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Sample records for mouse atrophic thymus

  1. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  2. MicroRNA expression in the aging mouse thymus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaqiong; Li, Daotong; Ouyang, Dan; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Ma, Yongjiang; Li, Yugu

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the process of aging in many model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, and in many organs, such as the mouse lung and human epididymis. However, the role of miRNAs in the thymus tissues of the aging mouse remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the miRNA expression profiles in the thymuses of 1-, 10- and 19-month-old mice using miRNA array and qRT-PCR assays. A total of 223 mouse miRNAs were screened, and the expression levels of those miRNAs exhibited gradual increases and decreases over the course of thymus aging. Fifty miRNAs in the 10-month-old thymus and 81 miRNAs in the 19-month-old thymus were defined as differentially expressed miRNAs (p<0.05) in comparison with their levels in the 1-month-old mouse, and approximately one-third of these miRNAs were grouped within 11 miRNA clusters. Each miRNA cluster contained 2 to 5 miRNA genes, and most of the cluster members displayed similar expression patterns, being either increased or decreased. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and the IPA database were used to analyze the 12 miRNAs that exhibited significant expression changes, revealing that as many as 15 pathways may be involved. Thus, our current study determined the expression profiles of miRNAs in the mouse thymus during the process of aging. The results suggested that these miRNAs could become meaningful biomarkers for studying thymus aging and that the aging-related alternations in miRNA expression may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, development and carcinogenesis/tumorigenesis.

  3. RNA synthesis in the thymus of the immunologically mature mouse

    PubMed Central

    Patt, D. J.; Cohen, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    RNA synthesis was investigated in the thymus glands of adult immunized mice. After the intraperitoneal injection of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC), the net synthesis of RNA in the gland increased. A small but consistent amount of the RNA synthesized was distinguished by RNA:DNA hybridizations from that found in the glands of mice not injected with antigen. The RNA formed after immunization did not appear by hybridization to be specific for different antigens since the species of RNA formed in the glands of mice injected with SRBC was indistinguishable from RNA formed in the thymuses of mice injected with chicken red blood cells. RNA synthesized in the thymus glands of mice pharmacologically `stressed' by the injections of hydrocortisone, however, was distinguishable from that formed in the glands of mice injected with antigen. PMID:4854183

  4. Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1 protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors and E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) are believed to participate in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The function of FoxO transcription factors is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In the present study FoxO1 protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation as well as MuRF1 protein expression, were examined in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated skeletal muscle. Methods Protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Muscles studied were 6-days denervated mouse hind-limb muscles (anterior tibial as well as pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, all atrophic), 6-days denervated mouse hemidiaphragm muscles (hypertrophic) and innervated control muscles. Total muscle homogenates were used as well as separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions of innervated and 6-days denervated anterior tibial and hemidiaphragm muscles. Results Expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 proteins increased 0.3-3.7-fold in all 6-days denervated muscles studied, atrophic as well as hypertrophic. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at S256 increased about 0.8-1-fold after denervation in pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and in hemidiaphragm but not in unfractionated anterior tibial muscle. A small (0.2-fold) but statistically significant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation was, however, observed in cytosolic fractions of denervated anterior tibial muscle. A statistically significant increase in FoxO1 acetylation (0.8-fold) was observed only in denervated anterior tibial muscle. Increases in total FoxO1 and in phosphorylated FoxO1 were only seen in cytosolic fractions of denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle whereas in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm both total FoxO1 and phosphorylated FoxO1 increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions. MuRF1 protein expression increased in cytosolic as well

  5. Thymus reticulum of autoimmune mice. 3. Ultrastructural study of NOD (non-obese diabetic) mouse thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Nabarra, B.; Andrianarison, I.

    1991-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse develops spontaneous insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Converging lines of evidence indicate that the disease is of autoimmune origin and is primarily mediated by T cells. It thus appeared interesting to study the morphology of the thymic microenvironment in order to determine whether the architecture and/or the cellular components of the organ are altered. In the NOD mouse, significant aspects of involution were observed as early as the first month of life, forming a heterogeneous pattern with non-involuted areas. With time, these involuted aspects increased in surface and severity. In non-involuted zones vacuolization of epithelial cells was noted, as well as infiltration by plasma cells and the presence of numerous macrophages with high phagocytic activity. Involuted areas, forming a cellular layer as if cells had lost their limiting membranes, were crossed by a great number of cystic cavities bordered by epithelial cells and cells containing granulations. Their lumens contained lymphocytes and a few macrophages. These observations, which are reminiscent of similar reports made in other autoimmune mouse strains, may be related to the functional thymic abnormality thought to participate in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:1843256

  6. Establishment of cells exhibiting mutated glycolipid synthesis from mouse thymus by immortalization with SV-40 virus.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Iwamori, Yuriko

    2005-11-01

    Immortalization with simian virus-40 and cloning of immortalized cells from mouse thymus were performed to establish cell lines for characterization of the mode of glycolipid expression in the thymic cells. Among the 25 cell lines obtained, three lines with different morphologies were established, that is, epithelial (IMTH-E), fibroblastic (IMTH-F), and asterisk-like (IMTH-I) cells, and their glycolipids, together with those in the thymus, were determined systematically. The major glycolipids in mouse thymus were the globo- and ganglio-series, both of which, were co-expressed in the three cell lines established. However, the mode of modification of the globo- and ganglio-series was distinct for each cell line. As to the globo-series, the structures with the longest carbohydrate chain for IMTH-E, -F, and -I cells were Gb3Cer, Gb4Cer, and Forssman antigen, respectively, having stepwise shorter carbohydrates at the nonreducing termini. Although the acidic glycolipids in IMTH-E cells comprised GM3 and GM2, and their sulfated isomers, IMTH-F and -I cells expressed GMlb and GDlc for the alpha-pathway, and up to GDI a for the a-pathway of ganglio-series glycolipids. GMlb-GalNAc present in the thymus was not detected in IMTH-F and -I cells, probably due to the lower synthetic activity for the metabolic intermediate Gg4Cer. The results indicate that the immortalization technique is useful for obtaining individual cells having unique glycolipid profiles for analysis of the functional significance and metabolism of glycolipids in the thymus.

  7. Differential splicing in mouse thymus generates two forms of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Doyen, N; d'Andon, M F; Bentolila, L A; Nguyen, Q T; Rougeon, F

    1993-01-01

    A new form of TdT mRNA has been identified by screening a mouse thymus cDNA library. It contains an open reading frame of 1527 base pairs corresponding to a protein containing 509 aminoacids, whereas the previously identified mouse TdT mRNA is composed of 1587 base pairs and encodes a protein of 529 aminoacids. Analysis of a mouse genomic clone containing the 3' portion of the TdT gene shows that these twenty additional aminoacids are encoded by an additional exon located between exons X and XI. Both forms of TdT mRNA are present in the thymus and could be generated by alternative splicing. The cDNA reported here corresponds to the major form of TdT mRNA in Balb/c mice and closely resembles human and bovine TdT cDNA. Expression of this cDNA in mammalian cells shows that it encodes a functional protein capable of catalysing N region insertions at the recombination junction of an episomic recombination substrate. Images PMID:8464703

  8. Ethanol extract of fermented soybean, Chungkookjang, inhibits the apoptosis of mouse spleen, and thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bok; Lee, Hye Sung; Kim, Sook Jin; Yoo, Hyung Jae; Hwang, Jae Sung; Chen, Gang; Youn, Hyun Joo

    2007-06-01

    Apoptosis is a step of the cell cycle which is important in the regulation of immune cell populations. Chungkookjang is a Korean traditional fermented soybean containing microorganisms, enzymes, and bioactive compounds which was used in the treatment of mouse spleen as well as thymus cells (CH1-fermented soybean containing barley, wormwood, and sea tangle; CH2-fermented soybean) and was found to exhibit substantially reduced small DNA fragmentation. An MTT assay showed that the treatment of CH1 and CH2 into the mouse splenocytes and thymocytes sharply increased their survival. Moreover, a FACS analysis also showed that CH1 and CH2 are effective at suppressing the apoptosis of splenocytes and thymocytes. The fermented soybean isoflavone concentrations, which are implicated in lowering breast and prostate cancers, lowering the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and improving bone health, were determined using Capillary Electrophoresis-Electrochemical Detection (CE-ED). The amount of Daidzein in fermented soybean significantly increased by 44-fold dramatically, compared with those in unfermented soybean. In this study, we demonstrated that ethanol extracts of Chungkookjang promote the survival of the mouse spleen and thymus cells in culture by suppressing their apoptotic death. Future studies should investigate which genes are related to apoptosis of the immune cells.

  9. Effects of several salt marsh plants on mouse spleen and thymus cell proliferation using mtt assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwan; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kim, You Ah; Youn, Hyun Joo; Lee, Burm-Jong

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, we have tested the effects of 21 salt marsh plants on cell proliferation of mouse immune cells (spleen and thymus) using MTT assay in culture. The methanolic extracts of six salt marsh plants ( Rosa rugosa, Ixeris tamagawaensis, Artemisia capillaris, Tetragonia tetragonoides, Erigeron annus, and Glehnia littoralis) showed very powerful suppressive effects of mouse immune cell death and significant activities of cell proliferation in vitro. Especially, the methanolic extract of Rosa rugosa was found to have fifteen times compared to the control treatment, demonstrating that Rosa rugosa may have a potent stimulation effect on immune cell proliferation. These results suggest that several salt marsh plants including Rosa rugosa could be useful for further study as an immunomodulating agent.

  10. Modeling the development of the post-natal mouse thymus in the absence of bone marrow progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zaharie, Daniela; Moleriu, Radu D.; Mic, Felix A.

    2016-01-01

    Many mathematical models have been published with the purpose of explaining aspects of T-cell development in the thymus. In this manuscript we adapted a four-compartment model of the thymus and used a range of mathematical approaches with the aim of explaining the dynamics of the four main thymocyte populations in the mouse thymus, from the emergence of the first fetal thymocyte until the death of the animal. At various pre-natal and post-natal stages we investigated experimentally the number and composition of thymocytes populations, their apoptosis and proliferation, along with data from literature, to create and validate the model. In our model the proliferation processes are characterized by decreasing proliferation rates, which allows us to model the natural involution of the thymus. The best results were obtained when different sets of parameters were used for the fetal and post-natal periods, suggesting that birth may induce a discontinuity in the modeled processes. Our model is able to model the development of both pre-natal and post-natal thymocyte populations. Also, our findings showed that the post-natal thymus is able to develop in the absence of the daily input of bone marrow progenitors, providing more evidence to support the autonomous development of the post-natal thymus. PMID:27824070

  11. Atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Stika, Catherine S

    2010-01-01

    With the loss of estrogen that occurs with menopause, physiologic and structural changes occur within the vulvovaginal mucosa that lead to a condition commonly called atrophic vaginitis. Although mild genital changes occur in most women, 10-47% of postmenopausal women will develop one or more debilitating symptoms that include vulvovaginal dryness, dyspareunia, vulvar itching or pain, recurrent urinary tract infections, as well as abnormal vaginal discharge. Topical estrogen replacement therapies reverse these mucosal changes and are effective treatments for the symptoms of atrophic vaginitis. Vaginal moisturizers and lubricants also provide symptomatic relief for vaginal dryness and dyspareunia, respectively. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Thymic hormone-containing cells. Characterization and localization of serum thymic factor in young mouse thymus studied by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The characterization and distribution of cells containing the serum thymic factor (FTS) in the thymus of young mice was studied by immunofluorescence using monoclonal anti-FTS antibodies. FTS+ cells were distributed throughout the thymic parenchyma but were more frequent in the medullary region than in the cortex. FTS-containing cells presented a stellate or globular aspect, and some of them exhibited fluorescent cytoplasmic granules. The epithelial nature of FTS+ cells was confirmed by double-labeling experiments using an anti- keratin antiserum (as an epithelial cell marker). Nevertheless, only a minority of keratin-positive epithelial reticular cells contained FTS. All controls, including the incubation of sections from nonthymic tissues with the anti-FTS antibodies, were negative. Taken together, these results confirm the exclusive localization of FTS-containing cells within the mouse thymus. PMID:7047671

  13. In-utero coxsackievirus B4 infection of the mouse thymus.

    PubMed

    Jaïdane, H; Halouani, A; Jmii, H; Elmastour, F; Abdelkefi, S; Bodart, G; Michaux, H; Chakroun, T; Sane, F; Mokni, M; Geenen, V; Hober, D; Aouni, M

    2017-03-01

    Type B coxsackievirus (CV-B) infections are involved frequently in the triggering of several autoimmune diseases such as myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, pancreatitis, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, thyroiditis or Sjögren's syndrome. Serological and virological evidence suggests that maternal infections during pregnancy can play a role in the appearance of these diseases in offspring. The current study aims to explore the effect of an in-utero CV-B infection on the fetal thymus, the central site for programming immunological self-tolerance. In this perspective, female Swiss albino mice were inoculated intraperitoneally or orally with the diabetogenic CV-B4 E2 strain at gestational days 10 or 17. Offspring were killed at different post-inoculation times, and their thymuses were analysed for evidence of infection and alterations in thymic T cell subsets. In-utero CV-B infection of the thymus was demonstrated during the course of vertical transmission, as attested by viral RNA and infectious virus detection in most analysed samples. No histopathological changes were evident. Thymic T cells were not depleted, despite being positive for viral RNA. As evidenced by flow cytometry analysis, CV-B infection of the fetal thymus induced significant changes of thymic T cell populations, particularly with maternal inoculation at gestational day 10. Altogether, these findings suggest that CV-B infection of the fetal thymus may play an important role in the genesis of autoimmune diseases. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  15. Changes in mouse thymus and spleen after return from the STS-135 mission in space.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Mao, Xiao Wen; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Jones, Tamako A; Slater, Jerry M; Pecaut, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous results with flight (FLT) mice showed abnormalities in thymuses and spleens that have potential to compromise immune defense mechanisms. In this study, the organs were further evaluated in C57BL/6 mice after Space Shuttle Atlantis returned from a 13-day mission. Thymuses and spleens were harvested from FLT mice and ground controls housed in similar animal enclosure modules (AEM). Organ and body mass, DNA fragmentation and expression of genes related to T cells and cancer were determined. Although significance was not obtained for thymus mass, DNA fragmentation was greater in the FLT group (P<0.01). Spleen mass alone and relative to body mass was significantly decreased in FLT mice (P<0.05). In FLT thymuses, 6/84 T cell-related genes were affected versus the AEM control group (P<0.05; up: IL10, Il18bp, Il18r1, Spp1; down: Ccl7, IL6); 15/84 cancer-related genes had altered expression (P<0.05; up: Casp8, FGFR2, Figf, Hgf, IGF1, Itga4, Ncam1, Pdgfa, Pik3r1, Serpinb2, Sykb; down: Cdc25a, E2F1, Mmp9, Myc). In the spleen, 8/84 cancer-related genes were affected in FLT mice compared to AEM controls (P<0.05; up: Cdkn2a; down: Birc5, Casp8, Ctnnb1, Map2k1, Mdm2, NFkB1, Pdgfa). Pathway analysis (apoptosis signaling and checkpoint regulation) was used to map relationships among the cancer-related genes. The results showed that a relatively short mission in space had a significant impact on both organs. The findings also indicate that immune system aberrations due to stressors associated with space travel should be included when estimating risk for pathologies such as cancer and infection and in designing appropriate countermeasures. Although this was the historic last flight of NASA's Space Shuttle Program, exploration of space will undoubtedly continue.

  16. Changes in Mouse Thymus and Spleen after Return from the STS-135 Mission in Space

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Daila S.; Mao, Xiao Wen; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E.; Jones, Tamako A.; Slater, Jerry M.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous results with flight (FLT) mice showed abnormalities in thymuses and spleens that have potential to compromise immune defense mechanisms. In this study, the organs were further evaluated in C57BL/6 mice after Space Shuttle Atlantis returned from a 13-day mission. Thymuses and spleens were harvested from FLT mice and ground controls housed in similar animal enclosure modules (AEM). Organ and body mass, DNA fragmentation and expression of genes related to T cells and cancer were determined. Although significance was not obtained for thymus mass, DNA fragmentation was greater in the FLT group (P<0.01). Spleen mass alone and relative to body mass was significantly decreased in FLT mice (P<0.05). In FLT thymuses, 6/84 T cell-related genes were affected versus the AEM control group (P<0.05; up: IL10, Il18bp, Il18r1, Spp1; down: Ccl7, IL6); 15/84 cancer-related genes had altered expression (P<0.05; up: Casp8, FGFR2, Figf, Hgf, IGF1, Itga4, Ncam1, Pdgfa, Pik3r1, Serpinb2, Sykb; down: Cdc25a, E2F1, Mmp9, Myc). In the spleen, 8/84 cancer-related genes were affected in FLT mice compared to AEM controls (P<0.05; up: Cdkn2a; down: Birc5, Casp8, Ctnnb1, Map2k1, Mdm2, NFkB1, Pdgfa). Pathway analysis (apoptosis signaling and checkpoint regulation) was used to map relationships among the cancer–related genes. The results showed that a relatively short mission in space had a significant impact on both organs. The findings also indicate that immune system aberrations due to stressors associated with space travel should be included when estimating risk for pathologies such as cancer and infection and in designing appropriate countermeasures. Although this was the historic last flight of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program, exploration of space will undoubtedly continue. PMID:24069384

  17. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  18. Effects of Thymus vulgaris ethanolic extract on chronic toxoplasmosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Eraky, Maysa Ahmad; El-Fakahany, Amany Farouk; El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Abou-Ouf, Eman Abdel-Rahman; Yaseen, Doaa Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    The current work was undertaken to investigate the potential effectiveness of Thymus vulgaris ethanolic extract (TVE) against Toxoplasma gondii infection in chronic experimental toxoplasmosis. To evaluate prophylactic effects, mice received 500 mg/kg TVE for 5 days before they were infected by an avirulent Me49 T. gondii strain. To investigate the therapeutic effects of the extract postinfection, daily treatment with TVE was initiated at 6 weeks postinfection and continued for 10 days. The following groups of animals were used as controls: uninfected/non-treated, infected/non-treated, and infected/treated with a combination of pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine. Brain cyst count and histopathological changes using H&E and Feulgen stains were used to evaluate the efficacy of TVE. The mean number of brain cysts was significantly decreased by 24 % in mice treated prophylactically with TVE. TVE also significantly reduced the mean number of brain cysts when administered to animals already chronically infected with T. gondii. The effect of TVE was comparable to that of treatment with a mixture of sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine (46 and 51 % reduction, respectively). Moreover, considerable amelioration of the pathological lesions in the brain and retina was observed. The results demonstrate the potential efficacy of T. vulgaris as a new natural therapeutic and prophylactic agent for use in the treatment of chronic toxoplasmosis.

  19. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MOUSE ISOANTIGENS: SEPARATION OF SOLUBLE TL (THYMUS-LEUKEMIA) ANTIGEN FROM SOLUBLE H-2 HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGEN BY COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. A. L.; Boyse, E. A.; Old, L. J.; Stockert, Elisabeth

    1967-01-01

    Mouse H-2 histocompatibility antigen has been extracted, solubilized, and partly purified from the cells of an A strain spontaneous leukemia carrying TL (thymus-leukemia) antigens. H-2 and TL. 1, 2, 3 activities were measured by inhibition of the cytotoxic effect of the corresponding isoantibodies. TL activity was associated with the H-2 active fraction obtained by solubilization and fractionation by gel filtration. TL specificity was largely separated from H-2 antigen by subsequent chromatography on DEAE Sephadex as an adjacent component in a series of fractions. The soluble H-2 antigen prepared from the leukemia cells was tested for most of the specificities determined by H-2a with no exceptional results. TL. 1, 2, 3 activities, measured as each component separately, were located in approximately the same position; there is no clear indication yet whether the three TL specificities are separable from one another. It appears that in addition to the close genetic linkage between the H-2 and TL loci, and their reciprocal interaction in producing H-2 and TL antigens, these antigens exhibit some similarity at the chemical level. PMID:6020006

  1. A crucial role of the thymus in induction by the lprcg gene of lymphadenopathy with autoimmunity in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, A; Moriyama, T; Ogata, Y; Katagiri, T; Kimura, M

    1992-01-01

    The new mutation at the lpr locus, lprcg, induces massive lymphoproliferation characterized by the selective expansion of CD4-, CD8-, B220+, Thy-1+ cells or double-negative T lymphocytes and production of autoantibodies as does lpr. The thymus is necessary for the induction of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and autoimmune symptoms by lpr. To determine whether or not the thymus is also indispensable to expression of the function of lrpcg, lprcg homozygous athymic nude mice (lprcg/lprcg nu/nu; lprcg nudes) were constructed by crossing CBA/KlJms-lprcg/lprcg (CBA-lprcg) and DDD/l-nu/nu mice and observed for lymphoid organ hyperplasia and autoantibody production with or without thymus grafts from various strains of mice including CBA-lprcg. Neither lymphoproliferation nor significantly increased production of autoantibodies was observed in unmanipulated lprcg nudes. In contrast, thymus grafts of both +/+ and lprcg/lprcg genotypes caused lymphoid organ hyperplasia composed of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and significantly augmented the production of antibodies against single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Interestingly, serum Ig and anti-ssDNA antibody levels rose in response to thymus grafts only in IgG but not in IgM classes. These results indicate that the thymus plays a crucial role in the induction of abnormal T-cell differentiation by lprcg and that thymic genotype is irrelevant. PMID:1592441

  2. A crucial role of the thymus in induction by the lprcg gene of lymphadenopathy with autoimmunity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, A; Moriyama, T; Ogata, Y; Katagiri, T; Kimura, M

    1992-04-01

    The new mutation at the lpr locus, lprcg, induces massive lymphoproliferation characterized by the selective expansion of CD4-, CD8-, B220+, Thy-1+ cells or double-negative T lymphocytes and production of autoantibodies as does lpr. The thymus is necessary for the induction of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and autoimmune symptoms by lpr. To determine whether or not the thymus is also indispensable to expression of the function of lrpcg, lprcg homozygous athymic nude mice (lprcg/lprcg nu/nu; lprcg nudes) were constructed by crossing CBA/KlJms-lprcg/lprcg (CBA-lprcg) and DDD/l-nu/nu mice and observed for lymphoid organ hyperplasia and autoantibody production with or without thymus grafts from various strains of mice including CBA-lprcg. Neither lymphoproliferation nor significantly increased production of autoantibodies was observed in unmanipulated lprcg nudes. In contrast, thymus grafts of both +/+ and lprcg/lprcg genotypes caused lymphoid organ hyperplasia composed of anomalous double-negative T lymphocytes and significantly augmented the production of antibodies against single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Interestingly, serum Ig and anti-ssDNA antibody levels rose in response to thymus grafts only in IgG but not in IgM classes. These results indicate that the thymus plays a crucial role in the induction of abnormal T-cell differentiation by lprcg and that thymic genotype is irrelevant.

  3. Cell-Autonomous Defects in Thymic Epithelial Cells Disrupt Endothelial-Perivascular Cell Interactions in the Mouse Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Jerrod L.; Griffith, Ann V.; Hughes III, Bernard; Saito, Fumi; Takahama, Yousuke; Richie, Ellen R.; Manley, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    The thymus is composed of multiple stromal elements comprising specialized stromal microenvironments responsible for the development of self-tolerant and self-restricted T cells. Here, we investigated the ontogeny and maturation of the thymic vasculature. We show that endothelial cells initially enter the thymus at E13.5, with PDGFR-β+ mesenchymal cells following at E14.5. Using an allelic series of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC) specific transcription factor Foxn1, we showed that these events are delayed by 1–2 days in Foxn1Δ/Δ mice, and this phenotype was exacerbated with reduced Foxn1 dosage. At subsequent stages there were fewer capillaries, leaky blood vessels, disrupted endothelium - perivascular cell interactions, endothelial cell vacuolization, and an overall failure of vascular organization. The expression of both VEGF-A and PDGF-B, which are both primarily expressed in vasculature-associated mesenchyme or endothelium in the thymus, were reduced at E13.5 and E15.5 in Foxn1Δ/Δ mice compared with controls. These data suggest that Foxn1 is required in TECs both to recruit endothelial cells and for endothelial cells to communicate with thymic mesenchyme, and for the differentiation of vascular-associated mesenchymal cells. These data show that Foxn1 function in TECs is required for normal thymus size and to generate the cellular and molecular environment needed for normal thymic vascularization. These data further demonstrate a novel TEC-mesenchyme-endothelial interaction required for proper fetal thymus organogenesis. PMID:23750244

  4. Effects of castration, Depo-testosterone and cyproterone acetate on lymphocyte T subsets in mouse thymus and spleen.

    PubMed

    Aboudkhil, S; Bureau, J P; Garrelly, L; Vago, P

    1991-11-01

    The effects of testosterone on the relative proportion of Thy 1.2, CD4 (L3T4) and CD8 (Lyt-2) cells in thymus and spleen were studied after castration and administration of Depo-testosterone (DT) separately or together with cyproterone acetate (CA) (an antiandrogen) in BDF1 mice. Injection of 0.5 mg/100 g body weight of DT during 2 weeks decreased significantly the number and proportion of double positive (DP) (CD4+ CD8+) and increased the percentage of single positive (SP) CD4+ (CD4+ CD8-), whereas there was a slight decrease in the Thy 1.2+ cells in the thymus. In parallel, we observed an increase in CD8+ (CD4- CD8+) cells in the spleen. The androgen deprivation after 3 weeks of castration induced a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ cells in thymus and both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in spleen. Injection of CA (0.5 mg/100 g body weight) had the same qualitative effects as DT on the proportion of lymphocyte T subsets in castrated mice. However, the combined activities of DT and CA were greater than either alone. These data indicate the main role of testosterone in the distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in male mice. The similar effects of CA and DT in the lymphoid organs may suggest a difference between androgen receptors of sexual and lymphoid organs.

  5. Expression profiling in mouse fetal thymus reveals clusters of coordinately expressed genes that mark individual stages of T-cell ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Ramialison, Mirana; Mohr, Elodie; Nal, Béatrice; Saboul, Thierry; Carrier, Alice; Tagett, Rebecca; Granjeaud, Samuel; Nguyen, Catherine; Gautheret, Daniel; Jordan, Bertrand R; Ferrier, Pierre

    2002-10-01

    To search for genes that participate in regulatory networks sustaining mouse embryonic T-cell development, we have performed expression profiling using nylon macroarrays. Labeled samples representative of individual developmental stages were utilized, taking advantage of cell homogeneity during early thymus ontogeny. cDNAs revealing differential expression were further selected using labeled samples derived from lymphoid versus non-lymphoid tissues, and from mutant thymi exhibiting T-cell developmental defects. We thus identified clusters of coexpressed genes during T-cell embryogenesis and characterized their sequences through bioinformatics. We compare our results with those from other profiling analyses in the immune system, and discuss their implications for the definition of genes whose products are involved in T-cell development.

  6. Editor's Highlight: Interactive Genotoxicity Induced by Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Arsenite in Mouse Thymus Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures affect many people worldwide leading to cancer and other diseases. Arsenite (As(+3)) and certain PAHs are known to cause genotoxicity. However, there is limited information on the interactions between As(+3) and PAHs at environmentally relevant concentrations. The thymus is the primary immune organ for T cell development in mammals. Our previous studies showed that environmentally relevant concentrations of As(+3) induce genotoxicity in mouse thymus cells through Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition. Certain PAHs, such as the metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), are known to cause DNA damage by forming DNA adducts. In the present study, primary mouse thymus cells were examined for DNA damage following 18 hr in vitro treatments with 5 or 50 nM As(+3) and 100 nM BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol (BP-Diol), or benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE). An interactive increase in genotoxicity and apoptosis were observed following treatments with 5 nM As (+)  (3 )+( )100 nM BP-diol and 50 nM As (+)  (3 )+( )100 nM BPDE. We attribute the increase in DNA damage to inhibition of PARP inhibition leading to decreased DNA repair. To further support this hypothesis, we found that a PARP inhibitor, 3,4-dihydro-5[4-(1-piperindinyl) butoxyl]-1(2H)-isoquinoline (DPQ), also interacted with BP-diol to produce an increase in DNA damage. Interestingly, we also found that As(+3) and BP-diol increased CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, suggesting that increased PAH metabolism may also contribute to genotoxicity. In summary, these results show that the suppression of PARP activity and induction of CYP1A1/CYP1B1 may act together to increase DNA damage produced by As(+3) and PAHs.

  7. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  8. Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its constituents increase the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji; Tanaka, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Teruki; Matuoka, Koozi; Anno, Takahiko

    2005-01-01

    The effects of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its phenolic compounds, thymol and carvacrol, on the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, i.e., phase I enzymes such as 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) and phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and quinone reductase (QR), were investigated. Mice were fed with a diet containing thyme (0.5% or 2.0%) or treated orally with thymol (50-200 mg/kg) or carvacrol (50-200 mg/kg) once a day for 7 successive days, and then the enzyme activities in the livers were analyzed. Dietary administration of 2% thyme caused slightly but significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.1-1.4-fold. Thymol (200 mg/kg) treatment resulted in significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.9-fold, and carvacrol (200 mg/kg) treatment caused significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.7-fold. Thymol-treated animals had significantly higher protein levels of GST alpha and GST micro, and carvacrol-treated animals had significantly higher levels of GST micro. These results imply that thyme contains bifunctional inducers (i.e., substances capable of inducing both phase I and phase II enzymes) and that thymol and carvacrol may account for the effects of thyme.

  9. Rapid-high, syncytium-inducing isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induce cytopathicity in the human thymus of the SCID-hu mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshima, H; Su, L; Bonyhadi, M L; Connor, R I; Ho, D D; McCune, J M

    1994-01-01

    Clinical deterioration in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease is associated with an increased viral burden in the peripheral blood and a loss of circulating CD4+ T cells. HIV-1 isolates obtained prior to this stage of disease often have a "slow-low," non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) phenotype, whereas those obtained afterwards are often characterized as "rapid-high" and syncytium inducing (SI). Paired NSI and SI isolates from two different patients were inoculated into the human thymus implants of SCID-hu mice. The two slow-low, NSI isolates replicated to minimal levels in the grafts and did not induce thymocyte depletion. In contrast, the two SI isolates from the same patients showed high levels of viral replication and induced a marked degree of thymocyte depletion, accompanied by evidence of programmed cell death. These observations reveal a correlation between the replicative and cytopathic patterns of HIV-1 isolates in vitro and in the SCID-hu mouse in vivo and provide direct evidence that the biological phenotype of HIV-1 switch may be a causal and not a derivative correlate of HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:7966610

  10. Atrophic Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Emmy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scarring is an unfortunate and frequent complication of acne, resulting in significant psychological distress for patients. Fortunately, numerous treatment options exist for acne scarring. Objectives: To extensively review the literature on treatment options for atrophic acne scarring. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the following topics: dermabrasion, subcision, punch techniques, chemical peels, tissue augmentation, and lasers. Results: The literature supports the use of various treatment modalities; superior results may be achieved when multiple modalities are combined for a multi-step approach to scarring. Conclusion: The safety and efficacy of various treatment devices for acne scarring is well established, but there is a paucity of split-face trials comparing modalities. PMID:25610524

  11. The SCID-hu mouse as a tool in immunotoxicological risk assessment: effects of 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl-imidazole (THI) and di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) on the human thymus in SCID-hu mice.

    PubMed

    de Heer, C; Schuurman, H J; Houben, G F; Pieters, R H; Penninks, A H; van Loveren, H

    1995-06-26

    SCID mice engrafted with human fetal thymus and liver tissue fragments (SCID-hu mice) are currently considered as a new tool in human immunotoxicological risk assessment. Testing of various immunotoxicants exerting thymotoxicity via different intrathymic target cell types is necessary for validation of this model. Therefore, SCID-hu mice were exposed to 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)-imidazole (THI), the immunotoxic component in the food additive, Caramel Colour III, or the organotin compound, di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC). Histopathological examination of the human thymus grafts of SCID-hu mice either exposed to THI or to DBTC showed a reduction in the relative size of the thymus cortex, an effect also described in rodents. These results indicate that the human thymus is a target for the immunotoxic action of both THI and DBTC. In addition, they indicate the promising potential of the SCID-hu mouse model as a tool for human immunotoxicological risk assessment.

  12. Dendritic Cells are Critical Accessory Cells for Thymus-Dependent Antibody Responses in Mouse and in Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Kayo; Steinman, Ralph M.; van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    1983-10-01

    We report that dendritic cells (DC) are necessary and potent accessory cells for anti-sheep erythrocyte responses in both mouse and man. In mice, a small number of DC (0.3-1% of the culture) restores the response of B/T-lymphocyte mixtures to that observed in unfractionated spleen. An even lower dose (0.03-0.1% DC) is needed if the T cells have been primed to antigen. Responses are both antigen and T cell dependent. Selective depletion of DC from unfractionated spleen with the monoclonal antibody 33D1 and complement ablates the antibody response. In contrast to DC, purified spleen macrophages are weak or inactive stimulators. However, when mixed with DC, macrophages can increase the yield of antibody-secreting cells about 2-fold. In man, small numbers (0.3-1%) of blood DC stimulate antibody formation in vitro. Purified human monocytes do not stimulate but in low doses (1% of the culture) inhibit the antibody response. Likewise, selective removal of human monocytes with antibody and complement enhances or accelerates the development of antibody-secreting cells. We conclude that DC are required for the development of T-dependent antibody responses by mouse and human lymphocytes in vitro.

  13. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Minalyan, Artem; Benhammou, Jihane N; Artashesyan, Aida; Lewis, Michael S; Pisegna, Joseph R

    2017-01-01

    At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System) that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet) and corpus-predominant (autoimmune). Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. PMID:28223833

  14. IGF-1 deficiency causes atrophic changes associated with upregulation of VGluT1 and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors in the mouse cochlear nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santamaría, V; Alvarado, J C; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, L; Murillo-Cuesta, S; Contreras, J; Juiz, J M; Varela-Nieto, I

    2016-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic protein that plays a crucial role in modulating neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Mice lacking the Igf1 gene exhibit profound deafness and multiple anomalies in the inner ear and spiral ganglion. An issue that remains unknown is whether, in addition to these peripheral abnormalities, IGF-1 deficiency also results in structural changes along the central auditory pathway that may contribute to an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, which might be reflected in abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABR). To assess such a possibility, we evaluated the morphological and physiological alterations in the cochlear nucleus complex of the adult mouse. The expression and distribution of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) and the vesicular inhibitory transporter (VGAT), which were used as specific markers for labeling excitatory and inhibitory terminals, and the involvement of the activity-dependent myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors in regulating excitatory synapses were assessed in a 4-month-old mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency and neurosensorial deafness (Igf1 (-/-) homozygous null mice). The results demonstrate decreases in the cochlear nucleus area and cell size along with cell loss in the cochlear nuclei of the deficient mouse. Additionally, our results demonstrate that there is upregulation of VGluT1, but not VGAT, immunostaining and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors together with increased wave II amplitude in the ABR recording. Our observations provide evidence of an abnormal neuronal cytoarchitecture in the cochlear nuclei of Igf1 (-/-) null mice and suggest that the increased efficacy of glutamatergic synapses might be mediated by MEF2 transcription factors.

  15. Evolution of thymus organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qing; Zhao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The thymus is the primary organ for functional T lymphocyte development in jawed vertebrates. A new study in the jawless fish, lampreys, indicates the existence of a primitive thymus in these surviving representatives of the most ancient vertebrates, providing strong evidence of co-evolution of T cells and thymus. This review summarizes the wealth of data that have been generated towards understanding the evolution of the thymus in the vertebrates. Progress in identifying genetic networks and cellular mechanisms that control thymus organogenesis in mammals and their evolution in lower species may inspire the development of new strategies for medical interventions targeting faulty thymus functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer Survival rates are often used by doctors ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. Atrophic tongue associated with Candida.

    PubMed

    Terai, Haruhiko; Shimahara, Masashi

    2005-08-01

    Traditionally, total atrophic tongue has been due to nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folic acid, or iron deficiencies, and partial atrophic tongue has been well known as median rhomboid glossitis or geographic tongue. The other cause of atrophic tongue is oral candidiasis. Forty patients with atrophic change of the tongue were examined on a relation to candidiasis. All of them complained of tongue pain on spicy or hot diet. Laboratory examinations included blood examination for diabetes and anemia, culture test and direct cytologic examination. The intensity of tongue pain was evaluated pre- and post-treatment using visual analogue scale (VAS). Twenty-four of 40 (60%) had pre-disposing factors of candidiasis including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, systemic steroid therapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and others in their medical history. Blood examinations revealed mild anemia and/or Fe deficiency in 5 (12.5%), mild diabetes in 4 (10.0%), both in two, while residual 29 patients (72.5%) were within reference levels. In the culture examination, candidal species were isolated in 72.5%, and almost all of them were candida albicans. The direct cytologic examination performed in 17 of 40 patients, witch revealed pseudohyphae of fungi in 14 patients (82.4%). After the antifungal treatment, the tongue pain disappeared or improved markedly in 80%. Simultaneously, the regenerative tendency of filifolm papilla of the tongue dorsum was observed in these patients. Atrophic tongue associated with pain at eating, even though it is mild atrophic change, has a high probability of being a candida-induced lesion. Long disease duration and no benefit by topical steroids are suggestive and diagnostic factors of this disease.

  18. Can Thymus Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thymus Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Thymus Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing for ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Atrophic vaginitis: signs, symptoms, and better outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Annabelle; Johnson, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis is a common finding in women with low estrogen states. Many women believe their symptoms are expected signs of aging. NPs can provide therapeutic options to improve vaginal health and quality of life. This article reviews physiology, clinical manifestations, signs, symptoms, and treatment methods for atrophic vaginitis.

  20. Organizing the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan José; García-Ceca, Javier; Alfaro, David; Stimamiglio, Marco Augusto; Cejalvo, Teresa; Jiménez, Eva; Zapata, Agustín G

    2009-02-01

    Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are molecules involved in the morphogenesis of numerous tissues, including the central nervous system in which they play a key role in determining cell positioning and tissue domains containing or excluding nerve fibers. Because common features have been suggested to occur in the microenvironmental organization of brain and thymus, a highly compartmentalized organ central for T cell differentiation, we examined the expression and possible role of Eph/ephrins in the biology of the thymus gland. We reviewed numerous in vivo and in vitro results that confirm a role for Eph and ephrins in the maturation of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC) network and T cell differentiation. Their possible involvement in different steps of early thymus organogenesis, including thymus primordium branching, lymphoid colonization, and thymocyte-TEC interactions, that determine the organization of a mature three-dimensional thymic epithelial network is also analyzed.

  1. What Is Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... discussed in How Is Thymus Cancer Staged? WHO classification system for thymomas Most doctors also classify thymomas ... the histologic type . The system used for this classification, which was developed by the World Health Organization ( ...

  2. Hemopoiesis in the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Marion D.

    1995-01-01

    The presence in the thymus of hemopoietic cells other than thymocytes has been known for many years, but the extent of the hemopoietic activity of the thymus and the possible functional implications have only recently begun to receive much attention. This review summarizes the literature in this field, especially in the light of current cytokine and thymic-factor knowledge, and includes clinical relevance where possible. PMID:8770555

  3. Possible association of Neu2 with plasma membrane fraction from mouse thymus exhibited sialidase activity with fetuin at pH 7.0 but not at pH 4.5.

    PubMed

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, Shigeko; Doi, Naoko; Fujii, Miwako; Go, Shinji; Kabayama, Kazuya; Moriya, Setsuko; Miyagi, Taeko; Koda, Toshiaki

    2013-08-01

    Compared to other organs, the mouse thymus exhibits a high level of sialidase activity in both the soluble and crude membrane fractions, as measured at neutral pH using 4MU-Neu5Ac as a substrate. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the sialidase with a high level of the activity at neutral pH in the crude membrane. Several parameters were analyzed using the soluble (S) fraction, N and D fractions that were obtained by NP-40 or DOC/NP-40 solubilization from the thymus crude membrane. The main sialidase activity in the N fraction exhibited almost the same pI as that of soluble Neu2 and 60% of the activity was removed from the membrane by three washes with 10 mM Tris-buffer, at pH 7.0. The N fraction preferentially hydrolyzed the sialic acid bond of glycoprotein and exhibited sialidase activity with fetuin at pH 7.0 but not at pH 4.5. The same activity was observed in a plasma membrane-rich fraction. To date, the removal of sialic acid from fetuin at pH 7.0 was reported only with soluble Neu2 and the membrane fraction from Neu2-transfected COS cells. We analyzed the gene that controls the sialidase activity in the crude membrane fraction at pH 7.0 using SMXA recombinant mice and found that compared with other three genes, Neu2 presented the best correlation with the activity level. We suggest that Neu2 is most likely responsible for the main activity in the N fraction, due to its association with the membrane by an unknown mechanism. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Thymus-derived lymphocytes and their interactions with macrophages are required for the production of osteoclast-activating factor in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, M; Vignery, A; Gershon, R K; Baron, R

    1984-01-01

    A bone-resorbing factor, comparable to the osteoclast-activating factor (OAF) produced from peripheral blood leukocytes, is shown to be produced by murine spleen cells activated with the T-cell mitogen Con A. Murine OAF is demonstrated here as being a product of the interaction between thymus-derived T lymphocytes and macrophages. Activation of T cells in the presence of macrophages with Con A yields culture supernatants with OAF activity. This OAF activity is not dialyzable and is not extracted by lipid solvents. Purified B cells in the presence or absence of macrophages and cocultured with Con A or activated with the B-cell-specific mitogen lipopolysaccharide yield culture supernatants with no detectable OAF activity. Similarly, macrophages cocultured with Con A or activated with lipopolysaccharide fail to yield culture supernatants with bone resorbing activity. These types of immune cell interactions are similar to that required for the production of lymphokines. These data support the hypothesis that one aspect of regulation of bone remodeling is through cells of the immune system. PMID:6609360

  5. Studies on thymus products

    PubMed Central

    Dardenne, Mireille; Papiernik, Martine; Bach, J.-F.; Stutman, O.

    1974-01-01

    Serum thymic factor (TF) has been tested by its action on spleen rosette-forming cells from adult thymectomized mice. It has been confirmed in a blind study using coded serum samples that TF disappeared early after adult thymectomy and reappeared after grafting a thymus, either as a free graft or enclosed in cell impermeable diffusion chambers. Similar reconstitution was also obtained by grafting a non-lymphoid epithelial thymoma or pure epithelial thymus, obtained by in vivo incubation of a thymus within a diffusion chamber in an intermediate host. Conversely, TF levels were not restored in thymectomized animals treated with dispersed spleen cells or with dispersed thymic lymphocytes. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4421188

  6. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Alison M.; Morris, Lucy X.; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne L. G.; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances H.; Tomlinson, Simon R.; Anderson, Richard A.; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Blackburn, C. Clare

    2013-01-01

    The thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyngeal pouch, as in the mouse, in contrast to previous suggestions. Finally, we define the timing of onset of hematopoietic cell colonization and epithelial cell differentiation in the human thymic primordium, showing, unexpectedly, that the first colonizing hematopoietic cells are CD45+CD34int/-. Collectively, our data provide essential information for translation of principles established in the mouse to the human, and are of particular relevance to development of improved strategies for enhancing immune reconstitution in patients. PMID:23571219

  7. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development.

    PubMed

    Farley, Alison M; Morris, Lucy X; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne L G; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances H; Tomlinson, Simon R; Anderson, Richard A; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blackburn, C Clare

    2013-05-01

    The thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyngeal pouch, as in the mouse, in contrast to previous suggestions. Finally, we define the timing of onset of hematopoietic cell colonization and epithelial cell differentiation in the human thymic primordium, showing, unexpectedly, that the first colonizing hematopoietic cells are CD45(+)CD34(int/-). Collectively, our data provide essential information for translation of principles established in the mouse to the human, and are of particular relevance to development of improved strategies for enhancing immune reconstitution in patients.

  8. Myelomalacia and hypoglycorrhachia in malignant atrophic papulosis.

    PubMed

    Label, L S; Tandan, R; Albers, J W

    1983-07-01

    A 25-year-old man with the skin lesions of malignant atrophic papulosis had clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of a multifocal asymmetric myelomalacia or polyradiculopathy in association with elevated CSF protein and hypoglycorrhachia. Autopsy findings included widespread infarctions and necrosis of brain, brainstem, and spinal cord. The combined clinical and laboratory findings were similar to those seen in systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, or meningeal carcinomatosis. Thus, malignant atrophic papulosis should be added to the differential diagnosis of either polyradiculopathy or myelomalacia.

  9. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  10. Evaluating evidence for atrophic scarring treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    McGrouther, Duncan; Chakrabarty, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Atrophic scars cause significant patient morbidity. Whilst there is evidence to guide treatment, there does not appear to be a systematic review to analyse the efficacy of treatment options. Objectives To retrieve all evidence relating to atrophic scar treatment and evaluate using the Clinical Evidence GRADE score in order to allow clinicians to make evidence-based treatment choices. Method Searches were performed in Medline, EMBASE, CINHL and Cochrane to identify all English studies published evaluating treatment of atrophic scars on adults excluding journal letters. Each study was allocated a GRADE score based on type of study, quality, dose response, consistency of results and significance of results. The end score allowed categorisation of evidence into high, moderate, low or very low quality. Results A total of 41 studies were retrieved from searches including randomised controlled trials, observational studies, retrospective analyses and case reports of which 7% were allocated a high-quality score, 10% a moderate score, 7% a low score and 75% a very low score. Treatment modalities included ablative laser therapy, non-ablative laser therapy, autologous fat transfer, dermabrasion, chemical peels, injectables, subcision, tretinoin iontophoresis and combination therapy. Conclusion There is a paucity of good-quality clinical evidence evaluating treatment modalities for atrophic scarring. Evidence supports efficacy of laser, surgery and peel therapy. Further biomolecular research is required to identify targeted treatment options and more randomised controlled trials would make the evidence base for atrophic scar treatment more robust. PMID:25352991

  11. Restoration of Thymus Function with Bioengineered Thymus Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Asako; Pradhan, Isha; Trucco, Massimo; Fan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the primary site for the generation of a diverse repertoire of T-cells that are essential to the efficient function of adaptive immunity. Numerous factors varying from aging, chemotherapy, radiation exposure, virus infection and inflammation contribute to thymus involution, a phenomenon manifested as loss of thymus cellularity, increased stromal fibrosis and diminished naïve T-cell output. Rejuvenating thymus function is a challenging task since it has limited regenerative capability and we still do not know how to successfully propagate thymic epithelial cells (TECs), the predominant population of the thymic stromal cells making up the thymic microenvironment. Here, we will discuss recent advances in thymus regeneration and the prospects of applying bioengineered artificial thymus organoids in regenerative medicine and solid organ transplantation. PMID:27529056

  12. Low expression of Neu2 sialidase in the thymus of SM/J mice-existence of neuraminidase positive cells "Neu-medullocyte" in the murine thymus.

    PubMed

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, S; Koda, T; Suwama, T; Matsukawa, H; Fujii, M; Tomobe, K; Nishimura, M

    2008-11-01

    We have already reported that the homogenate of the A/J mouse thymus shows a high sialidase activity at the neutral pH region and that in both soluble and membrane fractions optimal pH was 6.5-7 (Kijimoto-Ochiai et al., Glycoconj. J., 20:375-384, 2004). In the present study, we investigated the level of sialidase activities in the thymus of the SM/J mouse, a mouse strain that we know to have a Neu1(a) allele that reveals a low level of sialidase activity in the liver. We found that while in the A/J thymus the soluble sialidase activity at pH 6.5 was high, the SM/J thymus lacked all such activity. A QTL analysis of SMXA recombinant inbred strains showed that soluble sialidase activity correlated well with the D1Mit8/9 marker on chromosome 1. The murine whole DNA-sequence data and the results of our FISH analysis (Kotani et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 286:250-258, 2001) showed that this location is consistent with the position of Neu2 gene. We confirmed that it is hard to detect the Neu2 enzyme of the SM/J mouse thymus by an anti-Neu2 antibody using a Western blot analysis. We also found that while the mRNA expression of Neu2 was quite normal in the SM/J mouse liver, it was very low in the SM/J mouse thymus. We therefore conclude that the lack of soluble sialidase activity in the SM/J mouse thymus is due to the thymus-specific low expression level of the Neu2 gene. We have previously shown that the sialidase positive cell which contains the Mac-1 and immunoglobulin, and which is located sparsely in the corticomedullar region or medullary region of the A/J mouse thymus (Kijimoto-Ochiai et al., Glycoconj. J., 20:375-384, 2004). We showed now in this paper that the detection of this cell in the SM/J mouse thymus at pH 7.0 was difficult. We propose, therefore, to name the cell "Neu-medullocyte".

  13. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  14. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  15. Anatomy of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, Najib; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-05-01

    In the case of the thymus gland, the most common indications for resection are myasthenia gravis or thymoma. The consistency and appearance of the thymus gland make it difficult at times to discern from mediastinal fatty tissues. Having a clear understanding of the anatomy and the relationship of the gland to adjacent structures is important. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Minimally invasive thymus surgery].

    PubMed

    Rückert, J C; Ismail, M; Swierzy, M; Braumann, C; Badakhshi, H; Rogalla, P; Meisel, A; Rückert, R I; Müller, J M

    2008-01-01

    There are absolute and relative indications for complete removal of the thymus gland. In the complex therapy of autoimmune-related myasthenia gravis, thymectomy plays a central role and is performed with relative indication. In case of thymoma with or without myasthenia, thymectomy is absolutely indicated. Thymus resection is further necessary for cases of hyperparathyroidism with ectopic intrathymic parathyroids or with certain forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The transcervical operation technique traditionally reflected the well-founded desire for minimal invasiveness for thymectomy. Due to the requirement of radicality however, most of these operations were performed using sternotomy. With the evolution of therapeutic thoracoscopy in thoracic surgery, several pure or extended minimally invasive operation techniques for thymectomy have been developed. At present uni- or bilateral, subxiphoid, and modified transcervical single or combination thoracoscopic techniques are in use. Recently a very precise new level of thoracoscopic operation technique was developed using robotic-assisted surgery. There are special advantages of this technique for thymectomy. An overview of the development and experiences with minimally invasive thymectomy is presented, including data from the largest series published so far.

  17. ATROPHIC CARDIOMYOCYTE SIGNALING IN HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A.; Marion, Tony N.; Darazi, Fahed Al; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Cardinal pathologic features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle (LV) and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 wks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO4, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared to untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by: a) LV hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; b) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm2) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were re-expressing β-myosin heavy chain; and c) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with mRNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO4 cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function, but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO4 cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  18. Tretinoin-iontophoresis in atrophic acne scars.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Donath, P; Hannes, J; Perl, S; Neumayer, R; Reiner, A

    1999-02-01

    Atrophic acne scars are a frequent problem after acne. Hitherto, mainly invasive treatment measures were possible. In a recent paper, we demonstrated the positive effects of iontophoresis with 0.025% tretinoin gel vs. estriol 0.03%. In this further study, the recording of the clinical effects of iontophoresis with 0.025% tretinoin gel in atrophic acne scars was supplemented by immunohistochemistry investigations of collagen I and III, proliferation markers, and the estimation of epidermal thickness. The treatment was performed twice weekly in 32 volunteer patients for a period of 3 months by application of the substance under a constant direct current of 3 mA for 20 min. Skin biopsies prior to and at the end of treatment were performed in 32 voluntary patients in order to investigate collagen I/III and proliferation markers by immunohistochemistry methods. Clinically, at the end of treatment, in 94% of patients a significant decrease in the scar depth was observed. Neither epidermal thickness nor proliferation markers revealed a significant increase at the end of treatment. Furthermore, collagen I and collagen III showed no common trend, as expressed statistically by a lack of significance. In some cases, increases in collagen III became evident at the end of treatment. Tretinoin-iontophoresis is an effective, noninvasive treatment of atrophic acne scars without causing disturbing side-effects.

  19. Peripheral regulatory T lymphocytes recirculating to the thymus suppress the development of their precursors.

    PubMed

    Thiault, Nicolas; Darrigues, Julie; Adoue, Véronique; Gros, Marine; Binet, Bénédicte; Perals, Corine; Leobon, Bertrand; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Joffre, Olivier P; Robey, Ellen A; van Meerwijk, Joost P M; Romagnoli, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Most T lymphocytes, including regulatory T cells (Treg cells), differentiate in the thymus. The age-dependent involution of this organ leads to decreasing production of T cells. Here we found that the output of new Treg cells from the thymus decreased substantially more than that of conventional T cells. Peripheral mouse and human Treg cells recirculated back to the thymus, where they constituted a large proportion of the pool of Treg cells and displayed an activated and differentiated phenotype. In the thymus, the recirculating cells exerted their regulatory function by inhibiting interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent de novo differentiation of Treg cells. Thus, Treg cell development is controlled by a negative feedback loop in which mature progeny cells return to the thymus and restrain development of precursors of Treg cells.

  20. Thymus, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2013-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease. An autoantibody directed toward acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causes the destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and a reduction of the number of AChRs at neuromuscular junctions. A very puzzling, but interesting characteristic of myasthenia gravis is that many of the patients have an abnormality in their thymus. Many have a hyperplastic thymus with germinal centers, while others have a thymic tumor. How is the abnormality of the thymus related to myasthenia gravis? This review will summarize the existing evidence and try to find the missing link between the thymus and myasthenia gravis. The review will also comment on two distinct populations of myasthenia gravis patients without thymoma. The autoimmunity found in elderly patients is nonspecific and initiated via a different mechanism from the initiation of myasthenia gravis in younger patients.

  1. The thymus. Pediatric surgical aspects.

    PubMed

    Midulla, P S; Dolgin, S E; Shlasko, E

    2001-05-01

    Since the original description of thymic death in an infant 400 years ago, the thymus has been recognized as an important structure to practitioners caring for infants and children. The source of many cysts, masses, and tumors in the neck and mediastinum, the thymus gland merits the pediatric surgeon's attention. The thymus is clearly an important lymphoid organ, the removal of which may be therapeutic in MG, but congenital absence leads to profound cell-mediated immunodeficiency. The immunologic sequelae of its neonatal extirpation remains obscure. It is apparent that further research is needed to clarify the functional role of the thymus gland in the developing immune system. Until better elucidated, a conservative approach to neonatal thymectomy may be justified.

  2. Ectopic TBX1 suppresses thymic epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation during thymus organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Reeh, Kaitlin A. G.; Cardenas, Kim T.; Bain, Virginia E.; Liu, Zhijie; Laurent, Micheline; Manley, Nancy R.; Richie, Ellen R.

    2014-01-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands arise from a shared endodermal primordium in the third pharyngeal pouch (3rd pp). Thymus fate is specified in the ventral 3rd pp between E9.5 and E11, whereas parathyroid fate is specified in the dorsal domain. The molecular mechanisms that specify fate and regulate thymus and parathyroid development are not fully delineated. Previous reports suggested that Tbx1 is required for thymus organogenesis because loss of Tbx1 in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome and in experimental Tbx1 deletion mutants is associated with thymus aplasia or hypoplasia. However, the thymus phenotype is likely to be secondary to defects in pharyngeal pouch formation. Furthermore, the absence of Tbx1 expression in the thymus-fated domain of the wild-type 3rd pp suggested that Tbx1 is instead a negative regulator of thymus organogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated a novel mouse strain in which expression of a conditional Tbx1 allele was ectopically activated in the thymus-fated domain of the 3rd pp. Ectopic Tbx1 expression severely repressed expression of Foxn1, a transcription factor that marks the thymus-fated domain and is required for differentiation and proliferation of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitors. By contrast, ectopic Tbx1 did not alter the expression pattern of Gcm2, a transcription factor restricted to the parathyroid-fated domain and required for parathyroid development. Ectopic Tbx1 expression impaired TEC proliferation and arrested TEC differentiation at an early progenitor stage. The results support the hypothesis that Tbx1 negatively regulates TEC growth and differentiation, and that extinction of Tbx1 expression in 3rd pp endoderm is a prerequisite for thymus organogenesis. PMID:25053428

  3. Ectopic TBX1 suppresses thymic epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation during thymus organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reeh, Kaitlin A G; Cardenas, Kim T; Bain, Virginia E; Liu, Zhijie; Laurent, Micheline; Manley, Nancy R; Richie, Ellen R

    2014-08-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands arise from a shared endodermal primordium in the third pharyngeal pouch (3rd pp). Thymus fate is specified in the ventral 3rd pp between E9.5 and E11, whereas parathyroid fate is specified in the dorsal domain. The molecular mechanisms that specify fate and regulate thymus and parathyroid development are not fully delineated. Previous reports suggested that Tbx1 is required for thymus organogenesis because loss of Tbx1 in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome and in experimental Tbx1 deletion mutants is associated with thymus aplasia or hypoplasia. However, the thymus phenotype is likely to be secondary to defects in pharyngeal pouch formation. Furthermore, the absence of Tbx1 expression in the thymus-fated domain of the wild-type 3rd pp suggested that Tbx1 is instead a negative regulator of thymus organogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated a novel mouse strain in which expression of a conditional Tbx1 allele was ectopically activated in the thymus-fated domain of the 3rd pp. Ectopic Tbx1 expression severely repressed expression of Foxn1, a transcription factor that marks the thymus-fated domain and is required for differentiation and proliferation of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitors. By contrast, ectopic Tbx1 did not alter the expression pattern of Gcm2, a transcription factor restricted to the parathyroid-fated domain and required for parathyroid development. Ectopic Tbx1 expression impaired TEC proliferation and arrested TEC differentiation at an early progenitor stage. The results support the hypothesis that Tbx1 negatively regulates TEC growth and differentiation, and that extinction of Tbx1 expression in 3rd pp endoderm is a prerequisite for thymus organogenesis.

  4. How to assess the severity of atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yan-Cheng; Tang, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Ya-Li

    2011-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, is the main consequence of long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection, and is linked to the development of gastric cancer. The severity of atrophic gastritis is related to the lifetime risk of gastric cancer development, especially in terms of its degree and extent of mucosal damage. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to assess the severity of atrophic gastritis, interfere with the disease progress, and reverse gastric mucosal atrophy. In the article, we demonstrated some methods (conventional endoscopy, modern endoscopic technology and noninvasive methods) that may help assess the severity of atrophic gastritis and select the reasonable treatment protocols. PMID:21483628

  5. Myasthenia Gravis Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Maria I.; Jones, Margaret; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Gold, Ralf; Niks, Erik; Verschuuren, Jan J.G.M.; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Scaravilli, Francesco; Canelhas, Aurea; Morgan, B. Paul; Vincent, Angela; Willcox, Nick

    2007-01-01

    In early-onset myasthenia gravis, the thymus contains lymph node-type infiltrates with frequent acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-specific germinal centers. Our recent evidence/two-step hypothesis implicates hyperplastic medullary thymic epithelial cells (expressing isolated AChR subunits) in provoking infiltration and thymic myoid cells (with intact AChR) in germinal center formation. To test this, we screened for complement attack in a wide range of typical generalized myasthenia patients. Regardless of the exact serology, thymi with sizeable infiltrates unexpectedly showed patchy up-regulation of both C5a receptor and terminal complement regulator CD59 on hyperplastic epithelial cells. These latter also showed deposits of activated C3b complement component, which appeared even heavier on infiltrating B cells, macrophages, and especially follicular dendritic cells. Myoid cells appeared particularly vulnerable to complement; few expressed the early complement regulators CD55, CD46, or CR1, and none were detectably CD59+. Indeed, when exposed to infiltrates, and especially to germinal centers, myoid cells frequently labeled for C1q, C3b (25 to 48%), or even the terminal C9, with some showing obvious damage. This early/persistent complement attack on both epithelial and myoid cells strongly supports our hypothesis, especially implicating exposed myoid cells in germinal center formation/autoantibody diversification. Remarkably, the similar changes place many apparent AChR-seronegative patients in the same spectrum as the AChR-seropositive patients. PMID:17675582

  6. Implant rehabilitation for atrophic maxilla: a review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Seyed Asharaf; Karthigeyan, Suma; Deivanai, Mangala; Kumar, Arun

    2014-09-01

    A severely atrophied maxilla presents serious limitations for conventional implant placement. This presents challenge to the surgeon for implant placement in harmony with the planned prosthesis. Survey of various literatures using internet sources, manual searches, and common textbooks on dental implants shows, that a thorough knowledge of conventional augmentation procedures such as bone augmentation techniques, guided bone regeneration, alveolar distraction, maxillary sinus elevation techniques with or without grafting and contemporary techniques of implant placement provide effective long-term solutions in the management of the atrophic maxilla.

  7. An Atrophic Plaque with Arborizing Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Martinez, Alejandra; Chavez-Alvarez, Sonia; Herz-Ruelas, Maira; Miranda-Maldonado, Ivette; Vázquez-Martinez, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibromas are a common finding in the daily clinical practice. Most lesions are found incidentally or because patients seek medical attention due to the aspect of the lesion. Rare variants of dermatofibroma such as aneurismatic or atrophic dermatofibroma can be encountered simultaneously; thus, these combined features may raise the possibility of other diagnoses to be considered. By providing diverse clinical and dermoscopic examples of dermatofibromas, we may prevent misdiagnosing these lesions. This case illustrates how two rare variants of dermatofibroma can coexist. Clinical presentation of dermatofibromas may vary greatly, and it is essential for dermatologists to recognize them clinically and dermoscopically before obtaining histopathological diagnosis. PMID:27790113

  8. The thymus-pituitary axis and its changes during aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Brown, O A; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The pituitary-thymic axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is to review the evidence demonstrating that aging brings about a progressive disruption in the integration of this network. In doing so, we briefly review the experimental evidence supporting the view that immune and neuroendocrine aging are interdependent processes. The advantages and limits of the nude mouse as a model of thymus-dependent accelerated aging is also discussed. Next, we review a number of studies which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction 5 (TF5), thymosin alpha-1 and thymosin beta-4 on beta-endorphin, ACTH, glucocorticoids, LHRH and LH secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone (HTH) and thymus factor are summarized. Aging has a significant impact on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones. Thus, it has been reported that TF5 and HTH have thyrotropin-inhibiting activity in young but not in old rats. Furthermore, intravenous administration of HTH was also able to reduce plasma GH and increase corticosterone levels in both young and old rats, although these responses were much weaker in the old animals. Further evidence on this topic is discussed. It is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might therefore act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes

  9. Mechanisms of thymus organogenesis and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Julie; Manley, Nancy R.

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is the primary organ responsible for generating functional T cells in vertebrates. Although T cell differentiation within the thymus has been an area of intense investigation, the study of thymus organogenesis has made slower progress. The past decade, however, has seen a renewed interest in thymus organogenesis, with the aim of understanding how the thymus develops to form a microenvironment that supports T cell maturation and regeneration. This has prompted modern revisits to classical experiments and has driven additional genetic approaches in mice. These studies are making significant progress in identifying the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control specification, early organogenesis and morphogenesis of the thymus. PMID:21862553

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... Cancer? Can Thymus Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. What's New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thymus Cancer? Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer What’s New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer? There ... treating thymomas is still being explored. In addition, new treatments are being developed and tested. Researchers are ...

  13. The thymus: picture review of human thymus prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Varga, I; Pospisilova, V; Jablonska-Mestanova, V; Galfiova, P; Polak, S

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is derived from pharyngeal region; a region from which, in case of aquatic vertebrates, the gills develop. According to the classical hypothesis, the epithelial thymus stroma of human embryos is derived from the endodermal cells of the left and right ventral parts of the third pharyngeal pouches. But a close contact of the third pharyngeal pouch with its corresponding third pharyngeal clefts ectoderm plays an important role. Also an epithelial-mesenchymal interaction between the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm and surrounding neural crest derived-cells ectomesenchyme is necessary for the proliferation and differentiation of thymic epithelial cells. In our work we photographically presented the development of thymus from the 6th up to the 25th week of development. The first primordia of the thymus and parathyroid glands within the endoderm of third pharyngeal pouches can be seen in 8 to 9 mm stages. We found also an epithelial proliferation in the second pharyngeal pouches, but this "thymus secundus" stopped their differentiation. The thymus primordia at the 7th and 8th week of development contain almost exclusively epithelial cells. These cells are arranged at the periphery as a row of prismatic cells. The mesenchyme accumulates around the epithelial thymic primordium, and during 9th to 12th weeks of development, septa from mesenchyme fold between the epithelial cells and create the "openings" in the capsular surround. According to our observations, in the 13th week of development the differentiation of cortex and medulla becomes obvious and is completed from the 17th up to 18th week of development onward. The first developing Hassall's corpuscle was detected in the 13th week of development. The striking increase in the number of the Hassall's bodies was observed between the 16th and the 18th week of development, as well as between the 22nd and the 25th week of development (Fig. 14, Ref. 35).

  14. Screening markers for chronic atrophic gastritis in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ley, C; Mohar, A; Guarner, J; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Figueroa, L S; Halperin, D; Parsonnet, J

    2001-02-01

    Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinomas usually are preceded by chronic atrophic gastritis. Studies of gastric cancer prevention often rely on identification of this condition. In a clinical trial, we sought to determine the best serological screening method for chronic atrophic gastritis and compared our findings to the published literature. Test characteristics of potential screening tests (antibodies to Helicobacter pyloni or CagA, elevated gastrin, low pepsinogen, increased age) alone or in combination were examined among consecutive subjects enrolled in a study of H. pylori and preneoplastic gastric lesions in Chiapas, Mexico; 70% had chronic atrophic gastritis. English-language articles concerning screening for chronic atrophic gastritis were also reviewed. Sensitivity for chronic atrophic gastritis was highest for antibodies to H. pylori (92%) or CagA, or gastrin levels >25 ng/l (both 83%). Specificity, however, was low for these tests (18, 41, and 22%, respectively). Pepsinogen levels were highly specific but insensitive markers of chronic atrophic gastritis (for pepsinogen I <25 microg/l, sensitivity was 6% and specificity was 100%; for pepsinogen I:pepsinogen II ratio <2.5, sensitivity was 14% and specificity was 96%). Combinations of markers did not improve test characteristics. Screening test characteristics from the literature varied widely and did not consistently identify a good screening strategy. In this study, CagA antibodies alone had the best combination of test characteristics for chronic atrophic gastritis screening. However, no screening test was both highly sensitive and highly specific for chronic atrophic gastritis.

  15. [Atrophic glossitis is attributed to cobalamin deficiency].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-ci; Wang, Yu-feng; Sheng, Jing; Chen, Fu-xiang; Tang, Guo-yao

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the causes of atrophic glossitis(AG) and to explore the relationship between AG and serum cobalamin, folate levels. A total of 213 patients with AG treated from Jan.1979 to Jun. 2010 were analyzed for the causes of AG. Serum cobalamin, folate levels and complete blood count were tested in newly enrolled AG patients from Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011. All data were analyzed with SPSS 16.0 software package for Student's t test. There were 97 AG patients (45.4%) suffering from megaloblastic anemia (MA)/ macrocytosis. Among the 72 newly enrolled AG patients, fifty had cobalamin deficiency. Meanwhile, serum folate levels were increased in cobalamin deficiency group. Cobalamin deficiency is the common cause both of MA/macrocytosis and AG, also may be the main cause of AG. Furthermore, AG may be the early clinical manifestation of cobalamin deficiency.

  16. Imaging of the pediatric thymus: Clinicoradiologic approach

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Smita; Bhalla, Ashu S; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun K

    2017-01-01

    The thymus is a lymphatic organ that undergoes dynamic changes with age and disease. It is important to be familiar with these physiological changes in the thymus gland to be able to identify pathology and make an accurate diagnosis. The thymus may be involved in multisystem disorders or show focal isolated lesions. The aim of this article is to review the radiological anatomy of the thymus, normal variants, and pathology including hyperplasia and benign/malignant lesions involving the thymus gland in the pediatric age group. We also propose an algorithmic approach for imaging evaluation of a suspected thymic mass on the basis of morphologic features. PMID:28224091

  17. Characterization of thymus atrophy in calves with subclinical BVD challenged with BHV-1.

    PubMed

    Romero-Palomo, F; Risalde, M A; Molina, V; Lauzi, S; Bautista, M J; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2015-05-15

    Since the thymus is a target organ for the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), our experiment aimed to understand its relationship with the immunosuppressive effect by studying the consequences of a previous infection with BVDV on the thymus of calves challenged with bovine herpesvirus 1.1 (BHV-1). For this purpose, 12 animals were inoculated intranasally with non-cytopathic BVDV-1; 12 days later, 10 of them were coinfected intranasally with BHV-1. These animals were euthanized in batches of two at 0, 1, 2, 4, 7 or 14 dpi with BHV-1. Another 10 calves were inoculated solely with BHV-1 and euthanized in batches of two at 1, 2, 4, 7 or 14 dpi with BHV-1; two uninoculated calves were used as negative controls. Thymus samples from these animals were processed for viral detection and histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies focused on BVDV/BHV-1 antigens, cortex:medulla ratio, apoptosis (TUNEL and caspase-3), collagen deposition, and factor VIII endothelial detection. Our study revealed the immunohistochemical presence of BVDV antigen in all animals in the BVDV-infected group, unlike BHV-1 detection, which was observed in animals in both infection groups only by molecular techniques. BVDV-preinfected animals showed severe atrophic changes associated with reduced cortex:medulla ratio, higher presence of cortical apoptosis, and increased collagen deposition and vascularization. However, calves solely infected with BHV-1 did not show atrophic changes. These findings could affect not only the numbers of circulating and local mature T cells but also the T cell-mediated immunity, which seems to be impaired during infections with this virus, thus favoring pathogenic effects during secondary infections.

  18. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  19. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  20. Health-Promoting Effects of Thymus herba-barona, Thymus pseudolanuginosus, and Thymus caespititius Decoctions.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Andrea F; Pereira, Olívia R; Neto, Rodrigo T; Silva, Artur M S; Cardoso, Susana M

    2017-08-31

    Thymus herba-barona, Thymus pseudolanuginosus, and Thymus caespititius decoctions were screened for their phenolic constituents, along with their potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities. The total phenolic compounds in the extracts of the three plants ranged from 236.0 ± 26.6 mgGAE/g (T. caespititus) to 293.0 ± 30.5 mgGAE/g of extract (T. pseudolanuginosus), being particularly rich in caffeic acid derivatives, namely rosmarinic acid and its structural isomers, as well as flavones, such as luteolin-O-glucuronide. The T. pseudolanuginosus extract presented the best DPPH radical scavenging ability (EC50 = 10.9 ± 0.7 µg/mL), a high reducing power (EC50 = 32.2 ± 8.2 µg/mL), and effectively inhibited the oxidation of β-carotene (EC50 = 2.4 ± 0.2 µg/mL). The extracts also showed NO(●) scavenging activity close to that of ascorbic acid, and thus might be useful as anti-inflammatory agents. In addition, they exhibited antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus strains were the most sensitive bacteria to thyme extracts, with minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values in the range of 0.6-3.5 mg/mL. Overall, this work is an important contribution for the phytochemical characterization and the potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities of these three Thymus species, which have been poorly explored.

  1. Health-Promoting Effects of Thymus herba-barona, Thymus pseudolanuginosus, and Thymus caespititius Decoctions

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Andrea F.; Pereira, Olívia R.; Neto, Rodrigo T.

    2017-01-01

    Thymus herba-barona, Thymus pseudolanuginosus, and Thymus caespititius decoctions were screened for their phenolic constituents, along with their potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities. The total phenolic compounds in the extracts of the three plants ranged from 236.0 ± 26.6 mgGAE/g (T. caespititus) to 293.0 ± 30.5 mgGAE/g of extract (T. pseudolanuginosus), being particularly rich in caffeic acid derivatives, namely rosmarinic acid and its structural isomers, as well as flavones, such as luteolin-O-glucuronide. The T. pseudolanuginosus extract presented the best DPPH radical scavenging ability (EC50 = 10.9 ± 0.7 µg/mL), a high reducing power (EC50 = 32.2 ± 8.2 µg/mL), and effectively inhibited the oxidation of β-carotene (EC50 = 2.4 ± 0.2 µg/mL). The extracts also showed NO● scavenging activity close to that of ascorbic acid, and thus might be useful as anti-inflammatory agents. In addition, they exhibited antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus strains were the most sensitive bacteria to thyme extracts, with minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values in the range of 0.6–3.5 mg/mL. Overall, this work is an important contribution for the phytochemical characterization and the potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities of these three Thymus species, which have been poorly explored. PMID:28858228

  2. The thymus of the hairless rhino-j (hr/hr-j) mice

    PubMed Central

    SAN JOSE, I.; GARCÍA-SUÁREZ, O.; HANNESTAD, J.; CABO, R.; GAUNA, L.; REPRESA, J.; VEGA, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The hairless (hr) gene is expressed in a large number of tissues, primarily the skin, and a mutation in the hr gene is responsible for the typical cutaneous phenotype of hairless mice. Mutant hr mouse strains show immune defects involving especially T cells and macrophages, as well as an age-related immunodeficiency and an accelerated atrophy of the thymus. These data suggest that the hr mutation causes a defect of this organ, although hr transcripts have not been detected in fetal or adult mice thymus. The present study analyses the thymus of young (3 mo) and adult (9 mo) homozygous hr-rh-j mice (a strain of hairless mice) by means of structural techniques and immunohistochemistry to selectively identify thymic epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. There were structural alterations in the thymus of both young and adult rh-rh-j mice, which were more severe in older animals. These alterations consisted of relative cortical atrophy, enlargement of blood vessels, proliferation of perivascular connective tissue, and the appearance of cysts. hr-rh-j mice also showed a decrease in the number of epithelial and dendritic cells, and macrophages. Taken together, present results strongly suggest degeneration and accelerated age-dependent regression of the thymus in hr-rh-j mice, which could explain at least in part the immune defects reported in hairless mouse strains. PMID:11327202

  3. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Joanne; Pahouja, Gaurav; Andersen, Barbara; Lustberg, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25815692

  4. The thymus and rheumatology: should we care?

    PubMed Central

    Cosway, Emilie; Anderson, Graham; Garside, Paul; Prendergast, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance in relation to T-cell mediated autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent findings The well established association between major histocompatibility complex class II and RA has led us to understand that T cells, and the adaptive immune response, are important in the pathogenesis of disease. In order for autoimmune disease to develop, there is a breach of tolerance to self antigen and the mechanisms of both central and peripheral tolerance aim to prevent this. Here, we review evidence from mouse models indicating that alterations in T-cell receptor signalling thresholds during thymic selection may be linked to the escape of T cells that mediate autoimmune arthritis. In addition, we summarize the role of dendritic cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in both peripheral and thymic tolerance, and highlight their relevance to what we know about the aetiology of RA. Summary Mechanisms of central tolerance in the thymus and peripheral tolerance are in place to control autoreactive T cells and to prevent the development of autoimmune disease. We anticipate that a better understanding of these mechanisms will lead to the development of better, antigen-specific therapeutics to restore tolerance. PMID:26751840

  5. The thymus and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ragheb, S; Lisak, R P

    2001-05-01

    Self acetylcholine receptor (AchR) is targeted by a wayward immune response in myasthenia gravis (MG). The current understanding of the pathogenesis of the AChR-directed immune response is reviewed. Furthermore, the thymus is suspected of initiating and perpetuating the disease process in the majority of patients; its role as a central and peripheral lymphoid organ in MG is discussed. MG seems to result from a failure of (1) establishing tolerance to the AChR and (2) regulating the immune response.

  6. Atrophic Rhinitis Presenting with Ethmoidal Mucocele: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Jyotirmay; G, Srinish; V, Bijiraj V; Salian, Prajna L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrophic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic debilitating nasal mucosal disease predominantly prevalent in tropical countries. In the present case a 70-year-old female presented with a swelling in the right medial canthal area for six months and had features of Atrophic rhinitis with large septal perforation leading to saddle nose deformity. Computed tomography pictures were suggestive of ethmoidal mucocele and was later decompressed endoscopically. The sequelae and complications of AR like nasal septal perforation, saddle nose deformity, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), local and systemic spread of infection, atrophic pharyngitis, laryngitis, dacryocystitis and nasal myiasis have been reported in literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of AR presenting with ethmoidal mucocele. A case of AR with CRS is to be treated with caution as it can lead to complications as it is often neglected. PMID:25121010

  7. Atrophic Mandible Fractures: Are Bone Grafts Necessary? An Update.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime; Cunningham, Larry L; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2017-06-24

    The management of atrophic mandibular fractures poses a challenge because of anatomic variations and medical comorbidities associated with elderly patients. The purpose of this article is to review and update the literature regarding the management of atrophic mandible fractures using load-bearing reconstruction plates placed without bone grafts. We performed a review of the English-language literature looking for atrophic mandibular fractures with or without continuity defects and reconstruction without bone grafts. Included are 2 new patients from our institution who presented with fractures of their atrophic mandibles and had continuity defects and infections. Both patients underwent reconstruction with a combination of a reconstruction plate, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2, and tricalcium phosphate. This study was approved as an "exempt study" by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Kentucky. This investigation observed the Declaration of Helsinki on medical protocol and ethics. Currently, the standard of care to manage atrophic mandibular fractures with or without a continuity defect is a combination of a reconstruction plate plus autogenous bone graft. However, there is a need for an alternative option for patients with substantial comorbidities. Bone morphogenetic proteins, with or without additional substances, appear to be a choice. In our experience, successful healing occurred in patients with a combination of a reconstruction plate, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2, and tricalcium phosphate. Whereas primary reconstruction of atrophic mandibular fractures with reconstruction plates supplemented with autogenous bone graft is the standard of care, in selected cases in which multiple comorbidities may influence local and/or systemic outcomes, bone morphogenetic proteins and tricalcium phosphate can be used as a predictable alternative to autogenous grafts. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and

  8. Localised inhibition of FGF signalling in the third pharyngeal pouch is required for normal thymus and parathyroid organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Jackson, Abigail L.; Gordon, Julie; Lickert, Heiko; Manley, Nancy R.; Basson, M. Albert

    2012-01-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands are derived from the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm. The mechanisms that establish distinct molecular domains in the third pouch and control the subsequent separation of these organ primordia from the pharynx are poorly understood. Here, we report that mouse embryos that lack two FGF feedback antagonists, Spry1 and Spry2, display parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia and a failure of these organ primordia to completely separate from the pharynx. We show that FGF ligands and downstream reporter genes are expressed in highly regionalised patterns in the third pouch and that sprouty gene deletion results in upregulated FGF signalling throughout the pouch endoderm. As a consequence, the initiation of markers of parathyroid and thymus fate is altered. In addition, a normal apoptotic programme that is associated with the separation of the primordia from the pharynx is disrupted, resulting in the maintenance of a thymus-pharynx attachment and a subsequent inability of the thymus to migrate to its appropriate position above the heart. We demonstrate that the sprouty genes function in the pharyngeal endoderm itself to control these processes and that the defects in sprouty-deficient mutants are, at least in part, due to hyper-responsiveness to Fgf8. Finally, we provide evidence to suggest that parathyroid hypoplasia in these mutants is due to early gene expression defects in the third pouch, whereas thymus hypoplasia is caused by reduced proliferation of thymic epithelial cells in the thymus primordium. PMID:22912418

  9. Localised inhibition of FGF signalling in the third pharyngeal pouch is required for normal thymus and parathyroid organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer R; Jackson, Abigail L; Gordon, Julie; Lickert, Heiko; Manley, Nancy R; Basson, M Albert

    2012-09-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands are derived from the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm. The mechanisms that establish distinct molecular domains in the third pouch and control the subsequent separation of these organ primordia from the pharynx are poorly understood. Here, we report that mouse embryos that lack two FGF feedback antagonists, Spry1 and Spry2, display parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia and a failure of these organ primordia to completely separate from the pharynx. We show that FGF ligands and downstream reporter genes are expressed in highly regionalised patterns in the third pouch and that sprouty gene deletion results in upregulated FGF signalling throughout the pouch endoderm. As a consequence, the initiation of markers of parathyroid and thymus fate is altered. In addition, a normal apoptotic programme that is associated with the separation of the primordia from the pharynx is disrupted, resulting in the maintenance of a thymus-pharynx attachment and a subsequent inability of the thymus to migrate to its appropriate position above the heart. We demonstrate that the sprouty genes function in the pharyngeal endoderm itself to control these processes and that the defects in sprouty-deficient mutants are, at least in part, due to hyper-responsiveness to Fgf8. Finally, we provide evidence to suggest that parathyroid hypoplasia in these mutants is due to early gene expression defects in the third pouch, whereas thymus hypoplasia is caused by reduced proliferation of thymic epithelial cells in the thymus primordium.

  10. Insights into the mechanisms of thymus involution and regeneration by modeling the glucocorticoid-induced perturbation of thymocyte populations dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moleriu, Radu Dumitru; Zaharie, Daniela; Moatar-Moleriu, Lavinia Cristina; Gruia, Alexandra Teodora; Mic, Ani Aurora; Mic, Felix Aurel

    2014-05-07

    T-cells develop in the thymus and based on CD4 and CD8 expressions there are four main thymocyte populations in a normal mouse thymus. Currently, there are several mathematical models that describe the dynamics of thymocyte populations in a normal thymus, but only a few of them model the transient perturbation of their homeostasis. Our aim is to model the perturbation in the dynamics of each thymocyte population which is induced by the administration of a glucocorticoid, i.e. dexamethasone. The proposed approach relies on extending a four compartment thymus model based on differential equations by adding perturbation terms either globally (at the level of each equation) or locally (at the level of proliferation, death, and transfer rates). By fitting the perturbed model with experimental data on mice thymi collected before and after the administration of dexamethasone, it was possible to estimate the relevant parameters using a population-based stochastic search method. The fitted model is further used to conduct a quantitative analysis on the differentiated impact of dexamethasone on each T-cell population and on proliferation, death, and transfer processes. The obtained quantitative information on the perturbation could be used to explore and modify the flow of thymocytes between thymus compartments in order to elucidate the mechanisms of thymus involution and its subsequent regeneration. Since glucocorticoids are raised in many pathological situations, such a model could be useful in evaluating the impact of diseases on thymocyte dynamics in the thymus.

  11. Study of the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha in eicosanoid generation and thymocyte maturation in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S; Perron, Jean; Jacques, Frederic; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, home of maturation and selection of thymocytes for generation of functional T-cells. Multiple factors are involved throughout the different stages of the maturation process to tightly regulate T-cell production. The metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases and specific isomerases generates eicosanoids, lipid mediators capable of triggering cellular responses. In this study, we determined the profile of expression of the eicosanoids present in the mouse thymus at different stages of thymocyte development. As the group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids, thereby generating arachidonic acid, we further verified its contribution by including cPLA2α deficient mice to our investigations. We found that a vast array of eicosanoids is expressed in the thymus, which expression is substantially modulated through thymocyte development. The cPLA2α was dispensable in the generation of most eicosanoids in the thymus and consistently, the ablation of the cPLA2α gene in mouse thymus and the culture of thymuses from human newborns in presence of the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone did not impact thymocyte maturation. This study provides information on the eicosanoid repertoire present during thymocyte development and suggests that thymocyte maturation can occur independently of cPLA2α.

  12. Study of the Role of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Alpha in Eicosanoid Generation and Thymocyte Maturation in the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Perron, Jean; Jacques, Frederic; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, home of maturation and selection of thymocytes for generation of functional T-cells. Multiple factors are involved throughout the different stages of the maturation process to tightly regulate T-cell production. The metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases and specific isomerases generates eicosanoids, lipid mediators capable of triggering cellular responses. In this study, we determined the profile of expression of the eicosanoids present in the mouse thymus at different stages of thymocyte development. As the group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids, thereby generating arachidonic acid, we further verified its contribution by including cPLA2α deficient mice to our investigations. We found that a vast array of eicosanoids is expressed in the thymus, which expression is substantially modulated through thymocyte development. The cPLA2α was dispensable in the generation of most eicosanoids in the thymus and consistently, the ablation of the cPLA2α gene in mouse thymus and the culture of thymuses from human newborns in presence of the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone did not impact thymocyte maturation. This study provides information on the eicosanoid repertoire present during thymocyte development and suggests that thymocyte maturation can occur independently of cPLA2α. PMID:25969996

  13. Does a diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis on Papanicolaou test signify the presence of inflammation?

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra S; Weiss, Gerson; Bittman, Sara; Goldsmith, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal atrophy in menopause shows increased parabasal cells on cytology. This may be accompanied by abundant neutrophils. A shift in maturation index in the absence of significant inflammation is more accurately termed "atrophic pattern." This study aims to determine whether a diagnosis of "atrophic vaginitis" or atrophic pattern on Papanicolaou test is a reliable indicator of what is present on the slide. A retrospective review of Papanicolaou test slides from University Hospital Newark was performed. Cases that had been diagnosed as either atrophic vaginitis (n = 100) or atrophic pattern (n = 100) were selected. Exclusion criteria included any additional diagnosis of neoplasia. Slides were re-reviewed and scored based on abundance of neutrophils: 0 to 5, 6 to 10, or more than 10 neutrophils per high-power field (×40), with 10 fields per slide reviewed. Data were analyzed by χ analysis. Among 200 cases with atrophic vaginitis or atrophic pattern, the proportion of those diagnosed with atrophic vaginitis to those diagnosed with atrophic pattern increased across three neutrophil categories (P < 0.0001). A diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis on Papanicolaou test is reliably associated with increased numbers of neutrophils. A diagnosis of atrophic pattern is indicative of low numbers of neutrophils. As the Papanicolaou test diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis does not correlate with clinical symptoms, a single diagnostic term that does not suggest a disease process would more reliably communicate cytology findings to clinicians.

  14. Use of ELISA to detect toxigenic Pasteurella multocida in atrophic rhinitis in swine.

    PubMed

    Bowersock, T L; Hooper, T; Pottenger, R

    1992-10-01

    The use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a means of detecting dermonecrotoxin-producing strains of Pasteurella multocida was investigated. The assay was evaluated as a means to identify toxigenic P. multocida isolates recovered from nasal secretions of swine with atrophic rhinitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA for detecting dermonecrotoxin-producing P. multocida strains were compared to those of mouse-inoculation and cytotoxicity assays. The ELISA was highly sensitive and more specific than animal inoculation or tissue culture assay and is thus a more effective method for screening swine herds for the presence of toxigenic strains of P. multocida. The ELISA is a rapid, effective, economical way to identify toxigenic P. multocida isolates.

  15. Pediatric non-Helicobacter pylori atrophic gastritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pogoriler, Jennifer; Kamin, Daniel; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Although autoimmune atrophic gastritis is classically a disease of elderly adults, recent studies have described the disease in younger adults, particularly in those with other autoimmune diseases and iron-deficiency anemia. Atrophic gastritis in pediatrics is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed entity that has been primarily reported as single-case reports. This retrospective study of atrophic gastritis not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection was performed to further expand the knowledge of clinical presentation, pathologic findings, and natural history of this disease in the pediatric population. Twelve patients with a histologic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis were identified, with an age range of 8 months to 18 years. Seven had other autoimmune diseases and/or immunodeficiency. Atrophy was confined to the oxyntic mucosa in 10 patients, with intramucosal inflammation in a diffuse or basal-predominant pattern. Active inflammation was present in 7 patients. Pseudopyloric, intestinal, or squamous/mucinous metaplasia was seen at initial biopsy or on follow-up in 8 patients, and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia was seen in 5. One patient developed an adenocarcinoma during the follow-up period of 10 years. Two false-negative diagnoses were retrospectively identified. In the majority of cases, the possibility of atrophic gastritis was not raised by the submitting physician, and the endoscopic findings were not specific. Therefore, accurate diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion on the part of the pathologist, and the diagnosis should be considered particularly in patients with a clinical history of other autoimmune diseases or iron-deficiency anemia.

  16. The Chemical Fractionation of Rabbit and Swine Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Eugene L.; Lagg, Saima E.

    1957-01-01

    A chemical fractionation procedure, previously found applicable to bovine thymus and bovine and ovine palatine tonsils, was used to fractionate rabbit and hog thymus. With respect to the chemical fractionation steps, yields of fractions, and optical and electrophoretic properties, extracts from hog and rabbit thymus were indistinguishable from similar extracts prepared from calf thymus. The study provides composition and yield data applicable to the thymus of a small mammal readily available in most laboratories. PMID:13475395

  17. Local glucocorticoid production in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Talaber, Gergely; Jondal, Mikael; Okret, Sam

    2015-11-01

    Besides generating immunocompetent T lymphocytes, the thymus is an established site of de novo extra-adrenal glucocorticoid (GC) production. Among the compartments of the thymus, both stromal thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and thymocytes secrete biologically active GCs. Locally produced GCs secreted by the various thymic cellular compartments have been suggested to have different impact on thymic homeostasis. TEC-derived GCs may regulate thymocyte differentiation whereas thymocyte-derived GCs might regulate age-dependent involution. However the full biological significance of thymic-derived GCs is still not fully understood. In this review, we summarize and describe recent advances in the understanding of local GC production in the thymus and immunoregulatory steroid production by peripheral T cells and highlight the possible role of local GCs for thymus function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomics identifies differentially expressed proteins in neonatal murine thymus compared with adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The thymus is an immune organ essential for life and plays a crucial role in the development of T cells. It undergoes a fetal to adult developmental maturation process occurring in mouse during the postnatal months. The molecular modifications underlying these ontogenic changes are essentially unknown. Here we used a differential proteomic-based technique (2D-Difference Gel Electrophoresis) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to search for key proteins in the postnatal development of the thymus. Eight different BALB/c mice were used in the study: four mice aged of 1 day (neonatal) and four mice aged of 60 days (adult). Protein samples derived from thymus were labeled and run in 2D-PAGE (Two-Dimensional Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis). One whole-thymus tissue from each mouse was run on gels and each gel containing a pooled sample of the eight mice was run in parallel. The pooled sample was set as the internal pool, containing equal amount of each protein extract used in the experiment. Gels were matched and compared with Difference In-gel Analysis software. Differential spots were picked, in-gel digested and peptide mass fingerprints were obtained. Results Among the differentially regulated proteins in neonatal thymus group, 111 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, of which 95 proteins were up-regulated and 16 proteins were down-regulated. The identified proteins belong to several functional categories, including cell proliferation, cycle and apoptosis, transcription regulation, signal transduction, nucleotide processing, proteolysis and translation, protein folding, metabolism, oxidoreduction, cytoskeleton, immune response, and embryonic development. The major interaction networks comprised of cellular function and maintenance, cellular assembly and organization, and metabolism were also identified by STRING analysis. Conclusions The demonstrated molecular changes are

  19. A thymus candidate in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Guo, Peng; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hirano, Masayuki; Strohmeier, Christine; McCurley, Nathanael; Bockman, Dale E; Schorpp, Michael; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2011-02-03

    Immunologists and evolutionary biologists have been debating the nature of the immune system of jawless vertebrates--lampreys and hagfish--since the nineteenth century. In the past 50 years, these fish were shown to have antibody-like responses and the capacity to reject allografts but were found to lack the immunoglobulin-based adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates. Recent work has shown that lampreys have lymphocytes that instead express somatically diversified antigen receptors that contain leucine-rich-repeats, termed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs), and that the type of VLR expressed is specific to the lymphocyte lineage: T-like lymphocytes express type A VLR (VLRA) genes, and B-like lymphocytes express VLRB genes. These clonally diverse anticipatory antigen receptors are assembled from incomplete genomic fragments by gene conversion, which is thought to be initiated by either of two genes encoding cytosine deaminase, cytosine deaminase 1 (CDA1) in T-like cells and CDA2 in B-like cells. It is unknown whether jawless fish, like jawed vertebrates, have dedicated primary lymphoid organs, such as the thymus, where the development and selection of lymphocytes takes place. Here we identify discrete thymus-like lympho-epithelial structures, termed thymoids, in the tips of the gill filaments and the neighbouring secondary lamellae (both within the gill basket) of lamprey larvae. Only in the thymoids was expression of the orthologue of the gene encoding forkhead box N1 (FOXN1), a marker of the thymopoietic microenvironment in jawed vertebrates, accompanied by expression of CDA1 and VLRA. This expression pattern was unaffected by immunization of lampreys or by stimulation with a T-cell mitogen. Non-functional VLRA gene assemblies were found frequently in the thymoids but not elsewhere, further implicating the thymoid as the site of development of T-like cells in lampreys. These findings suggest that the similarities underlying the dual nature of the adaptive

  20. Severe atrophic vaginitis causing vaginal synechiae and hematocolpos at menopause.

    PubMed

    Segal, Saya; Harvie, Heidi S; Siegelman, Evan; Arya, Lily A

    2011-03-01

    Vaginal atrophy caused by decreased levels of ovarian estrogen production is common at menopause. Atrophic vaginitis severe enough to result in vaginal stricture of the upper two thirds of the vagina and subsequent hematocolpos is unusual. A 53-year-old woman presented with nonvisualization of the cervix at the time of her annual examination. Pelvic ultrasound reported a "vaginal cyst," and the final diagnosis of hematocolpos was made by magnetic resonance imaging. The woman was managed with surgical excision of vaginal synechiae followed by local vaginal estrogen therapy and dilators, with satisfactory results. Untreated severe atrophic vaginitis at menopause can result in a shortened vagina and hematocolpos. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful to characterize vaginal pathology in postmenopausal women.

  1. [Genetic nature of atrophic rhinitis in swine. II. Cytogenetic research].

    PubMed

    Gavrichenkov, A I

    1985-02-01

    This work is concerned with the problem of the nature of the atrophic rhinitis in swine. Our study demonstrates that the filter-passers when injecting intranasal provoke catarrhal rhinitis in sucking-pigs and rabbits and the disease lasts 10-12 days. Guinea-pigs and white mice show no disease symptoms after injection. After four passages of filter-passers through sucking-pigs, the pathogenic properties do not restore. The sucking-pigs and laboratory animals show no changes in organs and in nasal cavity. The findings of cytogenetic and allergic investigations indicate genetic aspects of this disease. To eliminate atrophic rhinitis, it is necessary to reveal heterozygotes, carry out experimental matings and analysis of hybrids. To date, a recessive gene is considered to mediate the disease. To obtain healthy offspring, animals heterozygous for this gene should be bred.

  2. [Neuropeptides, Cytokines and Thymus Peptides as Effectors of Interactions Between Thymus and Neuroendocrine System].

    PubMed

    Torkhovskaya, T I; Belova, O V; Zimina, I V; Kryuchkova, A V; Moskvina, S N; Bystrova, O V; Arion, V Ya; Sergienko, V I

    2015-01-01

    The review presents data on mutual influence of nervous system and thymus, realized through the neuroendocrine-immune interactions. The pres- ence of adrenergic and peptidergic nerves in thymus creates conditions for implementation of the effect of neuropeptides secreted by them. These neuropeptides induce activation of thymus cells receptors and influence on the main processes in thymus, including T-lymphocyte maturation, cytokine and hormones production. In turn, thymuspeptides and/or cytokines, controlled by them, enter the brain and exert influence on neuro- nalfunction, which creates the basis for changes of behavior and homeostasis maintenance in response to infection. Ageing and some infectious, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and cancer diseases are accompanied by distortion of interactions between thymus and central nervous system. Mechanisms of signaling pathways, which determine these interactions, are not revealed yet, and their understanding will promote the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  3. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  4. Thymus: the next (re)generation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2016-05-01

    As the primary site of T-cell development, the thymus plays a key role in the generation of a strong yet self-tolerant adaptive immune response, essential in the face of the potential threat from pathogens or neoplasia. As the importance of the role of the thymus has grown, so too has the understanding that it is extremely sensitive to both acute and chronic injury. The thymus undergoes rapid degeneration following a range of toxic insults, and also involutes as part of the aging process, albeit at a faster rate than many other tissues. The thymus is, however, capable of regenerating, restoring its function to a degree. Potential mechanisms for this endogenous thymic regeneration include keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) signaling, and a more recently described pathway in which innate lymphoid cells produce interleukin-22 (IL-22) in response to loss of double positive thymocytes and upregulation of IL-23 by dendritic cells. Endogenous repair is unable to fully restore the thymus, particularly in the aged population, and this paves the way toward the need for exogenous strategies to help regenerate or even replace thymic function. Therapies currently in clinical trials include KGF, use of the cytokines IL-7 and IL-22, and hormonal modulation including growth hormone administration and sex steroid inhibition. Further novel strategies are emerging in the preclinical setting, including the use of precursor T cells and thymus bioengineering. The use of such strategies offers hope that for many patients, the next regeneration of their thymus is a step closer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Thymus: The Next (Re)Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S.; Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary As the primary site of T cell development, the thymus plays a key role in the generation of a strong yet self-tolerant adaptive immune response, essential in the face of the potential threat from pathogens or neoplasia. As the importance of the role of the thymus has grown, so too has the understanding that it is extremely sensitive to both acute and chronic injury. The thymus undergoes rapid degeneration following a range of toxic insults, and also involutes as part of the aging process, albeit at a faster rate than many other tissues. The thymus is, however, capable of regenerating, restoring its function to a degree. Potential mechanisms for this endogenous thymic regeneration include keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) signaling, and a more recently described pathway in which innate lymphoid cells produce interleukin-22 (IL-22) in response to loss of double positive thymocytes and upregulation of IL-23 by dendritic cells. Endogenous repair is unable to fully restore the thymus, particularly in the aged population, and this paves the way towards the need for exogenous strategies to help regenerate or even replace thymic function. Therapies currently in clinical trials include KGF, use of the cytokines IL-7 and IL-22, and hormonal modulation including growth hormone administration and sex steroid inhibition. Further novel strategies are emerging in the pre-clinical setting, including the use of precursor T cells and thymus bioengineering. The use of such strategies offers hope that for many patients, the next regeneration of their thymus is a step closer. PMID:27088907

  6. Apoptosis in thymus of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Romano, Nicla; Ceccarelli, Giuseppina; Caprera, Cecilia; Caccia, Elisabetta; Baldassini, Maria Rosaria; Marino, Giovanna

    2013-08-01

    The presence and distribution of apoptotic cells during thymus development and in adult were studied by in situ end-labelling of fragmented DNA in three temperate species carp (Cyprinus carpio), sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus) and in the adult thymus of three Antarctic species belonging to the genus Trematomus spp. During thymus development some few isolated apoptotic cell (AC) firstly appeared in the central-external part of the organ (carp: 5 days ph; sea bass: 35 days ph grouper: 43 days ph). Initially the cells were isolated and then increased in number and aggregated in small groups in the outer-cortical region of the thymus larvae. The high density of apoptotic cells was observed in the junction between cortex and medulla from its appearance (border between cortex and medulla, BCM). ACs decreased in number in juveniles and adult as well as the ACs average diameter. In late juveniles and in adulthood, the apoptosis were restricted to the cortex. In Antarctic species the thymus is highly adapted to low temperature (high vascularisation to effort the circulation of glycoproteins enriched plasma and strongly compact parenchyma). The apoptosis process was more extended (4-7 fold) as compare with the thymus of temperate species, even if the distribution of ACs was similar in all examined species. Data suggested a common process of T lymphocyte negative-selection in BCM of thymus during the ontogeny. The selection process seems to be still active in adult polar fish, but restricted mainly in the cortex zone.

  7. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  8. T-cell reconstitution after thymus xenotransplantation induces hair depigmentation and loss.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-05-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG(-/-) recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens.

  9. T-Cell Reconstitution after Thymus Xenotransplantation Induces Hair Depigmentation and Loss

    PubMed Central

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG−/− recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens. PMID:23303453

  10. [Safety of promestriene capsule used in postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-jun; Lin, Shou-qing; Jing, Lian-hong; Wang, Zi-yi; Ye, Jia-lin; Zhang, Ying

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of promestriene capsule used in the treatment of postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis. Fifty-three women at age of 45 - 75 years (more than one year history of menopause) diagnosed with postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis were enrolled in self-control study. They all had typicalsymptoms of postmenopausal vaginitis. Promestriene was given by continuous therapy for 20 days, then maintenance therapy for for 8 weeks (1 pill two times per week used). The level of follicle stimulation hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E(2)) in serum was and thickness of endometrium were detected before and after treatment. The routine biochemical test was used as index to monitoring the safety. The vaginal mature index (VMI), the atrophic vaginitis evaluating score and vaginal healthy evaluating score were evaluated for therapeutic effect. In the mean time, adverse effect was recorded. (1) SAFETY: during promestriene treatment, no case with adverse effect was observed. Before treatment, the mean level of FSH and E(2) was (71 +/- 3) U/L and (41 +/- 18) pmol/L, the mean thickness of endometrium was (2.4 +/- 0.9) mm. After treatment, the mean level of FSH and E(2) was (67 +/- 22) U/L and (43 +/- 37) pmol/L, the mean thickness of endometrium was (2.5 +/- 1.3) mm. No significant difference was observed (P > 0.05). (2) Therapeutic effect: VMI were 42 +/- 15 before and 54 +/- 8 after treatment. The atrophic vaginitis evaluating score were 3.4 +/- 1.7 before and 1.5 +/- 1.4 after treatment. Vaginal healthy evaluating score were 7.8 +/- 2.4 before and 12.0 +/- 2.4 after treatment. They all showed significant difference (P < 0.01). (3) Adverse effect: six cases with vaginal bleeding, 3 cases with breast nodules and 1 case with cervical polyp was observed, however, it was uncertain whether those events were associated with promestriene use. The premestriene capsule was safe and effective in the treatment of postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis.

  11. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  12. [Development of the thymus and immune system].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Naoko; Nitta, Takeshi; Takahama, Yousuke

    2011-07-01

    A repertoire of T cells is primarily formed in the thymus through positive and negative selection of developing thymocytes. The medullary region of the thymus provides a microenvironment that is essential for the establishment of self-tolerance via the depletion of self-reactive T cells and the production of regulatory T cells. Within the medullary microenvironment, medullary thymic epithelial cells play a pivotal role in the establishment of self-tolerance, via the promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted self-antigens and the chemokine-mediated attraction of positively selected T cells from the cortex to the medulla. Positive selection also induces the expression of TNF-superfamily cytokines and thereby nurtures the growth and development of medullary thymic epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of how the thymus contributes to the development and selection of T cells, with emphasis on the establishment of self-tolerance in the thymic medulla.

  13. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of thymus and fat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gui C.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Reid, V.; Steinglass, K.; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Jacobowitz, Larry; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of the human thymus gland and surrounding mediastinal fat were measured to evaluate this approach in distinguishing between thymus and fat tissues during therapeutic surgery for myasthenia gravis disease.

  14. What Are the Key Statistics about Thymus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer About Thymus Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Thymus Cancers? Although thymic tumors are the ... number diagnosed each year is not known). Survival statistics for thymomas are discussed in Survival rates for ...

  15. Chronic atrophic gastritis in association with hair mercury level.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zeyun; Xue, Huiping; Jiang, Jianlan; Lin, Bing; Zeng, Si; Huang, Xiaoyun; An, Jianfu

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore hair mercury level in association with chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous stage of gastric cancer (GC), and thus provide a brand new angle of view on the timely intervention of precancerous stage of GC. We recruited 149 healthy volunteers as controls and 152 patients suffering from chronic gastritis as cases. The controls denied upper gastrointestinal discomforts, and the cases were diagnosed as chronic superficial gastritis (n=68) or chronic atrophic gastritis (n=84). We utilized Mercury Automated Analyzer (NIC MA-3000) to detect hair mercury level of both healthy controls and cases of chronic gastritis. The statistic of measurement data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, which was analyzed using Levene variance equality test and t test. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to determine associated factors affecting hair mercury levels, and multiple stepwise regression analysis was performed to deduce regression equations. Statistical significance is considered if p value is less than 0.05. The overall hair mercury level was 0.908949 ± 0.8844490 ng/g [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] in gastritis cases and 0.460198 ± 0.2712187 ng/g (mean±SD) in healthy controls; the former level was significantly higher than the latter one (p=0.000<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis subgroup was 1.155220 ± 0.9470246 ng/g (mean ± SD) and that in chronic superficial gastritis subgroup was 0.604732 ± 0.6942509 ng/g (mean ± SD); the former level was significantly higher than the latter level (p<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic superficial gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.05). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.01). Stratified analysis indicated that the hair mercury level in healthy controls with eating seafood was significantly higher than that in healthy

  16. [Clinico-morphological variants of gastric mucosa atrophic lesions].

    PubMed

    Naumova, L A; Pal'tsev, A I; Beliaeva, Ia Iu

    2009-01-01

    To characterize clinicomorphological manifestations of atrophic process (AP) in gastric mucosa (GM) in chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) associated and not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Clinicoendoscopic and pathomorphological (light microscopy of gastric biopsies, 6 point scale assessment of dysregeneratory alterations) investigations were made in 98 patients aged 16 to 68 years. H. pylori-negative CAG was diagnosed in 52 of them, H. pylori-positive one in 46 patients (groups 1 and 2, respectively). A comparative clinicomorphological analysis has identified 2 variants of AP morphogenesis in GM. Variant 1 is not associated with H. pylori but associated with a combined action of several endogenic risk factors of chronic gastritis or failure of regeneration, with diffuse or diffuse-focal changes with initial prevalence of dysregeneratory changes in a fundal stomach manifesting as a trend to atrophy of the glands. Clinically, this variant is characterized by longer disease, frequent systemic atrophic lesions of gastrointestinal mucosa, prevalent complaints of dyspeptic pain. Variant 2 is associated with a combined action of endo- and exogenic factors, H. pylori infection in particular, pathogenetic components of "chemical" gastritis (duodenogastric reflux, malnutrition), prevalence of dysregeneratory and sclerotic alterations in the antral stomach. GM atrophy is characterized by a significant frequency of concomitant endocrinopathies, undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia, systemic lesions, structurally--by multidirectional disorders of proliferation and differentiation. First of all, it is the result of impaired regulation of regenerative processes. AP polyetiology and different morphogenetic variants in GM suggest necessity of both individual diagnostic algorithm and pathogenetically sound therapy in each individual case.

  17. A retrospective study of patients with recurrent chronic atrophic candidosis.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; MacFarlane, T W

    1981-08-01

    A retrospective study was carried out in thirty-seven patients who had recurrent chronic atrophic candidosis (CAC). The factors commonly believed to predispose to CAC were investigated, including corrected whole blood folate, iron saturation, and vitamin B12. The incidence of CAC based on clinical and microbiologic criteria was assessed before and after antifungal therapy and correction of predisposing factors. No significant difference was found. Hence, the role of additional, less well-known predisposing factors in the etiopathology of CAC should be considered when one is treating patients with recurrent, chronic Candida infections.

  18. FOXN1 in thymus organogenesis and development

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Harsh Jayesh; Briones Leon, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Development of the primary T‐cell repertoire takes place in the thymus. The linked processes of T‐cell differentiation and T‐cell repertoire selection each depend on interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells; in particular, with the epithelial cells of the cortical and medullary thymic compartments (cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells; cTECs and mTECs, respectively). The importance of the thymic epithelial cell lineage in these processes was revealed in part through analysis of nude (nu/nu) mice, which are congenitally hairless and athymic. The nude phenotype results from null mutation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXN1, which has emerged as a pivotal regulator both of thymus development and homeostasis. FOXN1 has been shown to play critical roles in thymus development, function, maintenance, and even regeneration, which positions it as a master regulator of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) differentiation. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the regulation and functions of FOXN1 throughout thymus ontogeny, from the earliest stages of organogenesis through homeostasis to age‐related involution, contextualising its significance through reference to other members of the wider Forkhead family. PMID:27378598

  19. FOXN1 in thymus organogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Harsh Jayesh; Briones Leon, Alberto; Blackburn, C Clare

    2016-08-01

    Development of the primary T-cell repertoire takes place in the thymus. The linked processes of T-cell differentiation and T-cell repertoire selection each depend on interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells; in particular, with the epithelial cells of the cortical and medullary thymic compartments (cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells; cTECs and mTECs, respectively). The importance of the thymic epithelial cell lineage in these processes was revealed in part through analysis of nude (nu/nu) mice, which are congenitally hairless and athymic. The nude phenotype results from null mutation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXN1, which has emerged as a pivotal regulator both of thymus development and homeostasis. FOXN1 has been shown to play critical roles in thymus development, function, maintenance, and even regeneration, which positions it as a master regulator of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) differentiation. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the regulation and functions of FOXN1 throughout thymus ontogeny, from the earliest stages of organogenesis through homeostasis to age-related involution, contextualising its significance through reference to other members of the wider Forkhead family. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. [Characteristics of the pineal gland and thymus relationship in aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Kvetnoĭ, I M; Trofimov, A V; Sevost'ianova, N N

    2011-01-01

    The review presents the interference between thymus and pineal gland during their involution. The research data of thymus peptides influence on pineal gland and pineal peptides on thymus are summarized. Analysis of these data showed that pineal peptides (Epithalamin, Epitalon) had more effective geroprotective effect on thymus involution in comparison with geroprotective effect of thymic peptides (Thymalin, Thymogen) on involution of pineal gland. The key mechanisms of pineal peptides effect on thymus dystrophy is immunoendocrine cooperation, which is realized as transcription's activation of various proteins.

  1. TrkAIII expression in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, Antonella; Farina, Antonietta R; Cappabianca, Lucia; Cea, Gesilia; Panella, Sonia; Chioda, Antonella; Gallo, Rita; Cinque, Benedetta; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Campese, Antonio Francesco; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Mackay, Andrew R

    2007-02-01

    The alternative TrkAIII splice variant is expressed by murine and human thymus. Alternative TrkAIII splicing predominates in postembryonic day E13 (E17 and E18), postnatal murine (3 week and 3 month) and human thymuses, with TrkAIII mRNA expressed by selected thymocyte subsets and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a 100 kDa immunoprecipitable TrkAIII-like protein detected in purified thymocyte and whole thymus extracts. FACS and immunohistochemical analysis indicate a non-cell surface localisation for the TrkAIII-like protein in cortical CD4+/CD8+ double positive and, to a lesser extent, single positive thymocyte subsets at the cortex/medulla boundary and in Hassle's corpuscles, reticular epithelial and dendritic cells of the thymic medulla. TrkA(I/II) expression, on the other hand, predominates in sub-capsular regions of the thymus. TrkAIII-like immunoreactivity at the cortex/medulla boundary associates with regions of thymocyte proliferation and not apoptosis. A potential role for thymic hypoxia in thymocyte alternative TrkAIII splicing is supported by reversal to TrkAI splicing by normoxic but not hypoxic culture and induction of Jurkat T cell alternative TrkAIII splicing by the hypoxia mimic CoCl2. In contrast, TEC expression of TrkAIII predominates in both normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. The data support a potential role for TrkAIII in thymic development and function, of particular relevance to intermediate stage CD4+/CD8+ thymocyte subsets and TECs, which potentially reflects a reversible thymocyte and more permanent TEC adaptation to thymic environment. Since intracellular TrkAIII neither binds nor responds to NGF and can impede regular NGF/TrkA signalling (Tacconelli et al., Cancer Cell, 2004), its expression would be expected to provide an alternative and/or impediment to regular NGF/TrkA signalling within the developing and developed thymus of potential functional importance.

  2. Zygomatic Implant Subjected to Immediate Loading for Atrophic Maxilla Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Silva, Gustavo Henrique Souza; Da Silva Pereira, Fernanda Rayssa; da Silva, Raquel Damazia; Campos, Mirella Lindoso Gomes; Mattos, Thiago Borges; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos

    2016-10-14

    As life expectancy increases, a larger number of elderly people require dental health care attention for implant-supported rehabilitation, with the aim of restoring the function and aesthetics of the oral cavity. Most of these patients have lost their teeth long time ago, causing a severe bone resorption and maxillary sinus pneumatization. Therefore, the current study aims to demonstrate, through the description of the clinical case, the treatment with zygomatic implants as an option for treating severely atrophic maxillas. In this clinical study, the patient presented, in the clinical and image evaluation, severe alveolar bone atrophy, with height and thickness loss, in addition to a high-level pneumatization of the maxillary sinus, bilaterally. The classical zygomatic fixation technique was suggested, with 2 anterior conventional implants and 2 zygomatic implants in the posterior region with the placement of implant-supported prosthesis with immediate loading. The patient was monitored for 7 years and did not present pain complaints, absence of infection, or implant loss. Based on this clinical case study, it was concluded that the zygomatic implants are satisfactory options to aid the implant-supported rehabilitation of atrophic maxillas.

  3. Zygomatic Implant Subjected to Immediate Loading for Atrophic Maxilla Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Silva, Gustavo Henrique Souza; Da Silva Pereira, Fernanda Rayssa; da Silva, Raquel Damazia; Campos, Mirella Lindoso Gomes; Mattos, Thiago Borges; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos

    2016-11-01

    As life expectancy increases, a larger number of elderly people require dental health care attention for implant-supported rehabilitation, with the aim of restoring the function and aesthetics of the oral cavity. Most of these patients have lost their teeth long time ago, causing a severe bone resorption and maxillary sinus pneumatization. Therefore, the current study aims to demonstrate, through the description of the clinical case, the treatment with zygomatic implants as an option for treating severely atrophic maxillas. In this clinical study, the patient presented, in the clinical and image evaluation, severe alveolar bone atrophy, with height and thickness loss, in addition to a high-level pneumatization of the maxillary sinus, bilaterally. The classical zygomatic fixation technique was suggested, with 2 anterior conventional implants and 2 zygomatic implants in the posterior region with the placement of implant-supported prosthesis with immediate loading. The patient was monitored for 7 years and did not present pain complaints, absence of infection, or implant loss. Based on this clinical case study, it was concluded that the zygomatic implants are satisfactory options to aid the implant-supported rehabilitation of atrophic maxillas.

  4. Flattening of atrophic acne scars by using tretinoin by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Knor, Tanja

    2004-01-01

    Atrophic scars are a frequent consequence of acne, with a negative esthetic and psychological influence. Treatment of atrophic acne scars includes different invasive methods. In our study, we used a noninvasive method with local application of 0.05% tretinoin gel by iontophoresis. In patients with a tendency towards exacerbation, we performed mild peeling with 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution 3-4 times during the treatment. Twenty-minute treatments were applied on 38 patients, 29 women and 9 men, during 3.5 months on average. Median age of patients was 21 years (range, 16-29). Clinical assessment included an assessment of scars, pore size, skin moisture, vascularization, and skin firmness and elasticity. As confirmed by photographs taken before and after therapy, the treatment proved to be clinically effective in decreasing acne scars and persistence of effects. Flattening of acne scars was observed in 79% of the patients. The results depended on duration of scars persistence as well as on a the type of scars. The best results were achieved with younger scars as well as with superficial and ice pick scars. Side effects involved a very mild retinoid dermatitis and more often acne exacerbation. The therapy was clinically effective and the patients accepted the treatment very easily. Local therapy of acne scars with tretinoin by iontophoresis can in some cases successfully replace invasive techniques, and could also be combined with those techniques.

  5. [Thymus dependent immunity against Tyzzer's disease in the mouse].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Machii, K; Nakayama, M; Tamura, T; Ueda, K

    1977-01-01

    Nude (nu/nu) mice fail to resist to challenge infection of Tyzzer's disease after pretreatment with formalin-killed organisms that was effective for protecting heterozygous haired (nu/ł) mice from challenge. Resistance was induced nu/nu mice after the transfer of spleen cells from immunized nu/ł and concomitant formalin vaccine treatment.

  6. The mystery of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel; Ellis, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The thymus is the last organ in the human body to have its mechanisms fully understood, having had its function fully delineated more than 50 years ago (Miller , Tissue Antigens 63:509-517). Prior to this, the thymus gland has had an interesting history with theories having included a role in fetal growth and development before becoming more sinisterly, a cause of sudden infant death in the late 19th century known as status lymphaticus (Paltauf , Wien Klin Wochenschr 2:877-881). Until Miller (, Lancet 278:748-749) eventually proved its primarily immunological role, the history of this mysterious gland has closely mirrored the history of medicine itself, troubling the minds of pathologists such as Virchow (, Ueber die Chlorose und die damit zusammenhängenden Anomalien im Gefässapparate, insbesondere über "Endocarditis puerperalis," vorgetragen in der Sitzung der Berliner Geburtshülflichen Gesellschaft vom 12) and Grawitz (, Deut Med Wochenschr 22:429-431), surgeons such as Astley Cooper (, The Anatomy of the Thymus Gland) and Keynes (1953, Ann R Coll Surg 12:88), and eminent medical epidemiologists such as Greenwood and Woods [, J Hyg (Lond) 26:305-326]. This article will hopefully be of interest therefore to both clinician and historian alike. Clin. Anat. 29:679-684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New Patient-Oriented Tools for Assessing Atrophic Acne Scarring.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alison; Dréno, Brigitte; Finlay, Andrew Y; Thiboutot, Diane; Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bourdès, Valerie; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Petit, Laurent; Tan, Jerry

    2016-06-01

    Scarring on visible areas such as the face is associated with negative psychological impact. Many patients with acne have clinically relevant scarring for which they seek treatment, implying that there is an impact on their lives. Currently there are no validated tools to assess the burden of atrophic acne scarring from the patient's perspective or to assess treatment benefit. Two patient-reported outcome measures, the self-assessment of clinical acne-related scars (SCARS) and the facial acne scar quality of life (FASQoL) tools, both specific to facial atrophic acne scarring, were developed according to Food and Drug Administration guidance methodology. Patient interviews were conducted first to elicit patient-important concepts about scarring, then to validate patients' understanding of wording in the tools. These tools focus on symptoms (SCARS) and psychological and social well-being (FASQoL) and were designed to be suitable for self-completion and to be rapidly completed (2-5 min) within a clinical research setting. Concept elicitation interviews were conducted with 30 subjects and cognitive interviews with 20 subjects. With acne scarring, important concepts for patients included size, surface area affected, counts, and depth. The SCARS and FASQoL tools were shown to address relevant concepts that were easily understood by patients. Two patient-reported measures, SCARS and FASQoL, have been developed to help clinicians assess the severity and impact of acne scars. Responsivity of these instruments to treatment will require further evaluation. Galderma R&D, Sophia Antipolis, France.

  8. Rehabilitation of atrophic maxilla: a review of 101 zygomatic implants.

    PubMed

    Pi Urgell, Joan; Revilla Gutiérrez, Verónica; Gay Escoda, Cosme Gay

    2008-06-01

    Zygomatic implants are a good rehabilitation alternative for upper maxilla with severe bone reabsorption. These implants reduce the need for onlay-type bone grafting in the posterior sectors and for maxillary sinus lift procedures - limiting the use of bone grafts to the anterior zone of the upper jaw in those cases where grafting is considered necessary. To evaluate the survival of 101 zygomatic implants placed in upper maxilla presenting important bone reabsorption, with a follow-up of 1-72 months. A retrospective study was made of 101 Zygoma(R) implants (Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden) placed in 54 patients with totally edentulous and atrophic upper maxilla, in the period between 1998-2004. There were 35 women and 19 men, subjected to rehabilitation in the form of fixed prostheses and overdentures using 1-2 zygomatic implants and 2-7 implants in the anterior maxillary zone. The principal study variables were smoking, a history of sinusitis, the degree of bone reabsorption, and peri-implant bone loss, among others. The descriptive analysis of the 101 zygomatic implants placed in 54 patients with a mean age of 56 years (range 38-75) yielded a percentage survival of 96.04%, with four failed implants that were removed (two before and two after prosthetic loading). Nine patients were smokers, and none of the 54 subjects reported a history of sinus disorders. Zygomatic implants are designed for use in compromised upper maxilla. They allow the clinician to shorten the treatment time, affording an interesting alternative for fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. This study confirms that zygomatic bone offers predictable anchorage and acceptable support function for prostheses in atrophic jaws. However, these implants are not without complications. Longer-term evaluations are needed of zygomatic implant survival in order to establish a correct clinical prognosis.

  9. Atrophic rhinitis: a CFD study of air conditioning in the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Bailie, Neil; Martins, Dário A; Kimbell, Julia S

    2007-09-01

    Atrophic rhinitis is a chronic disease of the nasal mucosa. The disease is characterized by abnormally wide nasal cavities, and its main symptoms are dryness, crusting, atrophy, fetor, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. The etiology of the disease remains unknown. Here, we propose that excessive evaporation of the mucous layer is the basis for the relentless nature of this disease. Airflow and water and heat transport were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The nasal geometry of an atrophic rhinitis patient was acquired from computed tomography scans before and after a procedure to narrow the nasal cavity. Simulations of air conditioning in the atrophic nose were compared with similar computations performed within the nasal geometries of four healthy humans. The excessively wide cavity of the patient generated abnormal flow patterns, which led to abnormal patterns of water fluxes across the wall. Geometrically, the atrophic nose had a much lower surface area than the healthy nasal passages, which increased water fluxes per unit area. Nevertheless, the simulations indicated that the atrophic nose did not condition inspired air as effectively as the healthy geometries. These simulations of water transport in the nasal cavity are consistent with the hypothesis that excessive evaporation of mucus plays a key role in the pathophysiology of atrophic rhinitis. We conclude that the main goals of a surgery to treat atrophic rhinitis should be 1) to restore the original surface area of the nose, 2) to restore the physiological airflow distribution, and 3) to create symmetric cavities.

  10. Protective effects of heat shock protein70 induced by geranylgeranylacetone in atrophic gastritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-li; Chen, Shu-jie; Chen, Yan; Sun, Lei-min; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Ya-min; Zhou, Tian-hua; Si, Jian-min

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) on the progression of atrophic gastritis in rats and its potential mechanism. Atrophic gastritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats with 0.1% ammonia solution, 60% ethanol, and 20 mmol/L deoxycholic acid for 24 weeks. Accompanied by the induction of atrophic gastritis, 200 mg/kg GGA was administered by oral gavage for 8 weeks (weeks 17-24). The histological changes in gastric mucosa were quantitated by the index of inflammation, the gastric mucosal thickness, and the amount of glands of 1 mm horizontal length in antrum. Endogenous heat shock protein (HSP)70 levels and distribution were determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in gastric mucosa. GGA alleviated the pathological progression of atrophic gastritis with inflammation relief (inflammation index: 1.40 in the GGA group and 1.65 in the atrophic gastritis group) and glandular restoration (mucosal thickness and quantity of glands: 194.3 microm and 38.7 mm in the GGA group; 123.3 microm and 32.7 mm in the atrophic gastritis group; P<0.05). GGA significantly induced HSP70 synthesis (P<0.05). Moreover, quercetin, an inhibitor of HSP70 expression, aggravated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and glandular loss in the antrum. GGA prevented the progression of atrophic gastritis in rats via the induction of HSP70 expression.

  11. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  12. Histological Features and Biocompatibility of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitutes in the Atrophic Alveolar Ridge Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rancitelli, Davide; Grossi, Giovanni Battista; Herford, Alan Scott

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atrophic alveolar ridges for implant placement is today a common procedure in dentistry daily practice. The surgical reconstruction provides for the optimization of the supporting bone for the implants and a restoration of the amount of keratinized gingiva for esthetic and functional reasons. In the past, tissue regeneration has been performed with autogenous bone and free gingival or connective tissue grafts. Nowadays, bone substitutes and specific collagen matrix allow for a complete restoration of the atrophic ridge without invasive harvesting procedures. A maxillary reconstruction of an atrophic ridge by means of tissue substitutes and its histological features are then presented. PMID:27022489

  13. Induction of T-Cell Differentiation In Vitro by Thymin, a Purified Polypeptide Hormone of the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ross S.; Goldstein, Gideon

    1974-01-01

    Thymin, a purified polypeptide isolated from bovine thymus, was shown to induce the expression of differentiation antigens characteristic of thymocytes [TL and Thy-1 (θ)] when incubated in vitro with mouse bone marrow or spleen cells. This induction occurred in 5-10% of the cells from bone marrow after a 2-hr incubation with subnanogram concentrations of thymin. The induced cells expressed more TL and Thy-1 (θ) antigens than average normal thymocytes. PMID:4545430

  14. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization.

  15. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7−/−CCR9−/− (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160–200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  16. Immunotoxic effects of thymus in mice following exposure to nanoparticulate TiO2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fashui; Zhou, Yaoming; Zhou, Yingjun; Wang, Ling

    2017-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been extensively used in industry, medicine, and daily life, and have shown potential toxic effects for animals or humans. We noted that the effects of TiO2 NPs on the immune system and its mechanism of action in animals or humans have not been elucidated. Thus, mice were exposed to the TiO2 NPs (0, 1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg kg(-1) body weight) for 9 consecutive months. Exposure to TiO2 NPs was accumulated in the thymus, leading to a decrease in body weight and increases in the weight of the thymus or thymus indices. In the blood, exposure to TiO2 NPs significantly decreased white blood cell, red blood cell, reticulocyte, haemoglobin, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration; and increased mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, platelets, and mean platelet volume. The reductions of lymphocyte subsets, including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, and natural killer cell, were observed in the TiO2 NP-treated mouse thymus. Appearance of starry-sky aspect of the cortex that is given by the body of macrophages, bleeding, severe hemolysis or congestion, fatty degeneration, and cell apoptosis or necrosis were observed in the thymus following TiO2 NPs exposure. Importantly, TiO2 NPs increased expression of nucleic factor-κB(NF-κB), IκB kinase1/2, interleukin-1β, interleukin -4, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, cyclooxygenase 2, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, purinergic receptors-7, interferon-inducible protein 10, hypoxia inducible factor 1-α, p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p-p38, and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein, respectively; whereas suppressed expression of IκB, peroxisome proliferater-activated receptor-γ, trefoil factor 1, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, and prostaglandin E2 proteins in the thymus, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that TiO2 NPs exerts toxic effects on lymphoid organs and T cell

  17. Quantification of scar margin in keloid different from atrophic scar by multiphoton microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Chen, Jianxin; Lin, Bifang

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was applied to examine the marginal region at dermis of keloid compared with atrophic scar. High-resolution large-area image showed an obvious boundary at the scar margin and different morphological patterns of elastin and collagen on the two sides, further visualized by the focused three-dimensional images. Content alteration of elastin or collagen between the two sides of boundary was quantified to show significant difference between keloid and atrophic scar. Owing to the raised property of keloid with overproduced collagen on the scar side, the content alteration was positive for elastin and negative for collagen. On the contrary, the content alteration was negative for elastin and positive for collagen in the atrophic scar case due to the atrophic collagen on the scar side. It indicated that examination of the scar margin by MPM may lead a new way to discriminate different types of scars and better understand the scarring mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Analogies between the thymus and epidermis].

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, G

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, similarities between epidermis and thymus are reviewed. Both epidermis and thymus deal with an epithelial stroma harbouring dendritic cells, which are bone-marrow derived. Both epithelia are keratinized, and a map can be constructed illustrating histo-topographic and antigenic similarities between thymic epithelial cells distributed in various thymic zones (i.e. subcapsular cortex, outer cortex, inner cortex, medulla, outer layers of Hassall's bodies, inner layers of Hassall's bodies) and keratinocytes of different epidermal layers. By contrast, a possible similarity between thymocytes and Langerhans cells is not so easy to demonstrate, although both cell types are CD1 positive. Rather, in our opinion a comparison is preferable of thymocytes to Thy-1 positive dendritic epidermal cells, due to morphological, antigenic, functional and especially lineage similarities. Similarities between thymus and epidermis are clearly important dealing with analogous molecular interactions, namely, thymic epithelial cells/thymocytes versus keratinocytes/T-lymphocytes. Indeed, our recent investigations demonstrated that a subset of keratinocytes is ICAM-1 positive, and the whole keratinocyte population is LFA-3 positive. Since the interaction thymic epithelial cells (ICAM-1 and LFA-3 positive)/thymocytes (LFA-1 and CD2 positive) has been shown to be necessary for promotion of activation and maturation of thymocytes, the interaction keratinocytes (ICAM-1 and LFA-3 positive, as we demonstrated)/T-lymphocytes (LFA-1 and CD2 positive as well) might be, by analogy, important not only for the "homing" of T-lymphocytes within the epidermis, but also for the epidermis being considered a peripheral inductive site for T-cell activation and maturation.

  19. Horizontal Ridge Augmentation with Piezoelectric Hinge-Assisted Ridge Split Technique in the Atrophic Posterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Min-Sang; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Sang-Woon; Cho, Lee-Ra; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Lee, You-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Onlay bone grafting, guided bone regeneration, and alveolar ridge split technique are considered reliable bone augmentation methods on the horizontally atrophic alveolar ridge. Among these techniques, alveolar ridge split procedures are technique-sensitive and difficult to perform in the posterior mandible. This case report describes successful implant placement with the use of piezoelectric hinge-assisted ridge split technique in an atrophic posterior mandible. PMID:27489822

  20. Bilateral atrophic squirrhus of breast in neglected breast cancer: case report

    PubMed Central

    Louati, Doulira; Trigui, Khaled; Abid, Donia; Kammoun, Salma; Dermech, Manel; Chaabane, Kais; Amouri, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The atrophic squirrhus carcinoma is an advanced form of breast cancer, which is most often neglected by patients. These days it has become very rare. The bilaterality of this form is even more exceptional. We present a case of atrophic squirrhus breast cancer of a 58 years old woman, rural origin, which is particular for its bilaterality and rapid evolution causing the death after 22 months from the first abnormal functional sign. PMID:25883743

  1. Sonographic measurement of fetal thymus size in uncomplicated singleton pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Tangshewinsirikul, Chayada; Panburana, Panyu

    2017-03-04

    To establish sonographic reference ranges of the normal fetal thymus size between 17 and 38 weeks of gestational age (GA). The study was conducted between April 1 and December 31, 2013. Low-risk singleton pregnancies without obstetrical and medical complications at the GAs between 17 and 38 weeks were recruited for thymus measurement. The fetal thymus was identified on transabdominal sonography at the three-vessel view. Maximal transverse diameter, perimeter, and thymus/thoracic ratio were measured. The best-fit models in predicting thymic dimensions as a function of GA and biparietal diameter (BPD) were determined using regression analysis, and percentile charts for predicting thymic dimensions were constructed. A total of 296 singleton pregnancies were recruited in this study. Maximal transverse diameter, perimeter, and thymus/thoracic ratio increased throughout pregnancy. The regression equation for maximal transverse diameter of the thymus as a function of GA was as follows: Predicted mean thymus diameter (mm) = -25.904 + 2.476 × GA - 0.019 × GA(2) (r = 0.915; p < 0.001) with predicted standard deviations of thymus diameter (mm) = 1.428 + 0.044 × GA (r = 0.017; p < 0.001). Sonographic reference ranges of the normal fetal thymic dimensions between 17 and 38 weeks of GA have been established. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:150-159, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. T cells home to the thymus and control infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Claudia; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Cerqueira-Rodrigues, Bruno; Roque, Susana; Barreira-Silva, Palmira; Behar, Samuel M.; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    The thymus is a target of multiple pathogens. How the immune system responds to thymic infection is largely unknown. Despite being considered an immune privileged organ, we detect a mycobacteria-specific T cell response in the thymus following dissemination of Mycobacterium avium or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This response includes pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mycobacteria-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which stimulates infected cells and controls bacterial growth in the thymus. Importantly, the responding T cells are mature peripheral T cells that recirculate back to the thymus. The recruitment of these cells is associated with an increased expression of Th1 chemokines and an enrichment of CXCR3+ mycobacteria-specific T cells in the thymus. Finally, we demonstrate it is the mature T cells that home to the thymus that most efficiently control mycobacterial infection. Although the presence of mature T cells in the thymus has been recognized for some time, these data are the first to show that T cell recirculation from the periphery to the thymus is a mechanism that allows the immune system to respond to thymic infection. Maintaining a functional thymic environment is essential to maintain T cell differentiation and prevent the emergence of central tolerance to the invading pathogens. PMID:23315077

  3. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate.

  4. Immunological studies in chronic atrophic gastritis and chronic (superficial) gastritis.

    PubMed

    Fung, W P; Rigby, R J; Trenchev, P; Matz, L R

    1978-01-01

    Detection of autoantibodies, HLA typing and immunofluorescence studies on gastric biopsies were carried out in subjects with histologically proven chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and chronic superficial gastritis (CG). All were seronegative for parietal cell antibody and did not have pernicious anemia. Except for positive antismooth muscle and antimitochrondrial antibodies in one patient with CAG, autoantibodies (antinuclear, smooth muscle, mitochrondrial, parietal cell) were absent in patients with CAG and CG. Immunofluorescence studies showed that Ig-G and IgA were presented in the lamina propria of all cases with CAG or CG and of subjects with normal gastric histology. Ig-M was seen less often, in about half the cases. Complement C3 was an uncommon finding, being positive in only one case with CAG and one case with CG and in none of the cases with normal gastric histology. Fibrinogen was more commonly seen in patients with CG (5/5 cases) than in those with CAG (3/11 cases). Fibrinogen was found in one case with normal gastric histology. The most consistent fluorescence was obtained with antiparietal cell antiserum. All subjects with CAG showed negative or weak staining only. In contrast, subjects with CG and normal gastric histology had strong specific fluorescence. An increased frequency of HLA-A1 plus HLA-B8 was found in subjects with CAG (20.7% in controls; 40% in CAG).

  5. Rehabilitation of atrophic posterior maxilla with zygomatic implants: review.

    PubMed

    Candel-Martí, Eugenia; Carrillo-García, Celia; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review the published literature to evaluate treatment success with zygomatic implants in patients with atrophic posterior maxilla. Studies from 1987 to 2010 were reviewed. In each study, the following were assessed: indications for treatment, number of patients, number of implants, length and diameter of the implants, surgical technique, prosthetic rehabilitation, success rate, complications, and patient satisfaction. Sixteen studies were included, with a total of 941 zygomatic implants placed in 486 patients. The follow-up periods ranged from 12 to 120 months. Three different surgical techniques were used to place zygomatic implants: intrasinus implants with the classic sinus window technique, the sinus slot technique, and extrasinus zygomatic implants. The most common restoration used was fixed prosthesis, with either delayed loading after 3-6 months (89%-100% success) or immediate loading (96.37%-100% success). The weighted average success rate was 97.05%, and the most frequent complication was maxillary sinusitis. The general level of patient satisfaction was high. Zygomatic implants have a high success rate and constitute a suitable alternative to treat severe posterior maxillary atrophy.

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45–0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93–11.99), and the AUC was 0.82. G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:27149493

  7. Thymus and adrenal glands in elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Bunai, Yasuo; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Ogata, Mamoru

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution is generally considered to be an important finding for determining child abuse. The present study investigated the weight of the thymus and the adrenal glands in elder abuse cases to identify a potential marker for elder abuse. There was no significant difference in the thymus and the adrenal weight between elder abuse and control cases. However, the elder abuse cases in which the duration of abuse was less than 3 months showed a significant increase in the adrenal weight in comparison to control cases. In such cases, histopathological findings showed a loss of intracellular light granules from the zona fasciculata, which might indicate a loss of cholesterol due to the overproduction of glucocorticoid. These results might imply that the elderly, who were maltreated for less than 3 months, were in the early phase of a long-term stress state during which stress-induced overproduction of glucocorticoid was observed in adrenal glands as indicated by Selye. Our results suggest that an increase in adrenal weight may be a potential marker for elder abuse of relatively short periods, especially less than a few months.

  8. MAFbx/Atrogin-1 is required for atrophic remodeling of the unloaded heart

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Kedryn K.; Rodriguez, Meredith R.; Kansara, Seema; Chen, Wenhao; Carranza, Sylvia; Frazier, O. Howard; Glass, David J.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical unloading of the failing human heart induces profound cardiac changes resulting in the reversal of a distorted structure and function. In this process, cardiomyocytes break down unneeded proteins and replace those with new ones. The specificity of protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system is regulated by ubiquitin ligases. Over-expressing the ubiquitin ligase MAFbx/Atrogin-1 in the heart inhibits the development of cardiac hypertrophy, but the role of MAFbx/Atrogin-1 in the unloaded heart is not known. Methods and Results Mechanical unloading, by heterotopic transplantation, decreased heart weight and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in wild type mouse hearts. Unexpectedly, MAFbx/Atrogin-1−/− hearts hypertrophied after transplantation (n=8–10). Proteasome activity and markers of autophagy were increased to the same extent in WT and MAFbx/Atrogin-1−/− hearts after transplantation (unloading). Calcineurin, a regulator of cardiac hypertrophy, was only upregulated in MAFbx/Atrogin-1−/− transplanted hearts, while the mTOR pathway was similarly activated in unloaded WT and MAFbx/Atrogin-1−/− hearts. MAFbx/Atrogin-1−/− cardiomyocytes exhibited increased calcineurin protein expression, NFAT transcriptional activity, and protein synthesis rates, while inhibition of calcineurin normalized NFAT activity and protein synthesis. Lastly, mechanical unloading of failing human hearts with a left ventricular assist device (n=18) also increased MAFbx/Atrogin-1 protein levels and expression of NFAT regulated genes. Conclusions MAFbx/Atrogin-1 is required for atrophic remodeling of the heart. During unloading, MAFbx/Atrogin-1 represses calcineurin-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, MAFbx/Atrogin-1 not only regulates protein degradation, but also reduces protein synthesis, exerting a dual role in regulating cardiac mass. PMID:24650875

  9. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  10. Stimulatory effect of HGF-overexpressing adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on thymus regeneration in a rat thymus involution model.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Han, Sei-Myoung; Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Mi-Eun; Lee, Jun-Sik; Seo, Kyoung-Won; Youn, Hwa-Young; Lee, Hee-Woo

    2014-10-01

    The thymus is the central lymphoid organ providing a unique and essential microenvironment for T-cell precursor development into mature functionally competent T-lymphocytes. Thus, it is important to develop the strategies for enhancing thymic regeneration from involution induced by a variety of clinical treatments and conditions. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes proliferation in a variety of cell types. We have used stem cell-based HGF gene therapy to enhance regeneration from acute thymic involution. HGF-overexpressing human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HGF-hATMSCs) were generated by liposomal transfection with the pMEX expression vector, constructed by inserting the HGF gene. Significantly increased HGF expression in these cells was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HGF produced by HGF-hATMSCs enhanced the proliferation of a mouse thymic epithelial cell line and the expression of interleukin-7 in vitro. We also examined the effect of HGF-hATMSCs on thymic regeneration in rats with acute thymic involution. Significant increases in thymus size and weight, as well as the number of thymocytes (especially, early thymocyte progenitors), were seen in the HGF-hATMSCs-treated rats compared to saline-treated control animals. A stimulatory effect of HGF-hATMSCs on thymic regeneration has therefore been shown, highlighting the clinical value of HGF-hATMSCs for treating thymic involution. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. THYMUS INDEPENDENCE OF A COLLAGEN-LIKE SYNTHETIC POLYPEPTIDE AND OF COLLAGEN, AND THE NEED FOR THYMUS AND BONE MARROW-CELL COOPERATION IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO GELATIN

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sara; Mozes, Edna; Maoz, Arieh; Sela, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Several inbred mouse strains were screened for their ability to respond to the ordered periodic collagen-like polymer (Pro-Gly-Pro)n, to the random copolymer (Pro66, Gly34)n, to the protein conjugate Pro-Gly-Pro-ovalbumin, to rat tail tendon collagen, rat tail tendon gelatin, and to Ascaris cuticle collagen. Differences were obtained in the magnitude of the antibody titers towards the above immunogens among the strains tested. The level of the response to the ordered polymer (Pro-Gly-Pro)n was not similar to that towards the random (Pro66, Gly34)n, confirming differences in the antigenic determinants of the two immunogens. The role of the thymus in the immune response to (Pro-Gly-Pro)n and (Pro66, Gly34)n as well as to two collagens and gelatin, was studied in order to find out a possible correlation with the structural features of the immunogens. Heavily irradiated recipients were injected with syngeneic thymocytes, marrow cells, or a mixture of both cell populations and were immunized with the above-mentioned antigens. An efficient immune response to the ordered collagen-like (Pro-Gly-Pro)n was obtained in the absence of transferred thymocytes. The thymus independence of (Pro-Gly-Pro)n was confirmed when thymectomized irradiated mice were used as recipients. In contrast with these results, cooperation between thymus and marrow cells was necessary in order to elicit an immune response to (Pro56, Gly34)n. Similarly, the immune response to the triple helical collagen was found to be independent of the thymus, whereas for an effective response to its denatured product, gelatin, thymus cells were required. These findings indicate that a unique three-dimensional structure of immunogens possessing repeating antigenic determinants plays an important role in determining the need for cell to cell interaction in order to elicit an antibody response. PMID:4128446

  12. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K.; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Brömme, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II–associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of αβ-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology. PMID:12925692

  13. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Bromme, Dieter

    2003-08-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of alphabeta-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology.

  14. Haematopoietic cell lines capable of colonizing the thymus following in vivo transfer expressed T-cell receptor gamma-gene immature mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, M; Oku, M; Ohta, S; Yamagata, T

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism by which progenitor T (pro-T) cells recognize and enter the thymus, an attempt was made to produce haematopoietic cell lines by the fusion of BALB/c nude mouse bone marrow or foetal liver cells (gestation 14 and 15 days) with AKR thymoma BW5147, thereby immortalizing cells with potency to colonize the thymus, a characteristic of pro-T cells rarely found in adult bone marrow or foetal liver. The hybridomas thus produced were classified according to the phenotype of surface markers, T-cell receptor (TcR) gene configuration and expression. All hybridomas were negative in the surface expression of T-cell markers such as TcR alpha beta, TcR gamma delta, CD3, CD4 and CD8. They had TcR beta-, gamma- and delta-genes, each with a different status with respect to configuration and transcription. Some possessed partially rearranged TcR genes and others expressed immature TcR mRNA. The cell lines were examined for their capacity to colonize the thymus following intravenous injection into recipient mice. It was found that the cells with capacity of colonizing the thymus expressed immature TcR delta mRNA, while the cell lines lacking TcR delta-genes did not home to the thymus. These findings imply that the potency for migrating to thymus is closely associated with the particular stage of prethymic cell differentiation which could be estimated by the analysis of TcR genes, and that some cell lines with the expression of TcR delta-gene mRNA and the ability to colonize the thymus are derived from pro-T cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1478683

  15. Early development of the thymus in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hoon; Williams, Allison; Hong, Chang-Soo; You, Youngjae; Senoo, Makoto; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Xenopus laevis has been a model of choice for comparative and developmental studies of the immune system, little is known about organogenesis of the thymus, a primary lymphoid organ in vertebrates. Here we examined the expression of three transcription factors that have been functionally associated with pharyngeal gland development, gcm2, hoxa3 and foxn1, and evaluated the neural crest contribution to thymus development. Results In most species Hoxa3 is expressed in the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm where it directs thymus formation. In Xenopus, the thymus primordium is derived from the second pharyngeal pouch endoderm, which is hoxa3-negative, suggesting that a different mechanism regulates thymus formation in frogs. Unlike other species foxn1 is not detected in the epithelium of the pharyngeal pouch in Xenopus, rather, its expression is initiated as thymic epithelial cell starts to differentiate and express MHC class II molecules. Using transplantation experiments we show that while neural crest cells populate the thymus primordia, they are not required for the specification and initial development of this organ or for T cell differentiation in frogs. Conclusions These studies provide novel information on early thymus development in Xenopus, and highlight a number of features that distinguish Xenopus from other organisms. PMID:23172757

  16. Neuropeptides of human thymus in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mignini, F; Sabbatini, M; D'Andrea, V; Cavallotti, C

    2011-05-01

    Human thymus of healthy subjects and patients affected by thymoma-associated Myastenia Gravis were studied in order to visualize and compare the morphological distributive pattern of four neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, neuropeptide Y, and neurotensin. Based on our observations, we formulated hypotheses on their relations in neuro-immunomodulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Immuno-histochemical staining for neuropeptides was performed and morphological and morphometrical analyses were conducted on healthy and diseased thymus. In normal thymus, a specific distributive pattern was observed for the several neuropeptide-positive nerves in different thymus lobular zones. In particular substance P-positive fibers were observed in subcapsular zone, specifically located into parenchyma, where they represent the almost total amount of fibers; neurotensin-positive fibers were observed primarily located in parenchyma than perivascular site of several thymus lobular zones, and more abundant the cortico-medullary and medullary zones. Instead VIP- and NPY-positive fibers were widely distributed in perivascular and parenchymal sites of several thymus lobular zones. In thymoma, the distribution of neuropeptide-positive fibers was quantitatively reduced, while cells immunopositive to VIP and substance P were quantitatively increased and dispersed. Observation of the perivascular and parenchymal distribution of the analyzed neuropeptides suggests evidence that a regulatory function is performed by nerves and cells that secrete neuropeptide into the thymus. The alteration of neuropeptide patterns in thymoma suggests that these neurotransmitters play a role in autoimmune diseases such as Myastenia Gravis.

  17. Differential proteomics of Helicobacter pylori associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; Zanussi, Stefania; Casarotto, Mariateresa; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Paolo; Cannizzaro, Renato; De Re, Valli

    2014-02-28

    Atrophic autoimmune gastritis (AAG) is a condition of chronic inflammation and atrophy of stomach mucosa, for which development can be partially triggered by the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (HP). HP can cause a variety of gastric diseases, such as duodenal ulcer (DU) or gastric cancer (GC). In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was used by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify differentially expressed proteins of HP strains isolated from patients with AAG, to identify markers of HP strain associated with AAG. Proteome profiles of HP isolated from GC or DU were used as a reference to compare proteomic levels. Proteomics analyses revealed 27 differentially expressed spots in AAG-associated HP in comparison with GC, whereas only 9 differential spots were found in AAG-associated HP profiles compared with DU. Proteins were identified after matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-TOF and peptide mass fingerprinting. Some AAG-HP differential proteins were common between DU- and GC-HP (peroxiredoxin, heat shock protein 70 [HSP70], adenosine 5'-triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit α, flagellin A). Our results presented here may suggest that comparative proteomes of HP isolated from AAG and DU share more common protein expression than GC and provide subsets of putative AAG-specific upregulated or downregulated proteins that could be proposed as putative markers of AAG-associated HP. Other comparative studies by two-dimensional maps integrated with functional genomics of candidate proteins will undoubtedly contribute to better decipher the biology of AAG-associated HP strains.

  18. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  19. Retropharyngeal thymus and parathyroid gland: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Jordan C; Perry, Deborah A; Sewell, Ryan K

    2014-01-01

    Cervical ectopic thymus occurs when thymic tissue arrests during its embryologic descent through the neck to the upper mediastinum. Most often it presents as an asymptomatic neck mass. Rarely does it present with airway compromise, particularly in neonates. A neonate presented with a retropharyngeal mass causing dynamic upper airway obstruction, mimicking a venolymphatic malformation. Ultimately this proved to be aberrant ectopic thymus with an associated parathyroid gland. While there have been isolated reports of thymus or parathyroid in the retropharyngeal space, none of the prior reports found both within the same patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The development of T lymphocytes in fetal thymus organ culture.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takeshi; Ohigashi, Izumi; Takahama, Yousuke

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC) is a unique and powerful culture system that allows intrathymic T-lymphocyte development in vitro. T-cell development in FTOC well represents fetal thymocyte development in vivo. Here we describe the basic method for FTOC as well as several related techniques, including reconstitution of thymus lobes with T-lymphoid progenitor cells, high-oxygen submersion culture, reaggregation thymus organ culture, retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to developing thymocytes in FTOC, and coculture of progenitor cells with OP9-DL1 cells.

  1. Transpositioned flap vestibuloplasty combined with implant surgery in the severely resorbed atrophic edentulous ridge.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shou-Yen; Yeung, Tze-Cheung; Hung, Kai-Feng; Chou, I-Chiang; Wu, Che-Hsian; Chang, Richard Che-Shoa

    2002-01-01

    The use of transpositioned flap (lipswitch) vestibuloplasty combined with implant surgery in patients with severely resorbed atrophic edentulous ridges is reviewed. The cases of 17 patients with severely resorbed atrophic edentulous ridges at the mandible undergoing implant rehabilitation were reviewed. Lipswitch vestibuloplasty was followed immediately by the implant surgery. Postoperative follow-up consisted of clinical and radiographic examinations. Seventeen patients with atrophic ridges (12 class II and 5 class III) each had 2 implant fixtures placed in the mandible as abutments for a clip and bar overdenture. The average time of follow-up was 6 years. Before surgery, all patients had severely atrophic ridges with a compromised shallow vestibule of varying degrees. Satisfactory results were observed in regard to the immediate and long-term morphology of the vestibule, the health of the peri-implant tissue, the stability of implant fixtures, and the functionality of the prostheses. The lipswitch vestibuloplasty offers a safe and convenient method of surgical access for implant fixture installation, with the advantage of rebuilding the vestibule of a compromised atrophic ridge in the anterior mandible.

  2. The use of fractional laser photothermolysis for the treatment of atrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Alster, Tina S; Tanzi, Elizabeth L; Lazarus, Melissa

    2007-03-01

    Patients with atrophic scars commonly seek treatment for their removal but are often concerned about the prolonged recovery, short-lived results, and/or ineffectiveness of available therapies. A novel treatment using a 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber laser to induce fractional photothermolysis of treated skin has been used to resurface photodamaged skin but has not been studied previously in patients with atrophic scars to determine its effectiveness for this condition. To determine the effectiveness and safety of 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber laser treatment on atrophic scars. Fifty-three patients (skin phototypes I-V) with mild to moderate atrophic facial acne scars received monthly treatment with a 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber laser (Fraxel, Reliant Technologies Inc., San Diego, CA). Clinical response to treatment was determined at each treatment visit and 6 months after the final treatment session by two independent assessors using a quartile grading scale. Side effects and patient satisfaction were monitored at each follow-up visit. Clinical improvement averaged 51% to 75% in nearly 90% of patients after three monthly laser treatments. Mean improvement scores increased proportionately with each successive laser session. Clinical response rates were independent of age, gender, or skin phototype. Side effects included transient erythema and edema in most patients, but no dyspigmentation, ulceration, or scarring. Atrophic scars can be effectively and safely reduced with 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber laser treatment.

  3. Tbata modulates thymic stromal cell proliferation and thymus function

    PubMed Central

    El Kassar, Nahed; Gurunathan, Chandra; Chua, Kevin S.; League, Stacy C.; Schmitz, Sabrina; Gershon, Timothy R.; Kapoor, Veena; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Schwartz, Ronald H.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    Niche availability provided by stromal cells is critical to thymus function. Thymi with diminished function contain fewer stromal cells, whereas thymi with robust function contain proliferating stromal cell populations. Here, we show that the thymus, brain, and testes–associated gene (Tbata; also known as SPATIAL) regulates thymic epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation and thymus size. Tbata is expressed in thymic stromal cells and interacts with the enzyme Uba3, thereby inhibiting the Nedd8 pathway and cell proliferation. Thymi from aged Tbata-deficient mice are larger and contain more dividing TECs than wild-type littermate controls. In addition, thymic reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation occurred more rapidly in Rag2−/−Tbata−/− mice than in Rag2−/−Tbata+/+ littermate controls. These findings suggest that Tbata modulates thymus function by regulating stromal cell proliferation via the Nedd8 pathway. PMID:20937703

  4. Primary Salivary Gland Type Tumors of the Thymus.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, Neda; Weissferdt, Annikka; Moran, Cesar A

    2017-01-01

    The existence of primary salivary gland type tumors (SGTs), similar to those occurring in the major salivary glands, is well known in the thoracic cavity. When they occur in this anatomic area, these tumors more commonly arise from the lung. However, the existence of these tumors primarily affecting the thymus, although recognized in the literature, is rather not well documented or known. In addition, contrary to the primary lung SGTs, which are predominantly of the malignant type, these tumors when occur in thymus encompass a wider spectrum of biology ranging from benign to low grade, and high grade malignancy. The recognition of SGTs in the thymus, even though rare, is important to properly address treatment and prognosis. Herein, we will discuss the numerous benign a malignant SGTs that have been described in the thymus and highlight the difficulty that these tumors may pose when occurring in the thymic area.

  5. The Thymus in Experimental Mammary Carcinogenesis and Polychemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, O V; Kabakov, A V; Ishchenko, I Yu; Poveshchenko, A F; Raiter, T V; Strunkin, D N; Michurina, S V; Konenkov, V I

    2017-02-01

    Histological study of structural transformations in the thymus of Wistar females in induced carcinogenesis (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea injection in the right 2-nd mamma) and polychemotherapy (6 months after tumor growth initiation; cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracyl) was carried out. The area of the cortical matter in the thymus decreased 6 months after carcinogenesis induction, the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the counts of immunoblasts and cells with pyknotic nuclei increased, this indicating the development of accidental involution of the thymus. Animals of the experimental tumor+chemotherapy group exhibited morphological signs of lymphocyte migration from the thymus and suppressed activities of the lymphoid and epithelial components (lesser area of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue, lesser density of parenchymatous cell elements, lesser counts of immunoblasts and small lymphocytes, and larger area of the medulla) in comparison with animals without chemotherapy.

  6. Involution of the rat thymus in experimentally induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rabia, N; Kendall, M D

    1994-09-01

    The thymus, as part of the immune-neuroendocrine axis, is greatly influenced by factors from most endocrine glands, especially the thyroid. Antithyroid drugs (carbimazole and methimazole) were used to induce hypothyroidism in rats. Histological and ultrastructural examination of the thymus showed progressive thymic involution after 4 weeks of drug treatment to the end of observations (7 weeks). The involution was characterised by increased thymocyte apoptosis and thymocyte phagocytosis by macrophages. This resulted in thymocyte depopulation, increases in numbers of interdigitating cells, alterations to mainly subcapsular and medullary epithelial cells, an apparent increase of mast cells and collagen in the capsule and septa, and increased numbers of B cells and plasma cells. Lymphoid cells immuno-reactive with MRC OX12 (which detects B cells) were observed within blood vessel walls, suggesting that they may have been moving in and out of the thymus. The administration of drugs causing hypothyroidism, therefore, also caused marked involution of the thymus.

  7. Atrophic pityriasis versicolor occurring in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Elena; Piaserico, Stefano; Alaibac, Mauro

    2017-01-18

    Pityriasis versicolor is one of the most frequent epidermal mycotic infections in the world, but its atrophic variant is rarely described. The aetiology of the atrophy is still unknown, and two main hypotheses have been formulated, one suggesting a correlation with long-term use of topical steroids and the other a delayed type hypersensitivity to epicutaneous antigens derived from components of the fungus. Atrophic pityriasis versicolor is a benign disease, but needs to be distinguished from other more severe skin diseases manifesting with cutaneous atrophy. The diagnosis can be easily confirmed by direct microscopic observation of the scales soaked in 15% potassium hydroxide, which reveals the typical 'spaghetti and meatball' appearance, or by a skin biopsy in doubtful cases. Here, we describe a case of extensive atrophic pityriasis versicolor occurring in a woman affected by Sjögren's syndrome which completely resolved after topical antifungal treatment. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Diagnosis of Lingual Atrophic Conditions: Associations with Local and Systemic Factors. A Descriptive Review

    PubMed Central

    Erriu, M.; Pili, F.M.G.; Cadoni, S.; Garau, V.

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic glossitis is a condition characterised by absence of filiform or fungiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the tongue. Consequently, the ordinary texture and appearance of the dorsal tongue, determined by papillary protrusion, turns into a soft and smooth aspect. Throughout the years, many factors, both local and systemic, have been associated with atrophic glossitis as the tongue is currently considered to be a mirror of general health. Moreover, various tongue conditions were wrongly diagnosed as atrophic glossitis. Oral involvement can conceal underlying systemic conditions and, in this perspective, the role of clinicians is fundamental. Early recognition of oral signs and symptoms, through a careful examination of oral anatomical structures, plays a crucial role in providing patients with a better prognosis. PMID:27990187

  9. Transcriptional activator TAp63 is upregulated in muscular atrophy during ALS and induces the pro-atrophic ubiquitin ligase Trim63

    PubMed Central

    von Grabowiecki, Yannick; Abreu, Paula; Blanchard, Orphee; Palamiuc, Lavinia; Benosman, Samir; Mériaux, Sophie; Devignot, Véronique; Gross, Isabelle; Mellitzer, Georg; Gonzalez de Aguilar, José L; Gaiddon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and their understanding might help finding therapeutic solutions for pathologies such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We meta-analyzed transcriptomic experiments of muscles of ALS patients and mouse models, uncovering a p53 deregulation as common denominator. We then characterized the induction of several p53 family members (p53, p63, p73) and a correlation between the levels of p53 family target genes and the severity of muscle atrophy in ALS patients and mice. In particular, we observed increased p63 protein levels in the fibers of atrophic muscles via denervation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. At a functional level, we demonstrated that TAp63 and p53 transactivate the promoter and increased the expression of Trim63 (MuRF1), an effector of muscle atrophy. Altogether, these results suggest a novel function for p63 as a contributor to muscular atrophic processes via the regulation of multiple genes, including the muscle atrophy gene Trim63. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10528.001 PMID:26919175

  10. Myoid cells and neuroendocrine markers in myasthenic thymuses.

    PubMed

    Zółtowska, A; Pawełczyk, T; Stopa, M; Skokowski, J; Stepiński, J; Roszkiewicz, A; Nyka, W

    1998-01-01

    We have studied myoid cells in normal and myasthenic thymuses as well as in thymomas. For the presence of neuroendocrine markers-producing cells and identification of synaptophysin (Syn) the immunohistochemical method and immunoblot analysis were used. Myoid cells can be demonstrated in the thymus of myasthenic patients in high number. These cells occur in the vicinity of Hassall's bodies but also within them. Some regenerated Hassall's bodies displayed majority of myoid cells with their concentric arrangement around the centrally situated lacunar-like cell with nuclei of monocytogenic origin. Such phenomenon may suggest cooperation of myoid cells and their epithelial transitional forms with monocytogenic cells in various thymic hormone production. It is likely that myoid cells are the source of some thymic epithelial cells. According to some authors, thymomatous epithelial cells and skeletal muscle share a common epitope defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb), whereas thymic epithelial cells possess acetylocholine receptor (AChR) on their surface. The epithelial cells of some thymomas express also desmin. In normal thymuses of children, Syn and chromogranin A (Chg A) were demonstrated in some cells of Hassall's bodies by immunohistochemical method. In addition, antibodies to Syn stained nerve structures surrounding the thymic blood vessels. In myasthenic thymuses, Syn expression was in cortical and medullary epithelial cells, in myoid cells and only scanty and focal in keratinized epithelial cells of Hassall's bodies. The epithelial cells of some thymomas also express Syn. In some thymuses of all groups investigated in this study Chg A was seen in single cells of Hassall's bodies and focally in cortical epithelial cells. Our results show that in normal thymuses of cardiac surgery patients and in the adult myasthenic thymuses antibody raised against Syn recognized protein with molecular weight of 48,000 but not normal (38,000) Syn. It remains to be elucidated if

  11. Prognostic Value of Fetal Thymus Size in Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Atalay; Gezer, Cenk; Taner, Cuneyt Eftal; Solmaz, Ulas; Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Ozeren, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the size of the fetal thymus by sonography in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and to search for a possible relationship between a small fetal thymus and adverse perinatal outcomes. The transverse diameter of the fetal thymus was prospectively measured in 150 healthy and 143 IUGR fetuses between 24 and 40 weeks' gestation. The fetuses with IUGR were further divided according to normal or abnormal Doppler assessment of the umbilical and middle cerebral arteries and ductus venosus. Measurements were compared with reference ranges from controls. To determine which perinatal outcomes were independently associated with a small fetal thymus, a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Thymus size was significantly lower in IUGR fetuses compared to controls (P < .05). Among IUGR fetuses, thymus size was significantly smaller in IUGR fetuses with abnormal Doppler flow compared to normal flow (P < .05). A small thymus in IUGR fetuses was independently associated with early delivery (odds ratio [OR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.49; P= .023), respiratory distress syndrome (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.78; P= .005), early neonatal sepsis (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.11-2.42; P= .001), and a longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08-1.71; P = .017). Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with fetal thymic involution, and a small fetal thymus is an early indicator of adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by IUGR. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Does furan affect the thymus in growing male rats?

    PubMed

    Koçkaya, E Arzu; Kılıç, Aysun; Karacaoğlu, Elif; Selmanoğlu, Güldeniz

    2012-07-01

    Furan has been identified in foods such as heat-treated foods, including coffee, canned meat, hazelnuts, and infant foods and formulas. Children may be exposed to furan via either consumption of these foods or their derivatives. We evaluated the effects of furan on the thymus of weaning male rats in the present study. Five separate groups containing male rats were used: control, oil control, and three furan-treated groups. Furan was given orally to rats in the treatment groups at doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg/day for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, thymus of the rats were examined morphologically, histopathologically, and immunohistochemically. We observed that absolute and relative weights of thymus were decreased significantly in rats treated with 4- and 8-mg/kg/day doses of furan. In histopathological examination, enlargement of interstitial connective tissue between the thymic lobules, lymphocyte depletion, and hemorrhage were observed. We detected an increase in apoptotic cell counts in thymus of the treatment groups. In addition, we found significant differences in the distribution of fibronectin and transforming growth factor-beta in the thymus of the treatment groups. In conclusion, we suggest that furan has affected the thymus in growing male rats.

  13. Regeneration of the aged thymus by a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Nowell, Craig S; Blackburn, C Clare

    2014-04-01

    Thymic involution is central to the decline in immune system function that occurs with age. By regenerating the thymus, it may therefore be possible to improve the ability of the aged immune system to respond to novel antigens. Recently, diminished expression of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC)-specific transcription factor Forkhead box N1 (FOXN1) has been implicated as a component of the mechanism regulating age-related involution. The effects of upregulating FOXN1 function in the aged thymus are, however, unknown. Here, we show that forced, TEC-specific upregulation of FOXN1 in the fully involuted thymus of aged mice results in robust thymus regeneration characterized by increased thymopoiesis and increased naive T cell output. We demonstrate that the regenerated organ closely resembles the juvenile thymus in terms of architecture and gene expression profile, and further show that this FOXN1-mediated regeneration stems from an enlarged TEC compartment, rebuilt from progenitor TECs. Collectively, our data establish that upregulation of a single transcription factor can substantially reverse age-related thymic involution, identifying FOXN1 as a specific target for improving thymus function and, thus, immune competence in patients. More widely, they demonstrate that organ regeneration in an aged mammal can be directed by manipulation of a single transcription factor, providing a provocative paradigm that may be of broad impact for regenerative biology.

  14. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  15. Mechanobiology in the management of mobile atrophic and oligotrophic tibial nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nando; Marais, Leonard Charles; Aldous, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research indicates that atrophic nonunions are biologically active and may heal in the optimal biomechanical environment. Methods Thirty-three patients with mobile atrophic and oligotrophic tibial nonunions were treated with circular external fixation and functional rehabilitation. Seven patients required autogenous bone graft procedures. Results Bony union was achieved after the initial surgery in 31/33 (93.9%) tibias. Two persistent nonunions were successfully treated with repeat circular external fixation without bone graft. This resulted in final bony union in 33/33 (100%) patients. Conclusion Mechanobiological stimulation of tibial nonunions can produce union even if the biological activity appears to be low. PMID:27047221

  16. [Chronic atrophic polychondritis and renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis: a case report and literature review (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lambrozo, J; Baubion, D; Brodaty, Y; Leclerc, J P

    1981-01-01

    Glomerular lesions with a nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function developed secondary to a chronic atrophic polychondritis confirmed by auricular biopsy. In the absence of renal histology data, the possibility of an iatrogenic complication or a renal lesion specific to the affection itself were successively eliminated. Pos-mortem histological examination demonstrated renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis, the latter being clinically asymptomatic. The probable autoimmune origin of the chronic atrophic polychondritis has to be discussed in parallel with the dysimmunity mechanism responsible for the amyloid lesions, but no relationship between them was demonstrated.

  17. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  18. Thymus dependency of induced immune responses against Hymenolepis nana (cestode) using congenitally athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, A

    1985-04-01

    Anti-parasite antibody responses were compared among several strains of mice experimentally infected with the dwarf tapeworm, Hymenolepis nana. The antibody titres were highly variable among the mouse strains in addition to variation in worm fecundity and longevity. The influence of the thymus on both infection and anti-parasite antibody production (especially of IgE isotype) was studied by the use of congenitally athymic (nu/nu) nude and their phenotypically normal (nu/+) CD-1(ICR) mice infected with H. nana. All nude (nu/nu) mice harboured fully mature 70 day old adult tapeworms of the first generation derived from eggs initially given on day 0. In addition, they contained (a) younger second generation adults derived from autoinfection and present in the intestinal lumen, (b) a number of abnormally large (about 1-2 mm in diameter) balloon like, fluid filled cysticercoids in not only the intestinal tissue but also parenteral tissues such as the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and lung, and (c) normal cysticercoids derived from challenging eggs in the intestinal tissue. Infected nude mice produced no antibodies detectable by PCA (IgE) and double diffusion (IgG) tests. In contrast, normal (nu/+) mice and nude mice reconstituted with thymocytes expelled almost all luminal adults of the primary infection by day 70 and produced antibodies to extracts of adult H. nana. Neither autoinfection nor reinfection following egg challenge occurred in any of these normal (nu/+) and reconstituted nude mice. Therefore, acquired immune responses against H. nana (as assessed by resistance not only to the tissue phase measured by the failure of tissue cysticercoid recovery from egg challenge, but also to the lumen phase assessed by the failure of autoinfection adult recovery and 'worm expulsion' of the initially established adults) are all thymus-dependent in mice. The antibody responses examined are also thymus-dependent.

  19. Thymus dependency of induced immune responses against Hymenolepis nana (cestode) using congenitally athymic nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, A

    1985-01-01

    Anti-parasite antibody responses were compared among several strains of mice experimentally infected with the dwarf tapeworm, Hymenolepis nana. The antibody titres were highly variable among the mouse strains in addition to variation in worm fecundity and longevity. The influence of the thymus on both infection and anti-parasite antibody production (especially of IgE isotype) was studied by the use of congenitally athymic (nu/nu) nude and their phenotypically normal (nu/+) CD-1(ICR) mice infected with H. nana. All nude (nu/nu) mice harboured fully mature 70 day old adult tapeworms of the first generation derived from eggs initially given on day 0. In addition, they contained (a) younger second generation adults derived from autoinfection and present in the intestinal lumen, (b) a number of abnormally large (about 1-2 mm in diameter) balloon like, fluid filled cysticercoids in not only the intestinal tissue but also parenteral tissues such as the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and lung, and (c) normal cysticercoids derived from challenging eggs in the intestinal tissue. Infected nude mice produced no antibodies detectable by PCA (IgE) and double diffusion (IgG) tests. In contrast, normal (nu/+) mice and nude mice reconstituted with thymocytes expelled almost all luminal adults of the primary infection by day 70 and produced antibodies to extracts of adult H. nana. Neither autoinfection nor reinfection following egg challenge occurred in any of these normal (nu/+) and reconstituted nude mice. Therefore, acquired immune responses against H. nana (as assessed by resistance not only to the tissue phase measured by the failure of tissue cysticercoid recovery from egg challenge, but also to the lumen phase assessed by the failure of autoinfection adult recovery and 'worm expulsion' of the initially established adults) are all thymus-dependent in mice. The antibody responses examined are also thymus-dependent. PMID:4006301

  20. The effects of deoxynivalenol on gene expression in the murine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Kol, Sandra W.M. van; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and is often detected in grains. Because of its high abundance, there has been a large interest in the effects of DON in animals and humans. DON is known to be immunosuppressive at high concentrations and immunostimulatory at low concentrations. The present study aimed to acquire insight into the modes of action of DON. For this, C57Bl6 mice were orally exposed to 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg bw DON for 3, 6, or 24 h and thymuses were subjected to genome-wide expression microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that DON downregulated genes involved in proliferation, mitochondria, protein synthesis, and ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, GSEA showed a selective downregulation of genes highly expressed at the early precursor thymocytes stage. This indicates that early precursor thymocytes, particularly at the double-positive CD4+CD8+ stage, are more vulnerable to DON than very early or late precursor thymocytes. There was a large overlap of genes upregulated by DON with genes previously reported to be either upregulated during T cell activation or upregulated during negative selection of thymocytes that recognize 'self-antigens'. This indicates that DON induces cellular events that also occur after activation of the T cell receptor, for example, release of calcium from the endoplasmatic reticulum. This T cell activation in the thymus then evokes negative selection and depletion of thymocytes, which provides a plausible explanation for the high sensitivity of the thymus for DON exposure. The expression patterns of four genes indicative for some of the processes that were affected after DON treatment were confirmed using real-time PCR. Immunocytological experiments with primary mouse thymocytes demonstrated the translocation of NFAT from the cytoplasm into the nucleus upon exposure top DON, thus providing further evidence for the involvement of T cell activation.

  1. Antibacterial activity of Thymus daenensis methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Mojab, Faraz; Poursaeed, Mahshid; Mehrgan, Hadi; Pakdaman, Shima

    2008-07-01

    Medicinal plants are potential of antimicrobial compounds. The present study deals with the antibacterial activity of methanolic extract of Thymus daenensis. Aerial parts of the plant were collected from Alvand mountainside (Hamadan, Iran) in May 2005, air-dried and extracted by methanol. The dried extract was redissolved in methanol to make a 100 mg/ml solution and then filtered. Antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated against various Gram-positive and Gram-negatives bacteria using disk diffusion technique. Blank paper disks were loaded with 40 microl of the methanol solution and then dried up. The impregnated disks were placed on Mueller-Hinton agar inoculated with bacterial suspension equal to 0.5 McFarland. The extract inhibited the growth Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Entrococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, but it showed no activity against Gram-negative bacteria. The most significant effect was seen against S.aureus including MRSA, which are important nosocomial pathogens. MIC90 of the extract was determined against Gram-positive bacteria (3.12 mg/ml) and 11 MRSA strain (1.56 mg/ml).

  2. Atrophic vaginitis: concordance and interpretation of slides in the College of American Pathologists Cervicovaginal Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Gynecologic Cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Crothers, Barbara A; Booth, Christine N; Darragh, Teresa M; Means, Marilee M; Souers, Rhona J; Thomas, Nicole; Moriarty, Ann T

    2012-11-01

    Atrophic vaginitis is a commonly reported subset of Papanicolaou test results that are negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, but interpretive criteria overlap with atrophic changes and other entities, hindering concordance among observers. To report on the participant concordance from 2000 to 2009 in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Gynecologic Cytopathology, with a reference interpretation of atrophic vaginitis, and to investigate cytologic features of good and poorly performing slides to identify criteria useful in the interpretation of atrophic vaginitis. We summarized 18 302 responses from the program for slides with a reference interpretation of atrophic vaginitis. We randomly selected 18 Papanicolaou test results (3 conventional, 4 SurePath, and 11 ThinPrep) from good and poor performers for prospective, blinded criteria scoring for the following features: abundance of neutrophils, more than 100 degenerating parabasal cells, more than 25% necrotic background, more than 100 pseudoparakeratotic cells, and the presence of stripped or streaked nuclei, histiocytes, and superficial or intermediate squamous cells. Most Papanicolaou test results (>90%) with a specific reference interpretation of atrophic vaginitis were categorized as negative. Cytotechnologists are more likely than pathologists are to label it negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM) and are equally likely to mistake it for a high-grade lesion. Degenerating parabasal cells, pseudoparakeratosis, and necrotic background are associated with atrophic vaginitis (P  =  .001) on Papanicolaou. Abundant neutrophils (>100 per ×400 field) are also significantly correlated (P  =  .01). Exact concordance to atrophic vaginitis is less than 90%. Most of the discrepancies are negative results for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. Advanced atrophic features are as significant as neutrophils are to the interpretation of atrophic

  3. The Thymus: A Forgotten, But Very Important Organ.

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Pachura, Ewelina; Pachura, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Medical science seems to be on the threshold of a revolution: It seems possible that in twenty years, doctors will be able to replace organs in the human body like parts in a car. This is thanks to the recent achievement of a team from the Medical Research Council Center for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland - the group of researchers tried to regenerate the thymus gland in mice. The thymus gland is an essential organ for the development of the immune system, but very few people have any idea that it exists. In the literature and also in people's awareness, the fact is often that the thymus controls and harmonizes the entire immune system and the immune functioning of the organism. It is the primary donor of cells for the lymphatic system, much as bone marrow is the cell donor for the cardiovascular system. It is within the thymus that progenitor cells are created and then undergo maturation and differentiation into mature T cells. The thymus gland is located in the mediastinum, behind the sternum. It is composed of two identical lobes. Each lobe is divided into a central medulla and a peripheral cortex. The thymus is at its largest and most active during the neonatal and pre-adolescent periods. After this period the organ gradually disappears and is replaced by fat. In elderly individuals the thymus weighs 5 g. The aim of this work is to shed new light on this important immune defense organ, whose function is not confined to the destruction of nonfunctional T cells.

  4. The Immunoendocrine Thymus as a Pacemaker of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-06-01

    The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them.

  5. Rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla with pterygoid implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Candel, Eugenia; Peñarrocha, David; Peñarrocha, Maria

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature published and to assess the success of treatment of patients with atrophic posterior maxilla with pterygoid implants. Studies from 1992 to 2009 on patients with atrophic posterior maxilla rehabilitated with pterygoid implants were reviewed. Those reporting clinical series of at least 5 patients with atrophic posterior maxilla (Class IV and V of Cawood and Howell), rehabilitated with pterygoid implants and fixed prosthesis, and with 12 months minimum follow-up were included. In each study the following were assessed: number of patients, number of implants, surgical technique, prosthetic rehabilitation, success rate, bone loss, complications and patient satisfaction. Thirteen articles were included, reporting a total of 1053 pterygoid implants in 676 patients. The weighted average success of pterygoid implants was 90.7%; bone loss evaluated radiographically ranged between 0 and 4.5 mm. No additional complications compared with conventional implants were found, and patient satisfaction level with the prosthesis was high. Pterygoid implants have high success rates, similar bone loss levels to those of conventional implants, minimal complications and good acceptance by patients, being therefore an alternative to treat patients with atrophic posterior maxilla. Two anatomical locations in which implants are placed in the retromolar area can be distinguished: the pterygoid process and the pterygomaxillary region. Implant lengths and angulations vary between these two techniques.

  6. Comparative study of Langerhans cells in normal and pathological human scars. I. Atrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Cracco, C; Stella, M; Teich Alasia, S; Filogamo, G

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated Langerhans cells (LCs) in the epidermal component of human atrophic scars, comparing them with those in control skin and normotrophic scars. A preliminary analysis of the histological features was first carried out on vertical serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The total epidermal thickness and the thickness of the single epidermal layers were then measured, by means of a digitizing tablet and a morphometric program run on an Apple IIe computer. These parameters were found to be significantly lower (40%) in atrophic scars, if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (p less than 0.05). CDla-positive and HLA-DR-positive LCs were marked by indirect immunofluorescence. Their position among the epidermal layers, their dimensions, their density and their morphology were examined. In atrophic scars, LCs were densely and evenly distributed in all the epidermal layers. Their density was increased (about 1200 cells/mm2 of epidermal area), if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (both 300-400 cells/mm2 of epidermal area; p less than 0.001). The CDla-positive definite cell bodies, exhibiting an unstained nucleus, were as large as those evidentiated in the normotrophic scars and twice as much the control skin values (p less than 0.001). The present results provide morphological data that distinguish atrophic scars from control skin and normotrophic scars, and suggest an involvement of the Langerhans cells in this particular case of pathological scarring.

  7. Autologous fat transplantation for depressed linear scleroderma-induced facial atrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Jung, Jin Young; Chung, Kee Yang

    2008-12-01

    Facial linear scleroderma results in depressed atrophic scars. Autologous fat transplantation has been widely used, and fat appears to be an ideal material for filling depressed atrophic scars and contour deformities, but long-term results for autologous fat transplantation are controversial. To review the short- and long-term results of 20 patients who underwent multiple autologous fat transplantations for depressed atrophic scar correction. Twenty patients with clinically inactive facial linear scleroderma were included. They received at least two transplantations and had a 12-month follow-up evaluation. On the forehead, 51% to 75% improvement (average grading scale: 2.4) was achieved when observed at least 12 months after the last treatment. For the chin, correction was poor (average grading scale: 0.7) with less than 25% improvement. The infraorbital area showed fair correction, but the nose showed poor correction. Two of three patients with scalp reduction surgery showed excellent results, showing only slight scar widening. Autologous fat transplantation is an effective method for long-term correction of depressed atrophic scars left by linear scleroderma on the forehead but is less effective for corrections on the nose, infraorbital area, and chin.

  8. Biology of Mouse Thymic Virus, a Herpesvirus of Mice, and the Antigenic Relationship to Mouse Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S. S.; Parker, J. C.; Rowe, W. P.; Robbins, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse thymic virus (TA) is a herpesvirus which produces extensive necrosis of the thymus of newborn mice 7 to 14 days after infection. Infectious virus can be recovered from the thymus for only 10 days after infection, with highest titers occurring between days 5 and 7. In mice 5 days old or less, TA infects thymus cells and produces massive necrosis. TA also infects the salivary glands and persists as a chronic infection. Newborn mice infected with TA have no detectable humoral immune response. Infected adult mice respond, and humoral antibody is detected 7 days after infection. Titers are maintained for months thereafter. Regardless of the age of the mice inoculated with TA, persistent infection was established in the salivary glands, but no evidence for thymus involvement was observed when adults were infected. TA does not cross-react serologically by immunofluorescent, complement fixation, or virus neutralization tests with mouse cytomegalovirus; however, interestingly, the epidemiology of the two herpesviruses are similar. Both mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were isolated from the same animals in populations of laboratory and wild mice. Evidence of infection with mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were most apparent by virus isolations, since humoral antibody responses are rarely observed. All strains of mice tested were susceptible to TA infection. However, in some strains maximum necrosis occurred at 7 days, compared with 10 to 14 days for other strains. The difference in age susceptibility and the target tissue of thymus in newborn mice suggests that TA is a model herpesvirus for studying the effects of viral infections on humoral and cell-mediated immunological functions. Images PMID:231008

  9. A novel role for transcription factor Lmo4 in thymus development through genetic interaction with Cited2.

    PubMed

    Michell, Anna C; Bragança, José; Broadbent, Carol; Joyce, Bradley; Franklyn, Angela; Schneider, Jürgen E; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bamforth, Simon D

    2010-07-01

    Deletion of the transcriptional modulator Cited2 in the mouse results in embryonic lethality, cardiovascular malformations, adrenal agenesis, cranial ganglia fusion, exencephaly, and left-right patterning defects, all seen with a varying degree of penetrance. The phenotypic heterogeneity, observed on different genetic backgrounds, indicates the existence of both genetic and environmental modifiers. Mice lacking the LIM domain-containing protein Lmo4 share specific phenotypes with Cited2 null embryos, such as embryonic lethality, cranial ganglia fusion, and exencephaly. These shared phenotypes suggested that Lmo4 may be a potential genetic modifier of the Cited2 phenotype. Examination of Lmo4-deficient embryos revealed partially penetrant cardiovascular malformations and hypoplastic thymus. Examination of Lmo4;Cited2 compound mutants indicated that there is a genetic interaction between Cited2 and Lmo4 in control of thymus development. Our data suggest that this may occur, in part, through control of expression of a common target gene, Tbx1, which is necessary for normal thymus development.

  10. Aging reversibility: from thymus graft to vegetable extract treatment-- application to cure an age-associated pathology.

    PubMed

    Basso, Andrea; Rossolini, Giuliana; Piantanelli, Anna; Amici, Domenico; Calzuola, Isabella; Mancinelli, Loretta; Marsili, Valeria; Gianfranceschi, Gian Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal thymus graft and thymus calf extract (TME) in vivo treatment exert similar corrective actions on different mouse age-related alterations. The aim of the present paper is to investigate whether a vegetal extract, wheat sprout extract (WESPRE), could mimic the thymus action on recovering age-related alterations and if this extract can cure an age-associated pathology, the cataract in dogs. Present experiments were carried out by using WESPRE and TME in vivo in old mice to check their ability to recover the altered DNA synthesis in hepatocyte primary cultures. Old mice treated with WESPRE and TME showed a recovery of hepatocyte DNA synthesis levels when compared with the old untreated ones. The increase of DNA and protein contents observed in aged animals is reduced by WESPRE treatments to levels observed in young mice hepatocytes. We measured also WESPRE phosphorylation activity by endogenous kinase: it was from 10 to 40 times higher with respect to wheat seeds. Old dogs were orally treated for a month and the lens opacity analysed before and after the treatment. Results showed a reduction from 25 to 40% of lens opacity. The efficacy of wheat sprouts in the recovery of age-related alterations and in treating age-associated pathologies could be due to the contemporary presence of small regulatory acid peptides, a remarkable level of highly energetic phosphoric radicals and antioxidant molecules, peculiarities that may be, to some extent, related to the aging process regulation.

  11. Differential sensitivities of bone marrow, spleen and thymus to genotoxicity induced by environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; McClain, Shea; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Stýblo, Miroslav; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-11-16

    It is known in humans and mouse models, that drinking water exposures to arsenite (As(+3)) leads to immunotoxicity. Previously, our group showed that certain types of immune cells are extremely sensitive to arsenic induced genotoxicity. In order to see if cells from different immune organs have differential sensitivities to As(+3), and if the sensitivities correlate with the intracellular concentrations of arsenic species, male C57BL/6J mice were dosed with 0, 100 and 500ppb As(+3)via drinking water for 30d. Oxidation State Specific Hydride Generation- Cryotrapping- Inductively Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectrometry (HG- CT- ICP- MS) was applied to analyze the intracellular arsenic species and concentrations in bone marrow, spleen and thymus cells isolated from the exposed mice. A dose-dependent increase in intracellular monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) was observed in both bone marrow and thymus cells, but not spleen cells. The total arsenic and MMA(+3) levels were correlated with an increase in DNA damage in bone marrow and thymus cells. An in vitro treatment of 5, 50 and 500nM As(+3) and MMA(+3) revealed that bone marrow cells are most sensitive to As(+3) treatment, and MMA(+3) is more genotoxic than As(+3). These results suggest that the differential sensitivities of the three immune organs to As(+3) exposure are due to the different intracellular arsenic species and concentrations, and that MMA(+3) may play a critical role in immunotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors regulating stem cell recruitment to the fetal thymus.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, B; Owen, J J; Jenkinson, E J

    1999-04-01

    Colonization of the thymic rudiment during development is initiated before vascularization so that hemopoietic precursors must leave the pharyngeal vessels and migrate through the perithymic mesenchyme to reach the thymus, suggesting that they may be responding to a gradient of chemoattractant factors. We report that diffusible chemoattractants are produced by MHC class II+ epithelial cells of the fetal thymus, and that the response of precursors to these factors is mediated via a G protein-coupled receptor, consistent with factors being members of the chemokine family. Indeed, a number of chemokine receptors are expressed by thymic precursors, and several chemokines are also expressed by thymic epithelial cells. However, these chemokines are also expressed in a tissue that is unable to attract precursors, although the thymus expressed chemokine, TECK, is expressed at higher levels in thymic epithelial cells and we show that it has chemotactic activity for isolated thymic precursors. Neutralizing Ab to TECK, however, did not prevent thymus recolonization by T cell precursors, suggesting that other novel chemokines might be involved in this process. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in chemoattractant-mediated T cell precursor recruitment to the thymus during embryogenesis.

  13. Thymus and aging: morphological, radiological, and functional overview.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Nardo, Lorenzo; Favero, Gaia; Peroni, Michele; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio

    2014-02-01

    Aging is a continuous process that induces many alterations in the cytoarchitecture of different organs and systems both in humans and animals. Moreover, it is associated with increased susceptibility to infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic processes. The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ responsible for the production of immunocompetent T cells and, with aging, it atrophies and declines in functions. Universality of thymic involution in all species possessing thymus, including human, indicates it as a long-standing evolutionary event. Although it is accepted that many factors contribute to age-associated thymic involution, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the process. The exact time point of the initiation is not well defined. To address the issue, we report the exact age of thymus throughout the review so that readers can have a nicely pictured synoptic view of the process. Focusing our attention on the different stages of the development of the thymus gland (natal, postnatal, adult, and old), we describe chronologically the morphological changes of the gland. We report that the thymic morphology and cell types are evolutionarily preserved in several vertebrate species. This finding is important in understanding the similar problems caused by senescence and other diseases. Another point that we considered very important is to indicate the assessment of the thymus through radiological images to highlight its variability in shape, size, and anatomical conformation.

  14. Dendritic cells in hyperplastic thymuses from patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Yuriko; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Obara, Daiji; Yamagata, Munehisa; Tohgi, Hideo

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the hyperplastic myasthenia gravis (MG) thymus, we studied the frequency and distribution of three mature DC phenotypes (CD83(+)CD11c(+), CD86(+)CD11c(+), and HLA-DR(+)CD11c(+)) in samples from patients with MG whose symptoms dramatically improved following thymectomy and in non-MG control thymuses. In hyperplastic MG thymuses, mature DCs were much more numerous in nonmedullary areas, such as the subcapsular/outer cortex; around the germinal centers; and in extralobular connective tissue, particularly around blood vessels. Mature DCs strongly coexpressed CD44 and appeared to be components of a CD44-highly positive (CD44(high)) cell population migrating from the vascular system. Furthermore, in the hyperplastic MG thymus, the expression of secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC) markedly increased especially around extralobular blood vessels, where the CD44(high) cell population accumulated. These findings suggest that DCs may migrate into the hyperplastic thymus from the vascular system via mechanisms that involve CD44 and SLC. DCs may present self-antigens, thereby promoting the priming and/or boosting of potentially autoreactive T cells against the acetylcholine receptor.

  15. Thymus-autonomous T cell development in the absence of progenitor import

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Vera C.; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schlenner, Susan M.; Madan, Vikas; Schmidt, Manfred; Fink, Pamela J.; von Kalle, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Thymus function is thought to depend on a steady supply of T cell progenitors from the bone marrow. The notion that the thymus lacks progenitors with self-renewal capacity is based on thymus transplantation experiments in which host-derived thymocytes replaced thymus-resident cells within 4 wk. Thymus grafting into T cell–deficient mice resulted in a wave of T cell export from the thymus, followed by colonization of the thymus by host-derived progenitors, and cessation of T cell development. Compound Rag2−/−γc−/−KitW/Wv mutants lack competitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and are devoid of T cell progenitors. In this study, using this strain as recipients for wild-type thymus grafts, we noticed thymus-autonomous T cell development lasting several months. However, we found no evidence for export of donor HSCs from thymus to bone marrow. A diverse T cell antigen receptor repertoire in progenitor-deprived thymus grafts implied that many thymocytes were capable of self-renewal. Although the process was most efficient in Rag2−/−γc−/−KitW/Wv hosts, γc-mediated signals alone played a key role in the competition between thymus-resident and bone marrow–derived progenitors. Hence, the turnover of each generation of thymocytes is not only based on short life span but is also driven via expulsion of resident thymocytes by fresh progenitors entering the thymus. PMID:22778389

  16. Thymus-autonomous T cell development in the absence of progenitor import.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vera C; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schlenner, Susan M; Madan, Vikas; Schmidt, Manfred; Fink, Pamela J; von Kalle, Christof; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2012-07-30

    Thymus function is thought to depend on a steady supply of T cell progenitors from the bone marrow. The notion that the thymus lacks progenitors with self-renewal capacity is based on thymus transplantation experiments in which host-derived thymocytes replaced thymus-resident cells within 4 wk. Thymus grafting into T cell-deficient mice resulted in a wave of T cell export from the thymus, followed by colonization of the thymus by host-derived progenitors, and cessation of T cell development. Compound Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) mutants lack competitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and are devoid of T cell progenitors. In this study, using this strain as recipients for wild-type thymus grafts, we noticed thymus-autonomous T cell development lasting several months. However, we found no evidence for export of donor HSCs from thymus to bone marrow. A diverse T cell antigen receptor repertoire in progenitor-deprived thymus grafts implied that many thymocytes were capable of self-renewal. Although the process was most efficient in Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) hosts, γ(c)-mediated signals alone played a key role in the competition between thymus-resident and bone marrow-derived progenitors. Hence, the turnover of each generation of thymocytes is not only based on short life span but is also driven via expulsion of resident thymocytes by fresh progenitors entering the thymus.

  17. AMP-deaminase from thymus of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, I; Szydłowska, M; Szrok, S; Bakuła, S; Kaletha, K

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized clinically by skeletal muscle fatigue following the excessive exercise. Interestingly most of MG patients manifest parallely also some abnormalities of the thymus.AMP-deaminase (AMPD) from human thymus was not a subject of studies up to now. In this paper, mRNA expression and some physico-chemical and immunological properties of AMPD purified from the thymus of MG patients were described. Experiments performed identified the liver isozyme (AMPD2) as the main isoform of AMPD expressed in this organ. The activity of AMPD found in this organ was higher than in other human non-(skeletal) muscle tissues indicating on role the enzyme may play in supplying of guanylates required for the intensive multiplication of thymocytes.

  18. The thymus in myasthenia gravis: Site of "innate autoimmunity"?

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Le Panse, Rozen; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2011-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused, in most cases, by autoantibodies against components of the neuromuscular junction, frequently the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), and less often the muscle-specific kinase receptor. The thymus plays a major role in the pathogenesis of MG with anti-AChR antibodies: it shows marked pathologic alterations (hyperplastic or tumoral) in most AChR-positive patients and contains the elements required to initiate and sustain an autoimmune reaction (AChR autoantigen, AChR-specific T cells, and autoantibody-secreting plasma cells). In this study we review early and more recent findings implicating the thymus as site of AChR autosensitization in MG and briefly discuss the therapeutic role of thymectomy. We also summarize data showing that the MG thymus is in a state of chronic inflammation, and we review emerging evidence of a viral contribution to the onset and maintenance of the thymic autoimmune response.

  19. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  20. Characterization and Angiogenic Potential of Human Neonatal and Infant Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuyun; Mundada, Lakshmi; Johnson, Sean; Wong, Joshua; Witt, Russell; Ohye, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in angiogenesis during thymus regeneration. We have previously shown that MSCs can be isolated from enzymatically digested human neonatal and infant thymus tissue that is normally discarded during pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. In this paper, we demonstrate that thymus MSCs can also be isolated by explant culture of discarded thymus tissue and that these cells share many of the characteristics of bone marrow MSCs. Human neonatal thymus MSCs are clonogenic, demonstrate exponential growth in nearly 30 population doublings, have a characteristic surface marker profile, and express pluripotency genes. Furthermore, thymus MSCs have potent proangiogenic behavior in vitro with sprout formation and angiogenic growth factor production. Thymus MSCs promote neoangiogenesis and cooperate with endothelial cells to form functional human blood vessels in vivo. These characteristics make thymus MSCs a potential candidate for use as an angiogenic cell therapeutic agent and for vascularizing engineered tissues in vitro. PMID:25713463

  1. Characterization and angiogenic potential of human neonatal and infant thymus mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyun; Mundada, Lakshmi; Johnson, Sean; Wong, Joshua; Witt, Russell; Ohye, Richard G; Si, Ming-Sing

    2015-04-01

    Resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in angiogenesis during thymus regeneration. We have previously shown that MSCs can be isolated from enzymatically digested human neonatal and infant thymus tissue that is normally discarded during pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. In this paper, we demonstrate that thymus MSCs can also be isolated by explant culture of discarded thymus tissue and that these cells share many of the characteristics of bone marrow MSCs. Human neonatal thymus MSCs are clonogenic, demonstrate exponential growth in nearly 30 population doublings, have a characteristic surface marker profile, and express pluripotency genes. Furthermore, thymus MSCs have potent proangiogenic behavior in vitro with sprout formation and angiogenic growth factor production. Thymus MSCs promote neoangiogenesis and cooperate with endothelial cells to form functional human blood vessels in vivo. These characteristics make thymus MSCs a potential candidate for use as an angiogenic cell therapeutic agent and for vascularizing engineered tissues in vitro. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  3. [Single mechanism of remodelling extracellular matrix in thymus and pineal gland at aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2011-01-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 in thymus and pineal gland has been verified. These data demonstrate single mechanism of remodelling extracellular matrix in thymus and pineal gland at aging.

  4. Atrophic rhinitis caused by Pasteurella multocida type D: morphometric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Martineau-Doizé, B; Dumas, G; Larochelle, R; Frantz, J C; Martineau, G P

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the distribution and the extent of atrophy caused by Pasteurella multocida in the nasal conchae, experimental piglets were injected intramuscularly at seven days of age with either two or four 50% mouse lethal doses per kg body weight of P. multocida type D dermonecrotoxin. Experimental and control piglets were killed four, six and ten days postinjection. Serial transverse paraffin embedded sections of the noses were cut throughout the entire length of the nasal conchae. The area of the nasal ventral conchae was measured and the morphometric index of the nasal cavity was calculated. It was observed that P. multocida type D dermonecrotoxin induced severe atrophy of the nasal ventral conchae. This atrophy was present along the entire conchae. However, it was most severe at the level of the first and second premolar teeth. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:1889032

  5. Thymus organogenesis and development of the thymic stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Farley, Alison M; Blackburn, C Clare

    2007-01-01

    T-cell development occurs principally in the thymus. Here, immature progenitor cells are guided through the differentiation and selection steps required to generate a complex T-cell repertoire that is both self-tolerant and has propensity to bind self major histocompatibility complex. These processes depend on an array of functionally distinct epithelial cell types within the thymic stroma, which have a common developmental origin in the pharyngeal endoderm. Here, we describe the structural and phenotypic attributes of the thymic stroma, and review current cellular and molecular understanding of thymus organogenesis.

  6. [Thymus Development in Early Ontogeny: A Comparative Aspect].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, K A; Polevshchikov, A V

    2015-01-01

    This review is dedicated to comparative analysis of the early stages of thymus ontogeny in fish, amphibians, and mammals. Morphological and molecular-genetic aspects of the formation of thymic stroma, colonization of this organ with T-cell progenitors, and interaction of different cell populations in the course of organogenesis are considered. Particular attention is given to the hematopoietic role of the thymus during embryogenesis and new data on the origin of T-cell progenitors. The hypothesis about the possible presence in the organ of a self-sustaining population of stem cells, formed regardless of fetal hematopoiesis areas, is discussed.

  7. Thymus size at 6 months of age and subsequent child mortality.

    PubMed

    Garly, May-Lill; Trautner, Sisse Lecanda; Marx, Charlotte; Danebod, Kamilla; Nielsen, Jens; Ravn, Henrik; Martins, Cesário Lourenco; Balé, Carlito; Aaby, Peter; Lisse, Ida Maria

    2008-11-01

    To examine determinants of thymus size at age 6 months and investigate whether thymus size at this age is a determinant of subsequent mortality. Thymus size was measured by transsternal sonography in 923 6-month-old children participating in a measles vaccination trial in Guinea-Bissau. Thymus size was strongly associated with anthropometric measurements. Boys had larger thymuses than girls, controlling for anthropometry. Crying during sonography made the thymus appear smaller. Children who were not vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or were vaccinated with BCG in the preceding 4 weeks before inclusion into the study had larger thymuses. Children who had malaria or had been treated with chloroquine or Quinimax in the previous week before inclusion had smaller thymuses. Controlled for background factors associated with thymus size and mortality, small thymus size remained a strong and independent risk factor for mortality (hazard ratio = 0.31; 95% confidence interval = 0.18 to 0.52). Small thymus size at age 6 months is a strong risk factor for mortality. To prevent unnecessary deaths, it is important to identify preventable factors predisposing to small thymus size.

  8. FURTHER PROOF OF THE EXISTENCE OF A SPECIFIC TETANY-PRODUCING SUBSTANCE IN THE THYMUS GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Uhlenhuth, Eduard

    1918-01-01

    The effect of the thymus gland in producing tetany is due to a specific tetany toxin produced by and contained in the thymus, and the thymus gland must be added to the group of glands for which the function of internal secretion has been demonstrated. PMID:19871725

  9. Differences in biomarkers of type II collagen in atrophic and hypertrophic osteoarthritis of the hip: implications for the differing pathobiologies.

    PubMed

    Conrozier, T; Ferrand, F; Poole, A R; Verret, C; Mathieu, P; Ionescu, M; Vincent, F; Piperno, M; Spiegel, A; Vignon, E

    2007-04-01

    Cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis (OA) involves the excessive degradation and increased synthesis of cartilage matrix macromolecules including type II collagen (CII) and proteoglycans. The lack of osteophytes (atrophic form of OA) has been shown to be a disease severity factor in hip OA. Since osteophyte formation involves endochondral ossification and a cartilage intermediate, atrophic OA may also exhibit differences in cartilage turnover compared to hypertrophic OA. Cartilage serum biomarkers may offer an opportunity to identify such differences in patients. To determine whether serum levels of cartilage biomarkers can distinguish between the presence and absence of osteophyte formation in patients with atrophic and hypertrophic hip OA. Fifty-six patients (mean age/standard deviation (SD): 62/11; mean body mass index (BMI)/SD: 27/11) with symptomatic hip OA (American College of Rheumatology criteria; mean Lequesne index/SD: 8.3/4) were classified as having an atrophic or hypertrophic form of OA, according to the absence or presence, respectively, of any osteophyte on a standard radiograph of the pelvis. Minimum joint space width (minJSW) and angles of dysplasia [centre-edge (CE) and head-neck-shaft (HNS)] were determined by computerized measurements. The following serum markers were used which are commercial kits from Ibex Diagnostics (Montreal, QC): proteoglycan aggrecans turnover: CS 846; CII synthesis: C-propeptide (CPII), cleavage by collagenase of type II (C2C) and type I and II (C1,2C) collagens. Patients with atrophic and hypertrophic OA were compared for each variable and step to step logistic regression was used to determine the effect of variables on the belonging to each group. Correlations were examined using linear regression or Spearman test. CPII serum levels were significantly lower in the atrophic OA patients (77.3 vs 117.4 ng/mL). There were no significant differences between groups for C2C, C1,2C and CS 846 . CPII and C2C concentrations

  10. Central T cell tolerance: Identification of tissue-restricted autoantigens in the thymus HLA-DR peptidome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Iñaki; Collado, Javier A; Colobran, Roger; Carrascal, Montserrat; Ciudad, M Teresa; Canals, Françesc; James, Eddie A; Kwok, William W; Gärtner, Martina; Kyewski, Bruno; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Jaraquemada, Dolores

    2015-06-01

    Promiscuous gene expression (pGE) of tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRA) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is in part driven by the Autoimmune Regulator gene (AIRE) and essential for self-tolerance. The link between AIRE functional mutations and multi-organ autoimmunity in human and mouse supports the role of pGE. Deep sequencing of the transcriptome revealed that mouse mTECs potentially transcribe an unprecedented range of >90% of all genes. Yet, it remains unclear to which extent these low-level transcripts are actually translated into proteins, processed and presented by thymic APCs to induce tolerance. To address this, we analyzed the HLA-DR-associated thymus peptidome. Within a large panel of peptides from abundant proteins, two TRA peptides were identified: prostate-specific semenogelin-1 (an autoantigen in autoimmune chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome) and central nervous system-specific contactin-2 (an autoantigen in multiple sclerosis). Thymus expression of both genes was restricted to mTECs. SEMG1 expression was confined to mature HLA-DR(hi) mTECs of male and female donors and was AIRE-dependent, whereas CNTN2 was apparently AIRE-independent and was expressed by both populations of mTECs. Our findings establish a link between pGE, MHC-II peptide presentation and autoimmunity for bona fide human TRAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Taking pressure off the heart: the ins and outs of atrophic remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Kedryn K.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Our work on atrophic remodelling of the heart has led us to appreciate the simple principles in biology: (i) the dynamic nature of intracellular protein turnover, (ii) the return to the foetal gene programme when the heart remodels, and (iii) the adaptive changes of cardiac metabolism. Although the molecular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy are many, much less is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of cardiac atrophy. We state the case that knowing more about mechanisms of atrophic remodelling may provide insights into cellular consequences of metabolic and haemodynamic unloading of the stressed heart. Overall we strive to find an answer to the question: ‘What makes the failing heart shrink and become stronger?' We speculate that signals arising from intermediary metabolism of energy-providing substrates are likely candidates. PMID:21354996

  12. Fractional CO2 lasers for the treatment of atrophic acne scars: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Lauren Rose; Schweiger, Eric S

    2014-04-01

    This review examines the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 lasers for the treatment of atrophic scarring secondary to acne vulgaris. We reviewed 20 papers published between 2008 and 2013 that conducted clinical studies using fractional CO2 lasers to treat atrophic scarring. We discuss the prevalence and pathogenesis of acne scarring, as well as the laser mechanism. The histologic findings are included to highlight the ability of these lasers to induce the collagen reorganization and formation that improves scar appearance. We considered the number of treatments and different laser settings to determine which methods achieve optimal outcomes. We noted unique treatment regimens that yielded superior results. An overview of adverse effects is included to identify the most common ones. We concluded that more studies need to be done using uniform treatment parameters and reporting in order to establish which fractional CO2 laser treatment approaches allow for the greatest scar improvement.

  13. IL-1β a potential factor for discriminating between thyroid carcinoma and atrophic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Mnif, Mouna; Bougacha, Fadia; Charffedine, Ilhem; Rebuffat, Sandra; Rebai, Ahmed; Glasson, Emilie; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between cytokines and others soluble factors (hormones, antibodies...) can play an important role in the development of thyroid pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible correlation between serum cytokine concentrations, thyroid hormones (FT4 and TSH) and auto-antibodies (Tg and TPO), and their usefulness in discriminating between different thyroid conditions. In this study, we investigated serum from 115 patients affected with a variety of thyroid conditions (44 Graves' disease, 17 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 11 atrophic thyroiditis, 28 thyroid nodular goitre and 15 papillary thyroid cancer), and 30 controls. Levels of 17 cytokines in serum samples were measured simultaneously using a multiplexed human cytokine assay. Thyroid hormones and auto-antibodies were measured using ELISA. Our study showed that IL-1β serum concentrations allow the discrimination between atrophic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer groups (p = 0.027).

  14. [Study of the antioxidant drug "Karinat" in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Berspalov, V G; Shcherbakov, A M; Kalinovskiĭ, V P; Novik, V I; Chepik, O F; Aleksandrov, V A; Sobenin, I A; Orekhov, A N

    2004-01-01

    A randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of the drug karinat was carried out in patients with chronic multifocal atrophic gastritis. Karinat contains beta-carotene 2.5 mg, alpha-tocopherol 5 mg, ascorbic acid 30 mg and garlic powder 150 mg per tablet. Out of 66 patients, 34 received karinat, 32--placebo. Both karinat and placebo were administered for 6 months, one tablet twice a day. Karinat therapy improved digestion, the fibrogastroscopic pattern of mucosa, inhibited Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulated stomach activity, mitigated intestinal metaplasia and interfered with the epithelial proliferation of gastric mucosa. These therapeutic effects were more pronounced in the study group. On the whole, the effectiveness of the drug was significantly higher (29%). Karinat should be recommended for the management of chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor of stomach cancer.

  15. Implant Anchorage in the Nasopalatine Canal for the Rehabilitation of Severely Atrophic Maxilla.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pâmela Leticia Dos; Silva, Gustavo Henrique Souza; da Silva, Raquel Damazia; Da Silva Pereira, Fernanda Rayssa; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the clinical case of implant placement in the nasopalatine canal as an aid for atrophic maxilla rehabilitation. The surgical procedure was carried out in 2 stages, the first part consisted of a surgery to lift the maxillary sinus membrane associated with the xenogeneic bone placement and the second part consisted of the surgery for the implants placement, both under local anesthesia. A number of seven osseointegrated implants were placed in the maxilla, one was anchored in the nasopalatine canal region after having its neurovascular content emptied by means of the use of drill threads of the implant system. After 5 months, the implant reopening was carried out, followed by the molding, manufacturing and placement of the protocol-type prosthesis. The case has a 4-year follow-up without any painful symptomatology. The implant placed in the nasopalatine canal region is a viable option to assist in the rehabilitation with implant-supported prostheses in atrophic maxilla.

  16. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  17. Successful treatment of atrophic scars from cutaneous leishmaniasis using a fractional laser.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Khalid M

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis can lead to unsightly atrophic scars, which have limited treatment options. There is a scarcity of literature on its treatment modalities. Fractional lasers have been successfully used in treating a variety of skin conditions with minimal downtime and side effects. We report a successful treatment of a 25-year-old female patient with an atrophic scar from cutaneous leishmaniasis on the nose with a fractional laser (Fraxel Re:store SR 1500). Ten treatment sessions were performed at a pulse energy of 45 to 70 mJ. The treatment response was assessed by comparing pre- and posttreatment clinical photographs. After three sessions, the patient observed 40% improvement. More than 90% improvement was noticed after the tenth session. No significant adverse effects were noted. The improvement was persistent at the 3-month follow-up. The excellent improvement in this patient should encourage further studies to achieve more efficacy and optimize the treatment parameters.

  18. Major motor atrophic patterns in the face and neck: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Harnsberger, H.R.; Dillon, W.P.

    1985-06-01

    Cranial nerve deficits from various pathologic processes of the head and neck may result in characteristic patterns of denervation muscular atrophy. Such atrophic patterns may be clues to the location and extent of the lesion, particularly when cranial nerves are involved early in the course of the disease process. Thirty-six patients with computed tomographic (CT) evidence of muscular atrophy secondary to pathologic conditions involving the motor division of cranial nerves were examined. Five characteristic denervation muscular atrophy patterns seen on CT scans were identified. Recognition of these atrophic patterns can prevent misinterpretation of their CT appearance and direct the CT examination to the course of the compromised cranial nerve from the brainstem to its peripheral innervation.

  19. Effects of Thyme Extract Oils (from Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) on Cytokine Production and Gene Expression of oxLDL-Stimulated THP-1-Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, A; Reglero, G

    2012-01-01

    Properties of thyme extracts from three different species (Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) were examined. Two oil fractions from each species were obtained by CO(2) supercritical fluid extraction. Main compounds presented in the supercritical extracts of the three thyme varieties were 1,8 cineole, thymol, camphor, borneol, and carvacrol. As a cellular model of inflammation/atherogenesis, we use human macrophages derived from THP-1 monocytes and activated by oxidized LDLs. These cells were incubated with the thyme fraction oils, and the productions and gene expressions of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, IL-6, and IL-10 were determined. Thyme extracts significantly reduced production and gene expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, and IL-6 and highly increased these parameters on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine. Changes on production and gene expressions were dose dependent and according to the thyme content of each species. Taken together, these results may suggest that thyme extracts could have anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Effects of Thyme Extract Oils (from Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) on Cytokine Production and Gene Expression of oxLDL-Stimulated THP-1-Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, A.; Reglero, G.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of thyme extracts from three different species (Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis) were examined. Two oil fractions from each species were obtained by CO2 supercritical fluid extraction. Main compounds presented in the supercritical extracts of the three thyme varieties were 1,8 cineole, thymol, camphor, borneol, and carvacrol. As a cellular model of inflammation/atherogenesis, we use human macrophages derived from THP-1 monocytes and activated by oxidized LDLs. These cells were incubated with the thyme fraction oils, and the productions and gene expressions of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, IL-6, and IL-10 were determined. Thyme extracts significantly reduced production and gene expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, and IL-6 and highly increased these parameters on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine. Changes on production and gene expressions were dose dependent and according to the thyme content of each species. Taken together, these results may suggest that thyme extracts could have anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22577523

  1. Thymus atrophy and regeneration following dexamethasone administration to beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Cannizzo, F T; Spada, F; Benevelli, R; Nebbia, C; Giorgi, P; Brina, N; Bollo, E; Biolatti, B

    2010-08-28

    Thymus atrophy and regeneration were studied in 13- to 22-month-old beef calves treated with dexamethasone (DMT), using anabolic dosages and implementing different withdrawal times. Two trials were conducted. In trial 1, group A (n=6) received 0.7 mg/day DMT orally for 40 days, group B (n=6) received 1.4 mg/day orally for 40 days and group C (n=6) was the control. In trial 2, group D (n=6) received 0.7 mg/day DMT orally for 40 days, group E (n=6) received 1.4 mg/day orally for 40 days and group K (n=6) was the control. DMT withdrawal times before slaughter were six days (groups A and B) and 26 days (groups D and E). At slaughter, thymus atrophy was severe and progressive in animals from groups A and B. In contrast, thymus weight and volume of the animals from groups D and E were almost normal. Slight atrophy was also detected in the calves in these groups. Histological changes and Ki67 immunostaining revealed a large number of positive lymphoid cells, mostly in the cortical area, associated with higher expression of apoptosis in the medulla compared with controls. This demonstrated that the thymus of beef cattle is still able to regenerate following DMT administration.

  2. The discovery of the blood-thymus barrier.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    The blood-thymus barrier is a functional and selective barrier separating T-lymphocytes from blood and cortical capillaries in the cortex of the thymus. The existence of this barrier was proposed for the first in time in 1961 by Marshall and White, and demonstrated in 1963 by Clark and Weiss. The most clear morphological evidence concerning the existence of the blood-thymus barrier may be attributed to the collaborative work published in 1972 by two scientists, Morris Karnovsky and Elio Raviola. Raviola and Karnovsky, using peroxidase as a permeability tracer, demonstrated that the venules at the cortico-medullary junction are the site of leakage for blood antigens, while the capillaries draining the cortex are largely impermeable. Other permeability studies have confirmed the existence of a blood-thymus barrier, which allow the access to low molecular weight tracers, while most exclude high molecular weight particles. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thymic microenvironment reconstitution after postnatal human thymus transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Li, Jie; Devlin, Blythe H.; Markert, M. Louise

    2011-01-01

    A functional thymus develops after cultured thymus tissue is transplanted into subjects with complete DiGeorge anomaly. To gain insight into how the process occurs, 7 post-transplantation thymus biopsy tissues were evaluated. In 5 of 7 biopsies, the thymus appeared to be predominantly cortex with thymocytes expressing cortical markers. Unexpectedly, the epithelium expressed both cortical [cortical dendritic reticulum antigen 2 (CDR2)] and medullary [cytokeratin (CK) 14] markers. Early medullary development was suggested by epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) reactivity in small areas of biopsies. Two other biopsies had distinct mature cortex and medulla with normal restriction of CK14 to the medulla and subcapsular cortex, and of CDR2 to cortex. These data are consistent with a model in which thymic epithelium contains CK14+ “progenitor epithelial cells”. After transplantation these cells proliferate as CK14+CDR2+ thymic epithelial cells that are associated with cortical thymocytes. Later these cells differentiate into distinct cortical and medullary epithelia. PMID:21565561

  4. [Posterior mediastinal thymus. Apropos of a case in a child].

    PubMed

    Canarelli, J P; Pautard, J C; Baratte, B; Doidy, L; Ricard, J

    1992-01-01

    Posterior and upper mediastinal localization of the thymus gland is uncommon in young children. Presenting symptoms and signs are very variable from incidental diagnosis to bronchopneumonial with atelectasias of the left upper Chest X-Ray and CT Scan are sufficient to make the diagnosis. Treatment of complicated forms with bronchial compression requires thoracotomy and surgical excision.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Thy 1 homologue from human thymus.

    PubMed

    Bonewald, L F; Goust, J M; Sade, R M; Wang, A C

    1985-01-01

    A 40 000 M.W. glycoprotein was isolated from human thymus. This molecule binds lentil lectin, reacts with an antiserum made against the p25 antigen (the human Thy 1 homologue) and possesses almost identical amino acid composition as the p25 antigen and its 40 000 M.W. dimer.

  6. WNT signaling suppression in the senescent human thymus.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Velardi, Enrico; Grillari, Johannes; Kreil, David P; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Ángeles; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Leal, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Human thymus is completely developed in late fetal stages and its function peaks in newborns. After the first year of life, the thymus undergoes a progressive atrophy that dramatically decreases de novo T-lymphocyte maturation. Hormonal signaling and changes in the microRNA expression network are identified as underlying causes of human thymus involution. However, specific pathways involved in the age-related loss of thymic function remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed differential gene-expression profile and microRNA expression in elderly (70 years old) and young (less than 10 months old and 11 years old) human thymic samples. Our data have shown that WNT pathway deregulation through the overexpression of different inhibitors by the nonadipocytic component of the human thymus stimulates the age-related involution. These results are of particular interest because interference of WNT signaling has been demonstrated in both animal models and in vitro studies, with the three major hallmarks of thymic involution: (i) epithelial structure disruption, (ii) adipogenic process, and (iii) thymocyte development arrest. Thus, our results suggest that secreted inhibitors of the WNT pathway could be explored as a novel therapeutical target in the reversal of the age-related thymic involution.

  7. Resistance and barriers to local estrogen therapy in women with atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Krychman, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Vaginal atrophy results from a decrease in circulating estrogen and is experienced by approximately 50% of postmenopausal women. Its symptoms affect multiple dimensions of genitopelvic health, sexuality, and overall quality of life. Nonhormonal over-the-counter treatments may provide temporary symptom relief, but the condition is progressive, and hormonal treatment may be warranted. The study aims to review the literature and discuss the impact of atrophic vaginitis and various treatment options, including the resistance and barriers to the use of local estrogen therapy for atrophic vaginitis. This article also aims to provide a greater awareness of the condition and the difficulties in communicating effectively with patients, and to provide strategies to help healthcare professionals acquire effective communication skills to initiate a candid dialogue with patients who may be suffering in silence and may benefit from therapy. This review was based on peer-reviewed publications on the topic of atrophic vaginitis and local estrogen therapy identified from key word searches of PubMed, in addition to landmark studies/surveys and treatment guidelines/recommendations on menopause available in the literature and on the Internet. The main outcomes are the impact of atrophic vaginitis and the various treatment options, including the resistance and barriers to the use of local estrogen therapy. Minimally absorbed local vaginal estrogen therapy enables administration of estrogen doses much lower than systemic doses used for vasomotor symptoms. Local therapy is also the first-line pharmacologic treatment recommended by the North American Menopause and International Menopause Societies. Despite treatment options, the sensitive nature of the condition and embarrassment may prohibit or limit many women from openly discussing symptoms with healthcare professionals. Many are hesitant to initiate hormonal treatment because of safety concerns. Healthcare professionals should

  8. Dietary Intervention of Artemisia and Green Tea Extracts to Rejuvenate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Chronic Atrophic Gastritis and to Prevent Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Kangwan, Napapan; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Bok-Nam; Kim, Won-Hee; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-02-01

    As nonmicrobial dietary approach is capable of controlling Helicobacter pylori infection, we evaluated the efficacy of long-term dietary administration of Artemisia and/or green tea extracts on H. pylori-initiated, high-salt-promoted chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric tumorigenesis mouse model. Helicobacter pylori-infected and high-salt-diet-administered C57BL/6 mice were administered with Artemisia extracts (MP group) and/or green tea extracts (GT group) for 36 weeks in addition to the control group (ES group, gastroprotective drug, ecabet sodium 30 mg/kg, diet pellet). Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively, and their underlying molecular changes were measured in gastric homogenates. Detailed mechanisms were further evaluated in in vitro cell models. The erythematous and nodular changes and mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions were noted in the control group at 24 weeks. MP, GT, MPGT, and ES groups all showed significantly ameliorated pathologic lesion compared to the control group (p < .05). After the 36 weeks, scattered nodular masses with some central ulcers and thin gastric surface were noted in the control stomach, whereas no tumorous lesion and milder atrophic changes were observed in all MP, GT, and MPGT groups except ES group (p < .05). On molecular analysis, increased expressions of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, lipid peroxide, and activated STAT3 relevant to H. pylori infection were significantly decreased with MPGT administration (p < .01), whereas HSP70 was significantly increased. PGDH expressions, core tumor suppressor involved in carcinogenesis, were significantly decreased with H. pylori infection (p < .05), but significantly increased in MPGT group (p < .05). Increased mucosal apoptotic index noted in the control group was significantly decreased with MP and/or GT along with significantly preserved gastric gastroprotective mediators (p < .01) such as mucins, HSP27, and HSP70. H. pylori-induced serum

  9. Treatment of atrophic scars with fractionated CO2 laser facilitating delivery of topically applied poly-L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Rkein, Ali; Ozog, David; Waibel, Jill S

    2014-06-01

    Atrophic scars represent a loss of collagen and a challenging reconstructive dilemma with disappointing traditional treatments. To study the safety and efficacy of the treatment of atrophic scars using an ablative fractionated CO2 laser and topical poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) immediately after to improve atrophic scars. This was an uncontrolled, institutional review board-approved, prospective study evaluating the treatment of atrophic scars. Four blinded dermatologists evaluated a total of 20 photographs taken at baseline and 3 months after the laser and PLLA treatments using the Modified Manchester Scar Scale. Four criteria were evaluated: (1) overall improvement, (2) improvement in scar atrophy, (3) improvement in scar color/dyschromia mismatch, and (4) improvement in scar contour. All 4 observers accurately identified 76 of the 80 "before" and "after" photographs. Therefore, the blinded evaluating physicians agreed that at the 3-month follow-up visit, 95% of the scars had improved. Each criterion demonstrated an average improvement of at least 33%. The combination of using an ablative fractional CO2 laser and PLLA in the treatment of atrophic scars has a synergistic effect on their inherent properties in up-regulating new collagen synthesis to improve atrophic scars.

  10. Lack of specific association between gastric autoimmunity hallmarks and clinical presentations of atrophic body gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Bruno; Lahner, Edith; Negrini, Riccardo; Baccini, Flavia; Bordi, Cesare; Monarca, Bruno; Fave, Gianfranco Delle

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible relationships between gastric autoimmune phenomena and clinical presentations of this disorder, in consecutive atrophic body gastritis patients. METHODS: A total of 140 atrophic body gastritis patients, diagnosed as consecutive outpatients presenting with macrocytic or iron deficiency anemia, or longstanding dyspepsia underwent gastroscopy with antral and body biopsies, assay of intrinsic factor, parietal cells and Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) antibodies. Gastritis was assessed according to Sydney System. RESULTS: Parietal cell antibodies were equally distributed in all clinical presentations, whereas the positivity of intrinsic factor antibodies (49/140, 35%) was significantly higher in pernicious anemia patients (49.2%) than in iron deficiency (21.1%) and dyspeptic patients (27.8%). No specific pattern of autoantibodies was related to the clinical presentations of atrophic body gastritis. A positive correlation was obtained between the body atrophy score and the intrinsic factor antibody levels (r = 0.2216, P = 0.0085). Associated autoimmune diseases were present in 25/140 (17.9%) patients, but the prevalence of autoimmune diseases was comparable, irrespective of the clinical presentations. CONCLUSION: The so-called hallmarks of gastric autoimmunity, particularly in intrinsic factor antibody cannot be usefully employed in defining an autoimmune pattern in the clinical presentations of ABG. PMID:16149145

  11. Atrophic macular degeneration. Rate of spread of geographic atrophy and visual loss.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; McDonald, H R

    1989-10-01

    The authors studied 50 eyes with atrophic (dry) macular degeneration (geographic atrophy of age-related macular degeneration [GAMD], in 50 consecutive patients for 2 to 6 years (average, 3.4 years). There were 35 women and 15 men ranging in age from 60 to 89 years (average, 73 years). The areas of atrophy tended to follow the disappearance or flattening of soft drusen, pigment epithelial detachment, or reticular mottling of the retinal pigment epithelium. The atrophic areas were multifocal in 20 of the 50 eyes. Atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium was followed by atrophy of the choriocapillaris. The atrophic areas tended to expand (average rate in one direction, 139 microns per year) and cause gradual loss of central visual acuity. The rate of significant visual loss (from 20/50 or better to 20/100 or worse) was 8% of eyes per year. There was a tendency toward resistance of the spread of atrophy into the fovea. The atrophy tended to expand faster in patients under age 75 and slower in patients aged 75 and over. Subretinal neovascularization developed in ten of the 50 eyes.

  12. Rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic anterior mandible - the role of vertical alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mampilly, Mathew O; Rao, Latha P; Sequiera, Joyce; Rao, B H Sripathi; Chandra, Jagadish; Rai, Gunachandra

    2014-11-01

    The rehabilitation of patients with edentulous alveolar ridge is always a challenge, more so in case of a long standing atrophic mandible. Mandible, the largest movable bone in the maxillofacial skeleton is associated with many soft tissue attachments which imparts dislodging forces to prosthesis. In addition to this, the rate of resorption of the mandibular ridge is four times that of the maxilla. These factors make the environment of the mandibular arch less favorable to complete denture stability and retention. An ideal solution would be to augment the atrophic alveolar ridge with native bone of the individual which shall eliminate the possible complications, associated with conventional ridge augmentation procedures. With advent of modern technology, and increased biological understanding, the principles of distraction osteogenesis are increasingly being applied to the craniofacial skeleton and have been found to be a viable option in augmenting the native alveolar bone in the mandible. Here the application of an indigenous stainless steel vertical alveolar distraction device to augment atrophic anterior mandibular ridge is assessed in six patients.

  13. Rehabilitation of Edentulous Atrophic Anterior Mandible – The Role of Vertical Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Latha P; Sequiera, Joyce; Rao, B H Sripathi; Chandra, Jagadish; Rai, Gunachandra

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of patients with edentulous alveolar ridge is always a challenge, more so in case of a long standing atrophic mandible. Mandible, the largest movable bone in the maxillofacial skeleton is associated with many soft tissue attachments which imparts dislodging forces to prosthesis. In addition to this, the rate of resorption of the mandibular ridge is four times that of the maxilla. These factors make the environment of the mandibular arch less favorable to complete denture stability and retention. An ideal solution would be to augment the atrophic alveolar ridge with native bone of the individual which shall eliminate the possible complications, associated with conventional ridge augmentation procedures. With advent of modern technology, and increased biological understanding, the principles of distraction osteogenesis are increasingly being applied to the craniofacial skeleton and have been found to be a viable option in augmenting the native alveolar bone in the mandible. Here the application of an indigenous stainless steel vertical alveolar distraction device to augment atrophic anterior mandibular ridge is assessed in six patients. PMID:25584344

  14. Treatment of atrophic scars with fractional photothermolysis: short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyeong-Hun; Rhee, Do-Young; Bak, Hana; Chang, Sung-Eun; Lee, Mi-Woo; Choi, Jee-Ho; Moon, Kee-Chan; Bang, Jang-Seok; Kim, Beom-Joon; Kim, Myeung-Nam; Lee, Sun-Young

    2011-02-01

    Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. To determine the effectiveness and safety of fractional photothermolysis treatment of various atrophic scars in Korean patients. Fifty-nine patients with atrophic scars (caused by acne, trauma, herpes zoster, and burns) were treated with fractional photothermolysis using either Fraxel™ SR 750 or Fraxel™ SR 1500 instruments. Each patient underwent one to three treatment sessions 3-4 weeks apart. The assessment of treatment response was conducted by three dermatologists, who independently evaluated a series of photographs using a quartile grading scale. Skin biopsies were taken before treatment and 4 weeks after the final treatment, and were examined for procollagen-1, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and elastin by immunofluorescence staining. Four weeks after the final treatment, the mean overall improvement in objective grade was 2.0 when the Fraxel SR 750 was employed and 2.9 when the Fraxel SR 1500 was used. Confocal microscopy revealed an increase in procollagen-1 in dermis, with no difference or a slight increase in the levels of elastin and MMP-1. Side effects were minimal. After short-term follow-up, fractional photothermolysis appeared to be a safe and effective option for atrophic scar treatment of Asian skin.

  15. [Influence of peptides from pineal gland on thymus function at aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Trofimov, A V; Sevost'ianova, N N; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2010-01-01

    The interference between thymus and pineal gland during their involution is considered in this review. The research data about influence of thymus peptides on pineal gland and pineal peptides on thymus is summarized. Analysis of these data showed that pineal peptides (epithalamin, epitalon) had more effective geroprotective effect on thymus involution in comparison with geroprotective effect of thymic peptides (thymalin, thymogen) on involution of pineal gland. The key mechanisms of pineal peptides effect on thymus dystrophy is immunoendocrine cooperation, which is realized as transcription's activation of various proteins.

  16. Differential transcript profiles of MHC class Ib(Qa-1, Qa-2, and Qa-10) and Aire genes during the ontogeny of thymus and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Melo-Lima, Breno Luiz; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; de Magalhães, Danielle Aparecida Rosa; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Qa-2 and Qa-1 are murine nonclassical MHC class I molecules involved in the modulation of immune responses by interacting with T CD8(+) and NK cell inhibitory receptors. During thymic education, the Aire gene imposes the expression of thousands of tissue-related antigens in the thymic medulla, permitting the negative selection events. Aiming to characterize the transcriptional profiles of nonclassical MHC class I genes in spatial-temporal association with the Aire expression, we evaluated the gene expression of H2-Q7(Qa-2), H2-T23(Qa-1), H2-Q10(Qa-10), and Aire during fetal and postnatal development of thymus and other tissues. In the thymus, H2-Q7(Qa-2) transcripts were detected at high levels throughout development and were positively correlated with Aire expression during fetal ages. H2-Q7(Qa-2) and H2-T23(Qa-1) showed distinct expression patterns with gradual increasing levels according to age in most tissues analyzed. H2-Q10(Qa-10) was preferentially expressed by the liver. The Aire transcriptional profile showed increased levels during the fetal period and was detectable in postnatal ages in the thymus. Overall, nonclassical MHC class I genes started to be expressed early during the ontogeny. Their levels varied according to age, tissue, and mouse strain analyzed. This differential expression may contribute to the distinct patterns of mouse susceptibility/resistance to infectious and noninfectious disorders.

  17. Updates in MRI characterization of the thymus in myasthenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Popa, GA; Preda, EM; Scheau, C; Vilciu, C; Lupescu, IG

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the imaging appearance of the thymus in the myasthenic patients by using chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging, and, to correlate the chemical shift ratio (CSR) with pathologic findings after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: In the past year, a total of 11 myasthenic patients (4 males, 7 females; age range of 26-65 years), have been investigated by MRI centered at the thymic lodge. Our protocol included a Dual-Echo technique, T1-weighted In-phase/Opposed-phase MR images in all patients. A chemical shift ratio (CSR) was calculated by comparing the signal intensity of the thymus gland with that of the chest wall muscle for quantitative analysis. For this purpose, we have used standard region-of-interest electronic cursors at a slice level of the maximum axial surface of the thymus. We have identified two patients groups: a thymic hyperplasia group and a thymic tumoral group. Results: With the decrease in the signal intensity of the thymus gland at chemical shift, the MR imaging was evident only in the hyperplasia group. The mean CSR in the hyperplasia group was considerably lower than that in the tumor group, 0,4964 ± 0,1841, compared with 1,0398 ± 0,0244. The difference in CSR between the hyperplasia and tumor groups was statistically significant (P=0,0028). Conclusion: MR imaging using T1-weighted In-phase/Opposed-phase images could be a useful diagnostic tool in the preoperative assessment of the thymic lodge and may help differentiate thymic hyperplasia from tumors of the thymus gland Abbreviations: myasthenia gravis – MG; chemical shift ratio – CSR; frequency-encoding direction – FED PMID:22802894

  18. Critical influence of the thymus on peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Pedro Henrique Oliveira; Canto, Fábio B.; Nogueira, Jeane S.; Nunes, Caroline Fraga Cabral Gomes; Bonomo, Adriana César

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A tight balance between regulatory CD4+Foxp3+ (Treg) and conventional CD4+Foxp3− (Tconv) T cell subsets in the peripheral compartment, maintained stable throughout most of lifetime, is essential for preserving self‐tolerance along with efficient immune responses. An excess of Treg cells, described for aged individuals, may critically contribute to their reported immunodeficiency. In this work, we investigated if quantitative changes in thymus emigration may alter the Treg/Tconv homeostasis regardless of the aging status of the peripheral compartment. Methods We used two different protocols to modify the rate of thymus emigration: thymectomy of adult young (4–6 weeks old) mice and grafting of young thymus onto aged (18 months old) hosts. Additionally, lymphoid cells from young and aged B6 mice were intravenously transferred to B6.RAG2−/− mice. Alterations in Treg and Tconv peripheral frequencies following these protocols were investigated after 30 days by flow cytometry. Results Thymectomized young mice presented a progressive increase in the Treg cell frequency, while the grafting of a functional thymus in aged mice restored the young‐like physiological Treg/Tconv proportion. Strikingly, T cells derived from young or aged splenocytes colonized the lymphopenic periphery of RAG−/− hosts to the same extent, giving rise to similarly elevated Treg cell levels irrespective of the age of the donor population. In the absence of thymus output, the Treg subset seems to survive longer, as confirmed by their lower proportion of Annexin‐V+ cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that the thymus‐emigrating population, harboring an adequate proportion of Treg/Tconv lymphocytes, may be essential to keep the Treg cell balance, independently of age‐related shifts intrinsic to the peripheral environment or to the T cell biology. PMID:27980781

  19. INDUCTION OF IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE TO A THYMUS-DEPENDENT ANTIGEN IN THE ABSENCE OF THYMUS-DERIVED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, John W.

    1974-01-01

    Specific immunological unresponsiveness was induced using thymus-dependent antigens in congenitally athymic (nu/nu) mice, in which no T-cell function has been demonstrated. The tolerance was induced in vivo by the injection of 5–10 mg of either FGG or DNP-HGG. Spleen cells from treated mice were tested in vitro for the ability to mount thymus-independent immune responses against FGG in the presence of polymerized flagellin POL, and the DNP determinant conjugated to POL. A specific deficiency in either the in vitro anti-FGG or anti-DNP response was demonstrated, depending on the antigen used for treatment of the spleen cell donor. Athymic mice treated with FGG were also tested by in vivo challenge with FGG given with POL as an adjuvant and were found to be hyporesponsive. Unresponsiveness to in vitro challenge was established by 24 h after the in vivo injection of FGG. It was found that the injection of POL with the FGG prevented the development of unresponsiveness, but not if the POL was given 24 h or more after the FGG. The unresponsiveness could not be overcome by confrontation with allogeneic spleen cells from CBA mice, although the presence of allogeneic spleen cells had a large amplifying effect on the response of control spleen cells. These experiments demonstrate a mechanism for the tolerization of bone marrow-derived cells by thymus-dependent antigens in the absence of the thymus. PMID:4132995

  20. Alternatively spliced transcripts of the thymus-specific protease PRSS16 are differentially expressed in human thymus.

    PubMed

    Luther, C; Wienhold, W; Oehlmann, R; Heinemann, M K; Melms, A; Tolosa, E

    2005-02-01

    The putative serine protease PRSS16 is abundantly expressed in the thymic cortex and the gene is encoded within the HLA I complex. Although its function is not yet defined, the very restricted expression points to a role in T-cell development in the thymus. In this study, we show that the PRSS16 mRNA is alternatively spliced to generate at least five transcripts. Apart from the full-length sequence, we found two other isoforms with all putative active site residues of the serine protease, suggesting that those variants may also be functional. Semi-quantitative analysis of the splice variants in different tissue samples revealed a strong correlation between the specific formation of alternatively spliced PRSS16 transcripts and the age and thymus pathology status of the donor. Newborn thymi express mostly the PRSS16-4 and -5 isoforms and lack the PRSS16-1 transcript, which appears around 2 years of age and stays until adulthood. Incidentally, thymi from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with thymoma showed a marked decrease in the expression of the full-length PRSS16-1 and increased expression of the smaller isoforms. The data suggest a potential role of the PRSS16 isoforms in the postnatal morphogenesis of the thymus and in the thymus pathology related to MG.

  1. Intraoperative Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Thymus in Preclinical Models.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Kang, Homan; Gravier, Julien; Henary, Maged; Bordo, Mark W; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V

    2017-04-01

    There are currently no thymus-specific contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Thus, finding ectopic thymic tissue during certain operations is extremely difficult. The purpose of the present study was to determine if near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging could provide high sensitivity, real-time identification of thymic tissue during the operation. After initial in vivo screening of a 315-compound NIR fluorophore library for thymic uptake, methylene blue and five different 700-nm emitting candidate molecules were injected into CD-1 mice for quantitation of the signal-to-background ratio as a function of kinetics and dosing. Results were confirmed in 35-kg Yorkshire pigs. Dual-channel NIR imaging was also performed using a variety of 800-nm emitting NIR fluorophores targeted to various tissues in the mediastinum and neck. The compound Oxazine 170 demonstrated the highest signal-to-background ratio (≥3) for thymic tissue relative to mediastinal fat, heart, lung, muscle, thyroid gland, and parathyroid gland, with peak signal-to-background ratio occurring 4 h after 1 intravenous injection of a human equivalent dose of approximately 7 mg. Simultaneous dual-channel NIR imaging permitted unambiguous identification of the thymus from surrounding tissues, such as endocrine glands and lymph nodes. In mouse and pig, NIR fluorescence imaging using Oxazine 170 permits high sensitivity, real-time identification of thymic tissue for surgical procedures requiring its resection or avoidance. The performance of Oxazine 170 for imaging human thymic tissue is currently not known. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Food/nutrient intake and risk of atrophic gastritis among the Helicobacter pylori-infected population of northeastern Japan.

    PubMed

    Montani, Ai; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2003-04-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is considered a key risk factor for atrophic gastritis, along with other environmental factors, it is still unclear which factor is involved in the development of atrophic gastritis among H. pylori-infected subjects. In the present cross-sectional study, therefore, we analyzed various dietary factors in relation to the presence of atrophic gastritis among H. pylori-infected subjects who participated in a health check-up program in a town in northeastern Japan. One thousand and seventy-one subjects (362 males and 709 females) who provided both self-administered validated food frequency questionnaires and blood samples were the basis for the study, and all of them were serologically positive for H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Among them, 663 (223 males and 440 females) were diagnosed as having atrophic gastritis on the basis of serum pepsinogen levels. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated based on tertile categories of subjects without atrophic gastritis, using logistic regression analysis. Among females, high consumptions of rice (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3), cod roe (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.2) and cuttlefish (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.3) were associated with a moderately increased risk of atrophic gastritis after adjustment for age (P for trend = 0.02 for these items). Among males, high consumptions of rice and miso soup showed a tendency toward an increased risk (P for trend = 0.12 and 0.13, respectively). Vegetables and fruits showed no association among either males or females. From these results, it is suggested that the dietary habits of consumers of traditional Japanese foods may play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis after H. pylori infection.

  3. β2-Adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms in the relapse of myasthenia gravis with thymus abnormality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Zhang, Yun; He, Maolin

    2017-04-01

    The role of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) in the relapse of myasthenia gravis (MG) associated with thymus abnormality has not been fully identified. Using polymerase chain reaction and gene sequencing method, we investigated the relationship of β2-AR gene polymorphisms with different thymus pathology in MG patients. The role of β2-AR gene polymorphisms in the relapse of MG was further investigated. Age of onset (p = 0.034), the onset symptom of ocular MG (OMG; p = 0.023), the first symptom of OMG second generalization (p = 0.040) were different in MG with thymoma from those in MG with normal thymus or thymus hyperplasia. Gene polymorphisms of β2-AR on positions 16 and 27 showed no significant difference between relapsed and non-relapsed MG patients with thymus abnormality (thymus hyperplasia: position 16, p = 0.792; position 27, p = 0.664; thymoma: position 16, p = 0.226; position 27, p = 0.615). However, genotypes distribution on position 27 among MG patients with three thymus histology was significantly different (χ² = 8.153, p = 0.041). Furthermore, glucocorticoid can decrease relapse of MG with thymus hyperplasia (p = 0.021). MG patients with thymus abnormality differ from MG patients with normal thymus in age of onset, the onset symptom of OMG and the first symptom of OMG second generalization. β2-AR gene polymorphisms had no relationship with the relapse of MG with thymus abnormality. Gene polymorphism of β2-AR on position 27 was associated with different thymus histology of MG. Glucocorticoid was able to reduce the risk of relapse of MG with thymus hyperplasia.

  4. Assessment of first-trimester thymus size and correlation with maternal diseases and fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Borgelt, Judith M A; Möllers, Mareike; Falkenberg, Maria K; Amler, Susanne; Klockenbusch, Walter; Schmitz, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the reliability of fetal thymus measurement during first-trimester screening, and associated fetal thymus size with crown-rump length, maternal diseases and fetal outcome. In a retrospective cohort of 971 normal singleton first-trimester fetuses, we measured the anterior-posterior diameter of the thymus in a midsagittal plane in 767 fetuses. The intra-observer and inter-observer reliabilities were tested by intra-class correlation coefficient. We correlated thymus size with fetal crown-rump length, and investigated its association with maternal diseases (diabetes mellitus, rheumatic disorders, hypertension and coagulation disorders) and fetal outcome (small for gestational age, preterm birth and umbilical artery pH) using regression analyses. The intra-observer and inter-observer reliabilities of fetal thymus measurement were excellent (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.926, 95% CI 0.745-0.981 and 0.945, 95% CI 0.886-0.993, respectively). A linear relationship was found between crown-rump length and thymus size (β = 0.023, p = 0.001). Pregnancies affected by maternal diabetes had a decreased fetal thymus size (β = -0.209, p = 0.001), whereas in pregnancies affected by maternal rheumatic disease the thymus size was increased (β = 0.285, p < 0.001). Fetal thymus size was not associated with maternal hypertension or maternal coagulation disorders. There was a positive association between preterm birth and fetal thymus size (p < 0.001). Measurement of first-trimester thymus size is reliable. Fetal thymus size has a linear correlation with crown-rump length. Maternal diabetes, rheumatic disease and preterm birth appear to have an association with fetal thymus size. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  6. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, AT; Horhat, FG

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  7. Metabolic properties of histones from rat liver and thymus gland

    PubMed Central

    Ord, Margery G.; Stocken, L. A.

    1966-01-01

    1. The incorporation of 14C-labelled amino acids into acid-extractable proteins from rat-liver and -thymus nuclei confirmed the existence of a protein component with a higher uptake than that into the major histone components. 2. This rapidly labelled component appeared to contain the thiol groups detectable in the acid extracts. 3. Histone f1 contained 1mol. of serine phosphate/mol. of mol.wt. of 42000–43000. 4. Phosphate was present in other components of the 50mm-hydrochloric acid extract from liver and thymus nuclei, and was probably associated with the thiol-containing component. 5. The difference in amino acid uptake into the histones of diffuse and dense chromatin was confirmed. Dense chromatin was found to have a higher proportion of disulphide than did diffuse chromatin. PMID:5911533

  8. Human platelet aggregation inhibitors from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kenji; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Takaishi, Yoshihisa

    2002-06-01

    Two antiaggregant compounds, thymol (compound 1) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-5,5'-diisopropyl-2,2'-dimethylbiphenyl (compound 2) were isolated from the leaves of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). The structures were determined by (1)H-, (13)C-NMR and mass spectra (MS) studies. These compounds inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, ADP, arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin except that compound 2 did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by thrombin.

  9. [Surgery of the thymus gland, normal, atrophied or cancerous].

    PubMed

    Limet, R; Rogister, B

    2000-10-01

    Thymoma is the most frequently resected mediastinal tumor. Its malignancy is related more to macroscopical findings than to microscopical analysis. All thymomas should be resected, in order to prevent malignant degeneration. Furthermore, for the treatment of myasthenia, several centers recommend resection of the thymus, either tumoral (thymoma) or atrophied. Although the role of surgery in this regard is controversial, all authors unanimously stress that complete resection of all thymic remnants is essential to achieve adequate results.

  10. Neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus: a clinicopathological and prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Gal, A A; Kornstein, M J; Cohen, C; Duarte, I G; Miller, J I; Mansour, K A

    2001-10-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus are rare, histologically diverse neoplasms with an unpredictable clinical behavior. This study provides a useful clinicopathological classification and determines the relevance of specific prognostic factors. Ten neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus were analyzed for specific clinical and pathological features. Prognostic factors of these cases and 71 previously published cases were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox multivariate hazard model. There were 7 males and 3 females, with ages ranging from 26 to 77 years. Cases were classified as carcinoid tumor (2), atypical carcinoid tumor (6), and small cell carcinoma (2). An advanced clinical stage was evident in all instances with frequent recurrence (4) and metastases (8), and a short disease-free survival. Overall mortality was 60%. Statistical analysis of current and previously published cases (n = 81 total) revealed that unresectability (p = 0.0001), extent of surgical resection (p = 0.0002), and advanced clinical stage at presentation (p = 0.03) were associated with higher mortality. By multivariate Cox regression analysis, unresectability (p = 0.02) and advanced clinical stage (p = 0.03) were associated with decreased survival. Neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus can be classified into distinct clinicopathological entities, and specific factors have prognostic relevance.

  11. Relation of atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori-CagA+ and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Rafaela; Une, Clas; Ramírez, Vanessa; Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; González, María I; Ramírez, José A; de Mascarel, Antoine; Cuenca, Patricia; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo; Mégraud, Francis

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) CagA+ infection and pro-inflammatory polymorphisms of the genes interleukin (IL)-1RN and IL-1B with the risk of gastric atrophy and peptic ulcers in a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, a country with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. METHODS: Seven biopsy specimens, a fasting blood sample and a questionnaire concerning nutritional and sociodemographic factors were obtained from 501 consecutive patients who had undergone endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. A histopathological diagnosis was made. Pepsinogen concentrations were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Infection with H pylori CagA+ was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR respectively. RESULTS: In this dyspeptic population, 86% were H pylori positive and of these, 67.8% were positive for CagA. Atrophic antral gastritis (AAG) was associated with CagA+ status [odd ratio (OR) = 4.1; P < 0.000] and fruit consumption (OR = 0.3; P < 0.00). Atrophic body gastritis (ABG) was associated with pepsinogen PGI/PGII < 3.4 (OR = 4.9; P < 0.04) and alcohol consumption (OR = 7.3; P < 0.02). Duodenal ulcer was associated with CagA+ (OR = 2.9; P < 0.04) and smoking (OR = 2.4; P < 0.04). PGI < 60 μg/L as well as PGI/PGII < 3.4 were associated with CagA+. CONCLUSION: In a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, H pylori CagA+ is not associated with ABG, but it is a risk factor for AAG. The pro-inflammatory cytokine polymorphisms IL-1B + 3945 and IL-1RN are not associated with the atrophic lesions of this dyspeptic population. PMID:19030199

  12. Macroplate fixation of fractures of the edentulous atrophic mandible: immediate function and masticatory rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Steffen; Bürgers, Ralf; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Gosau, Martin

    2011-04-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the treatment outcome of fractures of the edentulous atrophic mandible by means of an extraoral approach using open reduction and internal fixation with macroplates. Eighteen patients with 21 fractures of the atrophic mandible, who had been treated between 1997 and 2006, were retrospectively analysed. Mandible height was categorised according to the Luhr classification and the patients' general health (The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification). Three types of titanium macroplates were used. Demographic data, treatment outcomes and the pre- and postoperative ability to wear mandible dentures were evaluated. The study population consisted of five men and 13 women with a median age of 78 years. The mean follow-up duration was 28 months. The most common cause of fractures was accidental falls (50%); the mandible was affected in 77.8%. Three fractures occurred in class I (bone height 15-20 mm), seven in class II (10-15 mm), and 11 in class III atrophy (<10 mm). According to the ASA classification, the collective showed a mean value of 3. An overall complication rate of 16.7% was noted, consisting of two minor and one major complication that required a second intervention. Five patients needed removal of the osteosynthesis material for prosthetic reasons. Only 50% of the patients were able to wear their dentures before surgery, and all but one were able to wear their prosthesis postoperatively. Treatment of atrophic mandible fractures with macroplates by means of an extraoral approach showed good results and a low complication rate. This procedure allows elderly patients to instantly load the mandible in the means of prosthetic and masticatory rehabilitation, preventing the necessity for second interventions.

  13. Histomorphometric analysis following augmentation of the anterior atrophic maxilla with cancellous bone block allograft.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Joseph; Marilena, Vered; Gross, Ora; Mardinger, Ofer; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2012-01-01

    Grafting with bone blocks may be required to restore the alveolar process in extremely atrophic maxillae prior to implant placement to ensure both function and esthetics. The present study was conducted to histologically and histomorphometrically evaluate the application of allograft cancellous bone blocks for the augmentation of the anterior atrophic maxilla. Consecutive patients with severe atrophy in the anterior maxilla underwent augmentation with cancellous bone block allografts. Bony deficiencies of at least 3 mm horizontally and up to 3 mm vertically according to computed tomographic para-axial reconstructions served as inclusion criteria. After 6 months, implants were placed and a cylindric sample core from the graft area was collected. All specimens were prepared for histologic and histomorphometric examination. Forty patients were included in the study. Eighty-three implants were placed in bone that was augmented with 60 cancellous freeze-dried bone block allografts. The implant survival rate was 98.8%. Mean follow-up was 48 ± 22 months (range, 14 to 82 months). The mean percentage of newly formed bone was 33% ± 18%, that of the residual cancellous block allograft was 26% ± 17%, and marrow and connective tissue comprised 41% ± 2%. Statistically significant histomorphometric differences regarding newly formed bone and residual cancellous block allograft were found between younger (< 40 years) and older (≥ 40 years) patients, respectively. Age did not appear to influence the percentage of marrow and connective tissue. Cancellous bone block allograft is biocompatible and osteoconductive, permitting new bone formation following augmentation of extremely atrophic anterior maxillae in a two-stage implant placement procedure. New bone formation was age-dependent.

  14. Efficacy and safety of vaginal estriol and progesterone in postmenopausal women with atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Janet A; Carter, Gloria; Meyn, Leslie A; Mermelstein, Fred; Balk, Judith L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of intravaginal estriol and progesterone on atrophic vaginitis in postmenopausal women. Under a physician-sponsored Investigational New Drug application, 19 healthy postmenopausal women with atrophic vaginitis received vaginal suppositories containing estriol (1 mg) and progesterone (30 mg). The participants were instructed to insert one suppository intravaginally once daily for 2 weeks and thrice weekly for a total of 6 months. Vaginal pH, Vaginal Maturation Index, urinalysis, self-reported vaginal dryness, menopausal quality of life, and serum estriol and progesterone levels were measured at enrollment and after 3 and 6 months of suppository use. Endometrial biopsies were obtained at enrollment and at 6 months. After 2 weeks of therapy, six participants had serum estriol and progesterone measured. The Vaginal Maturation Index, vaginal pH, and vaginal dryness rating improved significantly at 3 and 6 months compared with baseline. Menopausal quality of life scores improved significantly in all domains, with the sexual subscale showing the most improvement. There were no cases of endometrial hyperplasia after 6 months of suppository use. Serum preinsertion estriol at week 2 and months 3 and 6 were similar to baseline levels. Serum preinsertion progesterone increased but returned to baseline preinsertion levels at month 6, and preinsertion levels were significantly less at month 6 compared with month 3. Intravaginal administration of a combination estriol and progesterone agent to women with atrophic vaginitis may represent a safe and effective alternative to systemic hormone replacement, although this study was not adequate to provide proof of efficacy given that it was uncontrolled.

  15. Successful treatment of atrophic facial leishmaniasis scars by co2 fractional laser.

    PubMed

    AlGhamdi, Khalid; Khurrum, Huma

    2014-11-01

    A permanent, unpleasant atrophic leishmaniasis scar is a potentially disfiguring condition that causes social stigma with limited treatment choices. Fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing is expected to be a safe and effective treatment for leishmaniasis scars. To assess the safety and efficacy of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with a CO2 laser for facial leishmaniasis atrophic scars. Eleven patients (five males, age 18-47 years) underwent the fractional CO2 laser procedure. The mean duration for scars was 18.3 years. Three to five treatment sessions with the fractional laser eCO2 (10,600 nm, Lutronic Corporation, Gyeonggi-do, Korea ) were performed for each patient, at 2-month intervals, under topical anesthesia. Two passes (with tip type 120, density 150 spots/cm2 in static mode, and peak power of 30 watts) were performed on each leishmaniasis scar. Pulse energies ranged between 100 and 140 mJ. Posttreatment improvements in texture, atrophy, and overall satisfaction with appearance were graded on a quartile scale 1 month after the second session and 3 months after the final session. Scar improvement was graded using a 4-point score with a maximum score of 20. At the 3-month posttreatment follow-up, all subjects were rated as having at least 50% improvement in texture, atrophy, borders, and overall appearance of scars. The median score of improvement was 18 of 20 (range 11-19). Mild postinflammatory hyperpigmentation was the only adverse effect, observed in 18% (2 of 11) of subjects. After the procedure, moderate to severe erythema and edema typically resolved within 24 to 48 hours. No additional adverse effects were observed. Fractional CO2 resurfacing represents a safe, effective, and well-tolerated potential treatment for atrophic facial leishmaniasis scars in ethnic skin.

  16. Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing as Monotherapy in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2014-01-01

    Background: While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as ‘excellent’ if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and <25% improvement were labelled as ‘good’ and ‘poor’ response, respectively. The overall satisfaction of the patients and any adverse reactions to the treatment were also noted. Results: Most of the patients showed a combination of different morphological types of acne scars. At the time of final assessment 6 months after the last laser session, an excellent response was observed in 26 patients (43.3%) while 15 (25%) and 19 patients (31.7%) demonstrated a good and poor response respectively. Rolling and superficial boxcar scars responded the best while pitted scars responded the least to fractional laser monotherapy. The commonest reported adverse effect was transient erythema and crusting lasting for an average of 3-4 and 4-6 days, respectively while three patients developed post-inflammatory pigmentation lasting for 8-12 weeks. Conclusions: Fractional laser resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar scars with minimal

  17. [Severe hyperlipidemia, secondary to hypothyroidism due to atrophic thyroiditis in a girl].

    PubMed

    Pacín, Mirta

    2009-02-01

    We present a 5 years 8 months old girl with severe hyperlipidemia (high total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein values, and also, ectopic fat pericardial deposit). She was treated with diet and cholestyramine, without diagnosis of her disease etiology. Growth detention, weight loss, retarded bone age and clinical signs of hypometabolism were recorded. Thyroid profile confirms hypothyroidism diagnosis. Based on positive anti-thyroid antibodies and clearly reduced thyroid volume, a diagnosis of autoimmune atrophic thyroiditis was made, a very unusual pathology in early infancy. Linear growth was affected by late diagnosis.

  18. Plasma estrogen concentrations after oral and vaginal estrogen administration in women with atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Mary Beth; Nelson, Anita L; Mayer, Philip R; Ranganath, Radhika P; Norris, Paul M; Helzner, Eileen C; Preston, Richard A

    2010-11-01

    In this open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, two-treatment crossover study, 24 postmenopausal women with moderate to severe atrophic vaginitis received 0.3 mg conjugated estrogens daily for 14 days: 7 days orally (0.3 mg tablet) and 7 days vaginally (0.5 g cream). Steady-state plasma concentrations of E2 and estrone were one-third lower after vaginal versus oral administration of conjugated estrogens. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical presentation of multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Vieira, Érica Cristina; Minicucci, Eliana Maria; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease is observed mainly in recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation and is expressed by cutaneous or systemic signals and symptoms. Graft-versus-host disease is clinically classified as acute or chronic. Chronic Graft-versus-host disease occurs in up to 70% of hematopoietic cell transplanted patients and its clinical manifestations have important impact on morbidity and quality of life. The authors report an expressive cutaneous, oral and adnexal involvement in a patient with chronic Graft-versus-host disease with multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern. PMID:24173188

  20. Recent developments in interpositional bone-grafting of the atrophic mandible.

    PubMed

    Moloney, F; Stoelinga, P J; Tideman, H; de Koomen, H A

    1985-02-01

    A clinical study on 54 patients, who underwent augmentation of the atrophic mandible by interposed bone-grafts, but in whom routine follow-up vestibuloplasty was deliberately avoided, is presented. The results show a reduced rate of bone resorption in the anterior region and less interference with lip and chin sensibility. An additional study is included concerning the fate of the elevated ridge and associated bone-graft in the body region posterior to the mental foramen. Results suggest that the resorption pattern in this area is very similar to that of a subperiosteal bone-graft. Modification of surgical technique in this regard has produced encouraging results.

  1. Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, K.; Sado, T.

    1984-04-01

    Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus were studied in three sets of experiments. When TXB mice were grafted with 1-week-old thymus which had been previously irradiated at various doses, an exponential decrease was observed in the morphological regeneration of the thymus grafts and in their T-cell-inducing function at doses of 600 R and over, showing about 10% that of the control at 1500 R. When in situ thymus of adult mice was locally irradiated, the radiation effect on T-cell-inducing function was less pronounced as compared with the first experiment; i.e., about 40% of the control at 1797 R. When in situ thymus of 1-day-old newborn mice was locally irradiated, regeneration potential of 1-day-old newborn thymus was highly resistant to radiation exposure and no effect on immunological functions was observed even by local irradiation of 2000 R.

  2. Fatty infiltration of the thymus in response to illness in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Taweevisit, Mana; Anekpuritanang, Tauangtham; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2015-04-01

    Under physiologic stress, glucocorticoids contribute to thymic involution. While steroids enhance fatty infiltration, this change has not been well studied in the pediatric thymus during illness. Evaluation of 130 thymuses from fetuses, infants and children determined the frequency of thymic fatty infiltration to be low (25%), particularly in fetal thymus (4%). In most cases, fatty infiltration was focal. There was a significant correlation with duration of illness, but not with patient age, gestational age, or underlying disease. There was significantly less fatty infiltration in fetal thymus compared to post-natal thymus, for the same degree of thymic involution. Only seven cases showed diffuse thymic fatty infiltration; all were post-natal associated with an infectious etiology. In contrast, fetal cases of chorioamnionitis seldom showed fatty infiltration and only focally, implying the stress response of fetal thymus differs post-natal, possibly related to the timing of adipose tissue development and fetal glucocorticoid response to stress.

  3. Antibacterial activity and chemical constitutions of essential oils of Thymus persicus and Thymus eriocalyx from west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Talei, Gholam Reza; Meshkatalsadat, Mohammad Hadi

    2007-11-01

    The essential oils of Thymus persicus and Thymus eriocalyx were collected in Lorestan province, west of Iran and were examined by GC/MS and bacteriological tests. Twenty seven compounds representing 92.095% of T. persicus and 99.77% of Thymus eriocalyx essential oils were identified. The major constituents of T. persicus were thymol (10.71%), carvacrol (25.71%), gamma-terpinene (5.63%), alpha-pinene (1.14%), beta-pinene (1.02%), limonene (11.65%) trans-sabinene hydrate (7.78%) and 1-borneol (4.07%) and the major compounds of T. eriocalyx. were 1, 8-cinole (3.07%), L-linalool (1.01%), thymol (66.34%), caryophyllene oxide (2.96%) and carvacrol (7.5%). The oils also were examined for antibacterial activities against 6 standard bacteria by the broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods. They exhibited significant antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC =1 : 235, MBC =1:20), Escherichia coli (MIC = 1:320, MBC =1:80) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (MIC = MBC = 1:1280). The results were compared with control antibiotics.

  4. Histology and ultrastructure of the thymus during development in tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianmeng; Chen, Qiong; Lu, Maixin; Hu, Xinxin; Wang, Miao

    2017-05-01

    The thymus in teleost fishes plays an important role in producing functionally competent T-lymphocytes. However, the thymus in tilapia is not well known, which greatly hampers investigations into the immune responses of tilapia infected by aquatic pathogens. The histological structure and ultrastructure of the thymus in Oreochromis niloticus, including embryos and larvae at different developmental stages, juveniles, and adult fish, were systematically investigated using whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH), and light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The position of the thymus primordium was first labeled in the embryo at 2 days post-fertilization (dpf) with the thymus marker gene recombination activating gene 1 (Rag1), when the water temperature was 27 °C. Obvious structures of the thymus were easily observed in 4-dpf embryos. At this stage, the thymus was filled with stem cells. At 6 dpf, the thymus differentiated into the cortex and medulla. The shape of the thymus was 'broad bean'-like during the early stages from 4 to 10 dpf, and became wedge-shaped in fish larvae at 20 dpf. At 6 months post-fertilization (mpf), the thymus differentiated into the peripheral zone, central zone, and inner zone. During this stage, myoid cells and adipocytes appeared in the inner zone following thymus degeneration. Then, the thymus displayed more advanced degeneration by 1 year post-fertilization (ypf), and the separation of cortex and medulla was not observed at this stage. The thymic trabecula and lobule were absent during the entire course of development. However, the typical Hassall's corpuscle was present and underwent degeneration. Additionally, TEM showed that the thymic tissues contained a wide variety of cell types, namely lymphocytes, macrophages, epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and mastocytes. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  5. A fatal case of malignant atrophic papulosis (Degos' disease) in a man with factor V Leinden mutation and lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Hohwy, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Glümer; Tøttrup, Anders; Steiniche, Torben; Fogh, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    Malignant atrophic papulosis (Degos' disease) is a very rare condition characterized by atrophic papular skin lesions and variable association of systemic involvement. We describe a 33-year-old man who presented with a widespread skin eruption consistent with malignant atrophic papulosis. During the course of the disease he even developed penile ulcerations, a symptom that has been reported only a few times previously. He subsequently died of multiple perforations of the small bowel 2.5 years after onset of the disease. Laboratory investigations revealed a mutation of factor V Leiden and the presence of lupus anticoagulant, but no anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The patient was treated with narrow-band ultraviolet (UV)B, prednisolone and, later, aspirin, pentoxifyllin and warfarin. Despite this very intensive anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapy, the treatment had no effect on the skin lesions and could not prevent systemic involvement.

  6. Risk factors of type 1 gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis. A retrospective, multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Campana, Davide; Ravizza, Davide; Ferolla, Piero; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Grimaldi, Franco; Albertelli, Manuela; Ricci, Claudio; Santini, Donatella; Brighi, Nicole; Fazio, Nicola; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Tomassetti, Paola

    2016-09-03

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the presence of risk factors for a type 1 gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia in a large cohort of patients with chronic atrophic gastritis. The study design consisted of an Italian multicentre, retrospective analysis. The study included all consecutive patients with chronic atrophic gastritis with or without type 1 gastric neuroendocrine neoplasias followed at the participating centres. Two hundred and twenty-nine patients with chronic atrophic gastritis were enroled at the participating centres. A total of 207 patients (154 female, 53 males, median age: 56.0 years) were included in the final analysis. One hundred and twenty-six patients had chronic atrophic gastritis without a gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia and 81 had a chronic atrophic gastritis with type 1 gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia. The median Chromogranin A level, evaluated in 141 patients, was 52.0 U/L. At upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, atrophy of the gastric mucosa was mild/moderate in 137 patients and severe in 68. Intestinal metaplasia of the corpus was present in 168 patients. At histological examination, 81 patients had a gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia (42 patients had a NET G1 and 33 a NET G2). The median Ki67 index was 2.0 %. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the risk factors for a gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia were: male gender, chromogranin A greater than 61 U/L, presence of intestinal metaplasia and age equal to or greater than 59 years. Chromogranin A greater than 61 U/L, the presence of intestinal metaplasia and male gender were independent risk factors for a type 1 gastric neuroendocrine neoplasia in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis.

  7. [Acetylcholinesterase-positive innervation in the regenerated thymus in old rats after surgical and chemical castration].

    PubMed

    Dorko, F; Kocisová, M; Rybárová, S; Dorko, E

    1998-05-01

    Surgical and chemical castrations in old rats result in the regeneration of the involuted thymus. The distribution of ACHE-positive nerves did not differ in the regenerated thymi after surgical and chemical castrations. A number of ACHE-positive nerves were detected not only in perivascular topography but also in the functioning thymus parenchyma. A marked difference in thymus density of ACHE-positive nerves was found in rats without castration. We assume that our findings represent an indirect evidence that cholinergic nerves stimulate lymphopoiesis in the thymus. (Fig. 6, Ref. 16.)

  8. Altered levels of nerve growth factor in the thymus of subjects with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Stampachiacchiere, Barbara; Marinova, Tsvetana; Velikova, Kamelia; Philipov, Stanislav; Stankulov, Ivan S; Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF), a polypeptide known for its neurotrophic activities, is also involved in the differentiation and survival of immune cells, and that NGF and its high-affinity receptor are present in the thymus. We here demonstrate that the thymus of humans affected by myasthenia gravis (MG) contains significant concentrations of NGF. These observations support our hypothesis of a role for NGF in the thymus and suggest that the changes observed in the thymus of subject with MG may have functional significance.

  9. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  10. A two-short-implant-supported molar restoration in atrophic posterior maxilla: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the stress distribution of 2-short implants (2SIs) installed in a severely atrophic maxillary molar site. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different diameters of internal connection implants were modeled: narrow platform (NP), regular platform (RP), and wide platform (WP). The maxillary first molars were restored with one implant or two short implants. Three 2SI models (NP-oblique, NP-vertical, and NP-horizontal) and four single implant models (RP and WP in a centered or cantilevered position) were used. Axial and oblique loadings were applied on the occlusal surface of the crown. The von Mises stress values were measured at the bone-implant, peri-implant bone, and implant/abutment complex. RESULTS The highest stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and the peri-implant bone was noticed in the RP group, and the lowest stress distribution was observed in the 2SI groups. Cantilevered position showed unfavorable stress distribution with axial loading. 2SI types did not affect the stress distribution in oblique loading. The number and installation positions of the implant, rather than the bone level, influenced the stress distribution of 2SIs. The implant/abutment complex of WP presented the highest stress concentration while that of 2SIs showed the lowest stress concentration. CONCLUSION 2SIs may be useful for achieving stable stress distribution on the surrounding bone and implant-abutment complex in the atrophic posterior maxilla. PMID:27555900

  11. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. J. M.; Mitchell, G.; Bailie, N.; Thornhill, D.; Watterson, J.; Kimbell, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  12. A two-short-implant-supported molar restoration in atrophic posterior maxilla: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Ho-Yong; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stress distribution of 2-short implants (2SIs) installed in a severely atrophic maxillary molar site. Three different diameters of internal connection implants were modeled: narrow platform (NP), regular platform (RP), and wide platform (WP). The maxillary first molars were restored with one implant or two short implants. Three 2SI models (NP-oblique, NP-vertical, and NP-horizontal) and four single implant models (RP and WP in a centered or cantilevered position) were used. Axial and oblique loadings were applied on the occlusal surface of the crown. The von Mises stress values were measured at the bone-implant, peri-implant bone, and implant/abutment complex. The highest stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and the peri-implant bone was noticed in the RP group, and the lowest stress distribution was observed in the 2SI groups. Cantilevered position showed unfavorable stress distribution with axial loading. 2SI types did not affect the stress distribution in oblique loading. The number and installation positions of the implant, rather than the bone level, influenced the stress distribution of 2SIs. The implant/abutment complex of WP presented the highest stress concentration while that of 2SIs showed the lowest stress concentration. 2SIs may be useful for achieving stable stress distribution on the surrounding bone and implant-abutment complex in the atrophic posterior maxilla.

  13. Significant reduction of homocysteine level with multiple B vitamins in atrophic glossitis patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, A; Wang, Y-P; Lin, H-P; Chen, H-M; Cheng, S-J; Chiang, C-P

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated whether supplementations of different vitamins and iron could reduce the serum homocysteine levels in 91 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients. Atrophic glossitis (AG) patients with concomitant deficiencies of vitamin B12 only (n = 39, group I), folic acid only (n = 10, group II), iron only (n = 9, group III), or vitamin B12 plus iron (n = 19, group IV) were treated with vitamin BC capsules plus deficient hematinics. AG patients without definite hematinic deficiencies (n = 14, group V) were treated with vitamin BC capsules only. The blood homocysteine and hematinic levels at baseline and after treatment till all oral symptoms had disappeared were measured and compared by paired t-test. Supplementations with vitamin BC capsules plus corresponding deficient hematinics for groups I, II, III, IV patients and with vitamin BC capsules only for group V patients could reduce the high serum homocysteine levels to significantly lower levels after a mean treatment period of 8.3-11.6 months (all P-values < 0.05). Supplementations with vitamin BC capsules plus corresponding deficient hematinics or with vitamin BC capsules only can reduce the high serum homocysteine levels to significantly lower levels in AG patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  15. Stability of edentulous, atrophic mandibles after insertion of different dental implants. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Torsiglieri, T; Raith, S; Rau, A; Deppe, H; Hölzle, F; Steiner, T

    2015-06-01

    Fractures of the atrophic edentulous mandible are a rare complication that can become severe after the insertion of dental implants. This in vitro study investigated the effects of different implant settings varying in number, diameter, and length. and the influence of a fixed bar. In biomechanical experiments on artificial mandibles, an unmodified reference group, four implant settings with two different implants, and the effect of adding a fixed bar to these settings were tested. All specimens were loaded with incisal biting forces until failure due to fracture. Implants weakened all specimens significantly compared with those in the reference group. Without a fixed bar, four short and thick implants showed the best results, with high significance. With a fixed bar, four long and thin implants withstood the highest loads. The addition of fixed bars reduced the differences between the implant settings. Fixed bars did not show increased stability for all groups; however, these groups showed a higher mean strength. Four implants with a short and thick design should be the first choice when implants are placed without a fixed bar in an atrophic mandible. With a fixed bar, four long and thin implants should be used. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment with oxytetracycline hydrochloride in the prevention of atrophic rhinitis in baby pigs.

    PubMed

    de Jong, M F; Oosterwoud, R A

    1977-02-15

    Atrophic rhinitis (AR) caused serious losses in a breeding herd including approximately 120 sows. The extent to which piglets were affected by AR was assessed by determining the degree of shortening of the upper jaw. Animals showing a crooked nose or grade two or more of shortening of the upper jaw were considered to be clinically positive. Grades three and four of the upper jaw were observed in those animals which were severely affected by Atrophic rhinitis. Treatment of all piglets up to about eight weeks of age by the antibiotic oxytetracycline hydrochloride directed against the bacteria Bordetella bronchisepica and Pasteurella multocida was successful in reducing the proportion of clinically affected piglets from 30 per cent to 0 per cent within eight weeks. There was found to be a positive relationship between the proportion of piglets infected with the two above bacteria at an age of about five weeks and the incidence of shortening of the upper jaw at an age of about eight weeks. The proportion of piglets with shortening of the upper jaw rose following a marked increase in the number of piglets in farrowing and flat-deck houses and as a result of the supply of inadequately medicated feed.

  17. [Prevalence of atrophic gastritis in different populations in Siberia on medical evidence of the serological survey].

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, O V; Kurilovich, S A; Krotov, S A; Krotova, V A; Bessonov, P P; Vasil'ev, R R; Tatarinova, O V; Muchina, E G

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of atrophic gastritis in various population of Siberia with serological tests was studied. Representative samples of Novosibirsk adult population and also urban and rural population of Yakutia were examined. 348 persons at the age more than 45 years (180 males and 168 females) were studied. Concentration of pepsinogen I, gastrin 17 and antibodies to Helicobacter pilori in blood serum was estimated with immune-enzyme analysis ("Biohit GastroPanel", "Biohit", Finland). In addition, domestic test-systems were used for detection cytotoxic (expressing CagA-protein) strains H. pylori. Level of markers (pepsinogen, gastrin, antibodies to Helicobacter pilori and antibodies to CagA H. pilori) in observing populations had no difference between males and females, and also did not depend on age. Occurrence of atrophy in body of stomach in Novosibirsk population, urban and rural population of Yakutia was 10.1, 16.7 and 25.6% respectively, and in antral part--10.7, 25.6 and 8.9% respectively. Total atrophy was registered in 1% in all groups. Helicobacter infection was detected in 78-88% of population. Domestic immune-enzyme test-systems were comparable with data of histological examination and demonstrated greater sensitivity at H. pylori detection vs. foreign. High prevalence of atrophic gastritis in various groups of Siberia population was noticed, which must be was bounded with great level of H. pylori infection in population.

  18. [Polyneuropathy caused by vitamin B12 deficiency secondary to chronic atrophic gastritis and giardiasis].

    PubMed

    Brieva, L; Ara, J R; Bertol, V; Canellas, A; del Agua, C

    1998-06-01

    In chronic atrophic gastritis atrophy of the stomach glands leads to intrinsic factor deficit, with consequent failure to absorb vitamin B12 and gastric achylia, which predisposes to Giardia infection which in itself leads to depletion of vitamin B12. We describe the case of a patient with peripheral and central nervous system pathology due to lack of vitamin B12 secondary to the combined effect of these two disorders. A 54 year old woman consulted us for paraesthesia and weakness of the legs which had been progressive for the previous two years. She presented with tactile hypoaesthesia, hypoparaesthesia, distal hyperreflexia and dysymmetry of the legs, ataxic-spastic gait and a positive Romberg sign. The investigations carried out showed the serum vitamin B12 level to be 3 pg/ml (N: 180-900), hemoglobin 13 g/dl and MCV 111 fl with MCHC 348/dl; neurophysiological studies: compatible with demyelinating motor polyneuropathy. Schilling test: deficit of absorption of vitamin B12 which was corrected on administration of intrinsic factor; gastroscopy; atrophic gastritis which confirmed the morbid anatomy findings. There was also flora containing Helicobacter and massive Giardia infection. Replacement and antibiotic therapy was followed by complete remission of the clinical picture. We emphasize the excellent clinical response to treatment in spite of the time elapsed since onset of symptoms.

  19. Survival rate of osseointegrated implants in atrophic maxillae grafted with calvarial bone: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Quiles, J C; Souza, F A; Bassi, A P F; Garcia, I R; França, M T; Carvalho, P S P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical survival rate of osseointegrated implants placed in the atrophic maxilla that has been reconstructed by means of autogenous bone grafts harvested from a cranial calvarial site. Further, we sought to analyse the level of peri-implant bone after prosthetic rehabilitation and to determine subjective patient satisfaction with the treatment performed. This study conformed to the STROBE guidelines regarding retrospective studies. Twenty-five patients who had received osseointegrated implants with late loading in the reconstructed atrophic maxilla were included in the study. The survival rate and level of peri-implant bone loss were evaluated. A questionnaire related to the surgical and prosthetic procedures was completed. The observed implant survival rate was 92.35%. The mean bone loss recorded was 1.76mm in the maxilla and 1.54mm in the mandible. The results of the questionnaire indicated a high level of patient satisfaction, little surgical discomfort, and that the patients would recommend the procedure and would undergo the treatment again. From the results obtained, it is concluded that the cranial calvarial site is an excellent donor area; calvarial grafts provided stability and maintenance of bone volume over the course of up to 11 years. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New treatment of atrophic acne scars by iontophoresis with estriol and tretinoin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Binder, M; Macheiner, W; Bieglmayer, C

    1995-01-01

    Common treatment of atrophic acne scars consists of invasive methods such as dermabrasion, chemopeeling, or implantation of bovine collagen. In our study a new noninvasive treatment method consisting of local iontophoresis is demonstrated. Local iontophoresis was performed with either estriol--a mainly topically active estrogen--or with tretinoin. Eighteen women were treated with estriol iontophoresis twice weekly for a period of 3 months. In addition to photographic and clinical documentation of the skin, venous blood for determination of serum levels of prolactin and estradiol according to standard radioimmunoassay methods was obtained monthly. Tretinoin iontophoresis was performed according to the same time schedule in 28 patients (19 women and 9 men) with atrophic acne scars. Improvement of acne scars was observed in 93% of patients treated with tretinoin iontophoresis and in 100% of the group treated with estriol iontophoresis. No hormonal changes were noted in the estrogen group. Side effects involving the skin appeared in the tretinoin group in 4 cases and consisted of increased dryness and of retinoid dermatitis. Both treatments were shown to be clinically effective in decreasing acne scars and persistence of effects. This promising new therapeutic approach may thus replace invasive treatment methods in many patients.

  1. Prevalence of chronic atrophic gastritis in different parts of the world.

    PubMed

    Weck, Melanie Nicole; Brenner, Hermann

    2006-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a well-established precursor of intestinal gastric cancer, but epidemiologic data about its occurrence are sparse. We provide an overview on studies that examined the prevalence of CAG in different parts of the world. Articles containing data about the prevalence of chronic atrophic gastritis in unselected population samples and published until November 2005 were identified by searching the MEDLINE database. Furthermore, the references in the identified publications were screened for additional suitable studies. Studies comprising at least 50 subjects were included. Forty-one studies providing data on the prevalence of CAG in unselected population samples could be identified. CAG was determined by gastroscopy in 15 studies and by pepsinogen serum levels in 26 studies. Although results are difficult to compare due to the various definitions of CAG used, a strong increase with age, the lack of major gender differences, and strong variations between populations and population groups (in particular, relatively high rates in certain Asian populations) could be observed quite consistently. We conclude that CAG is relatively common among older adults in different parts of the world, but large variations exist. Large-scale international comparative studies with standardized methodology to determine CAG are needed to provide a coherent picture of the epidemiology of CAG in various populations. Noninvasive measurements of CAG by pepsinogen levels may be particularly suited for that purpose.

  2. Diethylstilbestrol alters positive and negative selection of T cells in the thymus and modulates T-cell repertoire in the periphery

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicole; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S. . E-mail: pnagark@hsc.vcu.edu

    2006-04-15

    Prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) is known to cause altered immune functions and increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease in humans. In the current study, we investigated the effects of DES on T-cell differentiation in the thymus using the HY-TCR transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the female mice exhibit positive selection of T cells bearing the Tg TCR, while the male mice show negative selection of such T cells. In female HY-TCR-Tg mice, exposure to DES showed more pronounced decrease in thymic cellularity when compared to male mice. Additionally, female mice also showed a significant decrease in the proportion of double-positive (DP) T cells in the thymus and HY-TCR-specific CD8{sup +} T cells in the periphery. Male mice exhibiting negative selection also showed decreased thymic cellularity following DES exposure. Moreover, the male mice showed increased proportion of double-negative (DN) T cells in the thymus and decreased proportion of CD8{sup +} T cells. The density of expression of HY-TCR on CD8{sup +} cells was increased following DES exposure in both females and males. Finally, the proliferative response of thymocytes to mitogens and peripheral lymph node T cells to male H-Y antigen was significantly altered in female and male mice following DES treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that DES alters T-cell differentiation in the thymus by interfering with positive and negative selection processes, which in turn modulates the T-cell repertoire in the periphery.

  3. Fetal thymus volume estimation by virtual organ computer-aided analysis in normal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Re, Claudia; Bertucci, Emma; Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Achiron, Reuven; Mazza, Vincenzo; Gindes, Liat

    2015-05-01

    The thymus has a pyramidal shape, which is best shown in coronal planes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of virtual organ computer-aided analysis to estimate fetal thymus volume in normal pregnancies. Three-dimensional volume data sets from the axial upper mediastinal section were acquired from 37 normal pregnancies between 12 and 35 weeks' gestation. Thymus volume was calculated by virtual organ computer-aided analysis by 2 separate examiners. In 12 cases, volumes were also acquired with 4-dimensional sonography and spatiotemporal image correlation software to assess the variability in thymus size between the systolic and diastolic periods of fetal heart motion. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the fetal thymus volume and gestational age. Paired Student t tests were used to evaluate both the level of agreement for interobserver and intraobserver variability and the difference between diastolic and systolic thymus volumes. Identification of the borders of the thymus and calculation of its volume were successful in 28 patients (77.7%). Statistically significant linear growth of the thymus during pregnancy, from 12 to 35 weeks, was found. The growth coefficient for each gestational age was 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.355 to 0.504; P < .001). The difference in thymus size between systole and diastole was minor (0.0798 cm(3); 95% confidence interval, -0.044 to 0.203 cm(3)). Interobserver and intraobserver variability was not statistically significant. Although the thymus has a complex shape, it was possible to determine its borders and to calculate its volume by virtual organ computer-aided analysis in 77.7% of cases. Linear growth during pregnancy was found, and the minor changes during systole and diastole could be explained by condensation of the soft tissue of the thymus secondary to cardiac activity. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Direct demonstration of murine thymus-dependent cell surface endogenous immunoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Szenberg, A; Marchalonis, J J; Warner, N L

    1977-01-01

    Antisera raised in mammals to murine immunoglobulin (Ig) do not detect surface Ig on thymus-dependent (T) lymphoma cells as assessed by immunofluorescence analysis. In contrast, chicken antibodies, produced against the (Fab)2 fragment of normal mouse IgG and purified by binding to and elution from IgG-Sepharose 4B, give strong indirect fluorescence with murine T cells and cultured T lymphoma cells. The surface Ig caps, is shed, and reappears, indicating that it is of endogenous origin. Nonlymphoid tumor cells of various myeloid types do not bind this reagent, even though they bear avid Fc receptors. The capacity of chicken antibodies to bind to both bone-marrow-dependent and T cell lymphomas was abolished by adsorption with myeloma-derived kappa chains coupled to Sepharose. The kappa antigenic determinant recognized by the chicken antibodies may thus be different from that seen by mammalian antibodies, and the degree of exposure of Ig on the T lymphoma surface might also affect ease of detectability with these reagents. These data provide direct evidence that T lymphocytes and T lymphoma cells express and synthesize a surface Ig containing determinants that at least 'crossreact with bone-marrow-cell-derived kappa chains. Images PMID:405673

  5. Antioxidant and Anticholinesterase Potential of Six Thymus Species.

    PubMed

    Kindl, Marija; Blažeković, Biljana; Bucar, Franz; Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities of the ethanolic extracts of six selected Thymus species growing in Croatia (T. longicaulis, T. praecox subsp. polytrichus, T. pulegioides, T. serpyllum subsp. serpyllum, T. striatus, and T. vulgaris). Antioxidant effectiveness was assessed using six different assays, in comparison with rosmarinic acid, luteolin, and reference antioxidants. All tested Thymus extracts possessed DPPH (IC50 = 3-6 μg/mL) and nitric oxide (IC50 = 70-177 μg/mL) free radical scavenging activities, strong reducing properties (IC50 = 11-15 μg/mL), ferrous ion chelating activity (IC50 = 126-389 μg/mL), ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 34-80 μg/mL), and high total antioxidant capacities (238-294 mg AAE/g). AChE inhibitory activity was examined using Ellman's colorimetric method and all tested extracts showed anti-AChE activity in a dose dependent manner. The values of 10-28%, 23-39%, and 64-86% were obtained for tested concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL, respectively. Additionally, the contents of total hydroxycinnamic derivatives, flavonoids, and tannins in dried plant samples were determined spectrophotometrically. Our results highlighted Thymus species as a rich source of natural antioxidants and AChE inhibitors that could be useful in preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Nab2 maintains thymus cellularity with aging and stress.

    PubMed

    Hastings, K Taraszka; Elizalde, Diana; Muppana, Leela; Levine, Sarah; Kamel, Christy M; Ingram, Wendy M; Kirkpatrick, Jennifer T; Hu, Chengcheng; Rausch, Matthew P; Gallitano, Amelia L

    2017-05-01

    Thymic cellularity is influenced by a variety of biological and environmental factors, such as age and stress; however, little is known about the molecular genetic mechanisms that regulate this process. Immediate early genes of the Early growth response (Egr) family have critical roles in immune function and response to environmental stress. The transcription factors, Egr1, Egr2 and Egr3, play roles in the thymus and in peripheral T-cell activation. Nab2, which binds Egrs 1, 2, and 3 as a co-regulator of transcription, also regulates peripheral T-cell activation. However, a role for Nab2 in the thymus has not been reported. Using Nab2-deficient (KO) mice we found that male Nab2KO mice have reduced thymus size and decreased numbers of thymocytes, compared with age-matched wildtype (WT) mice. Furthermore, the number of thymocytes in Nab2KO males decreases more rapidly with age. This effect is sex-dependent as female Nab2KO mice show neither reduced thymocyte numbers nor accelerated thymocyte loss with age, compared to female WT littermates. Since stress induces expression of Nab2 and the Egrs, we examined whether loss of Nab2 alters stress-induced decrease in thymic cellularity. Restraint stress induced a significant decrease in thymic cellularity in Nab2KO and WT mice, with significant changes in the thymocyte subset populations only in the Nab2KO mice. Stress reduced the percentage of DP cells by half and increased the percentage of CD4SP and CD8SP cells by roughly three-fold in Nab2KO mice. These findings indicate a requirement for Nab2 in maintaining thymocyte number in male mice with age and in response to stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antioxidant and Anticholinesterase Potential of Six Thymus Species

    PubMed Central

    Kindl, Marija; Blažeković, Biljana; Bucar, Franz; Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities of the ethanolic extracts of six selected Thymus species growing in Croatia (T. longicaulis, T. praecox subsp. polytrichus, T. pulegioides, T. serpyllum subsp. serpyllum, T. striatus, and T. vulgaris). Antioxidant effectiveness was assessed using six different assays, in comparison with rosmarinic acid, luteolin, and reference antioxidants. All tested Thymus extracts possessed DPPH (IC50 = 3–6 μg/mL) and nitric oxide (IC50 = 70–177 μg/mL) free radical scavenging activities, strong reducing properties (IC50 = 11–15 μg/mL), ferrous ion chelating activity (IC50 = 126–389 μg/mL), ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation (IC50 = 34–80 μg/mL), and high total antioxidant capacities (238–294 mg AAE/g). AChE inhibitory activity was examined using Ellman's colorimetric method and all tested extracts showed anti-AChE activity in a dose dependent manner. The values of 10–28%, 23–39%, and 64–86% were obtained for tested concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL, respectively. Additionally, the contents of total hydroxycinnamic derivatives, flavonoids, and tannins in dried plant samples were determined spectrophotometrically. Our results highlighted Thymus species as a rich source of natural antioxidants and AChE inhibitors that could be useful in preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26351513

  8. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Valášek, Jiří; Kaiser, Jozef; Florian, Zdeněk; Wolff, Jan

    2014-12-18

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant geometries and the levels of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the surrounding bone. Six mandibular bone segments demonstrating different grades of mandibular bone atrophy and various bone volume fractions (from 0.149 to 0.471) were imaged using a micro-CT device. The acquired bone STL models and implant (Brånemark, Straumann, Ankylos) were merged into a three-dimensional finite elements structure. The mean displacement value for all implants was 3.1 ±1.2 µm. Displacements were lower in the group with a strong BIC. The results indicated that the maximum strain values of cortical and cancellous bone increased with lower bone density. Strain distribution is the first and foremost dependent on the shape of bone and architecture of cancellous bone. The geometry of the implant, thread patterns, grade of bone atrophy and BIC all affect the displacement and micro-strain on the mandible bone. Preoperative finite element analysis could offer improved predictability in the long-term outlook of dental implant restorations.

  9. Reassociation kinetics of three satellite components of calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Votavová, H; Sponar, J

    1975-01-01

    Using absorption measurements the reassociation kinetics of three satellite DNA components isolated from calf thymus was studied under various conditions. A different method using CsC1 density gradient determinations particularly suited for kinetic analysis of mixtures was also used and shown to give similar results. Reassociation rate constants were corrected for mismatching during strand reassociation using data obtained by kinetic analysis of fractions of the 1.714 g/cm-3 satellite component. The values of corrected as well as uncorrected complexities were calculated and compared with results of other methods. They were shown to be compatible with the concept of sequence repetition at various levels. PMID:1168341

  10. Monoterpenes from thyme (Thymus vulgaris) as potential mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Choi, Won-Sik; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Kap-Ho; Lee, Sung-Eun

    2005-03-01

    Five monoterpenes (carvacrol, p-cymene, linalool, alpha-terpinene, and thymol) derived from the essential oil of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) were examined for their repellency against the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens. All 5 monoterpenes effectively repelled mosquitoes based on a human forearm bioassay. Alpha-terpinene and carvacrol showed significantly greater repellency than a commercial formulation, N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide (deet), whereas thymol showed similar repellency to that of deet. The duration of repellency after application for all these monoterpenes was equal to or higher than that of deet. These findings indicate that a spray-type solution containing 2% alpha-terpinene may serve as an alternative mosquito repellent.

  11. Turbulent drag reduction characteristics induced by calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. T.; Park, S. J.; Chan, C. K.; Choi, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    We report novel turbulent drag reduction (DR) behaviors of polydisperse calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) as a potential drag reducing candidate, by injecting appropriately prepared concentrated stock solution of the CT-DNA into a buffer solution in a rotating disk apparatus. By putting emphasis on the effect of DNA concentration, its DR characteristics were compared with that of λ-DNA possessing monodisperse molecular weight characteristics based on both DR efficiency and a mechanical degradation under turbulence. The DNA chains having much higher molecular size than that of λ-DNA are observed to be more susceptible to mechanical degradation in a turbulent flow. This result was verified via electrophoresis.

  12. Vertical Ridge Augmentation in the Atrophic Mandible: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Elnayef, Basel; Monje, Alberto; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico

    To systematically appraise the effectiveness/reliability of vertical ridge augmentation (VRA) in the atrophic mandible. Articles that addressed any one of the following four areas were included in this study: amount of VRA, implant survival (ISR) and success rates (SSR) in the area of newly regenerated bone, complication rate during the bone augmentation procedure, and bone resorption. An electronic literature search was conducted by two independent reviewers in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases for articles reporting VRA in the atrophic mandible via distraction osteogenesis (DO), inlay block grafting (IBG), onlay block grafting (OBG), and guided bone regeneration (GBR). For meta-analysis, two primary (VRA and ISR [%]) and two secondary outcomes were studied (SSR [%] and vertical bone resorption [VBR] [%}). Additionally, for qualitative assessment, complications (ie, causes of failure) were further extracted and comprehensively described. Overall, 73 full-text papers were evaluated. Of these, 52 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The weight mean (WM) of VRA (± SD) was 4.49 ± 0.33 mm (95% CI: 3.85 to 5.14 mm). It was most notable that DO involved greater VRA than IBG, and thus, significantly higher than GBR and OBG. The technique significantly influenced the mean VRA obtained (P < .001). Nonetheless, no technique showed superiority in terms of ISR or SSR. VBR and complications were shown to be minimized for GBR. If ~ 4 mm of VRA is needed, any technique in optimum local and systemic conditions should be equally reliable in the atrophic mandible. However, when greater VRA is needed, DO and IBG have demonstrated accuracy. By means of complication and VBR rates, GBR was shown to have the lowest. For ISR and SSR, no statistical differences existed among all techniques. Controlled studies are needed to examine the long-term peri-implant bone fate

  13. Thymus recovery after intensive physical exercise under conditions of immunocorrection and without it.

    PubMed

    Sapin, M R; Tkachuk, M G

    2005-11-01

    Exogenous antioxidants, e.g. tocopherol, prevent undesirable changes in the thymus and accelerate its recovery after intensive physical exercise. Four weeks after the end of training (swimming) the general structure of the thymus and content of LPO products in rats treated with tocopherol corresponded to the control values, in contrast to animals receiving no correction.

  14. Lymphotoxin β Receptor Controls T Cell Progenitor Entry to the Thymus.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Beth; James, Kieran D; Cosway, Emilie J; Parnell, Sonia M; Tumanov, Alexi V; Ware, Carl F; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2016-10-01

    The recruitment of lymphoid progenitors to the thymus is essential to sustain T cell production throughout life. Importantly, it also limits T lineage regeneration following bone marrow transplantation, and so contributes to the secondary immunodeficiency that is caused by delayed immune reconstitution. Despite this significance, the mechanisms that control thymus colonization are poorly understood. In this study, we show that in both the steady-state and after bone marrow transplant, lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) controls entry of T cell progenitors to the thymus. We show that this requirement maps to thymic stroma, further underlining the key importance of this TNFR superfamily member in regulation of thymic microenvironments. Importantly, analysis of the requirement for LTβR in relationship to known regulators of thymus seeding suggests that it acts independently of its regulation of thymus-homing chemokines. Rather, we show that LTβR differentially regulates intrathymic expression of adhesion molecules known to play a role in T cell progenitor entry to the thymus. Finally, Ab-mediated in vivo LTβR stimulation following bone marrow transplant enhances initial thymus recovery and boosts donor-derived T cell numbers, which correlates with increased adhesion molecule expression by thymic stroma. Collectively, we reveal a novel link between LTβR and thymic stromal cells in thymus colonization, and highlight its potential as an immunotherapeutic target to boost T cell reconstitution after transplantation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Noninvasive In Toto Imaging of the Thymus Reveals Heterogeneous Migratory Behavior of Developing T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Kuri, Paola; Inoue, Daigo; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hanelt, Marleen; Thumberger, Thomas; Rauzi, Matteo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Leptin, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The migration of developing T cells (thymocytes) between distinct thymic microenvironments is crucial for their development. Ex vivo studies of thymus tissue explants suggest two distinct migratory behaviors of thymocytes in the thymus. In the cortex, thymocytes exhibit a stochastic migration, whereas medullary thymocytes show confined migratory behavior. Thus far, it has been difficult to follow all thymocytes in an entire thymus and relate their differentiation steps to their migratory dynamics. To understand the spatial organization of the migratory behavior and development of thymocytes in a fully functional thymus, we developed transgenic reporter lines for the chemokine receptors ccr9a and ccr9b, as well as for rag2, and used them for noninvasive live imaging of the entire thymus in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We found that the expression of these two chemokine receptors in the medaka juvenile thymus defined two spatially distinct subpopulations of thymocytes. Landmark events of T cell development including proliferation, somatic recombination, and thymic selection can be mapped to subregions of the thymus. The migratory behavior of thymocytes within each of the subpopulations is equally heterogeneous, and specific migratory behaviors are not associated with particular domains in the thymus. During the period when thymocytes express rag2 their migratory behavior was more homogeneous. Therefore, the migratory behavior of thymocytes is partly correlated with their developmental stage rather than being defined by their spatial localization. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. VEGF-mediated cross-talk within the neonatal murine thymus

    PubMed Central

    Cuddihy, Andrew R.; Ge, Shundi; Zhu, Judy; Jang, Julie; Chidgey, Ann; Thurston, Gavin; Boyd, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of cross-talk that regulate the hematopoietic and epithelial compartments of the thymus are well established, the interactions of these compartments with the thymic endothelium have been largely ignored. Current understanding of the thymic vasculature is based on studies of adult thymus. We show that the neonatal period represents a unique phase of thymic growth and differentiation, marked by endothelium that is organized as primitive, dense networks of capillaries dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF dependence in neonates is mediated by significantly higher levels of both VEGF production and endothelial VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) expression than in the adult thymus. VEGF is expressed locally in the neonatal thymus by immature, CD4−CD8− “double negative” (DN) thymocytes and thymic epithelium. Relative to adult thymus, the neonatal thymus has greater thymocyte proliferation, and a predominance of immature thymocytes and cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs). Inhibition of VEGF signaling during the neonatal period results in rapid loss of the dense capillaries in the thymus and a marked reduction in the number of thymocytes. These data demonstrate that, during the early postnatal period, VEGF mediates cross-talk between the thymocyte and endothelial compartments of the thymus. PMID:19088378

  17. T cells generated in the absence of a thoracic thymus fail to establish homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Smolarchuk, Christa; Zhu, Lin Fu; Chan, William F N; Anderson, Colin C

    2014-08-01

    Cervical thymus mimics the thoracic thymus in supporting T-cell development and exists in a subset of mice and humans. Importantly, it remains unknown whether the cervical thymus can generate T cells that are self-tolerant in the complete absence of signals from the thoracic thymus. Using a fetal liver reconstitution model in thoracic thymectomized RAG(-/-) mice, we found that T cells could be generated without contribution from the thoracic thymus. However, these mice had decreased T cells, increased proportions of effector memory T cells and Treg phenotype cells, increased serum IgG1/2b, and increased frequency of T cells expressing IFN-γ, IL-17 or IL-10. Half of the mice that received a thoracic thymectomy and fetal liver cells, unlike sham surgery controls, developed substantial morbidity with age. Disease was associated with lymphopenia-driven activation rather than inherent defects in the cervical thymus, as both thoracic and cervical thymocytes could generate disease in lymphopenic recipients. Administration of the homeostatic cytokine IL-7 caused a rapid, transient increase in T-cell numbers and reduced the time to disease onset. Together the data suggests that the cervical thymus can function in the complete absence of the thoracic thymus; however, the T cells generated do not establish homeostasis.

  18. Postnatal development of hypoplastic thymus in semi-lethal dwarf pet/pet males.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Junko; Suzuki, Hiroetsu; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Katsushi

    2011-04-01

    The petit rat (pet/pet) is a new semi-lethal dwarf mutant with anomalies in the thymus and testes, defects inherited as a single autosomal recessive trait. At birth, these pet/pet rats show low birth weight and extremely small thymuses; at 140 days of age, their thymuses show abnormal involution. In the present study, we examined early postnatal development of hypoplastic pet/pet thymuses. In addition to being hypoplastic at birth, pet/pet thymus growth was almost completely impaired during the early postnatal period. As shown by cellular incorporation of BrdU, the mitotic activity was lower in pet/pet than in normal thymuses, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays showed that apoptosis occurred more often in pet/pet than in normal thymus cells during the first few days after birth. These results indicate that postnatal development of the hypoplastic pet/pet thymus is defective due to the reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of thymic cells.

  19. Pharmacological modulation of caspase-8 in thymus-related medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzesi, Nicola; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Thuy, Trinh Thy; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liberati, Anna Marina; Ayroldi, Emira; Riccardi, Carlo; Delfino, Domenico V

    2014-10-01

    The thymus is a lymphoid organ that governs the development of a diverse T-cell repertoire capable of defending against nonself-antigens and avoiding autoimmunity. However, the thymus can also succumb to different diseases. Hypertrophic diseases, such as thymomas, are typically associated with impairment of negative selection, which leads to autoimmune disease, or disruption of positive selection, which results in immunodeficiency. Hypotrophic diseases of the thymus can manifest during acute infections, cancer, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, or with aging. This condition leads to decreased immune function and can be treated by either replacing lost thymic tissue or by preventing thymic tissue death. Studies have demonstrated the critical role of caspase-8 in regulating apoptosis in the thymus. In this review, we discuss how pharmacological activation and inhibition of caspase-8 can be used to treat hypertrophic and hypotrophic diseases of the thymus, respectively, to improve its function. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Changes in the Structure of the Thymus under Conditions of Various Treatments for Experimental Mammary Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, O V; Kabakov, A V; Poveshchenko, A F; Ishchenko, I Yu; Poveshchenko, O V; Strunkin, D N; Raiter, T V; Michurina, S V; Konenkov, V I

    2017-03-01

    Morphological changes in the thymus of female Wistar rats with experimental mammary gland carcinomas were studied. After adjuvant therapy, the area of the cortical matter and density of parenchymal cells in the thymus decreased, while areas of the medulla, connective tissue, and content of immunoblasts and macrophages increased. In the thymuses of rats receiving exogenous DNA, morphological signs of activation of the lymphoid and epithelial components were found: areas of the cortex and medulla, glandular and connective tissue corresponded to the values in intact animals, the counts of lymphocytes in the central part of the cortical matter and of macrophages in all zones of the thymus increased, and lymphocyte migration from the thymus increased (in comparison with the chemotherapy group).

  1. Light and electron microscopic evaluation of thymuses from feline leukemia virus-infected kittens.

    PubMed

    Pack, F D; Chapman, W L

    1980-01-01

    Light microscopic and electron microscopic findings in thymuses from 4-week old feline leukemia virus-infected and 4- and 9-week old noninfected kittens were evaluated and found to be morphologically similar to each other. Thymuses from 9-week old feline leukemia virusinfected kittens were markedly atrophied and individual lobules within each thymus varied in the severity of atrophy. Loubules having the least severe atrophy had a moderate thinning of the cortex and a heterogeneous thymuses included intense eosinopoiesis at the corticomedullary junction, increased prominence of vasculature, and enlarged Hassal's corpuscles. In addition to these changes lobules of thymus having the most severe atrophy had a marked cortical thymocyte depletion, lobule collapse, and increased numbers of mast cells. Degeneration of epithelial cells in most lobules was indicated by electronlucency of the cytoplasmic matrix and often greatly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. The thymus and tail regenerative capacity in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Antonella; Bertolotti, Evelina

    2012-07-01

    A morphofunctional analysis of the thymus from differently aged Xenopus laevis tadpoles during regeneration of the tail is reported. In stage 50 larvae, competent to regenerate, the appendage cut provoked thymic structural modifications that affected the medullary microenvironment cells and changes in TNF-α immunoreactivity. Mucocyte-like cells, multicellular epithelial cysts, myoid cells and cells immunoreactive to TNF-α increased in number. Increased numbers of lymphocytes were also found in regenerating areas and, at the end of regeneration, thymic structural and immunocytochemical patterns were restored to control levels. The observed cellular responses and the induction of molecules critical for thymus constitutive processes suggest a stimulation of thymic function after tail amputation. In older larvae, whose capacity to form a new complete and correctly patterned tail was reduced, thymic morphological changes were more severe and may persist throughout the regeneration process with a significant reduction in organ size. In these larvae the histological patterns and the marked thymic decrease may be related to the events occurring during regeneration, i.e. the higher inflammatory response and the reduced tail regenerative potential.

  3. Thymus mastichina: chemical constituents and their anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Joana; Máximo, Patrícia; Cabrita, Eurico; Lourenço, Ana; Oliva, Abel; Almeida, Joana; Filipe, Mariana; Cruz, Pedro; Barcia, Rita; Santos, Miguel; Cruz, Helder

    2012-11-01

    The cytotoxicity-guided study of the dichloromethane and ethanol extracts of Thymus mastichina L. using the HCT colon cancer cell line allowed the identification of nine compounds, sakuranetin (1), sterubin (2), oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), lutein (5), beta-sitosterol (6), rosmarinic acid (7), 6-hydroxyluteolin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (8), and 6-hydroxyapigenin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (9). All compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against the HCT colon cancer cell line. Compound 4 showed cytotoxicity with GI50 value of 6.8 microg/mL. A fraction composed of a mixture (1:1) of triterpenoid acids 3 and 4 displayed improved cytotoxicity with a GI50 of 2.8 microg/mL suggesting a synergistic behavior. This is the first report on the chemical constituents of Thymus mastichina L. based on structural assignments by spectroscopic analysis. The presence of these constituents identified by colon cancer cytotoxicity-guided activity indicates that extracts of T. mastichina L. may have a protective effect against colon cancers.

  4. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of some Thymus species.

    PubMed

    Rustaiee, Ali Reza; Yavari, Alireza; Nazeri, Vahideh; Shokrpour, Majid; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Rasouli, Musa

    2013-06-01

    To ascertain whether there are chemical and genetic relationships among some Thymus species and also to determine correlation between these two sets of data, the essential-oil composition and genetic variability of six populations of Thymus including: T. daenensis ČELAK. (two populations), T. fallax FISCH. & C.A.MEY., T. fedtschenkoi RONNIGER, T. migricus KLOKOV & DES.-SHOST., and T. vulgaris L. were analyzed by GC and GC/MS, and also by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Thus, 27 individuals were analyzed using 16 RAPD primers, which generated 264 polymorphic scorable bands and volatiles isolated by distillation extraction were subjected to GC and GC/MS analyses. The yields of oils ranged from 2.1 to 3.8% (v/w), and 34 components were identified, amounting to a total percentage of 97.8-99.9%. RAPD Markers allowed a perfect distinction between the different species based on their distinctive genetic background. However, they did not show identical clustering with the volatile-oil profiles.

  5. Expression of pemphigus-autoantigen desmoglein 1 in human thymus.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, H; Berrih-Aknin, S; Bismuth, J; Joly, P; Gilbert, D; Tron, F

    2008-05-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) 1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the desmosome allowing cell-cell adhesion between keratinocytes, whose expression is restricted to stratified squamous epithelia-like epidermis. Dsg1 is the target autoantigen of pathogenic autoantibodies produced by pemphigus foliaceus and 50% of pemphigus vulgaris patients in a Dsg1-specific T-cell-dependent pathway. Herewith, we show that mRNA of the DSG1 gene is present in normal human thymus and show by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis that the expression of DSG1 transcript increases with age. Although immunoblot analysis on human thymus extracts using different anti-Dsg1 antibodies did not allow to detect the protein, we show by double-immunofluorescence assay that Dsg1 is expressed at protein level by CD19+ CD63+ cells located in the medulla. These data provide another illustration of the thymic expression of a tissue-specific autoantigen involved in an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which may participate in the tolerance acquisition and/or regulation of Dsg1-specific T cells.

  6. Etiology of myasthenia gravis: innate immunity signature in pathological thymus.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Cufi, Perrine; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), whose clinical hallmark is muscle weakness and early fatigability. The main target of autoimmunity in MG is the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) located in the NMJ. It is now widely accepted that the thymus is probably the prime site of autoimmunity development and maintenance in AChR-positive MG patients; however, the exact mechanisms triggering and perpetuating the intra-thymic autoimmune response to AChR are still unknown. As with many autoimmune diseases, MG has a multifactorial etiology, resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, as fully described in this review. Among environmental factors, viral infections could play a central role in autoimmunity, mainly through the induction of dysregulated Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated innate immune responses, which can lead to inflammation and adaptive autoimmune response. Growing evidence of chronic inflammation, TLR activation, and persistent viral infections in the thymus of MG patients, strongly supports the hypothesis that, in the context of a genetic susceptible background, the intrathymic innate immune responses to pathogen infections might contribute to MG etiology.

  7. Thyroid-Related Protein Expression in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do Joon; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Radioiodine whole body scan (WBS), related to sodium iodide symporter (NIS) function, is widely used to detect recurrence/metastasis in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer. However, the normal thymic uptake of radioiodine has occasionally been observed in young patients. We evaluated the expression of thyroid-related genes and proteins in the human thymus. Thymic tissues were obtained from 22 patients with thyroid cancer patients of all ages. The expression of NIS, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. NIS and TSHR were expressed in 18 (81.8%) and 19 samples (86.4%), respectively, whereas TPO was expressed in five samples (22.7%). Three thyroid-related proteins were localized to Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes. In contrast, Tg was detected in a single patient (4.5%) localized to vascular endothelial cells. The expression of thyroid-related proteins was not increased in young thymic tissues compared to that in old thymic tissues. In conclusion, the expression of NIS and TSHR was detected in the majority of normal thymus samples, whereas that of TPO was detected less frequently, and that of Tg was detected rarely. The increased thymic uptake of radioiodine in young patients is not due to the increased expression of NIS. PMID:28386277

  8. Improvement of Atrophic Acne Scars in Skin of Color Using Topical Synthetic Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Serum: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Marie Alexia; Herrmann, Jennifer; Moy, Lauren; Moy, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrophic scarring in skin of color is a common, permanent, and distressing result of uncontrolled acne vulgaris. Ablative lasers and chemical peels are frequently used to improve the appearance of atrophic scars, primarily through the stimulation of collagen and elastin; however, these treatment modalities are associated with risks, such as dyspigmentation and hypertrophic scarring, especially in patients with darker skin.

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the efficacy of topically applied synthetic epidermal growth factor (EGF) serum in reducing the appearance of atrophic acne scars in skin of color.

    METHODS: A single-center clinical trial was performed on twelve healthy men and women (average age 32.5) with Fitzpatrick Type IV-V skin and evidence of facial grade II-IV atrophic acne scars. Subjects applied topical EGF serum to the full-face twice daily for 12 weeks. Scar improvement was investigated at each visit using an Investigator Global Assessment (IGA), a Goodman grade, clinical photography, and patient self-assessment.

    RESULTS: Eleven subjects completed the trial. Compared to baseline, there was an improvement in mean IGA score from 3.36 (SEM = 0.15) to 2.18 (SEM = 0.33). Mean Goodman grade was reduced from 2.73 (SEM = 0.19) to 2.55 (SEM = 0.21). Of the eleven pairs of before and after photographs, nine were correctly chosen as the post-treatment image by a blind investigator. On self-assessment, 81% reported a "good" to "excellent" improvement in their scars compared to baseline (P = 0.004).

    CONCLUSION: Topical EGF may improve the appearance of atrophic acne scars in skin of color. Additional, larger studies should be conducted to better characterize improvement.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(4):322-326.

    .

  9. Serum Pepsinogen level, Atrophic Gastritis and the Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer – a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Kamangar, Farin; Marcus, Pamela M.; Taylor, Philip R.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly fatal disease without screening tests. Studies have suggested possible etiologic similarities between gastric and pancreatic cancers. Atrophic gastritis, a pre-malignant condition for gastric cancer, is characterized by low serum pepsinogen I (SPGI) level. We hypothesized that low SPGI level may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and be a useful biomarker for the disease. Methods Our analytic cohort included 20,962 participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC) who had SPGI level measured. Of these, 1,663 (7.9%) subjects had low SPGI levels (<25 μg/l) and were invited for gastroscopy which was completed in 1,059 (63.7%) participants. Atrophic gastritis was histologically-confirmed in 1,006 (95.0%) subjects. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pancreatic cancer. Results During follow-up of up to 16.3 years (mean=10.8 years; 226,325 person-years), 227 incident pancreatic cancers were diagnosed. The incidence rates were 9.9, 11.3, and 12.7 per 10,000 person-years of follow-up for participants with normal pepsinogen level (≥25 μg/l), low pepsinogen level and histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis, respectively. Compared to subjects with normal pepsinogen levels, there was no statistically significant increased risk of pancreatic cancer among subjects with low pepsinogen level (Adjusted HR=1.01; 95%CI: 0.63–1.62) or those with histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis (Adjusted HR=1.13; 95%CI: 0.66–1.95). Conclusions Atrophic gastritis, serological or histological, is not associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These findings do not provide any evidence for potential usefulness of SPGI for pancreatic cancer screening. PMID:19800305

  10. Reconstruction of severe atrophic jaws with Fresh Frized Bone Allografts: clinical histologic and histomorphometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boniello, R; Gasparini, G; D'Amato, G; Torroni, A; Marianetti, T M; Foresta, E; Azzuni, C; Cervelli, D; Pelo, S

    2013-05-01

    Rehabilitation of maxillary edentulism with implant-supported prostheses has come into common clinical practice. Although autologous bone has osteoinductive, osteoconductive and osteogenetic properties, its use is subject to certain disadvantages such as: Increased morbidity Limited amount of bone harvested from each donor site. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical, histological and histomorphometric results of homologous bone for implantoprosthetic rehabilitation in severe atrophic jaws. Twenty consecutive patients, 14 female and 6 males, were treated with homologous bone bank. Treatment protocol consist of: first surgycal step, trasversal and vertical volume restore, second surgycal step: screw remove, specimen biopsy and insert implant fixtures. Data show that Fresh Frozen Bone Allografts (FFBA) could be a valuable substitute for autologous bone, in as much as histological and histomorphometric results are widely overlapping. Homologous bone is a valuable option for its large availability with a low cost, good versatility, no morbidity at the donor site, shorter surgical time and hospital stay.

  11. The Regenerating Gene Iα Is Overexpressed in Atrophic Gastritis Rats with Hypergastrinemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shujie; Zhong, Jing; Zhou, Qunyan; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Liangjing; Si, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    The role of gastrin on the development of atrophic gastritis (AG) and its relationship with the expression of RegIα  in vivo remain unclear. We established experimental AG in rats by combination administration with sodium salicylate, alcohol, and deoxycholate sodium. The mean score of inflammation in gastric antrum in AG rats was significantly elevated (P < 0.05), while the number of glands dramatically decreased (P < 0.05). In addition, the cell proliferation in gastric glands was increased in experimental AG rats, as determined by immunohistochemistry staining of PCNA and GS II. The level of serum gastrin in AG rats was significantly elevated relative to that of normal rats (P < 0.01). Moreover, the expression of RegIα protein and its receptor mRNA was increased in gastric tissues in AG rats (P < 0.05). Taken together, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Reglα is related with hypergastrinemia in AG rats. PMID:21949663

  12. Loss of interleukin-21 leads to atrophic germinal centers in multicentric Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Shimizu, Yui; Sakurai, Nodoka; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Both multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) are systemic diseases, presenting with hypergammaglobulinemia and elevated serum levels of IgG4. However, with regard to histopathological findings, MCD shows atrophic germinal centers. On the other hand, expanded germinal centers are detected in IgG4-RD. We extracted germinal centers from specimens of each disorder by microdissection and analyzed the expression of mRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction to clarify the mechanisms underlying atrophied germinal centers in MCD. This analysis disclosed loss of interleukin (IL)-21 and B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-6 in the germinal centers of MCD. Loss of IL-21 is considered to be involved in the disappearance of Bcl-6 and leads to atrophied germinal centers in MCD.

  13. Posterior atrophic mandible rehabilitation with onlay allograft created with CAD-CAM procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacotti, Michele; Barausse, Carlo; Felice, Pietro

    2014-02-01

    Implant rehabilitation of the atrophic right posterior mandible in a 48-year-old woman using dehydrated homologous bone block, shaped with a computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) system, to avoid harvesting of autologous bone block and to assure a perfect fitting of the block above the alveolar crest. After 7 months, 6.09, 7.36, and 8.08 mm (mean, 7.18 mm) of total horizontal bone gain was observed at sites 6, 12, and 18 mm posterior to the right mental foramen, respectively. The use of a bone block with CAD-CAM system for alveolar ridge augmentation is a valuable alternative to autograft because it reduces time, cost, and complications for the patients. Data from a computerized tomographic scan can be used to shape a precise 3-dimensional homologous bone block using a CAD-CAM system.

  14. New Atrophic Acne Scar Classification: Reliability of Assessments Based on Size, Shape, and Number.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Tan, Jerry; Rueda, Maria Jose; Layton, Alison; Petit, Lauren; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Post-acne atrophic scarring is a major concern for which standardized outcome measures are needed. Traditionally, this type of scar has been classified based on shape; but survey of practicing dermatologists has shown that atrophic scar morphology has not been well enough defined to allow good agreement in clinical classification. Reliance on clinical assessment is still needed at the current time, since objective tools are not yet available in routine practice.
    Evaluate classification for atrophic acne scars by shape, size, and facial location and establish reliability in assessments.
    We conducted a non-interventional study with dermatologists performing live clinical assessments of atrophic acne scars. To objectively compare identification of lesions, individual lesions were marked on a high-resolution photo of the patient that was displayed on a computer during the clinical evaluation. The Jacob clinical classification system was used to define three primary shapes of scars 1) icepick, 2) boxcar, and 3) rolling. To determine agreement for classification by size, independent technicians assessed the investigators' markings on digital images. Identical localization of scars was denoted if the maximal distance between their centers was ≤ 60 pixels (approximately 3 mm). Raters assessed scars on the same patients twice (morning/afternoon). Aggregate models of rater assessments were created and analyzed for agreement.
    Raters counted a mean scar count per subject ranging from 15.75 to 40.25 scars. Approximately 50% of scars were identified by all raters and ~75% of scars were identified by at least 2 of 3 raters (weak agreement, Kappa pairwise agreement 0.30). Agreement between consecutive counts was moderate, with Kappa index ranging from 0.26 to 0.47 (after exclusion of one outlier investigator who had significantly higher counts than all others). Shape classifications of icepick, boxcar, and rolling differed significantly between raters and even

  15. Rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior mandible with short (4-mm) implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Roberto; Barausse, Carlo; Checchi, Luigi; Felice, Pierto

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a successful implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of an atrophic posterior mandible with 4-mm-long implants. The patient refused to undergo any reconstructive surgery, and because the available bone up to the inferior alveolar nerve was only 5 mm or less, the patient received four implants of 4-mm length. Four months after implant placement, a provisional prosthesis was put in place; after another 4 months, this was then in turn replaced with a definitive prosthesis. The use of such short implants allows a fixed prosthetic solution without the need for vertically augmenting the mandibular bone. This procedure considerably reduces intra- and postoperative patient discomfort compared with reconstructive surgery for the placement of longer implants. The follow-up time was 1 year after implant loading.

  16. Comparison of different laser systems in the treatment of hypertrophic and atrophic scars and keloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharschmidt, D.; Algermissen, Bernd; Willms-Jones, J.-C.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    Different laser systems and techniques are used for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloids and acne scars. Significant criteria in selecting a suitable laser system are the scar's vascularization, age and diameter. Flashlamp- pumped dye-lasers, CO2-lasers with scanner, Argon and Nd:YAG-lasers are used. Telangiectatic scars respond well to argon lasers, erythematous scars and keloids to dye-laser treatment. Using interstitial Nd:YAG-laser vaporization, scars with a cross-section over 1 cm can generally be reduced. For the treatment of atrophic and acne scars good cosmetic results are achieved with a CO2-laser/scanner system, which allows a precise ablation of the upper dermis with low risk of side-effects.

  17. The Opa1-Dependent Mitochondrial Cristae Remodeling Pathway Controls Atrophic, Apoptotic, and Ischemic Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Varanita, Tatiana; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Romanello, Vanina; Zaglia, Tania; Quintana-Cabrera, Rubén; Semenzato, Martina; Menabò, Roberta; Costa, Veronica; Civiletto, Gabriele; Pesce, Paola; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Mongillo, Marco; Sandri, Marco; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial morphological and ultrastructural changes occur during apoptosis and autophagy, but whether they are relevant in vivo for tissue response to damage is unclear. Here we investigate the role of the optic atrophy 1 (OPA1)-dependent cristae remodeling pathway in vivo and provide evidence that it regulates the response of multiple tissues to apoptotic, necrotic, and atrophic stimuli. Genetic inhibition of the cristae remodeling pathway in vivo does not affect development, but protects mice from denervation-induced muscular atrophy, ischemic heart and brain damage, as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. Mechanistically, OPA1-dependent mitochondrial cristae stabilization increases mitochondrial respiratory efficiency and blunts mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and reactive oxygen species production. Our results indicate that the OPA1-dependent cristae remodeling pathway is a fundamental, targetable determinant of tissue damage in vivo. PMID:26039448

  18. Atrophic nerve fibers in regions of reduced MIBG uptake in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hajime; Ozawa Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Isao

    1995-11-01

    A myocardial MIBG-SPECT examination was conducted 2 wk after doxorubicin chemotherapy on a 52-yr-old woman without cardiac symptoms. Despite normal {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy, reduced MIBG uptake was detected in the apical anterior, inferior and lateral segments of the left ventricle. The patient died of congestive heart failure due to doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy 10 mo later. At necropsy, the left ventricle was markedly dilated and the apical anterior, inferior and lateral walls were thin, stiff and whitish. Nerve fibers in the apical inferior wall were atrophic and markedly fibrotic where MIBG uptake was most reduced. Nerve fibers in the septum were normal where MIBG uptake had remained normal. The histologic findings correspond with the findings on the MIBG image. MIBG imaging may detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy before cardiac symptoms are manifest and cardiac function deteriorates. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Time Course of Atrophic Remodeling: Effects of Exercise on Cardiac Morpology and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. M.; Martin, D.; Caine, T.; Matz, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Early and consistent evaluation of cardiac morphology and function throughout an atrophic stimulus is critically important for the design and optimization of interventions. Exercise training is one intervention that has been shown to confer favorable improvements in LV mass and function during unloading. However, the format and intensity of exercise required to induce optimal cardiac improvements has not been investigated. PURPOSE: This randomized, controlled trial was designed to 1) comprehensively characterize the time course of unloading-induced morpho-functional remodeling, and 2) examine the effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiac structural and functional parameters during unloading. METHODS: Twenty six subjects completed 70 days of head down tilt bed rest (HDBR): 17 were randomized to exercise training (ExBR) and 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of integrated high intensity, continuous, and resistance exercise. We assessed cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass; LVM) and function (speckle-tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist) before (BR-2), during (BR7,21,31,70), and following (BR+0, +3) HDBR. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) was evaluated before (BR- 3), during (BR4,25,46,68) and following (BR+0) HDBR. RESULTS: Sedentary HDBR resulted in a progressive decline in LVM, longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain, and an increase in twist. ExBR mitigated decreases in LVM and function. Change in twist was significantly related to change in VO2max (R=0.68, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in cardiac morphology and function begin early during unloading. High-intensity exercise attenuates atrophic morphological and functional remodeling.

  20. Accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers marks the acceleration of sarcopenia in slow and fast twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sharon L; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-08-01

    The age-related decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, exhibits a marked acceleration in advanced age. Although many studies have remarked upon the accumulation of very small myofibers, particularly at advanced stages of sarcopenia, the significance of this phenomenon in the acceleration of sarcopenia has never been examined. Furthermore, although mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by a lack of cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity has been implicated in myofiber atrophy in sarcopenia, the contribution of this phenotype to the accumulation of severely atrophied fibers in aged muscles has never been determined. To this end, we examined the fiber size distribution in the slow twitch soleus (Sol) and fast twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscles between young adulthood (YA) and senescence (SEN). We also quantified the abundance of COX deficient myocytes and their size attributes to gain insight into the contribution of this phenotype to myofiber atrophy with aging. Our data showed that the progression of muscle atrophy, particularly its striking acceleration between late middle age and SEN, was paralleled by an accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers (≤ 1000 μm(2) in size) in both Sol and Gas. On the other hand, we observed no COX deficient myofibers in Sol, despite nearly 20% of the myofibers being severely atrophic. Similarly, only 0.17 ± 0.06% of all fibers in Gas were COX deficient, and their size was generally larger (2375 ± 319 μm(2)) than the severely atrophied myofibers noted above. Collectively, our results suggest that similar processes likely contribute to the acceleration of sarcopenia in both slow twitch and fast twitch muscles, and that COX deficiency is not a major contributor to this phenomenon.

  1. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser and its Combination with Subcision in Improving Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Gita; Jaffary, Fariba; Haftbaradaran, Elaheh; Hoseini, Sayed Mohsen; Mazaheri, Nafiseh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acne is a very common skin disease in which scars are seen in 95% of the patients. Although numerous treatments have been recommended, researchers are still searching for a single modality to treat the complication due to its variety in shape and depth. We compared the effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser alone and in combination with subcision in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center (Isfahan, Iran) during 2011–2012. Eligible patients with atrophic acne scars were treated with fractional CO2 laser alone (five sessions with 3-week interval) on the right side of the face and fractional CO2 laser plus subcision (one session using both with four sessions of fractional CO2 laser, with 3-week interval) on the left side. The subjects were visited 1, 2, and 6 months after the treatment. Patient satisfaction rate was analyzed using SPSS 20 software. Results: The average of recovery rate was 54.7% using the combination method and 43.0% using laser alone (P < 0.001). The mean patient satisfaction was significantly higher with the combination method than laser alone (6.6 ± 1.2 vs. 5.2 ± 1.8; P < 0.001). Bruising was only seen with the combination method and lasted for 1 week in 57.0% and for 2 weeks in 43.0%. Erythema was seen in both methods. Postinflammatory pigmentation and hyperpigmentation were associated with combination method. No persistent side effects were seen after 6 months. Conclusion: Using a combination of subcision and laser had suitable results regarding scar recovery and satisfaction rate. PMID:28349023

  2. Association of autoimmune thyroid diseases, chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoid: experience from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Castoro, C; Le Moli, R; Arpi, M L; Tavarelli, M; Sapuppo, G; Frittitta, L; Squatrito, S; Pellegriti, G

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS) type III are characterized by the association of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) with other autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, alopecia, pernicious anemia, vitiligo and chronic atrophic gastritis. A strong association between ATD and atrophic gastritis (AG) has been demonstrated. Moreover 10 % of patients affected by AG have a predisposition to develop gastric carcinoid and adenocarcinoma as a result of chronic hypergastrinemia caused by achlorhydria and subsequent ELC cells neoplastic transformation. The aim of the study is to evaluate, in a consecutive series of patients followed for ATD in our outpatients clinic, the prevalence of AG. In the period 2004-2014, 242 patients with ATD underwent a screening performing APCA, Vitamin B12, ferritin, iron, and hemoglobin and red cells count measurements with subsequent gastroscopy in case of APCA positivity. We found 57/242 (23.5 %) patients with APCA positivity. Of these patients 33/57 (57.8 %), 31 F and 2 M, were affected by Graves disease; 24/57 (42.1 %) 21 F and 3 M by Hashimoto thyroiditis; 10/57 (17.5 %) presented with anemia, 14/57 (24.5 %) with vitamin B12 deficiency, 9/57 (15.7 %) with iron deficiency. In 2/57 a gastric carcinoid was found. Our data confirm the high association rate of AG in ATD which frequently is not an isolated disease but configure the picture of APS type III and need to be followed accordingly. An early diagnosis may be useful for diagnosis of gastric carcinoids and to explain and treat a gastric related L-thyroxine malabsorption and presence of chronic unexplained anemia.

  3. Local inhibition of angiogenesis results in an atrophic non-union in a rat osteotomy model.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Strobel, C; Rauhe, J S; Bergmann, C; Schmidmaier, G; Wildemann, B

    2011-07-06

    Long bone and in particular tibia fractures frequently fail to heal. A disturbed revascularisation is supposed to be a major cause for impaired bone healing or the development of non-unions. We aim to establish an animal model, which reliably mimics the clinical situation. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and primary human osteoblast like cells (POBs) were cultured with different angiogenesis-inhibitors (Fumagillin, SU5416, Artesunate and 3,5,4'-Trimethoxystilbene) released out of poly(D,L-Lactide) (PDLLA) coated k-wires and cell activity was determined. Discs containing PDLLA or PDLLA + Fumagillin/Artesunate were placed at the chorionallantoic membrane of hen eggs and the effect on vessel formation and egg vitality was observed. Tibia osteotomy was performed in rats and stabilised with K-wires coated with PDLLA + Fumagillin or with PDLLA only (control group). The healing was compared at different time points to the PDLLA control. Fumagillin and Artesunate inhibited the activity of HMEC-1 with minor effect on POBs. Artesunate caused embryonic death, whereas Fumagillin had no effects on egg vitality, but reduced the blood vessels. In the animal study all rats showed an impaired healing with reduced biomechanical stability. The Fumagillin treated tibiae had a significantly decreased callus size at day 42 and 84, less blood vessels in the early callus, a reduced histological callus size at day 10, 28 and 84, as well as an altered callus composition. This study presents a less vascularised, atrophic, tibia non-union and can be used in further investigations to analyse the pathology of atrophic non-union and to test new interventions.

  4. Six-implant-supported immediate fixed rehabilitation of atrophic edentulous maxillae with tilted distal implants.

    PubMed

    Wentaschek, S; Hartmann, S; Walter, C; Wagner, W

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the treatment outcome of six Bredent blueSky™ implants (Bredent GmbH, Senden, Germany) immediately loaded with a fixed full-arch prosthesis (two tilted posterior and four axial frontal and premolar implants). All 10 patients with atrophic edentulous maxillae being treated with a standardized procedure from 09/2009 to 01/2013, who had a follow-up of at least 3 years, were included. Sixty implants were placed to support 10 screwed prostheses. Twenty-one of them were inserted in fresh extraction sockets. Lab-side-prepared provisional fixed prostheses were placed at the day of implantation. Periotest (PT) values and implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured after implant surgery and after 3 months of healing in all patients. The analyzed implants were in function in mean 64 ± 13 months (range 42 to 84 months). One axial and two tilted implants failed in three patients. The mean PT values decreased, and ISQ increased significantly after the first 3 months at the osseointegrated tilted and axial implants. With an area under the curve of 0.503 and 0.506 in the receiver operating characteristic, the PT values and the ISQ were unspecific parameters and unsuitable as a predictor for the risk of non-osseointegration. Within the limits of this small group (n = 10 patients/60 implants), the failure rate of the analyzed implant system (n = 3 respective 5% implant loss) seems to be comparable with other immediate-loading protocols. The failure rate of tilted implants in the atrophic upper jaw was quite high, but the aimed treatment concept could be achieved in every patient. The rehabilitation of the posterior region in edentulous maxilla remains a challenge.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell implantation in atrophic nonunion of the long bones

    PubMed Central

    Phedy, P.; Kholinne, E.; Djaja, Y. P.; Kusnadi, Y.; Merlina, M.; Yulisa, N. D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the therapeutic potential of combining bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) granules to treat nonunion of the long bone. Methods Ten patients with an atrophic nonunion of a long bone fracture were selectively divided into two groups. Five subjects in the treatment group were treated with the combination of 15 million autologous BM-MSCs, 5g/cm3 (HA) granules and internal fixation. Control subjects were treated with iliac crest autograft, 5g/cm3 HA granules and internal fixation. The outcomes measured were post-operative pain (visual analogue scale), level of functionality (LEFS and DASH), and radiograph assessment. Results Post-operative pain evaluation showed no significant differences between the two groups. The treatment group demonstrated faster initial radiographic and functional improvements. Statistically significant differences in functional scores were present during the first (p = 0.002), second (p = 0.005) and third (p = 0.01) month. Both groups achieved similar outcomes by the end of one-year follow-up. No immunologic or neoplastic side effects were reported. Conclusions All cases of nonunion of a long bone presented in this study were successfully treated using autologous BM-MSCs. The combination of autologous BM-MSCs and HA granules is a safe method for treating nonunion. Patients treated with BM-MSCs had faster initial radiographic and functional improvements. By the end of 12 months, both groups had similar outcomes. Cite this article: H.D. Ismail, P. Phedy, E. Kholinne, Y. P. Djaja, Y. Kusnadi, M. Merlina, N. D. Yulisa. Mesenchymal stem cell implantation in atrophic nonunion of the long bones: A translational study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:287–293. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.2000587. PMID:27412657

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the ileoanal pouch for ulcerative colitis--a complication of severe chronic atrophic pouchitis?

    PubMed

    Knupper, N; Straub, E; Terpe, H J; Vestweber, K H

    2006-07-01

    The appearance of a carcinoma in the ileal pouch after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative proctocolitis is rare. Most of these adenocarcinomas previously described in literature develop from residual viable rectal mucosa. We report a case of an adenocarcinoma arising in all probability from the ileal pouch after malignant transformation of the ileal pouch mucosa based on a chronic atrophic pouchitis. A 34-year-old man developed an adenocarcinoma after a double-stapled ileorectal J-pouch for ulcerative colitis (UC) proceeded from malignant ileal transformation. Before surgery, he had a 20-year history of UC refractory to medical therapy, but no occurrence of backwash ileitis, dysplasia or colitis-associated illness. He experienced severe pouchitis after IPAA since the ileostomy closure. Carcinoma was ensured by endoscopy, and the patient underwent an abdominoperineal pouch extirpation combined with excision of perirectal tissues and anal canal. Histology after surgery showed a pT4,pN2(4/16)pM0,G3 adenocarcinoma with global severe chronic atrophic pouchitis (CAP), villous atrophy and malignant ileal transformation. No metaplasia of the rectal mucosa was found, not even malignant epithelial transformation of the anal canal. This case suggests that a malignant transformation of the ileal pouch mucosa may occur as a pure complication of severe CAP, even in the absence of backwash ileitis or a previous history of cancer. The absence of metaplasia of the rectal mucosa revealed the passage from CAP to dysplastic epithelium and to cancer. A multifactorial development of carcinogenesis is supposed, but we emphasize the importance of severe CAP, and that careful surveillance is needed in patients after IPAA. We must submit that this is just a case report and cannot stand for general cancer development in ulcerative colitis, but it may point out the risk factor of chronic inflammation and leads the surgeon to skillful working

  7. A comparative study of vaginal estrogen cream and sustained-release estradiol vaginal tablet (Vagifem) in the treatment of atrophic vaginitis in Isfahan, Iran in 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Pardis; Ghahiri, Atallah; Daneshmand, Freshteh; Ghasemi, Mojdeh

    2015-12-01

    Atrophic vaginitis is a disease, which affects up to 50% of postmenopausal women. This study compared the effectiveness and user-friendliness of Vagifem (an estradiol vaginal tablet) and vaginal estrogen cream in the treatment of atrophic vaginitis. One hundred and sixty postmenopausal women with symptoms of atrophic vaginitis were randomly divided into two groups of treatment with Vagifem or with vaginal estrogen cream for 12 weeks. Patients used the medication daily for the first 2 weeks of the study, and twice weekly. Severity of vaginal atrophy and four main symptoms of atrophic vaginitis including dysuria, dyspareunia, vaginal itching, and dryness were evaluated and compared before and after treatment. In addition, patients were asked regarding user-friendliness and hygienic issues of medications. Both vaginal estrogen cream and Vagifem significantly improved symptoms of atrophic vaginitis but in terms of effectiveness for the treatment symptoms of atrophic vaginitis, there was no significant difference between the two medications. Vagifem compared to estrogen cream resulted in significantly lower rate of hygienic problems (0% versus 23%, P < 0.001), and was reported by the patients as a significantly easier method of treatment (90% versus 55%, P < 0.0001). This investigation showed that Vagifem is an appropriate medication for the treatment of atrophic vaginitis, which is as effective as vaginal estrogen creams and is more user-friendly.

  8. Thymus transplantation for complete DiGeorge syndrome: European experience.

    PubMed

    Davies, E Graham; Cheung, Melissa; Gilmour, Kimberly; Maimaris, Jesmeen; Curry, Joe; Furmanski, Anna; Sebire, Neil; Halliday, Neil; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Adams, Stuart; Bernatoniene, Jolanta; Bremner, Ronald; Browning, Michael; Devlin, Blythe; Erichsen, Hans Christian; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hutchison, Lizzie; Ip, Winnie; Ifversen, Marianne; Leahy, T Ronan; McCarthy, Elizabeth; Moshous, Despina; Neuling, Kim; Pac, Malgorzata; Papadopol, Alina; Parsley, Kathryn L; Poliani, Luigi; Ricciardelli, Ida; Sansom, David M; Voor, Tiia; Worth, Austen; Crompton, Tessa; Markert, M Louise; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2017-04-08

    Thymus transplantation is a promising strategy for the treatment of athymic complete DiGeorge syndrome (cDGS). Twelve patients with cDGS underwent transplantation with allogeneic cultured thymus. We sought to confirm and extend the results previously obtained in a single center. Two patients died of pre-existing viral infections without having thymopoiesis, and 1 late death occurred from autoimmune thrombocytopenia. One infant had septic shock shortly after transplantation, resulting in graft loss and the need for a second transplant. Evidence of thymopoiesis developed from 5 to 6 months after transplantation in 10 patients. Median circulating naive CD4 counts were 44 × 10(6)/L (range, 11-440 × 10(6)/L) and 200 × 10(6)/L (range, 5-310 × 10(6)/L) at 12 and 24 months after transplantation and T-cell receptor excision circles were 2,238/10(6) T cells (range, 320-8,807/10(6) T cells) and 4,184/10(6) T cells (range, 1,582-24,596/10(6) T cells). Counts did not usually reach normal levels for age, but patients were able to clear pre-existing infections and those acquired later. At a median of 49 months (range, 22-80 months), 8 have ceased prophylactic antimicrobials, and 5 have ceased immunoglobulin replacement. Histologic confirmation of thymopoiesis was seen in 7 of 11 patients undergoing biopsy of transplanted tissue, including 5 showing full maturation through to the terminal stage of Hassall body formation. Autoimmune regulator expression was also demonstrated. Autoimmune complications were seen in 7 of 12 patients. In 2 patients early transient autoimmune hemolysis settled after treatment and did not recur. The other 5 experienced ongoing autoimmune problems, including thyroiditis (3), hemolysis (1), thrombocytopenia (4), and neutropenia (1). This study confirms the previous reports that thymus transplantation can reconstitute T cells in patients with cDGS but with frequent autoimmune complications in survivors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  9. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony JC; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively. We investigated the association between thymus size (thymic index, TI) in infancy and subsequent infant and child survival in a contemporary South Asian population. Methods The study focused on the follow-up of a randomized trial of prenatal nutritional interventions in rural Bangladesh (ISRCTN16581394), with TI measured longitudinally in infancy (at birth and weeks 8, 24 and 52 of age) and accurate recording of mortality up to 5 years of age. Results A total of 3267 infants were born into the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab study; data on TI were available for 1168 infants at birth, increasing to 2094 infants by 52 weeks of age. TI in relation to body size was largest at birth, decreasing through infancy. For infants with at least one measure of TI available, there were a total of 99 deaths up to the age of 5 years. No association was observed between TI and subsequent mortality when TI was measured at birth. However, an association with mortality was observed with TI at 8 weeks of age [odds ratio (OR) for change in mortality risk associated with 1 standard deviation change in TI: all deaths: OR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.98; P = 0.038; and infection-related deaths only: OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.14, 0.74; P = 0.008]. For TI when measured at 24 and 52 weeks of age, the numbers of infection-related deaths were too few (3 and 1, respectively) for any meaningful association to be observed. Conclusion These results confirm that thymus size in early infancy predicts subsequent survival in a lower mortality setting than West Africa. The absence of an effect at birth and its appearance at 8 weeks of age suggests early postnatal influences such as breast milk trophic factors. PMID:24366492

  10. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony J C; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively. We investigated the association between thymus size (thymic index, TI) in infancy and subsequent infant and child survival in a contemporary South Asian population. The study focused on the follow-up of a randomized trial of prenatal nutritional interventions in rural Bangladesh (ISRCTN16581394), with TI measured longitudinally in infancy (at birth and weeks 8, 24 and 52 of age) and accurate recording of mortality up to 5 years of age. A total of 3267 infants were born into the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab study; data on TI were available for 1168 infants at birth, increasing to 2094 infants by 52 weeks of age. TI in relation to body size was largest at birth, decreasing through infancy. For infants with at least one measure of TI available, there were a total of 99 deaths up to the age of 5 years. No association was observed between TI and subsequent mortality when TI was measured at birth. However, an association with mortality was observed with TI at 8 weeks of age [odds ratio (OR) for change in mortality risk associated with 1 standard deviation change in TI: all deaths: OR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.98; P = 0.038; and infection-related deaths only: OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.14, 0.74; P = 0.008]. For TI when measured at 24 and 52 weeks of age, the numbers of infection-related deaths were too few (3 and 1, respectively) for any meaningful association to be observed. These results confirm that thymus size in early infancy predicts subsequent survival in a lower mortality setting than West Africa. The absence of an effect at birth and its appearance at 8 weeks of age suggests early postnatal influences such as breast milk trophic factors.

  11. CD34+CD38dim cells in the human thymus can differentiate into T, natural killer, and dendritic cells but are distinct from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Res, P; Martínez-Cáceres, E; Cristina Jaleco, A; Staal, F; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1996-06-15

    Recently we reported that the human thymus contains a minute population of CD34+CD38dim cells that do not express the T-cell lineage markers CD2 and CD5. The phenotype of this population resembled that of CD34+CD38dim cells present in fetal liver, umbilical cord blood, and bone marrow known to be highly enriched for pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this report we tested the hypothesis that the CD34+CD38dim thymocytes constitute the most primitive hematopoietic cells in the thymus using a combination of phenotypic and functional analyses. It was found that in contrast to CD34+CD38dim cells from fetal liver and bone marrow, CD34+CD38dim cells from the thymus express high levels of CD45RA and are negative for Thy-1. These data indicate that the CD34+CD38dim thymocytes are distinct from pluripotent stem cells. CD34+CD38dim thymocytes differentiate into T cells when cocultured with mouse fetal thymic organs. In addition, individual cells in this population can differentiate either to natural killer cells in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-7 (IL-7), and IL-2 or to dendritic cells in the presence of SCF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNFalpha), indicating that CD34+CD38dim thymocytes contain multi-potential hematopoietic progenitors. To establish which CD34+ fetal liver subpopulation contains the cells that migrate to the thymus, we investigated the T-cell-developing potential of CD34+CD38dim and CD34+CD38+ fetal liver cells and found that the capacity of CD34+ fetal liver cells to differentiate into T cells is restricted to those cells that are CD38dim. Collectively, these findings indicate that cells from the CD34+CD38dim fetal liver cell population migrate to the thymus before upregulating CD38 and committing to the T-cell lineage.

  12. Evidence for an early role for BMP4 signaling in thymus and parathyroid morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Julie; Patel, Seema R.; Mishina, Yuji; Manley, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    The thymus and parathyroids are pharyngeal endoderm-derived organs that develop from common organ primordia, which undergo a series of morphological events resulting in separate organs in distinct locations in the embryo. Previous gene expression and functional analyses have suggested a role for BMP4 signaling in early thymus organogenesis. We have used conditional deletion of Bmp4 or Alk3 from the pharyngeal endoderm and/or the surrounding mesenchyme using Foxg1-Cre, Wnt1-Cre or Foxn1-Cre. Deleting Bmp4 from both neural crest cells (NCC) and early endoderm-derived epithelial cells in Foxg1-Cre;Bmp4 conditional mutants resulted in defects in thymus-parathyroid morphogenesis. Defects included reduced condensation of mesenchymal cells around the epithelium, partial absence of the thymic capsule, a delay in thymus and parathyroid separation, and failed or dramatically reduced organ migration. Patterning of the primordia and initial organ differentiation were not affected in any of the mutants. Deleting Bmp4 from NCC-derived mesenchyme or differentiating thymic epithelial cells (TECs) had no effects on thymus-parathyroid development, while loss of Alk3 from either neural crest cells or TECs resulted in only a mild thymic hypoplasia. These results show that the processes of cell specification and morphogenesis during thymus-parathyroid development are independently controlled, and suggest a specific temporal and spatial role for BMP4-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during early thymus and parathyroid morphogenesis. PMID:20043899

  13. Prevalence of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus in Japan: the Fukushima health management survey.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Satoru; Ohira, Tetsuya; Shimura, Hiroki; Midorikawa, Sanae; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Abe, Masafumi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic intrathyroidal thymus is thought to be a rare entity, often discovered incidentally, and is due to aberrant thymic migration during embryogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus in children using ultrasound screening. This study was cross-sectional and was conducted with the initial preliminary survey of the Fukushima Health Management Survey between October 9, 2011, and March 31, 2012, after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. A total of 37,816 children were examined in the survey. Diagnostic criteria are based on the ultrasonographic appearance of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus, which were round, oval, or polygonal hypoechoic or hyperechoic areas, with multiple granular and punctate echogenic foci. A total of 375 (0.99%) cases (164 girls) with ectopic intrathyroidal thymus were observed. The mean age was 7.0 years (range 0-18 years). Ectopic intrathyroidal thymus was located in the right (n=180), left (n=178), or bilateral (n=17) thyroid lobes. The incidence of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus was inversely correlated with age and body mass index. The results reflect the prevalence of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus using ultrasonography in the general population. Further examination will be needed by way of longitudinal follow-up.

  14. Infant growth and the thymus: data from two South American native societies.

    PubMed

    Veile, Amanda; Winking, Jeffrey; Gurven, Michael; Greaves, Russell D; Kramer, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    The thymus plays an important role in the development of the immune system, yet little is known about the patterns and sources of variation in postnatal thymic development. The aim of this study is to contribute cross-cultural data on thymus size in infants from two South American native populations, the Tsimane of Bolivia and the Pumé of Venezuela. Thymic ultrasonography was performed and standard anthropometric measures collected from 86 Tsimane and Pumé infants. Patterns of infant growth and thymus size were compared between the two populations and the relationship between nutritional status and thymus size was assessed. Despite nearly identical anthropometric trajectories, Tsimane infants had larger thymuses than Pumé infants at all ages. Population, infant age, and infant mid-upper arm circumference were significant predictors of thymus area in the Tsimane and Pumé infants. This finding reveals a cross-cultural difference in thymus size that is not driven by nutritional status. We suggest that future studies focus on isolating prenatal and postnatal environmental factors underlying cross-cultural variation in thymic development.

  15. [Immunosuppression effect of co-infection with MDRV and H9 AIV on thymus in muscovy ducks].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fengqiang; Gao, Chunliang; Chen, Shaoying; Zhu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Shao; Chen, Shilong; Cai, Xi; Li, Zhaolong; Ma, Chunquan; Zhao, Jiarong

    2011-10-01

    To study the immunosuppression effect on the thymus of muscovy ducks after infected with muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) and H9 influenza virus (AIV). After 8-day-old birds were infected with MDRV or H9 AIV, or both, the morbidity and mortality were totaled, the morphology and ultra-structure of the thymus were observed, proliferation ability of thymus cell were detected and the virus distrubition were detected by RT-PCR. After H9 AIV infection, The morbidity was low (10%) and without death. No obvious pathological change was observed on the thymus, whereas the proliferation ability of thymus cell was obviously suppressed. After MDRV infection, The birds grew slow, the morbidity was 80% and mortality was 50%. Thymus was atrophy appearing local necrosis and proliferation ability of thymus cell was obviously suppressed. After co-infection with MDRV and H9 AIV, the birds grew even slower growth. The morbidity was 90% and mortality was 70%. The thymus was atrophy appearing the lymphopenia and local necrosis and proliferation ability of thymus cell was also more obviously suppressed than MDRV infection. Virus duration time and detection ratio in co-infection group were more than in AIV and MDRV group. H9 AIV could lead to minor immunosuppression and MDRV could cause serious immuno-suppression. H9 AIV could aggravate the immunosuppression of thymus after co-infected with MDRV, so MDRV and H9 AIV infection had synergic effect on immunosuppression of the thymus.

  16. RAPD and phytochemical analysis of Thymus moroderi plantlets after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Marco-Medina, Ana; Casas, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cryopreservation is at present the most reliable strategy to preserve plant germplasm. When aromatic plants are the object of conservation it is necessary to assess not only the genetic but also the phytochemical stability to ensure that plant material maintains its qualities after storage. In this work we present molecular and phytochemical stability data related to a previously described vitrification-based cryopreservation protocol for Thymus moroderi Pau ex Martínez. RAPD markers have been used to assess the genetic stability of T. moroderi explants and revealed 0.34 percent of variation in the cryopreserved material studied. Phytochemical data collected from GC-MS analysis of dichloromethane extracts from cryopreserved plantlets rendered a profile in which 1,8-cineole (14.5 percent), camphor (5.9 percent) and borneol (5.2 percent) were the major components. Both data confirmed the suitability of the cryopreservation protocol applied.

  17. Antibacterial activity in vitro of Thymus capitatus from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Qaralleh, Haitham N; Abboud, Muayad M; Khleifat, Khaled M; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Althunibat, Osama Y

    2009-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the antibacterial activity of aqueous and organic extracts of Thymus capitatus L. (Lamiaceae) leaves and stems. Dried ground powder leaves and stems were extracted with water (aqueous extracts), ethanol, dichloromethane and hexane (Soxhlet extracts). The antibacterial activity of these extracts was evaluated against bacteria using disc diffusion method. The result obtained showed that the leaves had stronger antibacterial activity than the stems extracts. The ethanolic extract had the highest yield products and the high antibacterial activity than all other solvents. The results suggest that essential oil as non-polar organic compounds could be the main active compounds in this plant. Therefore the antibacterial activity of leaves ethanol extracts (LEE) was compared with essential oils leaves extracts (LEO) of T. capitatus. The LEO showed greater antibacterial activity than LEE. The LEO showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most sensitive bacteria.

  18. Thymus transplantation in complete DiGeorge anomaly.

    PubMed

    Markert, M Louise; Devlin, Blythe H; Chinn, Ivan K; McCarthy, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Complete DiGeorge anomaly is characterized by athymia, congenital heart disease, and hypoparathyroidism. This congenital disease is fatal by age 2 years unless immune reconstitution is successful. There are multiple underlying syndromes associated with complete DiGeorge anomaly including 22q11 hemizygosity in approximately 50%, CHARGE association in approximately 25%, and diabetic embryopathy in approximately 15%. Approximately one-third of patients present with rash and lymphadenopathy associated with oligoclonal "host" T cells. This condition resembles Omenn syndrome. Immunosuppression is necessary to control the oligoclonal T cells. The results of thymus transplantation are reported for a series of 50 patients, of whom 36 survive. The survivors develop naïve T cells and a diverse T cell repertoire.

  19. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josée; Hunninghake, Gary M; Murakami, Takamichi; Washko, George R; O'Connor, George T; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P < 0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P < 0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P < 0.001) with higher pack-years (P = 0.04). Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. 74% of participants (mean age 58.9 years) demonstrated complete fatty thymus. Women show less fatty thymus compared to men at ages 40-69 years. Smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty degeneration in thymus.

  20. Effect of boric acid supplementation of ostrich water on the expression of Foxn1 in thymus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Tang, Juan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Foxn1 is essential for thymus development. The relationship between boric acid and thymus development, optimal dose of boric acid in ostrich diets, and the effects of boric acid on the expression of Foxn1 were investigated in the present study. Thirty healthy ostriches were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and supplemented with boric acid at the concentration of 0 mg/L, 40 mg/L, 80 mg/L, 160 mg/L, 320 mg/L, 640 mg/L, respectively. The histological changes in thymus were observed by HE staining, and the expression of Foxn1 analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TUNEL method was used to label the apoptotic cells. Ostrich Foxn1 was sequenced by Race method. The results were as following: Apoptosis in ostrich thymus was closely related with boric acid concentrations. Low boric acid concentration inhibited apoptosis in thymus, but high boric acid concentration promoted apoptosis. Foxn1-positive cells were mainly distributed in thymic medulla and rarely in cortex. Foxn1 is closely related to thymus growth and development. The nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of Foxn1 were 2736 bases and 654 amino acids in length. It is highly conserved as compared with other species. These results demonstrated that the appropriate boric acid supplementation in water would produce positive effects on the growth development of ostrich thymus by promoting Foxn1 expression, especially at 80 mg/L, and the microstructure of the thymus of ostrich fed 80 mg/L boric acid was well developed. The supplementation of high dose boron (>320 mg/L) damaged the microstructure of thymus and inhibited the immune function by inhibiting Foxn1 expression, particularly at 640 mg/L. The optimal dose of boric acid supplementation in ostrich diets is 80 mg/L boric acid. The genomic full-length of African ostrich Foxn1 was cloned for the first time in the study.

  1. Essential oil composition and antinociceptive activity of Thymus capitatus.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Juan Carlos Ramos; de Meneses, Danilo Andrade; de Vasconcelos, Aliny Pereira; Piauilino, Celyane Alves; Almeida, Fernanda Regina de Castro; Napoli, Edoardo Marco; Ruberto, Giuseppe; de Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado

    2017-12-01

    The essential oil (EO) from Thymus capitatus Hoff. et Link. (Lamiaceae) has been traditionally used for its medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Characterize the constituents from T. capitatus EO and further evaluate the antinociceptive activity by in vivo and in vitro procedures. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify and quantify the constituents of the T. capitatus EO. The antinociceptive activity was evaluated in vivo by the glutamate-induced nociception model in male Swiss mice (25 g), at doses of 3, 6 and 12 mg/kg, 1 h before evaluation of the licking time response (0-15 min). The mechanism of T. capitatus EO (1-500 μg/mL) on the isolated nerve excitability of Wistar rat (300 g) was assessed by the single sucrose technique. The EO of T. capitatus presented 33 components, mainly monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, carvacrol (ca. 80%) was its major constituent. T. capitatus EO induced antinociception in orally treated mice (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg) reducing the licking time from control (100.3 ± 11.9 s) to 84.8 ± 12.2, 62.7.6 ± 9.9, and 41.5 ± 12.7 s, respectively (n = 8; p < 0.05). Additionally, we have demonstrated that T. capitatus EO (500 μg/mL) decreased the compound action potential amplitude (VCAP) of about 80.0 ± 4.3% from control recordings (n = 4; p < 0.05). Such activity was presumably mediated through a voltage-gated Na(+ )channels. The present study demonstrated the antinociceptive activity of Thymus capitatus essential oil, which acts via peripheral nervous excitability blockade.

  2. Volatiles from Thymbra and Thymus species of the western Mediterranean basin, Portugal and Macaronesia.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, A Cristina; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2010-09-01

    Thyme is the common name of many taxa belonging to the Thymbra and Thymus genera. Given the economic importance of thyme oils, many thyme species have been studied and their essential oils and other volatile-containing extracts chemically characterized. Thymbra and Thymus species are frequent in the west Mediterranean region, considered to be the centre of origin of the genus Thymus, and extend further westwards in the Iberian Peninsula and northwest Africa, to the Macaronesian region in the Atlantic Ocean. The present work gives an overview of the chemical composition of the volatiles from the taxa of these two genera occurring in the above geographic area.

  3. Immunological relationship between acetylcholine receptor and thymus: a possible significance in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Aharonov, A; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Abramsky, O; Fuchs, S

    1975-01-01

    A defined immunological cross-reaction was observed between acetylcholine receptor fraction from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, and two calf thymus fractions. The cross-reaction was demonstrated on the cellular level by means of the lymphocyte transformation technique, and on the humoral level, by means of the microcomplement fixation assay. In the human disease myasthenia gravis both acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction and the thymus are affected, probably by an autoimmune mechanism. The immunological cross-reaction between acetylcholine receptor and thymic components may explain the association between endplate and thymus disorders in myasthenia gravis. PMID:1055418

  4. Isolation and identification of a new thymic peptide from calf thymus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xi-Ming; Duan, Ming-Xing; Deng, Bin; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Liu, Zheng; He, Hong-Xuan

    2004-08-01

    Various thymic peptides (including thymulin, thymic humoral factor, thymopoietin, etc.) play important roles in the process of T cell maturation and development. We isolated a new peptide from calf thymus and named it thymus activity factor II (TAF-II). A yield of 0.92 mg of TAF-II was purified from 500 g calf thymus. Analysis by LC/MSD-Trap showed the amino acid sequence of this hexapeptide to be Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-OH with molecular weight 618.5 daltons. We have also begun to investigate the influence of TAF-II.

  5. Antifungal activities of essential oils from Thymus quinquecostatus and T. magnus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungwon; Kim, Ji-Hyun

    2004-11-01

    The antifungal activities of essential oils from Thymus quinquecostatus and T. magnus, which are species native to Korea, were evaluated against seven common pathogenic fungi. Additionally, the effects of the oils together with ketoconazole were tested by the checkerboard titer test. Both of the two Thymus oils showed significant inhibition of the tested fungi, with minimal inhibitor concentrations (MICs) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) in the range of 0.04-0.39 mg/mL and 0.19-0.78 mg/mL, respectively. The two Thymus oils, and thymol as well, exhibited synergism with ketoconazole against Trichophyton rubrum, which showed the highest susceptibility to these oils.

  6. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [The efficiency and direction of thymus changes after whole-body exposure of mice to the weak electromagnetic field are determined by the initial status of the thymus].

    PubMed

    Semin, Iu A; Zhavoronkov, L P; Voron'ko, Ia V; Shvartsburg, L K; Rozhkova, O M

    2003-01-01

    The work presents results of the experimental study on thymus changes developing after whole-body exposure of mice to ultralow power pulse-modulated electromagnetic field (carrying frequency 2.39 GHz, modulating pulses with frequency 4 Hz, duration of impulses 0.025 sec, average power density 60 mW/cm2, absorbed dose 0.086 J/g or 0.172 J/g). It was shown that a percent of the microwave induced increase or decrease of thymus mass and the number of cells in the organ (y) are determined by the initial mass or number of cells in thymus accordingly to equation of linear regression: (yx = 215-2.25x, where x is the thymus mass of control animals (in a range 31-63 mg) and (yx = 178.6-41x, where x is the initial number of cells in thymus (in a range 0.6 x 10(8)-2.6 x 10(8)) reduced by a factor of 10(8).

  8. [A new approach to the evaluation of the state of the microcirculatory system in patients presenting with chronic atrophic pharyngitis and treated with a synthetic neuropeptide].

    PubMed

    Boldyreva, O V; Burenkov, G I; Toropova, L A

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the mechanisms of development of chronic atrophic pharyngitis. A method is proposed for studying microcirculation in the mucous membrane at the posterior pharyngeal wall of the patients with this condition using laser Doppler flowmetry. The role of chronic somatic pathology in the development of pharyngeal dystrophy is demonstrated. It is shown that therapy with the synthetic neuropeptide is highly efficacious for the treatment of chronic atrophic pharyngitis.

  9. Osteoarthritis of the hip joint in elderly patients is most commonly atrophic, with low parameters of acetabular dysplasia and possible involvement of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Matsuyama, Kanehiro; Sakuma, Daisuke; Setoguchi, Takao; Nagano, Satoshi; Kawamura, Ichiro; Maeda, Shingo; Komiya, Setsuro

    2017-12-01

    As elderly patients with hip osteoarthritis aged, acetabular dysplasia parameters decreased (Sharp's angle, acetabular roof obliquity angle, and acetabular head index) and the incidence of the atrophic type increased. Vertebral body fracture was more frequent in the atrophic type, suggesting the involvement of osteoporosis at the onset of hip osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased bone formation at a local site. However, excessive bone resorption has also been found to occur in the early stages of OA. Osteoporosis may be involved in the onset of OA in elderly patients. We conducted a cross-sectional radiographic study of patients with hip OA and examined the association between age and factors of acetabular dysplasia (Sharp's angle, acetabular roof obliquity angle, and acetabular head index) as well as the osteoblastic response to determine the potential involvement of osteoporosis. This study included 366 patients (58 men, 308 women) who had undergone total hip arthroplasty for the diagnosis of hip OA. We measured the parameters of acetabular dysplasia using preoperative frontal X-ray images and evaluated each patient according to Bombelli classification of OA (hypertrophic, normotrophic, or atrophic type). As the patients aged, the parameters of acetabular dysplasia decreased. The incidence of the atrophic type of OA was significantly higher in older patients. Vertebral body fractures were more frequent in the atrophic type than in the other types. Additionally, the index of acetabular dysplasia was lower in the atrophic type. By contrast, the hypertrophic type was present in relatively younger patients and was associated with an increased index of acetabular dysplasia. In elderly patients with hip OA, the parameters of acetabular dysplasia decreased and the incidence of the atrophic type increased as the patients aged. The frequency of vertebral body fracture was high in patients with the atrophic type, suggesting the involvement of

  10. [The application of helium-neon laser radiation for the combined treatment of the patients with atrophic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Sharipov, R A; Sharipova, E R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the efficacy of the treatment of the patients presenting with atrophic rhinitis (ozena) of the upper respiratory tract by the application of helium-neon laser radiation. A total of 120 patients aged from 15 to 53 years were treated based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, G.G. Kuvatov Republican Clinical Hospital, Ufa. All these patients underwent routine clinical, roentgenological, microbiological, and rheographic examination. The method for the treatment of atrophic rhinitis is described; it includes the application of helium-neon laser radiation in combination with the administration of the purified preparation of liquid polyvalent Klebsiella bacteriophage. The positive results of the treatment by the proposed method were documented in 90% of the patients.

  11. Minimally Invasive Approach Based on Pterygoid and Short Implants for Rehabilitation of an Extremely Atrophic Maxilla: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cucchi, Alessandro; Vignudelli, Elisabetta; Franco, Simonetta; Corinaldesi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    Extremely atrophic maxillae can be considered the most important indication for three-dimensional maxillary reconstruction. Different bone-augmentation techniques have been suggested to accomplish this. This article illustrates a minimally invasive approach to rehabilitation of the extremely atrophic maxilla. A 63-year-old male patient was referred for restoration of his totally edentulous maxilla with a fixed full-arch implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Four short implants in the premaxillary region and 2 longer implants in the pterygomaxillary regions were inserted with piezoelectric implant site preparation. At the 1-year follow-up appointment, no clinical or radiographic changes in the soft-tissue contours or crestal bone levels were observed. This surgical approach, based on the combination of short implants in the premaxillary regions and pterygoid implants in the pterygomaxillary regions, represents a way to shorten treatment timing, minimize the risk of surgical complications, and reduce patient discomfort and costs.

  12. Prognostic implications of imaging in atrophic macular degeneration and its use in clinical practice and clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Paul Cc; Layton, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Clinical prognostic markers in atrophic age-related macular degeneration include the extent of existing atrophy, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) patterns and optical coherence tomography changes in the outer retina/retinal pigment epithelium interface. The prognostic implications of these findings may be used to determine not just the rate of disease progression but also influence the likelihood, magnitude and clinical relevance of therapy responses. FAF phenotypes have been extensively investigated; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind their appearance have not been fully elucidated. Optical coherence tomography imaging is additive to FAF imaging in atrophic age-related macular degeneration, allowing the visualization of detail not available through FAF imaging whilst also displaying subtle changes correlating with the FAF phenotypes themselves, thereby giving clues to their histological determinates. The developing understanding of these imaging modalities and consequent development of prognostically useful classification systems have widespread implication in clinical care and clinical trial design.

  13. Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser in treatment of atrophic scar of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Nahidi, Yalda; Maleki, Masoud; Esmaily, Habibollah; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Unfortunately, it can lead to unsightly atrophic scars with limited treatment options. Fractional CO2 laser is accepted for treatment of atrophic acne scars and recently has been used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, so we planned to use fractional CO2 laser on leishmaniasis scar. We conducted this study on 60 leishmaniasis scars on the face of 40 patients. The lesions were treated by a fractional CO2 laser with beam size of 120 μm, with energy of 50-90 mJ, and 50-100 spots/cm(2) density with two passes in three monthly sessions. Evaluation was done in the first and second months after the first treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment. Digital photography was performed at each visit. Assessment of improvement rate by patient and physician was rated separately as follows: no improvement (0%), mild (<25%), moderate (25-50%), good (51-75%), and excellent (76-100%). Based on patients' opinion, in the first and second follow-up, 48.3 and 90% of them reported moderate to excellent healing, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up after the end of the experiment, most of the patients (88.3 and 95%, respectively) reported moderate to excellent healing of scars. Based on two observers' opinion, healing in the first follow-up in most of the patients (65%) was mild to moderate and 33% were reported as having no healing. In the second follow-up, only 5% of the patients were reported with no healing and 60% were reported as having moderate healing (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up, most of the patients (95 and 96.6%) were reported as having moderate to excellent healing (p = <0.001). Our results underlined the high efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for leishmaniasis scar. No significant adverse effects were noted.

  14. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin G Levels and Atrophic Gastritis Status on Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Atsushi; Tayama, Jun; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogawa, Sayaka; Saigo, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Masaki; Shirabe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is implicated in gastric and extra-gastric diseases. While gastritis-related chronic inflammation represents a known trigger of metabolic disturbances, whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) is affected by gastritis status remains unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of HP-related gastritis on the risk of MetS. Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled patients undergoing screening for MetS between 2014 and 2015. Investigations included HP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody assays to detect HP infection, and serum pepsinogen assays to evaluate atrophic gastritis status. The risk of MetS was evaluated via multiple logistic regression analyses with two covariates: serum HP infection status (IgG levels) and atrophic gastritis status (two criteria were applied; pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3 or both pepsinogen I levels ≤ 70 μg/L and pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3). Results Of 1,044 participants, 247 (23.7%) were HP seropositive, and 62 (6.0%) had MetS. HP seronegative and seropositive patients had similar risks of MetS. On the other hand, AG (defined in terms of serum PG I/II <3) was significant risk of MetS (OR of 2.52 [95% CI 1.05–7.52]). After stratification according to HP IgG concentration, patients with low HP infection status had the lowest MetS risk (defined as an odds ratio [OR] adjusted for age, sex, smoking, drinking and physical activity status). Taking this result as a reference, patients with negative, moderate, and high HP infection status had ORs (with 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of 2.15 (1.06–4.16), 3.69 (1.12–16.7), and 4.05 (1.05–26.8). Conclusions HP-associated gastritis represents a risk factor for MetS. Research should determine why low and not negative HP infection status is associated with the lowest MetS risk. PMID:27851820

  15. Clinical studies of the treatment of facial atrophic acne scars and acne with a bipolar fractional radiofrequency system.

    PubMed

    Kaminaka, Chikako; Uede, Mikiko; Matsunaka, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2015-06-01

    Few clinical studies have examined the utility of bipolar fractional radiofrequency (FRF) therapy as a treatment for atrophic acne scars and active acne in people with darker skin. This study was designed to compare the safety and efficacy of bipolar FRF therapy as a treatment for atrophic acne scars and acne vulgaris. Twenty-three Japanese patients with atrophic acne scars and mild to severe acne on both cheeks were treated with a bipolar FRF system (eMatrix; Syneron, Yokneam Illit, Israel). Five treatment sessions were carried out at 1-month intervals, and the patients were followed up for 3 months after the final treatment. Assessments of scar severity and the number of acne lesions and 3-D in vivo imaging analysis were performed. Evaluations of the treatment outcomes and their effects on the patients' quality of life (QOL) were also carried out. We demonstrated that the improvement in scar volume was marked in the patients with mild scars and was at least moderate in 23 (57.5%) of the treated areas. With regard to the number of acne lesions, the treated areas exhibited significantly fewer lesions compared with the baseline at each time point (P < 0.05). The patients' assessments of the treatment outcomes and their QOL indicated that both had improved significantly by the end of the study. Furthermore, significant reductions in the patients' sebum levels, skin roughness and scar depth were observed. Bipolar FRF treatment significantly improved the atrophic acne scars and acne of Japanese patients and had minimal side-effects. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Simultaneous sinus lifting and alveolar distraction of the atrophic maxillary alveolus for implant placement: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Gwan; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Kim, Byung-Ock

    2005-12-01

    This article describes a procedure for performing simultaneous sinus lifting and alveolar distraction to augment an atrophic maxillary alveolus. This technique is a 1-stage operation that is indicated when the amount of native sinus floor bone is minimal (<5 mm). The technique is contraindicated when there is <2 mm of sinus floor,when a 2-stage operation is needed (sinus lifting, alveolar distraction osteogenesis). Postoperative complications are minimal.

  17. Fixed rehabilitation of severely atrophic jaws using immediately loaded basal disk implants after in situ bone activation.

    PubMed

    Odin, Guillaume; Misch, Carl E; Binderman, Itzak; Scortecci, Gerard

    2012-10-01

    Rehabilitation of severely atrophic jaws is facilitated when basal disk implants are used after activation of the future bony implant bed with a purpose-designed instrument (Osteotensor) 45 to 90 days before implant surgery. Fabrication of a highly rigid, screw-secured fixed prosthesis that acts as an external orthopedic fixator permits immediate functional loading. This protocol also represents a second chance for patients who have experienced complete implant loss and/or bone graft failure.

  18. The participation of complement in the parietal cell antigen–antibody reaction in pernicious anaemia and atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Elizabeth; Glass, G. B. Jerzy

    1969-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that the parietal cell antibody circulating in the serum of pernicious anaemia patients is a complement fixing antibody. In this work, we have presented direct evidence using an immunofluorescent technique, that the antigen–antibody union occurring in the gastric mucosa between this antibody and the parietal cell antigen binds complement (C'). We have further adduced data to indicate that serum C' activity was decreased in more than one-third of our patients with pernicious anaemia and in one-fourth of those with advanced atrophic gastritis. Eighty-five per cent of the patients with lowered serum C' had parietal cell antibody in the serum and some of them also had intrinsic factor antibody. These findings support the concept of the autoimmune mechanism in the development of the gastric atrophic lesion in a proportion of patients with pernicious anaemia and atrophic gastritis. This mechanism includes the participation of complement in the antigen–antibody reaction at the parietal cell level. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4905403

  19. Senescent Atrophic Epidermis Retains Lrig1+ Stem Cells and Loses Wnt Signaling, a Phenotype Shared with CD44KO Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Laurent; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    Lrig1 is known to repress the epidermal growth through its inhibitory activity on EGFR, while CD44 promotes it. We analyzed the expression of these molecules in senescent atrophic human epidermis and in the epidermis of CD44KO mice. In normal human epidermis, Lrig1+ cells form clusters located in the basal layer in which CD44 expression is downregulated and Lef1 expression reflects an active Wnt signaling. In senescent atrophic human epidermis, we found retention of Lrig1high+ cells all along the basal layer, forming no clusters, with decrease of CD44 and lef1 expression. In vitro silencing of CD44 indicated that CD44 may be required for Wnt signaling. However, if looking at the ear epidermis of CD44KO mice, we only found a limited interfollicular epidermal atrophy and unchanged Lrig1high+ cells in the hair follicle. Cell lineage tracing further revealed that interfollicular epidermis did lost its self-renewing capacity but that its homeostasis relied on Lrig1-derived keratinocytes migrating from the hair follicle. Therefore, we conclude that CD44 downregulation is part of the phenotype of senescent atrophic human epidermis, and contributes to reduce Wnt signaling and to alter Lrig1high+ stem cell distribution. PMID:28099467

  20. Molecular Genotyping of Anisakis Larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and Endoscopic Evidence for Preferential Penetration of Normal over Atrophic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. Methods In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Results Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–31.8). Conclusions In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae. PMID:24586583

  1. Molecular genotyping of anisakis larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and endoscopic evidence for preferential penetration of normal over atrophic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-31.8). In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae.

  2. Surgical Treatment of the Atrophic Mandibular Fractures by Locked Plates Systems: Our Experience and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Giorgio; Sconza, Cristiano; Ardito, Emanuela; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The management of atrophic mandibular fractures in edentulous patients represents an insidious issue for the maxillofacial surgeon due to the biological and biomechanical conditions that are unfavorable for fracture fixation and bone healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of the treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures and to compare the outcomes of different plating systems used for stabilization. We selected a study group of 16 patients with fractures of completely edentulous atrophic mandibles who were treated in our department between 2004 and 2010. All patients were surgically treated by open reduction and internal rigid fixation using 2.0-mm large-profile locking and 2.4-mm locking bone plates. All patients achieved a complete fracture healing and fast functional recovery of mandibular movements without intraoperative or postoperative surgical complications. The results of our study demonstrated the efficacy of this type of treatment in association with a low postoperative complication rate, a reduction in the recovery time, and the possibility to have an immediately functional rehabilitation. There were very similar results using each of the two bone plating methods considered: no case had hardware failure or nonunion of the fracture. The 2.0-mm large locking plate is thinner, exposes through the soft tissues less frequently, and is much easier to shape and adapt to the mandibular anatomy. However, the 2.4-mm locking plate system still represents the reference hardware in the condition of severe bone atrophy. PMID:23730420

  3. Focal high-concentration trichloroacetic acid peeling for treatment of atrophic facial chickenpox scar: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Barikbin, Behrooz; Saadat, Nelda; Akbari, Zahra; Yousefi, Maryam; Toossi, Parviz

    2012-10-01

    Despite their prevalence, there is a paucity of information in the medical literature on the treatment of atrophic chickenpox scars. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using the chemical reconstruction of skin scar technique for the treatment of atrophic facial chickenpox scars. One hundred patients (mean age 23 years; Fitzpatrick skin types II-IV) were treated with focal chemical peeling with 70% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) for a maximum of six sessions. Improvement rate, frequency of adverse events and patient satisfaction were assessed. Five hundred thirty-three peeling sessions in 100 consecutive patients were performed. Final assessment at 12-week follow-up visit after the last treatment revealed improvement in 95% of patients: mild improvement in 12 cases, moderate improvement in 42 cases, and marked improvement in 41 cases. The appearance of scars did not change in five patients. Seventy-nine patients expressed moderate to high satisfaction with the results. Post-treatment side effects were mild and transient, resolving gradually within the study period. Focal peeling with high-concentration TCA appears to be a safe and effective alternative in the treatment of atrophic facial chickenpox scars. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Artificial neural networks in the recognition of the presence of thyroid disease in patients with atrophic body gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo; Centanni, Marco; Vannella, Lucy; Grossi, Enzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of artificial neural networks in predicting the presence of thyroid disease in atrophic body gastritis patients. METHODS: A dataset of 29 input variables of 253 atrophic body gastritis patients was applied to artificial neural networks (ANNs) using a data optimisation procedure (standard ANNs, T&T-IS protocol, TWIST protocol). The target variable was the presence of thyroid disease. RESULTS: Standard ANNs obtained a mean accuracy of 64.4% with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 59.8% in recognizing atrophic body gastritis patients with thyroid disease. The optimization procedures (T&T-IS and TWIST protocol) improved the performance of the recognition task yielding a mean accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 74.7% and 75.8%, 78.8% and 81.8%, and 70.5% and 69.9%, respectively. The increase of sensitivity of the TWIST protocol was statistically significant compared to T&T-IS. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that artificial neural networks may be taken into consideration as a potential clinical decision-support tool for identifying ABG patients at risk for harbouring an unknown thyroid disease and thus requiring diagnostic work-up of their thyroid status. PMID:18203288

  5. Retrospective study of pterygoid implants in the atrophic posterior maxilla: implant and prosthesis survival rates up to 3 years.

    PubMed

    Curi, Marcos Martins; Cardoso, Camila Lopes; Ribeiro, Karina de Cássia Braga

    2015-01-01

    Few reports have evaluated cumulative survival rates of implants placed in the pterygoid region in the medium term. The objective of this study was to evaluate success rates of pterygoid implants and prostheses in patients treated in the atrophic posterior maxilla. A retrospective study was performed of patients with an atrophic posterior maxilla rehabilitated with pterygoid implants between 1999 and 2010 and followed for at least 36 months after implant loading. Two outcome variables were considered: implant success and prosthesis success. The following predictor variables were recorded: sex, age, implant placement angulation, number and size of implants, prosthetic rehabilitation, bone loss, date of prosthesis delivery, and date of last follow-up. A statistical model was used to estimate the survival rates and associated confidence intervals. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test to compare survival curves. A total of 238 titanium implants (172 anterior and 66 pterygoid) were placed in 56 patients. The 3-year overall pterygoid implant survival rate was 99%. The 3-year overall prosthesis survival rate was 97.7%. The mean bone loss around pterygoid implants after 3 years of loading was 1.21 mm (range, 0.31 to 1.75). All patients were wearing the prostheses at the most recent follow-up examination. Placement of implants in the pterygoid region is a viable alternative treatment modality for rehabilitation of patients with an atrophic posterior maxilla.

  6. Senescent Atrophic Epidermis Retains Lrig1+ Stem Cells and Loses Wnt Signaling, a Phenotype Shared with CD44KO Mice.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Laurent; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    Lrig1 is known to repress the epidermal growth through its inhibitory activity on EGFR, while CD44 promotes it. We analyzed the expression of these molecules in senescent atrophic human epidermis and in the epidermis of CD44KO mice. In normal human epidermis, Lrig1+ cells form clusters located in the basal layer in which CD44 expression is downregulated and Lef1 expression reflects an active Wnt signaling. In senescent atrophic human epidermis, we found retention of Lrig1high+ cells all along the basal layer, forming no clusters, with decrease of CD44 and lef1 expression. In vitro silencing of CD44 indicated that CD44 may be required for Wnt signaling. However, if looking at the ear epidermis of CD44KO mice, we only found a limited interfollicular epidermal atrophy and unchanged Lrig1high+ cells in the hair follicle. Cell lineage tracing further revealed that interfollicular epidermis did lost its self-renewing capacity but that its homeostasis relied on Lrig1-derived keratinocytes migrating from the hair follicle. Therefore, we conclude that CD44 downregulation is part of the phenotype of senescent atrophic human epidermis, and contributes to reduce Wnt signaling and to alter Lrig1high+ stem cell distribution.

  7. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π∗ transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid.

  8. [Morphogenesis of Human Fetal Thymus during Weeks 22-27 of Development].

    PubMed

    Kulida, L V; Peretyatko, L P; Nazarov, S B

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features of human fetal thymus morphogenesis in early ontogeny in the case of uncomplicated pregnancy have been characterized. A steady increase of thymus dimensions and weight occurred concomitantly to differentiation of morphofunctional zones within the organ. Cell differentiation in the subcapsular and inner cortical zones of the thymus lobes was manifested as changes in parameters of expression of T-lymphocyte antigens CD1, CD2, and CD3 and ultrastructural features of reticuloepithelial cells (REC) type I and II forming a microenvironment for lymphocytes. RECs of the medullar zone formed a glomerular syncytium with desmosomal interepithelial contacts by week 22 of fetal development. Small lymphocytes predominated among thymocytes (66%). Hassall's corpuscles, the structural correlates of morphological and functional maturity, predominated in the fetal thymuses during developmental weeks 25-27.

  9. BDNF and its receptors in human myasthenic thymus: implications for cell fate in thymic pathology.

    PubMed

    Berzi, Angela; Ayata, C Korcan; Cavalcante, Paola; Falcone, Chiara; Candiago, Elisabetta; Motta, Teresio; Bernasconi, Pia; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Mantegazza, Renato; Meinl, Edgar; Farina, Cinthia

    2008-07-15

    Here we show that in myasthenic thymus several cell types, including thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and immune cells, were the source and the target of the neurotrophic factor brain-derived growth factor (BDNF). Interestingly, many actively proliferating medullary thymocytes expressed the receptor TrkB in vivo in involuted thymus, while this population was lost in hyperplastic or neoplastic thymuses. Furthermore, in hyperplastic thymuses the robust coordinated expression of BDNF in the germinal centers together with the receptor p75NTR on all proliferating B cells strongly suggests that this factor regulates germinal center reaction. Finally, all TEC dying of apoptosis expressed BDNF receptors, indicating that this neurotrophin is involved in TEC turnover. In thymomas both BDNF production and receptor expression in TEC were strongly hindered. This may represent an attempt of tumour escape from cell death.

  10. The human thymus microenvironment: heterogeneity detected by monoclonal anti-epithelial cell antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    de Maagd, R A; MacKenzie, W A; Schuurman, H J; Ritter, M A; Price, K M; Broekhuizen, R; Kater, L

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against human thymus stromal cells and their specificity for the epithelial component of thymus stroma assessed by double immunofluorescence using anti-keratin antibodies to identify epithelium. Our monoclonal antibodies identify six distinct patterns of epithelial cell antigen expression within the thymus: pan epithelial (antibody IP1); cortex (MR3 and MR6); cortical/medullary junction (IP2); subcapsule and subpopulation of medulla (MR10/MR14); Hassall's corpuscles and adjacent subpopulation of medulla (IP3); Hassall's corpuscles only (MR13/IP4). This heterogeneity of antigen expression suggests that many different epithelial microenvironments exist within the human thymus. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Cont Figure 2 PMID:3884494

  11. Initial seeding of embryonic thymus by immune-restricted lympho-myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Takuo; Boukarabila, Hanane; Thongjuea, Supat; Woll, Petter S.; Azzoni, Emanuele; Giustacchini, Alice; Lutteropp, Michael; Bouriez-Jones, Tiphaine; Vaidya, Harsh; Mead, Adam J.; Atkinson, Deborah; Böiers, Charlotta; Carrelha, Joana; Macaulay, Iain C.; Patient, Roger; Geissmann, Frederic; Nerlov, Claus; Sandberg, Rickard; de Bruijn, Marella F.T.R.; Blackburn, C. Clare; Godin, Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2016-01-01

    The last stages of T-lineage-restriction occur in the thymus following entry of thymus-seeding progenitors (TSPs). The identity and lineage potentials of TSPs remains unclear. Since the first embryonic TSPs enter a non-vascularized thymus-rudiment, we were able to directly image and establish the functional and molecular properties of embryonic thymopoiesis-initiating progenitors (T-IPs) prior to thymus-entry and Notch-activation. T-IPs did not include multipotent stem cells nor molecular evidence of T-cell-restricted progenitors. Rather, single cell molecular and functional analysis demonstrated that most fetal T-IPs co-express programs and potentials for lymphoid and myeloid components of the immune-system. Moreover, studies of Rbpj-deficient embryos, demonstrate, contrary to previous claims, that canonical Notch-signaling is neither involved in pre-thymic T-lineage-restriction nor T-IP migration. PMID:27695000

  12. What Happens in the Thymus Does Not Stay in the Thymus: How T Cells Recycle the CD4+-CD8+ Lineage Commitment Transcriptional Circuitry To Control Their Function.

    PubMed

    Vacchio, Melanie S; Bosselut, Rémy

    2016-06-15

    MHC-restricted CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are at the core of most adaptive immune responses. Although these cells carry distinct functions, they arise from a common precursor during thymic differentiation, in a developmental sequence that matches CD4 and CD8 expression and functional potential with MHC restriction. Although the transcriptional control of CD4(+)-CD8(+) lineage choice in the thymus is now better understood, less was known about what maintains the CD4(+) and CD8(+) lineage integrity of mature T cells. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that establish in the thymus, and maintain in postthymic cells, the separation of these lineages. We focus on recent studies that address the mechanisms of epigenetic control of Cd4 expression and emphasize how maintaining a transcriptional circuitry nucleated around Thpok and Runx proteins, the key architects of CD4(+)-CD8(+) lineage commitment in the thymus, is critical for CD4(+) T cell helper functions.

  13. Rhodiola rosea suppresses thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like-2 in septic rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; ZHANG, WEI; ZHANG, LIN-MING; WANG, YUN-HUI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea can enhance cellular immunity and humoral immune function in mice, and thus, it has become a research hotspot. However, its underlying mechanism of action has remained elusive. The present study investigated whether Rhodiola rosea was able to downregulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), thereby inhibiting the expression of apoptotic genes, attenuating T-lymphocyte apoptosis and improving immunity in septic mice. A mouse model of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established, and animals in the treatment group were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of Rhodiola rosea extract, while animals in the control group and sham-operated group were injected with an equivalent amount of normal saline. TIPE2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA and protein levels in thymic T cells were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, the thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis rate, thymus T-lymphocyte count and thymus T-lymphocyte sub-sets were assessed using flow cytometry. Levels of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were determined using ELISA. The results showed that, compared to that in the CLP group, the expression of TIPE2, Fas and FasL in the treatment group was significantly decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased (P<0.05). The thymus lymphocyte count in the CLP group was significantly higher compared with that in the treatment group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the apoptotic rate of thymus T-lymphocytes in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the CLP group (P<0.05). In addition, treatment with Rhodiola rosea rescued decreased in the counts of the CD3+ T and CD4+ T sub-sets of thymus T lymphocytes in the CLP group (P<0

  14. Rhodiola rosea suppresses thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like-2 in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Wei; Su, Mei-Xian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lin-Ming; Wang, Yun-Hui; Qian, Chuan-Yun

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea can enhance cellular immunity and humoral immune function in mice, and thus, it has become a research hotspot. However, its underlying mechanism of action has remained elusive. The present study investigated whether Rhodiola rosea was able to downregulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), thereby inhibiting the expression of apoptotic genes, attenuating T-lymphocyte apoptosis and improving immunity in septic mice. A mouse model of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established, and animals in the treatment group were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of Rhodiola rosea extract, while animals in the control group and sham-operated group were injected with an equivalent amount of normal saline. TIPE2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA and protein levels in thymic T cells were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, the thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis rate, thymus T-lymphocyte count and thymus T-lymphocyte sub-sets were assessed using flow cytometry. Levels of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were determined using ELISA. The results showed that, compared to that in the CLP group, the expression of TIPE2, Fas and FasL in the treatment group was significantly decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased (P<0.05). The thymus lymphocyte count in the CLP group was significantly higher compared with that in the treatment group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the apoptotic rate of thymus T-lymphocytes in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the CLP group (P<0.05). In addition, treatment with Rhodiola rosea rescued decreased in the counts of the CD3(+) T and CD4(+) T sub-sets of thymus T lymphocytes in the CLP group

  15. Distinct metaplastic and inflammatory phenotypes in autoimmune and adenocarcinoma-associated chronic atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangho; Choi, Eunyoung; Petersen, Christine P; Roland, Joseph T; Federico, Alessandro; Ippolito, Rossana; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Nardone, Gerardo; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Romano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastritis (AIG) and adenocarcinoma-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) are both associated with oxyntic atrophy, but AIG patients demonstrate an increased risk of carcinoid tumors rather than the elevated risk of adenocarcinoma observed with CAG. We therefore sought to compare the characteristics of the metaplastic mucosa in AIG and CAG patients. Methods We examined markers for metaplasia (spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM) and intestinal metaplasia) as well as proliferation (Ki67) and immune cell populations (neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils) in gastric sections from 16 female patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and AIG and 17 patients with CAG associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Results Both AIG and CAG patients demonstrated prominent SPEM and intestinal metaplasia. However, AIG patients displayed significantly lower numbers of infiltrating macrophages and significantly reduced mucosal cell proliferation as compared to CAG patients. Conclusions These findings indicate that, while both AIG and CAG patients display prominent oxyntic atrophy and metaplasia, the AIG patients do not show proliferative metaplastic lineages that would predispose to adenocarcinoma. PMID:28405320

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Diagnostic Methods in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Takuro; Ohde, Sachiko; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2017-01-01

    Background. There are several diagnostic methods for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. A cost-effective analysis is needed to decide on the optimal diagnostic method. The aim of this study was to determine a cost-effective diagnostic method in patients with atrophic gastritis (AG). Methods. A decision-analysis model including seven diagnostic methods was constructed for patients with AG diagnosed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Expected values of cost and effectiveness were calculated for each test. Results. If the prevalence of H. pylori in the patients with AG is 85% and CAM-resistant H. pylori is 30%, histology, stool H. pylori antigen (SHPAg), bacterial culture (BC), and urine H. pylori antibody (UHPAb) were dominated by serum H. pylori IgG antibody (SHPAb), rapid urease test (RUT), and urea breath test (UBT). Among three undominated methods, the incremental cost-effective ratios (ICER) of RUT versus SHPAb and UBT versus RUT were $214 and $1914, respectively. If the prevalence of CAM-sensitive H. pylori was less than 55%, BC was not dominated, but its H. pylori eradication success rate was 0.86. Conclusions. RUT was the most cost-effective at the current prevalence of CAM-resistant H. pylori. BC could not be selected due to its poor effectiveness even if CAM-resistant H. pylori was more than 45%. PMID:28337217

  17. Are atrophic long-bone nonunions associated with low-grade infections?

    PubMed Central

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Spranger, Ole; Gantz, Simone; Burckhardt, Irene; Zimmermann, Stefan; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing, especially when associated with bacterial infection, is a severe complication following long-bone fractures and requires special treatment. Because standard diagnostic techniques might provide falsely negative results, we evaluated the sonication method for detection of bacteria on implants of patients with fracture nonunions. A total of 49 patients with a nonunion (group NU) and, for comparison, 45 patients who had undergone routine removal of osteosynthetic material (group OM), were included in the study. Five different diagnostic methods (culture of tissue samples, culture of intraoperative swabs, histopathology of tissue samples, culture of sonication fluid, and 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction of sonication fluid) were compared and related to clinical data. Among the diagnostic tests, culture of sonication fluid demonstrated by far the highest detection rate of bacteria (57%) in group NU, and rather unexpectedly 40% in group OM. Culture of sonication samples also revealed a broad spectrum of bacteria, in particular Propionibacterium spp. In conclusion, our results indicate that more bacteria can be detected on implants of patients with atrophic nonunions of long-bone fractures by means of the sonication procedure, which provides a valuable additional diagnostic tool to decide on a surgical procedure (eg, two-step procedure) and to further specify antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26719698

  18. Occurrence, isolation and differentiation of Candida spp. and prevalence of variables associated to chronic atrophic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lund, Rafael Guerra; da Silva Nascente, Patrícia; Etges, Adriana; Ribeiro, Gladis Aver; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto Burkert

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the frequency of Candida spp. in patients with chronic atrophic candidiasis (CAC), to differentiate Candida species and to assess the prevalence of certain infection-associated variables to this disease. Patients with CAC and wearing partial or complete dentures were recruited. Data were obtained by means of a questionnaire with details involving identification of the subject, demographic characteristics, behaviour and medical history, clinical and mycological evaluation and identification of yeast. The sample collection was carried out in the palate or palate and tongue of the subjects using sterilised swabs. Data were submitted to statistical analyses using Fischer's test. Forty-three (53%) cases of CAC showed the presence of Candida albicans. Females (75.2%) wearing complete dentures (60.1%) for more than 10 years (58%) were risk factors to CAC development. It could be concluded that: (a) the results did not confirm a significant difference among patients with CAC concerning the presence or absence of Candida spp.; (b) the occurrence of Candida was negatively related to important factors associated to this opportunistic infection; and (c) mycological findings did not indicate that the variables investigated have a significant effect on oral infections by C. albicans or other Candida species.

  19. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; Van Oijen, Martijn; Perez, Guillermo Perez; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. Methods The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. Results In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Conclusions Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach. PMID:22242613

  20. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  1. Outcome of Dermal Grafting in the Management of Atrophic Facial Scars

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, Kanathur; Sacchidanand, S; Leelavathy, Budamakuntla; Shilpashree, Padmanabha; Divya, Gorur; Ranjitha, Rammurthy; Lakshmi, DV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scars over the face are cosmetically and psychologically disturbing. Various techniques have been described and are being practiced in the management of these scars. Aims and Objectives: This study was undertaken to study the safety, effectiveness of using dermal grafts as fillers in the management of facial scars due to acne, chickenpox, trauma or any others. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with atrophic facial scars of varied aetiology and willing for surgery were considered for dermal graft technique. After pre-operative workup, subcision was done 2 weeks before planned surgery. Depending on the type of scar, grafts were inserted using pocket or road railing techniques. Scar improvement was assessed based on patient satisfaction. Results: Linear scars showed excellent improvement. Acne, varicella and traumatic scars also showed good improvement. However, two patients did not appreciate improvement due to marked surface irregularities as the scars were elevated. They were further subjected to LASER and chemical peel resurfacing. Conclusion: Dermal grafting can be used in the management of any round to oval facial scar which is soft, prominent and at least 4–5 mm across; linear scars at least 2–3 mm across and 3–4 cm in length. However, scars with prominent surface irregularities need further resurfacing techniques along with dermal grafting. Limitations: Limitations of the study include small sample size, and only subjective assessment of the scar has been taken into consideration to assess the outcome. PMID:28163456

  2. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-03-30

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as (1)H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations.

  3. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  4. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45-0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93-11.99), and the AUC was 0.82.G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future.

  5. Exploratory Factor Analysis for Validating Traditional Chinese Syndrome Patterns of Chronic Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ajian; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Li; Sun, Leilei; Du, Shiyu; Yang, Qiang; Song, Xin; Liang, Chaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has long been used to treat chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the TCM syndrome characteristics of CAG and its core pathogenesis so as to promote optimization of treatment strategies. Methods. This study was based on a participant survey conducted in 4 hospitals in China. Patients diagnosed with CAG were recruited by simple random sampling. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on syndrome extraction. Results. Common factors extracted were assigned to six syndrome patterns: qi deficiency, qi stagnation, blood stasis, phlegm turbidity, heat, and yang deficiency. Distribution frequency of all syndrome patterns showed that qi deficiency, qi stagnation, blood stasis, phlegm turbidity, and heat excess were higher (76.7%–84.2%) compared with yang deficiency (42.5%). Distribution of main syndrome patterns showed that frequencies of qi deficiency, qi stagnation, phlegm turbidity, heat, and yang deficiency were higher (15.8%–20.8%) compared with blood stasis (8.3%). Conclusions. The core pathogenesis of CAG is combination of qi deficiency, qi stagnation, blood stasis, phlegm turbidity, heat, and yang deficiency. Therefore, treatment strategy of herbal prescriptions for CAG should include herbs that regulate qi, activate blood, resolve turbidity, clear heat, remove toxin, and warm yang. PMID:28077948

  6. The FSHD Atrophic Myotube Phenotype Is Caused by DUX4 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vanderplanck, Céline; Ansseau, Eugénie; Charron, Sébastien; Stricwant, Nadia; Tassin, Alexandra; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wilton, Steve D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to deletions in 4q35 within the D4Z4 repeat array in which we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene. We found stable DUX4 mRNAs only derived from the most distal D4Z4 unit and unexpectedly extended to the flanking pLAM region that provided an intron and a polyadenylation signal. DUX4 encodes a transcription factor expressed in FSHD but not control primary myoblasts or muscle biopsies. The DUX4 protein initiates a large transcription deregulation cascade leading to muscle atrophy and oxidative stress, which are FSHD key features. Methodology/Principal Findings We now show that transfection of myoblasts with a DUX4 expression vector leads to atrophic myotube formation associated with the induction of E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and Atrogin1/MAFbx) typical of muscle atrophy. DUX4 induces expression of downstream targets deregulated in FSHD such as mu-crystallin and TP53. We developed specific siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA. Addition of these antisense agents to primary FSHD myoblast cultures suppressed DUX4 protein expression and affected expression of the above-mentioned markers. Conclusions/Significance These results constitute a proof of concept for the development of therapeutic approaches for FSHD targeting DUX4 expression. PMID:22053214

  7. Can atrophic erosive oral lichen planus promote cardiovascular diseases? A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Davide; Barattero, Roberta; Carbone, Mario; Gambino, Alessio; Sciannameo, Veronica; Ricceri, Fulvio; Conrotto, Federico; Broccoletti, Roberto; Arduino, Paolo G

    2017-06-19

    Lichen planus has been recently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The oral manifestations can be divided into white hyperkeratotic lesions (WL) and atrophic erosive lesions (RL). The aim of this report was to compare the presence of CVDs between patients affected by WL or RL, to test the hypothesis that RL are associated with an increased incidence of CVDs. Patients were analysed through a complete collection of all the risk factors for CVDs. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of a cardiovascular event -acute coronary syndrome (ACS), any revascularization or stroke/TIA. A multivariable logistic regression model, adjusted for age at diagnosis, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, CVDs familiarity and periodontitis was performed. A prospective cohort of 307 patients has been evaluated; 185 (60.3%) had WL and 122 RL (39.7%). Twenty-four patients had a CVD. ACS occurred more frequently in RL (adjusted odd ratio 5.83; 95%CI: 1.16-29.39), mainly due to the higher risk of it after the histological diagnosis of OLP (odd ratio 4.23; 95%CI: 0.66-27.23). Patients with RL could possibly have a higher risk of developing ACS. Further analysis on larger cohort are however warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as 1H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations. PMID:28358020

  9. On the Feasibility of Utilizing Allogeneic Bone Blocks for Atrophic Maxillary Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Pikos, Michael A.; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Suarez, Fernando; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This systematic review was aimed at assessing the feasibility by means of survival rate, histologic analysis, and causes of failure of allogeneic block grafts for augmenting the atrophic maxilla. Material and Methods. A literature search was conducted by one reviewer in several databases. Articles were included in this systematic review if they were human clinical trials in which outcomes of allogeneic bone block grafts were studied by means of survival rate. In addition other factors were extracted in order to assess their influence upon graft failure. Results. Fifteen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and subsequently were analyzed in this systematic review. A total of 361 block grafts could be followed 4 to 9 months after the surgery, of which 9 (2.4%) failed within 1 month to 2 months after the surgery. Additionally, a weighed mean 4.79 mm (95% CI: 4.51–5.08) horizontal bone gain was computed from 119 grafted sites in 5 studies. Regarding implant cumulative survival rate, the weighed mean was 96.9% (95% CI: 92.8–98.7%), computed from 228 implants over a mean follow-up period of 23.9 months. Histologic analysis showed that allogeneic block grafts behave differently in the early stages of healing when compared to autogenous block grafts. Conclusion. Atrophied maxillary reconstruction with allogeneic bone block grafts represents a reliable option as shown by low block graft failure rate, minimal resorption, and high implant survival rate. PMID:25535616

  10. Long-term stability of atrophic ridges reconstructed with hydroxylapatite: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mercier, P; Bellavance, F; Cholewa, J; Djokovic, S

    1996-08-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of the long-term efficacy and stability of reconstructive surgery of atrophic ridges using dense hydroxylapatite (HA). Subperiosteal HA was used as a first stage of reconstruction in 678 ridges, 645 mandibular and 35 maxillary, followed after 4 to 5 weeks by a total lowering of the floor of the mouth, vestibuloplasty, and skin graft in the mandible: a same-stage submucous vestibuloplasty was done in the maxilla. Patients were followed for an average of 5.3 +/- 2.7 years by the same surgical and prosthodontic team. The presence of severe or moderate radiographic change was analyzed in relation to gender, age, severity of atrophy, postoperative complications, clinical changes, patient satisfaction, and type of HA particles used alone or with a binder. Seventy-seven percent of cases had no observable radiographic changes, 13% had moderate changes, and 10% had severe changes, of which fewer than half also had severe clinical changes. Relationships were established between the presence of radiographic change and certain parameters, especially postoperative delay in healing, severe or moderate clinical changes, and type of HA particles used. Hydroxylapatite, when used alone or with binding agents, and in association with basic techniques of reconstructive surgery and soft tissue handling, is a predictable and stable biomaterial for ridge reconstruction.

  11. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; van Oijen, Martijn; Perez Perez, Guillermo; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach.

  12. Efficacy of a novel Pasteurella multocida vaccine against progressive atrophic rhinitis of swine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Liao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chienjin; Winton, James R.; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Chiou, Chwei-Jang; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Maw-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of a novel vaccine composed of three short recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) proteins in combination with a bi-valent P. multocida whole-cell bacterin (rsPMT–PM) was evaluated in field studies for prevention and control of progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) of swine at 15 conventional farrow-to-finish farms. Experimental piglets that were immunized twice with the rsPMT–PM vaccine developed detectable titers of neutralizing antibodies (greater than 1:8) that prevented the growth retardation and pathological lesions typically observed following challenge with authentic PMT. A total of 542 sows were vaccinated once or twice prior to parturition and serum neutralizing antibody titers were evaluated. Both single and double vaccination protocols induced neutralizing antibody titers of 1:16 or higher in 62% and 74% of sows, respectively. Notably, neither sows nor piglets at a farm experiencing a severe outbreak of PAR at the time of the vaccination trial had detectable antibody titers, but antibody titers increased significantly to 1:16 or higher in 40% of sows following double vaccination. During the year after vaccination, clinical signs of PAR decreased in fattening pigs and growth performance improved sufficiently to reduce the rearing period until marketing by 2 weeks. Collectively, these results indicate that the rsPMT–PM vaccine could be used to provide protective immunity for controlling the prevalence and severity of PAR among farm-raised swine.

  13. Micronutrient deficiencies in patients with chronic atrophic autoimmune gastritis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcoli, Federica; Zilli, Alessandra; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Chronic atrophic autoimmune gastritis (CAAG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by an immune response, which is directed towards the parietal cells and intrinsic factor of the gastric body and fundus and leads to hypochlorhydria, hypergastrinemia and inadequate production of the intrinsic factor. As a result, the stomach’s secretion of essential substances, such as hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor, is reduced, leading to digestive impairments. The most common is vitamin B12 deficiency, which results in a megaloblastic anemia and iron malabsorption, leading to iron deficiency anemia. However, in the last years the deficiency of several other vitamins and micronutrients, such as vitamin C, vitamin D, folic acid and calcium, has been increasingly described in patients with CAAG. In addition the occurrence of multiple vitamin deficiencies may lead to severe hematological, neurological and skeletal manifestations in CAAG patients and highlights the importance of an integrated evaluation of these patients. Nevertheless, the nutritional deficiencies in CAAG are largely understudied. We have investigated the frequency and associated features of nutritional deficiencies in CAAG in order to focus on any deficit that may be clinically significant, but relatively easy to correct. This descriptive review updates and summarizes the literature on different nutrient deficiencies in CAAG in order to optimize the treatment and the follow-up of patients affected with CAAG. PMID:28216963

  14. Pre- and Postnatal Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations and Longitudinal Measures of Thymus Volume in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, Dean; Palkovicova, Lubica; Kocan, Anton; Drobna, Beata; Trnovec, Tomas; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, we reported an association between higher maternal polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations and smaller thymus volume in newborns in a birth cohort residing in eastern Slovakia. Objective: In the present report we address whether thymus volume at later ages is influenced by prenatal and early postnatal PCB exposure. Methods: At the time of delivery, 1,134 mother–infant pairs were enrolled. Maternal and 6- and 16-month infant blood samples were collected and analyzed for 15 PCB congeners. Thymus volume was measured in infants shortly after birth and at ages 6 and 16 months using ultrasonography. Results: Higher maternal PCB concentration was associated with reduced thymus volume at birth [a 0.21 SD reduction in thymus volume for an increase in total maternal PCB concentration from the 10th to the 90th percentile; 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.37, –0.05], whereas maternal PCB concentration was not predictive of 6- and 16-month thymus volume. Six-month infant PCB concentration was associated with a 0.40 SD decrease in 6-month thymus volume (95% CI: –0.76, –0.04). There was also some suggestion that thymus volume at 16 months was positively associated with concurrent infant PCB concentration. Conclusions: The potential adverse effects of in utero PCB exposure on thymic development may extend beyond the neonatal period. Results from this highly exposed cohort provide suggestive evidence that postnatal PCB concentrations may be influential, but a smaller set of 6-month PCB measurements limited statistical power at that time point. Implications regarding impaired immunologic maturation or long-term clinical implications remain to be determined. PMID:22275729

  15. Miller’s seminal studies on the role of thymus in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, D; Crivellato, E; Vacca, A

    2006-01-01

    The thymus is one of the two primary lymphoid organs. It is responsible for the provision of T lymphocytes to the entire body, and provides a unique microenvironment in which T cell precursors (thymocytes) undergo development, differentiation and clonal expansion. This review article summarizes the seminal work of the Australian scientist Francis Albert Pierre Miller concerning the description for the first time of the crucial role of the thymus for normal development of the immune system. PMID:16734604

  16. [The role of the pineal-thymus system in the regulation of autoimmunity, aging and lifespan].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-07-03

    Thymus is an immunoendocrine organ, the hormones of which mainly influence its own lymphatic elements. It has a central role in the immune system, the neonatal removal causes the collapse of immune system and the whole organism. The thymic nurse cells select the bone marrow originated lymphocytes and destroy the autoreactive ones, while thymus originated Treg cells suppress the autoreactive cells in the periphery. The involution of the organ starts after birth, however, this truly happens in the end of puberty only, as before this it is overcompensated by developmental processes. From the end of adolescence the involution allows the life, proliferation and enhanced functioning of some autoreactive cells, which gradually wear down the cells and intercellular materials, causing the aging. The enhanced and mass function of autoreactive cells lead to the autoimmune diseases and natural death. This means that the involution of thymus is not a part of the organismic involution, but an originator of it, which is manifested in the lifespan-pacemaker function. Thus, aging can be conceptualized as a thymus-commanded slow autoimmune process. The neonatal removal of pineal gland leads to the complete destruction of the thymus and the crashing down of the immune system, as well as to wasting disease. The involution of the pineal and thymus runs parallel, because the two organs form a functional unit. It is probable that the pineal gland is responsible for the involution of thymus and also regulates its lifespan determining role. However, the data reviewed here do not prove the exclusive role of the pineal-thymus system in the regulation of aging and lifespan, but only call attention to such possibility.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass.

    PubMed

    Peters, H Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A; Tan, Sanda A

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15-25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  18. Functional unity of the thymus and pineal gland and study of the mechanisms of aging.

    PubMed

    Polyakova, V O; Linkova, N S; Kvetnoy, I M; Khavinson, V Kh

    2011-09-01

    The data on the morphology and functions of the thymus and pineal gland in individuals of different age are analyzed and common mechanisms of involution of these organs during aging and the consequencies of this process are discussed. Based on the data on the molecular changes in the thymus and pineal gland during aging, the authors hypothesize the functional unity of these organs and their mutual complementarity in the maintenance of normal immune and endocrine status during aging.

  19. Intrathyroidal Ectopic Thymus in Children: Retrospective Analysis of Grayscale and Doppler Sonographic Features.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Adalet Elcin; Ceyhan, Koray; Sıklar, Zeynep; Bilir, Pelin; Yağmurlu, Emin Aydın; Berberoğlu, Merih; Fitoz, Suat

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to define grayscale and color Doppler sonographic features of an ectopic intrathyroidal thymus and to differentiate it from other thyroid nodule etiologies. We retrospectively reviewed imaging findings from 30 children who had a diagnosis of an ectopic intrathyroidal thymus from November 2005 to January 2013. Nodular thyroid lesions that were enclosed by the thyroid parenchyma and showed a typical echo pattern consistent with the thymus were accepted as the enclosed form of an intrathyroidal ectopic thymus. Eleven of these 30 children had an intrathyroidal ectopic thymus enclosed by the thyroid parenchyma, and they were enrolled in the study. The recorded sonograms were reviewed according to side, location, size, shape, echo pattern, internal content, and vascularization. The enclosed forms of ectopic intrathyroidal thymuses were unilateral in all children and located in the mid portion (n = 10) or lower portion (n = 1). All lesions were well demarcated, and the most common shape was fusiform (n = 8). Nine lesions showed a typical hypoechoic echo pattern with internal linear and punctate echoes resembling a mediastinal thymus. On color Doppler imaging, 6 lesions showed hypovascularity compared to the thyroid parenchyma, and 5 lesions showed internal vascularity. Unique sonographic features of the enclosed form of an ectopic intrathyroidal thymus, including a hypoechoic echo pattern with multiple linear and punctate echoes, a fusiform shape, a well-demarcated contour, and a mid- or low-lying location with hypovascularity or internal vascularity, can help radiologists differentiate it from other thyroid nodule etiologies. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of early events of thymus repopulation in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A.; Hammerling, U.; Mathieson, B.J.

    1983-04-01

    The phenotype of murine thymocytes repopulating the thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras shortly after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution was analyzed by immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Thymuses in these chimeras, while essentially devoid of lymphoid cells at day 7, were repopulated by days 10 to 12 after irradiation. It was found that this initial repopulation arose from a radioresistant intrathymic precursor that expanded to an almost complete complement of host-type thymocytes. However, these host-derived thymocytes were unusual in that they were relatively deficient in Lyt 1+2- and peanut agglutinin ''dull'' cells as compared with normal thymocytes. Donor bone-marrow-derived cells first appeared in the irradiated chimeric thymuses between days 12 and 15 after irradiation and bone marrow transfer. By day 19, chimeric thymuses contained more than 98% donor cells. This course was identical for three chimeric combinations, each made across different genetic barriers. In contrast to the cells that populate the fetal thymus during normal ontogeny, the first donor bone-marrow-derived cells that can be detected within the irradiated chimeric thymuses already expressed phenotypically normal adult T cell subpopulations in that they contained significant numbers both of Lyt 1+2- and of Lyt 1+2+ thymocytes. Thus, the Lyt phenotype of donor cells that initially repopulate an adult thymus after irradiation is markedly different from the Lyt phenotype of cells that initially populate the fetal thymus. The differences between adult and fetal thymic development that are observed in radiation bone marrow chimeras may be important in our understanding of T cell differentiation in these animals.

  1. Dysfunction of irradiated thymus for the development of helper T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Hirokawa, K.; Nishikawa, S.; Imanishi, J.; Katsura, Y.

    1987-07-15

    The development of cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in an intact or irradiated thymus was investigated. C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) mice were whole body-irradiated, or were irradiated with shielding over either the thymus or right leg and tail, and were transferred with 1.5 X 10(7) bone marrow cells from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1). At various days after reconstitution, thymus cells from the recipient mice were harvested and a peanut agglutinin low-binding population was isolated. This population was further treated with anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement to remove host-derived cells and was assayed for the frequency of cytotoxic T cell precursors (CTLp) and for the activity of helper T cells (Th). In the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated mice, Th activity reached normal control level by day 25, whereas CTLp frequency remained at a very low level during these days. In the thymus of whole body-irradiated mice, generation of CTLp was highly accelerated while that of Th was retarded, the period required for reconstitution being 25 days and more than 42 days for CTLp and Th, respectively. Preferential development of CTLp was also seen in right leg- and tail-shielded (L-T-shielded) and irradiated recipients. Histological observation indicated that Ia+ nonlymphoid cells were well preserved in the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated recipients, whereas in L-T-shielded and irradiated recipients, such cells in the medulla were markedly reduced in number. These results suggest strongly that the generation of Th but not CTLp is dependent on radiosensitive thymic component(s), and that such components may represent Ia+ cells themselves in the medulla or some microenvironment related to Ia+ cells.

  2. Conventional and unconventional extraction methods applied to the plant, Thymus serpyllum L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đukić, D.; Mašković, P.; Vesković Moračanin, S.; Kurćubić, V.; Milijašević, M.; Babić, J.

    2017-09-01

    This study deals with the application of two conventional and three non-conventional extraction approaches for isolation of bioactive compounds from the plant Thymus serpyllum L. The extracts obtained were tested regarding their chemical profile (content of phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins, gallotannins and anthocyanins) and antioxidant activities. Subcritical water extract of Thymus serpyllum L. generally had the highest concentrations of the chemical bioactive compounds examined and the best antioxidant properties.

  3. Dose-dependent Medicinal Effects of Thymus haussknechtii Velen Grown Wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kılıçgün, Hasan; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine dose-dependent interactions between phenolic contents and antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal effect mechanisms of the infusions of Thymus haussknechtii Velen, naturally grown in the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Therefore, the infusions of Thymus haussknechtii were tested and the interactions between phenolic contents and antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal effect mechanisms were determined by way of different antioxidant, antibacterial and antioxidant test systems. The concentrations of Thymus haussknechtii showed strong hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity and free radical scavenging activity [1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) % inhibition]. Also, it was seen that Thymus haussknechtii infusions possessed strong antibacterial and antifungal activity against different gram negative and positive bacteria and fungi. In this study, positive correlations between antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal potency and the total phenolic content of Thymus haussknechtii were found. When the concentration differences were examined, it was seen that concentrations of 4% had the most strong antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activity. As a result, Thymus haussknechtii can be reliable antioxidant, antibacterial antifungal substance at concentrations of 4% when it is used as a supplement to therapeutic regimens and for medicinal purposes.

  4. Protection against apoptosis in chicken bursa and thymus cells by phorbol ester in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, J.; Thorbecke, G.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Programmed suicide or apoptosis, due to activation of endogenous nucleases, occurs in immature CD4{sup {minus}}85{sup {minus}} mammalian thymus cells. Like the thymus, the bursa of Fabricius is a site of massive lymphopoiesis accompanied by cell death in vivo. In the present study the authors have, therefore, examined whether chicken bursa and thymus cells exhibit apoptosis. Bursa and thymus cells from SC chickens, 4-10 weeks of age, were incubated for 8-24 hrs with various reagents. Genomic DNA was isolated, electrophoresed in 3% Nusieve agarose gels, and examined for patterns of DNA fragmentation. A laddering of DNA in multiples of 200 base pairs, indicative of apoptosis, was observed with both bursa and thymus cells. These patterns of DNA fragmentation from bursa cells could be prevented by adding phorbol myristic acetate during culture and, more effectively, by PMA plus ionomycin, but not by ionomycin alone or by anti-{mu}. PMA did not affect the patterns of DNA fragmentation seen with spleen cells. Addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the preventive effect of PMA on apoptosis. PMA also greatly promoted the survival of bursa cells in culture, as assayed by percentage cell death and by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. It is concluded that bursa and thymus cells from the chicken exhibit apoptosis. The data further suggest that protein kinase C activation protects apoptosis in cultured bursa cells.

  5. Normal Thymus in Adults: Appearance on CT and Associations with Age, Sex, BMI and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josée; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Murakami, Takamichi; Washko, George R.; O'Connor, George T.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the CT appearance and size of the thymus in associations with characteristics of participants. Materials and Methods 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51% female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size, and morphology. These were correlated with participants’ age, sex, BMI, and smoking history. Results Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74%) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18%) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7%) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2), and 36 (1%) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 (P<0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P<0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P<0.001) with higher pack-years (P=0.04). Conclusions Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores than men, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. PMID:25925358

  6. Ectopic Intrathyroidal Thymus in Childhood: A Sonographic Finding Leading to Misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vlachopapadopoulou, Elpis-Athina; Vakaki, Marina; Karachaliou, Fotini-Eleni; Kaloumenou, Irene; Kalogerakou, Kleanthi; Gali, Christina; Michalacos, Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    During gestation, the primordial thymus migrates from the pharynx to the anterior mediastinum, thus thymic tissue can remain at any point along this path. Intrathyroidal thymic remnants are rare, and their sonographic patterns have only recently been described. This retrospective study presents the sonographic appearance of ectopic intrathyroidal thymus and emphasizes the role of sonography in order to avoid misdiagnosis. The population consisted of 42 children, 3.5-14 years old, who had a thyroid sonogram performed due to a positive family history or symptoms indicative of thyroid disease, and ectopic intrathyroidal thymus was recognized. In all patients, the same pattern was revealed: a fusiform intrathyroidal lesion, with no mass effect, homogeneously hypoechoic, with diffuse bright internal echoes. The similarity to the characteristic sonographic pattern of the normal mediastinal thymus was crucial for the diagnosis of ectopic intrathyroidal thymic tissue. In 8 cases, a normal elongated thymus was found connected to the thyroid with an accessory lobe embedded in the lower thyroid pole. The above sonographic appearances mimicked a thyroid nodule. Awareness of the sonographic patterns of the ectopic intrathyroidal thymus is mandatory to avoid misdiagnosis. In most cases, further investigation is unnecessary, but sonographic follow-up should be recommended. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Arachidonic acid accumulates in the stromal macrophages during thymus involution in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Alexandra T; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Mic, Ani A; Ordodi, Valentin L; Paunescu, Virgil; Mic, Felix A

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes is a debilitating disease with chronic evolution that affects many tissues and organs over its course. Thymus is an organ that is affected early after the onset of diabetes, gradually involuting until it loses most of its thymocyte populations. We show evidence of accumulating free fatty acids with generation of eicosanoids in the diabetic thymus and we present a possible mechanism for the involution of the organ during the disease. Young rats were injected with streptozotocin and their thymuses examined for cell death by flow cytometry and TUNEL reaction. Accumulation of lipids in the diabetic thymus was investigated by histology and electron microscopy. The identity and quantitation of accumulating lipids was done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography. The expression and dynamics of the enzymes were monitored via immunohistochemistry. Diabetes causes thymus involution by elevating the thymocyte apoptosis. Exposure of thymocytes to elevated concentration of glucose causes apoptosis. After the onset of diabetes, there is a gradual accumulation of free fatty acids in the stromal macrophages including arachidonic acid, the substrate for eicosanoids. The eicosanoids do not cause thymocyte apoptosis but administration of a cyclooxygenase inhibitor reduces the staining for ED1, a macrophage marker whose intensity correlates with phagocytic activity. Diabetes causes thymus involution that is accompanied by accumulation of free fatty acids in the thymic macrophages. Excess glucose is able to induce thymocyte apoptosis but eicosanoids are involved in the chemoattraction of macrophage to remove the dead thymocytes.

  8. The effect of dichloroacetate on male rat thymus and on thymocyte cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Stanevičiūtė, Jurate; Urbonienė, Daiva; Valančiūtė, Angelija; Balnytė, Ingrida; Vitkauskienė, Astra; Grigalevičienė, Brigita; Stakišaitis, Donatas

    2016-12-01

    The study aim was to investigate the effect of dichloroacetate (DCA) on thymus and the thymocyte cycle in rats. Wistar male gonad-intact and castrated rats (4-5 weeks) were investigated in the following groups: (1) control; (2) treated with DCA; and (3) treated with the DCA and sodium valproate (NaVP) combination. Rats were treated for 4 weeks with DCA 200 mg/kg/day alone and 300 mg/kg/day of NaVP plus 200 mg/kg/day of DCA (every second week, beginning with NaVP). After the experiment, the thymus was weighted, and the thymus lobe was taken for thymocyte flow cytometry. In gonad-intact rats, the thymus weight of the control was higher than in rats treated with DCA (P <0.001) or with the NaVP-DCA combination (P <0.04); a comparison of thymus weight between DCA- and NaVP-DCA-treated groups revealed a higher thymus weight loss in the DCA-treated group (P <0.03). Flow cytometry shows that DCA treatment increased the percentage of cells in the G2-M phase (P <0.03) and reduced in G1-G0 (P <0.02). The DCA treatment effect was determined only in gonad-intact but not in castrated rats. The authors discuss the possible DCA and NaVP interaction mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Promiscuous Gene Expression in the Thymus: The Root of Central Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Danielle A. R.; Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Junta, Cristina M.; Sandrin-Garcia, Paula; Fachin, Ana Lucia; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T.; Passos, Geraldo A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The thymus is a complex organ with an epithelium formed by two main cell types, the cortical thymic epithelial (cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), referred to as stroma. Immature thymocytes arising from the bone marrow, macrophages and dendritic cells also populate the thymus. Thymocytes evolve to mature T cells featuring cell differentiation antigens (CDs), which characterize the phenotypically distinct stages, defined as double-negative (DN), double positive (DP) and single positive (SP), based on expression of the coreceptors CD4 and CD8. The thymus is therefore implicated in T cell differentiation and during development into T cells thymocytes are in close association with the stroma. Recent evidence showed that mTECs express a diverse set of genes coding for parenchymal organ specific proteins. This phenomenon has been termed promiscuous gene expression (PGE) and has led to the reconsideration of the role of the thymus in central T cell tolerance to self-antigens, which prevents autoimmunity. The evidence of PGE is causing a reanalysis in the scope of central tolerance understanding. We summarize the evidence of PGE in the thymus, focusing particularly the use of cDNA microarray technology for the broad characterization of gene expression and demarcation of PGE emergence during thymus ontogeny. PMID:17162352

  10. Increased thymus- and decreased parathyroid-fated organ domains in Splotch mutant embryos

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Ann V.; Cardenas, Kim; Carter, Carla; Gordon, Julie; Iberg, Aimee; Engleka, Kurt; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Manley, Nancy R.; Richie, Ellen R.

    2009-01-01

    Embryos that are homozygous for Splotch, a null allele of Pax3, have a severe neural crest cell (NCC) deficiency that generates a complex phenotype including spina bifida, exencephaly and cardiac outflow tract abnormalities. Contrary to the widely held perception that thymus aplasia or hypoplasia is a characteristic feature of Pax3Sp/Sp embryos, we find that thymic rudiments are larger and parathyroid rudiments are smaller in E11.5–12.5 Pax3Sp/Sp compared to Pax3+/+ embryos. The thymus originates from bilateral third pharyngeal pouch primordia containing endodermal progenitors of both thymus and parathyroid glands. Analyses of Foxn1 and Gcm2 expression revealed a dorsal shift in the border between parathyroid- and thymus-fated domains at E11.5, with no change in the overall cellularity or volume of each shared primordium. The border shift increases the allocation of third pouch progenitors to the thymus domain and correspondingly decreases allocation to the parathyroid domain. Initial patterning in the E10.5 pouch was normal suggesting that the observed change in the location of the organ domain interface arises during border refinement between E10.5 and E11.5. Given the well-characterized NCC defects in Splotch mutants, these findings implicate NCCs in regulating patterning of third pouch endoderm into thymus- versus parathyroid-specified domains, and suggest that organ size is determined in part by the number of progenitor cells specified to a given fate. PMID:19135046

  11. Essential Microenvironment for Thymopoiesis is Preserved in Human Adult and Aged Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, J.; Utsuyama, M.; Seki, S.; Akamatsu, H.; Sunamori, M.; Kasai, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Normal human thymuses at various ages were immunohistologically examined in order to determine whether adult or aged thymus maintained the microenvironment for the T cell development and thymopoiesis was really ongoing. To analyze the thymic microenvironment, two monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) were employed. One is MoAb to IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) recognizing medullary and subcapsular cortical epithelial cells of normal infant human thymus. The other is UH-1 MoAb recognizing thymic epithelial cells within the cortex, which are negative with IL-1R-MoAb. Thymus of subjects over 20 years of age was split into many fragments and dispersed in the fatty tissue. However, the microenvironment of each fragment was composed of both IL-1R positive and UH-1 positive epithelial cells, and the UH-1 positive portion was populated with lymphocytes showing a follicle-like appearance. Lymphocytes in these follicle-like portions were mostly CD4+CD8+ double positive cells and contained many proliferating cells as well as apoptotic cells. Thus these follicle-like portions in adult and aged thymus were considered to be functioning as cortex as in infant thymus. Proliferative activity of thymocytes in the thymic cortex and the follicle-like portions definitely declined with advance of age, while incidence of apoptotic thymocytes increased with aging. PMID:14575158

  12. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  13. Glandular Trichomes and Essential Oil of Thymus quinquecostatus

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ping; Liu, Hanzhu; Gao, Ting; Xin, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The distribution and types of glandular trichomes and essential oil chemistry of Thymus quinquecostatus were studied. The glandular trichomes are distributed on the surface of stem, leaf, rachis, calyx and corolla, except petiole, pistil and stamen. Three morphologically distinct types of glandular trichomes are described. Peltate trichomes, consisting of a basal cell, a stalk cell and a 12-celled head, are distributed on the stem, leaf, corolla and outer side of calyx. Capitate trichomes, consisting of a unicellular base, a 1–2-celled stalk and a unicellular head, are distributed more diffusely than peltate ones, existing on stem, leaf, rachis and calyx. Digitiform trichomes are just distributed on the outer side of corolla, consisting of 1 basal cell, 3 stalk cells and 1 head cell. All three types of glandular trichomes can secrete essential oil, and in small capitate trichomes of rachis, all peltate trichomes and digitiform trichomes, essential oil is stored in a large subcuticular space, released by cuticle rupture, whereas, in other capitate trichomes, essential oil crosses the thin cuticle. The essential oil of T. quinquecostatus is yellow, and its content is highest in the growth period. 68 constituents were identified in the essential oils. The main constituent is linalool. PMID:24250266

  14. Glandular trichomes and essential oil of Thymus quinquecostatus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ping; Liu, Hanzhu; Gao, Ting; Xin, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The distribution and types of glandular trichomes and essential oil chemistry of Thymus quinquecostatus were studied. The glandular trichomes are distributed on the surface of stem, leaf, rachis, calyx and corolla, except petiole, pistil and stamen. Three morphologically distinct types of glandular trichomes are described. Peltate trichomes, consisting of a basal cell, a stalk cell and a 12-celled head, are distributed on the stem, leaf, corolla and outer side of calyx. Capitate trichomes, consisting of a unicellular base, a 1-2-celled stalk and a unicellular head, are distributed more diffusely than peltate ones, existing on stem, leaf, rachis and calyx. Digitiform trichomes are just distributed on the outer side of corolla, consisting of 1 basal cell, 3 stalk cells and 1 head cell. All three types of glandular trichomes can secrete essential oil, and in small capitate trichomes of rachis, all peltate trichomes and digitiform trichomes, essential oil is stored in a large subcuticular space, released by cuticle rupture, whereas, in other capitate trichomes, essential oil crosses the thin cuticle. The essential oil of T. quinquecostatus is yellow, and its content is highest in the growth period. 68 constituents were identified in the essential oils. The main constituent is linalool.

  15. Assessment of genetic and chemical variability in Thymus caramanicus.

    PubMed

    Hadian, Javad; Bigdeloo, Mahdi; Nazeri, Vahideh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-05-01

    Thymus caramanicus is an endemic species grown in Iran with interesting pharmacological and biological properties. In the present work, essential oil compositions and inter-simple sequences repeat (ISSR) markers were used to estimate the relationships among and within seven populations of T. caramanicus, belonging to three provinces in Iran. The studied individuals were distinguished on the basis of ISSR markers and constituents of essential oil. A total of 127 band positions were produced by 12 ISSR primers, of which 105 were found polymorphic with 82.68% polymorphism. Genetic similarity values among individuals ranged between 0.15 and 0.82 which was indicative of a high level of genetic variation. On the basis of their genetic similarities, ISSR analysis allowed to group the samples into two main clusters. One of these included populations originated from Kerman and Isfahan provinces, and the other cluster consists of populations from Semnan province. Chemical compounds of essential oils were found variable in the various individuals and all samples were principally composed of phenolic constituents (carvacrol and/or thymol). As a consequence, the plants were classified into two major chemotypes including carvacrol and thymol/carvacrol. A relationship between genetic and chemical variability and geographic distribution has been observed in studied populations of T. caramanicus.

  16. Antinociceptive effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Thymus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Abbas Ali; Babaei, Mahdi; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Jarrahi, Morteza; Jadidi, Majid; Sadeghi, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Previous investigation has shown that Thymus Vulgaris (TV) modulates pain. The aim of this work was to examine the role of TV on acute and chronic pain and compares its effect with dexamethasone (DEX) and stress (ST) by using hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests in mice. In this study male albino mice (25-30 g.) in 21 groups (n=147) were used. TV (100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg), DEX (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) and vehicle (VEH) were injected 30 minutes before pain assessment tests. Stress was applied by 1 min swimming in cold water (18-22 degrees ). Acute and chronic pain was assessed by hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests. For assessment of the role of opioid receptors in antinoceception of TV extract, Naloxon (NAL, 2mg/kg, ip) as opioid receptor antagonist was injected before the injection of the more effective dose (500 mg/kg) of TV extract. Results indicated that TV, DEX and ST have analgesic effects in all tests (P<0.01 in comparison with control group). Above findings showed that TV extract, DEX and ST have modulatory effects on acute and chronic pain. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which TV extract has an inhibitory effect on pain sensation.

  17. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L; McFeeters, Robert L; Setzer, William N

    2016-10-27

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris.

  18. Essential Oils Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Three Thymus Species

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamzeh

    2012-01-01

    The essential oils of three wild-growing Thymus species, collected from west of Iran during the flowering stage, were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Under the optimum extraction and analysis conditions, 44, 38, and 38 constituents (mainly monoterpenes compounds) were identified in T. kotschyanus Boiss. and Hohen, T. eriocalyx (Ronniger) Jalas, and T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak) Jalas which represented 89.9%, 99.7%, and 95.8% of the oils, respectively. The main constituents were thymol (16.4–42.6%), carvacrol (7.6–52.3%), and γ-terpinene (3–11.4%). Antioxidant activity was employed by two complementary test systems, namely, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free-radical scavenging and β-carotene/linoleic acid systems. Antioxidant activity of polar subfraction of T. daenensis subsp lancifolius (Celak) Jalas was found to be higher than those of the others in DPPH assay, while nonpolar subfraction of T. eriocalyx (Ronniger) Jalas has most antioxidant activity in β-carotene/linoleic acid test (19.1 ± 0.1 μg/mL and 96.1 ± 0.8% inhibition rate, resp.). PMID:21876714

  19. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Setzer, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris. PMID:28231164

  20. Antioxidative effect of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) in sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Zaborowska, Zofia; Przygoński, Krzysztof; Bilska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is a main problem during food processing, storage and consumption leading to losses of quality, stability, safety and nutritive value. Antioxidants have been used to prevent oxidation changes and off - flavor development in food products. Aim of the research was to evaluate antioxidative effect of thyme ethanol extract on sunflower oil during its storage in different temperature conditions. Oil samples were stored in darkness at 4°C, 18°C, 38°C. Samples of thyme (thymus vulgaris) were purchased at a local pharmacy in Poznań, Poland and sunflower oil was acquired from a local supermarket. Thyme extract was characterized by total polyphenol content. Antioxidant activity was estimated with use of DPPH and ABTS radicals scavenging methods. Ethanol extract of thyme at 1% level was added to sunflower oil. Peroxide value (PV), anisidine value (AV), totox value (TxV) and fatty acids (FA) content were taken as parameters for evaluation of effectiveness of thyme extract in stabilization of sunflower oil. High polyphenol content, DPPH and ABTS radicals scavenging activity of ethanol thyme extract were evaluated. Results from different parameters were in agreement with other researchers, suggesting the antioxidant effect of thyme on antioxidant stability. Results show that thyme extract prolonged stability of sunflower oil and it may be a potent antioxidant for its stabilization. Ethanol thyme extract may be used as a natural antioxidant to prolong stability of oils.

  1. Chitosan microbeads for encapsulation of thyme (Thymus serpyllum L.) polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Trifković, Kata T; Milašinović, Nikola Z; Djordjević, Verica B; Krušić, Melina T Kalagasidis; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D; Nedović, Viktor A; Bugarski, Branko M

    2014-10-13

    In this work chitosan microbeads were prepared by emulsion technique and loaded with thyme polyphenols by diffusion from an external aqueous solution of Thymus serpyllum L. The effects of concentrations of chitosan (1.5-3% (w/v)) and GA (glutaraldehyde) (0.1-0.4% (v/v)), as a crosslinking agent on the main properties of microbeads were assessed. The obtained microgel beads from ∼ 220 to ∼ 790 μm in diameter were exposed to controlled drying process at air (at 37 °C) after which they contracted to irregular shapes (∼ 70-230 μm). The loading of dried microbeads with polyphenols was achieved by swelling in the acidic medium. The swelling rate of microbeads decreased with the increase in GA concentration. Upon this rehydration, thyme polyphenols were effectively encapsulated (active load of 66-114 mg GAE g(beads)(-1)) and the microbeads recovered a spherical shape. Both, the increase in the amount of the crosslinking agent and the presence of polyphenols, contributed to a more pronounced surface roughness of microbeads. The release of encapsulated polyphenols in simulated gastrointestinal fluids was prolonged to 3h.

  2. Exosomes in the Thymus: Antigen Transfer and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Thymocytes go through several steps of maturation and selection in the thymus in order to form a functional pool of effector T-cells and regulatory T-cells in the periphery. Close interactions between thymocytes, thymic epithelial cells, and dendritic cells are of vital importance for the maturation, selection, and lineage decision of the thymocytes. One important question that is still unanswered is how a relatively small epithelial cell population can present a vast array of self-antigens to the manifold larger population of developing thymocytes in this selection process. Here, we review and discuss the literature concerning antigen transfer from epithelial cells with a focus on exosomes. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released from a cell into the extracellular space. These vesicles can carry proteins, microRNAs, and mRNAs between cells and are thus able to participate in intercellular communication. Exosomes have been shown to be produced by thymic epithelial cells and to carry tissue-restricted antigens and MHC molecules, which may enable them to participate in the thymocyte selection process. PMID:26257734

  3. Probing the binding mode of psoralen to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Guowen; Wang, Langhong

    2014-06-01

    The binding properties between psoralen (PSO) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were predicted by molecular docking, and then determined with the use of UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, coupled with DNA melting and viscosity measurements. The data matrix obtained from UV-vis spectra was resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) approach. The pure spectra and the equilibrium concentration profiles for PSO, ctDNA and PSO-ctDNA complex extracted from the highly overlapping composite response were obtained simultaneously to evaluate the PSO-ctDNA interaction. The intercalation mode of PSO binding to ctDNA was supported by the results from the melting studies, viscosity measurements, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments, competitive binding investigations and CD analysis. The molecular docking prediction showed that the specific binding most likely occurred between PSO and adenine bases of ctDNA. FT-IR spectra studies further confirmed that PSO preferentially bound to adenine bases, and this binding decreased right-handed helicity of ctDNA and enhanced the degree of base stacking with the preservation of native B-conformation. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a major role in the binding process.

  4. SIT and TRIM determine T cell fate in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Uwe; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2008-11-01

    Thymic selection is a tightly regulated developmental process essential for establishing central tolerance. The intensity of TCR-mediated signaling is a key factor for determining cell fate in the thymus. It is widely accepted that low-intensity signals result in positive selection, whereas high-intensity signals induce negative selection. Transmembrane adaptor proteins have been demonstrated to be important regulators of T cell activation. However, little is known about their role during T cell development. Herein, we show that SIT (SHP2 Src homology domain containing tyrosine phosphatase 2-interacting transmembrane adaptor protein) and TRIM (TCR-interacting molecule), two structurally related transmembrane adaptors, cooperatively regulate TCR signaling potential, thereby influencing the outcome of thymic selection. Indeed, loss of both SIT and TRIM resulted in the up-regulation of CD5, CD69, and TCRbeta, strong MAPK activation, and, consequently, enhanced positive selection. Moreover, by crossing SIT/TRIM double-deficient mice onto transgenic mice bearing TCRs with different avidity/affinity, we found profound alterations in T cell development. Indeed, in female HY TCR transgenic mice, positive selection was completely converted into negative selection resulting in small thymi devoided of double-positive thymocytes. More strikingly, in a nonselecting background, SIT/TRIM double-deficient single-positive T cells developed, were functional, and populated the periphery. In summary, we demonstrated that SIT and TRIM regulate cell fate of developing thymocytes, thus identifying them as essential regulators of central tolerance.

  5. Thymus hyperplasia, differential diagnosis in the wheezing infant.

    PubMed

    Pedroza Meléndez, A; Larenas-Linnemann, D

    1997-01-01

    Thymus hyperplasia is not a rare condition in infancy, but it is generally considered not to cause any symptoms. We present here a series of 11 children seen at the National Institute of Pediatrics (NIP), Mexico-city, that do have respiratory symptoms secondary to the enlarged gland. Age of onset of the symptoms was median at birth, with age of first visit to the NIP of 6 months. Symptoms were respiratory crisis and various respiratory complaints. Five underwent thoracotomy and resection of the right pulmonary lobe was necessary in one, because of irreversible changes in the lung tissue due to chronic compression. In another patient thymic lobectomy was executed because extrinsic compression of the right upper bronchus resulted in recurrent atelectasia. The five biopsies taken during the intervention showed normal or hyperplastic or involutive thymic tissue without signs of malignancy. The evolution was positive in all the patients. In conclusion thymic hyperplasia must be taken into account in the evaluation of an infant with respiratory symptoms.

  6. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    PubMed

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process.

  7. Influence of human myasthenia gravis thymus on the differentiation of human cord blood stem cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Ru; Liu, Ping Ping; Xuan, Xiao Yan; Guan, Sha Sha; Du, Ying; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Qing Yong

    2014-02-01

    The normal thymus contributes to T lymphocytes differentiation and induction of tolerance to self-antigens. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by abnormal thymic hyperplasia. To assess the potential influence of MG-thymus on the differentiation of T lymphocytes differentiation, we used the MG-thymus transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice model to evaluate the human cord blood stem cells differentiation. Thymus fragments from MG patient and human cord blood stem cells were transplanted into SCID mice successively. SCID mice were observed to develop sustained human T lymphocytes and a functional anti-tumor immune. The levels of various T cell subsets in SCID mice with MG-thymus were different from that of control group. Among that, the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was significant lower in SCID mice with MG-thymus. The deficiency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells seens to contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.

  8. The SCID-hu mouse as a model for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aldrovandi, G M; Feuer, G; Gao, L; Jamieson, B; Kristeva, M; Chen, I S; Zack, J A

    1993-06-24

    During normal fetal ontogeny, one of the first organs to harbour CD4-positive cells is the thymus. This organ could therefore be one of the earliest targets infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in utero. HIV-1-infected cells and pathological abnormalities of the thymus have been seen in HIV-1-infected adults and children, and in some fetuses aborted from infected women. Studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis have been hampered by lack of a suitable animal model system. Here we use the SCID-hu mouse as a model to investigate the effect of virus infection on human tissue. The mouse is homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) defect. The model is constructed by implanting human fetal liver and thymus under the mouse kidney capsule. A conjoint human organ develops, which allows normal maturation of human thymocytes. After direct inoculation of HIV-1 into these implants, we observed severe depletion of human CD4-bearing cells within a few weeks of infection. This correlated with increasing virus load in the implants. Thus the SCID-hu mouse may be a useful in vivo system for the study of HIV-1-induced pathology.

  9. A strong association between thyrotropin receptor-blocking antibody-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and HLA-DR8 and HLA-DQB1 0302 in Koreans

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Bo Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang-Soon; Lee, Jung-Bin ); Shong, Young Kee ); Han, Hoon ); Chang, Youn Bok )

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated whether the associations between HLA alleles of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism varied according to the presence or absence of TSH receptor-blocking antibody (TRBab). They analyzed the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens by serotyping and the DQA1 and DQB1 genes using both enzymatic DNA amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridizations. The patient population consisted of 47 Korean patients with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and 62 patients with goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. The antigen frequency of HLA-DR8 was significantly increased in 23 atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis patients that were positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) compared to 136 controls [52% vs. 16%; x[sup 2] = 13.1; Pc (corrected P value) = 0.003]. This relative risk was 5.7; the etiological fraction was 0.43. HLA-DQB1*0302 was also increased in patients with TBII-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (24% vs. 7%; x[sup 2] = 11.2; Pc = 0.012; relative risk = 4.4; etiological fraction = 0.19). No specific DR antigens or DQB1 alleles were increased in either TBII-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroidities or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. A significant decrease in the frequency of HLA-DR6 antigen was observed in both TBII-positive atrophic antoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 8.4; Pc = 0.03) and goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 23.2; Pc < 0.001) patients. The frequency of the HLC-Cwl antigen was significantly increased in all patient groups. The authors conclude that TRBab-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis is immunogenetically different from both goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis and TRBab-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis. It is possible that HLA-DR8 and/or DQB1*0302 may be related to the susceptibility genes involved in the production of TRBab in Koreans. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse

    PubMed Central

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-01-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres. PMID:21208206

  11. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-02-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres.

  12. Tachykinins, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in nerves of the mammalian thymus: interactions with mast cells in autonomic and sensory neuroimmunomodulation?

    PubMed

    Weihe, E; Müller, S; Fink, T; Zentel, H J

    1989-05-22

    By the use of light microscopic (LM) immunohistochemistry the distribution of tachykinin (TK)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like immunoreactivity in nerves supplying the mammalian (rat, mouse, guinea-pig, cat) thymus gland has been determined. There were no interspecies variations. Fibres staining for TK and CGRP completely overlapped indicating coexistence. They were present in the capsule, in interlobular septa and in the corticomedullary boundary and occurred in perivascular and paravascular plexus supplying arteries, veins and the microvasculature. Some TK/CGRP-immunoreactive (ir) fibres travelled between lymphoid cells and close contacts with mast cells were frequent. NPY-ir fibres were different from those staining for TK/CGRP and predominated in the perivascular plexus of arterial blood vessels. Only very rarely they coursed in the lymphoid parenchyma. Intimate contacts of NPY-ir fibres with mast cells were less frequent than those of TK/CGRP-ir fibres. We conclude that the NPY innervation is mainly sympathetic noradrenergic while thymic nerves coding for TK and CGRP are most likely of sensory origin. These pathways may play a differential neuroimmunomodulatory role in the thymus, possibly via interaction with mast cells.

  13. Comparative analysis of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography, and the titer of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG focusing on the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Nobutake; Hirano, Chigaya; Takahashi, Yu; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Nakayama, Chiemi; Matsuda, Rie; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Chihiro; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Ryoichi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGI-ES) and double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography (UGI-XR) are two major image-based methods to diagnose atrophic gastritis, which is mostly induced by Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there have been few studies directly comparing them. Atrophic gastritis was evaluated using the data of 962 healthy subjects who underwent UGI-ES and UGI-XR within 1 year. Based on UGI-ES and UGI-XR, 602 subjects did not have atrophic gastritis and 254 subjects did have it. Considering UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis as the standard, sensitivity and specificity of UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 92.0 % (254/276) and 92.8 % (602/649), respectively. The seven-grade Kimura-Takemoto classification of UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis showed a strong and significant association with the four-grade UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis. Sensitivity and specificity of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG to detect UGI-ES/UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 89.4 % (227/254) and 99.8 % (601/602), indicating that atrophic gastritis can be overlooked according to serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG alone.

  14. Rehabilitation of the atrophic mandible with short implants in different positions: A finite elements study.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Hugo E; Camati, Paulo R; Faot, Fernanda; Sotto-Maior, Bruno S; Martinez, Elizabeth F; Peruzzo, Daiane C

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether the use of inclined short implants without lower transcortical involvement (test model - SI), thus preserving the mandibular lower cortical bone, could optimize stress distribution. Six identical atrophic mandible models were created featuring 8mm of height at the symphysis. Two study factors were evaluated: implant length and angulation. Implant length was represented either by short implants (7mm) with preservation of the mandibular lower cortical bone or standard implants (9mm) with a bicortical approach and 3 possible implant positioning configurations: 4 distally-inclined implants at 45° (experimental model), all-on-four, 4 vertical implants. All tridimensional (3D) models were analyzed using the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the Ansys Workbench software. The maximum stress on the bone at the cervical region of the implants in the experimental model was 132MPa and transcortical involvement with implant inclination yielded higher values (171MPa). Regarding von Mises stress on the retaining screw of the prosthesis, 61MPa was recorded for the experimental model while upright implants had the highest values (223MPa). At the acrylic base, 4MPa was recorded for the experimental model whereas models with upright implants showed the highest stress values (11MPa). Rehabilitation of severely resorbed mandibles with 4 short implants placed distally at 45°, without lower transcortical involvement, were biomechanically more favorable, generating lower stress peaks, than the models with short implants on an all-on-four, or on an upright configuration, with or without lower transcortical involvement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Forné, Montserrat; Barrio, Jesus; De la Coba, Cristobal; González, Begoña; Rivera, Robin; Esteve, Maria; Fernandez-Bañares, Fernando; Madrigal, Beatriz; Gras-Miralles, Beatriz; Perez-Aisa, Angeles; Viver-Pi-Sunyer, Jose M.; Bory, Felipe; Rosinach, Merce; Loras, Carmen; Esteban, Carlos; Santolaria, Santos; Gomollon, Fernando; Valle, Julio; Gisbert, Javier P.

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that GastroPanel might be a useful tool for the diagnosis of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) measuring four biomarkers in blood: basal gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen I and II (PGI and PGII), and Helicobacter pylori antibodies. Aim To determine the accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG. Methods This was a prospective, blinded, multicenter study that included dyspeptic patients. G17, PGI, and PGII were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Three antrum and two corpus biopsies were obtained for standard histological analysis and rapid urease test. Biopsies were analyzed by a single blinded expert pathologist. Results Ninety-one patients were included (77% women, mean age 44 years, 51% H. pylori positive, 17% with CAG). G17 was reduced in patients with antrum CAG (5.4 vs. 13.4 pmol/l; P<0.01) and increased in patients with corpus CAG (11 vs. 24 pmol/l; P<0.05), but its accuracy was only acceptable in the case of corpus localization [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), 74%]; PGII difference was almost statistically significant only when testing for corpus atrophy (33 vs. 21 μg/l; P=0.05; AUC=72%). The PGI and PGI/PGII ratio showed no significant differences (AUCs were all unacceptably low). Helicobacter pylori antibody levels were higher in H. pylori-infected patients (251 vs. 109 EIU, P=0.01; AUC=70). The accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG was as follows: sensitivity 50%; specificity 80%; positive 25% and negative 92% predictive values; and positive 2.4 and negative 0.6 likelihood ratios. Conclusion GastroPanel is not accurate enough for the diagnosis of CAG; thus, its systematic use in clinical practice cannot be recommended. PMID:25014624

  16. Time Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Atrophic Gastritis Over 40 Years in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tomoari; Haruma, Ken; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Sumii, Koji; Akiyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinji; Shiotani, Akiko; Graham, David Y

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection produces progressive mucosal damage that may eventually result in gastric cancer. We studied the changes that occurred in the presence and severity of atrophic gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infection that occurred coincident with improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. The prevalence of H. pylori infection and histologic grades of gastric damage were retrospectively evaluated using gastric biopsy specimens obtained over a 40-year period. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were scored using the updated Sydney classification system. The prevalence of H. pylori and severity of atrophy were examined in 1381 patients including 289 patients examined in the 1970s (158 men; mean age, 44.9 years), 787 in the 1990s (430 men; 44.2 years), and 305 in the 2010s (163 men; 53.2 years). Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly from 74.7% (1970s) to 53% (1990s) and 35.1% (2010s) (p < .01). The prevalence of atrophy in the antrum and corpus was significantly lower in the 2010s (33, 19%, respectively) compared to those evaluated in either the 1970s (98, 82%) (p < .001) or 1990s (80, 67%) (p < .001). The severity of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia also declined remarkably among those with H. pylori infection. There has been a progressive and rapid decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection as well a fall in the rate of progression of gastric atrophy among H. pylori-infected Japanese coincident with the westernization and improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Volumetric Stability of Fresh Frozen Bone Blocks in Atrophic Posterior Mandible Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Erick Ricardo; Ferraz, Emanuela Prado; Neto, Evandro Carneiro Martins; Chaushu, Gavriel; Chaushu, Liat; Xavier, Samuel Porfírio

    2017-02-01

    Fresh frozen bone allografts (FFB) have become an alternative for bone augmentation in the past decades, especially because of the absence of recent reports of disease transmission or immunologic reactions when it is used. The aim of this prospective controlled study is to evaluate volumetric changes of newly created bone following reconstruction of the atrophic posterior mandible. Twenty consecutive patients presenting for reconstruction of posterior mandibular alveolar bone ridge width ≤6.0 mm and/or height ≤6.0 who met all inclusion and exclusion criteria were included. FFB blocks were used. The main outcome variable investigated was bone volume dynamics. Vertical, horizontal, and 3-dimensional bone gain data were measured from computerized tomography scans. The main predictor variable was time evaluated at 3 points: immediately after surgery (T1), at implant placement (T2), and 1 year after functional loading (T3). Secondary outcome parameters evaluated were implant survival, histologic findings, and microtomographic morphometry. The study included 28 hemi-mandibles, 50 FFB bone blocks, and 15 female and 5 male patients (mean age, 51.8 years). Block and implant survival rates were 100% and 96%, respectively, after 31.75 months of follow-up. Vertical and horizontal bone gain at T2 was 5.15 and 6.42 mm, respectively. Volumetric resorption was 31% at T2, followed by an additional 10% reduction at T3. Histologic evaluation showed newly formed vital bone in intimate contact with the remaining FFB. Microtomography revealed 31.8% newly formed bone, 14.5% remaining grafted bone, and 53.7% connective tissue and bone marrow. Thus, FFB blocks may lead to new bone formation and consolidation, with satisfactory volumetric bone maintenance, allowing implant-supported rehabilitation with high success rates.

  18. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-09-19

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori, AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori-positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori-negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH 〈3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH 〈3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH 〈3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  19. Reduced myotube diameter, atrophic signalling and elevated oxidative stress in cultured satellite cells from COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, Pascal; Rodriguez, Julie; Blaquière, Marine; Sedraoui, Sami; Gouzi, Fares; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Mercier, Jacques; Préfaut, Christian; Hayot, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to skeletal limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have not been fully elucidated. Exhausted muscle regenerative capacity of satellite cells has been evocated, but the capacity of satellite cells to proliferate and differentiate properly remains unknown. Our objectives were to compare the characteristics of satellite cells derived from COPD patients and healthy individuals, in terms of proliferative and differentiation capacities, morphological phenotype and atrophy/hypertrophy signalling, and oxidative stress status. Therefore, we purified and cultivated satellite cells from progressively frozen vastus lateralis biopsies of eight COPD patients and eight healthy individuals. We examined proliferation parameters, differentiation capacities, myotube diameter, expression of atrophy/hypertrophy markers, oxidative stress damages, antioxidant enzyme expression and cell susceptibility to H2 O2 in cultured myoblasts and/or myotubes. Proliferation characteristics and commitment to terminal differentiation were similar in COPD patients and healthy individuals, despite impaired fusion capacities of COPD myotubes. Myotube diameter was smaller in COPD patients (P = 0.015), and was associated with a higher expression of myostatin (myoblasts: P = 0.083; myotubes: P = 0.050) and atrogin-1 (myoblasts: P = 0.050), and a decreased phospho-AKT/AKT ratio (myoblasts: P = 0.022). Protein carbonylation (myoblasts: P = 0.028; myotubes: P = 0.002) and lipid peroxidation (myotubes: P = 0.065) were higher in COPD cells, and COPD myoblasts were significantly more susceptible to oxidative stress. Thus, cultured satellite cells from COPD patients display characteristics of morphology, atrophic signalling and oxidative stress similar to those described in in vivo COPD skeletal limb muscles. We have therefore demonstrated that muscle alteration in COPD can be studied by classical in vitro cellular models.

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection with Atrophic Gastritis Is an Independent Risk Factor for Advanced Colonic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hye Won; Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Jong-Soo; Koo, Ja Eun; Chung, Eun Ju; Chang, Hye-Sook; Choe, Jaewon; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for atrophic gastritis (AG) and gastric cancer. The correlation between H. pylori, AG and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) has only been examined in a limited number of studies, and findings have been inconclusive. We aimed to investigate the association between H. pylori infection status, AG and advanced CRN. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the presence of serum anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies, AG, and advanced CRN in 6,351 consecutive asymptomatic subjects who underwent a screening colonoscopy. Results A total of 316 participants (5.0%) had advanced CRN. H. pylori seropositivity was 61.3%. In a univariate analysis, the presence of H. pylori infection was associated with advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.91; p=0.001). H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of advanced CRN after adjusting for clinically relevant confounders (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.72; p=0.023). H. pylori-related AG was significantly associated with the risk of advanced CRN (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.91; p=0.030), whereas H. pylori infection without AG was not. Conclusions H. pylori infection increased the risk of advanced CRN, especially when it was combined with AG. Strict colonoscopy screening and surveillance may be warranted in those with H. pylori-positive AG. PMID:27458180

  1. Digital Workflow for Fixed Implant Rehabilitation of an Extremely Atrophic Edentulous Mandible in Three Appointments.

    PubMed

    Papaspyridakos, Panos; Rajput, Neha; Kudara, Yukio; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2017-05-06

    To present a rationale to reduce treatment complexity, number of surgeries, and overall treatment time for patients with extreme mandibular ridge deficiency. A 67-year-old fully edentulous male presented with a chief complaint of poor retention and stability of the mandibular complete denture with consequent discomfort and inability to chew. A novel 3-appointment protocol from guided implant placement to definitive prosthesis delivery was implemented. At the first appointment, a guided surgery protocol with the All-on-4 concept was used in the mandible. Implant placement was followed by immediate loading with a fixed provisional prosthesis providing the patient with immediate function. Final impression, cast verification and articulation, determination of VDO, and interocclusal records were obtained in the same appointment. In the second appointment, the framework try-in was performed and a pick-up impression was taken after a new CR record. The third appointment included the delivery of the final screw-retained, one-piece, full-arch prosthesis opposed by a maxillary complete denture. This expedited protocol allows for implant placement with a surgical template generated from preoperative virtual planning of the implants and the CAD/CAM prosthodontic rehabilitation using a digital workflow. The patient was satisfied with the esthetic and functional outcome and was enrolled into a 6-month recall program. This article describes an expedited protocol illustrating a digital workflow for full arch implant rehabilitation of the extremely atrophic mandible. Flapless implant placement with a surgical template generated from virtual planning was followed by immediate loading with a fixed prosthesis. Digital impression/digitization of the working cast and CAD/CAM technology were used to mill the definitive prosthesis. From guided surgery to the definitive rehabilitation only three appointments were necessary. This digital workflow can enhance patient acceptance and comfort

  2. Positive relationship between p42.3 gene and inflammation in chronic non-atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Cui, Yun; Fu, Qing Yan; Lu, You Yong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Chen, Xiao Yu

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a typical type of inflammation-related tumor. The p42.3 gene is shown to be highly expressed in GC, but its association with gastritis remains unknown. We aimed to explore the relationship between gastric inflammation and p42.3 gene in vitro and in vivo. Normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) were treated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Total cell mRNA and protein were extracted and collected, and polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were performed to determine the relative expression of p42.3 gene. In total, 291 biopsy samples from patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis were collected and immunohistochemistry was used to measure the p42.3 protein expression. The association between p42.3 protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Both H. pylori and TNF-α significantly enhanced the p42.3 protein expression in GES-1 cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. In addition, p42.3 gene expression was positively associated with the severity of gastric mucosal inflammation and H. pylori infection (P = 0.000). Its expression was significantly more common in severe gastric inflammation and in H. pylori-infected cases. p42.3 gene expression is associated with gastric mucosal inflammation that can be upregulated by TNF-α and H. pylori infection. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Evidence of Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Gastric Cancer and Non-Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-López, Juan L.E.; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger. PMID:24448220

  4. Incidence of chronic atrophic gastritis: systematic review and meta-analysis of follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Mariam Abdullahi; Weck, Melanie Nicole; Gao, Lei; Brenner, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is an important precursor lesion of intestinal gastric cancer. As it is typically asymptomatic, epidemiological data on the incidence of CAG are sparse. We aimed to provide an overview of published data on CAG incidence (overall and according to risk factors) from follow-up studies. Articles with information on incidence of CAG published in English until 26th of July 2009 were identified through a systematic MEDLINE and EMBASE search. Data extracted include study characteristics and key findings regarding the incidence of CAG. A meta-analysis was performed on the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and CAG incidence. Overall, data on CAG incidence were available from 14 studies, in 7 studies incidence could be estimated according to H. pylori infection. Most studies were conducted in symptomatic or high risk populations and the maximum number of incident cases was 284. Incidence estimates ranged from 0 to 11% per year and were consistently below 1% in patients not infected with H. pylori. The highest incidence was observed in a special study conducted on ulcer patients treated by proximal gastric vagotomy. Rate ratios for the association between H. pylori infection and CAG incidence ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 with a summary estimate of 5.0 (95% confidence interval: 3.1-8.3). Incidence of CAG is very low in the absence of H. pylori infection. There is a need for more population-based studies to provide comparable estimates of incidence and the impact of risk factors in the development of CAG.

  5. Rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla with tilted implants: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Candel-Martí, Eugenia; Ata-Ali, Javier; Peñarrocha-Diago, María

    2013-10-01

    We review the evidence-based literature on the use of tilted implants in the rehabilitation of patients with maxillary atrophy. Studies from 1999 to 2010 on patients with atrophic maxilla rehabilitated with tilted implants were reviewed. Clinical series with at least 10 patients rehabilitated using tilted implants and a follow-up of at least 12 months after prosthetic load were included. Case reports and studies with missing data were excluded. In each study the following was assessed: surgical technique, prosthesis type, timing of implant loading, success rate and marginal bone loss of tilted and axial implants, complications and patient satisfaction level. Thirteen studies were included, reporting a total of 782 tilted and 666 axial implants in 319 patients. Success rates went from 91.3% to 100% for axial implants and from 92.1% to 100% for tilted implants; radiographic marginal bone loss went from 0.4 mm to 0.92 mm in tilted implants and from 0.35 mm to 1.21 mm in axial implants. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the studies. No surgical complications and only minor prosthetic complications were reported. High patient satisfaction was found with all types of prosthesis (full-arch fixed, partial fixed and overdentures) placed over tilted implants. The literature on tilted implants shows that implants placed with this technique, both used alone and combined with axially placed implants, and rehabilitated with different prosthetic options have high success rates, minimal complications and high patient satisfaction. However, lack of homogeneity among studies and relatively short follow-up periods for most studies make necessary more studies.

  6. Ikaros family transcription factors expression in rat thymus: detection of impaired development.

    PubMed

    Paradzik, M; Novak, S; Mokrovic, G; Bordukalo Niksic, T; Heckel, D; Stipic, J; Pavicic Baldani, D; Cicin-Sain, L; Antica, M

    2012-01-01

    The expression of Ikaros family transcription factors and consequently their signalling pathway is limiting for hematopoietic and lymphocyte development in mice and human. Due to their importance, these transcription factors are highly homologous between species. As an initial approach to examining the possible involvement of Ikaros transcription factors in pathogenesis of rat lymphoid development, we analyzed the expression of all known Ikaros family members, Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus in the rat thymus. We established a semi-quantitative RT-PCR to detect mRNA of each transcription factor. For the first time we give evidence of the expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the rat thymus. Further, we evaluated whether their mRNA expression was succumbed to changes when the rats were exposed to ethanol, as a known debilitating agent during development. Therefore we analyzed the thymus of adult rats whose mothers were forced to drink ethanol during gestation, to detect possible changes in thymus mRNA expression levels of Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus. We found that rats prenatally exposed to ethanol show a slightly higher expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the adult thymus when compared to control rats, but these differences were not statistically significant. We further studied the distribution of the major lymphocyte subpopulations in the rat thymus according to CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression by four color flow cytometry. We found a higher incidence of CD3 positive cells in the double positive, CD4+CD8+ thymic subpopulation of rats prenatally exposed to ethanol when compared to non-exposed animals. Our findings indicate that ethanol exposure of pregnant rats might influence the development of CD3 positive cells in the thymus of the offspring but this result should be further tackled at the level of transcription factor expression.

  7. A prospective study of prenatal and postnatal development of thymus of Deshi chicken.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M; Khan, Z I; Khalil, M; Islam, R

    2003-01-01

    Thymus was one of the primary lymphoid organs along with the bursa in birds. The growth of the thymus of deshi chicken (Gallus Domesticus) from prenatal embryonic day fifteen (ED15) to postnatal day ninety (D90) were studied. In macroscopic study, it was found as a paired, lobulated gland, one half of which was located on either side of the neck. Each half consists of six to eight, flattened, ovoid to elongated, pale white to yellowish white lobes of varing size and shape of lymphoid tissue lying in the sub-dermal connective tissue of the neck. Histologically, the thymus of deshi chicken at embryonic day fifteen was covered by a very thin connective tissue capsule from which septa arises and divides the gland into lobes and lobules. The lobules were homogenous, small in size and the cortex and medulla were demarcated. Lobules have developing Hassall's corpuscles and they were of uniform shape and size. The lobules become well developed with advancing age. The cortex gradually becomes thicker and was packed with large lymphocytes. Hassall's corpuscles became larger and there number increases at postnatal period (D90) in the medulla of the thymus. The growth and development of thymus at each stage of the study period were found to be significantly high. The present finding of thymus of deshi chicken was found similar to the adult hybrid chicken. The study also indicates that the chicken thymic cell population, structure & functions was similar to the human thymus histologically. It was also found that the chicken embryo allows easy experimental access to all the stages of the thymic development so the present study will be helpful for experimentation on lymphoid organs and to understand pathophysiology of immunological diseases of human.

  8. Thymus-Associated Parathyroid Hormone Has Two Cellular Origins with Distinct Endocrine and Immunological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijie; Farley, Alison; Chen, Lizhen; Kirby, Beth J.; Kovacs, Christopher S.; Blackburn, C. Clare; Manley, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of extracellular calcium and inorganic phosphorus homeostasis. Although the parathyroid glands were thought to be the only source of PTH, extra-parathyroid PTH production in the thymus, which shares a common origin with parathyroids during organogenesis, has been proposed to provide an auxiliary source of PTH, resulting in a higher than expected survival rate for aparathyroid Gcm2 −/− mutants. However, the developmental ontogeny and cellular identity of these “thymic” PTH–expressing cells is unknown. We found that the lethality of aparathyroid Gcm2 −/− mutants was affected by genetic background without relation to serum PTH levels, suggesting a need to reconsider the physiological function of thymic PTH. We identified two sources of extra-parathyroid PTH in wild-type mice. Incomplete separation of the parathyroid and thymus organs during organogenesis resulted in misplaced, isolated parathyroid cells that were often attached to the thymus; this was the major source of thymic PTH in normal mice. Analysis of thymus and parathyroid organogenesis in human embryos showed a broadly similar result, indicating that these results may provide insight into human parathyroid development. In addition, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) express PTH in a Gcm2-independent manner that requires TEC differentiation and is consistent with expression as a self-antigen for negative selection. Genetic or surgical removal of the thymus indicated that thymus-derived PTH in Gcm2 −/− mutants did not provide auxiliary endocrine function. Our data show conclusively that the thymus does not serve as an auxiliary source of either serum PTH or parathyroid function. We further show that the normal process of parathyroid organogenesis in both mice and humans leads to the generation of multiple small parathyroid clusters in addition to the main parathyroid glands, that are the likely source of physiologically relevant

  9. Fetal thymus size in human pregnancies reveals inverse association with regulatory T cell frequencies in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Diemert, Anke; Hartwig, Isabel; Pagenkemper, Mirja; Mehnert, Ryoko; Hansen, Gudula; Tolosa, Eva; Hecher, Kurt; Arck, Petra

    2016-02-01

    To determine fetal thymus growth and its relationship with fetal weight and cord blood T-regulatory cells in a prospective study. Assessment of fetal immune organs by ultrasound could provide a screening approach to identify fetuses at risk of impaired postnatal immunity. Thymus size was measured with four ultrasound techniques. The approaches with lowest coefficient of variation (thymus transverse diameter, 3 vessel edge) were used to longitudinally assess fetal and thymus growth in 137 cases at four time points between a gestational age (GA) of 13 and 37 weeks. Cord blood at birth was analyzed by flow-cytometry to evaluate the frequency of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Fetal thymus growth is significantly correlated with fetal weight (GA 23-25 weeks r=0.40, p<0.01; GA 28-30 weeks r=0.21, p=0.04, GA 35-37 weeks r=0.56, p<0.01). We observed an inverse correlation between fetal thymus size at GA 23-25 weeks and cord blood Treg cells (r=0.37, p=0.01). Thymus growth occurs in a linear fashion throughout pregnancy and can be reliably measured using ultrasound. Our findings of an inverse correlation between thymus growth and Treg cells in cord blood suggests a link between fetal growth, thymus development and immune-status at birth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anticandidal activity of the essential oils of Thymus maroccanus and Thymus broussonetii and their synergism with amphotericin B and fluconazol.

    PubMed

    Saad, A; Fadli, M; Bouaziz, M; Benharref, A; Mezrioui, N-E; Hassani, L

    2010-11-01

    The discovery of antifungal drugs had eradicated some infections that ravaged the humankind. But their indiscriminate use has led to the development of multidrug resistant pathogens. One strategy employed to overcome these resistance mechanisms is the use of combination of the essential oils (EOs) of medicinal plants and conventional drugs. In this study, we investigated a possible synergistic effect of the EOs of two Moroccan endemic thymes (Thymus broussonetii and T. maroccanus) with amphotericin B (Amp B) and fluconazol against Candida albicans. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) of T. maroccanus and T. broussonetii EOs combined with Amp B and fluconazol, calculated from the checkerboard titer assay, were 0.49, 0.27, 0.37 and 0.3, respectively. Also, our results indicate that the synergistic effect of EOs with fluconazol was stronger than the combination with Amp B. All these data highlight that the EOs tested potentiate the antifungal action of Amp B and fluconazol, suggesting a possible utilization of these EOs in addition to antifungal drugs for the treatment of some candidiasis due to C. albicans. The use of these combinations is likely to reduce the minimum effective dose of the drugs, thus minimizing their toxic side effects and the treatment cost.

  11. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments.

  12. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  13. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  14. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-jun; He, Cai-yun; Sun, Li-ping; Liu, Jing-wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I–II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:28150722

  15. Botanical biocides. 4. Mosquitocidal activity of certain Thymus capitatus constituents.

    PubMed

    Mansour, S A; Messeha, S S; el-Gengaihi, S E

    2000-02-01

    Successive extraction of Thyme plant, Thymus capitatus (L.) Hoffm. and Link (Lamiaceae), by different solvents of increasing polarity, showed that potency was highly attributed to the non-polar fraction (e.g., petroleum ether) when tests were carried out against the larvae and adults of Culex pipiens (L). Of special concern to the mosquitocidal activity, the following fractions and isolates were recognized: the volatile oil, unsaponifiable portion, and certain compounds isolated from the unsaponifiable portion (e.g., Thymol, alpha-Amyrin, Carvacrol + beta-Caryophyllene). The volatile oil, Thymol, and the unsaponifiable portion proved high larvicidal potency against the tested insect (LC50 = 49.0, 58.0, and 100.0 ppm, respectively). Non-lethal concentrations of these substances synergized the toxicity of Malathion, while induced additive or antagonistic effects when mixed with Permethrin or Pirimiphos-methyl. The unsaponifiable portion and volatile oil showed the highest adulticidal potency (LC50 = 0.0070 and 0.0076 mg/cm2, respectively). The efficacy of the tested candidates as repellent agents was found in the following order: unsaponifiable portion > alpha-Amyrin > Thymol > volatile oil > Carvacrol + beta-Caryophyllene. Thymol as well as volatile oil affected egg hatchability, causing Sterility Indices accounting for 0.70 and 0.74, respectively, while the unsaponifiable portion showed lower degree of sterility (0.81). The results obtained in this study may shed light on the importance of T. capitatus as a probable source of some biologically active agents for mosquito control in the future.

  16. Interactions of new derivatives of anthracene with calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolszczak, Marian; Grzesiak, Edyta; Kowalczyk, Dorota; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2002-05-01

    A series of anthracenes and bis-anthracenes have been subjected to photophysical study in water and in solutions of calf thymus DNA. The DNA binding properties have been studied using absorption, emission, melting DNA, viscometric and fluorescence polarization experiments. These studies indicate intercalation of anthryl probes into DNA helix. Trifunctional molecules consisting of two antrhacenes linked bya polyamine chain intercalate into DNA with binding constants in the range 2 × 104 - 8 × 105 M-1 depending on the linker properties. In the homogeneous solution the fluorescence of anthracene moieties shows the mono-exponential decay, with a life-time of about 8-9 ns. Upon binding to DNA, the fluorescence of anthryl probes is strongly quenched by the DNA bases. Furthermore, the fluorescence decay profile shows a distinct bi- exponential behavior in the presence of DNA with a short- lived component of 8 ns and with dominating long-lived component of 30 ns. The anthryl triplet decay kinetics is also altered by the presence of the polynucleotides. On the one hand the yield of the triplet is dramatically decreased, and on the other hand the life-time of the triplet is increased in the DNA solution. The reaction of the aquated electron with intercalculators has been investigated by pulse radio lysis technique in water and in the presence of DNA. The rate of reaction of eaq- with intercalated anthracenes is reduced tenfold in respect to that for free molecules. While direct scavenging of eaq- with intercalated anthracenes is reduced tenfold in respect to that for free molecules. While direct scavenging of eaq- by the anthracenes intercalated into DNA was observed, electron migration form DNA base radical anion to the intercalator was not.

  17. Computer-aided diagnostic method for classification of Alzheimer's disease with atrophic image features on MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Koga, Hiroshi; Mihara, Futoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shuji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2008-03-01

    Our goal for this study was to attempt to develop a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) method for classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with atrophic image features derived from specific anatomical regions in three-dimensional (3-D) T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Specific regions related to the cerebral atrophy of AD were white matter and gray matter regions, and CSF regions in this study. Cerebral cortical gray matter regions were determined by extracting a brain and white matter regions based on a level set based method, whose speed function depended on gradient vectors in an original image and pixel values in grown regions. The CSF regions in cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles were extracted by wrapping the brain tightly with a zero level set determined from a level set function. Volumes of the specific regions and the cortical thickness were determined as atrophic image features. Average cortical thickness was calculated in 32 subregions, which were obtained by dividing each brain region. Finally, AD patients were classified by using a support vector machine, which was trained by the image features of AD and non-AD cases. We applied our CAD method to MR images of whole brains obtained from 29 clinically diagnosed AD cases and 25 non-AD cases. As a result, the area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve obtained by our computerized method was 0.901 based on a leave-one-out test in identification of AD cases among 54 cases including 8 AD patients at early stages. The accuracy for discrimination between 29 AD patients and 25 non-AD subjects was 0.840, which was determined at the point where the sensitivity was the same as the specificity on the ROC curve. This result showed that our CAD method based on atrophic image features may be promising for detecting AD patients by using 3-D MR images.

  18. Cytotoxic Effect of Thymus caramanicus Jalas on Human Oral Epidermoid Carcinoma KB Cells.

    PubMed

    Fekrazad, Reza; Afzali, Mehrad; Pasban-Aliabadi, Hamzeh; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Aminizadeh, Maryam; Mostafavi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Identifying new chemotherapeutic agents with fewer side effects is a major concern for scientists today. Thymus caramanicus Jalas (Lamiaceae family) is one of the species of Thymus that grows wild in different regions of Iran. Traditionally, leaves of this plant are used in the treatment of diabetes, arthritis and cancer. Here was investigated the cytotoxic property of Thymus caramanicus essential oil and extract in human oral epidermoid carcinoma KB cells. Cell viability was measured by MTT and neutral red assays. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of essential oil (0.05-1 µL/mL) and extract (25-150 µg/mL) for 24 h. Doxorubicin was used as anticancer control drug. The data showed that the essential oil (IC50=0.44 µL/mL) and extract (IC50=105 µg/mL) induce potent cytotoxic property. Surprisingly, cytotoxic effects of essential oil and extract of this plant on KB cancer cells were greater than those on normal gingival HGF1-PI1 cell line. In addition, Thymus caramanicus could potentiate the effect of doxorubicin in sub-effective concentrations. The results of the present study indicate that essential oils and extracts of Thymus caramanicus have potential anti-proliferative property on KB cells and can be used as pharmaceutical case study for oral cancer treatments.

  19. [Ginkgo biloba extract enhances the immune function of spleen and thymus in SD rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Si, Lifang; Li, Xiangneng; Li, Zhansheng

    2015-06-01

    To study the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on the immune function of spleen and thymus in SD rats. Forty SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 rats each group). Three experimental groups were given GBE daily by gavage in doses of 40, 120, 360 mg/(kg.d), respectively. Animals in the control group were fed the same amount of PBS. After 28 days, the rats were sacrificed by chloral hydrate anesthesia. The spleen and thymus were harvested to determine the organ index first. MTT assay was used to detect the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenic lymphocyte proliferation and transformation. Neutral red assay was performed to measure the rat peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis. The ultrastructural changes of spleen and thymus were observed under scanning electron microscope. Administration of GBE in the rats increased the mass indexes of rat thymus and spleen, dose-dependently elevated the lymphocyte proliferative responses and enhanced the peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis. In experimental groups, the numbers of mature spleen and thymus lymphocytes were significantly raised in comparison with the control rats. GBE plays a regulatory role in immune function of the rat by increasing the mass of immune organs, increasing the number of mature T lymphocytes as well as their proliferative responses, and enhancing the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal macrophages.

  20. Thymus transcriptome reveals novel pathways in response to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Liu, P; Nolan, L K; Lamont, S J

    2016-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) can cause significant morbidity in chickens. The thymus provides the essential environment for T cell development; however, the thymus transcriptome has not been examined for gene expression in response to APEC infection. An improved understanding of the host genomic response to APEC infection could inform future breeding programs for disease resistance and APEC control. We therefore analyzed the transcriptome of the thymus of birds challenged with APEC, contrasting susceptible and resistant phenotypes. Thousands of genes were differentially expressed in birds of the 5-day post infection (dpi) challenged-susceptible group vs. 5 dpi non-challenged, in 5 dpi challenged-susceptible vs. 5 dpi challenged-resistant birds, as well as in 5 dpi vs. one dpi challenged-susceptible birds. The Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was the major innate immune response for birds to respond to APEC infection. Moreover, lysosome and cell adhesion molecules pathways were common mechanisms for chicken response to APEC infection. The T-cell receptor signaling pathway, cell cycle, and p53 signaling pathways were significantly activated in resistant birds to resist APEC infection. These results provide a comprehensive assessment of global gene networks and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in the thymus under APEC infection. These findings provide novel insights into key molecular genetic mechanisms that differentiate host resistance from susceptibility in this primary lymphoid tissue, the thymus. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  1. Chemical composition of essential oils of Thymus and Mentha species and their antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Soković, Marina D; Vukojević, Jelena; Marin, Petar D; Brkić, Dejan D; Vajs, Vlatka; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2009-01-07

    The potential antifungal effects of Thymus vulgaris L., Thymus tosevii L., Mentha spicata L., and Mentha piperita L. (Labiatae) essential oils and their components against 17 micromycetal food poisoning, plant, animal and human pathogens are presented. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodestillation of dried plant material. Their composition was determined by GC-MS. Identification of individual constituents was made by comparison with analytical standards, and by computer matching mass spectral data with those of the Wiley/NBS Library of Mass Spectra. MIC's and MFC's of the oils and their components were determined by dilution assays. Thymol (48.9%) and p-cymene (19.0%) were the main components of T. vulgaris, while carvacrol (12.8%), a-terpinyl acetate (12.3%), cis-myrtanol (11.2%) and thymol (10.4%) were dominant in T. tosevii. Both Thymus species showed very strong antifungal activities. In M. piperita oil menthol (37.4%), menthyl acetate (17.4%) and menthone (12.7%) were the main components, whereas those of M. spicata oil were carvone (69.5%) and menthone (21.9%). Mentha sp. showed strong antifungal activities, however lower than Thymus sp. The commercial fungicide, bifonazole, used as a control, had much lower antifungal activity than the oils and components investigated. It is concluded that essential oils of Thymus and Mentha species possess great antifungal potential and could be used as natural preservatives and fungicides.

  2. Protecting Effects of Dexamethasone on Thymus of Rats with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiping, Zhang; Li, Chen; Miao, Lin; Hua, Tian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To study the protecting effects of dexamethasone on thymus of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods. The SAP rats were randomly assigned to the model group and dexamethasone-treated group, the other normal healthy rats were assigned to the sham operation group. The rat survival, thymus pathological changes, apoptotic index, as well as expression levels of NF-κB, P-selectin, Bax, Bcl-2, and Caspase-3 protein of all groups were observed, respectively, at 3 hours, 6 hours, and 12 hours. The contents of amylase and endotoxin in plasma as well as the contents of TNF-α, PLA2, and NO in serum were determined. Results. There was no marked difference between the model group and treated group in survival. The contents of different indexes in blood of treated group were lower than those of the model group to various degrees at different time points. The thymus pathological score was lower in treated group than in model group at 12 hours.The treated group in Caspase-3 protein expression of thymus significantly exceeded the model group at 12 hours. The apoptotic index was significantly higher in treated group than in model group. Conclusion. Dexamethasone has protecting effects on thymus of SAP rats. PMID:18288275

  3. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  4. Thymus transcriptome reveals novel pathways in response to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, H.; Liu, P.; Nolan, L. K.; Lamont, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) can cause significant morbidity in chickens. The thymus provides the essential environment for T cell development; however, the thymus transcriptome has not been examined for gene expression in response to APEC infection. An improved understanding of the host genomic response to APEC infection could inform future breeding programs for disease resistance and APEC control. We therefore analyzed the transcriptome of the thymus of birds challenged with APEC, contrasting susceptible and resistant phenotypes. Thousands of genes were differentially expressed in birds of the 5-day post infection (dpi) challenged-susceptible group vs. 5 dpi non-challenged, in 5 dpi challenged-susceptible vs. 5 dpi challenged-resistant birds, as well as in 5 dpi vs. one dpi challenged-susceptible birds. The Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was the major innate immune response for birds to respond to APEC infection. Moreover, lysosome and cell adhesion molecules pathways were common mechanisms for chicken response to APEC infection. The T-cell receptor signaling pathway, cell cycle, and p53 signaling pathways were significantly activated in resistant birds to resist APEC infection. These results provide a comprehensive assessment of global gene networks and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in the thymus under APEC infection. These findings provide novel insights into key molecular genetic mechanisms that differentiate host resistance from susceptibility in this primary lymphoid tissue, the thymus. PMID:27466434

  5. Relationship between age of allogeneic thymus donor and immunological restoration of athymic ('nude") mice.

    PubMed

    Radov, L A; Sussdorf, D H; McCann, R L

    1975-12-01

    In nude mice back-crossed a minimum of five times to BALB/c, solid thymus grafts from C57Bl donors 3 days of age or younger restored both the humoral immune response against sheep erythrocytes and cellular immunity as tested by rejection of CBA skin grafts. Donor thymus placed under the renal capsule at a dose of 0-5 mg/g of recipient resulted in normal humoral immunity, while a minimum dose of 1-5 mg/g was required to reconstitute cellular competence. None of the various amounts of allogeneic thymus tissue transplanted affected the immunological status of nude recipients when grafts were obtained from donors 4 days of age or older. Histological findings correlated with the humoral and cellular responses observed. In nudes grafted with neonatal tissue, the thymus implant proliferated and developed normal architecture. The density of lymphocytes in thymus-dependent regions of peripheral lymphoid organs was near normal. On the other hand, most grafts from older (3-week-old) donors were resorbed by 90 days after implantation. In a number of cases, however, Russell bodies and numerous blast and plasma cells were seen in the graft site. Our observations suggest a possible cytotoxic rejection of implants from older allogeneic donors, while the survival and restorative capacity of transplants from 3-day-old or younger donors may have been due to a tolerogenic effect of the graft on the nude recipient.

  6. Relationship between age of allogeneic thymus donor and immunological restoration of athymic ('nude") mice.

    PubMed Central

    Radov, L A; Sussdorf, D H; McCann, R L

    1975-01-01

    In nude mice back-crossed a minimum of five times to BALB/c, solid thymus grafts from C57Bl donors 3 days of age or younger restored both the humoral immune response against sheep erythrocytes and cellular immunity as tested by rejection of CBA skin grafts. Donor thymus placed under the renal capsule at a dose of 0-5 mg/g of recipient resulted in normal humoral immunity, while a minimum dose of 1-5 mg/g was required to reconstitute cellular competence. None of the various amounts of allogeneic thymus tissue transplanted affected the immunological status of nude recipients when grafts were obtained from donors 4 days of age or older. Histological findings correlated with the humoral and cellular responses observed. In nudes grafted with neonatal tissue, the thymus implant proliferated and developed normal architecture. The density of lymphocytes in thymus-dependent regions of peripheral lymphoid organs was near normal. On the other hand, most grafts from older (3-week-old) donors were resorbed by 90 days after implantation. In a number of cases, however, Russell bodies and numerous blast and plasma cells were seen in the graft site. Our observations suggest a possible cytotoxic rejection of implants from older allogeneic donors, while the survival and restorative capacity of transplants from 3-day-old or younger donors may have been due to a tolerogenic effect of the graft on the nude recipient. PMID:1193689

  7. Young, proliferative thymic epithelial cells engraft and function in aging thymuses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Miller, Christine M.; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Wagers, Amy J.; Serwold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The thymus reaches its maximum size early in life and then begins to shrink, producing fewer T cells with increasing age. This thymic decline is thought to contribute to age-related T cell lymphopenias and hinder T cell recovery following bone marrow transplantation. While several cellular and molecular processes have been implicated in age-related thymic involution, their relative contributions are not known. Using heterochronic parabiosis, we observe that young circulating factors are not sufficient to drive regeneration of the aged thymus. In contrast, we find that resupplying young, engraftable thymic epithelial cells to a middle-aged or defective thymus leads to thymic growth and increased T cell production. Intrathymic transplantation and in vitro colony forming assays reveal that the engraftment and proliferative capacities of thymic epithelial cells diminish early in life, whereas the receptivity of the thymus to thymic epithelial cell engraftment remains relatively constant with age. These results support a model in which thymic growth and subsequent involution are driven by cell intrinsic changes in the proliferative capacity of thymic epithelial cells, and further show that young thymic epithelial cells can engraft and directly drive the growth of involuted thymuses. PMID:25870244

  8. Expression of somatostatin and cDNA cloning in the thymus of the African ostrich.

    PubMed

    Min, Chen; Min, He; Kemei, Peng; Ke, Xiao; Haibo, Huang; Daiyun, Zhu; Xinting, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The thymus in addition to being a central lymphoid organ is also an endocrine organ which produces various neuropeptides that influence the function of this gland. Somatostatin is a neuropeptide that was isolated initially in the hypothalamus and which inhibits the release of growth hormone. The distribution of somatostatin-producing cells and the sequence of somatostatin have been determined in many species. In the present study, we investigated the expression of somatostatin in the thymus of the African ostrich and its sequence by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that somatostatin mRNA was expressed in the thymus and somatostatin immunoreative cells were distributed in both the cortical and medullary regions of the thymus. Results of cDNA cloning revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of African ostrich somatostatin were 348 bases and 116 amino acids in length and that it is highly conserved to that of other reported species. These findings indicated that the somatostatin expressed in the thymus of ostrich might play an important role in the function of the gland. In addition, this research has provided novel molecular data allowing further study of somatostatin in the ostrich. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. [Strabismus correction as an alternative treatment to evisceration and enucleation for artificial eye prosthesis intolerance in atrophic eyes].

    PubMed

    Bleyen, I; Hafezi, F; de Faber, J-T; Paridaens, D

    2008-10-01

    We report on two patients, each with an atrophic blind eye who underwent strabismus correction as an alternative treatment of artificial eye prosthesis intolerance. Both patients had acquired intolerance of their prostheses, which could not be adjusted by the ocularist. The intolerance was assumed to result from focal corneal pressure by the prosthesis, related to progressive exotropia and hypertropia. This led to irritation and pain in both patients, and to focal corneal staining in one. Both patients underwent retropositioning of the external and superior rectus muscles of the left eye. At 4 weeks and 13 months postoperatively, they were free of symptoms while wearing the original artificial eye prosthesis.

  10. Successful treatment of atrophic postoperative and traumatic scarring with carbon dioxide ablative fractional resurfacing: quantitative volumetric scar improvement.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elliot T; Chapas, Anne; Brightman, Lori; Hunzeker, Christopher; Hale, Elizabeth K; Karen, Julie K; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2010-02-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) for nonacne atrophic scarring. In this before-and-after trial, each scar received 3 AFR treatments and 6 months of follow-up. Private academic practice. Fifteen women with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV, aged 21 to 66 years, presented with 22 nonacne atrophic scars between June 1 and November 30, 2007. Three patients (3 scars) were excluded from the study after receiving 1 AFR treatment and not returning for follow-up visits. The remaining 12 patients (19 scars) completed all 3 treatments and 6 months of follow-up. Each scar received 3 AFR treatments at 1- to 4-month intervals. Erythema, edema, petechiae, scarring, crusting, and dyschromia were graded after treatment and through 6 months of follow-up. Skin texture, pigmentation, atrophy, and overall appearance were evaluated after treatment and through 6 months of follow-up by the patient and a nonblinded investigator. A 3-dimensional optical profiling system generated high-resolution topographic representations of atrophic scars for objective measurement of changes in scar volume and depth. Adverse effects of treatment were mild to moderate, and no scarring or delayed-onset hypopigmentation was observed. At the 6-month follow-up visit, patient and investigator scores demonstrated improvements in skin texture for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.79]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 2.95]), pigmentation for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.32]; investigator range, 1-4 [mean, 2.21]), atrophy for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.26]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 2.95]), and overall scar appearance for all scars (patient range, 2-4 [mean, 2.89]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 3.05]). Image analysis revealed a 38.0% mean reduction of volume and 35.6% mean reduction of maximum scar depth. The AFR treatments represent a safe, effective treatment modality for improving atrophic scarring due to surgery or trauma.

  11. Thymus lotocephalus wild plants and in vitro cultures produce different profiles of phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Sandra; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Coelho, Natacha; Romano, Anabela

    2012-12-01

    We compared the phenolic metabolites and antioxidant activities of Thymus lotocephalus G. López & R. Morales wild plants and in vitro cultures using different extraction solvents. HPLC-DAD analysis allowed the identification and quantification of phenolic (caffeic and rosmarinic) acids and flavones (luteolin and apigenin) in extracts from both sources. The in vitro cultures accumulated large amounts of rosmarinic acid. However, extracts from both sources were able to neutralise free radicals in different test systems (TEAC and ORAC assays), to form complexes with Fe(2+) and to protect mouse brains against Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation. The solvent significantly influenced the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of the extracts, water/ethanol being the most efficient for the extraction of antioxidant phytochemicals. We conclude that in vitro cultures of T. lotocephalus represent a promising alternative for the production of valuable natural antioxidants and an efficient tool for the in vitro biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid, therefore avoiding the need to exploit populations of wild plants.

  12. In vivo induction of apoptosis in the thymus by administration of mycobacterial cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate).

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Y; Kaneda, K; Fujiwara, N; Morimoto, M; Oka, S; Yano, I

    1997-01-01

    It is reported that some bacteria or bacterial components cause thymic atrophy via the apoptotic process. The present study demonstrated for the first time in vivo induction of apoptosis in the mouse thymus by mycobacterial cord factor (CF) (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate). When 300 microg of purified CF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was intravenously administered to BALB/c mice in the form of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion, thymic atrophy and pulmonary granulomas were induced with a peak on day 7, whereas, in the form of liposomes, CF induced thymic atrophy on days 14 to 21 in parallel with the development of hepatic granulomas. Thymic atrophy resulted from the depletion of cortical lymphocytes via apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation and karyorrhectic changes. In contrast, mycobacterial sulfatide (2,3,6,6'-tetraacyl trehalose 2'-sulfate) caused neither thymic atrophy nor granuloma formation. Compared to lipopolysaccharide-induced thymocyte apoptosis, CF (w/o/w)-induced thymocyte apoptosis developed more slowly, reached a maximum later, and lasted longer but was less intense. Although serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in CF-treated mice were not significantly elevated, administration of anti-TNF-alpha antibody almost completely inhibited thymic atrophy and granuloma formation. Serum corticosterone levels were only slightly elevated by CF administration. The present results indicate that mycobacterial CF induces thymic atrophy via apoptosis, which is closely linked with granuloma formation. PMID:9125563

  13. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  14. Bilateral ectopic cervical thymus presenting as a neck mass: Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanrivermis Sayit, Asli; Elmali, Muzaffer; Hashimov, Jalal; Ceyhan Bilgici, Meltem; Dağdemir, Ayhan

    2016-09-01

    Ectopic cervical thymus (ECT) is a rare cause of neck mass in the pediatric age group. It is extremely uncommon in infants. Overall more than 100 cases have been reported in the literature, though fewer than 10% involved infants. Furthermore, ECT is usually unilateral and more frequently seen in men than in women. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred initial imaging modality, especially in pediatric neck masses given its wide availability, low cost and lack of radiation exposure. US can show the location, extension, and echotexture of the ECT. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be performed to verify the diagnosis and confirm communication between the ECT and the mediastinal thymus. Diffusion restriction can aid diagnosis when seen in a neck mass similar to that in the mediastinal thymus. Herein is described a case of bilateral ECT in a 2-month-old boy with associated US and MRI findings. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Pharmacological evaluation of antihypertensive effect of aerial parts of Thymus linearis benth.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer; Akhtar, Muhammad Shoaib; Jabeen, Qaiser; Khan, Hafeez Ullah; Maheen, Safirah; Haroon-Ur-Rash; Karim, Sabeha; Rasool, Shahid; Malik, Muhammad Nasir Hayat; Khan, Kifayatullah; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Latif, Fouzia; Tabassum, Nazia; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Wasim

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally Thymus linearis Benth. have been used for treatment of various diseases including hypertension. The present study was conducted to evaluate the hypotensive and antihypertensive effect of aqueous methanolic extract of aerial parts of Thymus linearis Benth. in normotensive and hypertensive rats. Acute and subchronic studies were also conducted. The aqueous methanolic extract produced a significant decrease in SBP, DBP, MBP and heart rate of both normotensive and hypertensive rats. LDv, of the extract was found to be 3000 mg/kg. The extract also exhibited a reduction in serum ALT, AST, ALP, cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL levels, while a significant increase in HDL level was observed. It is conceivable therefore, that Thymus linearis Benth. contains certain active compound(s) that are possibly responsible for the observed antihypertensive activity. Moreover, these findings further authenticate the traditional use of this plant in folklore medicine.

  16. Is the plant-associated microbiota of Thymus spp. adapted to plant essential oil?

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Maida, Isabel; Bacci, Giovanni; Ninno, Cristina; Bilia, Anna Rita; Biffi, Sauro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Flamini, Guido; Fani, Renato; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-11-21

    We examined whether the microbiota of two related aromatic thyme species, Thymus vulgaris and Thymus citriodorus, differs in relation to the composition of the respective essential oil (EO). A total of 576 bacterial isolates were obtained from three districts (leaves, roots and rhizospheric soil). They were taxonomically characterized and inspected for tolerance to the EO from the two thyme species. A district-related taxonomic pattern was found. In particular, high taxonomic diversity among the isolates from leaves was detected. Moreover, data obtained revealed a differential pattern of resistance of the isolates to EOs extracted from T. vulgaris and T. citriodorus, which was interpreted in terms of differing chemical composition of the EO of their respective host plants. In conclusion, we suggest that bacterial colonization of leaves in Thymus spp. is influenced by the EO present in leaf glandular tissue as one of the selective forces shaping endophytic community composition.

  17. A critical overview on Thymus daenensis Celak.: phytochemical and pharmacological investigations.

    PubMed

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Krenn, Liselotte

    2015-03-01

    Thymus daenensis Celak. is an herb endemic to Iran belonging to the Lamiaceae family. Growing in many parts of Iran, the plant is extensively used in folk medicine. This review was performed to compile phytochemical and pharmacological data of T. daenensis. Databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Scientific Information Database, Embase, IranMedex and Google Scholar were searched for the terms "Thymus daenensis" and "Avishan-e-denaii" up to 1st January 2014. Following reported ethnopharmacological uses, various T. daenensis preparations have been investigated for antimicrobial, antioxidant, insecticidal and immunomodulatory effects in recent studies. Moreover, numerous studies have been published on the composition of the herb's essential oil, focusing either on environmental parameters or preparation methods. Due to its high concentration of thymol, the plant's essential oil possesses high antimicrobial activities on human pathogenic strains. However, comprehensive studies on the toxicity and teratogenicity as well as clinical efficacy of Thymus daenensis are missing.

  18. Age-related changes in the thymus gland: CT-pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A.V.; Korobkin, M.; Olanow, W.; Heaston, D.K.; Ram, P.C.; Dunnick, N.R.; Silverman, P.M.

    1983-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that computed tomography (CT) is useful for thymoma detection in patients with myasthenia gravis. However, that usefulness may be conditioned by the state of the normal thymus. To examine this concept, the CT findings in 64 consecutive patients with histologic confirmation of thymic status after thymectomy or thymic biopsy during mediastinal exploration were reviewed. The normal thymus has a bilobed, arrowhead-shaped cross section at all ages, with gradual focal or diffuse fatty infiltration of the parenchyma usually occurring between 20 and 40 years of age. A thymoma is usually a spherical or oval mass, often producing a focal, distinct bulge in the adjacent pleural reflection. The differentiation of thymoma from normal thymus should be possible in most patients if age-related changes in the normal gland are appreciated.

  19. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil Against Major Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2017-01-01

    The objective of present investigation was to determine antimicrobial activity of Thymus vulgaris oil on some oral pathogens. Thymus vulgaris oil was prepared by hydrodistillation and tested against 30 clinical isolates of each of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, prepared from related oral infections using agar disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Thymus vulgaris oil at concentrations of 16 to 256 μg/mL exhibited strong inhibitory activity on all clinical isolates producing inhibition zones of 7.5 to 42 mm as measured by agar disk diffusion method. Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus mutans were the most sensitive isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1.9 and 3.6 μg/mL, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration values for C albicans, A actinomycetemcomitans, and P gingivalis were 16.3, 32, and 32 μg/mL, respectively.

  20. IN VITRO STUDIES ON STRAIN-DEPENDENT PRODUCTION OF THYMUS-SPECIFIC AUTOANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Fuji, H.; Milgrom, F.

    1973-01-01

    In vitro cultures of spleen cells (S) from normal 8–10-wk-old DBA/2J mice were shown to develop a small number of plaque-forming cells (PFC) that released antibodies lytic to syngenic and autologous thymus cells as well as to syngenic lymphoma L5178Y cells used as the target in the PFC assay. A marked increase in the number of PFC detectable on L5178Y target cells was demonstrated on day 4 in the cultures of S cells to which syngenic or autologous thymus cells had been added (S+T) at time 0, whereas the PFC detectable on thymus cells in such cultures remained at a level similar to that in S cultures. This suggested that two populations of PFC participated in the observed phenomena. No PFC developed in the culture of thymus cells (T). The addition of the cell-free supernatants of 24-h cultures of T or of L5178Y cells to syngenic S cultures also caused a specific increase in the number of the PFC detectable on L5178Y, which suggested that certain immunogenic factors released from the T cells stimulated the response observed in the S+T cultures. Antibodies of IgM nature were detected in the supernatants of S+T cultures by means of cytolysis in agar of L5178Y cells. Although such antibodies did not cause lysis of thymus cells, they could be completely removed by absorption with normal adult or fetal thymus cells of syngenic origin. Still, the absorbing capacity of L5178Y was much higher than that of thymus cells. The absorption was more efficient at 4°C than at 22°C, and hardly any absorption occurred at 37°C. The tissue distribution of the antigen under study seemed to be restricted to thymus cells since no other murine tissue cells tested removed the antibodies. The thymic antigen under study was not restricted to strain DBA/2J and could be demonstrated on thymus cells of all other strains tested. On the other hand, the ability of spleen cells to respond in vitro to this antigen has thus far been observed only in DBA/2J mice. Spleen cells of strains C57BL/6J and

  1. EphB–ephrin-B2 interactions are required for thymus migration during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Katie E.; Gordon, Julie; Cardenas, Kim; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Makinen, Taija; Grigorieva, Elena; Wilkinson, David G.; Blackburn, C. Clare; Richie, Ellen; Manley, Nancy R.; Adams, Ralf H.; Kioussis, Dimitris; Coles, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymus organogenesis requires coordinated interactions of multiple cell types, including neural crest (NC) cells, to orchestrate the formation, separation, and subsequent migration of the developing thymus from the third pharyngeal pouch to the thoracic cavity. The molecular mechanisms driving these processes are unclear; however, NC-derived mesenchyme has been shown to play an important role. Here, we show that, in the absence of ephrin-B2 expression on thymic NC-derived mesenchyme, the thymus remains in the cervical area instead of migrating into the thoracic cavity. Analysis of individual NC-derived thymic mesenchymal cells shows that, in the absence of ephrin-B2, their motility is impaired as a result of defective EphB receptor signaling. This implies a NC-derived cell-specific role of EphB–ephrin-B2 interactions in the collective migration of the thymic rudiment during organogenesis. PMID:20616004

  2. Response of thymus lymphocytes to streptozotocin-induced diabetes and exogenous vitamin C administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozerkan, Dilşad; Ozsoy, Nesrin; Cebesoy, Suna

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes causes oxidative stress, which in turn generates excessive free radicals resulting in cellular damage. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that protects tissues and organs from oxidative stress. The thymus is one of the most important lymphoid organs, which regulates T-lymphocyte proliferation and maturation. The aim of this study is to investigate the protective effects of vitamin C on the thymus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The mitotic activity and cell integrity of thymic lymphocytes were explored. Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: control (Group 1), STZ-diabetes (Group 2) and vitamin C-treated STZ-diabetics (Group 3). Rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg STZ to induce diabetes. Vitamin C (20 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically. Semithin and ultrathin sections were examined under a light or an electron microscope, respectively. Considerable numbers of mitotic lymphocytes were observed in the thymus of control rats. In the diabetic rats, however, numbers of mitotic lymphocytes decreased to ∼57% of controls, and cell division abnormalities were observed. Additionally, diabetic rats showed degeneration in the structure of the thymus including trabecular thickening, accumulation of lipid vacuoles, heterochromatic nuclei and loss of mitochondrial cristae. Degradation of medullar and cortical integrity was also detected. In the vitamin C-treated STZ-diabetic group, the structure of the thymus and mitotic activity of the lymphocytes were similar to the control group. These results suggest that vitamin C protects the thymus against injury caused by diabetes and restores thymocyte mitotic activity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [The influence of the thymus peptides on analgesia caused by acute and chronic immobilization].

    PubMed

    Novoseletskaya, A V; Kiseleva, N M; Belova, O V; Zimina, I V; Inozemtsev, A N; Arion, V Ya; Sergienko, V I

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of thymic polypeptides on pain sensitivity and to analyze a possible role of the opioid system in the implementation of the analgesia caused by immobilization stress. The study was performed on male Wistar rats at the Moscow state University named after M. V. Lomonosov. We studied effects of thymus peptides: thymuline (0.15 mg/kg), fraction 5 thymosin (0.25 microgram/kg) and cattle thymus extracted product (CTEP) (0.5 mg/kg) on pain sensitivity in rats using test "tail flick" without stress, with acute (3 h) and sub acute (12 h) immobilization stress. The comparison groups were animals treated with saline and spleen polypeptides. It is shown that preparations of thymus increase the threshold of pain sensitivity in the intact animals. Immobilization stress duration 3 and 12 h in thymus peptides treated rats caused a less pronounced increase in pain threshold than in the control groups (immob