.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Ruth; Deutsch, Judith E

    2007-07-01

    Motor imagery is the mental representation of movement without any body movement. Abundant evidence on the positive effects of motor imagery practice on motor performance and learning in athletes, people who are healthy, and people with neurological conditions (eg, stroke, spinal cord injury, Parkinson disease) has been published. The purpose of this update is to synthesize the relevant literature about motor imagery in order to facilitate its integration into physical therapist practice. This update also will discuss visual and kinesthetic motor imagery, factors that modify motor imagery practice, the design of motor imagery protocols, and potential applications of motor imagery.

  10. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-02-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs.

  11. New moves in motor control.

    PubMed

    Büschges, Ansgar; Scholz, Henrike; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2011-07-12

    Motor behaviour results from information processing across multiple neural networks acting at all levels from initial selection of the behaviour to its final generation. Understanding how motor behaviour is produced requires identifying the constituent neurons of these networks, their cellular properties, and their pattern of synaptic connectivity. Neural networks have been traditionally studied with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical approaches. These approaches have been highly successful in particularly suitable 'model' preparations, typically ones in which the numbers of neurons in the networks were relatively small, neural network composition was unvarying across individual animals, and the preparations continued to produce fictive motor patterns in vitro. However, analysing networks without these characteristics, and analysing the complete ensemble of networks that cooperatively generate behaviours, is difficult with these approaches. Recently developed molecular and neurogenetic tools provide additional avenues for analysing motor networks by allowing individual or groups of neurons within networks to be manipulated in novel ways and allowing experiments to be performed not only in vitro but also in vivo. We review here some of the new insights into motor network function that these advances have provided and indicate how these advances might bridge gaps in our understanding of motor control. To these ends, we first review motor neural network organisation highlighting cross-phylum principles. We then use prominent examples from the field to show how neurogenetic approaches can complement classical physiological studies, and identify additional areas where these approaches could be advantageously applied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid rocket motor witness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Witness Test was undertaken to examine the potential for using thermal infrared imagery as a tool for monitoring static tests of solid rocket motors. The project consisted of several parts: data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation. For data acquisition, thermal infrared data were obtained of the DM-9 test of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor on December 23, 1987, at Thiokol, Inc. test facility near Brigham City, Utah. The data analysis portion consisted of processing the video tapes of the test to produce values of temperature at representative test points on the rocket motor surface as the motor cooled down following the test. Interpretation included formulation of a numerical model and evaluation of some of the conditions of the motor which could be extracted from the data. These parameters included estimates of the insulation remaining following the tests and the thickness of the charred layer of insulation at the end of the test. Also visible was a temperature signature of the star grain pattern in the forward motor segment.

  13. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs. PMID:10653770

  14. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  15. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  16. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  17. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Cromwell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor contro ller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram packag e that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position s ensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44 -pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus , RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPI O), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier.

  18. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  19. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  20. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  1. 26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. The U-bolt and concrete deadman which anchors the cable of the tramway is to the right. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  2. Primary motor cortex disinhibition during motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Coxon, James P; Peat, Nicola M; Byblow, Winston D

    2014-07-01

    Motor learning requires practice over a period of time and depends on brain plasticity, yet even for relatively simple movements, there are multiple practice strategies that can be used for skill acquisition. We investigated the role of intracortical inhibition in the primary motor cortex (M1) during motor skill learning. Event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess corticomotor excitability and inhibition thought to involve synaptic and extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Short intracortical inhibition (SICI) was assessed using 1- and 2.5-ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Participants learned a novel, sequential pinch-grip task on a computer in either a repetitive or interleaved practice structure. Both practice structures showed equivalent levels of motor performance at the end of acquisition and at retention 1 wk later. There was a novel task-related modulation of 1-ms SICI. Repetitive practice elicited a greater reduction of 1- and 2.5-ms SICI, i.e., disinhibition, between rest and task acquisition, compared with interleaved practice. These novel findings support the use of a repetitive practice structure for motor learning because the associated effects within M1 have relevance for motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use - Motor Tip Sheet #10

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors use no energy when turned off. Reducing motor operating time by just 10% usually saves more energy than replacing a standard efficiency motor with a NEMA Premium® efficiency motor. In fact, given that 97% of the life cycle cost of purchasing and operating a motor is energy-related, turning a motor off 10% of the time could reduce energy costs enough to purchase three new motors.

  4. Plasma motor generator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The significant potential advantages of a plasma motor generator system over conventional systems for the generation of electrical power and propulsion for spacecraft in low Earth orbits warrants its further investigation. The two main components of such a system are a long insulated wire and the plasma generating hollow cathodes needed to maintain electrical contact with the ionosphere. Results of preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations of this system are presented. The theoretical work involved the equilibrium configurations of the wire and the nature of small oscillation about these equilibrium positions. A particularly interesting result was that two different configurations are allowed when the current is above a critical value. Experimental investigations were made of the optimal starting and running conditions for the proposed, low current hollow cathodes. Although optimal ranges of temperature, argon pressure and discharge voltage were identified, start up became progressively more difficult. This supposed depletion or contamination of the emissive surface could be countered by the addition of new emissive material.

  5. Synthetic Motors and Nanomachines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Amar

    2006-03-01

    A bistable and palindromically-constituted [3]rotaxane incorporating two mechanically-mobile rings interlocked around a linear dumbbell component, has been designed to operate like the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle. Contraction and extension occurs when the inter-ring distance of the two rings switch, ideally, between 4.2 and 1.4 nm upon redox stimulation either chemically or electrochemically in the solution phase. When the mobile rings of these artificial molecular muscles are bound onto the tops of gold-coated, micron-scale cantilever beams, their controllable nanometer motions have a chance to be amplified along the long axis of each cantilever. It turns out that ˜6 billion of the self-assembled [3]rotaxanes can bend the cantilevers in a bistable manner concomitant with the cycled addition of redox agents. The extent of bending is commensurate with 10's of pN of force per [3]rotaxane. Recent studies on a set of ``single-shot'' control [2]rotaxanes have provided additional evidence for the origins of the force generation as it arises from a molecule-based electrostatic repulsion energy of about 10 kcal/mol at 300 K. These findings will be presented in terms of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics that have been utilized extensively to direct the design and synthesis of artificial molecular machines and which may also serve as a guide for the rational design of unidirectional molecular motors.

  6. Controlled wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, F.A.

    1983-12-27

    A mechanical sail including a rotatable mast, the mast including a top vane mount and a bottom vane mount, the mounts being spaced from each other on the mast and rotatable therewith, a series of rotatable vanes spaced from and surrounding the mast and supported by and between the mounts, cam operaters extending between the mounts and connected to the vanes for controlling the rotation of the vanes, a first controller associated with the mast below the bottom vane mount for controlling the cam operators, the first controller being movable vertically with respect to the mast, a second controller for moving the first controller vertically with respect to the mast, the vanes being flexible and bowed outwardly, the bottom vane mount being movable with respect to the mast and connected to the second controller whereby when the second controller is operated, the bottom vane mount will move toward the top vane mount causing the vanes to bow outwardly at a desired arc and whereby when the first controller is moved, the vanes are caused to rotate to the desired angle of attack with respect to wind velocity and direction. When the sail is connected to a motor drive, the vessel may be driven forward or rearward depending on the angle of attack of the vanes through 180/sup 0/.

  7. Motor proteins 1: kinesins.

    PubMed

    Bloom, G S; Endow, S A

    1995-01-01

    Progress regarding the kinesins is now being made at a rapid and accelerating rate. The in vivo-functions, and biophysical and enzymatic properties of kinesin itself are being explored at ever increasing levels of detail. The kinesin-related proteins now number several dozen, and although more is known about primary structure than function for most of the proteins, this trend is already reversing. For example, knowledge about the kinesin-related protein, ncd, is expanding rapidly, and more is already known about its three-dimensional structure than is known for kinesin heavy chain. This volume presents a comprehensive review of the major published works on kinesin and kinesin-related proteins. Hopefully, this manuscript will complement other recent review articles [17, 20, 25, 37, 60-62, 67, 69, 75, 85-88, 231, 233, 238, 244, 269-271, 281, 282, 292] or books [49, 227, 293] that have focused on more selective aspects of the kinesin family, or have been aimed more generally at MT motor proteins. In line with the stated purpose of the Protein Profile series, annual updates of the review on the kinesins are planned for at least the next few years.

  8. Mechanical thermal motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for converting thermal energy such as solar energy into mechanical motion for driving fluid pumps and similar equipment. The thermal motor comprises an inner concentric cylinder carried by a stationary core member. The core member has a cylindrical disc plate fixed adjacent to a lower portion and extending radially from it. An outer concentric cylinder rotatably carried on the disc plate defining a space between the inner and outer concentric cylinders. A spiral tubular member encircles the inner concentric cylinder and is contained within the space between the inner and outer cylinders. One portion is connected to the inner concentric cylinder and a second portion connected to the outer concentric cylinder. A heated fluid is conveyed through the tubular member and is periodically cooled causing the tubular member to expand and contract. This causes the outer concentric cylinder to reciprocally rotate on the base plate accordingly. The reciprocating motion of the outer concentric cylinder is then utilized to drive a pump member in a pump chamber.

  9. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  10. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Voon, V; Brezing, C; Gallea, C; Hallett, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Conversion disorder is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that conversion disorder with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amgydala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Methods Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated two-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Results Eleven conversion disorder patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. Conclusion We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation. PMID:21935985

  11. 75 FR 72863 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that the Agency's Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee...

  12. 76 FR 12214 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice: Announcement of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting; request for comment. SUMMARY: The Federal Motor Carrier Safety...

  13. 75 FR 50797 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC)...

  14. 75 FR 29384 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC)...

  15. Drill-motor holding fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  16. Gearless speed-reduction motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, J.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed rolling electric motor has output shaft speed reductions of 1000 to 1 or better. Light compact unit uses no gears or pulleys to reduce speed presenting less bulk and frictional loss, and more efficiency.

  17. Battery powererd electric motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbacker, K.

    1984-02-28

    A battery powered vehicle is provided with a vehicle frame and an electric motor whose main shaft is connected to a differential gear by means of a gear train with a variable transmission ratio, the motor shaft and all gear shafts being parallel to the axle of the driving wheels. In order to achieve a compact design and to avoid power-consuming drive elements the electric motor and the variable transmission gear as well as a potential reducing gear mounted between the latter and the differential gear, are positioned on a subframe which is connected to the housing of the driving wheel axle on the one side whereas the other side carrying the electric motor is attached to the vehicle frame by means of a cardanic suspension.

  18. Small Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

  19. Drill-motor holding fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  20. Advanced Motor-Controller Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-22

    which document the three stages of develop- _ - fment. "U Volume Summary A. Phase I Report Flux Synthesis and PWM Synthesis Techniques Theory and...Three Phase Power Bridge and Evaluation of Motor Controller Volume Summary The three reports assembled in this votume represent work performed...1963-A * I ADVANCED MOTOR-CONTROLLER * DEVELOPMENT Final Report for Period October 1979 - June 1983 June 22, 1983 Report DTNSRDC-PASD-CR-1-83

  1. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  2. A soft and dexterous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Tse, Tony Chun Hin; Inamura, Tokushu; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas; Gisby, Todd

    2011-03-01

    We present a soft, bearing-free artificial muscle motor that cannot only turn a shaft but also grip and reposition it through a flexible gear. The bearing-free operation provides a foundation for low complexity soft machines, with multiple degree-of-freedom actuation, that can act simultaneously as motors and manipulators. The mechanism also enables an artificial muscle controlled gear change. Future work will include self-sensing feedback for precision, multidegree-of-freedom operation.

  3. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  4. Meissner-Effect Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed stepping motor derives torque from diamagnetic repulsion produced by Meissner effect - exclusion of magnetic field from interior of superconductor. Design of motor takes advantage of silver-doped YB2Cu3O and other compounds superconductive at temperatures as high as that of liquid nitrogen. Skin of rotor cooled below its superconducting-transition temperature by liquid nitrogen. O-rings prevent leaks of liquid nitrogen from rotor. Weight, cost, and maintenance reduced.

  5. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  6. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  7. Medical management of motor fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Richard B

    2008-08-01

    Given the magnitude of the problem of motor fluctuations in patients who have Parkinson's disease treated with levodopa, a significant effort has been expended by physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers over the years to find effective treatments. This article briefly reviews the medical options for managing motor fluctuations that are in common use in the United States or that are expected to be available soon.

  8. Paliperidone-associated motor tics.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Han; Chiu, Nan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Paliperidone-associated motor tics. Case report. We report a 30-year-old man with schizophrenia who developed motor tics (eye blinking) after treatment of paliperidone up to 15 mg daily. Tic-like symptoms, from simple eye blinking to complex Tourette-like syndrome, may occur during paliperidone treatment, especially with high dose. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  10. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  11. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  16. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  17. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  18. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  19. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  20. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOEpatents

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2017-10-10

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for performing a laser operation. A system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam having a wavelength less than 1060 nm through the electrical motor.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those...

  2. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOEpatents

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  3. Precision stop control for motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Montenegro, Justino (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved stop control system and method are provided for a motor having a drive mechanism in which the motor is coupled to a motor controller that controls the speed and position of the drive mechanism using a first signal indicative of a commanded position of the drive mechanism, a second signal indicative of the actual speed of the drive mechanism and a third signal indicative of the actual position of the drive mechanism. The improved system/method uses a first circuit that receives the first and third signal and generates an error signal indicative of a difference therebetween. A second circuit receives the error signal and compares same with a threshold position error. The result of this comparison is used to selectively supply the second signal (i.e., speed) to the motor controller at least whenever the error signal is less than the threshold position error so that the motor controller can use the second signal in conjunction with the third signal to stop the motor.

  4. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karen C; Stienen, Ger J M; Schmid, Christoph F

    2002-01-01

    Both experimental evidence and theoretical models for collective effects in the working mechanism of molecular motors are reviewed at three different levels, namely: (i) interaction between the two heads of double-headed motors, particularly in processive motors like kinesin, myosin V and myosin VI, (ii) cooperative regulation of muscle thin filaments by accessory proteins and the Ca2+ level, and (iii) collective dynamic effects stemming from the mechanical coupling of molecular motors within macroscopic structures such as muscle thick filaments or axonemes. We aim to bridge the gap between structural information at the molecular level and physiological data with accompanying specific models on the one hand, and general stochastic physical models for the action of molecular motors on the other hand. An underlying assumption is that while, ultimately, the function of molecular motors will be explainable by a quantitative description of specific intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions, for some coarse grained larger scale dynamic features it will be sufficient and illuminating to construct physical models that are simplified to the bare essentials.

  5. Unconventional functions of microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Virgil; Muresan, Zoia

    2012-04-01

    With the functional characterization of proteins advancing at fast pace, the notion that one protein performs different functions - often with no relation to each other - emerges as a novel principle of how cells work. Molecular motors are no exception to this new development. Here, we provide an account on recent findings revealing that microtubule motors are multifunctional proteins that regulate many cellular processes, in addition to their main function in transport. Some of these functions rely on their motor activity, but others are independent of it. Of the first category, we focus on the role of microtubule motors in organelle biogenesis, and in the remodeling of the cytoskeleton, especially through the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Of the second category, we discuss the function of microtubule motors as static anchors of the cargo at the destination, and their participation in regulating signaling cascades by modulating interactions between signaling proteins, including transcription factors. We also review atypical forms of transport, such as the cytoplasmic streaming in the oocyte, and the movement of cargo by microtubule fluctuations. Our goal is to provide an overview of these unexpected functions of microtubule motors, and to incite future research in this expanding field.

  6. Sensory change following motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Andrew A G; Nasir, Sazzad M; Darainy, Mohammad; Ostry, David J

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe two studies linking perceptual change with motor learning. In the first, we document persistent changes in somatosensory perception that occur following force field learning. Subjects learned to control a robotic device that applied forces to the hand during arm movements. This led to a change in the sensed position of the limb that lasted at least 24 h. Control experiments revealed that the sensory change depended on motor learning. In the second study, we describe changes in the perception of speech sounds that occur following speech motor learning. Subjects adapted control of speech movements to compensate for loads applied to the jaw by a robot. Perception of speech sounds was measured before and after motor learning. Adapted subjects showed a consistent shift in perception. In contrast, no consistent shift was seen in control subjects and subjects that did not adapt to the load. These studies suggest that motor learning changes both sensory and motor function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. LTD, RP, and Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Yoshito; Nakamura, Yoji

    2016-02-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at excitatory synapses between parallel fibers and a Purkinje cell has been regarded as a critical cellular mechanism for motor learning. However, it was demonstrated that normal motor learning occurs under LTD suppression, suggesting that cerebellar plasticity mechanisms other than LTD also contribute to motor learning. One candidate for such plasticity is rebound potentiation (RP), which is long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses between a stellate cell and a Purkinje cell. Both LTD and RP are induced by the increase in postsynaptic Ca(2+) concentration, and work to suppress the activity of a Purkinje cell. Thus, LTD and RP might work synergistically, and one might compensate defects of the other. RP induction is dependent on the interaction between GABAA receptor and GABAA receptor binding protein (GABARAP). Transgenic mice expressing a peptide which inhibits binding of GABARAP and GABAA receptor only in Purkinje cells show defects in both RP and adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a motor learning paradigm. However, another example of motor learning, adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR), is normal in the transgenic mice. Both VOR and OKR are reflex eye movements suppressing the slip of visual image on the retina during head movement. Previously, we reported that delphilin knockout mice show facilitated LTD induction and enhanced OKR adaptation, but we recently found that VOR adaptation was not enhanced in the knockout mice. These results together suggest that animals might use LTD and RP differently depending on motor learning tasks.

  8. Sensory Plasticity in Human Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    Ostry, David J; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence from behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging studies that the acquisition of motor skills involves both perceptual and motor learning. Perceptual learning alters movements, motor learning, and motor networks of the brain. Motor learning changes perceptual function and the sensory circuits of the brain. Here, we review studies of both human limb movement and speech that indicate that plasticity in sensory and motor systems is reciprocally linked. Taken together, this points to an approach to motor learning in which perceptual learning and sensory plasticity have a fundamental role.

  9. Sensory plasticity in human motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Ostry, David J; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is accumulating evidence from behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies that the acquisition of motor skills involves both perceptual and motor learning. Perceptual learning alters movements, motor learning and motor networks of the brain. Motor learning changes perceptual function and the brain’s sensory circuits. Here we review studies of both human limb movement and speech which indicate that plasticity in sensory and motor systems is reciprocally linked. Taken together, this points to an approach to motor learning in which perceptual learning and sensory plasticity play a fundamental role. PMID:26774345

  10. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  11. 75 FR 67770 - General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Orion Assembly Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation... Assistance on March 17, 2010, applicable to workers of General Motors Company, formerly known as General... the Lake Orion, Michigan location of General Motors Company, formerly known as General Motors...

  12. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  13. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  14. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  15. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  16. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  17. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  18. Supplementary motor area (SMA) volume is associated with psychotic aberrant motor behaviour of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stegmayer, Katharina; Horn, Helge; Federspiel, Andrea; Razavi, Nadja; Bracht, Tobias; Laimböck, Karin; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Müller, Thomas J; Walther, Sebastian

    2014-07-30

    We aimed to investigate whether aberrant motor behavior in schizophrenia was associated with structural alterations in the motor system. Whole brain voxel based morphometry of patients with different severity of motor symptoms identified altered gray matter volume in the supplementary motor area (SMA), a key region of the motor system.

  19. Lower Motor Neuron Findings after Upper Motor Neuron Injury: Insights from Postoperative Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Florman, Jeffrey E.; Duffau, Hugues; Rughani, Anand I.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertonia and hyperreflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hyperreflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexia motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock. PMID:23508473

  20. Emergence of Motor Circuit Activity

    PubMed Central

    Law, Chris; Paquet, Michel; Kania, Artur

    2014-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, ordered neuronal activity patterns can occur even in the absence of sensory input and to investigate how these arise, we have used the model system of the embryonic chicken spinal motor circuit, focusing on motor neurons of the lateral motor column (LMC). At the earliest stages of their molecular differentiation, we can detect differences between medial and lateral LMC neurons in terms of expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits, including CHRNA5, CHRNA7, GRIN2A, GRIK1, HTR1A and HTR1B, as well as the KCC2 transporter. Using patch-clamp recordings we also demonstrate that medial and lateral LMC motor neurons have subtly different activity patterns that reflect the differential expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Using a combination of patch-clamp recordings in single neurons and calcium-imaging of motor neuron populations, we demonstrate that inhibition of nicotinic, muscarinic or GABA-ergic activity, has profound effects of motor circuit activity during the initial stages of neuromuscular junction formation. Finally, by analysing the activity of large populations of motor neurons at different developmental stages, we show that the asynchronous, disordered neuronal activity that occurs at early stages of circuit formation develops into organised, synchronous activity evident at the stage of LMC neuron muscle innervation. In light of the considerable diversity of neurotransmitter receptor expression, activity patterns in the LMC are surprisingly similar between neuronal types, however the emergence of patterned activity, in conjunction with the differential expression of transmitter systems likely leads to the development of near-mature patterns of locomotor activity by perinatal ages. PMID:24722186