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Sample records for mouse brain stem

  1. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  2. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  3. 3D culture of murine neural stem cells on decellularized mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jorrit; Reekmans, Kristien; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSC) in diseased or injured brain tissue is widely studied as a potential treatment for various neurological pathologies. However, effective cell replacement therapy relies on the intrinsic capacity of cellular grafts to overcome hypoxic and/or immunological barriers after transplantation. In this context, it is hypothesized that structural support for grafted NSC will be of utmost importance. With this study, we present a novel decellularization protocol for 1.5 mm thick mouse brain sections, resulting in the generation of acellular three-dimensional (3D) brain sections. Next, the obtained 3D brain sections were seeded with murine NSC expressing both the eGFP and luciferase reporter proteins (NSC-eGFP/Luc). Using real-time bioluminescence imaging, the survival and growth of seeded NSC-eGFP/Luc cells was longitudinally monitored for 1-7 weeks in culture, indicating the ability of the acellular brain sections to support sustained ex vivo growth of NSC. Next, the organization of a 3D maze-like cellular structure was examined using confocal microscopy. Moreover, under mitogenic stimuli (EGF and hFGF-2), most cells in this 3D culture retained their NSC phenotype. Concluding, we here present a novel protocol for decellularization of mouse brain sections, which subsequently support long-term 3D culture of undifferentiated NSC.

  4. Taurine release in mouse brain stem slices under cell-damaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Saransaari, P; Oja, S S

    2007-01-01

    Taurine has been thought to be essential for the development and survival of neural cells and to protect them under cell-damaging conditions. In the brain stem taurine regulates many vital functions, including cardiovascular control and arterial blood pressure. We have recently characterized the release of taurine in the adult and developing brain stem under normal conditions. Now we studied the properties of preloaded [3H]taurine release under various cell-damaging conditions (hypoxia, hypoglycemia, ischemia, the presence of metabolic poisons and free radicals) in slices prepared from the mouse brain stem from developing (7-day-old) and young adult (3-month-old) mice, using a superfusion system. Taurine release was greatly enhanced under these cell-damaging conditions, the only exception being the presence of free radicals in both age groups. The ischemia-induced release was characterized to consist of both Ca2+-dependent and -independent components. Moreover, the release was mediated by Na+-, Cl--dependent transporters operating outwards, particularly in the immature brain stem. Cl- channel antagonists reduced the release at both ages, indicating that a part of the release occurs through ion channels, and protein kinase C appeared to be involved. The release was also modulated by cyclic GMP second messenger systems, since inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterases suppressed ischemic taurine release. The inhibition of phospholipases also reduced taurine release at both ages. This ischemia-induced taurine release could constitute an important mechanism against excitotoxicity, protecting the brain stem under cell-damaging conditions.

  5. Tumorigenic development of induced pluripotent stem cells in ischemic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toru; Kawai, Hiromi; Tian, Fengfeng; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may provide cures for various neurological diseases. However, undifferentiated iPS cells have high tumorigenicity, and evaluation of the cells fates, especially in pathologic condition model, is needed. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ischemic condition to undifferentiated iPS cells fates in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Undifferentiated iPS cells were characterized with immunofluorescent staining. The iPS cells (5 × 10⁵) were injected into ipsilateral striatum and cortex after 24 h of MCAO. Histological analysis was performed from 3 to 28 days after cell transplantation. iPS cells in ischemic brain formed teratoma with higher probability (p < 0.05) and larger volume (p < 0.01) compared with those in intact brain. Among the four transcriptional factors to produce iPS cells, c-Myc, Oct3/4, and Sox2 strongly expressed in iPS-derived tumors in ischemic brain (p < 0.01). Additionally, expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated vascular endothelial growth factor receptor2 (phospho-VEGFR2) were significantly increased in iPS-derived tumors in the ischemic brain (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the transcriptional factors might increase expression of MMP-9 and activate VEGFR2, promoting teratoma formation in the ischemic brain. We strongly propose that the safety of iPS cells should be evaluated not only in normal condition, but also in a pathologic, disease model.

  6. In Vivo Fate Imaging of Intracerebral Stem Cell Grafts in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nelles, Melanie; Beyrau, Andreas; Hoehn, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    We generated transgenic human neural stem cells (hNSCs) stably expressing the reporter genes Luciferase for bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and GFP for fluorescence imaging, for multimodal imaging investigations. These transgenic hNSCs were further labeled with a clinically approved perfluoropolyether to perform parallel 19F MRI studies. In vitro validation demonstrated normal cell proliferation and differentiation of the transgenic and additionally labeled hNSCs, closely the same as the wild type cell line, making them suitable for in vivo application. Labeled and unlabeled transgenic hNSCs were implanted into the striatum of mouse brain. The time profile of their cell fate after intracerebral grafting was monitored during nine days following implantation with our multimodal imaging approach, assessing both functional and anatomical condition. The 19F MRI demarcated the graft location and permitted to estimate the cell number in the graft. BLI showed a pronounce cell loss during this monitoring period, indicated by the decrease of the viability signal. The in vivo obtained cell fate results were further validated and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. We could show that the surviving cells of the graft continued to differentiate into early neurons, while the severe cell loss could be explained by an inflammatory reaction to the graft, showing the graft being surrounded by activated microglia and macrophages. These results are different from earlier cell survival studies of our group where we had implanted the identical cells into the same mouse strain but in the cortex and not in the striatum. The cortical transplanted cells did not show any loss in viability but only pronounced and continuous neuronal differentiation. PMID:26641453

  7. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Kosi, Nina; Alić, Ivan; Kolačević, Matea; Vrsaljko, Nina; Jovanov Milošević, Nataša; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland; Mitrečić, Dinko

    2015-02-01

    The nucleolar protein 2 gene encodes a protein specific for the nucleolus. It is assumed that it plays a role in the synthesis of ribosomes and regulation of the cell cycle. Due to its link to cell proliferation, higher expression of Nop2 indicates a worse tumor prognosis. In this work we used Nop2(gt1gaj) gene trap mouse strain. While lethality of homozygous animals suggested a vital role of this gene, heterozygous animals allowed the detection of expression of Nop2 in various tissues, including mouse brain. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy techniques, applied to a mature mouse brain, human brain and on mouse neural stem cells revealed expression of Nop2 in differentiating cells, including astrocytes, as well as in mature neurons. Nop2 was detected in various regions of mouse and human brain, mostly in large pyramidal neurons. In the human, Nop2 was strongly expressed in supragranular and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex and in layer III of the cingulate cortex. Also, Nop2 was detected in CA1 and the subiculum of the hippocampus. Subcellular analyses revealed predominant location of Nop2 within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. To test if Nop2 expression correlates to cell proliferation occurring during tissue regeneration, we induced strokes in mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two weeks after stroke, the number of Nop2/nestin double positive cells in the region affected by ischemia and the periventricular zone substantially increased. Our findings suggest a newly discovered role of Nop2 in both mature neurons and in cells possibly involved in the regeneration of nervous tissue.

  8. Taurine Induces Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells and Synapse Development in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, Mattu Chetana; Marcy, Guillaume; Low, Guoliang; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Zhao, Xianfeng; Rosales, Francisco J.; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5) hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems. PMID:22916184

  9. HETEROTOPICALLY TRANSPLANTED CVO NEURAL STEM CELLS GENERATE NEURONS AND MIGRATE WITH SVZ CELLS IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lori B.; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ [3]. The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the Nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU+ cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:20298755

  10. Induced neural stem cells achieve long-term survival and functional integration in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Kathrin; Zhang, Mingyue; van Wüllen, Thea; Sakalem, Marna; Tapia, Natalia; Baumuratov, Aidos; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Schöler, Hans R; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2014-09-01

    Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]). iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications. PMID:25241741

  11. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  13. [Effects of Low and Sublethal Doses of γ-Radiation on Mesenchymal and Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Brain].

    PubMed

    Posypanova, G A; Moskaleva, E Yu; Rodina, A V; Semochkina, Yu P; Ratushnjak, M G; Perevozchikova, V G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exist in the brain in addition to the neural stem cells (NSC). The aim of this work was to investigate the sensitivity of mouse brain MSC (MSC(BR)) to sublethal doses of γ-radiation in comparison with the sensitivity of bone marrow MSC (MSC(BM)) and NSC and to study the effects of γ-irradiation at low doses on these cells. Cells were exposed to γ-radiation (137Cs) at the doses of 10 to 200 mGy at a dose rate of 10 mGy/min; higher doses were achieved at the dose rates of 200 and 500 mGy/min (60Co). The survival of cells was assessed by counting living cells after staining with trypan blue in the Goryaev's chamber or using the MTT test for NSC growing as neurospheres. SP fraction was measured using flow cytometry after incubation with rhodamine-123. Exposure to the doses in the range of 10 to 500 mGy stimulated cell proliferation. The maximum decrease in the cells number was seen on the seventh day after irradiation and it was practically the same for the MSC(BR) and MSC(BM). NCS were more radiosensitive than MSC. Exposure to the doses of 100 to 500 mGy stimulated cells proliferation of all SCs except of MSC(BM). It was shown that the size of SP fraction of MSC(BR) was diminished after γ-irradiation at low doses. Thus, the stimulation of cell proliferation after γ-irradiation at low doses is accompanied by the redistribution of distinct cell subpopulations: the decrease in the SP fraction and the increase in the general population of cells were observed.

  14. [Effects of Low and Sublethal Doses of γ-Radiation on Mesenchymal and Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Brain].

    PubMed

    Posypanova, G A; Moskaleva, E Yu; Rodina, A V; Semochkina, Yu P; Ratushnjak, M G; Perevozchikova, V G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exist in the brain in addition to the neural stem cells (NSC). The aim of this work was to investigate the sensitivity of mouse brain MSC (MSC(BR)) to sublethal doses of γ-radiation in comparison with the sensitivity of bone marrow MSC (MSC(BM)) and NSC and to study the effects of γ-irradiation at low doses on these cells. Cells were exposed to γ-radiation (137Cs) at the doses of 10 to 200 mGy at a dose rate of 10 mGy/min; higher doses were achieved at the dose rates of 200 and 500 mGy/min (60Co). The survival of cells was assessed by counting living cells after staining with trypan blue in the Goryaev's chamber or using the MTT test for NSC growing as neurospheres. SP fraction was measured using flow cytometry after incubation with rhodamine-123. Exposure to the doses in the range of 10 to 500 mGy stimulated cell proliferation. The maximum decrease in the cells number was seen on the seventh day after irradiation and it was practically the same for the MSC(BR) and MSC(BM). NCS were more radiosensitive than MSC. Exposure to the doses of 100 to 500 mGy stimulated cells proliferation of all SCs except of MSC(BM). It was shown that the size of SP fraction of MSC(BR) was diminished after γ-irradiation at low doses. Thus, the stimulation of cell proliferation after γ-irradiation at low doses is accompanied by the redistribution of distinct cell subpopulations: the decrease in the SP fraction and the increase in the general population of cells were observed. PMID:27245003

  15. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neurogenesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Jose R; Daynac, Mathieu; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Cebrian-Silla, Arantxa; Sii Felice, Karine; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Boussin, François D; Mouthon, Marc-André

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the subventricular zone of high dose-irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neurogenesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neurogenesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging. PMID:23526803

  16. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  17. Assessment of long-term safety and efficacy of intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Donega, Vanessa; Nijboer, Cora H.; van Velthoven, Cindy T. J.; Youssef, Sameh A.; de Bruin, Alain; van Bel, Frank; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: For clinical translation, we assessed whether intranasal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment after hypoxia–ischemia (HI) induces neoplasia in the brain or periphery at 14 mo. Furthermore, the long-term effects of MSCs on behavior and lesion size were determined. Method: HI was induced in 9-d-old mice. Pups received an intranasal administration of 0.5 × 106 MSCs or vehicle at 10 d post-HI. Full macroscopical and microscopical pathological analysis of 39 organs per mouse was performed. Sensorimotor behavior was assessed in the cylinder-rearing test at 10 d, 28 d, 6 mo, and 9 mo. Cognition was measured with the novel object recognition test at 3 and 14 mo post-HI. Lesion size was determined by analyzing mouse-anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and mouse-anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) staining at 5 wk and 14 mo. Results: At 14 mo post-HI, we did not observe any neoplasia in the nasal turbinates, brain, or other organs of HI mice treated with MSCs. Furthermore, our results show that MSC-induced improvement of sensorimotor and cognitive function is long lasting. In contrast, HI-vehicle mice showed severe behavioral impairment. Recovery of MAP2- and MBP-positive area lasted up to 14 mo following MSC treatment. Conclusion: Our results provide strong evidence of the long-term safety and positive effects of MSC treatment following neonatal HI in mice. PMID:26270577

  18. Multipotential stem cells from the adult mouse brain proliferate and self-renew in response to basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gritti, A; Parati, E A; Cova, L; Frolichsthal, P; Galli, R; Wanke, E; Faravelli, L; Morassutti, D J; Roisen, F; Nickel, D D; Vescovi, A L

    1996-02-01

    It has been established that the adult mouse forebrain contains multipotential (neuronal/glial) progenitor cells that can be induced to proliferate in vitro when epidermal growth factor is provided. These cells are found within the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, together with other progenitor cell populations, whose requirements for proliferation remain undefined. Using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), we have isolated multipotential progenitors from adult mouse striatum. These progenitors proliferate and can differentiate into cells displaying the antigenic properties of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. The neuron-like cells possess neuronal features, exhibit neuronal electrophysiological properties, and are immunoreactive for GABA, substance P, choline acetyl-transferase, and glutamate. Clonal analysis confirmed the multipotency of these bFGF-dependent cells. Most significantly, subcloning experiments demonstrated that they were capable of self-renewal, which led to a progressive increase in population size over serial passaging. These results demonstrate that bFGF is mitogenic for multipotential cells from adult mammalian forebrain that possess stem cell properties. PMID:8558238

  19. Intranasal delivery of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in mouse models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Lusine; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Stolzing, Alexandra; Schäfer, Richard; Siegel, Georg; Fabian, Claire; Kahle, Philipp; Biedermann, Tilo; Lourhmati, Ali; Buadze, Marine; Novakovic, Ana; Proksch, Barbara; Gleiter, Christoph H; Frey, William H; Schwab, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In view of the rapid preclinical development of cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disorders, traumatic brain injury, and tumors, the safe and efficient delivery and targeting of therapeutic cells to the central nervous system is critical for maintaining therapeutic efficacy and safety in the respective disease models. Our previous data demonstrated therapeutically efficacious and targeted delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the brain in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The present study examined delivery of bone marrow-derived MSCs, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in a transgenic model of PD [(Thy1)-h[A30P] αS] and an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) via intranasal application (INA). INA of microglia in naive BL/6 mice led to targeted and effective delivery of cells to the brain. Quantitative PCR analysis of eGFP DNA showed that the brain contained the highest amount of eGFP-microglia (up to 2.1 × 10(4)) after INA of 1 × 10(6) cells, while the total amount of cells detected in peripheral organs did not exceed 3.4 × 10(3). Seven days after INA, MSCs expressing eGFP were detected in the olfactory bulb (OB), cortex, amygdala, striatum, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem of (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS transgenic mice, showing predominant distribution within the OB and brainstem. INA of eGFP-expressing macrophages in 13-month-old APP/PS1 mice led to delivery of cells to the OB, hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. Both MSCs and macrophages contained Iba-1-positive population of small microglia-like cells and Iba-1-negative large rounded cells showing either intracellular amyloid β (macrophages in APP/PS1 model) or α-synuclein [MSCs in (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS model] immunoreactivity. Here, we show, for the first time, intranasal delivery of cells to the brain of transgenic PD and AD mouse models. Additional work is needed to determine the optimal dosage (single treatment regimen or repeated

  20. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  1. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  2. General Information about Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Neural Stem Cells and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenggang; Chopp, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stroke activates neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) of the lateral ventricle, which increases neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Within the ischemic brain, neural stem cells, neuroblasts and OPCs appear to actively communicate with cerebral endothelial cells and other brain parenchymal cells to mediate ischemic brain repair; however, stroke-induced neurogenesis unlikely plays any significant roles in neuronal replacement. In this mini-review, we will discuss recent findings how intercellular communications between stroke-induced neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis and brain parenchymal cells could potentially facilitate brain repair processes. PMID:27488979

  4. MeCP2 Regulates the Synaptic Expression of a Dysbindin-BLOC-1 Network Component in Mouse Brain and Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Larimore, Jennifer; Ryder, Pearl V.; Kim, Kun-Yong; Ambrose, L. Alex; Chapleau, Christopher; Calfa, Gaston; Gross, Christina; Bassell, Gary J.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Smith, Yoland; Talbot, Konrad; Park, In-Hyun; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and genetic evidence suggest overlapping pathogenic mechanisms between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. We tested this hypothesis by asking if mutations in the ASD gene MECP2 which cause Rett syndrome affect the expression of genes encoding the schizophrenia risk factor dysbindin, a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), and associated interacting proteins. We measured mRNA and protein levels of key components of a dysbindin interaction network by, quantitative real time PCR and quantitative immunohistochemistry in hippocampal samples of wild-type and Mecp2 mutant mice. In addition, we confirmed results by performing immunohistochemistry of normal human hippocampus and quantitative qRT-PCR of human inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived human neurons from Rett syndrome patients. We defined the distribution of the BLOC-1 subunit pallidin in human and mouse hippocampus and contrasted this distribution with that of symptomatic Mecp2 mutant mice. Neurons from mutant mice and Rett syndrome patients displayed selectively reduced levels of pallidin transcript. Pallidin immunoreactivity decreased in the hippocampus of symptomatic Mecp2 mutant mice, a feature most prominent at asymmetric synapses as determined by immunoelectron microcopy. Pallidin immunoreactivity decreased concomitantly with reduced BDNF content in the hippocampus of Mecp2 mice. Similarly, BDNF content was reduced in the hippocampus of BLOC-1 deficient mice suggesting that genetic defects in BLOC-1 are upstream of the BDNF phenotype in Mecp2 deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that the ASD-related gene Mecp2 regulates the expression of components belonging to the dysbindin interactome and these molecular differences may contribute to synaptic phenotypes that characterize Mecp2 deficiencies and ASD. PMID:23750231

  5. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  6. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M; Mortrud, Marty T; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Phillips, John W; Hohmann, John G; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R; Zeng, Hongkui

    2014-04-10

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain's wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  7. [Toxic effect of formaldehyde on mouse different brain regions].

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Hua; Cai, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Min; Li, Hui; You, Hui-Hui; Mei, Yu-Fei; Yang, Xu; Ding, Shu-Mao

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of the nervous system lesions induced by formaldehyde (FA). Male Balb/c mice were exposed to gaseous formaldehyde for 7 days (8 h/d) with three different concentrations (0, 0.5 and 3.0 mg/m(3)). A group of animals injected with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA (0.01 mL/g) was also set and exposed to 3.0 mg/m(3) FA. The concentrations of cAMP, cGMP, NO and the activity of NOS in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem were determined by corresponding assay kits. The results showed that, compared with the control (0 mg/m(3) FA) group, the cAMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem were significantly increased in 0.5 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05), but decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05); The concentration of cAMP in hippocampus was significantly decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05). In comparison with the control group, L-NMMA group showed unchanged cAMP contents and NOS activities in different brain regions, but showed increased cGMP contents in hippocampus and NO contents in cerebral cortex (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group, L-NMMA group showed increased contents of cAMP and reduced NOS activities in different brain regions, as well as significantly decreased cGMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem and NO content in brain stem. These results suggest that the toxicity of FA on mouse nervous system is related to NO/cGMP and cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:26490067

  8. [Toxic effect of formaldehyde on mouse different brain regions].

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Hua; Cai, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Min; Li, Hui; You, Hui-Hui; Mei, Yu-Fei; Yang, Xu; Ding, Shu-Mao

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of the nervous system lesions induced by formaldehyde (FA). Male Balb/c mice were exposed to gaseous formaldehyde for 7 days (8 h/d) with three different concentrations (0, 0.5 and 3.0 mg/m(3)). A group of animals injected with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA (0.01 mL/g) was also set and exposed to 3.0 mg/m(3) FA. The concentrations of cAMP, cGMP, NO and the activity of NOS in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem were determined by corresponding assay kits. The results showed that, compared with the control (0 mg/m(3) FA) group, the cAMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem were significantly increased in 0.5 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05), but decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05); The concentration of cAMP in hippocampus was significantly decreased in 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group (P < 0.05). In comparison with the control group, L-NMMA group showed unchanged cAMP contents and NOS activities in different brain regions, but showed increased cGMP contents in hippocampus and NO contents in cerebral cortex (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with 3.0 mg/m(3) FA group, L-NMMA group showed increased contents of cAMP and reduced NOS activities in different brain regions, as well as significantly decreased cGMP contents in cerebral cortex and brain stem and NO content in brain stem. These results suggest that the toxicity of FA on mouse nervous system is related to NO/cGMP and cAMP signaling pathways.

  9. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  10. Stages of Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  11. Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embroyonic Stem Cell Diffferentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. Abcg2 is a multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter whose activity may be considered a hallmark of stem cell plasticity. The role of Abcg2 during early embryogenesis, however, is unclear. Studies...

  12. Organ donation. 3. Brain stem death.

    PubMed

    Bothamley, J

    2000-01-01

    Following an exploration of nurses' perceptions of organ donation, and of consent and patient's rights in the preceding articles, this series concludes with an examination of brain stem death, and in particular the literature which challenges popular assumptions about it. This makes challenging and sometimes disturbing reading, but as the author reminds us, these are issues which theatre nurses cannot ignore.

  13. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks.

  14. Stem Cell Models of Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Kelava, Iva; Lancaster, Madeline A

    2016-06-01

    Recent breakthroughs in pluripotent stem cell technologies have enabled a new class of in vitro systems for functional modeling of human brain development. These advances, in combination with improvements in neural differentiation methods, allow the generation of in vitro systems that reproduce many in vivo features of the brain with remarkable similarity. Here, we describe advances in the development of these methods, focusing on neural rosette and organoid approaches, and compare their relative capabilities and limitations. We also discuss current technical hurdles for recreating the cell-type complexity and spatial architecture of the brain in culture and offer potential solutions.

  15. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Mawad, M.E.; Silver, A.J.; Hilal, S.K.; Ganti, S.R.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed.

  16. Cell type- and brain region-resolved mouse brain proteome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kirti; Schmitt, Sebastian; Bergner, Caroline G; Tyanova, Stefka; Kannaiyan, Nirmal; Manrique-Hoyos, Natalia; Kongi, Karina; Cantuti, Ludovico; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Philips, Mari-Anne; Rossner, Moritz J; Mann, Matthias; Simons, Mikael

    2015-12-01

    Brain transcriptome and connectome maps are being generated, but an equivalent effort on the proteome is currently lacking. We performed high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics for in-depth analysis of the mouse brain and its major brain regions and cell types. Comparisons of the 12,934 identified proteins in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and cortical neurons with deep sequencing data of the transcriptome indicated deep coverage of the proteome. Cell type-specific proteins defined as tenfold more abundant than average expression represented about a tenth of the proteome, with an overrepresentation of cell surface proteins. To demonstrate the utility of our resource, we focused on this class of proteins and identified Lsamp, an adhesion molecule of the IgLON family, as a negative regulator of myelination. Our findings provide a framework for a system-level understanding of cell-type diversity in the CNS and serves as a rich resource for analyses of brain development and function. PMID:26523646

  17. Rosiglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Strum, Jay C; Shehee, Ron; Virley, David; Richardson, Jill; Mattie, Michael; Selley, Paula; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nock, Christina; Saunders, Ann; Roses, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was found to simulate mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain in an apolipoprotein (Apo) E isozyme-independent manner. Rosiglitazone induced both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and estrogen-stimulated related receptor alpha (ESRRA) mRNA, a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Transcriptomics and proteomics analysis suggested the mitochondria produced in the presence of human ApoE3 and E4 were not as metabolically efficient as those in the wild type or ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we propose that PPARgamma agonism induces neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and improves glucose utilization leading to improved cellular function and provides mechanistic support for the improvement in cognition observed in treatment of Alzheimer's patients with rosiglitazone.

  18. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis.

  19. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis. PMID:26055730

  20. GFAPδ Expression in Glia of the Developmental and Adolescent Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L.; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M.

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans. PMID:23285135

  1. Postnatal Neural Stem Cells in Treating Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Gazalah, Hussein; Mantash, Sarah; Ramadan, Naify; Al Lafi, Sawsan; El Sitt, Sally; Darwish, Hala; Azari, Hassan; Fawaz, Lama; Ghanem, Noël; Zibara, Kazem; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Kobeissy, Firas; Soueid, Jihane

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and disabilities worldwide. It affects approximately 1.5 million people each year and is associated with severe post-TBI symptoms such as sensory and motor deficits. Several neuro-therapeutic approaches ranging from cell therapy interventions such as the use of neural stem cells (NSCs) to drug-based therapies have been proposed for TBI management. Successful cell-based therapies are tightly dependent on reproducible preclinical animal models to ensure safety and optimal therapeutic benefits. In this chapter, we describe the isolation of NSCs from neonatal mouse brain using the neurosphere assay in culture. Subsequently, dissociated neurosphere-derived cells are used for transplantation into the ipsilateral cortex of a controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI model in C57BL/6 mice. Following intra-cardiac perfusion and brain removal, the success of NSC transplantation is then evaluated using immunofluorescence in order to assess neurogenesis along with gliosis in the ipsilateral coronal brain sections. Behavioral tests including rotarod and pole climbing are conducted to evaluate the motor activity post-treatment intervention. PMID:27604746

  2. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  3. Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials and brain death.

    PubMed

    Machado, C; Valdés, P; García-Tigera, J; Virues, T; Biscay, R; Miranda, J; Coutin, P; Román, J; García, O

    1991-01-01

    BAEP records were obtained from 30 brain-dead patients. Three BAEP patterns were observed: (1) no identifiable waves (73.34%), (2) an isolated bilateral wave I (16.66%), and (3) an isolated unilateral wave I (10%). When wave I was present, it was always significantly delayed. Significant augmentation of wave I amplitude was present bilaterally in one case and unilaterally in another. On the other hand, in serial records from 3 cases wave I latency tended to increase progressively until this component disappeared. During the same period, wave I amplitude fluctuations were observed. A significant negative correlation was found for wave I latency with heart rate and body temperature in 1 case. Two facts might explain the progressive delay and disappearance of wave I in brain-dead patients: a progressive hypoxic-ischaemic dysfunction of the cochlea and the eighth nerve plus hypothermia, often present in brain-dead patients. Then the incidence of wave I preservation reported by different authors in single BAEP records from brain-dead patients might depend on the moment at which the evoked potential study was done in relation to the onset of the clinical state. It is suggested that, although BAEPs provide an objective electrophysiological assessment of brain-stem function, essential for BD diagnosis, this technique could be of no value for this purpose when used in isolation.

  4. Derivation of Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Karanfil, Işıl; Bagci-Onder, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells offer therapeutic tools for neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on embryoid body (EB)-mediated stem cell culture techniques used to derive NSCs from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Generation of healthy and stable NSCs from iPSCs heavily depends on standardized in vitro cell culture systems that mimic the embryonic environments utilized during neural development. Specifically, the neural induction and expansion methods after EB formation are described in this review.

  5. Distribution of Cytoglobin in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Stefan; Wystub, Sylvia; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex (CCo), in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells), in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes), basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum (VP)), and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes) were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei), epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus (SC). The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive (Cygb-IR) fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide (NO)-synthase in neurons, which supports a

  6. Human-Mouse Chimerism Validates Human Stem Cell Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are defined by their capacity to differentiate into all three tissue layers that comprise the body. Chimera formation, generated by stem cell transplantation to the embryo, is a stringent assessment of stem cell pluripotency. However, the ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to form embryonic chimeras remains in question. Here we show using a stage-matching approach that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the capacity to participate in normal mouse development when transplanted into gastrula-stage embryos, providing in vivo functional validation of hPSC pluripotency. hiPSCs and hESCs form interspecies chimeras with high efficiency, colonize the embryo in a manner predicted from classical developmental fate mapping, and differentiate into each of the three primary tissue layers. This faithful recapitulation of tissue-specific fate post-transplantation underscores the functional potential of hPSCs and provides evidence that human-mouse interspecies developmental competency can occur.

  7. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  8. Id4 Marks Spermatogonial Stem Cells in the Mouse Testis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Xu, Qing; Zhao, Danfeng; Degui Chen, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a classic adult stems cell-dependent process, supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, the identification of SSCs and elucidation of their behaviors in undisturbed testis has long been a big challenge. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse model, Id4-2A-CreERT2-2A-tdTomato, which allowed us to mark Id4-expressing (Id4(+)) cells at different time points in situ and track their behaviors across distinct developmental stages during steady-state and regenerating spermatogenesis. We found that Id4(+) cells continue to produce spermatogonia, spermatocytes and sperm in mouse testis, showing they are capable of self-renewal and have differentiation potential. Consistent with these findings, ablation of Id4(+) cells in mice results in a loss of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, developmental fate mapping reveals that Id4(+) SSCs originate from neonate Id4(+) gonocytes. Therefore, our results indicate that Id4 marks spermatogonial stem cells in the mouse testis.

  9. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  10. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  11. Jarid2 regulates mouse epidermal stem cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mejetta, Stefania; Morey, Lluis; Pascual, Gloria; Kuebler, Bernd; Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Lee, Youngsook; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-08-02

    Jarid2 is required for the genomic recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) in embryonic stem cells. However, its specific role during late development and adult tissues remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we show that deletion of Jarid2 in mouse epidermis reduces the proliferation and potentiates the differentiation of postnatal epidermal progenitors, without affecting epidermal development. In neonatal epidermis, Jarid2 deficiency reduces H3K27 trimethylation, a chromatin repressive mark, in epidermal differentiation genes previously shown to be targets of the PRC2. However, in adult epidermis Jarid2 depletion does not affect interfollicular epidermal differentiation but results in delayed hair follicle (HF) cycling as a consequence of decreased proliferation of HF stem cells and their progeny. We conclude that Jarid2 is required for the scheduled proliferation of epidermal stem and progenitor cells necessary to maintain epidermal homeostasis.

  12. Posterior foss avenous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, T.R.; Truwit, C.L. ); Dowd, C.F. ); Symonds, D.L. )

    1994-04-01

    To describe 11 cases of posterior fossa venous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem. Eleven cases of posterior fossa venous angioma with drainage through the brain stem were evaluated using MR. Correlation with known routes of venous drainage for the cerebellum and brain stem is made. Six of the 11 venous angiomas were found in the cerebellum, four in the brain stem; one involved both the cerebellum and brain stem. The cerebellar venous angiomas drained to subependymal veins about the fourth ventricle and dorsal pons. These then connected with an enlarged transmesencephalic or transpontine vein, to drain anteriorly to the anterior pontine veins. The brain stem angiomas had variable drainage depending on location. Evidence of hemorrhage was seen in five cases. Cerebellar and brain stem venous angiomas have several potential routes of drainage, including an enlarged vein traversing the pons, midbrain, or medulla. A knowledge of the normal venous anatomy of this region helps to understand the occurrence of these uncommon routes of venous drainage. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  14. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  15. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome

    PubMed Central

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J. F.; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of “wiring cost” explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost in the mouse connectome by using data from 461 systematically acquired anterograde-tracer injections into the right cortical and subcortical regions of the mouse brain. We estimated brain-wide weights, distances, and wiring costs of axonal projections and performed a multiscale topological and spatial analysis of the resulting weighted and directed mouse brain connectome. Our analysis showed that the mouse connectome has small-world properties, a hierarchical modular structure, and greater-than-minimal wiring costs. High-participation hubs of this connectome mediated communication between functionally specialized and anatomically localized modules, had especially high wiring costs, and closely corresponded to regions of the default mode network. Analyses of independently acquired histological and gene-expression data showed that nodal participation colocalized with low neuronal density and high expression of genes enriched for cognition, learning and memory, and behavior. The mouse connectome contains high-participation hubs, which are not explained by wiring-cost minimization but instead reflect competitive selection pressures for integrated network topology as a basis for higher cognitive and behavioral functions. PMID:26216962

  16. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J F; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-08-11

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of "wiring cost" explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost in the mouse connectome by using data from 461 systematically acquired anterograde-tracer injections into the right cortical and subcortical regions of the mouse brain. We estimated brain-wide weights, distances, and wiring costs of axonal projections and performed a multiscale topological and spatial analysis of the resulting weighted and directed mouse brain connectome. Our analysis showed that the mouse connectome has small-world properties, a hierarchical modular structure, and greater-than-minimal wiring costs. High-participation hubs of this connectome mediated communication between functionally specialized and anatomically localized modules, had especially high wiring costs, and closely corresponded to regions of the default mode network. Analyses of independently acquired histological and gene-expression data showed that nodal participation colocalized with low neuronal density and high expression of genes enriched for cognition, learning and memory, and behavior. The mouse connectome contains high-participation hubs, which are not explained by wiring-cost minimization but instead reflect competitive selection pressures for integrated network topology as a basis for higher cognitive and behavioral functions. PMID:26216962

  17. Improvement in Isolation and Identification of Mouse Oogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiyong; Wu, Meng; Zhang, Jinjin; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Cheng, Jing; Shen, Wei; Luo, Aiyue; Fang, Li; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    Female germline stem cells (FGSCs) or oogonial stem cells (OSCs) have the capacity to generate newborn oocytes and thus open a new door to fight ovarian aging and female infertility. However, the production and identification of OSCs are difficult for investigators. Rare amount of these cells in the ovary results in the failure of the acquisition of OSCs. Furthermore, the oocyte formation by OSCs in vivo was usually confirmed using tissue sections by immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry in previous studies. STO or MEF feeder cells are derived from mouse, not human. In our study, we modified the protocol. The cells were digested from ovaries and cultured for 2-3 days and then were purified by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). The ovaries and fetus of mice injected with EGFP-positive OSCs were prepared and put on the slides to directly visualize oocyte and progeny formation under microscope. Additionally, the human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) were also used as feeder cells to support the proliferation of OSCs. The results showed that all the modified procedures can significantly improve and facilitate the generation and characterization of OSCs, and hUC-MSCs as feeder will be useful for isolation and proliferation of human OSCs avoiding contamination from mouse. PMID:26635882

  18. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases.

  19. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy. PMID:26687081

  20. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-18

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy.

  1. Oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse brain; the effect of LPS-induced inflammatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kazunori; Furube, Eriko; Muneoka, Shiori; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-19

    Evidence have been accumulated that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain. The fornix, projection and commissure pathway of hippocampal neurons, carries signals from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain and has critical role in memory and learning. However, basic characterization of adult oligodendrogenesis in this brain region is not well understood. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to examine the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and the effect of acute inflammatory stimulation on oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse. We demonstrated the proliferation of OPCs and a new generation of mature oligodendrocytes by using bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Oligodendrogenesis of adult fornix was also demonstrated by using oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 transgenic mouse. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) attenuated proliferation of OPCs in the fornix together with reduced proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells. Time course analysis showed that a single administration of LPS attenuated the proliferation of OPCs during 24-48 h. On the other hand, consecutive administration of LPS did not suppress proliferation of OPCs. The treatment of LPS did not affect differentiation of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes. Treatment of a microglia inhibitor minocycline significantly attenuated basal proliferation of OPCs under normal condition. In conclusion, the present study indicates that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs and a single administration of LPS transiently attenuates proliferation of OPCs without changing differentiation in the fornix of the adult mouse brains.

  2. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  3. Therapeutic potentials of human adipose-derived stem cells on the mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Soon; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Hyeong-Geun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Chang, Keun-A; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) using stem cells has long been the focus of many researchers, but the ideal therapeutic strategy has not yet been developed. The consistency and high reliability of the experimental results confirmed by animal models are considered to be a critical factor in the stability of stem cell transplantation for PD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the preventive and therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) for PD and was to identify the related factors to this therapeutic effect. The hASC were intravenously injected into the tail vein of a PD mouse model induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Consequently, the behavioral performances were significantly improved at 3 weeks after the injection of hASC. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons were rescued, the number of structure-modified mitochondria was decreased, and mitochondrial complex I activity was restored in the brains of the hASC-injected PD mouse model. Overall, this study underscores that intravenously transplanted hASC may have therapeutic potential for PD by recovering mitochondrial functions.

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  5. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  6. Combination Cell Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Stem Cells for Brain Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. Method and Materials The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. Result The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. Conclusions The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats. PMID:26019759

  7. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of paraquat accumulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Tarasewicz, Elizabeth; Mathew, Jason; Ohman Strickland, Pamela A.; Buckley, Brian; Richardson, Jason R.; Richfield, Eric K.

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a potential human neurotoxicant and is used in models of oxidative stress. We determined the toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in adult mouse brain following repeated or prolonged PQ exposure. PQ accumulated in different brain regions and reached a plateau after ~18 i.p. (10 mg/kg) doses and resulted in modest morbidity and mortality unpredictably associated with dose interval and number. PQ had divergent effects on horizontal locomotor behavior depending on the number of doses. PQ decreased striatal dopamine levels after the 18th to 36th i.p. dose (10 mg/kg) and reduced the striatal level of tyrosine hydroxylase. Drinking water exposure to PQ (0.03– 0.05 mg/ml) did not result in any mortality and resulted in concentration and time dependent levels in the brain. The brain half-life of PQ varied with mouse strain. PQ accumulates and may saturate a site in mouse brain resulting in complex PQ level and duration-related consequences. These findings should alter our risk assessment of this compound and demonstrate a useful, but complex dynamic model for understanding the consequences of PQ in the brain. PMID:19084006

  8. Identification and Specification of the Mouse Skeletal Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Charles K.F.; Seo, Eun Young; Chen, James Y.; Lo, David; McArdle, Adrian; Sinha, Rahul; Tevlin, Ruth; Seita, Jun; Vincent-Tompkins, Justin; Wearda, Taylor; Lu, Wan-Jin; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Chung, Michael T.; Marecic, Owen; Tran, Misha; Yan, Kelley S.; Upton, Rosalynd; Walmsley, Graham G.; Lee, Andrew S.; Sahoo, Debashis; Kuo, Calvin; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How are skeletal tissues derived from skeletal stem cells? Here, we map bone, cartilage and stromal development from a population of highly pure, post-natal skeletal stem cells (mouse Skeletal Stem Cell, mSSC) to its downstream progenitors of bone, cartilage and stromal tissue. We then investigated the transcriptome of the stem/progenitor cells for unique gene expression patterns that would indicate potential regulators of mSSC lineage commitment. We demonstrate that mSSC niche factors can be potent inducers of osteogenesis, and several specific combinations of recombinant mSSC niche factors can activate mSSC genetic programs in situ, even in non-skeletal tissues, resulting in de novo formation of cartilage or bone and bone marrow stroma. Inducing mSSC formation with soluble factors and subsequently regulating the mSSC niche to specify its differentiation towards bone, cartilage, or stromal cells could represent a paradigm shift in the therapeutic regeneration of skeletal tissues. PMID:25594184

  9. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  10. Stem cell delivery of therapies for brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) poses a problem to deliver drugs for brain malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders. Stem cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to delivery drugs or RNA to the brain. This use of methods to bypass the hurdles of delivering drugs across the BBB is particularly important for diseases with poor prognosis such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Stem cell treatment to deliver drugs to neural tumors is currently in clinical trial. This method, albeit in the early phase, could be an advantage because stem cells can cross the BBB into the brain. MSCs are particularly interesting because to date, the experimental and clinical evidence showed ‘no alarm signal’ with regards to safety. Additionally, MSCs do not form tumors as other more primitive stem cells such as embryonic stem cells. More importantly, MSCs showed pathotropism by migrating to sites of tissue insult. Due to the ability of MSCs to be transplanted across allogeneic barrier, drug-engineered MSCs can be available as off-the-shelf cells for rapid transplantation. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of stem cells to deliver prodrugs, genes and RNA to treat neural disorders. PMID:25097727

  11. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  12. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J.; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  13. A versatile new technique to clear mouse and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Large volumes imaging with microscopic resolution is limited by light scattering. In the last few years based on refractive index matching, different clearing approaches have been developed. Organic solvents and water-based optical clearing agents have been used for optical clearing of entire mouse brain. Although these methods guarantee high transparency and preservation of the fluorescence, though present other non-negligible limitations. Tissue transformation by CLARITY allows high transparency, whole brain immunolabelling and structural and molecular preservation. This method however requires a highly expensive refractive index matching solution limiting practical applicability. In this work we investigate the effectiveness of a water-soluble clearing agent, the 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) to clear mouse and human brain. TDE does not quench the fluorescence signal, is compatible with immunostaining and does not introduce any deformation at sub-cellular level. The not viscous nature of the TDE make it a suitable agent to perform brain slicing during serial two-photon (STP) tomography. In fact, by improving penetration depth it reduces tissue slicing, decreasing the acquisition time and cutting artefacts. TDE can also be used as a refractive index medium for CLARITY. The potential of this method has been explored by imaging a whole transgenic mouse brain with the light sheet microscope. Moreover we apply this technique also on blocks of dysplastic human brain tissue transformed with CLARITY and labeled with different antibody. This clearing approach significantly expands the application of single and two-photon imaging, providing a new useful method for quantitative morphological analysis of structure in mouse and human brain.

  14. Intranasal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Significantly Extends Survival of Irradiated Mice with Experimental Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell–based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. 111In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of 111In-oxine–labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell–based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  15. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  16. Nanomedicine Approaches to Modulate Neural Stem Cells in Brain Repair.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tiago; Boto, Carlos; Saraiva, Cláudia M; Bernardino, Liliana; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-06-01

    We explore the concept of modulating neural stem cells and their niches for brain repair using nanotechnology-based approaches. These approaches include stimulating cell proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation to functionally recover damaged areas. Nanoscale-engineered materials potentially overcome limited crossing of the blood-brain barrier, deficient drug delivery, and cell targeting.

  17. Using the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) to evaluate the embryotoxicity of haloacetic acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combining the data from cytotoxicity assays in undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and differentiated mouse cells with the data from a differentiation assay in mES ...

  18. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  19. Generation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells without viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Okita, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Masato; Hyenjong, Hong; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2008-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by introducing Oct3/4 and Sox2 with either Klf4 and c-Myc or Nanog and Lin28 using retroviruses or lentiviruses. Patient-specific iPS cells could be useful in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, viral integration into the host genome increases the risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we report the generation of mouse iPS cells without viral vectors. Repeated transfection of two expression plasmids, one containing the complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of Oct3/4, Sox2, and Klf4 and the other containing the c-Myc cDNA, into mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in iPS cells without evidence of plasmid integration, which produced teratomas when transplanted into mice and contributed to adult chimeras. The production of virus-free iPS cells, albeit from embryonic fibroblasts, addresses a critical safety concern for potential use of iPS cells in regenerative medicine.

  20. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  1. Brain Stem Hypoplasia Associated with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  2. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  3. Learning Biomarkers of Pluripotent Stem Cells in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Scheubert, Lena; Schmidt, Rainer; Repsilber, Dirk; Luštrek, Mitja; Fuellen, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are able to self-renew, and to differentiate into all adult cell types. Many studies report data describing these cells, and characterize them in molecular terms. Machine learning yields classifiers that can accurately identify pluripotent stem cells, but there is a lack of studies yielding minimal sets of best biomarkers (genes/features). We assembled gene expression data of pluripotent stem cells and non-pluripotent cells from the mouse. After normalization and filtering, we applied machine learning, classifying samples into pluripotent and non-pluripotent with high cross-validated accuracy. Furthermore, to identify minimal sets of best biomarkers, we used three methods: information gain, random forests and a wrapper of genetic algorithm and support vector machine (GA/SVM). We demonstrate that the GA/SVM biomarkers work best in combination with each other; pathway and enrichment analyses show that they cover the widest variety of processes implicated in pluripotency. The GA/SVM wrapper yields best biomarkers, no matter which classification method is used. The consensus best biomarker based on the three methods is Tet1, implicated in pluripotency just recently. The best biomarker based on the GA/SVM wrapper approach alone is Fam134b, possibly a missing link between pluripotency and some standard surface markers of unknown function processed by the Golgi apparatus. PMID:21791477

  4. Periodic properties of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rozov, Stanislav V; Zant, Janneke C; Karlstedt, Kaj; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2014-01-01

    Brain histamine is involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and alertness. Despite the widespread use of the mouse as an experimental model, the periodic properties of major markers of the mouse histaminergic system have not been comprehensively characterized. We analysed the daily levels of histamine and its first metabolite, 1-methylhistamine, in different brain structures of C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains, and the mRNA level and activity of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in C57BL/6J mice. In the C57BL/6J strain, histamine release, assessed by in vivo microdialysis, underwent prominent periodic changes. The main period was 24 h peaking during the activity period. Additional 8 h periods were also observed. The release was highly positively correlated with active wakefulness, as shown by electroencephalography. In both mouse strains, tissue histamine levels remained steady for 24 h in all structures except for the hypothalamus of CBA/J mice, where 24-h periodicity was observed. Brain tissue 1-methylhistamine levels in both strains reached their maxima in the periods of activity. The mRNA level of histidine decarboxylase in the tuberomamillary nucleus and the activities of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in the striatum and cortex did not show a 24-h rhythm, whereas in the hypothalamus the activities of both enzymes had a 12-h periodicity. These results show that the activities of histamine-metabolizing enzymes are not under simple direct circadian regulation. The complex and non-uniform temporal patterns of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain suggest that histamine is strongly involved in the maintenance of active wakefulness.

  5. Defining a Genotoxic Profile with Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Moon; Rebel, Vivienne I.; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Many genotoxins are found in the environment from synthetic to natural, yet very few have been studied in depth. This means we fail to understand many molecules that damage DNA, we do not understand the type of damage they cause and the repair pathways required to correct their lesions. It is surprising so little is known about the vast majority of genotoxins since they have potential to cause disease from developmental defects to cancer to degenerative ailments. By contrast some of these molecules have commercial and medical potential and some can be weaponized. Therefore, we need a systematic method to efficiently generate a genotoxic profile for these agents. A genotoxic profile would include the type of damage the genotoxin causes, the pathways used to repair the damage and the resultant mutations if repair fails. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are well suited for identifying pathways and mutations. Mouse ES cells are genetically tractable and many DNA repair mutant cells are available. ES cells have a high mitotic index and form colonies so experiments can be completed quickly and easily. Furthermore, ES cells have robust DNA repair pathways to minimize genetic mutations at a particularly vulnerable time in life, early development when a mutation in a single cell could ultimately contribute to a large fraction of the individual. After an initial screen, other types of cells and mouse models can be used to complement the analysis. This review discusses the merging field of genotoxic screens in mouse ES cells that can be used to discover and study potential genotoxic activity for chemicals commonly found in our environment. PMID:23598974

  6. Microinjection of membrane-impermeable molecules into single neural stem cells in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B; Taverna, Elena

    2014-05-01

    This microinjection protocol allows the manipulation and tracking of neural stem and progenitor cells in tissue at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate how to apply microinjection to organotypic brain slices obtained from mice and ferrets; however, our technique is not limited to mouse and ferret embryos, but provides a means of introducing a wide variety of membrane-impermeable molecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, hydrophilic compounds) into neural stem and progenitor cells of any developing mammalian brain. Microinjection experiments are conducted by using a phase-contrast microscope equipped with epifluorescence, a transjector and a micromanipulator. The procedure normally takes ∼2 h for an experienced researcher, and the entire protocol, including tissue processing, can be performed within 1 week. Thus, microinjection is a unique and versatile method for changing and tracking the fate of a cell in organotypic slice culture.

  7. Brown adipogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate microstrands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unser, Andrea Mannarino

    The ability of brown adipocytes (fat cells) to dissipate energy as heat shows great promise for the treatment of obesity and other metabolic disorders. Employing pluripotent stem cells, with an emphasis on directed differentiation, may overcome many issues currently associated with primary fat cell cultures. However, brown adipocytes are difficult to transplant in vivo due to the instability of fat, in terms of necrosis and neovascularization, once injected. Thus, 3D cell culture systems that have the potential to mimic adipogenic microenvironments are needed, not only to advance brown fat implantation, but also to better understand the role of brown adipocytes in treating obesity. To address this need, we created 3D "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" by microfluidic synthesis of alginate hydrogel microstrands that encapsulated cells and directly induced cell differentiation into brown adipocytes, using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model of pluripotent stem cells and brown preadipocytes as a positive control. The effect of hydrogel formation parameters on brown adipogenesis was studied, leading to the establishment of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands". Brown adipocyte differentiation within microstrands was confirmed by lipid droplet accumulation, immunocytochemistry and qPCR analysis of gene expression of brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in addition to adipocyte marker expression. Compared to a 2D approach, 3D differentiated "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" exhibited higher level of brown adipocyte marker expression. The functional analysis of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" was attempted by measuring the mitochondrial activity of ESC-differentiated brown adipocytes in 3D using Seahorse XF24 3 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. The ability to create "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" from pluripotent stem cells opens up a new arena to understanding brown adipogenesis and its implications in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  8. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  9. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  10. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  11. GATA-1 directly regulates Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-Zhong; Ai, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Lin-Lin; Guo, Ze-Kun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-25

    Nanog safeguards pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Insight into the regulation of Nanog is important for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pluripotency of mESCs. In a silico analysis, we identify four GATA-1 putative binding sites in Nanog proximal promoter. The Nanog promoter activity can be significantly repressed by ectopic expression of GATA-1 evidenced by a promoter reporter assay. Mutation studies reveal that one of the four putative binding sites counts for GATA-1 repressing Nanog promoter activity. Direct binding of GATA-1 on Nanog proximal promoter is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data provide new insights into the expanded regulatory circuitry that coordinates Nanog expression. - Highlights: • The Nanog proximal promoter conceives functional element for GATA-1. • GATA-1 occupies the Nanog proximal promoter in vitro and in vivo. • GATA-1 transcriptionally suppresses Nanog.

  12. Osteosarcoma: mouse models, cell of origin and cancer stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, Maria V.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common non-hematologic primary tumor of bone in children and adults. High-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgical resection have improved prognosis, with long-term survival for non-metastatic disease approaching 70%. However, most OS tumors are high grade and tend to rapidly develop pulmonary metastases. Despite clinical advances, patients with metastatic disease or relapse have a poor prognosis. Here the cell biology of OS is reviewed with a special emphasis on mouse models as well as the roles of the cell of origin and cancer stem cells. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of human OS is essential for the development of improved prognostic and diagnostic markers as well as targeted therapies for both primary and metastatic OS.

  13. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  14. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  15. Distribution of alarin immunoreactivity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Nicole; Mayer, Christian; Santic, Radmila; Navio, Ruben Peco; Wagner, Andrea; Bauer, Hans Christian; Sperk, Guenther; Boehm, Ulrich; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Alarin is a 25 amino acid peptide that belongs to the galanin peptide family. It is derived from the galanin-like peptide gene by a splice variant, which excludes exon 3. Alarin was first identified in gangliocytes of neuroblastic tumors and later shown to have a vasoactive function in the skin. Recently, alarin was demonstrated to stimulate food intake as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rodents, suggesting that it might be a neuromodulatory peptide in the brain. However, the individual neurons in the central nervous system that express alarin have not been identified. Here, we determined the distribution of alarin-like immunoreactivity (alarin-LI) in the adult murine brain. The specificity of the antibody against alarin was demonstrated by the absence of labeling after pre-absorption of the antiserum with synthetic alarin peptide and in transgenic mouse brains lacking neurons expressing the GALP gene. Alarin-LI was observed in different areas of the murine brain. A high intensity of alarin-LI was detected in the accessory olfactory bulb, the medial preoptic area, the amygdala, different nuclei of the hypothalamus such as the arcuate nucleus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, the trigeminal complex, the locus coeruleus, the ventral chochlear nucleus, the facial nucleus, and the epithelial layer of the plexus choroideus. The distinct expression pattern of alarin in the adult mouse brain suggests potential functions in reproduction and metabolism.

  16. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  17. Effects of hyperthermia and radiation on mouse testis stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.O.; Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.; West, J.

    1981-11-01

    The response of mouse testis stem cells to hyperthermia and combined hyperthermia-radiation treatments was assayed by spermatogenic colony regrowth, sperm head counts, testis weight loss, and fertility. With the use of spermatogenic colony assay, thermal enhancement ratios at an isosurvival level of 0.1 were 1.27 at 41 degrees, 1.80 at 42 degrees, and 3.97 at 43 degrees for testes exposed to heat for 30 min prior to irradiation. Sperm head counts were reduced by heat alone from a surviving fraction of 0.58 at 41 degrees to 0.003 at 42.5-43.5 degrees. Curves for sperm head survival measured 56 days after the testes had been heated for 30 min prior to irradiation were biphasic and showed a progressive downward displacement to lower survival with increasing temperature. The 41, 42, and 43 degrees curves were displaced downward by factors of 2, 58, and 175, respectively. The proportion of animals remaining sterile after 30 min of heat (41-43 degrees) and the median sterility period in days increased with increasing temperature. The minimum sperm count necessary to regain fertility was 13% of the normal mouse level.

  18. In vivo Importance of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair for Mouse Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Laure; Etienne, Olivier; Roque, Telma; Desmaze, Chantal; Haton, Céline; Mouthon, Marc-André; Bernardino-Sgherri, Jacqueline; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Boussin, François D.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical development without exogenous stress, but it dramatically enhanced the radiation sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cells. This resulted in the death of all cells irradiated during S or G2, whereas the viability of cells irradiated in G1 or G0 was not affected by Rad54 disruption. Apoptosis occurred after long arrests at intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. This concerned every type of neural stem and progenitor cells, showing that the importance of Rad54 for radiation response was linked to the cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation and not to the differentiation state. In the developing brain, RAD54-dependent homologous recombination appeared absolutely required for the repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation during S and G2 phases, but not for the repair of endogenous damages in normal conditions. Altogether our data support the existence of RAD54-dependent and -independent homologous recombination pathways. PMID:22666344

  19. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  20. Recycling selectable markers in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, A; Bradley, A

    1996-01-01

    As a result of gene targeting, selectable markers are usually permanently introduced into the mammalian genome. Multiple gene targeting events in the same cell line can therefore exhaust the pool of markers available and limit subsequent manipulations or genetic analysis. In this study, we describe the combined use of homologous and CRE-loxP-mediated recombination to generate mouse embryonic stem cell lines carrying up to four targeted mutations and devoid of exogenous selectable markers. A cassette that contains both positive and negative selectable markers flanked by loxP sites, rendering it excisable by the CRE protein, was constructed. Homologous recombination and positive selection were used to disrupt the Rep-3 locus, a gene homologous to members of the mutS family of DNA mismatch repair genes. CRE-loxP-mediated recombination and negative selection were then used to recover clones in which the cassette had been excised. The remaining allele of Rep-3 was then subjected to a second round of targeting and excision with the same construct to generate homozygous, marker-free cell lines. Subsequently, both alleles of mMsh2, another mutS homolog, were disrupted in the same fashion to obtain cell lines homozygous for targeted mutations at both the Rep-3 and mMsh2 loci and devoid of selectable markers. Thus, embryonic stem cell lines obtained in this fashion are suitable for further manipulation and analysis involving the use of selectable markers. PMID:8657161

  1. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  2. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  3. Human brain stem structures respond differentially to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH) with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by functional MRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). In a second experiment, we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e., the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  4. Recent Progress in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Embryonic and Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic control mechanisms of mammalian brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool to characterize changes in brain anatomy in mutant mouse strains and injury progression in mouse models of fetal and neonatal brain injury. Progress in the last decade has enabled us to acquire MRI data with increasing anatomical details from the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain. High-resolution ex vivo MRI, especially with advanced diffusion MRI methods, can visualize complex microstructural organizations in the developing mouse brain. In vivo MRI of the embryonic mouse brain, which is critical for tracking anatomical changes longitudinally, has become available. Applications of these techniques may lead to further insights into the complex and dynamic processes of brain development. PMID:26973471

  5. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  6. A highly selective fluorescent probe for direct detection and isolation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Yogeswari; Kang, Nam-Young; Park, Sung-Jin; Alamudi, Samira Husen; Kim, Jun-Young; Sahu, Srikanta; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Vendrell, Marc; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell research has gathered immense attention in the past decade due to the remarkable ability of stem cells for self-renewal and tissue-specific differentiation. Despite having numerous advancements in stem cell isolation and manipulation techniques, there is a need for highly reliable probes for the specific detection of live stem cells. Herein we developed a new fluorescence probe (CDy9) with high selectivity for mouse embryonic stem cells. CDy9 allows the detection and isolation of intact stem cells with marginal impact on their function and capabilities. PMID:26115574

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Anandamide Metabolism in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates inflammation and contributes to neurodegeneration. Best known for its pathological up-regulation, COX-2 is also constitutively expressed within the brain and mediates synaptic transmission through prostaglandin synthesis. Along with arachidonic acid, COX-2 oxygenates the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in vitro. Inhibition of COX-2 enhances retrograde signaling in the hippocampus, suggesting COX-2 mediates endocannabinoid tone in healthy brain. The degree to which COX-2 may regulate endocannabinoid metabolism in vivo is currently unclear. Therefore, we explored the effect of COX-2 inhibition on [3H]AEA metabolism in mouse brain. Although AEA is hydrolyzed primarily by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), ex vivo autoradiography revealed that COX-2 inhibition by nimesulide redirected [3H]AEA substrate from COX-2 to FAAH in the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. These data indicate that COX-2 possesses the capacity to metabolize AEA in vivo and can compete with FAAH for AEA in several brain regions. Temporal fluctuations in COX-2 expression were observed in the brain, with an increase in COX-2 protein and mRNA in the hippocampus at midnight compared with noon. COX-2 immunolocalization was robust in the hippocampus and several cortical regions. Although most regions exhibited no temporal changes in COX-2 immunolocalization, increased numbers of immunoreactive cells were detected at midnight in layers II and III of the somatosensory and visual cortices. These temporal variations in COX-2 distribution reduced the enzyme's contribution toward [3H]AEA metabolism in the somatosensory cortex at midnight. Taken together, our findings establish COX-2 as a mediator of regional AEA metabolism in mouse brain. PMID:20702753

  8. Mouse Models of Brain Metastasis for Unravelling Tumour Progression.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R

    2016-01-01

    Secondary tumours in the brain account for 40 % of triple negative breast cancer patients, and the percentage may be higher at the time of autopsy. The use of in vivo models allow us to recapitulate the molecular mechanisms potentially used by circulating breast tumour cells to proliferate within the brain.Metastasis is a multistep process that depends on the success of several stages including cell evasion from the primary tumour, distribution and survival within the blood stream and cerebral microvasculature, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and proliferation within the brain microenvironment. Cellular adhesion molecules are key proteins involved in all of the steps in the metastatic process. Our group has developed two different in vivo models to encompass both seeding and colonisation stages of the metastatic process: (1) haematogenous dissemination of tumour cells by direct injection into the left ventricle of the heart, and (2) direct implantation of the tumour cells into the mouse brain.This chapter describes, in detail, the practical implementation of the intracerebral model, which can be used to analyse tumour proliferation within a specific area of the central nervous system and tumour-host cell interactions. We also describe the use of immunohistochemistry techniques to identify, at the molecular scale, tumour-host cell interactions, which may open new windows for brain metastasis therapy.

  9. Label-free structural photoacoustic tomography of intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Capitalizing on endogenous hemoglobin contrast, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a deep-tissue highresolution imaging modality, has drawn increasing interest in neuro-imaging. However, most existing studies are limited to functional imaging on the cortical surface, and the deep-brain structural imaging capability of PACT has never been demonstrated. Here, we explicitly studied the limiting factors of deep-brain PACT imaging. We found that the skull distorted the acoustic signal and blood suppressed the structural contrast from other chromophores. When the two effects are mitigated, PACT can provide high-resolution label-free structural imaging through the entire mouse brain. With 100 μm in-plane resolution, we can clearly identify major structures of the brain, and the image quality is comparable to that of magnetic resonance microscopy. Spectral PACT studies indicate that structural contrasts mainly originate from cytochrome and lipid. The feasibility of imaging the structure of the brain in vivo has also been discussed. Our results demonstrate that PACT is a promising modality for both structural and functional brain imaging.

  10. Pathological yawning as a presenting symptom of brain stem ischaemia in two patients

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, L; Cucurachi, L; Chierici, E; Pavesi, G

    2006-01-01

    Two cases of brain stem stroke involving the upper pons and the ponto‐mesencephalic junction presented with transient excessive pathological yawning, associated with gait ataxia and in one subject with upper limb and facial hemiparesis. A causal relation is hypothesised between the brain stem lesion and pathological yawning, possibly related to denervation hypersensitivity of a putative brain stem yawn centre. Excessive yawning may herald brain stem ischaemia. PMID:16174652

  11. Hydrogel delivery of erythropoietin to the brain for endogenous stem cell stimulation after stroke injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfei; Cooke, Michael J; Morshead, Cindi M; Shoichet, Molly S

    2012-03-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is challenging because systemic delivery requires high doses to achieve diffusion across the blood-brain barrier and often results in systemic toxicity. Intracerebroventricular implantation of a minipump/catheter system provides local delivery, yet results in brain tissue damage and can be prone to infection. An alternate local delivery strategy, epi-cortical delivery, releases the biomolecule directly to the brain while causing minimal tissue disruption. We pursued this strategy with a hyaluronan/methyl cellulose (HAMC) hydrogel for the local release of erythropoietin to induce endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells of the subventricular zone to promote repair after stroke injury in the mouse brain. Erythropoeitin promotes neurogenesis when delivered intraventricularly, thereby making it an ideal biomolecule with which to test this new epi-cortical delivery strategy. We investigated HAMC in terms of the host tissue response and the diffusion of erythropoeitin therefrom in the stroke-injured brain for neural repair. Erythropoietin delivered from HAMC at 4 and 11 days post-stroke resulted in attenuated inflammatory response, reduced stroke cavity size, increased number of both neurons in the peri-infarct region and migratory neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, and decreased apoptosis in both the subventricular zone and the injured cortex. We demonstrate that HAMC-mediated epi-cortical administration is promising for minimally invasive delivery of erythropoeitin to the brain. PMID:22217804

  12. Brain tumour stem cells: possibilities of new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sara G M; Vescovi, Angelo L

    2007-08-01

    Cancers are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, including highly proliferative immature precursors and differentiated cells, which may belong to different lineages. Recent advances in stem cell research have demonstrated the existence of tumour-initiating, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-solid and solid tumours. These cells are defined as CSCs because they show functional properties that resemble those of their normal counterpart to a significant extent. This concept applies to CSCs from brain tumours and, particularly, to glioblastoma stem-like cells, which self-renew under clonal conditions and differentiate into neuron- and glia-like cells, and into aberrant cells, with mixed neuronal/astroglia phenotypes. Notably, across serial transplantation into immunodeficient mice, glioblastoma stem-like cells are able to form secondary tumours which are a phenocopy of the human disease. A significant effort is underway to identify both CSC-specific markers and the molecular mechanism that underpin the tumorigenic potential of these cells, for this will have a critical impact on the understanding of the origin of malignant brain tumour and the discovery of new and more specific therapeutic approaches. Lately, the authors have shown that some of the bone morphogenetic proteins can reduce the tumorigenic ability of CSCs in GBMs. This suggests that mechanisms regulating the physiology of normal brain stem cells may be still in place in their cancerous siblings and that this may lead to the development of cures that selectively target the population CSCs found in the patients' tumour mass.

  13. Differential gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem cells and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yinshan; Feng, Meiying; Liu, Shanshan; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xianwei; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Shouquan; Ma, Ningfang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) may be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells under in vitro culture conditions, due to epigenetic modifications, which are closely associated with the expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. Thus, this study was conducted to compare the gene expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors in mSSCs and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Firstly, the freshly isolated mSSCs [mSSCs (f)] were enriched by magnetic-activated cell sorting with Thy1.2 (CD90.2) microbeads, and the typical morphological characteristics were maintained under in vitro culture conditions for over 5 months to form long-term propagated mSSCs [mSSCs (l)]. These mSSCs (l) expressed pluripotency-associated genes and were induced to differentiate into sperm. Our findings indicated that the mSSCs (l) expressed high levels of the transcription factors, Lin28 and Prmt5, and the epigenetic factors, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1, in comparison with the mESCs, with the levels of Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1 and Tert significantly higher than those in the mESCs. There was no significant difference in Kdm2b expression between mSSCs (l) and mESCs. Furthermore, the gene expression of N-Myc, Dppa2, Tbx3, Nr5a2, Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1 in the mSSCs (l) was markedly higher in comparison to that in the mSSCs (f). Collectively, our results suggest that the mSSCs and the mESCs displayed differential gene expression profiles, and the mSSCs possessed the potential to acquire pluripotency based on the high expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. These data may provide novel insights into the reprogramming mechanism of mSSCs. PMID:27353491

  14. Alternative splicing regulates mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salomonis, Nathan; Schlieve, Christopher R; Pereira, Laura; Wahlquist, Christine; Colas, Alexandre; Zambon, Alexander C; Vranizan, Karen; Spindler, Matthew J; Pico, Alexander R; Cline, Melissa S; Clark, Tyson A; Williams, Alan; Blume, John E; Samal, Eva; Mercola, Mark; Merrill, Bradley J; Conklin, Bruce R

    2010-06-01

    Two major goals of regenerative medicine are to reproducibly transform adult somatic cells into a pluripotent state and to control their differentiation into specific cell fates. Progress toward these goals would be greatly helped by obtaining a complete picture of the RNA isoforms produced by these cells due to alternative splicing (AS) and alternative promoter selection (APS). To investigate the roles of AS and APS, reciprocal exon-exon junctions were interrogated on a genome-wide scale in differentiating mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with a prototype Affymetrix microarray. Using a recently released open-source software package named AltAnalyze, we identified 144 genes for 170 putative isoform variants, the majority (67%) of which were predicted to alter protein sequence and domain composition. Verified alternative exons were largely associated with pathways of Wnt signaling and cell-cycle control, and most were conserved between mouse and human. To examine the functional impact of AS, we characterized isoforms for two genes. As predicted by AltAnalyze, we found that alternative isoforms of the gene Serca2 were targeted by distinct microRNAs (miRNA-200b, miRNA-214), suggesting a critical role for AS in cardiac development. Analysis of the Wnt transcription factor Tcf3, using selective knockdown of an ES cell-enriched and characterized isoform, revealed several distinct targets for transcriptional repression (Stmn2, Ccnd2, Atf3, Klf4, Nodal, and Jun) as well as distinct differentiation outcomes in ES cells. The findings herein illustrate a critical role for AS in the specification of ES cells with differentiation, and highlight the utility of global functional analyses of AS. PMID:20498046

  15. Generation of eggs from mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Saitou, Mitinori

    2013-08-01

    Oogenesis is an integrated process through which an egg acquires the potential for totipotency, a fundamental condition for creating new individuals. Reconstitution of oogenesis in a culture that generates eggs with proper function from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is therefore one of the key goals in basic biology as well as in reproductive medicine. Here we describe a stepwise protocol for the generation of eggs from mouse PSCs, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). ESCs and iPSCs are first induced into primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) that are in turn aggregated with somatic cells of female embryonic gonads, the precursors for adult ovaries. Induction of PGCLCs followed by aggregation with the somatic cells takes up to 8 d. The aggregations are then transplanted under the ovarian bursa, in which PGCLCs grow into germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes in ∼1 month. The PGCLC-derived GV oocytes can be matured into eggs in 1 d by in vitro maturation (IVM), and they can be fertilized with spermatozoa by in vitro fertilization (IVF) to obtain healthy and fertile offspring. This method provides an initial step toward reconstitution of the entire process of oogenesis in vitro.

  16. Comparative mouse brain tractography of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Moldrich, Randal X.; Pannek, Kerstin; Hoch, Renee; Rubenstein, John L.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Richards, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography can be employed to simultaneously analyse three-dimensional white matter tracts in the brain. Numerous methods have been proposed to model diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance data for tractography, and we have explored the functionality of some of these for studying white and grey matter pathways in ex vivo mouse brain. Using various deterministic and probabilistic algorithms across a range of regions of interest we found that probabilistic tractography provides a more robust means of visualizing both white and grey matter pathways than deterministic tractography. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of probabilistic tractography profiles to streamline number, step size, curvature, fiber orientation distribution, and whole-brain versus region of interest seeding. Using anatomically well-defined cortico-thalamic pathways, we show how density maps can permit the topographical assessment of probabilistic tractography. Finally, we show how different tractography approaches can impact on dMRI assessment of tract changes in a mouse deficient for the frontal cortex morphogen, fibroblast growth factor 17. In conclusion, probabilistic tractography can elucidate the phenotypes of mice with neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders in a quantitative manner. PMID:20303410

  17. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-02-12

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation.

  18. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  19. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  20. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances J; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 T. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately 2 h. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI-based mouse brain atlas.

  1. Gelatin induces trophectoderm differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sha; Hua, Jinlian; Cao, Xuanhong; Wang, Huayan

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we selected gelatin as ECM (extracellular matrix) to support differentiation of mES (mouse embryonic stem) cells into TE (trophectoderm), as gelatin was less expensive and widely used. We found that 0.2% and 1.5% gelatin were the suitable concentrations to induce TE differentiation by means of detecting Cdx2 expression using real-time PCR. Moreover, about 15% cells were positive for Cdx2 staining after 6 days differentiation. We discovered that the expressions of specific markers for TE, such as Cdx2, Eomes, Hand1 and Esx1 were prominently increased after gelatin induction. Meanwhile, the expression of Oct4 was significantly decreased. We also found that inhibition of the BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) signalling by Noggin could promote mES cells differentiation into TE, whereas inhibition of the Wnt signalling by Dkk1 had the contrary effect. This could be used as a tool to study the differentiation and function of early trophoblasts as well as further elucidating the molecular mechanism during abnormal placental development.

  2. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neurogenesis and Microglia Activation in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pikhovych, Anton; Stolberg, Nina Paloma; Jessica Flitsch, Lea; Walter, Helene Luise; Graf, Rudolf; Fink, Gereon Rudolf; Schroeter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been suggested as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke, but the mechanisms of its action to date remain poorly understood. Moreover, studies aimed at unraveling those mechanisms have essentially been limited to the rat, where tDCS activates resident microglia as well as endogenous neural stem cells. Here we studied the effects of tDCS on microglia activation and neurogenesis in the mouse brain. Male wild-type mice were subjected to multisession tDCS of either anodal or cathodal polarity; sham-stimulated mice served as control. Activated microglia in the cerebral cortex and neuroblasts generated in the subventricular zone as the major neural stem cell niche were assessed immunohistochemically. Multisession tDCS at a sublesional charge density led to a polarity-dependent downregulation of the constitutive expression of Iba1 by microglia in the mouse cortex. In contrast, both anodal and, to an even greater extent, cathodal tDCS induced neurogenesis from the subventricular zone. Data suggest that tDCS elicits its action through multifacetted mechanisms, including immunomodulation and neurogenesis, and thus support the idea of using tDCS to induce regeneration and to promote recovery of function. Furthermore, data suggest that the effects of tDCS may be animal- and polarity-specific. PMID:27403166

  3. Neural stem cells in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the adult brain was a quiescent organ unable to produce new neurons. At the beginning of the1960's, this dogma was challenged by a small group of neuroscientists. To date, it is well-known that new neurons are generated in the adult brain throughout life. Adult neurogenesis is primary confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. In both the human and the rodent brain, the primary progenitor of adult SVZ is a subpopulation of astrocytes that have stem-cell-like features. The human SVZ possesses a peculiar cell composition and displays important organizational differences when compared to the SVZ of other mammals. Some evidence suggests that the human SVZ may be not only an endogenous source of neural precursor cells for brain repair, but also a source of brain tumors. In this review, we described the cytoarchitecture and cellular composition of the SVZ in the adult human brain. We also discussed some clinical implications of SVZ, such as: stem-cell-based therapies against neurodegenerative diseases and its potential as a source of malignant cells. Understanding the biology of human SVZ and its neural progenitors is one of the crucial steps to develop novel therapies against neurological diseases in humans. PMID:23181200

  4. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  5. Development of an invitro technique to use mouse embryonic stem cell in evaluating effects of xenobiotics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal has been to develop a high-throughput, in vitro technique for evaluating the effects of xenobiotics using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We began with the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST), which is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combin...

  6. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  7. Isolation of Mouse Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells and Their Functional Analysis in a Reconstitution Assay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Escandon, Julia; Cotsarelis, George

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic structure readily accessible within the skin, and contains various pools of stem cells that have a broad regenerative potential during normal homeostasis and in response to injury. Recent discoveries demonstrating the multipotent capabilities of hair follicle stem cells and the easy access to skin tissue make the HF an attractive source for isolating stem cells and their subsequent application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we describe the isolation and purification of hair follicle bulge stem cells from mouse skin, and hair reconstitution assays that allows the functional analysis of multipotent stem cells. PMID:27431247

  8. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  9. Marrow Stromal Cells Migrate Throughout Forebrain and Cerebellum, and They Differentiate into Astrocytes after Injection into Neonatal Mouse Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopen, Gene C.; Prockop, Darwin J.; Phinney, Donald G.

    1999-09-01

    Stem cells are a valuable resource for treating disease, but limited access to stem cells from tissues such as brain restricts their utility. Here, we injected marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice and asked whether these multipotential mesenchymal progenitors from bone marrow can adopt neural cell fates when exposed to the brain microenvironment. By 12 days postinjection, MSCs migrated throughout the forebrain and cerebellum without disruption to the host brain architecture. Some MSCs within the striatum and the molecular layer of the hippocampus expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and, therefore, differentiated into mature astrocytes. MSCs also populated neuron rich regions including the Islands of Calleja, the olfactory bulb, and the internal granular layer of the cerebellum. A large number of MSCs also were found within the external granular layer of the cerebellum. In addition, neurofilament positive donor cells were found within the reticular formation of the brain stem, suggesting that MSCs also may have differentiated into neurons. Therefore, MSCs are capable of producing differentiated progeny of a different dermal origin after implantation into neonatal mouse brains. These results suggest that MSCs are potentially useful as vectors for treating a variety of central nervous system disorders.

  10. Prolonged Toxicokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Paraquat in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Winnik, Bozena; Thiruchelvam, Mona J.; Buckley, Brian; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg; Richfield, Eric K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ) has been implicated as a risk factor for the Parkinson disease phenotype (PDP) in humans and mice using epidemiologic or experimental approaches. The toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in the brain are not well understood. Objectives The TK and TD of PQ in brain were measured after single or repeated doses. Methods Brain regions were analyzed for PQ levels, amount of lipid peroxidation, and functional activity of the 20S proteasome. Results Paraquat (10 mg/kg, ip) was found to be persistent in mouse ventral midbrain (VM) with an apparent half-life of approximately 28 days and was cumulative with a linear pattern between one and five doses. PQ was also absorbed orally with a concentration in brain rising linearly after single doses between 10 and 50 mg/kg. The level of tissue lipid peroxides (LPO) was differentially elevated in three regions, being highest in VM, lower in striatum (STR), and least in frontal cortex (FCtx), with the earliest significant elevation detected at 1 day. An elevated level of LPO was still present in VM after 28 days. Despite the cumulative tissue levels of PQ after one, three, and five doses, the level of LPO was not further increased. The activity of the 20S proteasome in the striatum was altered after a single dose and reduced after five doses. Conclusions These data have implications for PQ as a risk factor in humans and in rodent models of the PDP. PMID:17938734

  11. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  12. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Matthew A; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J; Reilly, John F; Young, Warren G; Bloom, Floyd E; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-07-19

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional "imprint" consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org).

  13. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  14. Paternally biased X inactivation in mouse neonatal brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background X inactivation in female eutherian mammals has long been considered to occur at random in embryonic and postnatal tissues. Methods for scoring allele-specific differential expression with a high degree of accuracy have recently motivated a quantitative reassessment of the randomness of X inactivation. Results After RNA-seq data revealed what appeared to be a chromosome-wide bias toward under-expression of paternal alleles in mouse tissue, we applied pyrosequencing to mouse brain cDNA samples from reciprocal cross F1 progeny of divergent strains and found a small but consistent and highly statistically significant excess tendency to under-express the paternal X chromosome. Conclusions The bias toward paternal X inactivation is reminiscent of marsupials (and extraembryonic tissues in eutherians), suggesting that there may be retained an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mark driving the bias. Allelic bias in expression is also influenced by the sampling effect of X inactivation and by cis-acting regulatory variation (eQTL), and for each gene we quantify the contributions of these effects in two different mouse strain combinations while controlling for variability in Xce alleles. In addition, we propose an efficient method to identify and confirm genes that escape X inactivation in normal mice by directly comparing the allele-specific expression ratio profile of multiple X-linked genes in multiple individuals. PMID:20663224

  15. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  16. Chick embryos can form teratomas from microinjected mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Seiki; Matsubara, Yuko; Hosoe, Misa

    2016-02-01

    We examined whether chick embryos are a suitable experimental model for the evaluation of pluripotency of stem cells. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) expressing the reporter gene, LacZ or GFP were injected into the subgerminal cavity of blastoderms (freshly oviposited) or the marginal vein of chick embryos (2 days of incubation). Injected mESCs were efficiently incorporated into the body and extra-embryonic tissues of chick embryos and formed small clusters. Increased donor cell numbers injected were positively associated with the efficiency of chimera production, but with lower viability. A single mESC injected into the blastoderm proliferated into 34.7 ± 3.8 cells in 3 days, implying that the chick embryo provides an optimal environment for the growth of xenogenic cells. In the embryo body, mESCs were interspersed as small clustered chimeras in various tissues. Teratomas were observed in the yolk sac and the brain with three germ layers. In the yolk sac, clusters of mESCs gradually increased in volume and exhibited varied morphology such as a water balloon-like or dark-red solid mass. However, mESCs in the brain developed into a large soft tissue mass of whitish color and showed a tendency to differentiate into ectodermal lineage cells, including primitive neural ectodermal and neuronal cells expressing the neurofilament protein. These results indicate that chick embryos are useful for the teratoma formation assays of mESCs and have a broad-range potential as an experimental host model. PMID:26691605

  17. Progesterone promotes propagation and viability of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shan-Wei; Song, Hou-Yan

    2009-10-25

    It has been known that estrogen-17beta stimulates proliferation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. To explore the function of another steroid hormone progesterone, we used MTT method and BrdU incorporation assay to obtain growth curves, clone forming assay to detect the propagation and viability of individual mES cells, Western blot to test the expression of ES cell marker gene Oct-4, fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) to test cell cycle, and real-time PCR to detect the expressions of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and proto-oncogenes. The results showed that progesterone promoted proliferation of mES cells. The number of clones was more in progesterone-treated group than that in the control group. The expression of pluripotency-associated transcriptional factor Oct-4 changed little after progesterone treatment as shown by Western blot, indicating that most of mES cells were in undifferentiated state. The results of FACS proved that progesterone promoted DNA synthesis in mES cells. The proportion of mES cells in S+G(2)/M phase was higher in progesterone-treated group than that in the control group. Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as proto-oncogenes (c-myc, c-fos) were up-regulated when cells were treated with progesterone. The results obtained indicate that progesterone promotes propagation and viability of mES cells. The up-regulation of cell cycle-related factors might contribute to the function of progesterone.

  18. Specialized mouse embryonic stem cells for studying vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Drew E; Burns, Andrew B; Hatano, Rachel; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; McCloskey, Kara E

    2014-01-01

    Vascular progenitor cells are desirable in a variety of therapeutic strategies; however, the lineage commitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cell from a common progenitor is not well-understood. Here, we report the generation of the first dual reporter mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines designed to facilitate the study of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle development in vitro. These mESC lines express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the endothelial promoter, Tie-2, and Discomsoma sp. red fluorescent protein (RFP) under the promoter for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). The lines were then characterized for morphology, marker expression, and pluripotency. The mESC colonies were found to exhibit dome-shaped morphology, alkaline phosphotase activity, as well as expression of Oct 3/4 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. The mESC colonies were also found to display normal karyotypes and are able to generate cells from all three germ layers, verifying pluripotency. Tissue staining confirmed the coexpression of VE (vascular endothelial)-cadherin with the Tie-2 GFP+ expression on endothelial structures and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain with the α-SMA RFP+ smooth muscle cells. Lastly, it was verified that the developing mESC do express Tie-2 GFP+ and α-SMA RFP+ cells during differentiation and that the GFP+ cells colocalize with the vascular-like structures surrounded by α-SMA-RFP cells. These dual reporter vascular-specific mESC permit visualization and cell tracking of individual endothelial and smooth muscle cells over time and in multiple dimensions, a powerful new tool for studying vascular development in real time. PMID:25328412

  19. A crossed brain stem syndrome without crossed sensory symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Vrettos, Apostolos; Fiotaki, Kyriaki; Galati, Elpida; Plachouras, Diamantis

    2013-01-01

    Lateral medullary infarction (LMI) or Wallenberg syndrome is a type of brain stem stroke, more specifically, a type of crossed brain stem syndrome. LMI is a well-described entity with several documented typical characteristics including pain and temperature impairment in the ipsilateral to the lesion side of the face and the contralateral side of the trunk and limbs. We present a case of LMI which describes a patient who presented with atypical features of analgesia and thermanaesthesia on the contralateral side of the face and absence of sensory deficit on the ipsilateral side. We attributed this pattern of involvement to a lesion that affects the ventral trigeminothalamic tract and spares the dorsolateral part of the medulla where the spinal trigeminal tract and its nucleus lie. This case report highlights the presence of atypical presentations of LMI that may initially challenge the physician's diagnostic reasoning. PMID:23355553

  20. Neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Thumanu, Kanjana; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Parnpai, Rangsun; Heraud, Philip

    2010-04-01

    Embryonic Stem-derived Neural Cells (ESNCs) hold potential as a source of neurons for a cell-based therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and other neurological diseases and disorders in the future. The sorting of neural cell types is envisaged to be one of the most important processed for clinical application of these cells in cell-based therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, laboratory-based FTIR and Synchrotron-FTIR (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy were used to identify FTIR marker for distinguishing different neural cell types derived from the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Unsupervised Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (UHCA) were shown to be able to distinguish the developmental stage of mESCs into three cell types: embryoid bodies (EBs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), and ESNCs. Moreover, PCA provided the mean for identifying potential FTIR "marker bands" that underwent dramatic changes during stem cell differentiation along neural lineages. These appeared to be associated with changes in lipids (bands from CH 2 and CH 3 stretching vibrations at ˜2959, 2923 and 2852 cm -1) and proteins (changes in the amide I band at ˜1659 and 1637 cm -1). The results suggested that lipid content of cells increased significantly over the time of differentiation, suggesting increased expression of glycerophospholipids. Changes in the amide I profile, suggested concomitant increases in α-helix rich proteins as mESCs differentiated towards ESNCs, with a corresponding decrease in β-sheet rich proteins, corresponding with changes in cytoskeleton protein which may have been taking place involved with the establishment of neural structure and function.

  1. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different polymers and their MRI contrast effects in the mouse brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Songbo; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Xuan; Yang, Gao; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    PEG and PEG/PEI modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) (0 or 0.3 g). PEG/PEI-SPIONs were coated with Tween 80 (PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses indicated that PEG, PEG/PEI and PEG/PEI/Tween 80 were attached to the surfaces of the SPIONs. The PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs performed excellent colloidal stability in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and in deionized water with the mean hydrodynamic sizes of 19.5, 21.0, 24.0 nm and the zeta potentials of -5.0, 35.0, 19.0 mV, respectively. All the SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the Kunming (KM) mouse brains were performed, the PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs exhibited vascular imaging effects in bulbus olfactorius, frontal cortex, temporal, thalamus and brain stem of the mouse brains after 24 h intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The SPIONs have potentials as MRI contrast agents in the mouse brains.

  2. Therapeutic Effect of Ligustilide-Stimulated Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Thromboembolic Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kang; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Huang, Pi-Chun; Lin, Po-Cheng; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a result of cerebral ischemia that triggers a cascade of both physiological and biochemical events. No effective treatment is available for stroke; however, stem cells have the potential to rescue tissue from the effects of stroke. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are an abundant source of adult stem cells; therefore, ADSC therapy can be considered as a future strategy for regenerative medicine. However, more research is required to improve the effectiveness of transplanted ADSCs as a treatment for stroke in the mouse stroke model. Ligustilide, isolated from the herb Angelica sinensis, exhibits a protective effect on neurons and inhibits inflammation. We also demonstrated that ligustilide treatment increases the expression levels of homing factors such as SDF-1 and CXCR4. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of ADSC transplantation and ligustilide treatment in a mouse thromboembolic stroke model by behavioral tests, including beam walking, locomotor activity, and rotarod analysis. ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide were transplanted into the brains of stroke mice. The results showed that the therapeutic effect of ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide was better than that of ADSCs without ligustilide pretreatment. There was no difference between the recovery of mice treated by ADSC transplantation combined with subcutaneous ligustilide injection and that of mice treated only with ADSCs. The TUNEL assay showed fewer apoptotic cells in the brains of mice transplanted with ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide as well as in those without pretreatment. In summary, pretreatment of ADSCs with ligustilide improves the therapeutic efficacy of ADSC transplantation. The results of this study will help improve stem cell therapies being developed for future clinical applications. PMID:26787228

  3. Return to quiescence of mouse neural stem cells by degradation of a proactivation protein.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Noelia; van den Berg, Debbie L C; Forget, Antoine; Andersen, Jimena; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Hunt, Charles; Ayrault, Olivier; Guillemot, François

    2016-07-15

    Quiescence is essential for long-term maintenance of adult stem cells. Niche signals regulate the transit of stem cells from dormant to activated states. Here, we show that the E3-ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing 1) is required for proliferating stem cells of the adult mouse hippocampus to return to quiescence. Huwe1 destabilizes proactivation protein Ascl1 (achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1) in proliferating hippocampal stem cells, which prevents accumulation of cyclin Ds and promotes the return to a resting state. When stem cells fail to return to quiescence, the proliferative stem cell pool becomes depleted. Thus, long-term maintenance of hippocampal neurogenesis depends on the return of stem cells to a transient quiescent state through the rapid degradation of a key proactivation factor. PMID:27418510

  4. Stem Cell-Paved Biobridges Facilitate Stem Transplant and Host Brain Cell Interactions for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S.; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5 hours of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke, thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25770817

  5. Brain-stem involvement in multiple sclerosis: a comparison between brain-stem auditory evoked potentials and the acoustic stapedius reflex.

    PubMed

    Kofler, B; Oberascher, G; Pommer, B

    1984-01-01

    Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and the acoustic stapedius reflex (ASR) were recorded in 68 patients with definite, probable and possible multiple sclerosis (using the definitions of McAlpine). The high incidence of abnormal results, 68% and 60%, respectively, pointed to the diagnostic value of these two measures in detecting brain-stem dysfunction. Combination of the methods increased the diagnostic yield to 85%. Since in part the same brain-stem generator sites underlie BAEPs and the ASR, it was considered that a study of their correlation might serve to increase the reliability and validity of these techniques. There was 71% agreement overall between results from the two measures. Furthermore, 72% of the joint BAEP and ASR abnormalities corresponded in detection of the brain-stem lesion site. It was concluded that the combined approach may supply powerful, complementary information on brain-stem dysfunction, which may aid in establishing the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  6. Synergistic effect of therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-beta via apoptotic pathway in the metastatic mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-02-01

    As an approach to improve treatment of breast cancer metastasis to the brain, we employed genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs, HB1.F3 cells) consisting of neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing cytosine deaminase and the interferon-beta genes, HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β. In this model, MDA-MB-231/Luc breast cancer cells were implanted in the right hemisphere of the mouse brain, while pre-stained GESTECs with redfluorescence were implanted in the contralateral brain. Two days after stem cells injection, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) was administrated via intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis of extracted brain confirmed the therapeutic efficacy of GESTECs in the presence of 5-FC based on reductions in density and aggressive tendency of breast cancer cells, as well as pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis relative to a negative control. Additionally, expression of PCNA decreased in the stem cells treated group. Treatment of breast cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) increased the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative factor, BAX and p21 protein through phosphorylation of p53 and p38. Moreover, analysis of stem cell migratory ability revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells endogenously secreted VEGF, and stem cells expressed their receptor (VEGFR2). To confirm the role of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling in tumor tropism of stem cells, samples were treated with the VEGFR2 inhibitor, KRN633. The number of migrated stem cells decreased significantly in response to KRN633 due to Erk1/2 activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition. Taken together, these results indicate that treatment with GESTECs, particularly HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β co-expressing CD.IFN-β, may be a useful strategy for treating breast cancer metastasis to the brain in the presence of a prodrug.

  7. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-01

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  8. The metabolism of phospholipids in mouse brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P. A.; Rowe, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    1. Slices of mouse brain grey matter were incubated with [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate. Doubly labelled phospholipids were extracted from subcellular fractions prepared from the slices in a mixture of metabolic inhibitors, under conditions where there was negligible change in radioactive labelling during the preparation. Two tissue fractions were studied in detail; one contained a high proportion of mitochondria and the other was mainly microsomal. 2. In all tissue fractions the highest incorporations of both [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate occurred into phosphatidylcholine. 3. After incubation for 1hr., the 32P/14C ratios for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid in the mitochondrial fraction were similar to those in the microsomal fraction. 4. The 32P/14C ratios were similar in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and much lower than those in phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol. PMID:16742443

  9. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  10. Selective normalisation of regional brain bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in the mucopolysaccharidosis 1 (Hurler) mouse.

    PubMed

    Saville, Jennifer T; Lehmann, Rebecca J; Derrick-Roberts, Ainslie L K; Fuller, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) is a glycerophospholipid highly enriched in the lysosomal network and elevated in lysosomal diseases. To correct this elevation, BMP synthesis was manipulated by dietary fatty acid supplementation and the impact on subregional brain BMP and pathology assessed in the mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis 1 (Hurler syndrome (HS)). There was widespread elevation of BMP in HS mice across all six sub-regions - brain stem, cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and the sub-cortex - with 22:6/22:6 the most abundant species. Linoleic acid normalised total BMP in all regions except the cortex and cerebellum, although there were differences in fatty acid species; the major finding a decrease in 22:6- and a concomitant increase in 22:5-containing species. A battery of behaviour assessments showed that in the water cross maze both HS and wild type mice performed less well on the linoleic acid diet, and that both HS and wild type mice on the linoleic acid diet performed similarly and better in the exploratory open field test. This may be a consequence of differential subregional BMP composition in the brain. The effects of high fat and docosahexaenoic/eicosapentaenoic acid enriched diets were generally unremarkable. Although major pathologies were not completely abrogated, much of the neurobehavioural testing was confounded by skeletal pathology that did not resolve. This is the first detailed characterisation of subregional brain BMP species informing on the ability to manipulate this phospholipid in the brain, and as such, may hold promise as an adjunct therapy not only for HS but also for other lysosomal diseases. PMID:26710715

  11. Key Signaling Events for Committing Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Germline Fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Qi; Cao, Wen-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The process of germline development carries genetic information and preparatory totipotency across generations. The last decade has witnessed remarkable successes in the generation of germline cells from mouse pluripotent stem cells, especially induced germline cells with the capacity for producing viable offspring, suggesting clinical applications of induced germline cells in humans. However, to date, the culture systems for germline induction with accurate sex-specific meiosis and epigenetic reprogramming have not been well-established. In this study, we primarily focus on the mouse model to discuss key signaling events for germline induction. We review mechanisms of competent regulators on primordial germ cell induction and discuss current achievements and difficulties in inducing sex-specific germline development. Furthermore, we review the developmental identities of mouse embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells under certain defined culture conditions as it relates to the differentiation process of becoming germline cells.

  12. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  13. Brain Penetration and Efficacy of Different Mebendazole Polymorphs in a Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Wanjiku, Teresia; Rudek, Michelle A; Joshi, Avadhut; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mebendazole (MBZ), first used as an antiparasitic drug, shows preclinical efficacy in models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Three different MBZ polymorphs (A, B and C) exist and a detailed assessment of the brain penetration, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor properties of each individual MBZ polymorph is necessary to improve mebendazole-based brain cancer therapy. Experimental Design and Results In this study, various marketed and custom-formulated MBZ tablets were analyzed for their polymorph content by IR spectroscopy and subsequently tested in orthotopic GL261 mouse glioma model for efficacy and tolerability. The pharmacokinetics and brain concentration of MBZ polymorphs and two main metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. We found that polymorph B and C both increased survival in a GL261 glioma model, as B exhibited greater toxicity. Polymorph A showed no benefit. Both, polymorph B and C, reached concentrations in the brain that exceeded the IC50 in GL261 cells 29-fold. In addition, polymorph C demonstrated an AUC0-24h brain-to-plasma (B/P) ratio of 0.82, whereas B showed higher plasma AUC and lower B/P ratio. In contrast, polymorph A presented markedly lower levels in the plasma and brain. Furthermore, the combination with elacridar was able to significantly improve the efficacy of polymorph C in GL261 glioma and D425 medulloblastoma models in mice. Conclusion Among MBZ polymorphs, C reaches therapeutically effective concentrations in the brain tissue and tumor with less side effects and is the better choice for brain cancer therapy. Its efficacy can be further enhanced by combination with elacridar. PMID:25862759

  14. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  15. Establishment of mouse embryonic stem cells from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos using three derivation methods

    PubMed Central

    González, Sheyla; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study is to compare three previously described mouse embryonic stem cell derivation methods to evaluate the influence of culture conditions, number of isolated blastomeres and embryonic stage in the derivation process. Methods Three embryonic stem cell derivation methods: standard, pre-adhesion and defined culture medium method, were compared in the derivation from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos at 4- and 8-cell stages. Results A total of 200 embryonic stem cell lines were obtained with an efficiency ranging from 1.9% to 72%. Conclusions Using either isolated blastomeres or whole embryos, the highest rates of mouse embryonic stem cell establishment were achieved with the defined culture medium method and efficiencies increased as development progressed. Using isolated blastomeres, efficiencies increased in parallel to the proportion of the embryo volume used to start the derivation process. PMID:20862536

  16. Transcriptomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to thalidomide during spontaneous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    Thalidomide is a potent developmental toxicant that induces a range of birth defects, notably severe limb malformations. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning the teratogenic effects of thalidomide, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and published the major findings in a research article entitled "Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells" [1]. The data presented herein contains complementary information related to the aforementioned research article.

  17. Transcriptomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to thalidomide during spontaneous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is a potent developmental toxicant that induces a range of birth defects, notably severe limb malformations. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning the teratogenic effects of thalidomide, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and published the major findings in a research article entitled “Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells” [1]. The data presented herein contains complementary information related to the aforementioned research article. PMID:26217789

  18. Tandem Affinity Purification of Protein Complexes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using In Vivo Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianlong; Cantor, Alan B.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2009-01-01

    In dissecting the pluripotent state in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, we have employed in vivo biotinylation of critical transcription factors for streptavidin affinity purification of protein complexes and constructed a protein-protein interaction network. This has facilitated discovery of novel pluripotency factors and a better understanding of stem cell pluripotency. Here we describe detailed procedures for in vivo biotinylation system setup in mouse ES cells and affinity purification of multi-protein complexes using in vivo biotinylation. In addition, we present a protocol employing SDS-PAGE fractionation to reduce sample complexity prior to submission for mass spectrometry (MS) protein identification. PMID:19306258

  19. Implications of aneuploidy for stem cell biology and brain therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Devalle, Sylvie; Sartore, Rafaela C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Borges, Helena L.; Martins, Rodrigo A. P.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cellular basis of neurological disorders have advanced at a slow pace, especially due to the extreme invasiveness of brain biopsying and limitations of cell lines and animal models that have been used. Since the derivation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), a novel source of cells for regenerative medicine and disease modeling has become available, holding great potential for the neurology field. However, safety for therapy and accurateness for modeling have been a matter of intense debate, considering that genomic instability, including the gain and loss of chromosomes (aneuploidy), has been repeatedly observed in those cells. Despite the fact that recent reports have described some degree of aneuploidy as being normal during neuronal differentiation and present in healthy human brains, this phenomenon is particularly controversial since it has traditionally been associated with cancer and disabling syndromes. It is therefore necessary to appreciate, to which extent, aneuploid pluripotent stem cells are suitable for regenerative medicine and neurological modeling and also the limits that separate constitutive from disease-related aneuploidy. In this review, recent findings regarding chromosomal instability in PSCs and within the brain will be discussed. PMID:22973193

  20. Myogenic Progenitors from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Magli, Alessandro; Incitti, Tania; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Muscle homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells which, in both pathologic and non-pathologic conditions, are able to repair or generate new muscle fibers. Although muscle stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential, their application in cell therapy protocols is prevented by several restrictions, including the limited ability to grow ex vivo. Since pluripotent stem cells have the unique potential to both self-renew and expand almost indefinitely, they have become an attractive source of progenitors for regenerative medicine studies. Our lab has demonstrated that embryonic stem cell (ES)-derived myogenic progenitors retain the ability to repair existing muscle fibers and contribute to the pool of resident stem cells. Because of their relevance in both cell therapy and disease modeling, in this chapter we describe the protocol to derive myogenic progenitors from murine ES cells followed by their intramuscular delivery in a murine muscular dystrophy model. PMID:27492174

  1. Focal cerebral ischemia activates neurovascular restorative dynamics in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Min; Hu, Xiaoming; Lu, Shiduo; Gan, Yu; Li, Peiying; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers regeneration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs), which are associated with neovascularization and white matter repair in the brain. This study analyzed the dynamics of neurogenesis, neovascularization, and white matter injury/repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and elucidated their temporal association. Mice were subjected to MCAO for 60 minutes and sacrificed up to 28 days after reperfusion. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as measured by double staining of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) with DCX or tomato lectin, respectively, were substantially activated soon after ischemia and persisted for 4 weeks. Despite the moderate recovery of functional vessels in infarct margin from 7 days post-ischemia, a significant decrease in vascular density remained over time. Clusters of immature neurons localized proximal to angiogenic blood vessels beginning 14 days after ischemia, suggesting interplay between neurogenesis and revascularization. Progenitors of oligodendrocytes (NG2+) constitutively presented in the normal brain and proliferated soon after ischemia. However, axon damage and the loss of white matter integrity after ischemic stroke were almost irreversible, as revealed by sustained decreases of myelin basic protein (MBP) and neurofilament-200 expression. PMID:22202008

  2. Culturing of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Poly-3-Hydroxybutyrate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, N V; Bonartsev, A P; Zharkova, I I; Makhina, T K; Myshkina, V L; Kharitonova, E P; Voinova, V V; Bonartseva, G A; Shaitan, K V; Belyavskii, A V

    2015-08-01

    We studied the possibility of long-term culturing of mouse mesenchymal stem cells on a porous scaffold made of biocompatible polymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate. The cells remained viable for at least 2 months and passed more than 65 population doublings in culture. Culturing on the scaffold did not change surface phenotype of cells. 3D poly-3-hydroxybutyrate scaffolds are appropriate substrate for long-term culturing of mesenchymal stem cells.

  3. Pluripotent stem cells induced from mouse neural stem cells and small intestinal epithelial cells by small molecule compounds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junqing; Ge, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Zhengyuan; He, Shan; Wang, Yuping; Lin, Hua; Yang, Weifeng; Liu, Junfang; Zhao, Yang; Deng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported a chemical approach to generate pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts. However, whether chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (CiPSCs) can be derived from other cell types remains to be demonstrated. Here, using lineage tracing, we first verify the generation of CiPSCs from fibroblasts. Next, we demonstrate that neural stem cells (NSCs) from the ectoderm and small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from the endoderm can be chemically reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells. CiPSCs derived from NSCs and IECs resemble mouse embryonic stem cells in proliferation rate, global gene expression profile, epigenetic status, self-renewal and differentiation capacity, and germline transmission competency. Interestingly, the pluripotency gene Sall4 is expressed at the initial stage in the chemical reprogramming process from different cell types, and the same core small molecules are required for the reprogramming, suggesting conservation in the molecular mechanism underlying chemical reprogramming from these diverse cell types. Our analysis also shows that the use of these small molecules should be fine-tuned to meet the requirement of reprogramming from different cell types. Together, these findings demonstrate that full chemical reprogramming approach can be applied in cells of different tissue origins and suggest that chemical reprogramming is a promising strategy with the potential to be extended to more initial types. PMID:26704449

  4. Evaluation of vertigo by auditory brain stem response.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Louis W; Welsh, John J; Rosen, Laurie G

    2002-08-01

    The authors examined the hypothesis that abnormal patterns of the auditory brain stem response (ABR) could supplement the neuro-otological evaluation and assist in localizing the site of vestibulocerebellar dysfunction. This project is based upon the fact that the sources of waves I through V have been regionally identified. Absent or delayed patterns can be referenced to the normal data, and the site of a lesion generating vertigo can be established. We found absence of waves or prolonged interpeak latencies in 25% of the vertiginous subjects with normal hearing and magnetic resonance images of the brain. We conclude that in selected cases, lesions affecting the vestibular system can influence the ABR, and the electrophysiological tests of audition may suggest regionalization of the dysfunction in the hindbrain and midbrain. PMID:12184596

  5. Brain mesenchymal stem cells: physiology and pathological implications.

    PubMed

    Pombero, Ana; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as progenitor cells that give rise to a number of unique, differentiated mesenchymal cell types. This concept has progressively evolved towards an all-encompassing concept including multipotent perivascular cells of almost any tissue. In central nervous system, pericytes are involved in blood-brain barrier, and angiogenesis and vascular tone regulation. They form the neurovascular unit (NVU) together with endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. This functional structure provides an optimal microenvironment for neural proliferation in the adult brain. Neurovascular niche include both diffusible signals and direct contact with endothelial and pericytes, which are a source of diffusible neurotrophic signals that affect neural precursors. Therefore, MSCs/pericyte properties such as differentiation capability, as well as immunoregulatory and paracrine effects make them a potential resource in regenerative medicine. PMID:27273235

  6. RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huayu

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ.

  7. Long-term proliferation in culture and germline transmission of mouse male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Ogonuki, Narumi; Inoue, Kimiko; Miki, Hiromi; Ogura, Atsuo; Toyokuni, Shinya; Shinohara, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that originates in a small population of spermatogonial stem cells. Here we report the in vitro culture of spermatogonial stem cells that proliferate for long periods of time. In the presence of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and leukemia inhibitory factor, gonocytes isolated from neonatal mouse testis proliferated over a 5-month period (>10(14)-fold) and restored fertility to congenitally infertile recipient mice following transplantation into seminiferous tubules. Long-term spermatogonial stem cell culture will be useful for studying spermatogenesis mechanism and has important implications for developing new technology in transgenesis or medicine.

  8. Stem Cells Antigen-1 Enriches for a Cancer Stem Cell-Like Subpopulation in Mouse Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Won; Park, Jung Min; Park, Dong Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong need to identify markers to enrich gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, CSC enrichment markers for mouse gastric cancers have not yet been determined. In our previous study, we generated primary mouse gastric cancer cell line NCC-S1 (S1) established from a Villin-cre;Smad4(F/F) ;Trp53(F/F) ;Cdh1(F/wt) mouse and its metastatic variant cell line NCC-S1M (S1M). Interestingly, S1M cells exhibited CSC-like features, such as increased tumorigenic potential and chemoresistance. By comparing gene expression profiles between S1 and S1M cells, we identified Stem Cells Antigen-1 (Sca-1) as a cell surface marker, which was mostly upregulated in S1M. Sca-1 was upregulated in tumorspheres from S1 cells or after cisplatin treatment in S1 cells. Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis showed that approximately 7% of cancer cells exhibited positivity for Sca-1 in primary mouse gastric cancer tissues. An in vivo-limiting dilution assay showed that Sca-1(high) mouse gastric cancer cells demonstrated increased tumorigenicity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. The Sca-1 expression was downregulated by TGF-β pathway activation and Wnt pathway inhibition in mouse gastric cancer cells. Sca-1(high) cells showed relatively low TGF-β reporter activity and high TCF/LEF1 reporter activity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Sca-1 was a β-catenin/LEF1 target gene. Sca-1(high) allografts were more resistant to cisplatin/fluorouracil chemotherapy than Sca-1(negative) allografts, and overexpressed Bcl-xL. Eighty-five mouse genes overexpressed in Sca-1(high) S1 cells compared with Sca-1(negative) cells clustered 123 pretreatment gastric cancer patient samples according to survival following chemotherapy. Taken together, Sca-1 is a novel CSC enrichment marker that mediates TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse gastric cancer. Stem Cells 2016;34:1177-1187. PMID:26869189

  9. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  10. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  11. Assessment of a 42 metal salts chemical library in mouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental effects of xenobiotics on differentiation can be profiled using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) technique was used to evaluate a library of 42 metal and metaloid salts. Jl mESCs were allowed to prolif...

  12. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    PubMed

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ).

  13. Breathing in fetal lambs: the effect of brain stem section.

    PubMed

    Dawes, G S; Gardner, W N; Johnston, B M; Walker, D W

    1983-02-01

    The effects of section of the brain stem caudally (through the upper pons or mid-collicular) or rostrally (through the caudal hypothalamus or anterior commissure-suprachiasmatic nucleus) were studied in fetal lambs from 118 days gestation, after recovery in utero. In lambs sectioned caudally, breathing movements and electrocortical activity were dissociated. After some days recovery breathing tended to become continuous, with an abnormal prolongation of inspiratory time. Isocapnic hypoxia caused an increase in the rate and amplitude of breathing. After carotid denervation hypoxia still caused an increase in the amplitude of breathing. In lambs sectioned rostrally, there was also dissociation between breathing movements and electrocortical activity. Breathing remained episodic, with an incidence similar to that of intact fetal lambs. In two lambs after 10 days of recovery the breathing and electrocortical rhythms returned, from time to time, to their normal phasic relationship. Isocapnic hypoxia caused a diminution or arrest of breathing, as in intact lambs. The cardiovascular effects of transection were examined. Baroreflex sensitivity was normal in those lambs sectioned caudally and enhanced in those sectioned rostrally. It is concluded first that as a result of rostral section, independent episodic rhythms of fetal breathing and electrocortical activity can be dissociated. Secondly, moderate isocapnic hypoxia causes arrest of fetal breathing indirectly, requiring the integrity of a suprapontine mechanism. And thirdly, after caudal section of the brain stem, hypoxia causes enhancement of fetal breathing efforts, independently of the carotid chemoreceptors. Possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:6875894

  14. Brain-stem evoked potentials and noise effects in seagulls.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A

    1985-01-01

    Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) recorded from the seagull were large-amplitude, short-latency, vertex-positive deflections which originate in the eighth nerve and several brain-stem nuclei. BAEP waveforms were similar in latency and configurations to that reported for certain other lower vertebrates and some mammals. BAEP recorded at several pure tone frequencies throughout the seagull's auditory spectrum showed an area of heightened auditory sensitivity between 1 and 3 kHz. This range was also found to be the primary bandwidth of the vocalization output of young seagulls. Masking by white noise and pure tones had remarkable effects on several parameters of the BAEP. In general, the tone- and click-induced BAEP were either reduced or obliterated by both pure tone and white noise maskers of specific signal to noise ratios and high intensity levels. The masking effects observed in this study may be related to the manner in which seagulls respond to intense environmental noise. One possible conclusion is that intense environmental noise, such as aircraft engine noise, may severely alter the seagull's localization apparatus and induce sonogenic stress, both of which could cause collisions with low-flying aircraft.

  15. Location of cat brain stem neurons that drive sweating.

    PubMed

    Shafton, Anthony D; McAllen, Robin M

    2013-05-15

    The brain stem premotor pathways controlling most noncardiovascular sympathetic outflows are unknown. Here, we mapped the brain stem neurons that drive sweating, by microinjecting excitant amino acid (L-glutamate or D,L-homocysteate: 0.4-3 nmol) into 420 sites over the pons and medulla of eight chloralose-anesthetized cats (70 mg/kg iv). Sweating was recorded by the electrodermal potential at the ipsilateral forepaw pad. Responses were classified as immediate (<5 s latency) or delayed (>10 s latency). Immediate responses were obtained from 16 sites (1-3 per animal) and were accompanied by no change in blood pressure. Those sites were clustered between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM). Microinjections into 33 surrounding sites caused delayed electrodermal responses of lesser amplitude, while the remaining 371 sites evoked none. To retrogradely label bulbospinal neurons that may mediate electrodermal responses, fluorescent latex microspheres were injected into the region of the intermediolateral cell column in the fourth thoracic segment in an earlier preparatory procedure on six of the animals. A cluster of retrogradely labeled neurons was identified between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract. Neurons in this discrete region of the RVMM, thus, drive sweating in the cat's paw and may do so via direct spinal projections. PMID:23467325

  16. Generation of stomach tissue from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Taka-aki K; Ninomiya, Naoto; Sekine, Mari; Komazaki, Shinji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Successful pluripotent stem cell differentiation methods have been developed for several endoderm-derived cells, including hepatocytes, β-cells and intestinal cells. However, stomach lineage commitment from pluripotent stem cells has remained a challenge, and only antrum specification has been demonstrated. We established a method for stomach differentiation from embryonic stem cells by inducing mesenchymal Barx1, an essential gene for in vivo stomach specification from gut endoderm. Barx1-inducing culture conditions generated stomach primordium-like spheroids, which differentiated into mature stomach tissue cells in both the corpus and antrum by three-dimensional culture. This embryonic stem cell-derived stomach tissue (e-ST) shared a similar gene expression profile with adult stomach, and secreted pepsinogen as well as gastric acid. Furthermore, TGFA overexpression in e-ST caused hypertrophic mucus and gastric anacidity, which mimicked Ménétrier disease in vitro. Thus, in vitro stomach tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells mimics in vivo development and can be used for stomach disease models.

  17. Localized q-space imaging of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    King, M D; Houseman, J; Gadian, D G; Connelly, A

    1997-12-01

    Localized q-space imaging was used to obtain water displacement profiles from mouse brain. These profiles take the form of unidirectional diffusive displacement probability distributions. Two groups of mice were studied, a normal group and a group in which surgery had been performed to produce a unilateral reduction in the supply of blood to the forebrain. q-Space measurements were made both in vivo and postmortem. The displacement profiles were characterized using the summary parameter prob[d < 10], which is the proportion of water molecules that undergo a net diffusive displacement that is less than +/-10 microm, during the diffusion period (50 ms). The range of prob[d < 10] values in the normal group was 0.71 to 0.77 in vivo compared with 0.78 to 0.87 in the impaired hemisphere of the surgically treated group. An increase in prob[d < 10] occurred postmortem to yield values in the range 0.79 to 0.81 and 0.80 to 0.89 in the normal and surgically treated group, respectively. These observations are consistent with the diffusion-weighted image intensity changes that occur after a period of ischemia.

  18. New Japanese encephalitis vaccines: alternatives to production in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Thomas, Stephen J

    2011-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavivirus maintained in a zoonotic cycle and transmitted by the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus, causes epidemics of encephalitis throughout much of Asia. Resident populations, including short- or long-term visitors to enzootic regions, are at risk of infection and disease. For the past several decades, killed viral vaccines prepared in tissue culture or mouse brain have been used effectively to immunize travelers and residents of enzootic countries. Cost, efficacy and safety concerns led to the development of a live-attenuated virus vaccine (SA14-14-2) and more recently, to the licensure in the USA, Europe, Canada, and Australia of a purified inactivated, tissue culture-based Japanese encephalitis vaccine (IXIARO(®), referred to as IC51; Intercell AG, Vienna, Austria). In addition, a live-attenuated yellow fever-Japanese encephalitis chimeric vaccine (IMOJEV™, referred to as Japanese encephalitis-CV; Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France) was recently licensed in Australia and is under review in Thailand. A broad portfolio of safe and effective Japanese encephalitis vaccines has become available to meet the needs of at-risk populations; when appropriately delivered, these new vaccines should greatly diminish the burden of disease.

  19. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  20. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction.

  1. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  2. Measuring Complexity of Mouse Brain Morphological Changes Using GeoEntropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-fiqi, Heba Z.; Pham, Tuan D.; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Crane, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on research into human neurodegenerative diseases, an effective computing approach for the analysis of complex brain morphological changes would represent a significant technological innovation. The availability of mouse models of such disorders provides an experimental system to test novel approaches to brain image analysis. Here we utilize a mouse model of a neurodegenerative disorder to model changes to cerebellar morphology during the postnatal period, and have applied the GeoEntropy algorithm to measure the complexity of morphological changes.

  3. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  4. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  5. Inhibition of mouse GPM6A expression leads to decreased differentiation of neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Michibata, Hideo; Okuno, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Nae; Wakimoto, Koji; Kyono, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Kan; Kondo, Yasushi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Glycoprotein M6A (GPM6A) is known as a transmembrane protein and an abundant cell surface protein on neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the function of GPM6A is still unknown in the differentiation of neurons derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells. To investigate the function of GPM6A, we generated knockdown mouse ES cell lines (D3m-shM6A) using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector driven by the U6 small nuclear RNA promoter, which can significantly suppress the expression of mouse GPM6A mRNA. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and immunocytochemical analysis showed that expression of shRNA against GPM6A markedly reduced the expression of neuroectodermal-associated genes (OTX1, Lmx1b, En1, Pax2, Pax5, Sox1, Sox2, and Wnt1), and also the number of neural stem cells (NSC) derived from D3mshM6A cells compared to control vector-transfected mouse ES cells (D3m-Mock). Moreover, our results show a decrease in both the number of neuronal markers and the number of differentiating neuronal cells (cholinergic, catecholaminergic, and GABAergic neurons) from NSC in D3m-shM6A cells. Hence, our findings suggest that expression level of GPM6A is directly or indirectly associated with the differentiation of neurons derived from undifferentiated ES cells. PMID:18522499

  6. Significant expansion of the REST/NRSF cistrome in human versus mouse embryonic stem cells: potential implications for neural development.

    PubMed

    Rockowitz, Shira; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-07-13

    Recent studies have employed cross-species comparisons of transcription factor binding, reporting significant regulatory network 'rewiring' between species. Here, we address how a transcriptional repressor targets and regulates neural genes differentially between human and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We find that the transcription factor, Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST; also called neuron restrictive silencer factor) binds to a core group of ∼1200 syntenic genomic regions in both species, with these conserved sites highly enriched with co-factors, selective histone modifications and DNA hypomethylation. Genes with conserved REST binding are enriched with neural functions and more likely to be upregulated upon REST depletion. Interestingly, we identified twice as many REST peaks in human ESCs compared to mouse ESCs. Human REST cistrome expansion involves additional peaks in genes targeted by REST in both species and human-specific gene targets. Genes with expanded REST occupancy in humans are enriched for learning or memory functions. Analysis of neurological disorder associated genes reveals that Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and oxidative stress genes are particularly enriched with human-specific REST binding. Overall, our results demonstrate that there is substantial rewiring of human and mouse REST cistromes, and that REST may have human-specific roles in brain development and functions. PMID:25990720

  7. Significant expansion of the REST/NRSF cistrome in human versus mouse embryonic stem cells: potential implications for neural development

    PubMed Central

    Rockowitz, Shira; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have employed cross-species comparisons of transcription factor binding, reporting significant regulatory network ‘rewiring’ between species. Here, we address how a transcriptional repressor targets and regulates neural genes differentially between human and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We find that the transcription factor, Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST; also called neuron restrictive silencer factor) binds to a core group of ∼1200 syntenic genomic regions in both species, with these conserved sites highly enriched with co-factors, selective histone modifications and DNA hypomethylation. Genes with conserved REST binding are enriched with neural functions and more likely to be upregulated upon REST depletion. Interestingly, we identified twice as many REST peaks in human ESCs compared to mouse ESCs. Human REST cistrome expansion involves additional peaks in genes targeted by REST in both species and human-specific gene targets. Genes with expanded REST occupancy in humans are enriched for learning or memory functions. Analysis of neurological disorder associated genes reveals that Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and oxidative stress genes are particularly enriched with human-specific REST binding. Overall, our results demonstrate that there is substantial rewiring of human and mouse REST cistromes, and that REST may have human-specific roles in brain development and functions. PMID:25990720

  8. A mouse embryonic stem cell bank for inducible overexpression of human chromosome 21 genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dosage imbalance is responsible for several genetic diseases, among which Down syndrome is caused by the trisomy of human chromosome 21. Results To elucidate the extent to which the dosage imbalance of specific human chromosome 21 genes perturb distinct molecular pathways, we developed the first mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell bank of human chromosome 21 genes. The human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank includes, in triplicate clones, 32 human chromosome 21 genes, which can be overexpressed in an inducible manner. Each clone was transcriptionally profiled in inducing versus non-inducing conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional response yielded results that were consistent with the perturbed gene's known function. Comparison between mouse ES cells containing the whole human chromosome 21 (trisomic mouse ES cells) and mouse ES cells overexpressing single human chromosome 21 genes allowed us to evaluate the contribution of single genes to the trisomic mouse ES cell transcriptome. In addition, for the clones overexpressing the Runx1 gene, we compared the transcriptome changes with the corresponding protein changes by mass spectroscopy analysis. Conclusions We determined that only a subset of genes produces a strong transcriptional response when overexpressed in mouse ES cells and that this effect can be predicted taking into account the basal gene expression level and the protein secondary structure. We showed that the human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank is an important resource, which may be instrumental towards a better understanding of Down syndrome and other human aneuploidy disorders. PMID:20569505

  9. Characterization of Bovine NANOG5′-flanking Region during Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye-Jeong; Park, Hwan Hee; Linh, Tran Thi Thuy; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used as a powerful tool for research including gene manipulated animal models and the study of developmental gene regulation. Among the critical regulatory factors that maintain the pluripotency and self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs, NANOG plays a very important role. Nevertheless, because pluripotency maintaining factors and specific markers for livestock ESCs have not yet been probed, few studies of the NANOG gene from domestic animals including bovine have been reported. Therefore, we chose mouse ESCs in order to understand and compare NANOG expression between bovine, human, and mouse during ESCs differentiation. We cloned a 600 bp (−420/+181) bovine NANOG 5′-flanking region, and tagged it with humanized recombinant green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) as a tracing reporter. Very high GFP expression for bovine NANOG promoter was observed in the mouse ESC line. GFP expression was monitored upon ESC differentiation and was gradually reduced along with differentiation toward neurons and adipocyte cells. Activity of bovine NANOG (−420/+181) promoter was compared with already known mouse and human NANOG promoters in mouse ESC and they were likely to show a similar pattern of regulation. In conclusion, bovine NANOG 5-flanking region functions in mouse ES cells and has characteristics similar to those of mouse and human. These results suggest that bovine gene function studied in mouse ES cells should be evaluated and extrapolated for application to characterization of bovine ES cells. PMID:26580439

  10. Differential regulation of morphology and stemness of mouse embryonic stem cells by substrate stiffness and topography.

    PubMed

    Lü, Dongyuan; Luo, Chunhua; Zhang, Chen; Li, Zhan; Long, Mian

    2014-04-01

    The maintenance of stem cell pluripotency or stemness is crucial to embryonic development and differentiation. The mechanical or physical microenvironment of stem cells, which includes extracellular matrix stiffness and topography, regulates cell morphology and stemness. Although a growing body of evidence has shown the importance of these factors in stem cell differentiation, the impact of these biophysical or biomechanical regulators remains insufficiently characterized. In the present study, we applied a micro-fabricated polyacrylamide hydrogel substrate with two elasticities and three topographies to systematically test the morphology, proliferation, and stemness of mESCs. The independent or combined impact of the two factors on specific cell functions was analyzed. Cells are able to grow effectively on both polystyrene and polyacrylamide substrates in the absence of feeder cells. Substrate stiffness is predominant in preserving stemness by enhancing Oct-4 and Nanog expression on a soft polyacrylamide substrate. Topography is also a critical factor for manipulating stemness via the formation of a relatively flattened colony on a groove or pillar substrate and a spheroid colony on a hexagonal substrate. Although topography is less effective on soft substrates, it plays a role in retaining cell stemness on stiff, hexagonal or pillar-shaped substrates. mESCs also form, in a timely manner, a 3D structure on groove or hexagonal substrates. These results further the understanding of stem cell morphology and stemness in a microenvironment that mimics physiological conditions.

  11. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  12. Cell cycle measurement of mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F

    2014-01-01

    Lifelong production of blood cells is sustained by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). HSC reside in a mitotically quiescent state within specialized areas of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment known as the hematopoietic niche (HN). HSC enter into active phases of cell cycle in response to intrinsic and extrinsic biological cues thereby undergoing differentiation or self-renewal divisions. Quiescent and mitotically active HSC have different metabolic states and different functional abilities such as engraftment and BM repopulating potential following their transplantation into conditioned recipients. Recent studies reveal that various cancers also utilize the same mechanisms of quiescence as normal stem cells and preserve the root of malignancy thus contributing to relapse and metastasis. Therefore, exploring the stem cell behavior and function in conjunction with their cell cycle status has significant clinical implications in HSC transplantation and in treating cancers. In this chapter, we describe methodologies to isolate or analytically measure the frequencies of quiescent (G0) and active (G1, S, and G2-M) hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells among murine BM cells.

  13. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV. PMID:27453325

  14. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  15. Control of mouse U1 snRNA gene expression during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Lund, E; Kahan, B W; Dahlberg, J E

    1997-01-01

    Early in mouse development, two classes of U1 RNAs, mU1a and mU1b, are synthesized, but as development proceeds, transcription of the embryo-specific mU1b genes is selectively down-regulated to a barely detectable level. We show here that during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, both exogenously introduced and endogenous U1b genes are subject to normal developmental regulation. Thus, ES cells represent a convenient isogenic system for studying the control of expression of developmentally regulated snRNA genes. Using this system, we have identified a region in the proximal 5'flanking region, located outside the PSE element, that is responsible for differential transcription of the mU1a and mU1b genes in both developing cells and transiently transfected NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:9153321

  16. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  17. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U.; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke. PMID:27073384

  18. A Survey of Imprinted Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Starmer, Joshua; Schertzer, Megan D.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred mammalian genes are expressed preferentially from one parental allele as the result of a process called genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is prevalent in extra-embryonic tissue, where it plays an essential role during development. Here, we profiled imprinted gene expression via RNA-Seq in a panel of six mouse trophoblast stem lines, which are ex vivo derivatives of a progenitor population that gives rise to the placental tissue of the mouse. We found evidence of imprinted expression for 48 genes, 31 of which had been described previously as imprinted and 17 of which we suggest as candidate imprinted genes. An equal number of maternally and paternally biased genes were detected. On average, candidate imprinted genes were more lowly expressed and had weaker parent-of-origin biases than known imprinted genes. Several known and candidate imprinted genes showed variability in parent-of-origin expression bias between the six trophoblast stem cell lines. Sixteen of the 48 known and candidate imprinted genes were previously or newly annotated noncoding RNAs and six encoded for a total of 60 annotated microRNAs. Pyrosequencing across our panel of trophoblast stem cell lines returned levels of imprinted expression that were concordant with RNA-Seq measurements for all eight genes examined. Our results solidify trophoblast stem cells as a cell culture-based experimental model to study genomic imprinting, and provide a quantitative foundation upon which to delineate mechanisms by which the process is maintained in the mouse. PMID:25711832

  19. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  20. Behavior of neural stem cells in the Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed

    Waldau, B; Shetty, A K

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) and a progressive loss of neurons leading to dementia. Because hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to functions such as learning, memory and mood, there has been great interest in examining the effects of AD on hippocampal neurogenesis. This article reviews the pertinent studies and tries to unite them in one possible disease model. Early in the disease, oligomeric Abeta may transiently promote the generation of immature neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs). However, reduced concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors and higher levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 seem to induce a developmental arrest of newly generated neurons. Furthermore, fibrillary Abeta and down-regulation of oligodendrocyte-lineage transcription factor-2 (OLIG2) may cause the death of these nonfunctional neurons. Therefore, altering the brain microenvironment for fostering apt maturation of graft-derived neurons may be critical for improving the efficacy of NSC transplantation therapy for AD.

  1. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Yanal; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Taewoo; Takahashi, Hazuki; Orlando, Valerio; Carninci, Piero; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs. PMID:27112104

  2. Immunofluorescence Tomography of Mouse Ocular Surface Epithelial Stem Cells and Their Niche Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Kavianpour, Behdad; Wu, Karen L.; Xie, Yilu; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, there are no definitive immunomarkers for epithelial stem cells (corneal and conjunctival) or their poorly understood niche microenvironment. The H2B-GFP/K5tTA mouse enables visualization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), which exhibit the functional marker of stem cell quiescence. We used immunofluorescence tomography to evaluate putative stem cell markers and LRCs of the mouse ocular surface. Methods H2B-GFP/K5tTA mice were pulsed for 56 days and then chased with doxycycline to label LRCs. Limbus and eyelid tissue was 3-dimensionally (3-D) reconstructed using immunofluorescence tomography to identify and characterize LRCs using the putative stem cell markers sox9, keratin 19, lrig1, blimp1, and abcb5. Results After 28 days of chase, LRCs were localized to the entire limbus epithelium and, infrequently, the anterior limbal stroma. Label-retaining cells comprised 3% of limbal epithelial cells after 56 days of chase. Conjunctival LRCs were localized to the fornix and comprised 4% of the total fornix epithelial cells. No stem cell immunomarker was specific for ocular surface LRCs; however, blimp1 enriched for limbal basal epithelial cells and 100% of green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP+) cells at the limbus and fornix were found to be lrig1-positive. Conclusions Label-retaining cells represent a larger population of the mouse limbus than previously thought. They decrease in number with increased doxycycline chase, suggesting that LRC populations with different cell cycle lengths exist at the limbus. We conclude that current immunomarkers are unable to colocalize with the functional marker of epithelial stem cell quiescence; however, blimp1 may enrich for limbal epithelial basal cells. PMID:26559480

  3. A Method to Identify and Isolate Pluripotent Human Stem Cells and Mouse Epiblast Stem Cells Using Lipid Body-Associated Retinyl Ester Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Thangaselvam; Mukherjee, Odity; Menon, Radhika; Megha, P.B.; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the use of a characteristic blue fluorescence to identify and isolate pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and human-induced pluripotent stem cells. The blue fluorescence emission (450–500 nm) is readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and correlates with the expression of pluripotency markers (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG). It allows easy identification and isolation of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells, high-throughput fluorescence sorting and subsequent propagation. The fluorescence appears early during somatic reprogramming. We show that the blue fluorescence arises from the sequestration of retinyl esters in cytoplasmic lipid bodies. The retinoid-sequestering lipid bodies are specific to human and mouse pluripotent stem cells of the primed or epiblast-like state and absent in naive mouse embryonic stem cells. Retinol, present in widely used stem cell culture media, is sequestered as retinyl ester specifically by primed pluripotent cells and also can induce the formation of these lipid bodies. PMID:25068130

  4. A method to identify and isolate pluripotent human stem cells and mouse epiblast stem cells using lipid body-associated retinyl ester fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Thangaselvam; Mukherjee, Odity; Menon, Radhika; Megha, P B; Panicker, Mitradas M

    2014-07-01

    We describe the use of a characteristic blue fluorescence to identify and isolate pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and human-induced pluripotent stem cells. The blue fluorescence emission (450-500 nm) is readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and correlates with the expression of pluripotency markers (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG). It allows easy identification and isolation of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells, high-throughput fluorescence sorting and subsequent propagation. The fluorescence appears early during somatic reprogramming. We show that the blue fluorescence arises from the sequestration of retinyl esters in cytoplasmic lipid bodies. The retinoid-sequestering lipid bodies are specific to human and mouse pluripotent stem cells of the primed or epiblast-like state and absent in naive mouse embryonic stem cells. Retinol, present in widely used stem cell culture media, is sequestered as retinyl ester specifically by primed pluripotent cells and also can induce the formation of these lipid bodies.

  5. The Maintenance of Pluripotency Following Laser Direct-Write of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Schiele, Nathan R; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2010-01-01

    The ability to precisely pattern embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro into predefined arrays/geometries may allow for the recreation of stem cell niche for better understanding of how cellular microenvironmental factors govern stem cell maintenance and differentiation. In this study, a new gelatin-based laser direct-write (LDW) technique was utilized to deposit mouse ES cells into defined arrays of spots, while maintaining stem cell pluripotency. Results obtained from these studies showed that ES cells were successfully printed into specific patterns and remained viable. Furthermore, ES cells retained the expression of Oct4 in nuclei after LDW, indicating that the laser energy did not affect their maintenance of an undifferentiated state. The differentiation potential of mouse ES cells after LDW was confirmed by their ability to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and to spontaneously become cell lineages representing all three germ layers, revealed by the expression of marker proteins of nestin (ectoderm), Myf-5 (mesoderm) and PDX-1 (endoderm), after 7 days of cultivation. Gelatin-based LDW provides a new avenue for stem cell patterning, with precision and control of the cellular microenvironment. PMID:21168910

  6. Capturing Identity and Fate Ex Vivo: Stem Cells from the Mouse Blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Garg, V; Morgani, S; Hadjantonakis, A-K

    2016-01-01

    During mouse preimplantation development, three molecularly, morphologically, and spatially distinct lineages are formed, the embryonic epiblast, the extraembryonic primitive endoderm, and the trophectoderm. Stem cell lines representing each of these lineages have now been derived and can be indefinitely maintained and expanded in culture, providing an unlimited source of material to study the interplay of tissue-specific transcription factors and signaling pathways involved in these fundamental cell fate decisions. Here we outline our current understanding of the derivation, maintenance, and properties of these in vitro stem cell models representing the preimplantation embryonic lineages. PMID:27475857

  7. Malignant Glioma: Lessons from Genomics, Mouse Models, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M.; Parada, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment. PMID:22464322

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles regulate functional assortment of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chabra, S; Ranjan, M; Bhandari, R; Kaur, T; Aggrawal, M; Puri, V; Mahajan, N; Kaur, I P; Puri, S; Sobti, R C

    2011-01-01

    A rapid decline in self-renewability, viability and function, of isolated stem cells are major hurdles in developing cell based therapies. There has been an increasing interest towards identifying a support material for maintaining stem cell features of the isolated cells. Pioneering observations of the present paper, demonstrate functionally diverse potential of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) in deciding the fate & behavior of mouse mesenchymal stem cell. The evidences are provided to show the dual nature of the SLNs for being a scaffold for the stem cell attachment, to retain stemness, and as reagent for inducing stem cell differentiation. Scanning electron microscopic examinations together with expression analysis were used to conform to such observations. Results of the study thus suggest that Solid lipid nanoparticles can be used as a good support material when functionalized to achieve adhesive properties and as a molecular paradigm for studying the adipocytic differentiation. We envisage a new role of SLNs towards regulating stem cell character by orchestrating the structural alignment during preparation of Solid lipid nanoparticles.

  9. Activated astrocytes enhance the dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells and promote brain repair through bFGF.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Yunhui; Tu, Jie; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Bifeng; Chen, Shanping; Zhou, Jiawei; Mu, Yangling; Wang, Liping

    2014-12-17

    Astrocytes provide neuroprotective effects against degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and play a fundamental role in DA differentiation of neural stem cells. Here we show that light illumination of astrocytes expressing engineered channelrhodopsin variant (ChETA) can remarkably enhance the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and significantly promote the DA differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro. Light activation of transplanted astrocytes in the substantia nigra (SN) also upregulates bFGF levels in vivo and promotes the regenerative effects of co-transplanted stem cells. Importantly, upregulation of bFGF levels, by specific light activation of endogenous astrocytes in the SN, enhances the DA differentiation of transplanted stem cells and promotes brain repair in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our study indicates that astrocyte-derived bFGF is required for regulation of DA differentiation of the stem cells and may provide a strategy targeting astrocytes for treatment of PD.

  10. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  11. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  12. Electrophysiological recordings of patterned rat brain stem slice neurons.

    PubMed

    Lauer, L; Vogt, A; Yeung, C K; Knoll, W; Offenhäusser, A

    2002-08-01

    Dissociated neuronal cultures on substrates patterned with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have yielded much information in the past. However, although the culture of brain slices has many advantages over dissociated neuronal cultures, its feasibility on patterned substrates has not been demonstrated to date. In the present study, neuronal outgrowth from brain stem slices onto homogeneous control substrates, and onto laminin structures of grid- and line-shape was achieved. Cultures were evaluated by means of phase contrast microscopy, antibody staining, and patch-clamp measurements. Only patterns with line sizes of more than 4 microm yielded satisfactory neuronal outgrowth. The size of the nodes in the pattern influenced the nodal compliance of the spreading cells and the amount of unstructured overgrowth. Best grid patterns were 4 microm lines and 10 microm nodes, best line patterns were 4 microm lines and 20 microm nodes. On patterned substrates, average sodium and potassium currents were reduced by approximately 50% compared to controls, whereas area-normalized ion-currents were in the same order of magnitude. This indicates that as a consequence of the pattern-enforced geometrical confinement, neurons tend to have a smaller surface. In addition, neurons on patterned substrates were rapidly covered with glial overgrowth. This was shown by antibody staining. PMID:12102183

  13. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Saif I; Dondzillo, Anna; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Felsen, Gidon; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  14. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  15. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  16. Developing osteoblasts as an endpoint for the mouse embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinrong; Hansen, Deborah K; Merry, Gwenn; DeJarnette, Christian; Nolen, Greg; Sloper, Daniel; Fisher, J Edward; Harrouk, Wafa; Tassinari, Melissa S; Inselman, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    The mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test (EST) using cardiomyocyte differentiation is a promising in vitro assay for detecting potential embryotoxicity; however, the addition of another differentiation endpoint, such as osteoblasts, may improve the predictive value of the test. A number of variables such as culture conditions and starting cell number were investigated. A 14 day direct plating method of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) was used to test the predictivity of osteoblast differentiation as an endpoint in the EST. Twelve compounds were tested using the prediction model developed in the ECVAM validation study. Eight of the compounds selected from the EST validation study served as model compounds; four additional compounds known to produce skeletal defects were also tested. Our results indicate comparable chemical classification between the validated cardiomyocyte endpoint and the osteoblast endpoint. These results suggest that differentiation to osteoblasts may provide confirmatory information in predicting embryotoxicity.

  17. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with cystic brain stem necroses and thalamic calcifications in a preterm twin.

    PubMed

    Peters, B; Walka, M M; Friedmann, W; Stoltenburg-Didinger, G; Obladen, M

    2000-06-01

    A severe and rare ischemic brain lesion in a preterm twin boy is reported. The boy was born after two weeks of anhydramnios and amnionic infection at 24 weeks of gestation. Following a difficult Caesarean section and prolonged umbilical cord compression he developed prenatal acidosis with an umbilical cord pH of 6.96. At the age of 7 h, heart rate variability narrowed due to severely disturbed brain stem function and the patient developed clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Sonography demonstrated extensive symmetrical brain stem and basal ganglia lesions. After a prolonged comatose and apneic state, death occurred at the age of 25 days. Autopsy confirmed columnar bilateral cavitation of basal ganglia, diencephalon, brain stem and spinal gray matter, as well as focal calcifications in the palladium, thalamus, and brain stem. The findings highly resemble those observed after experimental or clinical cardiac arrest.

  18. Laboratory investigations on neuroparalytic accidents associated with suckling mouse brain rabies vaccine. III. -- Preservation of vaccine potency after elimination of murine brain myelin by centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Larghi, O P; Varela-Diaz, V M; Soto, E; Imas, B; Cuba-Caparo, A; Fuenzalida, E

    1976-01-01

    Myelin, which has been found in nine day-old mouse brain, was eliminated from weanling mouse brain suspensions by centrifugation at 17,000 g for 10 min, as demonstrated by electron microscopy and guinea-pig inoculation tests for encephalitogenic activity. This centrifugation procedure did not affect the potency of seven batches of suckling mouse brain vaccine, when centrifuged and non-centrifuged samples of the same batches were compared by a modified NIH potency test (t = 0.17). The present results with weanling mouse brain preparations suggest that centrifugation at 17,000 g be used in the preparation of rabies suckling mouse brain vaccine instead of the 1,900 g currently employed, which does not eliminate myelin. This new procedure would be expected to reduce the number of postvaccinal reactions which are attributable to the small amount of myelin which remains in vaccines prepared with new-born animal brains following the current procedure.

  19. caBIG® Spotlight - Solving Research Problems: Analyze Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Transcriptional Profiles —

    Cancer.gov

    Read a case study to learn more about how Dr. Bradley Merrill of the University of Illinois at Chicago and his lab were able to perform their first gene expression array experiment comparing a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line to a non-mutant control line using GenePattern, an application supported by the Molecular Analysis Tools Knowledge Center which provides bioinformatics tools for gene expression, proteomic and SNP analysis.

  20. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  1. Comparison of the metabolic activation of environmental carcinogens in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Krais, Annette M.; Mühlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Kucab, Jill E.; Chinbuah, Helena; Cornelius, Michael G.; Wei, Quan-Xiang; Hollstein, Monica; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Schmeiser, Heinz H.

    2015-01-01

    We compared mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and fibroblasts (MEFs) for their ability to metabolically activate the environmental carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) and aristolochic acid I (AAI), measuring DNA adduct formation by 32P-postlabelling and expression of xenobiotic-metabolism genes by quantitative real-time PCR. At 2 μM, BaP induced Cyp1a1 expression in MEFs to a much greater extent than in ES cells and formed 45 times more adducts. Nqo1 mRNA expression was increased by 3-NBA in both cell types but induction was higher in MEFs, as was adduct formation. For AAI, DNA binding was over 450 times higher in MEFs than in ES cells, although Nqo1 and Cyp1a1 transcriptional levels did not explain this difference. We found higher global methylation of DNA in ES cells than in MEFs, which suggests higher chromatin density and lower accessibility of the DNA to DNA damaging agents in ES cells. However, AAI treatment did not alter DNA methylation. Thus mouse ES cells and MEFs have the metabolic competence to activate a number of environmental carcinogens, but MEFs have lower global DNA methylation and higher metabolic capacity than mouse ES cells. PMID:25230394

  2. Multicolor Fluorescence Imaging of Traumatic Brain Injury in a Cryolesion Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is characterized by initial tissue damage, which then can lead to secondary processes such as cell death and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Clinical and preclinical studies of traumatic brain injury typically employ anatomical imaging techniques and there is a need for new molecular imaging methods that provide complementary biochemical information. Here, we assess the ability of a targeted, near-infrared fluorescent probe, named PSS-794, to detect cell death in a brain cryolesion mouse model that replicates certain features of traumatic brain injury. In short, the model involves brief contact of a cold rod to the head of a living, anesthetized mouse. Using noninvasive whole-body fluorescence imaging, PSS-794 permitted visualization of the cryolesion in the living animal. Ex vivo imaging and histological analysis confirmed PSS-794 localization to site of brain cell death. The nontargeted, deep-red Tracer-653 was validated as a tracer dye for monitoring blood-brain-barrier disruption, and a binary mixture of PSS-794 and Tracer-653 was employed for multicolor imaging of cell death and blood-brain-barrier permeability in a single animal. The imaging data indicates that at 3 days after brain cryoinjury the amount of cell death had decreased significantly, but the integrity of the blood-brain-barrier was still impaired; at 7 days, the blood-brain-barrier was still three times more permeable than before cryoinjury. PMID:22860222

  3. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  4. Petasites japonicus Stimulates the Proliferation of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Dong Gu; Kim, Bang-Jin; Kim, Ki-Jung; Kim, Byung-Gak; Oh, Myeong-Geun; Han, Chan Kyu; Lee, Sanghyun; Ryu, Buom-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oriental natural plants have been used as medical herbs for the treatment of various diseases for over 2,000 years. In this study, we evaluated the effect of several natural plants on the preservation of male fertility by assessing the ability of plant extracts to stimulate spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) proliferation by using a serum-free culture method. In vitro assays showed that Petasites japonicus extracts, especially the butanol fraction, have a significant effect on germ cells proliferation including SSCs. The activity of SSCs cultured in the presence of the Petasites japonicus butanol fraction was confirmed by normal colony formation and spermatogenesis following germ cell transplantation of the treated SSCs. Our findings could lead to the discovery of novel factors that activate SSCs and could be useful for the development of technologies for the prevention of male infertility. PMID:26207817

  5. Directed neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells and their gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesong; Gu, Qi; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Qingwen; Tang, Huixiang; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Xinbing; Yan, Hao; Hao, Jie; Zeng, Fanyi

    2013-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) may be useful as a therapeutic source of cells for the production of healthy tissue; however, they are associated with certain challenges including immunorejection as well as ethical issues. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising substitute since a patient's own adult cells would serve as tissue precursors. Ethical concerns prevent a full evaluation of the developmental potency of human ESCs and iPSCs, therefore, mouse iPSC models are required for protocol development and safety assessments. We used a modified culturing protocol to differentiate pluripotent cells from a mouse iPS cell line and two mouse ES cell lines into neurons. Our results indicated that all three pluripotent stem cell lines underwent nearly the same differentiation process when induced to form neurons in vitro. Genomic expression microarray profiling and single-cell RT-qPCR were used to analyze the neural lineage differentiation process, and more than one thousand differentially expressed genes involved in multiple molecular processes relevant to neural development were identified.

  6. Transplanted transgenically marked oligodendrocytes survive, migrate and myelinate in the normal mouse brain as they do in the shiverer mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, F; Duhamel-Clerin, E; Gansmüller, A; Baron-Van Evercooren, A; Villarroya, H; Gumpel, M

    1994-05-01

    The dye Hoechst 33342 was combined with an immunodetectable transgene product (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, CAT) expressed in differentiated oligodendrocytes to trace their fate after transplantation in the normal and the shiverer mouse brain. In the shiverer brain, the technique allowed us to visualize grafted cells inside myelin basic protein-positive myelin patches. Most of these cells were CAT-positive/Hoechst 33342-negative, reinforcing our hypothesis that cell division probably follows migration of grafted oligodendrocytes. Correlation of their morphology and distribution with their location in the host CNS suggested a local effect on the cell division and morphogenesis of the grafted material. When compared with transplantation of fragments of normal newborn donor tissue into the newborn shiverer brain, no difference could be seen between the behaviour of normal and transgenic oligodendrocytes. In the normal brain, transgenic oligodendrocytes survived at least 150 days and successfully myelinated the host axons. The timing of differentiation of grafted cells was similar in both types of recipient brains. Migration occurred rostrally and caudally. Although migrating cells could be observed along the meninges and the blood vessels, migration occurred preferentially along white matter tracts. The extent of migration was influenced by the site of implantation, and grafted cells could be found up to 6 mm from the grafting point. No differences in the timing of differentiation or the pattern or extent of migration could thus be demonstrated when transgenic oligodendrocytes were transplanted in the normal or the shiverer brain. This validates our previous studies using the newborn shiverer mouse as recipient.

  7. Erk signaling is indispensable for genomic stability and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haixia; Guo, Renpeng; Zhang, Qian; Guo, Hongchao; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhenfeng; Gao, Shan; Liu, Lin; Chen, Lingyi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Mek/Erk signaling by pharmacological Mek inhibitors promotes self-renewal and pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Intriguingly, Erk signaling is essential for human ESC self-renewal. Here we demonstrate that Erk signaling is critical for mouse ESC self-renewal and genomic stability. Erk-depleted ESCs cannot be maintained. Lack of Erk leads to rapid telomere shortening and genomic instability, in association with misregulated expression of pluripotency genes, reduced cell proliferation, G1 cell-cycle arrest, and increased apoptosis. Erk signaling is also required for the activation of differentiation genes but not for the repression of pluripotency genes during ESC differentiation. Furthermore, we find an Erk-independent function of Mek, which may explain the diverse effects of Mek inhibition and Erk knockout on ESC self-renewal. Together, in contrast to the prevailing view, Erk signaling is required for telomere maintenance, genomic stability, and self-renewal of mouse ESCs. PMID:26483458

  8. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  9. OAT3-mediated extrusion of the 99mTc-ECD metabolite in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Okada, Maki; Odaka, Kenichi; Yui, Joji; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-04-01

    After administration of the (99m)Tc complex with N,N'-1,2-ethylenediylbis-L-cysteine diethyl ester ((99m)Tc-ECD), a brain perfusion imaging agent, the radioactive metabolite is trapped in primate brain, but not in mouse and rat. Here, we investigate the involvement of metabolite extrusion by organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier in mice, in this species difference. The efflux rate of radioactivity in the cerebrum of Oat3(-/-) mice at later phase was 20% of that of control mice. Thus, organic anion transporters in mouse brain would be involved in the low brain retention of radioactivity after (99m)Tc-ECD administration.

  10. Comparison of the Ultrastructures of Primed and Naïve Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Dongmei; Bu, Shixia

    2016-02-01

    Culture conditions have been established to maintain the pluripotency of mouse naïve and primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) using human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as the feeder layer. In this study, the ultrastructures of mouse primed ESCs grown on hAECs were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with mouse naïve ESCs, the undifferentiated mouse primed ESC line ESD-EpiSC [ESC-derived epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs)] revealed typical characteristics, including large nuclei, reticulated nucleoli, scanty cytoplasm, and low cytoplasm-to-nuclear ratios. Cells had prominent Golgi apparatus and well-developed endoplasmic reticulum. Adjacent cells were tightly in contact with dense junction desmosomes. However, in EpiSC colonies, cell contact was no longer close like naïve ESCs, and differentiated cells existed. The differentiated cells had small nucleoli with large cytoplasm, which represented primitive mesenchyme. Phagosomes or apoptotic cells were also common in the cytoplasm of differentiated cells, which suggests a differentiation potential. When exposed to leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), ESD-EpiSCs could convert to naïve-like cells. We further analyzed the ultrastructure of converted EpiSCs (cESCs). As compared to ESD-EpiSCs, cESCs showed similar ultrastructural characteristics as naïve ESCs. These findings suggest that ultrastructure could be used to evaluate the pluripotency of ESCs. PMID:26757253

  11. Evaluation of Neuronal Protective Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Severe Whole-brain Ischemia in Mouse Model and Analysis of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Go; OKAMOTO, Ken; KUSANO, Teruo; MATSUDA, Yoko; FUSE, Akira; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  12. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong; Nahm, Sang-Soep

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains.

  13. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells.

  14. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. PMID:27503706

  15. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  16. From Naive to Primed Pluripotency: In Vitro Conversion of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells in Epiblast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Matteo; Jouneau, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derive from the inner cell mass (ICM) of a blastocyst at E3.5 while mouse epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) derive from the late epiblast of a post-implantation embryo at E5.5-E7.5. Both cells are able to differentiate into derivatives of the three germs layers but only ESCs are able to produce chimeras when they are introduced into a blastocyst. To support the naive state of pluripotency, ESC culture requires Leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) and either serum or inhibitors of Erk and Gsk3 pathways (2i) while the primed pluripotency of EpiSCs is maintained using Activin A and Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2). It is possible to obtain EpiSCs in vitro starting from ESCs but also to induce ESCs starting from EpiSCs even if this second process is very difficult and inefficient. In this protocol we describe how we perform the process of conversion from ESCs to EpiSCs.

  17. From Naive to Primed Pluripotency: In Vitro Conversion of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells in Epiblast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Matteo; Jouneau, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derive from the inner cell mass (ICM) of a blastocyst at E3.5 while mouse epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) derive from the late epiblast of a post-implantation embryo at E5.5-E7.5. Both cells are able to differentiate into derivatives of the three germs layers but only ESCs are able to produce chimeras when they are introduced into a blastocyst. To support the naive state of pluripotency, ESC culture requires Leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) and either serum or inhibitors of Erk and Gsk3 pathways (2i) while the primed pluripotency of EpiSCs is maintained using Activin A and Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2). It is possible to obtain EpiSCs in vitro starting from ESCs but also to induce ESCs starting from EpiSCs even if this second process is very difficult and inefficient. In this protocol we describe how we perform the process of conversion from ESCs to EpiSCs. PMID:25720370

  18. Enrichment of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells by the Stem Cell Dye CDy1.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Morimoto, Hiroko; Shinohara, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) comprise a small population of germ cells with self-renewal potential. Previous studies have shown that SSCs share several common features with stem cells in other self-renewing tissues, including surface markers and proliferative machinery. However, studies of SSCs are severely handicapped by the small number of SSCs and the lack of SSC-specific markers. In the present study, we examined the utility of CDy1 and Rh123, both of which are used for the collection of stem cells in several self-renewing tissues. CDy1 stained germline stem (GS) cells, cultured spermatogonia enriched for SSC activity, after in vitro incubation without exerting toxic effects. Unlike previously reported stem cell-specific dyes, CDy1 was also useful for enrichment of SSCs in both GS cell culture and mature adult testes. Spermatogonial transplantation showed that ∼1 in 66.7 cells exhibited SSC activity after CDH1-based magnetic cell selection and CDy1 staining. In contrast, although Rh123 was previously used successfully to collect SSCs from cryptorchid testes, it was not possible to recover SSCs from both GS cell cultures and wild-type testes. Thus, CDy1 staining will provide a useful strategy for the enrichment of SSCs and may be used in conjunction with other reagents for the enrichment of SSCs.

  19. The potential of neural stem cells to repair stroke-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi Ping; Lang, Bradley T; Baskaya, Mustafa K; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2009-05-01

    Acute injuries to CNS such as stroke induce neural progenitor proliferation in adult brain which might be an endogenous attempt to self-repair. This process is known to be altered by several exogenous and endogenous modulators including growth factors that could help to reinforce the post-stroke neurogenesis. Increasing the neurogenesis may be a future therapeutic option to decrease the cognitive and behavioral deficits following stroke. In addition, transplantation of various types of stem cells into the injured brain is currently thought to be an exciting option to replace the neurons lost in the post-ischemic brain. These include immortalized stem cell lines, neural progenitors prepared from embryonic and adult animals and mesenchymal stem cells. Using exogenous stem cells in addition to modulating endogenous neurogenesis, we may be able to repair the injured brain after a devastating stroke. This article reviewed the current literature of these two issues. PMID:19283395

  20. Differentiation patterns of mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mai; Kamishibahara, Yu; Kitazawa, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Shimizu, Norio

    2016-05-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the ability to differentiate in vitro into various cell lineages including neurons. The differentiation of these cells into neurons has potential applications in regenerative medicine. Previously, we reported that a chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG)-conditioned medium (CM) promoted the differentiation of mouse ES and iPS cells into neurons. Here, we used real-time PCR to investigate the differentiation patterns of ES and iPS cells into neurons when DRG-CM was added. DRG-CM promoted the expression levels of βIII-tubulin gene (a marker of postmitotic neurons) in ES and iPS cells. ES cells differentiated into neurons faster than iPS cells, and the maximum peaks of gene expression involved in motor, sensory, and dopaminergic neurons were different. Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors could be very valuable at numerous stages in the production and use of stem cells in basic research and eventual cell-based therapies. Thus, we investigated whether the addition of a ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and DRG-CM on the basis of the differentiation patterns promotes the neuronal differentiation of ES cells. When the ROCK inhibitor was added to the culture medium at the initial stages of cultivation, it stimulated the neuronal differentiation of ES cells more strongly than that stimulated by DRG-CM. Moreover, the combination of the ROCK inhibitor and DRG-CM promoted the neuronal differentiation of ES cells when the ROCK inhibitor was added to the culture medium at day 3. The ROCK inhibitor may be useful for promoting neuronal differentiation of ES cells. PMID:25354731

  1. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  2. Non-specific Immunostaining by a Rabbit Antibody against Gustducin α Subunit in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Kevin; Chen, Bei; Cohen, Akiva S.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2015-01-01

    Gustducin is a guanosine nucleotide-binding protein functionally coupled with taste receptors and thus originally identified in taste cells of the tongue. Recently, bitter taste receptors and gustducin have been detected in the airways, digestive tracts and brain. The existing studies showing taste receptors and gustducin in the brain were carried out exclusively on frozen sections. In order to avoid the technical shortcomings associated with frozen sectioning, we performed immunofluorescence staining using vibratome-cut sections from mouse brains. Using a rabbit gustducin antibody, we could not detect neurons or astrocytes as reported previously. Rather, we found dense fibers in the nucleus accumbens and periventricular areas. We assumed these staining patterns to be specific after confirmation with conventional negative control staining. For the verification of this finding, we stained gustducin knockout mouse brain and tongue sections with the same rabbit gustducin antibody. Whereas negative staining was confirmed in the tongue, intensive fibers were constantly stained in the brain. Moreover, immunostaining with a goat gustducin antibody could not demonstrate the fibers in the brain tissue. The present study implies a cross immunoreaction that occurs with the rabbit gustducin antibody in mouse brain samples, suggesting that the conventional negative controls may not be sufficient when an immunostaining pattern is to be verified. PMID:25411190

  3. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  4. High-speed label-free functional photoacoustic microscopy of mouse brain in action.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wong, Terence T W; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-05-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for three-dimensional high-resolution, high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. We implemented a single-wavelength pulse-width-based method with a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both resting and stimulated states in the mouse brain.

  5. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study the BBB, 2) Available mouse genetic tools that can aid in the study of the BBB, and 3) Potential tools that if generated could greatly aid in our understanding of the BBB. PMID:23305182

  6. Circulating tumor cells exhibit stem cell characteristics in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, Thomas; Betzler, Alexander M.; Nanduri, Lahiri K.; Bork, Ulrich; Kahlert, Christoph; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Swiersy, Anka; Büchler, Markus W.; Reissfelder, Christoph; Weitz, Jürgen; Rahbari, Nuh N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is closely linked to the occurrence of distant metastases, which putatively develop from circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed into circulation by the tumor. As far more CTCs are shed than eventually metastases develop, only a small subfraction of CTCs harbor full tumorigenic potential. The aim of this study was to further characterize CRC-derived CTCs to eventually identify the clinically relevant subfraction of CTCs. We established an orthotopic mouse model of CRC which reliably develops metastases and CTCs. We were able to culture the resulting CTCs in vitro, and demonstrated their tumor-forming capacity when re-injected into mice. The CTCs were then subjected to qPCR expression profiling, revealing downregulation of epithelial and proliferation markers. Genes associated with cell-cell adhesion (claudin-7, CD166) were significantly downregulated, indicating a more metastatic phenotype of CTCs compared to bulk tumor cells derived from hepatic metastases. The stem cell markers DLG7 and BMI1 were significantly upregulated in CTC, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype and increased capacity of tumor formation and self-renewal. In concert with their in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity, these findings indicate stem cell properties of mouse-derived CTCs. In conclusion, we developed an orthotopic mouse model of CRC recapitulating the process of CRC dissemination. CTCs derived from this model exhibit stem-cell like characteristics and are able to form colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo. Our results provide new insight into the biology of CRC-derived CTCs and may provide new therapeutic targets in the metastatic cascade of CRC. PMID:27029058

  7. Possible role of brain stem respiratory neurons in mediating vomiting during space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if brain stem expiratory neurons control abdominal muscle activity during vomiting. The activity of 27 ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons, which are known to be of primary importance for control of abdominal muscle activity during respiration, was recorded. It is concluded that abdominal muscle activity during vomiting must be controlled not only by some brain stem expiratory neurons but also by other input(s).

  8. Brain stem auditory evoked responses during the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Vaney, N; Sethi, A; Tandon, O P

    1994-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine changes, if any, in Brain stem auditory evoked responses (BAEP's) during the cold pressor test (CPT) in healthy human subjects. Thirteen subjects (age 18-25 yrs) were selected for the study. Their BAEP's were recorded using standardized technique employing 10-20 international electrode placement system and sound click stimuli of specified intensity, duration and frequency. The standard CPT was performed in the non-dominant hand and the BAEP's, heart rate and blood pressure were recorded before and during the CPT. The values of absolute peak latencies and amplitude of evoked responses were statistically analysed. The amplitude of wave V showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) during the CPT (0.47 +/- 0.203 and 0.37 +/- 0.174 mu v before and during CPT respectively). This could be due to interaction of activated central ascending monoaminergic pathways or nociceptive afferents with the midbrain auditory generator so as to increase it's activity.

  9. Dynamics of the mouse brain cortical synaptic proteome during postnatal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Miguel A.; Klemmer, Patricia; Gebuis, Titia; Hassan, Chopie; van Nierop, Pim; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Smit, August B.; Li, Ka Wan

    2016-01-01

    Development of the brain involves the formation and maturation of numerous synapses. This process requires prominent changes of the synaptic proteome and potentially involves thousands of different proteins at every synapse. To date the proteome analysis of synapse development has been studied sparsely. Here, we analyzed the cortical synaptic membrane proteome of juvenile postnatal days 9 (P9), P15, P21, P27, adolescent (P35) and different adult ages P70, P140 and P280 of C57Bl6/J mice. Using a quantitative proteomics workflow we quantified 1560 proteins of which 696 showed statistically significant differences over time. Synaptic proteins generally showed increased levels during maturation, whereas proteins involved in protein synthesis generally decreased in abundance. In several cases, proteins from a single functional molecular entity, e.g., subunits of the NMDA receptor, showed differences in their temporal regulation, which may reflect specific synaptic development features of connectivity, strength and plasticity. SNARE proteins, Snap 29/47 and Stx 7/8/12, showed higher expression in immature animals. Finally, we evaluated the function of Cxadr that showed high expression levels at P9 and a fast decline in expression during neuronal development. Knock down of the expression of Cxadr in cultured primary mouse neurons revealed a significant decrease in synapse density. PMID:27748445

  10. Local application of drugs to study nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function in mouse brain slices.

    PubMed

    Engle, Staci E; Broderick, Hilary J; Drenan, Ryan M

    2012-10-29

    Tobacco use leads to numerous health problems, including cancer, heart disease, emphysema, and stroke. Addiction to cigarette smoking is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that stems from the biophysical and cellular actions of nicotine on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the central nervous system. Understanding the various nAChR subtypes that exist in brain areas relevant to nicotine addiction is a major priority. Experiments that employ electrophysiology techniques such as whole-cell patch clamp or two-electrode voltage clamp recordings are useful for pharmacological characterization of nAChRs of interest. Cells expressing nAChRs, such as mammalian tissue culture cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, are physically isolated and are therefore easily studied using the tools of modern pharmacology. Much progress has been made using these techniques, particularly when the target receptor was already known and ectopic expression was easily achieved. Often, however, it is necessary to study nAChRs in their native environment: in neurons within brain slices acutely harvested from laboratory mice or rats. For example, mice expressing "hypersensitive" nAChR subunits such as α4 L9'A mice (1) and α6 L9'S mice (2), allow for unambiguous identification of neurons based on their functional expression of a specific nAChR subunit. Although whole-cell patch clamp recordings from neurons in brain slices is routinely done by the skilled electrophysiologist, it is challenging to locally apply drugs such as acetylcholine or nicotine to the recorded cell within a brain slice. Dilution of drugs into the superfusate (bath application) is not rapidly reversible, and U-tube systems are not easily adapted to work with brain slices. In this paper, we describe a method for rapidly applying nAChR-activating drugs to neurons recorded in adult mouse brain slices. Standard whole-cell recordings are made from neurons in slices, and a second micropipette filled with a drug of

  11. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Rockland, Kathleen; Seung, H. Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse. PMID:25558063

  12. Localization of PPAR isotypes in the adult mouse and human brain

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Anna; Truitt, Jay; Merriman, Morgan; Ponomareva, Olga; Jameson, Kelly; Ferguson, Laura B.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. PPAR agonists have well-documented anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles in the central nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that PPAR agonists are attractive therapeutic agents for treating neurodegenerative diseases as well as addiction. However, the distribution of PPAR mRNA and protein in brain regions associated with these conditions (i.e. prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, ventral tegmental area) is not well defined. Moreover, the cell type specificity of PPARs in mouse and human brain tissue has yet to be investigated. We utilized quantitative PCR and double immunofluorescence microscopy to determine that both PPAR mRNA and protein are expressed ubiquitously throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PPARs have unique cell type specificities that are consistent between species. PPARα was the only isotype to colocalize with all cell types in both adult mouse and adult human brain tissue. Overall, we observed a strong neuronal signature, which raises the possibility that PPAR agonists may be targeting neurons rather than glia to produce neuroprotection. Our results fill critical gaps in PPAR distribution and define novel cell type specificity profiles in the adult mouse and human brain. PMID:27283430

  13. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis on student competencies such as scientific process, scientific communication, and societal relevance while teaching foundational neurobiological content such as brain anatomy, cellular neurophysiology, and activity modulation. Student feedback indicates that the BRAIN Initiative is an engaging and instructional context for this course. Course module organization, suitable BRAIN Initiative commentary literature, sample primary literature, and important assignments are presented. PMID:27385926

  14. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jennifer E

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis on student competencies such as scientific process, scientific communication, and societal relevance while teaching foundational neurobiological content such as brain anatomy, cellular neurophysiology, and activity modulation. Student feedback indicates that the BRAIN Initiative is an engaging and instructional context for this course. Course module organization, suitable BRAIN Initiative commentary literature, sample primary literature, and important assignments are presented. PMID:27385926

  15. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jennifer E

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis on student competencies such as scientific process, scientific communication, and societal relevance while teaching foundational neurobiological content such as brain anatomy, cellular neurophysiology, and activity modulation. Student feedback indicates that the BRAIN Initiative is an engaging and instructional context for this course. Course module organization, suitable BRAIN Initiative commentary literature, sample primary literature, and important assignments are presented.

  16. Prolactin transport into mouse brain is independent of prolactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rosemary S E; Wyatt, Amanda K; Herbison, Ryan E; Knowles, Penelope J; Ladyman, Sharon R; Binart, Nadine; Banks, William A; Grattan, David R

    2016-02-01

    The anterior pituitary hormone prolactin exerts important physiologic actions in the brain. However, the mechanism by which prolactin crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain is not completely understood. On the basis of high expression of the prolactin receptor in the choroid plexus, it has been hypothesized that the receptor may bind to prolactin in the blood and translocate it into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This study aimed to test this hypothesis by investigating transport of (125)I-labeled prolactin ((125)I-prolactin) into the brain of female mice in the presence and absence of the prolactin receptor (PRLR(-/-)). Peripherally administered prolactin rapidly activates brain neurons, as evidenced by prolactin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (pSTAT5) in neurons within 30 min of administration. The transport of prolactin into the brain was saturable, with transport effectively blocked only by a very high dose of unlabeled ovine prolactin. Transport was regulated, as in lactating mice with chronically elevated levels of prolactin, the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain was significantly increased compared to nonlactating controls. There was no change in the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain in PRLR(-/-) mice lacking functional prolactin receptors compared to control mice, indicating transport is independent of the prolactin receptor. These data suggest that prolactin transport into the brain involves another as yet unidentified transporter molecule. Because CSF levels of (125)I-prolactin were very low, even up to 90 min after administration, the data suggest that CSF is not the major route by which blood prolactin gains access to neurons in the brain.

  17. Convection Enhanced Delivery of Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus into the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kevin R; Gordon, Marcia N

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has become an extremely useful tool for the study of gene over expression or knockdown in the central nervous system of experimental animals. One disadvantage of intracranial injections of rAAV vectors into the brain parenchyma has been restricted distribution to relatively small volumes of the brain. Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a method for delivery of clinically relevant amounts of therapeutic agents to large areas of the brain in a direct intracranial injection procedure. CED uses bulk flow to increase the hydrostatic pressure and thus improve volume distribution. The CED method has shown robust gene transfer and increased distribution within the CNS and can be successfully used for different serotypes of rAAV for increased transduction of the mouse CNS. This chapter details the surgical injection of rAAV by CED into a mouse brain.

  18. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  19. Myogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells That Lack a Functional Pax7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Grabowska, Iwona; Archacka, Karolina; Bem, Joanna; Swierczek, Barbara; Helinska, Anita; Streminska, Wladyslawa; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Koblowska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Overexpression of Pax7 has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. However, the effects of the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have not yet been directly tested. Herein, we studied mouse stem cells that lacked a functional Pax7 gene and characterized the differentiation of these stem cells under conditions that promoted the derivation of myoblasts in vitro. We analyzed the expression of myogenic factors, such as myogenic regulatory factors and muscle-specific microRNAs, in wild-type and mutant cells. Finally, we compared the transcriptome of both types of cells and did not find substantial differences in the expression of genes related to the regulation of myogenesis. As a result, we showed that the absence of functional Pax7 does not prevent the in vitro myogenic differentiation of ESCs. PMID:26649785

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  1. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Beal, Marc A; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  2. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  3. 3D mouse embryonic stem cell culture for generating inner ear organoids.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karl R; Hashino, Eri

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a culture system in which inner-ear sensory tissue is produced from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells under chemically defined conditions. This model is amenable to basic and translational investigations into inner ear biology and regeneration. In this protocol, mouse ES cells are aggregated in 96-well plates in medium containing extracellular matrix proteins to promote epithelialization. During the first 14 d, a series of precisely timed protein and small-molecule treatments sequentially induce epithelia that represent the mouse embryonic non-neural ectoderm, preplacodal ectoderm and otic vesicle epithelia. Ultimately, these tissues develop into cysts with a pseudostratified epithelium containing inner ear hair cells and supporting cells after 16-20 d. Concurrently, sensory-like neurons generate synapse-like structures with the derived hair cells. We have designated the stem cell-derived epithelia harboring hair cells, supporting cells and sensory-like neurons as inner ear organoids. This method provides a reproducible and scalable means to generate inner ear sensory tissue in vitro.

  4. Computational identification of putative lincRNAs in mouse embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Lyu, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Gao, Yang; Guo, Jing; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    As the regulatory factors, lncRNAs play critical roles in embryonic stem cells. And lincRNAs are most widely studied lncRNAs, however, there might still might exist a large member of uncovered lncRNAs. In this study, we constructed the de novo assembly of transcriptome to detect 6,701 putative long intergenic non-coding transcripts (lincRNAs) expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which might be incomplete with the lack coverage of 5′ ends assessed by CAGE peaks. Comparing the TSS proximal regions between the known lincRNAs and their closet protein coding transcripts, our results revealed that the lincRNA TSS proximal regions are associated with the characteristic genomic and epigenetic features. Subsequently, 1,293 lincRNAs were corrected at their 5′ ends using the putative lincRNA TSS regions predicted by the TSS proximal region prediction model based on genomic and epigenetic features. Finally, 43 putative lincRNAs were annotated by Gene Ontology terms. In conclusion, this work provides a novel catalog of mouse ESCs-expressed lincRNAs with the relatively complete transcript length, which might be useful for the investigation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of lincRNA in mouse ESCs and even mammalian development. PMID:27713513

  5. Changing Iron Content of the Mouse Brain during Development

    PubMed Central

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; McCormick, Sean P.; Abbott, Louise C.; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is crucial to many processes in the brain yet the percentages of the major iron-containing species contained therein, and how these percentages change during development, have not been reliably determined. To do this, C57BL/6 mice were enriched in 57Fe and their brains were examined by Mössbauer, EPR, and electronic absorption spectroscopy; Fe concentrations were evaluated using ICP-MS. Excluding the contribution of residual blood hemoglobin, the three major categories of brain Fe included ferritin (an iron storage protein), mitochondrial iron (consisting primarily of Fe/S clusters and hemes), and mononuclear nonheme high-spin (NHHS) FeII and FeIII species. Brains from prenatal and one-week old mice were dominated by ferritin and were deficient in mitochondrial Fe. During the next few weeks of life, the brain grew and experienced a burst of mitochondriogenesis. Overall brain Fe concentration and the concentration of ferritin declined during this burst phase, suggesting that the rate of Fe incorporation was insufficient to accommodate these changes. The slow rate of Fe import and export to/from the brain, relative to other organs, was verified by an isotopic labeling study. Iron levels and ferritin stores replenished in young adult mice. NHHS FeII species were observed in substantial levels in brains of several ages. A stable free-radical species that increased with age was observed by EPR spectroscopy. Brains from mice raised on an Fe-deficient diet showed depleted ferritin iron but normal mitochondrial iron levels. PMID:22810488

  6. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  7. Therapeutic effects of mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Yi, Tac-Ghee; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Seon Ji; Lee, Kyuheon; Lee, Youn Sook; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Song, Sun U; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-11-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells (mcMSCs), which were originated from a single cell by a subfractionation culturing method, are recognized as new paradigm for stem cell therapy featured with its homogenous cell population. Next to proven therapeutic effects against pancreatitis, in the current study we demonstrated that mcMSCs showed significant therapeutic effects in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis model supported with anti-inflammatory and restorative activities. mcMSCs significantly reduced the disease activity index (DAI) score, including weight loss, stool consistency, and intestinal bleeding and significantly increased survival rates. The pathological scores were also significantly improved with mcMSC. We have demonstrated that especial mucosal regeneration activity accompanied with significantly lowered level of apoptosis as beneficiary actions of mcMSCs in UC models. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 were all significantly concurrent with significantly repressed NF-κB activation compared to the control group and significantly decreased infiltrations of responsible macrophage and neutrophil. Conclusively, our findings provide the rationale that mcMSCs are applicable as a potential source of cell-based therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially contributing either to prevent relapse or to accelerate healing as solution to unmet medical needs in IBD therapy. PMID:26566304

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells without Myc from mouse and human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masato; Koyanagi, Michiyo; Tanabe, Koji; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Aoi, Takashi; Okita, Keisuke; Mochiduki, Yuji; Takizawa, Nanako; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells provides an opportunity to generate patient- or disease-specific pluripotent stem cells. Such induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from mouse fibroblasts by retroviral transduction of four transcription factors: Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. Mouse iPS cells are indistinguishable from embryonic stem (ES) cells in many respects and produce germline-competent chimeras. Reactivation of the c-Myc retrovirus, however, increases tumorigenicity in the chimeras and progeny mice, hindering clinical applications. Here we describe a modified protocol for the generation of iPS cells that does not require the Myc retrovirus. With this protocol, we obtained significantly fewer non-iPS background cells, and the iPS cells generated were consistently of high quality. Mice derived from Myc(-) iPS cells did not develop tumors during the study period. The protocol also enabled efficient isolation of iPS cells without drug selection. Furthermore, we generated human iPS cells from adult dermal fibroblasts without MYC.

  9. Connectome and Maturation Profiles of the Developing Mouse Brain Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Parker, Drew; Ghanbari, Yasser; Smith, Alex; Hua, Kegang; Mori, Susumu; Abel, Ted; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive effort to establish a structural mouse connectome using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging coupled with connectivity analysis tools. This work lays the foundation for imaging-based structural connectomics of the mouse brain, potentially facilitating a whole-brain network analysis to quantify brain changes in connectivity during development, as well as deviations from it related to genetic effects. A connectomic trajectory of maturation during postnatal ages 2-80 days is presented in the C57BL/6J mouse strain, using a whole-brain connectivity analysis, followed by investigations based on local and global network features. The global network measures of density, global efficiency, and modularity demonstrated a nonlinear relationship with age. The regional network metrics, namely degree and local efficiency, displayed a differential change in the major subcortical structures such as the thalamus and hippocampus, and cortical regions such as visual and motor cortex. Finally, the connectomes were used to derive an index of "brain connectivity index," which demonstrated a high correlation (r = 0.95) with the chronological age, indicating that brain connectivity is a good marker of normal age progression, hence valuable in detecting subtle deviations from normality caused by genetic, environmental, or pharmacological manipulations.

  10. The importance of three-dimensional scaffold structure on stemness maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianshu; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-09-01

    Revealing the mechanisms of cell fate regulation is important for scientific research and stem cell-based therapy. The traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultured mES cells are in a very different 2D niche from the in vivo equivalent-inner cell mass (ICM). Because the cell fate decision could be regulated by many cues which could be impacted by geometry, the traditional 2D culture system would hamper us from understanding the in vivo situations correctly. Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold was believed to provide a 3D environment closed to the in vivo one. In this work, three different scaffolds were prepared for cell culture. Several characters of mES cells were changed under 3D scaffolds culture compared to 2D, and these changes were mainly due to the alteration in geometry but not the matrix. The self-renewal of mES cells was promoted by the introducing of dimensionality. The stemness maintenance of mES was supported by all three 3D scaffolds without feeder cells in the long-time culture. Our findings demonstrated that the stemness maintenance of mES cells was promoted by the 3D geometry of scaffolds and this would provide a promising platform for ES cell research.

  11. Decrease in Prosaposin in the Dystrophic mdx Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-ling; Li, Cheng; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Shouichiro; Wang, Zhan-You; Cao, Ya-ming; Matsuda, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin gene induces metabolic and structural disorders in the brain. A lack of dystrophin in brain structures is involved in impaired cognitive function. Prosaposin (PS), a neurotrophic factor, is abundant in the choroid plexus and various brain regions. We investigated whether PS serves as a link between dystrophin loss and gross and/or ultrastructural brain abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings The distribution of PS in the brains of juvenile and adult mdx mice was investigated by immunochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. Immunochemistry revealed lower levels of PS in the cytoplasm of neurons of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and choroid plexus in mdx mice. Western blotting confirmed that PS levels were lower in these brain regions in both juveniles and adults. Even with low PS production in the choroids plexus, there was no significant PS decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In situ hybridization revealed that the primary form of PS mRNA in both normal and mdx mice was Pro+9, a secretory-type PS, and the hybridization signals for Pro+9 in the above-mentioned brain regions were weaker in mdx mice than in normal mice. We also investigated mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Stronger activation of ERK1/2 was observed in mdx mice, ERK1/2 activity was positively correlated with PS activity, and exogenous PS18 stimulated both p-ERK1/2 and PS in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions/Significance Low levels of PS and its receptors suggest the participation of PS in some pathological changes in the brains of mdx mice. PMID:24244600

  12. Molecular genetics of pediatric brain stem gliomas. Application of PCR techniques to small and archival brain tumor specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Correa, K.M.; Gusella, J.F.; Deimling, A. von )

    1993-09-01

    Brain stem gliomas are pediatric astrocytomas that histologically resemble adult supratentorial astrocytomas such as gliobastomas multiforme (GBM). The molecular genetic studies have suggested that adult GBM can be divided into two genetic subsets: Tumors with p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations and chromosome 17p loss that occur more commonly in younger patients; and tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification that occur more commonly in older patients. Brain stem gliomas have not been studied since biopsies of these tumors are rare and extremely small. The authors investigated the molecular genetic composition of seven brain stem glioblastomas (two small biopsies, five autopsies) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for chromosomal loss, gene mutation and gene amplification. Four cases lost portions of chromosome 17p that included the 53p gene. These four cases and one additional case had mutations in the p53 gene. None of the cases showed amplification of the EGFR gene. Allelic losses of the long arm of chromosome 10 were noted in four cases. These results suggest similarities between pediatric brain stem glioblastomas and those GBM that occur in younger adult patients, and confirm the utility of PCR-based means of studying small and archival brain tumor specimens. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Design of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouls, John C.; Izenson, Michael G.; Greeley, Harold P.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-04-01

    We present the design process of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain at 9.4 T. The yttrium barium copper oxide coil has been designed through an iterative process of three-dimensional finite-element simulations and validation against room temperature copper coils. Compared to previous designs, the Helmholtz pair provides substantially higher B1 homogeneity over an extended volume of interest sufficiently large to image biologically relevant specimens. A custom-built cryogenic cooling system maintains the superconducting probe at 60 ± 0.1 K. Specimen loading and probe retuning can be carried out interactively with the coil at operating temperature, enabling much higher through-put. The operation of the probe is a routine, consistent procedure. Signal-to-noise ratio in a mouse brain increased by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 as compared to a room-temperature solenoid coil optimized for mouse brain microscopy. We demonstrate images encoded at 10 × 10 × 20 μm for an entire mouse brain specimen with signal-to-noise ratio of 18 and a total acquisition time of 16.5 h, revealing neuroanatomy unseen at lower resolution. Phantom measurements show an effective spatial resolution better than 20 μm.

  14. Quantitative analysis of cytokine-induced vascular toxicity and vascular leak in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Irwan, Yetty Y; Feng, Yi; Gach, H Michael; Symanowski, James T; McGregor, John R; Veni, Gopalkrishna; Schabel, Matthias; Samlowski, Wolfram E

    2009-09-30

    A storm of inflammatory cytokines is released during treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), closely approximating changes initially observed during sepsis. These signals induce profound changes in neurologic function and cognition. Little is known about the mechanisms involved. We evaluated a number of experimental methods to quantify changes in brain blood vessel integrity in a well-characterized IL-2 treatment mouse model. Measurement of wet versus dry weight and direct measurement of small molecule accumulation (e.g. [(3)H]-H(2)O, sodium fluorescein) were not sensitive or reliable enough to detect small changes in mouse brain vascular permeability. Estimation of brain water content using proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements using a 7T mouse MRI system was sensitive to 1-2% changes in brain water content, but was difficult to reproduce in replicate experiments. Successful techniques included use of immunohistochemistry using specific endothelial markers to identify vasodilation in carefully matched regions of brain parenchyma and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI. Both techniques indicated that IL-2 treatment induced vasodilation of the brain blood vessels. DCE MRI further showed a 2-fold increase in the brain blood vessel permeability to gadolinium in IL-2 treated mice compared to controls. Both immunohistochemistry and DCE MRI data suggested that IL-2 induced toxicity in the brain results from vasodilation of the brain blood vessels and increased microvascular permeability, resulting in perivascular edema. These experimental techniques provide us with the tools to further characterize the mechanism responsible for cytokine-induced neuropsychiatric toxicity.

  15. Bone defects and future regenerative nanomedicine approach using stem cells in the mutant Tabby mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noordijk, Mélanie; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Eap, Sandy; Huck, Olivier; Fioretti, Florence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Bacon, William; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Clauss, François

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) is associated to a large spectrum of ectodermal and extra-ectodermal symptoms, especially craniofacial bone morphological, structural and metabolic anomalies. This skeletal phenotype described in affected patients and in the Ta mutant mouse model leads to craniofacial dysmorphies, endosseous implants and jaw bone grafts complications. Bone tissue bioengineering based on the use of PCL synthetic nanofibrous membrane and BMP nanoreservoirs appears as an original and promising approach to prevent such complications in the context of dysfunctional bone. Use of osteoblasts or stem cells seeded biomembranes appears as another strategy developed on the Tabby (Ta) model of XLHED. The Ta mouse experimental model is used to study the jaw bone response during the post-operative period after bone lesion and placement of synthetic PCL membrane functionalized with nanoreservoirs embedding different BMPs dimers or seeded with living cells. PMID:25538062

  16. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  17. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  18. Zinc Chloride Transiently Maintains Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency by Activating Stat3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Jinbo; Yu, Jia; Guo, Jing; Liu, Shiying; Qian, Chunmei; Song, Liwen; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing

    2016-01-01

    An improved understanding of the pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cells is important for investigations of early embryo development and for cell replacement therapy, but the mechanism behind pluripotency is still incompletely understood. Recent findings show that zinc, an essential trace element in humans, is critically involved in regulating various signaling pathways and genes expression. However, its role in ES cell fate determination remains to be further explored. Here we showed that 2μM zinc chloride (ZnCl2) transiently maintained mouse ES cell pluripotency in vitro. The cultured mouse ES cells remained undifferentiated under 2μM ZnCl2 treatment in leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) withdrawal, retinoic acid (RA) or embryoid bodies (EBs) differentiation assays. In addition, ZnCl2 increased pluripotency genes expression and inhibited differentiation genes expression. Further mechanistic studies revealed that ZnCl2 transiently activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling through promoting Stat3 phosphorylation. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling abrogated the effects of ZnCl2 on mouse ES cell pluripotency. Taken together, this study demonstrated a critical role of zinc in the pluripotency maintenance of mouse ES cells, as well as an important regulator of Stat3 signaling. PMID:26910359

  19. Expression profiling of nuclear receptors in human and mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chang-Qing; Jeong, Yangsik; Fu, Mingui; Bookout, Angie L; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T; Sun, Tingwan; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Xie, Yang; Root, Sierra; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Ren-He; Chen, Y Eugene; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate gene expression in essential biological processes including differentiation and development. Here we report the systematic profiling of NRs in human and mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines and during their early differentiation into embryoid bodies. Expression of the 48 human and mouse NRs was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. In general, expression of NRs between the two human cell lines was highly concordant, whereas in contrast, expression of NRs between human and mouse ESCs differed significantly. In particular, a number of NRs that have been implicated previously as crucial regulators of mouse ESC biology, including ERRbeta, DAX-1, and LRH-1, exhibited diametric patterns of expression, suggesting they may have distinct species-specific functions. Taken together, these results highlight the complexity of the transcriptional hierarchy that exists between species and governs early development. These data should provide a unique resource for further exploration of the species-specific roles of NRs in ESC self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:19196830

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  1. Selective apoptosis of pluripotent mouse and human stem cells by novel ceramide analogues prevents teratoma formation and enriches for neural precursors in ES cell–derived neural transplants

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard; Silva, Jeane; Wang, Guanghu; Krishnamurthy, Kannan; Condie, Brian G.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of stem cell–derived tumors (teratomas) is observed when engrafting undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells, embryoid body–derived cells (EBCs), or mammalian embryos and is a significant obstacle to stem cell therapy. We show that in tumors formed after engraftment of EBCs into mouse brain, expression of the pluripotency marker Oct-4 colocalized with that of prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4), a protein mediating ceramide-induced apoptosis during neural differentiation of ES cells. We tested the ability of the novel ceramide analogue N-oleoyl serinol (S18) to eliminate mouse and human Oct-4(+)/PAR-4(+) cells and to increase the proportion of nestin(+) neuroprogenitors in EBC-derived cell cultures and grafts. S18-treated EBCs persisted in the hippocampal area and showed neuronal lineage differentiation as indicated by the expression of β-tubulin III. However, untreated cells formed numerous teratomas that contained derivatives of endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Our results show for the first time that ceramide-induced apoptosis eliminates residual, pluripotent EBCs, prevents teratoma formation, and enriches the EBCs for cells that undergo neural differentiation after transplantation. PMID:15545317

  2. Effect of soman on the cholinergic system in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, H.L.; Szakal, A.R.; Little, D.M.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of soman on levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) and turnover rate of ACh have been studied in whole brain and brain regions (cerebellum, medulla-pons, midbrain, corpus striatum, hippocampus and cortex) of mice. Animals were injected with saline or a dose of soman up to 80..mu..g/kg, i.v. and were sacrificed by focussed microwave irradiation of the head. The tracer, /sup 3/H-Ch was injected (i.v.) 2 min prior to sacrifice and turnover rate of ACh was quantitated by using HPLC with electrochemical detection. A behaviorally effective dose of 80 ..mu..g/kg soman increased the levels of ACh significantly in whole brain (57.5%), corpus striatum (42.8%), hippocampus (24.1%) and cortex (43.1%). The levels of Ch were also increased in cerebellum (80.1%), midbrain (75.7%), corpus striatum (86.0%) and cortex (52.5%). The turnover rate of ACh was decreased in whole brain (53.8%), cerebellum (80.4%), medulla-pons (66.8%), midbrain (57.0%), corpus striatum (62.1%) and cortex (52.6%). The duration of these effects lasted more than 1 hr and the results indicate that the decrease in ACh turnover is not due necessarily to an increase in brain levels of ACh and/or Ch.

  3. Brain resistance to HSV-1 encephalitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, G; Calistri, A; Cavaggioni, A; Favero, M; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Palù, G

    2002-06-01

    Brain resistance to intracerebral superinfections develops after a peripheral inoculation of neurovirulent viruses. Superinfection resistance combines specificity, toward the virus used for the peripheral inoculum, and short-term duration after the inoculum. In order to study this unusual combination, neurovirulent superinfections were made on albino Swiss mice previously infected with a nasal inoculum. A herpesvirus strain SC16, or a homologue recombinant virus carrying the reporter lac Z gene or a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a virus taxonomically unrelated to Herpesviridae) were used. The mice underwent a neurological examination and their survival rate was recorded. The brains superinfected with the reporter virus were stained for the beta-galactosidase reaction to trace the virus spread and the inflammatory infiltrates were characterized immunocytochemically. The results confirm and extend previous observations about virus specificity and short-term duration of superinfection resistance. They show, moreover, an enhanced brain inflammation with T-cells and macrophages infiltrating the tissue around microvessels, at a time when both neurovirulence and the spread of herpesvirus in the brain are reduced. The results suggest that the immune response to superinfection in the nervous tissue is enhanced by blood-brain barrier mechanisms that promote the timely extravasation of immune cells.

  4. Dissecting the heterogeneity of gene expressions in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Thomson, Matt; Liu, S. John; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2011-03-01

    A population of genetically identical cells, of the same nominal cell type, and cultured in the same petri dish, will nevertheless often exhibit varying patterns of gene expression. Taking mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system, we use immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to examine in detail the distribution of expression levels for various transcription factors key to the maintenance of the ES cell identity. We find the population-level distribution of many proteins, once rescaled by the average expression level, have very similar shapes. This suggest the largest component of observed heterogeneity comes from a single source. More subtly, we find the expression many of genes appears to modulate with the cell cycle. This may suggest that the program for maintaining ES cell identity is tightly coupled to the cell cycle machinery. This work is supported by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research.

  5. Neuralization of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate hydrogels under retinoic acid and SAG treatment.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Peto, Heather

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the differentiation of a mouse embryonic stem cell line (CGR8) into neurons, under retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. When stem cells underwent through an embryoid body (EB) formation stage, dissociation and seeding on glass coverslips, immunofluorescent labelling for neuronal markers (Nestin, b-Tubulin III, MAP2) revealed the presence of both immature neural progenitors and mature neurons. Undifferentiated CGR8 were also encapsulated in tubular, alginate-gelatin hydrogels and incubated in differentiation media containing retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG). Cryo-sections of the hydrogel tubes were positive for Nestin, Pax6 and b-Tubulin III, verifying the presence of neurons and neural progenitors. Provided neural induction can be more precisely directed in the tubular hydrogels, these scaffolds will become a powerful model of neural tube development in embryos and will highlight potential strategies for spinal cord regeneration. PMID:26737053

  6. Formation of gut-like structures in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from the three germ layers; however, there are still few reports about the formation of functional organs from embryonic stem cells. Recently, we reported that by hanging drops of mouse ES cells, embryoid bodies (EBs) formed gut-like structures in vitro composed of three layers corresponding to the epithelium, lamina propria, and musculature. The morphological features and the process of formation are similar to gut and its organogenesis in vivo. Thus, this is a good model for development of the gut and a useful tool for analysis of the factors required for gut organogenesis. The protocol basically involves a method of hanging drops to make EBs, which are then plated on coated dishes for outgrowth. EBs develop to form gut-like structures when induced to spontaneously enter a program of differentiation in vitro without addition of any extrinsic factors.

  7. Maintenance of pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells persistently infected with murine coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, A; Machii, K; Azuma, S; Toyoda, Y; Kyuwa, S

    1996-01-01

    A persistently coronavirus-infected embryonic stem (ES) cell line A3/MHV was established by infecting an ES cell line, A3-1, with mouse hepatitis virus type-2. Although almost all A3/MHV cells were found infected, both A3/MHV and A3-1 cells expressed comparable levels of cell surface differentiation markers. In addition, A3/MHV cells retained the ability to form embryoid bodies. These results suggest that persistent coronavirus infection does not affect the differentiation of ES cells. PMID:8648758

  8. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  9. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation.

  10. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor in mouse embryonic stem cell culture and osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Laura C; Fitzsimmons, Ross; Lee, Poh; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E; Uludağ, Hasan

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively explored as a cell source in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involving bone repair. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been a valuable growth factor to support the culture of human stem cells as well as their osteogenic differentiation, but the influence of bFGF on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells is not known. Towards this goal, D3 cells were treated with bFGF during maintenance conditions and during spontaneous and osteogenic differentiation. In feeder-free monolayers, up to 40 ng/ml of exogenous bFGF did not support self-renewal of mES without LIF during cell expansion. During spontaneous differentiation in high-density cultures, bFGF stimulated cell proliferation under certain conditions but did not influence differentiation, as judged by stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 expression. The addition of bFGF reduced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity associated with osteoblast activity during differentiation induced by osteogenic supplements, although the extent of mineralization was unaffected by bFGF. The bFGF increased the mesenchymal stem cell marker Sca-1 in an mES cell population and led to an enhanced increase in osteocalcin and runx2 expression in combination with BMP-2. These results suggest that bFGF could be utilized to expand the cell population in high-density cultures in addition to enriching the BMP-2 responsiveness of mES cells. PMID:22674886

  11. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts to Neural Stem Cells by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chuang; Lim, Yoon; Duffieldl, Michael D.; Li, Hua; Liu, Jia; Abdul Manaph, Nimshitha Pavathuparambil; Yang, Miao; Keating, Damien J.; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Although it is possible to generate neural stem cells (NSC) from somatic cells by reprogramming technologies with transcription factors, clinical utilization of patient-specific NSC for the treatment of human diseases remains elusive. The risk hurdles are associated with viral transduction vectors induced mutagenesis, tumor formation from undifferentiated stem cells, and transcription factors-induced genomic instability. Here we describe a viral vector-free and more efficient method to induce mouse fibroblasts into NSC using small molecules. The small molecule-induced neural stem (SMINS) cells closely resemble NSC in morphology, gene expression patterns, self-renewal, excitability, and multipotency. Furthermore, the SMINS cells are able to differentiate into astrocytes, functional neurons, and oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we have established a novel way to efficiently induce neural stem cells (iNSC) from fibroblasts using only small molecules without altering the genome. Such chemical induction removes the risks associated with current techniques such as the use of viral vectors or the induction of oncogenic factors. This technique may, therefore, enable NSC to be utilized in various applications within clinical medicine. PMID:26788068

  12. Stem Cell Emergence and Hemopoietic Activity Are Incompatible in Mouse Intraembryonic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Isabelle; Garcia-Porrero, Juan Antonio; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise; Cumano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    In the mouse embryo, the generation of candidate progenitors for long-lasting hemopoiesis has been reported in the paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Here, we address the following question: can the P-Sp/AGM environment support hemopoietic differentiation as well as generate stem cells, and, conversely, are other sites where hemopoietic differentiation occurs capable of generating stem cells? Although P-Sp/AGM generates de novo hemopoietic stem cells between 9.5 and 12.5 days post coitus (dpc), we show here that it does not support hemopoietic differentiation. Among mesoderm-derived sites, spleen and omentum were shown to be colonized by exogenous cells in the same fashion as the fetal liver. Cells colonizing the spleen were multipotent and pursued their evolution to committed progenitors in this organ. In contrast, the omentum, which was colonized by lymphoid-committed progenitors that did not expand, cannot be considered as a hemopoietic organ. From these data, stem cell generation appears incompatible with hemopoietic activity. At the peak of hemopoietic progenitor production in the P-Sp/AGM, between 10.5 and 11.5 dpc, multipotent cells were found at the exceptional frequency of 1 out of 12 total cells and 1 out of 4 AA4.1+ cells. Thus, progenitors within this region constitute a pool of undifferentiated hemopoietic cells readily accessible for characterization. PMID:10429669

  13. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  14. Isolation of Sphere-Forming Stem Cells from the Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kazuo; Senn, Pascal; Heller, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear has very limited ability to regenerate lost sensory hair cells. This deficiency becomes apparent when hair cell loss leads to hearing loss as a result of either ototoxic insult or the aging process. Coincidently, with this inability to regenerate lost hair cells, the adult cochlea does not appear to harbor cells with a proliferative capacity that could serve as progenitor cells for lost cells. In contrast, adult mammalian vestibular sensory epithelia display a limited ability for hair cell regeneration, and sphere-forming cells with stem cell features can be isolated from the adult murine vestibular system. The neonatal inner ear, however, does harbor sphere-forming stem cells residing in cochlear and vestibular tissues. Here, we provide protocols to isolate sphere-forming stem cells from neonatal vestibular and cochlear sensory epithelia as well as from the spiral ganglion. We further describe procedures for sphere propagation, cell differentiation, and characterization of inner ear cell types derived from spheres. Sphere-forming stem cells from the mouse inner ear are an important tool for the development of cellular replacement strategies of damaged inner ears and are a bona fide progenitor cell source for transplantation studies. PMID:18839346

  15. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Zarkower, David

    2016-01-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  17. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  18. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  19. Fluorescent-Protein Stabilization and High-Resolution Imaging of Cleared, Intact Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Martin K.; Scherbarth, Annemarie; Sprengel, Rolf; Engelhardt, Johann; Theer, Patrick; Giese, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain. PMID:25993380

  20. Morphological asymmetries of mouse brain assessed by geometric morphometric analysis of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Barbeito-Andrés, Jimena; Bernal, Valeria; Gonzalez, Paula N

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian brain has repeated structures at both sides of the median plane, although some asymmetries have been described even under normal conditions. Characterizing normal patterns of asymmetry in mouse brain is important to recognize features that depart from expected ranges in the most widely used mammalian model. Analyses on brain morphology based on magnetic resonance image (MRI) have largely focused on volumes while less is known about shape asymmetry. We introduce a flexible protocol based on geometric morphometrics to assess patterns of asymmetry in shape and size of mouse brain from microMRI scans. After systematic digitization of landmarks and semilandmarks, we combine multivariate methods for statistical analyses with visualization tools to display the results. No preliminary treatment of the images (e.g. space normalization) is needed to collect data on MRI slices and visual representations improve the interpretation of the results. Results indicated that the protocol is highly repeatable. Asymmetry was more evident for shape than for size. Particularly, fluctuating asymmetry accounted for more variation than directional asymmetry in all brain regions. Since this approach can detect subtle shape variation between sides, it is a promising methodology to explore morphological changes in the brain of model organisms and can be applied in future studies addressing the effect of genetic and environmental factors on brain morphology. PMID:27108357

  1. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  2. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain. PMID:26898475

  3. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  4. Morphological asymmetries of mouse brain assessed by geometric morphometric analysis of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Barbeito-Andrés, Jimena; Bernal, Valeria; Gonzalez, Paula N

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian brain has repeated structures at both sides of the median plane, although some asymmetries have been described even under normal conditions. Characterizing normal patterns of asymmetry in mouse brain is important to recognize features that depart from expected ranges in the most widely used mammalian model. Analyses on brain morphology based on magnetic resonance image (MRI) have largely focused on volumes while less is known about shape asymmetry. We introduce a flexible protocol based on geometric morphometrics to assess patterns of asymmetry in shape and size of mouse brain from microMRI scans. After systematic digitization of landmarks and semilandmarks, we combine multivariate methods for statistical analyses with visualization tools to display the results. No preliminary treatment of the images (e.g. space normalization) is needed to collect data on MRI slices and visual representations improve the interpretation of the results. Results indicated that the protocol is highly repeatable. Asymmetry was more evident for shape than for size. Particularly, fluctuating asymmetry accounted for more variation than directional asymmetry in all brain regions. Since this approach can detect subtle shape variation between sides, it is a promising methodology to explore morphological changes in the brain of model organisms and can be applied in future studies addressing the effect of genetic and environmental factors on brain morphology.

  5. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71-4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  6. Are there fetal stem cells in the maternal brain?☆

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, Osman; Çekin, Necmi; Taştemir, Deniz; Tunç, Erdal; Güzel, Ali İrfan; Meral, Demet; Demirbek, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    Fetal cells can enter maternal blood during pregnancy but whether they can also cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain remains poorly understood. Previous results suggest that fetal cells are summoned to repair damage to the mother's brain. If this is confirmed, it would open up new and safer avenues of treatment for brain damage caused by strokes and neural diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a baby's stem cells can enter the maternal brain during pregnancy. Deceased patients who had at least one male offspring and no history of abortion and blood transfusion were included in this study. DNA was extracted from brain tissue samples of deceased women using standard phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation methods. Genomic DNA was screened by quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction amplification together with short tandem repeat markers specific to the Y chromosome, and 13, 18, 21 and X. Any foreign DNA residues that could be used to interpret the presence of fetal stem cells in the maternal brain were monitored. Results indicated that fetal stem cells can not cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the maternal brain. PMID:25206703

  7. Towards ultrahigh resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Ali; Bely, Nicholas; Chen, Chen; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing high-resolution functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing both mechanical and optical scanning in the photoacoustic microscopy, we can image spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images is going to be acquired noninvasively with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. We developed an optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) with diode laser. Laser light was raster scanned due to XY-stage movement. Images from ultra-high OR-PAM can then be used to study brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy.

  8. Automatic macroscopic density artefact removal in a Nissl-stained microscopic atlas of whole mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, W; Li, A; Wu, J; Yang, Z; Meng, Y; Wang, S; Gong, H

    2013-08-01

    Acquiring a whole mouse brain at the micrometer scale is a complex, continuous and time-consuming process. Because of defects caused by sample preparation and microscopy, the acquired image data sets suffer from various macroscopic density artefacts that worsen the image quality. We have to develop the available preprocessing methods to improve image quality by removing the artefacts that effect cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization. In this study, a set of automatic artefact removal methods is proposed for images obtained by tissue staining and optical microscopy. These methods significantly improve the complicated images that contain various structures, including cells and blood vessels. The whole mouse brain data set with Nissl staining was tested, and the intensity of the processed images was uniformly distributed throughout different brain areas. Furthermore, the processed image data set with its uniform brightness and high quality is now a fundamental atlas for image analysis, including cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization.

  9. High-resolution prediction of mouse brain connectivity using gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-02-01

    The brain is a multi-level system in which the high-level functions are generated by low-level genetic mechanisms. Thus, elucidating the relationship among multiple brain levels via correlative and predictive analytics is an important area in brain research. Currently, studies in multiple species have indicated that the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns are predictive of brain wiring. Specifically, results on the worm Caenorhabditis elegans have shown that the prediction of neuronal connectivity using gene expression signatures yielded statistically significant results. Recent studies on the mammalian brain produced similar results at the coarse regional level. In this study, we provide the first high-resolution, large-scale integrative analysis of the transcriptome and connectome in a single mammalian brain at a fine voxel level. By using the Allen Brain Atlas data, we predict voxel-level brain connectivity based on the gene expressions in the adult mouse brain. We employ regularized models to show that gene expression is predictive of connectivity at the voxel-level with an accuracy of 93%. We also identify a set of genes playing the most important role in connectivity prediction. We use only this small number of genes to predict the brain wiring with an accuracy over 80%. We discover that these important genes are enriched in neurons as compared to glia, and they perform connectivity-related functions. We perform several interesting correlative studies to further elucidate the transcriptome-connectome relationship.

  10. Effect of the Fusarium toxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, on the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z H; Deng, H D; Deng, Y T; Deng, J L; Zuo, Z C; Yu, S M; Shen, L H; Cui, H M; Xu, Z W; Hu, Y C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find effects of Fusarium toxins on brain injury in mice. We evaluated the individual and combined effect of the Fusarium toxins zearalenone and deoxynivalenol on the mouse brain. We examined brain weight, protein, antioxidant indicators, and apoptosis. After 3 and 5days of treatment, increased levels of nitric oxide, total nitric oxide synthase, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and malondialdehyde were observed in the treatment groups. This was accompanied by reduced levels of brain protein, superoxide dismutase (apart from the low-dose zearalenone groups), glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity, and percentage of apoptotic cells. By day 12, most of these indicators had returned to control group levels. The effects of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol were dose-dependent, and were synergistic in combination. Our results suggest that brain function is affected by zearalenone and deoxynivalenol.

  11. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Coma (Video) Cerebral Angiography: Catheter Insertion (News) Human Brains Aren't Distinctly Male or Female, Study Says ... recover. Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Human Brains Aren't Distinctly Male or Female, Study Says ...

  12. Practical Application of Microelectroporation into Developing Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Ogawa, Masaharu

    One key approach toward understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying embryonic development involves the overexpression or misexpression of target genes in specific regions and at specific time points. The mouse gene-knockout system has been used extensively for loss-of-function studies due to the availability of a large number of mutant lines and the technical advantages of this system. In contrast, gain-of-function analyses have been performed through the production of knock-in and transgenic animals and with the use of various viruses (Cornetta 2006; Jakobsson et al., 2003; Hashimoto and Mikoshiba, 2004). However, it is not always possible to express or suppress genes in a spatially and temporally restricted manner, and the generation of genetically modified mice and recombinant viruses is time consuming and labor intensive. With the aim of solving these problems, many attempts have been made to apply the electroporation technique in research on developmental biology. Due to the accessibility of the avian embryo, it has been used as a classic model system for the study of developmental events in vertebrates. A novel technique for successful gene delivery into chick embryos has been established; this technique is known as in ovo electroporation and appears to be an excellent method, permitting quick and direct examination of the function of the delivered genes (Muramatsu et al., 1997; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Nakamura et al., 2000; Yasuda et al., 2000). It seems that this technique can be adapted to the mouse embryo and would permit more rapid functional analysis of genes than is achieved by the generation of knockout or transgenic mouse lines. However, the inaccessibility of embryos in the mammalian uterus renders in utero manipulations targeting precise regions difficult or impossible at most stages of development. Efforts have been undertaken by various researchers to establish an in utero electroporation system, and there have been several

  13. Transport of thyroxine across the blood-brain barrier is directed primarily from brain to blood in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Michals, E.A.

    1985-12-23

    The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the transport of thyroxine was examined in mice. Radioiodinated (hot thyroxine (hT/sub 4/) administered icv had a half-time disappearance from the brain of 30 min. This increased to 60 min (p < 0.001) when administered with 211 pmole/mouse of unlabeled (cold) thyroxine (cT/sub 4/). The Km for this inhibition of hT/sub 4/ transport out of the brain by cT/sub 4/ was 9.66 pmole/brain. Unlabeled 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (cT/sub 3/) was unable to inhibit transport of hT/sub 4/ out of the brain, although both cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.05) and cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.05) did inhibit transport of radioiodinated 3,3',5 triiodothyronine (hT/sub 3/) to a small degree. Entry of hT/sub 4/ into the brain after peripheral administration was negligible and was not affected by either cT/sub 4/ nor cT/sub 3/. By contrast, the entry of hT/sub 3/ into the brain after peripheral administration was inhibited by cT/sub 3/ (p < 0.001) and was increased by cT/sub 4/ (p < 0.01). The levels of the unlabeled thyroid hormones administered centrally in these studies did not affect bulk flow, as assessed by labeled red blood cells (/sup 99m/Tc-RBC), or the carrier mediated transport of iodide out of the brain. Likewise, the vascular space of the brain and body, as assessed by /sup 99m/Tc-RBC, was unchanged by the levels of peripherally administered unlabeled thyroid hormones. Therefore, the results of these studies are not due to generalized effects of thyroid hormones on BBB transport. The results indicate that in the mouse the major carrier-mediated system for thyroxine in the BBB transports thyroxine out of the brain, while the major system for triiodothyronine transports hormone into the brain. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. The Preventive Effects of Neural Stem Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Intra-ventricular Injection on Brain Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Samimi, Nastaran; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Shakibajahromi, Benafshe; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Sani, Mahsa; Mohamadpour, Masoomeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important causes of disability in developed countries and, unfortunately, there is no effective treatment for this major problem of central nervous system (CNS); cell therapy may be helpful to recover this disease. In some conditions such as cardiac surgeries and neurosurgeries, there are some possibilities of happening brain stroke. Inflammation of CNS plays an important role in stroke pathogenesis, in addition, apoptosis and neural death could be the other reasons of poor neurological out come after stroke. In this study, we examined the preventive effects of the neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) intra-ventricular injected on stroke in rats. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of neural and MSCs for stroke in rats. Materials and Methods: The MSCs were isolated by flashing the femurs and tibias of the male rats with appropriate media. The NSCs were isolated from rat embryo ganglion eminence and they cultured NSCs media till the neurospheres formed. Both NSCs and MSCs were labeled with PKH26-GL. One day before stroke, the cells were injected into lateral ventricle stereotactically. Results: During following for 28 days, the neurological scores indicated that there are better recoveries in the groups received stem cells and they had less lesion volume in their brain measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Furthermore, the activities of caspase-3 were lower in the stem cell received groups than control group and the florescent microscopy images showed that the stem cells migrated to various zones of the brains. Conclusion: Both NSCs and MSCs are capable of protecting the CNS against ischemia and they may be good ways to prevent brain stroke consequences situations. PMID:26605202

  15. MRI as a tool to study brain structure from mouse models for mental retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan; Kooy, R. F.; Reyniers, E.; Fransen, E.; Oostra, B. A.; Willems, Peter; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1998-07-01

    Nowadays, transgenic mice are a common tool to study brain abnormalities in neurological disorders. These studies usually rely on neuropathological examinations, which have a number of drawbacks, including the risk of artefacts introduced by fixation and dehydration procedures. Here we present 3D Fast Spin Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in combination with 2D and 3D segmentation techniques as a powerful tool to study brain anatomy. We set up MRI of the brain in mouse models for the fragile X syndrome (FMR1 knockout) and Corpus callosum hypoplasia, mental Retardation, Adducted thumbs, Spastic paraplegia and Hydrocephalus (CRASH) syndrome (L1CAM knockout). Our major goal was to determine qualitative and quantitative differences in specific brain structures. MRI of the brain of fragile X and CRASH patients has revealed alterations in the size of specific brain structures, including the cerebellar vermis and the ventricular system. In the present MRI study of the brain from fragile X knockout mice, we have measured the size of the brain, cerebellum and 4th ventricle, which were reported as abnormal in human fragile X patients, but found no evidence for altered brain regions in the mouse model. In CRASH syndrome, the most specific brain abnormalities are vermis hypoplasia and abnormalities of the ventricular system with some degree of hydrocephalus. With the MRI study of L1CAM knockout mice we found vermis hypoplasia, abnormalities of the ventricular system including dilatation of the lateral and the 4th ventricles. These subtle abnormalities were not detected upon standard neuropathological examination. Here we proved that this sensitive MRI technique allows to measure small differences which can not always be detected by means of pathology.

  16. Electrically elicited blink reflex and early acoustic evoked potentials in circumscribed and diffuse brain stem lesions.

    PubMed

    Klug, N; Csécsei, G

    1987-01-01

    In the present paper, the function of the brain stem in patients with brain stem lesions of various aetiology is investigated with electrophysiological methods. The clinical observations are supplemented by experimental investigations on cats, in which the blink reflex and the early acoustic evoked potentials were registered during the acute elevation of intracranial pressure. The findings in patients with circumscribed space-occupying lesions in the posterior fossa document that the registration of the BR and the BAEP have a functional diagnostic significance above and beyond the neurological and radiological investigation. In the case of the cerebellar space occupations, specific alterations could not be observed. On the contrary, the alterations of BR and BAEP indicate a general disturbance of brain stem function, possibly as a result of a general increase of intracranial pressure. In cerebellopontine angle tumours, both BR and BAEP showed specific alterations which were usually asymmetrical. The BR changes ipsilateral to the tumour are of major topodiagnostic significance, whereas the alterations of the contralateral potential are especially informative in the registration of BAEP. The alterations of BR and BAEP also allow an appraisal of the localization and extent of the lesion in primary space occupations in the brain stem: A pathological R1 indicates a pontine lesion, whereas pathological R2 responses are found in medullary and in oral pontine and mesencephalic lesions. In contrast to cerebellopontine angle tumours, the BAEP tends to show symmetrical alterations in primary brain stem lesions. The prolongations of interpeak latencies correspond to the brain stem segment concerned, and the same also applies to pathological amplitude reduction and deformations of individual potentials. In patients with localized brain stem damage, the reflex pathway of R2 is discussed on the basis of the BR findings. In contrast to the view held up to now that only structures

  17. Brain oxygen tension controls the expansion of outer subventricular zone-like basal progenitors in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne K; Braunschweig, Lena; Marrone, Lara; Storch, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex shows a conserved six-layered structure that differs between species in the total number of cortical neurons produced owing to differences in the relative abundance of distinct progenitor populations. Recent studies have identified a new class of proliferative neurogenic cells in the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) in gyrencephalic species such as primates and ferrets. Lissencephalic brains of mice possess fewer OSVZ-like progenitor cells and these do not constitute a distinct layer. Most in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that oxygen regulates the maintenance, proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells. Here we dissect the effects of fetal brain oxygen tension on neural progenitor cell activity using a novel mouse model that allows oxygen tension to be controlled within the hypoxic microenvironment in the neurogenic niche of the fetal brain in vivo. Indeed, maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21% and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal brain oxygenation. Increased oxygen tension in fetal mouse forebrain in vivo leads to a marked expansion of a distinct proliferative cell population, basal to the SVZ. These cells constitute a novel neurogenic cell layer, similar to the OSVZ, and contribute to corticogenesis by heading for deeper cortical layers as a part of the cortical plate.

  18. Quantitative map of multiple auditory cortical regions with a stereotaxic fine-scale atlas of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukano, Hiroaki; Horie, Masao; Hishida, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging studies have recently revealed the presence of multiple auditory cortical regions in the mouse brain. We have previously demonstrated, using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging, at least six regions in the mouse auditory cortex, including the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), the secondary auditory field (AII), dorsoanterior field (DA), dorsomedial field (DM), and dorsoposterior field (DP). While multiple regions in the visual cortex and somatosensory cortex have been annotated and consolidated in recent brain atlases, the multiple auditory cortical regions have not yet been presented from a coronal view. In the current study, we obtained regional coordinates of the six auditory cortical regions of the C57BL/6 mouse brain and illustrated these regions on template coronal brain slices. These results should reinforce the existing mouse brain atlases and support future studies in the auditory cortex. PMID:26924462

  19. Burn wound healing with injection of adipose-derived stem cells: a mouse model study.

    PubMed

    Karimi, H; Soudmand, A; Orouji, Z; Taghiabadi, E; Mousavi, S J

    2014-03-31

    Stem cells have shown promise with regard to the healing process of burn wounds. However, donor sites for these cells are still under investigation. The aim of this study is to review the efficacy of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in accelerating wound healing of third degree burns in a mouse model. To this end, forty healthy male inbred Balb/c mice were selected and set up as an experimental model for third degree burn wounds. They were randomly divided into 3 equally sized groups: the ADSCs group, the mechanically prepared adipose tissue group, and the control group. The wounds were examined daily until the mice were sacrificed for tissue sampling in the 3(rd) week. Our results showed that wound surface area and eschar thickness were smaller in the ADSCs group throughout the study period, although there was no significant difference between the groups for decreasing values of wound area characteristics. In terms of wound healing parameters, lymphocyte and macrophage cell counts were larger in the ADSCs group compared to the other groups. Fibroplasia, collagen synthesis and remodeling were more aberrant in this group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in either of these observed differences (p>0.05). Although enzymatically prepared ADSCs seem a potential treatment in wound healing, our study of a mouse model burn wound revealed no significant improvement in using this option.

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver.

  1. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72h after exposure to 0.25mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment.

  2. Stem-cell Based Engineered Immunity Against HIV Infection in the Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Rezek, Valerie; Youn, Cindy; Rick, Jonathan; Lam, Brianna; Chang, Nelson; Zack, Jerome; Kamata, Masakazu; Kitchen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of stem cell-based gene therapies against HIV, there is pressing requirement for an animal model to study the hematopoietic differentiation and immune function of the genetically modified cells. The humanized Bone-marrow/Liver/Thymus (BLT) mouse model allows for full reconstitution of a human immune system in the periphery, which includes T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes. The human thymic implant also allows for thymic selection of T cells in autologous thymic tissue. In addition to the study of HIV infection, the model stands as a powerful tool to study differentiation, development and functionality of cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here we outline the construction of humanized non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-common gamma chain knockout (cγ(-/-))-Bone-marrow/Liver/Thymus (NSG-BLT) mice with HSCs transduced with CD4 chimeric antigen receptor (CD4CAR) lentivirus vector. We show that the CD4CAR HSCs can successfully differentiate into multiple lineages and have anti-HIV activity. The goal of the study is to demonstrate the use of NSG-BLT mouse model as an in vivo model for engineered immunity against HIV. It is worth noting that, because lentivirus and human tissue is used, experiments and surgeries should be performed in a Class II biosafety cabinet in a Biosafety Level 2 (BSL2) with special precautions (BSL2+) facility. PMID:27404517

  3. Developmental analysis of tropomyosin gene expression in embryonic stem cells and mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Muthuchamy, M; Pajak, L; Howles, P; Doetschman, T; Wieczorek, D F

    1993-01-01

    Tropomyosins (TMs) comprise a family of actin-binding proteins which play an important role in the regulation of contractility in muscle (cardiac, skeletal, and smooth) and nonmuscle cells. Although they are present in all cells, different isoforms are characteristic of specific cell types. In vertebrates, there are four different TM genes (alpha-TM, beta-TM, TM30, and TM4), three of which generate alternatively spliced isoforms. This study defines the expression patterns of these isoforms during murine embryogenesis, using both in vivo and in vitro conditions. The embryonic stem cell culture system, which has been shown to mimic different stages of mouse embryonic development, including the differentiation of primitive organ systems such as the myocardium, is used for our in vitro analysis. Our results demonstrate that several TM isoforms are expressed in specific developmental patterns, often correlated with the differentiation of particular tissues or organs. Surprisingly, other TMs, such as the striated muscle beta-TM and smooth muscle alpha-TM, are expressed constitutively. This study also demonstrates that there is an excellent correlation between the expression patterns of the TM isoforms observed in developing embryonic stem cells and mouse embryos. In addition, a quantitative molecular analysis of TM isoforms was conducted in embryonic, neonatal, and adult cardiac tissue. Our results show for the first time that the alpha- and beta-TM striated muscle transcripts are present in the earliest functional stages of the heart, and these TM isoforms are identical to those present throughout cardiac development. Images PMID:7684495

  4. Regional volumes in brain stem and cerebellum are associated with postural impairments in young brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Leunissen, Inge; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Hoogkamer, Wouter; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffer from postural control impairments that can profoundly affect daily life. The cerebellum and brain stem are crucial for the neural control of posture and have been shown to be vulnerable to primary and secondary structural consequences of TBI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphometric differences in the brain stem and cerebellum can account for impairments in static and dynamic postural control in TBI. TBI patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 30) completed three challenging postural control tasks on the EquiTest® system (Neurocom). Infratentorial grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes were analyzed with cerebellum-optimized voxel-based morphometry using the spatially unbiased infratentorial toolbox. Volume loss in TBI patients was revealed in global cerebellar GM, global infratentorial WM, middle cerebellar peduncles, pons and midbrain. In the TBI group and across both groups, lower postural control performance was associated with reduced GM volume in the vermal/paravermal regions of lobules I-IV, V and VI. Moreover, across all participants, worse postural control performance was associated with lower WM volume in the pons, medulla, midbrain, superior and middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellum. This is the first study in TBI patients to demonstrate an association between postural impairments and reduced volume in specific infratentorial brain areas. Volumetric measures of the brain stem and cerebellum may be valuable prognostic markers of the chronic neural pathology, which complicates rehabilitation of postural control in TBI.

  5. Regional volumes in brain stem and cerebellum are associated with postural impairments in young brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Leunissen, Inge; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Hoogkamer, Wouter; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffer from postural control impairments that can profoundly affect daily life. The cerebellum and brain stem are crucial for the neural control of posture and have been shown to be vulnerable to primary and secondary structural consequences of TBI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphometric differences in the brain stem and cerebellum can account for impairments in static and dynamic postural control in TBI. TBI patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 30) completed three challenging postural control tasks on the EquiTest® system (Neurocom). Infratentorial grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes were analyzed with cerebellum-optimized voxel-based morphometry using the spatially unbiased infratentorial toolbox. Volume loss in TBI patients was revealed in global cerebellar GM, global infratentorial WM, middle cerebellar peduncles, pons and midbrain. In the TBI group and across both groups, lower postural control performance was associated with reduced GM volume in the vermal/paravermal regions of lobules I-IV, V and VI. Moreover, across all participants, worse postural control performance was associated with lower WM volume in the pons, medulla, midbrain, superior and middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellum. This is the first study in TBI patients to demonstrate an association between postural impairments and reduced volume in specific infratentorial brain areas. Volumetric measures of the brain stem and cerebellum may be valuable prognostic markers of the chronic neural pathology, which complicates rehabilitation of postural control in TBI. PMID:26441014

  6. Multiple Antenatal Dexamethasone Treatment Alters Brain Vessel Differentiation in Newborn Mouse Pups.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Schlundt, Marian; Fehrholz, Markus; Ehrke, Alexander; Kunzmann, Steffen; Liebner, Stefan; Speer, Christian P; Förster, Carola Y

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal steroid treatment decreases morbidity and mortality in premature infants through the maturation of lung tissue, which enables sufficient breathing performance. However, clinical and animal studies have shown that repeated doses of glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone and betamethasone lead to long-term adverse effects on brain development. Therefore, we established a mouse model for antenatal dexamethasone treatment to investigate the effects of dexamethasone on brain vessel differentiation towards the blood-brain barrier (BBB) phenotype, focusing on molecular marker analysis. The major findings were that in total brains on postnatal day (PN) 4 triple antenatal dexamethasone treatment significantly downregulated the tight junction protein claudin-5, the endothelial marker Pecam-1/CD31, the glucocorticoid receptor, the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and Abc transporters (Abcb1a, Abcg2 Abcc4). Less pronounced effects were found after single antenatal dexamethasone treatment and in PN10 samples. Comparisons of total brain samples with isolated brain endothelial cells together with the stainings for Pecam-1/CD31 and claudin-5 led to the assumption that the morphology of brain vessels is affected by antenatal dexamethasone treatment at PN4. On the mRNA level markers for angiogenesis, the sonic hedgehog and the Wnt pathway were downregulated in PN4 samples, suggesting fundamental changes in brain vascularization and/or differentiation. In conclusion, we provided a first comprehensive molecular basis for the adverse effects of multiple antenatal dexamethasone treatment on brain vessel differentiation. PMID:26274818

  7. A pharmacological evidence of positive association between mouse intermale aggression and brain serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A V; Osipova, D V; Naumenko, V S; Terenina, E; Mormède, P; Popova, N K

    2012-07-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the regulation of mouse intermale aggression. Previously, it was shown that intensity of mouse intermale aggression was positively associated with activity of the key enzyme of 5-HT synthesis - tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) in mouse brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pharmacological activation or inhibition of 5-HT synthesis in the brain on intermale aggression in two mouse strains differing in the TPH2 activity: C57BL/6J (B6, high TPH2 activity, high aggressiveness) and CC57BR/Mv (BR, low TPH2 activity, low aggressiveness). Administration of 5-HT precursor L-tryptophan (300 mg/kg, i.p.) to BR mice significantly increased the 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in the midbrain as well as the number of attacks and their duration in the resident-intruder test. And vice versa, administration of TPH2 inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (300 mg/kg, i.p., for 3 consecutive days) to B6 mice dramatically reduced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in brain structures and attenuated the frequency and the duration of aggressive attacks. At the same time, L-tryptophan or pCPA did not influence the percentage of aggressive mice and the attack latency reflecting the threshold of aggressive reaction. This result indicated that the intensity of intermale aggression, but not the threshold of aggressive reaction is positively dependent on 5-HT metabolism in mouse brain.

  8. Functional networks underlying latent inhibition learning in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Puga, Frank; Barrett, Douglas W; Bastida, Christel C; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2007-10-15

    The present study reports the first comprehensive map of brain networks underlying latent inhibition learning and the first application of structural equation modeling to cytochrome oxidase data. In latent inhibition, repeated exposure to a stimulus results in a latent form of learning that inhibits subsequent associations with that stimulus. As neuronal energy demands to form learned associations changes, so does the induction of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase. Therefore, cytochrome oxidase can be used as an endpoint metabolic marker of the effects of experience on regional brain metabolic capacity. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to map brain regions in mice trained on a tone-footshock fear conditioning paradigm with either tone preexposure (latent inhibition), conditioning only (acquisition), conditioning followed by tone alone (extinction), or no handling or conditioning (naive). The ventral cochlear nucleus, medial geniculate, CA1 hippocampus, and perirhinal cortex showed modified metabolic capacity due to latent inhibition. Structural equation modeling was used to determine the causal influences in an anatomical network of these regions and others thought to mediate latent inhibition, including the accumbens and entorhinal cortex. An uncoupling of ascending influences between auditory regions was observed in latent inhibition. There was also a reduced influence on the accumbens from the perirhinal cortex in both latent inhibition and extinction. The results suggest a specific network with a neural mechanism of latent inhibition that appears to involve sensory gating, as evidenced by modifications in metabolic capacity and effective connectivity between auditory regions and reduced perirhinal cortex influence on the accumbens.

  9. A Novel Mouse Model of Penetrating Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja; Wing, Ian D.; Davidsson, Johan; Plantman, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) has been difficult to model in small laboratory animals, such as rats or mice. Previously, we have established a non-fatal, rat model for pTBI using a modified air-rifle that accelerates a pellet, which hits a small probe that then penetrates the experimental animal’s brain. Knockout and transgenic strains of mice offer attractive tools to study biological reactions induced by TBI. Hence, in the present study, we adapted and modified our model to be used with mice. The technical characterization of the impact device included depth and speed of impact, as well as dimensions of the temporary cavity formed in a brain surrogate material after impact. Biologically, we have focused on three distinct levels of severity (mild, moderate, and severe), and characterized the acute phase response to injury in terms of tissue destruction, neural degeneration, and gliosis. Functional outcome was assessed by measuring bodyweight and motor performance on rotarod. The results showed that this model is capable of reproducing major morphological and neurological changes of pTBI; as such, we recommend its utilization in research studies aiming to unravel the biological events underlying injury and regeneration after pTBI. PMID:25374559

  10. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  11. Effects of PAMAM dendrimers in the mouse brain after a single intranasal instillation.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Sone, Hideko; Kurokawa, Yoshika; Zeng, Yang; Zeng, Qin; Nitta, Hiroshi; Hirano, Seishiro

    2014-08-01

    Dendrimers are highly branched spherical nanomaterials produced for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications such as a drug delivery system. The toxicological profiles of dendrimers are largely unknown. We investigated the in vivo effects of nasal exposure to polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on their effects on neurological biomarkers in the mouse brain. A single dose of PAMAM dendrimers (3 or 15μg/mouse) was intranasally administered to 8-week old male BALB/c mice. Twenty-four hours after administration, the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex were collected and potential biomarkers in the blood and brain were examined using blood marker, microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses. No remarkable changes in standard serum biochemical markers were observed in the blood. A microarray analysis showed the alterations of the genes expression level related to pluripotent network, serotonin-anxiety pathway, TGF-beta receptor signaling, prostaglandin synthesis-regulation, complement-coagulation cascades, and chemokine-signaling pathway and non-odorant GPCR signaling pathways in brain tissues. Brain derived-neurotrophic factor mRNA was up-regulated in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice treated with a high dose of dendrimers. These findings suggest that PAMAM dendrimers may reach the brain via the systemic circulation or an olfactory nerve route after intranasal instillation, and indicate that a single intranasal administration of PAMAM dendrimers may potentially lead to neuronal effects by modulating the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathway.

  12. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  13. Characteristics of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells and therapeutic comparisons between syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cell transplantation in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Wha; Shin, Il Seob; Park, So Young; Yoon, Eun Ji; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we found that the intravenous administration of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells was a promising therapeutic option for autoimmune thyroiditis even when the cells were transplanted into a xenogeneic model without an immunosuppressant. Therefore, we explored the comparison between the therapeutic effects of syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cells on an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mouse model. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with porcine thyroglobulin. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells derived from C57BL/6 mice (syngeneic) or BALB/c mice (allogeneic) or saline as a vehicle control were administered intravenously four times weekly. Blood and tissue samples were collected 1 week after the last transplantation. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells from mice were able to differentiate into multiple lineages in vitro; however, mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells did not have immunophenotypes identical to those from humans. Syngeneic and allogeneic administrations of adipose tissue-derived stem cells reduced thyroglobulin autoantibodies and the inflammatory immune response, protected against lymphocyte infiltration into the thyroid, and restored the Th1/Th2 balance without any adverse effects. However, different humoral immune responses were observed for infused cells from different stem cell sources. The strongest humoral immune response was induced by xenogeneic transplantation, followed by allogeneic and syngeneic administration, in that order. The stem cells were mostly found in the spleen, not the thyroid. This migration might be because the stem cells primarily function in systemic immune modulation, due to being given prior to disease induction. In this study, we confirmed that there were equal effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in treating autoimmune thyroiditis between syngeneic and allogeneic transplantations.

  14. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-08-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges.

  15. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach.

    PubMed

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges. PMID:27534708

  16. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    PubMed Central

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges. PMID:27534708

  17. Embryonic Stem Cells Contribute to Mouse Chimeras in the Absence of Detectable Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Benjamin L.; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras. PMID:18338954

  18. Embryonic stem cells contribute to mouse chimeras in the absence of detectable cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Benjamin L; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine; Coucouvanis, Electra

    2008-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras.

  19. Conditioned medium from the stem cells of human dental pulp improves cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mita, Tsuneyuki; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Hattori, Hisashi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by a decline in cognitive abilities and the appearance of β-amyloid plaques in the brain. Although the pathogenic mechanisms associated with AD are not fully understood, activated microglia releasing various neurotoxic factors, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress mediators, appear to play major roles. Here, we investigated the therapeutic benefits of a serum-free conditioned medium (CM) derived from the stem cells of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a mouse model of AD. The intranasal administration of SHEDs in these mice resulted in substantially improved cognitive function. SHED-CM contained factors involved in multiple neuroregenerative mechanisms, such as neuroprotection, axonal elongation, neurotransmission, the suppression of inflammation, and microglial regulation. Notably, SHED-CM attenuated the pro-inflammatory responses induced by β-amyloid plaques, and generated an anti-inflammatory/tissue-regenerating environment, which was accompanied by the induction of anti-inflammatory M2-like microglia. Our data suggest that SHED-CM may provide significant therapeutic benefits for AD.

  20. Symmetry breaking, germ layer specification and axial organisation in aggregates of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Susanne C; Baillie-Johnson, Peter; Balayo, Tina; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Nowotschin, Sonja; Turner, David A; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are clonal populations derived from preimplantation mouse embryos that can be propagated in vitro and, when placed into blastocysts, contribute to all tissues of the embryo and integrate into the normal morphogenetic processes, i.e. they are pluripotent. However, although they can be steered to differentiate in vitro into all cell types of the organism, they cannot organise themselves into structures that resemble embryos. When aggregated into embryoid bodies they develop disorganised masses of different cell types with little spatial coherence. An exception to this rule is the emergence of retinas and anterior cortex-like structures under minimal culture conditions. These structures emerge from the cultures without any axial organisation. Here, we report that small aggregates of mESCs, of about 300 cells, self-organise into polarised structures that exhibit collective behaviours reminiscent of those that cells exhibit in early mouse embryos, including symmetry breaking, axial organisation, germ layer specification and cell behaviour, as well as axis elongation. The responses are signal specific and uncouple processes that in the embryo are tightly associated, such as specification of the anteroposterior axis and anterior neural development, or endoderm specification and axial elongation. We discuss the meaning and implications of these observations and the potential uses of these structures which, because of their behaviour, we suggest to call 'gastruloids'.

  1. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio; Campagnolo, Luisa

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  2. Mouse primed embryonic stem cells could be maintained and reprogrammed on human amnion epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fei; Dong, Zhangli; Jiang, Lizheng; Lai, Dongmei; Guo, Lihe

    2013-01-15

    Naïve and primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent 2 pluripotent states of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), corresponding to the pre- and postimplantation cells, respectively, in vivo. Primed ESCs are distinct from naïve cells in biological characteristics, genetic features, developing potentials, and antagonistic signal pathway dependences to support undifferentiated growth. In vitro, naïve mESCs are readily converted to primed cells upon transferring to primed pluripotency signaling. ESC-derived epiblast stem cells (ESD-EpiSCs) are stabilized primed cells derived from naïve mESCs in vitro, and cannot be maintained with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling with or without mouse embryonic fibroblasts as the feeder layer. Here, we show that the undifferentiated growth of ESD-EpiSCs could be maintained with the basic fibroblast growth factor employing human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as the feeder layer. Upon exposure to LIF, ESD-EpiSCs could undergo a reprogramming process on hAECs and be converted to naïve-like cells converted ESCs (cESCs), in which naïve pluripotency markers were activated, and primed markers were suppressed. DNA methylation analysis also validated the epigenetic conversion from primed to naïve-like pluripotent status. The bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is an important signaling factor in pluripotency controlling, germ cell development, and neural commitment. It showed that ESD-EpiSCs and cESCs exhibited different features toward BMP4. Our results prove that hAECs are ideal feeder cells for both naïve and primed ESCs. More importantly, the primed ESCs are allowed to be reprogrammed to naïve-like pluripotent cells on hAECs. These findings suggest that under suitable conditions primed ESCs have the potency of converting to naïve-like ESCs.

  3. Automatic Stem Cell Detection in Microscopic Whole Mouse Cryo-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wuttisarnwattana, Patiwet; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; van't Hof, Wouter; Cooke, Kenneth R; Wilson, David L

    2016-03-01

    With its single cell sensitivity over volumes as large as or larger than a mouse, cryo-imaging enables imaging of stem cell biodistribution, homing, engraftment, and molecular mechanisms. We developed and evaluated a highly automated software tool to detect fluorescently labeled stem cells within very large ( ∼ 200 GB) cryo-imaging datasets. Cell detection steps are: preprocess, remove immaterial regions, spatially filter to create features, identify candidate pixels, classify pixels using bagging decision trees, segment cell patches, and perform 3D labeling. There are options for analysis and visualization. To train the classifier, we created synthetic images by placing realistic digital cell models onto cryo-images of control mice devoid of cells. Very good cell detection results were (precision=98.49%, recall=99.97%) for synthetic cryo-images, (precision=97.81%, recall=97.71%) for manually evaluated, actual cryo-images, and false positives in control mice. An α-multiplier applied to features allows one to correct for experimental variations in cell brightness due to labeling. On dim cells (37% of standard brightness), with correction, we improved recall (49.26%→ 99.36%) without a significant drop in precision (99.99%→ 99.75%) . With tail vein injection, multipotent adult progenitor cells in a graft-versus-host-disease model in the first days post injection were predominantly found in lung, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Distribution was not simply related to blood flow. The lung contained clusters of cells while other tissues contained single cells. Our methods provided stem cell distribution anywhere in mouse with single cell sensitivity. Methods should provide a rational means of evaluating dosing, delivery methods, cell enhancements, and mechanisms for therapeutic cells.

  4. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  5. Novel Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Mouse Models for Type 1 Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Chen, Wanqiu; Jun, Kristine; Arthur, Helen M.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Endoglin (ENG) is a causative gene of type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1). HHT1 patients have a higher prevalence of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) than the general population and patients with other HHT subtypes. The pathogenesis of brain AVM in HHT1 patients is currently unknown and no specific medical therapy is available to treat patients. Proper animal models are crucial for identifying the underlying mechanisms for brain AVM development and for testing new therapies. However, creating HHT1 brain AVM models has been quite challenging because of difficulties related to deleting Eng-floxed sequence in Eng2fl/2fl mice. To create an HHT1 brain AVM mouse model, we used several Cre transgenic mouse lines to delete Eng in different cell-types in Eng2fl/2fl mice: R26CreER (all cell types after tamoxifen treatment), SM22α-Cre (smooth muscle and endothelial cell) and LysM-Cre (lysozyme M-positive macrophage). An adeno-associated viral vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF) was injected into the brain to induce focal angiogenesis. We found that SM22α-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo caused AVMs in the postnatal brain, spinal cord, and intestines. Induction of Eng deletion in adult mice using R26CreER plus local VEGF stimulation induced the brain AVM phenotype. In both models, Eng-null endothelial cells were detected in the brain AVM lesions, and formed mosaicism with wildtype endothelial cells. However, LysM-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo did not cause AVM in the postnatal brain even after VEGF stimulation. In this study, we report two novel HHT1 brain AVM models that mimic many phenotypes of human brain AVM and can thus be used for studying brain AVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. Further, our data indicate that macrophage Eng deletion is insufficient and that endothelial Eng homozygous deletion is required for HHT1 brain AVM development. PMID:24520391

  6. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  7. Epigallocatechin Gallate Inhibits Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation to Adipogenic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Chani, Baldeep; Puri, Veena; Chander Sobti, Ranbir; Puri, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major component of green tea polyphenols having a potent anti-oxidant potential. Besides inhibiting the growth of many cancer cell types and inducing proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes, it has been shown to promote reduction of body fat. The fact that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have ability to self-renew and differentiate into the cells of mesodermal lineages, such as fat and bone, it is, thus, possible that EGCG may directly be involved in affecting fat metabolism through its effect on mesenchymal stem cells. Hence, with this aim, the present study was designed to determine the effect of EGCG on mouse mesenchymal stem cells, C3H10T1/2 cells differentiation into adipocytes. To understand this process, the cells were incubated with varying concentrations of EGCG (1 μM, 5 μM, 10 μM, 50 μM) in the presence and /or absence of adipogenic medium for 9 days. The results demonstrated that, EGCG inhibited the cells proliferation, migration and also prevented their differentiation to adipogenic lineage. These effects were analyzed through the inhibition of wound healing activity, reduction in Oil red O stained cells, together with decrease in the expression of Adipisin gene following EGCG treatment. These observations thus demonstrated anti-adipogenic effect of EGCG with a possibility of its role in the therapeutic intervention of obesity. PMID:27397998

  8. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  9. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-09-20

    Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  10. Genome Editing in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem/Progenitor Cells Using Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Fanslow, Danielle A.; Wirt, Stacey E.; Barker, Jenny C.; Connelly, Jon P.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Dann, Christina Tenenhaus

    2014-01-01

    Editing the genome to create specific sequence modifications is a powerful way to study gene function and promises future applicability to gene therapy. Creation of precise modifications requires homologous recombination, a very rare event in most cell types that can be stimulated by introducing a double strand break near the target sequence. One method to create a double strand break in a particular sequence is with a custom designed nuclease. We used engineered nucleases to stimulate homologous recombination to correct a mutant gene in mouse “GS” (germline stem) cells, testicular derived cell cultures containing spermatogonial stem cells and progenitor cells. We demonstrated that gene-corrected cells maintained several properties of spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells including the ability to colonize following testicular transplantation. This proof of concept for genome editing in GS cells impacts both cell therapy and basic research given the potential for GS cells to be propagated in vitro, contribute to the germline in vivo following testicular transplantation or become reprogrammed to pluripotency in vitro. PMID:25409432

  11. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim O.; et al

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicatesmore » minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.« less

  12. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim O.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. Finally, we propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  13. Cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells possess cancer stem cell properties in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Guo, Weichun; Wang, Lu; Yu, Ling; Mei, Hongjun; Fang, Shuo; Ji, Peng; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gaiwei; Song, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignancy of the bones, and although advances in chemotherapy and surgery had been achieved in recent years, the long-term survival rate has reached a plateau. The main reason for this is the aggressive malignant potential and poor response of the disease to chemotherapy. However, several studies have found that tumor resistance is associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). To address this issue, in the present study, osteosarcoma cells were treated with specially designated concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP) in a mouse model. Hematoxylin and eosin staining analyses were performed to assess tissue structure, in vivo passaging and CDDP treatment. Drug resistance genes and well-established stemness genes were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A serum-starved sphere formation assay was adopted to evaluate the ability to generate spherical clones and flow cytometry as used to test the expression of the cluster of differentiation 117 and Stro-1 surface markers, known as markers of CSCs. It was found that CDDP could induce an effect of resistance in the osteosarcoma cells, which possessed cancer stem CSC properties, as shown by the elevated expression of CSC marker genes and the higher expression of the cluster of differentiation 117 and Stro-1 surface markers. Moreover, the cells that dissociated from the tumor tissues exhibited an increased ability to form sarcospheres. The results of this study provided a significant correlation between resistance and CSCs, and revealed a clue indicating that osteosarcoma recurrence is likely to be associated with CSCs. PMID:27698833

  14. Specificity and Heterogeneity of Terahertz Radiation Effect on Gene Expression in Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Booshehri, Layla G.; Erat, Anna; Zabolotny, Janice; Mielke, Charles H.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny

    2013-01-01

    We report that terahertz (THz) irradiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) with a single-frequency (SF) 2.52 THz laser or pulsed broadband (centered at 10 THz) source results in irradiation specific heterogenic changes in gene expression. The THz effect depends on irradiation parameters such as the duration and type of THz source, and on the degree of stem cell differentiation. Our microarray survey and RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that prolonged broadband THz irradiation drives mMSCs toward differentiation, while 2-hour irradiation (regardless of THz sources) affects genes transcriptionally active in pluripotent stem cells. The strictly controlled experimental environment indicates minimal temperature changes and the absence of any discernable response to heat shock and cellular stress genes imply a non-thermal response. Computer simulations of the core promoters of two pluripotency markers reveal association between gene upregulation and propensity for DNA breathing. We propose that THz radiation has potential for non-contact control of cellular gene expression.

  15. Cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells possess cancer stem cell properties in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Guo, Weichun; Wang, Lu; Yu, Ling; Mei, Hongjun; Fang, Shuo; Ji, Peng; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gaiwei; Song, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignancy of the bones, and although advances in chemotherapy and surgery had been achieved in recent years, the long-term survival rate has reached a plateau. The main reason for this is the aggressive malignant potential and poor response of the disease to chemotherapy. However, several studies have found that tumor resistance is associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). To address this issue, in the present study, osteosarcoma cells were treated with specially designated concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP) in a mouse model. Hematoxylin and eosin staining analyses were performed to assess tissue structure, in vivo passaging and CDDP treatment. Drug resistance genes and well-established stemness genes were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A serum-starved sphere formation assay was adopted to evaluate the ability to generate spherical clones and flow cytometry as used to test the expression of the cluster of differentiation 117 and Stro-1 surface markers, known as markers of CSCs. It was found that CDDP could induce an effect of resistance in the osteosarcoma cells, which possessed cancer stem CSC properties, as shown by the elevated expression of CSC marker genes and the higher expression of the cluster of differentiation 117 and Stro-1 surface markers. Moreover, the cells that dissociated from the tumor tissues exhibited an increased ability to form sarcospheres. The results of this study provided a significant correlation between resistance and CSCs, and revealed a clue indicating that osteosarcoma recurrence is likely to be associated with CSCs.

  16. The pluripotency factor Nanog regulates pericentromeric heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Novo, Clara Lopes; Tang, Calvin; Ahmed, Kashif; Djuric, Ugljesa; Fussner, Eden; Mullin, Nicholas P; Morgan, Natasha P; Hayre, Jasvinder; Sienerth, Arnold R; Elderkin, Sarah; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Chambers, Ian; Ellis, James; Bazett-Jones, David P; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    An open and decondensed chromatin organization is a defining property of pluripotency. Several epigenetic regulators have been implicated in maintaining an open chromatin organization, but how these processes are connected to the pluripotency network is unknown. Here, we identified a new role for the transcription factor NANOG as a key regulator connecting the pluripotency network with constitutive heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells. Deletion of Nanog leads to chromatin compaction and the remodeling of heterochromatin domains. Forced expression of NANOG in epiblast stem cells is sufficient to decompact chromatin. NANOG associates with satellite repeats within heterochromatin domains, contributing to an architecture characterized by highly dispersed chromatin fibers, low levels of H3K9me3, and high major satellite transcription, and the strong transactivation domain of NANOG is required for this organization. The heterochromatin-associated protein SALL1 is a direct cofactor for NANOG, and loss of Sall1 recapitulates the Nanog-null phenotype, but the loss of Sall1 can be circumvented through direct recruitment of the NANOG transactivation domain to major satellites. These results establish a direct connection between the pluripotency network and chromatin organization and emphasize that maintaining an open heterochromatin architecture is a highly regulated process in embryonic stem cells. PMID:27125671

  17. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  18. Transcriptional Profiling of Adult Neural Stem-Like Cells from the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O.; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33–60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate. PMID

  19. Immunomodulation in stem cell differentiation into neurons and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Henning; do Nascimento, Isis Cristina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Tárnok, Attila

    2015-06-01

    Immunomodulators regulate stem cell activity at all stages of development as well as during adulthood. Embryonic stem cell (ESC) proliferation as well as neurogenic processes during embryonic development are controlled by factors of the immune system. We review here immunophenotypic expression patterns of  different stem cell types, including ESC, neural (NSC) and tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), and focus on immunodulatory properties of these cells. Immune and inflammatory responses, involving actions of cytokines as well as toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling are known to affect the differentiation capacity of NSC and MSC. Secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory messengers by MSC have been observed as the consequence of TLR and cytokine activation and promotion of differentiation into specified phenotypes. As result of augmented differentiation capacity, stem cells secrete angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, resulting in multifactorial actions in tissue repair. Immunoregulatory properties of tissue specific adult stem cells are put into the context of possible clinical applications.

  20. Mapping oxygen concentration in the awake mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Declan G; Parpaleix, Alexandre; Roche, Morgane; Charpak, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Although critical for brain function, the physiological values of cerebral oxygen concentration have remained elusive because high-resolution measurements have only been performed during anesthesia, which affects two major parameters modulating tissue oxygenation: neuronal activity and blood flow. Using measurements of capillary erythrocyte-associated transients, fluctuations of oxygen partial pressure (Po2) associated with individual erythrocytes, to infer Po2 in the nearby neuropil, we report the first non-invasive micron-scale mapping of cerebral Po2 in awake, resting mice. Interstitial Po2 has similar values in the olfactory bulb glomerular layer and the somatosensory cortex, whereas there are large capillary hematocrit and erythrocyte flux differences. Awake tissue Po2 is about half that under isoflurane anesthesia, and within the cortex, vascular and interstitial Po2 values display layer-specific differences which dramatically contrast with those recorded under anesthesia. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring energy parameters non-invasively in physiological conditions to precisely quantify and model brain metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12024.001 PMID:26836304

  1. Relationship of impaired brain glucose metabolism to learning deficit in the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Nishikawa, H; Hirai, K; Kato, K; Miyamoto, M

    1996-10-11

    The relationship between brain glucose metabolism and learning deficit was examined in the senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, which has been proven to be a useful murine model of age-related behavioral disorders. SAMP8, 7 months old, exhibited marked learning impairment in the passive avoidance task, as compared with the control strain, senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1. SAMP8 also exhibited a reduction in brain glucose metabolism, as indicated by a reduction in [14C]2-deoxyglucose accumulation in the brain following the intravenous injection impaired glucose metabolism correlated significantly with the learning impairment in all brain regions in SAMR1 and SAMP8. In the SAMP8, a significant correlation was observed in the posterior half of the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that the SAMP8 strain is a useful model of not only age-related behavioral disorders, but also glucose hypometabolism observed in aging and dementias. PMID:8905734

  2. Imaging whole-brain cytoarchitecture of mouse with MRI-based quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Xie, Luke; Dibb, Russell; Li, Wei; Decker, Kyle; Zhang, Yuyao; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Chunlei

    2016-08-15

    The proper microstructural arrangement of complex neural structures is essential for establishing the functional circuitry of the brain. We present an MRI method to resolve tissue microstructure and infer brain cytoarchitecture by mapping the magnetic susceptibility in the brain at high resolution. This is possible because of the heterogeneous magnetic susceptibility created by varying concentrations of lipids, proteins and irons from the cell membrane to cytoplasm. We demonstrate magnetic susceptibility maps at a nominal resolution of 10-μm isotropic, approaching the average cell size of a mouse brain. The maps reveal many detailed structures including the retina cell layers, olfactory sensory neurons, barrel cortex, cortical layers, axonal fibers in white and gray matter. Olfactory glomerulus density is calculated and structural connectivity is traced in the optic nerve, striatal neurons, and brainstem nerves. The method is robust and can be readily applied on MRI scanners at or above 7T. PMID:27181764

  3. The ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin are required for retinoic acid-dependent neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; De Mori, Roberta; Savino, Mauro; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of the primary cilium, a complex, evolutionarily conserved, organelle playing an important role in sensing and transducing cell signals, is the unifying pathogenetic mechanism of a growing number of diseases collectively termed "ciliopathies", typically characterized by multiorgan involvement. Developmental defects of the central nervous system (CNS) characterize a subset of ciliopathies showing clinical and genetic overlap, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MS). Although several knock-out mice lacking a variety of ciliary proteins have shown the importance of primary cilia in the development of the brain and CNS-derived structures, developmental in vitro studies, extremely useful to unravel the role of primary cilia along the course of neural differentiation, are still missing. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have been recently proven to mimic brain development, giving the unique opportunity to dissect the CNS differentiation process along its sequential steps. In the present study we show that mESCs express the ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin in a developmentally-regulated manner, and that these proteins co-localize with acetylated tubulin labeled cilia located at the outer embryonic layer. Further, mESCs differentiating along the neuronal lineage activate the cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling machinery, which is impaired in Meckelin knock-out cells but results unaffected in Jouberin-deficient mESCs. However, both lose the ability to acquire a neuronal phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate a pivotal role of Meckelin and Jouberin during embryonic neural specification and indicate mESCs as a suitable tool to investigate the developmental impact of ciliary proteins dysfunction.

  4. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El-Akabawy, Gehan; El-Mehi, Abeer

    2015-06-01

    The clinical significance of enhancing endogenous circulating haematopoietic stem cells is becoming increasingly recognized, and the augmentation of circulating stem cells using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has led to promising preclinical and clinical results for several liver fibrotic conditions. However, this approach is largely limited by cost and the infeasibility of maintaining long-term administration. Preclinical studies have reported that StemEnhance, a mild haematopoietic stem cell mobilizer, promotes cardiac muscle regeneration and remedies the manifestation of diabetes. However, the effectiveness of StemEnhance in ameliorating liver cirrhosis has not been studied. This study is the first to evaluate the beneficial effect of StemEnhance administration in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis. StemEnhance augmented the number of peripheral CD34-positive cells, reduced hepatic fibrosis, improved histopathological changes, and induced endogenous liver proliferation. In addition, VEGF expression was up-regulated, while TNF-α expression was down-regulated in thioacetamide-induced fibrotic livers after StemEnhance intake. These data suggest that StemEnhance may be useful as a potential therapeutic candidate for liver fibrosis by inducing reparative effects via mobilization of haematopoietic stem cells.

  5. Efficient and Rapid Derivation of Primitive Neural Stem Cells and Generation of Brain Subtype Neurons From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yiping; Shin, Soojung; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Liu, Qiuyue; Sheng, Jianting; Li, Fuhai; Zhan, Ming; Davis, Janine; Bharti, Kapil; Zeng, Xianmin; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, are unique cell sources for disease modeling, drug discovery screens, and cell therapy applications. The first step in producing neural lineages from hPSCs is the generation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Current methods of NSC derivation involve the time-consuming, labor-intensive steps of an embryoid body generation or coculture with stromal cell lines that result in low-efficiency derivation of NSCs. In this study, we report a highly efficient serum-free pluripotent stem cell neural induction medium that can induce hPSCs into primitive NSCs (pNSCs) in 7 days, obviating the need for time-consuming, laborious embryoid body generation or rosette picking. The pNSCs expressed the neural stem cell markers Pax6, Sox1, Sox2, and Nestin; were negative for Oct4; could be expanded for multiple passages; and could be differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, in addition to the brain region-specific neuronal subtypes GABAergic, dopaminergic, and motor neurons. Global gene expression of the transcripts of pNSCs was comparable to that of rosette-derived and human fetal-derived NSCs. This work demonstrates an efficient method to generate expandable pNSCs, which can be further differentiated into central nervous system neurons and glia with temporal, spatial, and positional cues of brain regional heterogeneity. This method of pNSC derivation sets the stage for the scalable production of clinically relevant neural cells for cell therapy applications in good manufacturing practice conditions. PMID:24113065

  6. Intrinsic expression of transcortin in neural cells of the mouse brain: a histochemical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Sivukhina, Elena; Helbling, Jean-Christophe; Minni, Amandine M; Schäfer, H Hendrik; Pallet, Véronique; Jirikowski, Gustav F; Moisan, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-15

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, transcortin) has been shown to be expressed in the brain of rat and human species. In this study, we examined the CBG brain expression and cDNA structure in mice, comparing wild-type (Cbg(+/+)) and Cbg knockout mice (Cbg(-/-), obtained by genetic disruption of the SerpinA6 alias Cbg gene). We used double immunofluorescence labeling with specific neuronal and glial markers to analyze the cellular localization of CBG in various regions of the mouse brain. In wild-type (Cbg(+/+)) mice, we found CBG immunoreactivity in neuronal perikarya of the magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei, amygdala, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pituitary. A portion of glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes) contained CBG immunoreactivity, including some of the ependymal cells and choroid plexus cells. No CBG immunoreactivity was detected in Cbg(-/-) brain tissues. Using RT-PCR, we showed that the full-length Cbg mRNA is present in those regions, indicating an intrinsic expression of the steroid-binding globulin. Furthermore, sequencing analysis showed that Cbg cDNA obtained from the mouse hypothalamus was homologous to Cbg cDNA obtained from the liver. Finally, we have evaluated the relative levels of CBG expression in various brain regions and in the liver by quantitative PCR. We found that brain levels of Cbg mRNA are low compared with the liver but significantly higher than in CBG-deficient mice. Although derived from the same gene as liver CBG, brain CBG protein may play a specific or complementary role that requires the production and analysis of brain-specific Cbg knockout models. PMID:22996440

  7. Gene expression based mouse brain parcellation using Markov random field regularized non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Haynor, David R.; Thompson, Carol L.; Lein, Ed; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the geography of genetic expression in the mouse brain has opened previously unexplored avenues in neuroinformatics. The Allen Brain Atlas (www.brain-map.org) (ABA) provides genome-wide colorimetric in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression images at high spatial resolution, all mapped to a common three-dimensional 200μm3 spatial framework defined by the Allen Reference Atlas (ARA) and is a unique data set for studying expression based structural and functional organization of the brain. The goal of this study was to facilitate an unbiased data-driven structural partitioning of the major structures in the mouse brain. We have developed an algorithm that uses nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to perform parts based analysis of ISH gene expression images. The standard NMF approach and its variants are limited in their ability to flexibly integrate prior knowledge, in the context of spatial data. In this paper, we introduce spatial connectivity as an additional regularization in NMF decomposition via the use of Markov Random Fields (mNMF). The mNMF algorithm alternates neighborhood updates with iterations of the standard NMF algorithm to exploit spatial correlations in the data. We present the algorithm and show the sub-divisions of hippocampus and somatosensory-cortex obtained via this approach. The results are compared with established neuroanatomic knowledge. We also highlight novel gene expression based sub divisions of the hippocampus identified by using the mNMF algorithm.

  8. Transcriptomic configuration of mouse brain induced by adolescent exposure to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Eun, Jung Woo; Kwack, Seung Jun; Noh, Ji Heon; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie Hongjian; Ryu, Jae Chun; Ahn, Young Min; Min, Jin-Hye; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Rhee, Gyu Seek; Nam, Suk Woo

    2009-05-15

    The amphetamine derivative ({+-})-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is a synthetic amphetamine analogue used recreationally to obtain an enhanced affiliative emotional response. MDMA is a potent monoaminergic neurotoxin with the potential to damage brain serotonin and/or dopamine neurons. As the majority of MDMA users are young adults, the risk that users may expose the fetus to MDMA is a concern. However, the majority of studies on MDMA have investigated the effects on adult animals. Here, we investigated whether long-term exposure to MDMA, especially in adolescence, could induce comprehensive transcriptional changes in mouse brain. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse brain regions demonstrated significant gene expression changes in the cerebral cortex. Supervised analysis identified 1028 genes that were chronically dysregulated by long-term exposure to MDMA in adolescent mice. Functional categories most represented by this MDMA characteristic signature are intracellular molecular signaling pathways of neurotoxicity, such as, the MAPK signaling pathway, the Wnt signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, long-term potentiation, and the long-term depression signaling pathway. Although these resultant large-scale molecular changes remain to be studied associated with functional brain damage caused by MDMA, our observations delineate the possible neurotoxic effects of MDMA on brain function, and have therapeutic implications concerning neuro-pathological conditions associated with MDMA abuse.

  9. Dysbindin-Associated Proteome in the P2 Synaptosome Fraction of Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The gene DTNBP1 encodes the protein dysbindin and is among the most promising and highly investigated schizophrenia-risk genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that dysbindin plays an important role in the regulation of neuroplasticity. Dysbindin was reported to be a stable component of BLOC-1 complex in the cytosol. However, little is known about the endogenous dysbindin-containing complex in the brain synaptosome. In this study, we investigated the associated proteome of dysbindin in the P2 synaptosome fraction of mouse brain. Our data suggest that dysbindin has three isoforms associating with different complexes in the P2 fraction of mouse brain. To facilitate immunopurification, BAC transgenic mice expressing a tagged dysbindin were generated, and 47 putative dysbindin-associated proteins, including all components of BLOC-1, were identified by mass spectrometry in the dysbindin-containing complex purified from P2. The interactions of several selected candidates, including WDR11, FAM91A1, snapin, muted, pallidin, and two proteasome subunits, PSMD9 and PSMA4, were verified by coimmunoprecipitation. The specific proteasomal activity is significantly reduced in the P2 fraction of the brains of the dysbindin-null mutant (sandy) mice. Our data suggest that dysbindin is functionally interrelated to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and offer a molecular repertoire for future study of dysbindin functional networks in brain. PMID:25198678

  10. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  11. Bitter Taste Stimuli Induce Differential Neural Codes in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.; Boughter, John D.; Lemon, Christian H.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests taste stimuli commonly classified as “bitter” induce heterogeneous neural and perceptual responses. Here, the central processing of bitter stimuli was studied in mice with genetically controlled bitter taste profiles. Using these mice removed genetic heterogeneity as a factor influencing gustatory neural codes for bitter stimuli. Electrophysiological activity (spikes) was recorded from single neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius during oral delivery of taste solutions (26 total), including concentration series of the bitter tastants quinine, denatonium benzoate, cycloheximide, and sucrose octaacetate (SOA), presented to the whole mouth for 5 s. Seventy-nine neurons were sampled; in many cases multiple cells (2 to 5) were recorded from a mouse. Results showed bitter stimuli induced variable gustatory activity. For example, although some neurons responded robustly to quinine and cycloheximide, others displayed concentration-dependent activity (p<0.05) to quinine but not cycloheximide. Differential activity to bitter stimuli was observed across multiple neurons recorded from one animal in several mice. Across all cells, quinine and denatonium induced correlated spatial responses that differed (p<0.05) from those to cycloheximide and SOA. Modeling spatiotemporal neural ensemble activity revealed responses to quinine/denatonium and cycloheximide/SOA diverged during only an early, at least 1 s wide period of the taste response. Our findings highlight how temporal features of sensory processing contribute differences among bitter taste codes and build on data suggesting heterogeneity among “bitter” stimuli, data that challenge a strict monoguesia model for the bitter quality. PMID:22844505

  12. Mapping of the full length and the truncated interleukin-18 receptor alpha in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Alboni, Silvia; Cervia, Davide; Ross, Brendon; Montanari, Claudia; Gonzalez, Alejandro Sanchez; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; De Vries, David; Sugama, Shuei; Brunello, Nicoletta; Blom, Joan; Tascedda, Fabio; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The cytokine IL-18 acts on the CNS both in physiological and pathological conditions. Its action occurs through the heterodimeric receptor IL-18Rα\\β. To better understand IL-18 central effects, we investigated in the mouse brain the distribution of two IL-18Rα transcripts, a full length and an isoform lacking the intracellular domain hypothesized to be a decoy receptor. Both isoforms were expressed in neurons throughout the brain primarily with overlapping distribution but also with some unique pattern. These data suggest that IL-18 may modulate neuronal functions and that its action may be regulated through expression of a decoy receptor. PMID:19640592

  13. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-02-27

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in /sup 3/H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture.

  14. High-speed Label-free Functional Photoacoustic Microscopy of Mouse Brain in Action

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which is capable of three-dimensional high-resolution high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. A single-wavelength pulse-width-based method was implemented to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution and a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in the brain in both resting and stimulated states. PMID:25822799

  15. The relation between motor activity and [3H]uridine uptake in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pakkenberg, H; Fog, R

    2006-12-01

    Using microautoradiography ex vivo we tested the effect of forced running on a roller drum for 3 h on the nuclear incorporation of [5-(3)H uridine] in mouse brain. Specific neuron types with increased nuclear labelling included primary motor cortex layer 5 nerve cells with nuclei greater than 12 microm (+38%) and large neuron nuclei in putamen (+58%). Mice running for 45 min do not show any change in the labelling of nerve cell nuclei compared with mice moving freely in the cage. The [(3)H]uridine uptake in other cell types, e.g. other neurons in cortical layer 5, neurons in sensory cortex and in the other cell layers in motor cortex, were not different from control mice. We conclude that RNA synthesis is normally low in adult mouse brain, but that physical exercise stimulates RNA synthesis in specific populations of large neurons in the motor system.

  16. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  17. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  18. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    While adult heart muscle is the least regenerative of tissues, embryonic cardiomyocytes are proliferative, with embryonic stem (ES) cells providing an endless reservoir. In addition to secreted factors and cell-cell interactions, the extracellular microenvironment has been shown to play an important role in stem cell lineage specification, and understanding how scaffold elasticity influences cardiac differentiation is crucial to cardiac tissue engineering. Though previous studies have analyzed the role of matrix elasticity on the function of differentiated cardiomyocytes, whether it affects the induction of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells is poorly understood. Here, we examine the role of matrix rigidity on cardiac differentiation using mouse and human ES cells. Culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates of varied monomer-to-crosslinker ratios revealed that rigid extracellular matrices promote a higher yield of de novo cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated ES cells. Using a genetically modified ES system that allows us to purify differentiated cardiomyocytes by drug selection, we demonstrate that rigid environments induce higher cardiac troponin T expression, beating rate of foci, and expression ratio of adult α- to fetal β- myosin heavy chain in a purified cardiac population. M-mode and mechanical interferometry image analyses demonstrate that these ES-derived cardiomyocytes display functional maturity and synchronization of beating when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes harvested from a developing embryo. Together, these data identify matrix stiffness as an independent factor that instructs not only the maturation of already differentiated cardiomyocytes but also the induction and proliferation of cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated progenitors. Manipulation of the stiffness will help direct the production of functional cardiomyocytes en masse from stem cells for regenerative medicine purposes.

  19. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    While adult heart muscle is the least regenerative of tissues, embryonic cardiomyocytes are proliferative, with embryonic stem (ES) cells providing an endless reservoir. In addition to secreted factors and cell-cell interactions, the extracellular microenvironment has been shown to play an important role in stem cell lineage specification, and understanding how scaffold elasticity influences cardiac differentiation is crucial to cardiac tissue engineering. Though previous studies have analyzed the role of the matrix elasticity on the function of differentiated cardiomyocytes, whether it affects the induction of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of matrix rigidity on the cardiac differentiation using mouse and human ES cells. Culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates of varied monomer-to-crosslinker ratios revealed that rigid extracellular matrices promote a higher yield of de novo cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated ES cells. Using an genetically modified ES system that allows us to purify differentiated cardiomyocytes by drug selection, we demonstrate that rigid environments induce higher cardiac troponin T expression, beating rate of foci, and expression ratio of adult α- to fetal β- myosin heavy chain in a purified cardiac population. M-mode and mechanical interferometry image analyses demonstrate that these ES-derived cardiomyocytes display functional maturity and synchronization of beating when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes harvested from a developing embryo. Together, these data identify matrix stiffness as an independent factor that instructs not only the maturation of the already differentiated cardiomyocytes but also the induction and proliferation of cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated progenitors. Manipulation of the stiffness will help direct the production of functional cardiomyocytes en masse from stem cells for regenerative medicine purposes. PMID:24311969

  20. How stem cells speak with host immune cells in inflammatory brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases.

  1. A prior feature SVM-MRF based method for mouse brain segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teresa; Bae, Min Hyeok; Zhang, Min; Pan, Rong; Badea, Alexandra

    2012-02-01

    We introduce an automated method, called prior feature Support Vector Machine-Markov Random Field (pSVMRF), to segment three-dimensional mouse brain Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) images. Our earlier work, extended MRF (eMRF) integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Markov Random Field (MRF) approaches, leading to improved segmentation accuracy; however, the computation of eMRF is very expensive, which may limit its performance on segmentation and robustness. In this study pSVMRF reduces training and testing time for SVM, while boosting segmentation performance. Unlike the eMRF approach, where MR intensity information and location priors are linearly combined, pSVMRF combines this information in a nonlinear fashion, and enhances the discriminative ability of the algorithm. We validate the proposed method using MR imaging of unstained and actively stained mouse brain specimens, and compare segmentation accuracy with two existing methods: eMRF and MRF. C57BL/6 mice are used for training and testing, using cross validation. For formalin fixed C57BL/6 specimens, pSVMRF outperforms both eMRF and MRF. The segmentation accuracy for C57BL/6 brains, stained or not, was similar for larger structures like hippocampus and caudate putamen, (~87%), but increased substantially for smaller regions like susbtantia nigra (from 78.36% to 91.55%), and anterior commissure (from ~50% to ~80%). To test segmentation robustness against increased anatomical variability we add two strains, BXD29 and a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Segmentation accuracy for new strains is 80% for hippocampus, and caudate putamen, indicating that pSVMRF is a promising approach for phenotyping mouse models of human brain disorders.

  2. Transplantation of enteric neural stem/progenitor cells into the irradiated young mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Osman, Ahmed M; Zhou, Kai; Zhu, Changlian; Blomgren, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for brain tumors but often results in cognitive deficits in survivors. Transplantation of embryonic or brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (BNSPCs) ameliorated cognitive impairment after irradiation (IR) in animal models. However, such an approach in patients requires a clinically relevant source of cells. We show for the first time the utilization of enteric neural stem/progenitor cells (ENSPCs) from the postnatal intestinal wall as a source of autologous cells for brain repair after injury caused by IR. Cells were isolated from the intestinal wall and propagated in vitro for 1 week. Differentiation assays showed that ENSPCs are multipotent and generated neurons, astrocytes, and myofibroblasts. To investigate whether ENSPCs can be used in vivo, postnatal day 9 mice were subjected to a single moderate irradiation dose (6 or 8 Gy). Twelve days later, mice received an intrahippocampal injection of syngeneic ENSPCs. Four weeks after transplantation, 0.5% and 1% of grafted ENSPCs were detected in the dentate gyrus of sham and irradiated animals, respectively, and only 0.1% was detected after 16 weeks. Grafted ENSPCs remained undifferentiated but failed to restore IR-induced loss of BNSPCs and the subsequent impaired growth of the dentate gyrus. We observed microglia activation, astrogliosis, and loss of granule neurons associated with grafted ENSPC clusters. Transplantation of ENSPCs did not ameliorate IR-induced impaired learning and memory. In summary, while autologous ENSPC grafting to the brain worked technically, even in the absence of immunosuppression, the protocols need to be modified to improve survival and integration.

  3. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  4. Aberrant brain stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Han; Jung, Won Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD. Materials and methods In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology. Results Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group. Conclusion This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27601903

  5. Aberrant brain stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Han; Jung, Won Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD. Materials and methods In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology. Results Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group. Conclusion This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  7. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin−/CD45−, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy. PMID:25779995

  8. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  9. Mouse Ovarian Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Resist Chemotherapy and Retain Ability to Initiate Oocyte-Specific Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Kalpana; Bhartiya, Deepa; Anand, Sandhya; Bhutda, Smita

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate stem cells in adult mouse ovary, the effect of chemotherapy on them and their potential to differentiate into germ cells. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that were SCA-1+/Lin-/CD45-, positive for nuclear octamer-binding transforming factor 4 (OCT-4), Nanog, and cell surface stage-specific embryonic antigen 1, were identified in adult mouse ovary. Chemotherapy resulted in complete loss of follicular reserve and cytoplasmic OCT-4 positive progenitors (ovarian germ stem cells) but VSELs survived. In ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cell cultures from chemoablated ovary, proliferating germ cell clusters and mouse vasa homolog/growth differentiation factor 9-positive oocyte-like structure were observed by day 6, probably arising as a result of differentiation of the surviving VSELs. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) exerted a direct stimulatory action on the OSE and induced stem cells proliferation and differentiation into premeiotic germ cell clusters during intact chemoablated ovaries culture. The FSH analog pregnant mare serum gonadotropin treatment to chemoablated mice increased the percentage of surviving VSELs in ovary. The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of potential VSELs in mouse ovaries and show that they survive chemotherapy, are modulated by FSH, and retain the ability to undergo oocyte-specific differentiation. These results show relevance to women who undergo premature ovarian failure because of oncotherapy.

  10. Effect of incubation temperature on infectivity titration of mouse brain-passaged avian infectious bronchitis virus in laboratory host systems.

    PubMed

    Yachida, S; Iritani, Y; Katagiri, K

    1979-09-01

    Mouse brain-passaged infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) could not be assayed for its infectivity at 39.5 degrees C, but could be so at 37 degrees C and 39.5 degrees C. Antigen accumulation was not detected by immunofluorescence in CEK cells infected with mouse brain-passaged IBV at 39.5 degrees C, perhaps due to the difference in the cellular environments.

  11. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  12. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  13. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions. PMID:17169347

  14. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Methods: Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. Results: The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Conclusions: Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  15. Immunochemical detection of arylamine N-acetyltransferase during mouse embryonic development and in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Stanley, L A; Copp, A J; Pope, J; Rolls, S; Smelt, V; Perry, V H; Sim, E

    1998-11-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are important in susceptibility to xenobiotic-induced disorders (e.g., drug-induced autoimmune disease, bladder cancer), but their role in endogenous metabolism is yet to be elucidated. The discovery that human NAT1 acts upon p-aminobenzoylgluatamate (p-ABG) to generate p-acetamidobenzoylglutamate (p-AABG), a major urinary metabolite of folic acid, suggests that human NAT1 may play a role in folic acid metabolism and hence in the normal development of the neural tube. In this study we examined the distribution of NAT in neuronal tissue from adult mice and embryos. Immunohistochemical staining of the adult mouse cerebellum revealed NAT2 (the mouse homologue of human NAT1) expression in the cell bodies and dendrites of Purkinje cells and in the neuroglia of the molecular layer. In embryos, NAT2 was detected in developing neuronal tissue on days 9.5, 11.5, and 13.5. It was expressed intensely in the nerual tube around the time of closure. The level of expression subsequently declined in the neuroepithelium but increased in glial cells. In addition, NAT2 was detected in the developing heart and gut. These findings demonstrate that the embryo itself expresses an enzyme which is involved in the metabolism of folic acid, so that the role played by both mother and embryo must be considered when examining the role of folic acid in embryonic development. These findings imply that polymorphisms in NAT genes could play a role in determining susceptibility to neural tube defects (NTD) and orofacial clefting, developmental disorders which can be prevented by dietary administration of folic acid. PMID:9839355

  16. Maternal vitamin D deficiency alters fetal brain development in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Jazmin E; Tesic, Dijana; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Zosky, Graeme R; Smith, Jeremy T; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to vitamin D is thought to be critical for optimal fetal neurodevelopment, yet vitamin D deficiency is apparent in a growing proportion of pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine whether a mouse model of vitamin D-deficiency alters fetal neurodevelopment. Female BALB/c mice were placed on either a vitamin D control (2,195 IU/kg) or deficient (0 IU/kg) diet for 5 weeks prior to and during pregnancy. Fetal brains were collected at embryonic day (E) 14.5 or E17.5 for morphological and gene expression analysis. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy reduced fetal crown-rump length and head size. Moreover, lateral ventricle volume was reduced in vitamin D-deficient foetuses. Expression of neurotrophin genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) was altered, with Bdnf reduced at E14.5 and increased at E17.5 following vitamin D deficiency. Brain expression of forkhead box protein P2 (Foxp2), a gene known to be important in human speech and language, was also altered. Importantly, Foxp2 immunoreactive cells in the developing cortex were reduced in vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. At E17.5, brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was reduced in females, as was TH protein localization (to identify dopamine neurons) in the substantia nigra of vitamin D-deficient female foetuses. Overall, we show that prenatal vitamin D-deficiency leads to alterations in fetal mouse brain morphology and genes related to neuronal survival, speech and language development, and dopamine synthesis. Vitamin D appears to play an important role in mouse neurodevelopment. PMID:25753408

  17. Prioritizing the development of mouse models for childhood brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Kevin K; Ozkan, Emin D; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in hundreds of genes contribute to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction associated with developmental brain disorders (DBDs). Due to the sheer number of risk factors available for study combined with the cost of developing new animal models, it remains an open question how genes should be prioritized for in-depth neurobiological investigations. Recent reviews have argued that priority should be given to frequently mutated genes commonly found in sporadic DBD patients. Intrigued by this idea, we explored to what extent "high priority" risk factors have been studied in animals in an effort to assess their potential for generating valuable preclinical models capable of advancing the neurobiological understanding of DBDs. We found that in-depth whole animal studies are lacking for many high priority genes, with relatively few neurobiological studies performed in construct valid animal models aimed at understanding the pathological substrates associated with disease phenotypes. However, some high priority risk factors have been extensively studied in animal models and they have generated novel insights into DBD patho-neurobiology while also advancing early pre-clinical therapeutic treatment strategies. We suggest that prioritizing model development toward genes frequently mutated in non-specific DBD populations will accelerate the understanding of DBD patho-neurobiology and drive novel therapeutic strategies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. PMID:26231830

  18. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko; Shinohara, Takashi; Nakano, Toru

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  19. Analysis of mRNA Translation Rate in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Anisa B; Vardy, Leah A

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is essential to enable embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to either self-renew or to differentiate. Translational regulation of mRNA plays a major role in regulating gene expression and has been shown to be important for ESC differentiation. Sucrose gradients can be used to separate mRNAs based on the number of associated ribosomes and this can be used as a readout of the rate of translation. Following centrifugation through a sucrose gradient, mRNAs can be recovered, purified, and analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine their ribosomal load in different cell states. Here, we describe how to differentiate mouse ESCs to Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) and analyze the rate of translation of individual mRNAs by qRT-PCR following polysome fractionation.

  20. Gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells following levitation in an ultrasound standing wave trap.

    PubMed

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08-0.85 MPa) and times (5-60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21208732

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Following Levitation in an Ultrasound Standing Wave Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08–0.85 MPa) and times (5–60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (E-mail: Bazoud@tcd.ie) PMID:21208732

  2. Chondroitin Sulfate Is Indispensable for Pluripotency and Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumikawa, Tomomi; Sato, Ban; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans are present on the surfaces of virtually all cells and in the extracellular matrix and are required for cytokinesis at early developmental stages. Studies have shown that heparan sulfate (HS) is essential for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that are primed for differentiation, whereas the function of CS has not yet been elucidated. To clarify the role of CS, we generated glucuronyltransferase-I-knockout ESCs lacking CS. We found that CS was required to maintain the pluripotency of ESCs and promoted initial ESC commitment to differentiation compared with HS. In addition, CS-A and CS-E polysaccharides, but not CS-C polysaccharides, bound to E-cadherin and enhanced ESC differentiation. Multiple-lineage differentiation was inhibited in chondroitinase ABC-digested wild-type ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that CS is a novel determinant in controlling the functional integrity of ESCs via binding to E-cadherin.

  3. Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation using mouse bone marrow and spleen cells fractionated by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Y; Itzicovitch, L; Meshorer, A; Sharon, N

    1978-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells were fractionated with the aid of soybean agglutinin and peanut agglutinin. A test for spleen colony-forming units in the isolated fractions showed that the hemopoietic stem cells are agglutinated by both of these lectins. The capacity of the agglutinated fractions to reconstitute lethally irradiated allogeneic mice was investigated. A sequential fractionation of splenocytes from SWR donors by soybean agglutinin and peanut agglutinin, or a single fractionation by soybean agglutinin of splenocytes from BALB/c donors, afforded a cell fraction that successfully reconstituted lethally irradiated (BALB/c X C57BL/6)F1 mice, without complications due to graft-versus-host reaction. Images PMID:26916

  4. Induction of neural stem cell-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jai-Hee; Yoon, Byung Sun; Kim, Bona; Park, Gyuman; Jung, Hye-Youn; Maeng, Isaac; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Seung Jun; Kim, Aeree; Oh, Sejong; Whang, Kwang Youn; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ki Dong; You, Seungkwon

    2008-06-27

    Recently, Bmi1 was shown to control the proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we demonstrated the induction of NSC-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1 under NSC culture conditions. These NSCLCs exhibited the morphology and growth properties of NSCs, and expressed NSC marker genes, including nestin, CD133, and Sox2. In vitro differentiation of NSCLCs resulted in differentiated cell populations containing astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A and valproic acid), the potential of NSCLCs for proliferation, dedifferentiation, and self-renewal was significantly inhibited. Our data indicate that multipotent NSCLCs can be generated directly from astrocytes by the addition of Bmi1.

  5. Time- and dose-dependent effects of ethanol on mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Worley, Sarah L; Vaughn, Brittney J; Terry, Alexander I; Gardiner, Catherine S; DeKrey, Gregory K

    2015-11-01

    Ethanol is a common solvent used with mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells in protocols to test chemicals for evidence of developmental toxicity. In this study, dose-response relationships for ethanol toxicity in mES cells were examined. For cells maintained in an undifferentiated state, ethanol significantly reduced viable cell numbers with estimated half maximal inhibitory concentrations of 1.5% and 0.8% ethanol after 24 and 48h, respectively, observations which correlated with significantly increased expression of apoptotic markers. For cells cultured to induce cardiomyocyte formation, up to 0.5% ethanol during the first two days failed to alter the outcome of differentiation, whereas 0.3% ethanol for 11 days significantly reduced the fraction of cultures containing contracting areas, an observation that correlated with significantly reduced cell numbers. These results suggest that ethanol is not an inert solvent at concentrations that might be used for developmental toxicity testing.

  6. Mapping the mouse brain with rs-fMRI: An optimized pipeline for functional network identification.

    PubMed

    Zerbi, Valerio; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The use of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) in translational research is a powerful tool to assess brain connectivity and investigate neuropathology in mouse models. However, despite encouraging initial results, the characterization of consistent and robust resting state networks in mice remains a methodological challenge. One key reason is that the quality of the measured MR signal is degraded by the presence of structural noise from non-neural sources. Notably, in the current pipeline of the Human Connectome Project, a novel approach has been introduced to clean rs-fMRI data, which involves automatic artifact component classification and data cleaning (FIX). FIX does not require any external recordings of physiology or the segmentation of CSF and white matter. In this study, we evaluated the performance of FIX for analyzing mouse rs-fMRI data. Our results showed that FIX can be easily applied to mouse datasets and detects true signals with 100% accuracy and true noise components with very high accuracy (>98%), thus reducing both within- and between-subject variability of rs-fMRI connectivity measurements. Using this improved pre-processing pipeline, maps of 23 resting state circuits in mice were identified including two networks that displayed default mode network-like topography. Hierarchical clustering grouped these neural networks into meaningful larger functional circuits. These mouse resting state networks, which are publicly available, might serve as a reference for future work using mouse models of neurological disorders.

  7. Characteristics of electrically induced locomotion in rat in vitro brain stem-spinal cord preparation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Y; Garcia-Rill, E; Skinner, R D

    1990-09-01

    1. Electrical stimulation of two brain stem regions in the decerebrate neonatal rat brain--the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) and the medioventral medulla (MED)--were found to elicit rhythmic limb movements in the hind-limb-attached, in vitro, brain stem-spinal cord preparation. 2. Electromyographic (EMG) analysis revealed locomotion similar to that observed during stepping in the adult rat. The step-cycle frequency could be increased by application of higher-amplitude currents; but, unlike the adult, alternation could not be driven to a gallop. 3. Threshold currents for inducing locomotion were significantly lower for stimulation of the MED compared with the MLR. Brain stem transections carried out at midpontine levels demonstrated that the presence of the MLR was not required for the expression of MED-stimulation-induced effects. 4. Substitution of the standard artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) by magnesium-free aCSF did not affect interlimb relationships and resulted in a significant decrease of the threshold currents for inducing locomotion. 5. Fixation of the limbs during electrical stimulation of brain stem sites altered the amplitude and duration of the EMG patterns, but the basic rhythm and timing of each muscle contraction during the step cycle was not affected. 6. These studies suggest that, although peripheral afferent modulation is evident in the neonatal locomotor control system, descending projections from brain stem-locomotor regions appear capable of modulating the activity of spinal pattern generators as early as the day of birth. However, there may be ceiling to the maximal frequency of stepping possible at this early age, perhaps suggesting a later-developing mechanism for galloping.

  8. Optimization of protocols for derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from refractory strains, including the non obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Davies, Timothy J; Fairchild, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    The derivation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from a variety of genetic backgrounds remains a desirable objective in the generation of mice functionally deficient in genes of interest and the modeling of human disease. Nevertheless, disparity in the ease with which different strains of mice yield ESC lines has long been acknowledged. Indeed, the generation of bona fide ESCs from the non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a well-characterized model of human type I diabetes, has historically proved especially difficult to achieve. Here, we report the development of protocols for the derivation of novel ESC lines from C57Bl/6 mice based on the combined use of high concentrations of leukemia inhibitory factor and serum-replacement, which is equally applicable to fresh and cryo-preserved embryos. Further, we demonstrate the success of this approach using Balb/K and CBA/Ca mice, widely considered to be refractory strains. CBA/Ca ESCs contributed to the somatic germ layers of chimeras and displayed a very high competence at germline transmission. Importantly, we were able to use the same protocol for the derivation of ESC lines from nonpermissive NOD mice. These ESCs displayed a normal karyotype that was robustly stable during long-term culture, were capable of forming teratomas in vivo and germline competent chimeras after injection into recipient blastocysts. Further, these novel ESC lines efficiently formed embryoid bodies in vitro and could be directed in their differentiation along the dendritic cell lineage, thus illustrating their potential application to the generation of cell types of relevance to the pathogenesis of type I diabetes. PMID:21933027

  9. Cellular heterogeneity in the mouse esophagus implicates the presence of a non-quiescent epithelial stem cell population

    PubMed Central

    DeWard, Aaron D.; Cramer, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also utilized an in vitro 3-D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a non-quiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus. PMID:25373907

  10. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  11. Enhanced reseeding of decellularized rodent lungs with mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lecht, Shimon; Stabler, Collin T.; Rylander, Alexis L.; Chiaverelli, Rachel; Schulman, Edward S.; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lelkes, Peter I.

    2016-01-01

    Repopulation of decellularized lung scaffolds (DLS) is limited due to alterations in the repertoire and ratios of the residual extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, characterized by e.g., the retention of type I collagen and loss of glycoproteins. We hypothesized that pre-treatment of decellularized matrices with defined ECM proteins, which match the repertoire of integrin receptors expressed by the cells to be seeded (e.g., embryonic stem cells) can increase the efficacy of the reseeding process. To test this hypothesis, we first determined the integrin receptors profile of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Mouse ESCs express α3, α5, α6, α9 and β1, but not α1, α2 and α4 integrin subunits, as established by Western blotting and adhesion to laminin and fibronectin, but not to collagens type I and IV. Reseeding of DLS with mESCs was inefficient (6.9 ± 0.5%), but was significantly enhanced (2.3 ± 0.1 fold) by pre-treating the scaffolds with media conditioned by A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which we found to contain ~5 μg/ml laminin. Furthermore, pre-treatment with A549-conditioned media resulted in a significantly more uniform distribution of the seeded mESCs throughout the engineered organ as compared to untreated DLS. Our study may advance whole lung engineering by stressing the importance of matching the integrin receptor repertoire of the seeded cells and the cell binding motifs of DLS. PMID:24439414

  12. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  13. Role of adrenal catecholamines in cerebrovasodilation evoked from brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Iadecola, C.; Lacombe, P.M.; Underwood, M.D.; Ishitsuka, T.; Reis, D.J.

    1987-06-01

    The authors studied whether adrenal medullary catecholamines (CAs) contribute to the metabolically linked increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal medullary reticular formation (DMRF). Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. The DMRF was electrically stimulated with intermittent trains of pulses through microelectrodes stereotaxically implanted. Blood gases were controlled and, during stimulation, arterial pressure was maintained within the autoregulated range for rCBF. rCBF and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined in homogenates of brain regions by using (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine and ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), respectively, as tracers. Plasma CAs (epinephrine and norepinephrine) were measured radioenzymatically. DMRF stimulation increased rCBF throughout the brain and elevated plasma CAs substantially. Acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the increase in plasma epinephrine, reduced the increases in flow in cerebral cortex, and abolished them elsewhere in brain. They conclude that the increases in rCBF elicited from the DMRF has two components, one dependent on, and the other independent of CAs. Since the BBB is impermeable to CAs and DMRF stimulation fails to open the BBB, the results suggest that DMRF stimulations allows, through a mechanism not yet determined, circulating CAs to act on brain and affect brain function.

  14. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  15. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  16. Expression Profile of DNA Damage Signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    Exposure of living systems to radiation results in a wide assortment of lesions, the most signif-icant of is damage to genomic DNA which induce several cellular functions such as cell cycle arrest, repair, apoptosis etc. The radiation induced DNA damage investigation is one of the im-portant area in biology, but still the information available regarding the effects of proton is very limited. In this report, we investigated the differential gene expression pattern of DNA damage signaling genes particularly, damaged DNA binding, repair, cell cycle arrest, checkpoints and apoptosis using quantitative real-time RT-PCR array in proton exposed mouse brain tissues. The expression profiles showed significant changes in DNA damage related genes in 2Gy proton exposed mouse brain tissues as compared with control brain tissues. Furthermore, we also show that significantly increased levels of apoptotic related genes, caspase-3 and 8 activities in these cells, suggesting that in addition to differential expression of DNA damage genes, the alteration of apoptosis related genes may also contribute to the radiation induced DNA damage followed by programmed cell death. In summary, our findings suggest that proton exposed brain tissue undergo severe DNA damage which in turn destabilize the chromatin stability.

  17. In vivo near-infrared imaging for the tracking of systemically delivered mesenchymal stem cells: tropism for brain tumors and biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Muk; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Woo, Ji Sun; Ryu, Chung Heon; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including brain tumors. However, the tracking of in vivo stem cell migration, distribution, and survival need to be defined for their clinical application. The systemic routes of stem cell delivery must be determined because direct intracerebral injection as a cure for brain tumors is an invasive method. In this study, we show for the first time that near-infrared (NIR) imaging can reveal the distribution and tumor tropism of intravenously injected MSCs in an intracranial xenograft glioma model. MSCs were labeled with NIR fluorescent nanoparticles, and the effects of the NIR dye on cell proliferation and migratory capacity were evaluated in vitro. We investigated the tumor-targeting properties and tissue distribution of labeled MSCs introduced by intravenous injection and followed by in vivo imaging analysis, histological analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed no cytotoxicity or change in the overall growth rate and characteristics of labeled MSCs compared with control MSCs. NIR fluorescent imaging showed the organ distribution and targeted tumor tropism of systemically injected human MSCs. A significant number of MSCs accumulated specifically at the tumor site in the mouse brain. These results suggest that NIR-based cell tracking is a potentially useful imaging technique to visualize cell survival, migration, and distribution for the application of MSC-mediated therapies in the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:26719691

  18. Derivation of T cells in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kučerová-Levisohn, Martina; Lovett, Jordana; Lahiji, Armin; Holmes, Roxanne; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Ortiz, Benjamin D

    2014-10-14

    The OP9/OP9-DL1 co-culture system has become a well-established method for deriving differentiated blood cell types from embryonic and hematopoietic progenitors of both mouse and human origin. It is now used to address a growing variety of complex genetic, cellular and molecular questions related to hematopoiesis, and is at the cutting edge of efforts to translate these basic findings to therapeutic applications. The procedures are straightforward and routinely yield robust results. However, achieving successful hematopoietic differentiation in vitro requires special attention to the details of reagent and cell culture maintenance. Furthermore, the protocol features technique sensitive steps that, while not difficult, take care and practice to master. Here we focus on the procedures for differentiation of T lymphocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC). We provide a detailed protocol with discussions of the critical steps and parameters that enable reproducibly robust cellular differentiation in vitro. It is in the interest of the field to consider wider adoption of this technology, as it has the potential to reduce animal use, lower the cost and shorten the timelines of both basic and translational experimentation.

  19. In vitro differentiation and maturation of mouse embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideaki; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Baba, Shinji; Naito, Masato; Machimoto, Takafumi; Kamo, Naoko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Ikai, Iwao . E-mail: ikai@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-09-10

    It is difficult to induce the maturation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into hepatocytes in vitro. We previously reported that Thy1-positive mesenchymal cells derived from the mouse fetal liver promote the maturation of hepatic progenitor cells. Here, we isolated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing cells from mouse ES cells for subsequent differentiation into hepatocytes in vitro by coculture with Thy1-positive cells. ES cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of an AFP promoter were cultured under serum- and feeder layer-free culture conditions. The proportion of GFP-positive cells plateaued at 41.6 {+-} 12.2% (means {+-} SD) by day 7. GFP-positive cells, isolated by flow cytometry, were cultured in the presence or absence of Thy1-positive cells as a feeder layer. Isolated GFP-positive cells were stained for AFP, Foxa2, and albumin. The expression of mRNAs encoding tyrosine amino transferase, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, and glucose-6-phosphatase were only detected following coculture with Thy1-positive cells. Following coculture with Thy1-positive cells, the isolated cells produced and stored glycogen. Ammonia clearance activity was also enhanced following coculture. Electron microscopic analysis indicated that the cocultured cells exhibited the morphologic features of mature hepatocytes. In conclusion, coculture with Thy1-positive cells in vitro induced the maturation of AFP-producing cells isolated from ES cell cultures into hepatocytes.

  20. Zscan4 Is Activated after Telomere Shortening in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakai-Futatsugi, Yoko; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary ZSCAN4 is a DNA-binding protein that functions for telomere elongation and genomic stability. In vivo, it is specifically expressed at the two-cell stage during mouse development. In vitro, it is transiently expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), only in 5% of the population at one time. Here we attempted to elucidate when, under what circumstances, Zscan4 is activated in ESCs. Using live cell imaging, we monitored the activity of Zscan4 together with the pluripotency marker Rex1. The lengths of the cell cycles in ESCs were diverse. Longer cell cycles were accompanied by shorter telomeres and higher activation of Zscan4. Since activation of Zscan4 is involved in telomere elongation, we speculate that the extended cell cycles accompanied by Zscan4 activation reflect the time for telomere recovery. Rex1 and Zscan4 did not show any correlation. Taken together, we propose that Zscan4 is activated to recover shortened telomeres during extended cell cycles, irrespective of the pluripotent status. PMID:26997646

  1. Lack of Rybp in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Impairs Cardiac Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ujhelly, Olga; Szabo, Viktoria; Kovacs, Gergo; Vajda, Flora; Mallok, Sylvia; Prorok, Janos; Acsai, Karoly; Hegedus, Zoltan; Krebs, Stefan; Dinnyes, Andras; Pirity, Melinda Katalin

    2015-09-15

    Ring1 and Yy1 binding protein (Rybp) has been implicated in transcriptional regulation, apoptotic signaling and as a member of the polycomb repressive complex 1, it has an important function in regulating pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Earlier, we had proved that Rybp plays an essential role in mouse embryonic and central nervous system development. This work identifies Rybp, as a critical regulator of heart development. Rybp is readily detectable in the developing mouse heart from day 8.5 of embryonic development. Prominent Rybp expression persists during all embryonic stages, and Rybp marks differentiated cell types of the heart. By utilizing rybp null ESCs in an in vitro cardiac differentiation assay, we found that rybp null ESCs do not form rhythmically beating cardiomyocytes (CMCs). Gene expression profiles revealed a downregulation of cardiac terminal and upregulation of germline-specific markers in the rybp null CMCs. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes regulated by Rybp. Among these are several that are important in cardiac development and contractility such as Plagl1, Isl1, and Tnnt2. Importantly, forced expression of rybp in rybp-deficient ESCs by a lentiviral vector was able to rescue the mutant phenotype. Our data provide evidence for a previously unrecognized function of Rybp in heart development and point out the importance of germ cell lineage gene silencing during somatic differentiation.

  2. A gonogenic stimulated transition of mouse embryonic stem cells with enhanced control of diverse differentiation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moshfegh, Cameron; Aires, Lina; Kisielow, Malgorzata; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells share markers with undifferentiated primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we discovered that a cellular state with some molecular markers of male gonocyte induction, including a G1/S phase arrest and upregulation of specific genes such as Nanos2, Tdrd1, Ddx4, Zbtb16 and Plk1s1, can be chemically induced in male mouse ES cells in vitro, which we termed gonogenic stimulated transition (GoST). After longer culture of the resulting GoST cells without chemical stimulation, several molecular markers typical for early gonocytes were detected including the early gonocyte marker Tex101. Motivated by previous studies that found multipotency in cell lines derived from neonatal male germ cells in vitro, we then compared the differentiation potential of GoST cells to that of ES cells in vitro. Interestingly, GoST cells showed equal neurogenic, but enhanced cardiogenic and hepatogenic differentiation compared to ES cells in vitro. This work shows for the first time that some important molecular markers of the first developmental sexual differentiation program can be induced in male mouse ES cells in vitro and defines a novel concept to generate cells with enhanced multipotency. PMID:27157261

  3. A gonogenic stimulated transition of mouse embryonic stem cells with enhanced control of diverse differentiation pathways.

    PubMed

    Moshfegh, Cameron; Aires, Lina; Kisielow, Malgorzata; Vogel, Viola

    2016-05-09

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells share markers with undifferentiated primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we discovered that a cellular state with some molecular markers of male gonocyte induction, including a G1/S phase arrest and upregulation of specific genes such as Nanos2, Tdrd1, Ddx4, Zbtb16 and Plk1s1, can be chemically induced in male mouse ES cells in vitro, which we termed gonogenic stimulated transition (GoST). After longer culture of the resulting GoST cells without chemical stimulation, several molecular markers typical for early gonocytes were detected including the early gonocyte marker Tex101. Motivated by previous studies that found multipotency in cell lines derived from neonatal male germ cells in vitro, we then compared the differentiation potential of GoST cells to that of ES cells in vitro. Interestingly, GoST cells showed equal neurogenic, but enhanced cardiogenic and hepatogenic differentiation compared to ES cells in vitro. This work shows for the first time that some important molecular markers of the first developmental sexual differentiation program can be induced in male mouse ES cells in vitro and defines a novel concept to generate cells with enhanced multipotency.

  4. Analysis of chaperone mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain by meta analysis of the Allen Brain Atlas.

    PubMed

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T N; Borchelt, David R

    2010-10-28

    The pathology of many neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins in various cell types and regional substructures throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. The accumulation of these aggregated proteins signals dysfunction of cellular protein homeostatic mechanisms such as the ubiquitin/proteasome system, autophagy, and the chaperone network. Although there are several published studies in which transcriptional profiling has been used to examine gene expression in various tissues, including tissues of neurodegenerative disease models, there has not been a report that focuses exclusively on expression of the chaperone network. In the present study, we used the Allen Brain Atlas online database to analyze chaperone expression levels. This database utilizes a quantitative in situ hybridization approach and provides data on 270 chaperone genes within many substructures of the adult mouse brain. We determined that 256 of these chaperone genes are expressed at some level. Surprisingly, relatively few genes, only 30, showed significant variations in levels of mRNA across different substructures of the brain. The greatest degree of variability was exhibited by genes of the DnaJ co-chaperone, Tetratricopeptide repeat, and the HSPH families. Our analysis provides a valuable resource towards determining how variations in chaperone gene expression may modulate the vulnerability of specific neuronal populations of mammalian brain.

  5. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D; Levin, Eli C; Nagele, Robert G; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses-a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin-were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD.

  6. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D; Levin, Eli C; Nagele, Robert G; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses-a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin-were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  7. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C.; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D.; Levin, Eli C.; Nagele, Robert G.; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  8. Prenatal pharmacotherapy rescues brain development in a Down's syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Sandra; Stagni, Fiorenza; Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giacomini, Andrea; De Franceschi, Marianna; Moldrich, Randal; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Mardon, Karine; Giuliani, Alessandro; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual impairment is a strongly disabling feature of Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder of high prevalence (1 in 700-1000 live births) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence shows that widespread neurogenesis impairment is a major determinant of abnormal brain development and, hence, of intellectual disability in Down's syndrome. This defect is worsened by dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations. Most of the pharmacotherapies designed to improve cognitive performance in Down's syndrome have been attempted in Down's syndrome mouse models during adult life stages. Yet, as neurogenesis is mainly a prenatal event, treatments aimed at correcting neurogenesis failure in Down's syndrome should be administered during pregnancy. Correction of neurogenesis during the very first stages of brain formation may, in turn, rescue improper brain wiring. The aim of our study was to establish whether it is possible to rescue the neurodevelopmental alterations that characterize the trisomic brain with a prenatal pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine, a drug that is able to restore post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down's syndrome. Pregnant Ts65Dn females were treated with fluoxetine from embryonic Day 10 until delivery. On post-natal Day 2 the pups received an injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and were sacrificed after either 2 h or after 43 days (at the age of 45 days). Untreated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice exhibited a severe neurogenesis reduction and hypocellularity throughout the forebrain (subventricular zone, subgranular zone, neocortex, striatum, thalamus and hypothalamus), midbrain (mesencephalon) and hindbrain (cerebellum and pons). In embryonically treated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice, precursor proliferation and cellularity were fully restored throughout all brain regions. The recovery of proliferation potency and cellularity was still present in treated Ts65Dn 45-day-old mice. Moreover, embryonic treatment restored

  9. Auditory brain stem response abnormalities in the very low birthweight infant: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cox, L C; Hack, M; Metz, D A

    1984-01-01

    Auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) testing was performed on 50 very low birthweight infants in an effort to assess the effects of multiple neonatal risk factors on auditory function. The results suggested that no single risk factor was predictive of ABR abnormality while combined risk factors were shown to be very predictive.

  10. Reconstruction of brain circuitry by neural transplants generated from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan H; Björklund, Anders

    2015-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells, ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs) have the capacity to generate neural progenitors that are intrinsically patterned to undergo differentiation into specific neuronal subtypes and express in vivo properties that match the ones formed during normal embryonic development. Remarkable progress has been made in this field during recent years thanks to the development of more refined protocols for the generation of transplantable neuronal progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, and the access to new tools for tracing of neuronal connectivity and assessment of integration and function of grafted neurons. Recent studies in brains of neonatal mice or rats, as well as in rodent models of brain or spinal cord damage, have shown that ESC- or iPSC-derived neural progenitors can be made to survive and differentiate after transplantation, and that they possess a remarkable capacity to extend axons over long distances and become functionally integrated into host neural circuitry. Here, we summarize these recent developments in the perspective of earlier studies using intracerebral and intraspinal transplants of primary neurons derived from fetal brain, with special focus on the ability of human ESC- and iPSC-derived progenitors to reconstruct damaged neural circuitry in cortex, hippocampus, the nigrostriatal system and the spinal cord, and we discuss the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that determine the growth properties of the grafted neurons and their capacity to establish target-specific long-distance axonal connections in the damaged host brain.

  11. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS). The second is patient-derived stem cells for modeling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprograming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson's disease). Some genetic diseases are also modeled in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilization. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These "olfactory neurosphere-derived" cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. HCS is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for HCS.

  12. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS). The second is patient-derived stem cells for modeling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprograming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson's disease). Some genetic diseases are also modeled in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilization. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These "olfactory neurosphere-derived" cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. HCS is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for HCS. PMID:23543597

  13. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  14. Establishment of a proteome profile and identification of molecular markers for mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Guo, Yueshuai; Zheng, Bo; Shao, Binbin; Jiang, Min; Wang, Gaigai; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are undifferentiated cells that are required to maintain spermatogenesis throughout the reproductive life of mammals. Although SSC transplantation and culture provide a powerful tool to identify the mechanisms regulating SSC function, the precise signalling mechanisms governing SSC self-renewal and specific surface markers for purifying SSCs remain to be clearly determined. In the present study, we established a steady SSC culture according to the method described by Shinohara's lab. Fertile progeny was produced after transplantation of cultured SSCs into infertile mouse testis, and the red fluorescence exhibited by the culture cell membranes was stably and continuously transmitted to the offspring. Next, via advanced mass spectrometry and an optimized proteomics platform, we constructed the proteome profile, with 682 proteins expressed in SSCs. Furthermore bioinformatics analysis showed that the list contained several known molecules that are regulated in SSCs. Several nucleoproteins and membrane proteins were chosen for further exploration using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. The results showed that SALL1, EZH2, and RCOR2 are possibly involved in the self-renewal mechanism of SSCs. Furthermore, the results of tissue-specific expression analysis showed that Gpat2 and Pld6 were uniquely and highly expressed in mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The cellular localization of PLD6 was further explored and the results showed it was primarily expressed in the spermatogonial membrane of mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The proteins identified in this study form the basis for further exploring the molecular mechanism of self-renewal in SSCs and for identifying specific surface markers of SSCs. PMID:25352495

  15. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  16. A genome-scale map of expression for a mouse brain section obtained using voxelation

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Mark H.; Geng, Alex B.; Khan, Arshad H.; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Boline, Jyl; Levy, Shawn; Toga, Arthur W.; Smith, Richard D.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2007-08-20

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological diseases. We have reconstructed 2- dimensional images of gene expression for 20,000 genes in a coronal slice of the mouse brain at the level of the striatum by using microarrays in combination with voxelation at a resolution of 1 mm3. Good reliability of the microarray results were confirmed using multiple replicates, subsequent quantitative RT-PCR voxelation, mass spectrometry voxelation and publicly available in situ hybridization data. Known and novel genes were identified with expression patterns localized to defined substructures within the brain. In addition, genes with unexpected patterns were identified and cluster analysis identified a set of genes with a gradient of dorsal/ventral expression not restricted to known anatomical boundaries. The genome-scale maps of gene expression obtained using voxelation will be a valuable tool for the neuroscience community.

  17. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to abnormal brain activity (increased interictal discharges) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. PMID:25069089

  18. Dynamic Proteomic Profiling of Extra-Embryonic Endoderm Differentiation in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Claire M; Schröter, Christian; Gatto, Laurent; Dikicioglu, Duygu; Fidaner, Isik Baris; Christoforou, Andy; Deery, Michael J; Cho, Lily T Y; Niakan, Kathy K; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2015-09-01

    During mammalian preimplantation development, the cells of the blastocyst's inner cell mass differentiate into the epiblast and primitive endoderm lineages, which give rise to the fetus and extra-embryonic tissues, respectively. Extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN) differentiation can be modeled in vitro by induced expression of GATA transcription factors in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, we use this GATA-inducible system to quantitatively monitor the dynamics of global proteomic changes during the early stages of this differentiation event and also investigate the fully differentiated phenotype, as represented by embryo-derived XEN cells. Using mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic profiling with multivariate data analysis tools, we reproducibly quantified 2,336 proteins across three biological replicates and have identified clusters of proteins characterized by distinct, dynamic temporal abundance profiles. We first used this approach to highlight novel marker candidates of the pluripotent state and XEN differentiation. Through functional annotation enrichment analysis, we have shown that the downregulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, the reorganization of membrane trafficking machinery, and the breakdown of cell-cell adhesion are successive steps of the extra-embryonic differentiation process. Thus, applying a range of sophisticated clustering approaches to a time-resolved proteomic dataset has allowed the elucidation of complex biological processes which characterize stem cell differentiation and could establish a general paradigm for the investigation of these processes.

  19. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate.

  20. Cadmium affects mitotically inherited histone modification pathways in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gadhia, S R; O'Brien, D; Barile, F A

    2015-12-25

    The fetal basis of adult disease (FeBAD) theorizes that embryonic challenges initiate pathologies in adult life through epigenetic modification of gene expression. In addition, inheritance of H3K27 methylation marks, especially in vitro, is still controversial. Metals, such as Cd, are known to affect differentiation, DNA repair and epigenetic status in mES cells. We tested the premise that Cd exerts differential toxicity in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells by targeting total histone protein (THP) production early in stem cell development, while affecting H3K27-mono-methylation (H3K27me(1)) in latter stages of differentiation. The inability of mES cells to recover from Cd insult at concentrations greater than IC50 indicates that maximum cytotoxicity occurs during initial hours of exposure. Moreover, as a measure of chromatin stability, low dose acute Cd exposure lowers THP production. The heritable effects of Cd exposure on cell proliferation, chromatin stability and transcription observed through several cell population doublings were detected only during alternate passages on days 3, 7, and 11, presumably due to slower maturation of histone methylation marks. These findings demonstrate a selective disruption of chromatin structure following acute Cd exposure, an effect not seen in developmentally mature cells. Hence, we present that acute Cd toxicity is cumulative and disrupts DNA repair, while concurrently affecting cell cycle progression, chromatin stability and transcriptional state in mES cells.

  1. Colony stimulating factor 1 is an extrinsic stimulator of mouse spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Oatley, Jon M.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Tobias, John W.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provide the foundation for testis homeostasis, yet mechanisms that control their functions in mammals are poorly defined. We used microarray transcript profiling to identify specific genes whose expressions are augmented in the SSC-enriched Thy1+ germ cell fraction of mouse pup testes. Comparisons of gene expression in the Thy1+ germ cell fraction with the Thy1-depleted testis cell population identified 202 genes that are expressed 10-fold or higher in Thy1+ cells. This database provided a mining tool to investigate specific characteristics of SSCs and identify novel mechanisms that potentially influence their functions. These analyses revealed that colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (Csf1r) gene expression is enriched in Thy1+ germ cells. Addition of recombinant colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), the specific ligand for Csf1r, to culture media significantly enhanced the self-renewal of SSCs in heterogeneous Thy1+ spermatogonial cultures over a 63-day period without affecting total germ cell expansion. In vivo, expression of Csf1 in both pre-pubertal and adult testes was localized to clusters of Leydig cells and select peritubular myoid cells. Collectively, these results identify Csf1 as an extrinsic stimulator of SSC self-renewal and implicate Leydig and myoid cells as contributors of the testicular stem cell niche in mammals. PMID:19270176

  2. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac. PMID:27075878

  3. Expression profiles of Wnt genes during neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Norshariza; Li, Meng; Mason, John O

    2008-03-01

    The Wnt family of secreted signaling proteins regulates many aspects of animal development and the behavior of several types of stem cells, including embryonic stem (ES) cells. Activation of canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to either inhibit or promote the differentiation of ES cells into neurons, depending on the stage of differentiation. Here, we describe the expression of all 19 mouse Wnt genes during this process. Using the well-established retinoic acid induction protocol we found that all Wnt genes except Wnt8b are expressed as ES cells differentiate into neurons, many of them in dynamic patterns. The expression pattern of 12 Wnt genes was analyzed quantitatively at 2-day intervals throughout neural differentiation, showing that multiple Wnt genes are expressed at each stage. A large proportion of these, including both canonical and noncanonical Wnts, are expressed at highest levels during later stages of differentiation. The complexity of the patterns observed indicates that disentangling specific roles for individual Wnt genes in the differentiation process will be a significant challenge.

  4. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  5. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M.; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  6. Efficient reprogramming of human and mouse primary extra-embryonic cells to pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shogo; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hirano, Kunio; Makino, Hatsune; Nishino, Koichiro; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Okita, Hajime; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamanaka, Shinya; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Tada, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    Practical clinical applications for current induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies are hindered by very low generation efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate that newborn human (h) and mouse (m) extra-embryonic amnion (AM) and yolk-sac (YS) cells, in which endogenous KLF4/Klf4, c-MYC/c-Myc and RONIN/Ronin are expressed, can be reprogrammed to hiPSCs and miPSCs with efficiencies for AM cells of 0.02% and 0.1%, respectively. Both hiPSC and miPSCs are indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells in colony morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, global gene expression profile, DNA methylation status of OCT4 and NANOG, teratoma formation and, in the case of miPSCs, generation of germline transmissible chimeric mice. As copious amounts of human AM cells can be collected without invasion, and stored long term by conventional means without requirement for in vitro culture, they represent an ideal source for cell banking and subsequent 'on demand' generation of hiPSCs for personal regenerative and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:19912344

  7. Inhibition of β-catenin–TCF1 interaction delays differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sujash S.; Saj, Abil; Gocha, Tenzin; Murphy, Matthew; Gonsalves, Foster C.; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hayward, Penelope; Akgöl Oksuz, Betül; Shen, Steven S.; Madar, Aviv; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The ability of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to self-renew or differentiate into various cell lineages is regulated by signaling pathways and a core pluripotency transcriptional network (PTN) comprising Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway promotes pluripotency by alleviating T cell factor TCF3-mediated repression of the PTN. However, it has remained unclear how β-catenin’s function as a transcriptional activator with TCF1 influences mESC fate. Here, we show that TCF1-mediated transcription is up-regulated in differentiating mESCs and that chemical inhibition of β-catenin/TCF1 interaction improves long-term self-renewal and enhances functional pluripotency. Genetic loss of TCF1 inhibited differentiation by delaying exit from pluripotency and conferred a transcriptional profile strikingly reminiscent of self-renewing mESCs with high Nanog expression. Together, our data suggest that β-catenin’s function in regulating mESCs is highly context specific and that its interaction with TCF1 promotes differentiation, further highlighting the need for understanding how its individual protein–protein interactions drive stem cell fate. PMID:26459597

  8. miR-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse inner ear neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Du, Jintao; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhou, Wei; Zong, Lin; Dong, Chang; Chen, Kaitian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Xihui; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) act as key regulators in neuronal development, synaptic morphogenesis and plasticity. However, their role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear neural stem cells (NSCs) remains unclear. In this study, 6 miRNAs were selected and their expression patterns during the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs were examined by RT-qPCR. We demonstrated that the culture of spiral ganglion stem cells present in the inner ears of newborn mice gave rise to neurons in vitro. The expression patterns of miR-124, miR-132, miR-134, miR-20a, miR-17-5p and miR-30a-5p were examined during a 14-day neuronal differentiation period. We found that miR-124 promoted the neuronal differentiation of and neurite outgrowth in mouse inner ear NSCs, and that the changes in the expression of tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) during inner ear NSC differentiation were associated with miR-124 expression. Our findings indicate that miR-124 plays a role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs. This finding may lead to the development of novel strategies for restoring hearing in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  10. BMP4 induction of trophoblast from mouse embryonic stem cells in defined culture conditions on laminin.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yohei; Furue, Miho Kusuda; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirose, Michiko; Wakisaka, Noriko; Danno, Hiroki; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Oeda, Shiho; Aihara, Yuko; Shiota, Kunio; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishiura, Shoichi; Asashima, Makoto

    2010-05-01

    Because mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) do not contribute to the formation of extraembryonic placenta when they are injected into blastocysts, it is believed that mESCs do not differentiate into trophoblast whereas human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can express trophoblast markers when exposed to bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in vitro. To test whether mESCs have the potential to differentiate into trophoblast, we assessed the effect of BMP4 on mESCs in a defined monolayer culture condition. The expression of trophoblast-specific transcription factors such as Cdx2, Dlx3, Esx1, Gata3, Hand1, Mash2, and Plx1 was specifically upregulated in the BMP4-treated differentiated cells, and these cells expressed trophoblast markers. These results suggest that BMP4 treatment in defined culture conditions enabled mESCs to differentiate into trophoblast. This differentiation was inhibited by serum or leukemia inhibitory factor, which are generally used for mESC culture. In addition, we studied the mechanism underlying BMP4-directed mESC differentiation into trophoblast. Our results showed that BMP4 activates the Smad pathway in mESCs inducing Cdx2 expression, which plays a crucial role in trophoblast differentiation, through the binding of Smad protein to the Cdx2 genomic enhancer sequence. Our findings imply that there is a common molecular mechanism underlying hESC and mESC differentiation into trophoblast.

  11. Generation of transgene-free induced pluripotent mouse stem cells by the piggyBac transposon

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kosuke; Rad, Roland; Takeda, Junji; Bradley, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been generated from somatic cells by transgenic expression of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc. A major difficulty in the application of this technology for regenerative medicine, however, is the delivery of reprogramming factors. Whereas retroviral transduction increases the risk of tumorigenicity, transient expression methods have considerably lower reprogramming efficiencies. Here we show a highly efficient piggyBac transposon-based approach to generate integration-free iPSCs. Transposons carrying 2A peptide-linked reprogramming factors induced reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with equivalent efficiencies to retroviral transduction. Transposons were removed from these primary iPSCs by re-expressing transposase. Transgene-free iPSCs could be easily identified by HSVtk-FIAU selection. piggyBac excises without a footprint, leaving the iPSC genome without any genetic alteration. iPSCs fulfilled all criteria of pluripotency, such as expression of embryonic stem cell-specific markers, teratoma formation and contribution to chimeras. piggyBac transposon-based reprogramming may be used to generate therapeutically applicable iPSCs. PMID:19337237

  12. An alternative long-term culture system for highly-pure mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Bao-Rong; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lingling; Hao, Ding-Jun; Yang, Hao

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have great clinical potential to give rise to a variety of cell types besides all spermatogenic lineage cells. The development of an efficient method for long-term culture of highly-pure SSCs is essential for further studies related to SSC biological events. Here, we describe an in vitro culture system obtaining mouse SSC cultures of high purity, viability, and proliferation. For establishing long-term cultures of SSCs, we mainly focused on isolation procedures and culture conditions. These included co-coating of extracellular substrates, that is, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and laminin, as well as combinatiorial use of three milder enzymes and simultaneously less trypsin to minimize enzyme-mediated degradation of SSCs. Furthermore, a unique purification procedure was performed to effectively eliminate contaminating non-SSCs. Finally, a critical step is to ensure SSC maintenance and expansion by utilizing optimal culture medium. Obtained data suggest that applying our optimally modified method, SSCs can be cultured for over 90 days with high purity (around 93.5%). Moreover, SSCs isolated and expanded using our protocol fulfills all criteria of SSCs without losing their stemness-characterized by SSC-phenotypic gene expression and long-term self-renewal. This study describes for the first time a protocol allowing isolation and expansion of SSCs suitable for numerous studies related to SSC-based clinical therapies of various diseases.

  13. Effects of heat shock on survival, proliferation and differentiation of mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, Hiroyuki; Otsu, Masahiro; Suzuki, Asami; Nakayama, Takashi; Akama, Kuniko; Watanabe, Masaru; Inoue, Nobuo

    2014-02-01

    Hyperthermia during pregnancy is a significant cause of reproductive problems ranging from abortion to congenital defects of the central nervous system (CNS), including neural tube defects and microcephaly. Neural stem cells (NSCs) can proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia, playing a key role in the formation of the CNS. Here, we examined the effects of heat shock on homogeneous proliferating NSCs derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. After heat shock at 42 °C for 20 min, the proliferating NSCs continued to proliferate, although subtle changes were observed in gene expression and cell survival and proliferation. In contrast, heat shock at 43 °C caused a variety of responses: the up-regulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSP), induction of apoptosis, temporal inhibition of cell proliferation and retardation of differentiation. Finally, effects of heat shock at 44 °C were severe, with almost all cells disappearing and the remaining cells losing the capacity to proliferate and differentiate. These temperature-dependent effects of heat shock on NSCs may be valuable in elucidating the mechanisms by which hyperthermia during pregnancy causes various reproductive problems.

  14. Generation of mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells with plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Okita, Keisuke; Hong, Hyenjong; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2010-03-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells has been reported by introducing a combination of several transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). The induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patient's somatic cells could be a useful source for drug discovery and cell transplantation therapies. However, to date, most iPS cells were made using viral vectors, such as retroviruses and lentiviruses. Here we describe an alternative method to generate iPS cells from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by continual transfection of plasmid vectors. This protocol takes around 2 months to complete, from MEF isolation to iPS cell establishment. Although the reprogramming efficiency of this protocol is still low, the established iPS cells are most likely free from plasmid integration. This virus-free technique reduces the safety concern for iPS cell generation and application, and provides a source of cells for the investigation of the mechanisms underlying reprogramming and pluripotency.

  15. At Least Three Transporters Likely Mediate Threonine Uptake Needed for Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Formisano, Tara M.; Van Winkle, Lon J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are at the forefront of current regenerative and biomedical research. Thus, there exists an imperative and urgent need to understand the mechanisms that drive stem cell function in order to exploit their use as a therapeutic tool. Amino acids are potent inducers of signaling cascades that drive stem cell proliferation and differentiation. With a focus on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, Threonine (Thr) is the only amino acid required in culture media for mES cell proliferation. Current research associates this need for Thr with threonine dehydrogenase (TDH), which catabolizes Thr to glycine and acetyl-CoA in mES cells. This theory depends, in part, on the ability of 3- hydroxynorvaline (3-HNV) to inhibit both TDH and mES cell proliferation. However, the concentration of 3-HNV needed to inhibit mES cell proliferation is more than an order of magnitude less than its apparent Ki for TDH inhibition. Additionally, 3-HNV inhibits human embryonic stem (hES) cell proliferation, but hES cells do not express a functional tdh gene. Such findings indicate another mechanism for Thr stimulated mES and hES cell proliferation. Since amino acid transporters may be inducers of signaling cascades, we characterized the Thr transport systems in mES cells. We found that there is a Na+-dependent and a Na+-independent component of substrate-saturable transport, with the Na+-dependent component predominating. We also found that of 20 amino acids tested, the amino acids that were the strongest inhibitors of the Na+-dependent component of radiolabeled Thr transport were Ser, Cys, 4-OH-Pro, Asn, Met, and non-radiolabeled Thr itself. Such findings are consistent with characteristics of the ASC transport system, suggesting that this ASC system is responsible for the majority of Thr transport in mES cells. We confirmed expression of mRNA encoding the ASC system transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2, in mES cells using RT-PCR. In conclusion, mES cells likely express at least three

  16. CD133 is a modifier of hematopoietic progenitor frequencies but is dispensable for the maintenance of mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Kathrin; Grinenko, Tatyana; Mende, Nicole; Reichert, Doreen; Portz, Melanie; Ripich, Tatsiana; Carmeliet, Peter; Corbeil, Denis; Waskow, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Pentatransmembrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133) is expressed at the cell surface of multiple somatic stem cells, and it is widely used as a cell surface marker for the isolation and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and cancer stem cells. CD133 has been linked on a cell biological basis to stem cell-fate decisions in human HSCs and emerges as an important physiological regulator of stem cell maintenance and expansion. Its expression and physiological relevance in the murine hematopoietic system is nevertheless elusive. We show here that CD133 is expressed by bone marrow-resident murine HSCs and myeloid precursor cells with the developmental propensity to give rise to granulocytes and monocytes. However, CD133 is dispensable for the pool size and function of HSCs during steady-state hematopoiesis and after transplantation, demonstrating a substantial species difference between mouse and man. Blood cell numbers in the periphery are normal; however, CD133 appears to be a modifier for the development of growth-factor responsive myeloerythroid precursor cells in the bone marrow under steady state and mature red blood cells after hematopoietic stress. Taken together, these studies show that CD133 is not a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cell function in mouse but that it modifies frequencies of growth-factor responsive hematopoietic progenitor cells during steady state and after myelotoxic stress in vivo. PMID:23509298

  17. Role of astrocytes as neural stem cells in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, bona fide neural stem cells were discovered in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the largest neurogenic niche lining the striatal wall of the lateral ventricles of the brain. In this region resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that express the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and LeX. Astonishingly, these GFAP-expressing progenitors display stem-cell-like features both in vivo and in vitro. Throughout life SVZ astrocytes give rise to interneurons and oligodendrocyte precursors, which populate the olfactory bulb and the white matter, respectively. The role of the progenies of SVZ astrocytes has not been fully elucidated, but some evidence indicates that the new neurons play a role in olfactory discrimination, whereas oligodendrocytes contribute to myelinate white matter tracts. In this chapter, we describe the astrocytic nature of adult neural stem cells, their organization into the SVZ and some of their molecular and genetic characteristics. PMID:23619383

  18. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-pretreated neuron stem cell transplantation on Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Yu, Ying; Cai, Hongliu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common case of dementia and its possible therapies, such as neuron stem cell (NSC) transplantation therapy, have been studied for years. In order to improve NSC transplantation effects, we were inspired to pretreat NSC using brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) before transplantation. The AD mouse model was constructed and effects of BDNF+NSC transplant group and traditional NSC transplant group were compared using the four indicators: conditions of learning and memory ability recovery tested by Morris Water Maze (MWM), number of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, expression of synaptophysin, and number of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE)-positive fibers detected by chemical staining. Results showed all the four indicators were significantly lower in the AD model group than the control group (P < 0.05). Traditional NSC transplantation could improve these indicators to some extent but still possessed significant differences from the control group (P < 0.05). Especially, the BDNF+NSC transplant group showed significant improvements in the four indicators when compared with the AD model group (P < 0.05). Taken these data together, BDNF pretreatment improved the NSC transplantation effects, showing advantages over the traditional NSC transplantation. Our study could facilitate the application of stem cell transplantation therapy to AD treatment. PMID:26885166

  19. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  20. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  1. Fine-grained mapping of mouse brain functional connectivity with resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mechling, Anna E; Hübner, Neele S; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Harsan, Laura-Adela

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the intrinsic circuit-level functional organization of the brain has benefited tremendously from the advent of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI). In humans, resting-state functional network has been consistently mapped and its alterations have been shown to correlate with symptomatology of various neurological or psychiatric disorders. To date, deciphering the mouse brain functional connectivity (MBFC) with rsfMRI remains a largely underexplored research area, despite the plethora of human brain disorders that can be modeled in this specie. To pave the way from pre-clinical to clinical investigations we characterized here the intrinsic architecture of mouse brain functional circuitry, based on rsfMRI data acquired at 7T using the Cryoprobe technology. High-dimensional spatial group independent component analysis demonstrated fine-grained segregation of cortical and subcortical networks into functional clusters, overlapping with high specificity onto anatomical structures, down to single gray matter nuclei. These clusters, showing a high level of stability and reliability in their patterning, formed the input elements for computing the MBFC network using partial correlation and graph theory. Its topological architecture conserved the fundamental characteristics described for the human and rat brain, such as small-worldness and partitioning into functional modules. Our results additionally showed inter-modular interactions via "network hubs". Each major functional system (motor, somatosensory, limbic, visual, autonomic) was found to have representative hubs that might play an important input/output role and form a functional core for information integration. Moreover, the rostro-dorsal hippocampus formed the highest number of relevant connections with other brain areas, highlighting its importance as core structure for MBFC.

  2. Neuroinformatics for genome-wide 3D gene expression mapping in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Pathak, Sayan D; Kuan, Chihchau; Lau, Chris; Dong, Hongwei; Sodt, Andrew; Dang, Chinh; Avants, Brian; Yushkevich, Paul; Gee, James C; Haynor, David; Lein, Ed; Jones, Allan; Hawrylycz, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit genome-wide searches to discover genes that are uniquely expressed in brain circuits and regions that control behavior. Previous gene expression mapping studies in model organisms have employed situ hybridization (ISH), a technique that uses labeled nucleic acid probes to bind to specific mRNA transcripts in tissue sections. A key requirement for this effort is the development of fast and robust algorithms for anatomically mapping and quantifying gene expression for ISH. We describe a neuroinformatics pipeline for automatically mapping expression profiles of ISH data and its use to produce the first genomic scale 3-D mapping of gene expression in a mammalian brain. The pipeline is fully automated and adaptable to other organisms and tissues. Our automated study of over 20,000 genes indicates that at least 78.8 percent are expressed at some level in the adult C56BL/6J mouse brain. In addition to providing a platform for genomic scale search, high-resolution images and visualization tools for expression analysis are available at the Allen Brain Atlas web site (http://www.brain-map.org).

  3. Morphological maturation of the mouse brain: An in vivo MRI and histology investigation.

    PubMed

    Hammelrath, Luam; Škokić, Siniša; Khmelinskii, Artem; Hess, Andreas; van der Knaap, Noortje; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-01-15

    With the wide access to studies of selected gene expressions in transgenic animals, mice have become the dominant species as cerebral disease models. Many of these studies are performed on animals of not more than eight weeks, declared as adult animals. Based on the earlier reports that full brain maturation requires at least three months in rats, there is a clear need to discern the corresponding minimal animal age to provide an "adult brain" in mice in order to avoid modulation of disease progression/therapy studies by ongoing developmental changes. For this purpose, we have studied anatomical brain alterations of mice during their first six months of age. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, structural and volume changes of the brain were identified and compared with histological analysis of myelination. Mouse brain volume was found to be almost stable already at three weeks, but cortex thickness kept decreasing continuously with maximal changes during the first three months. Myelination is still increasing between three and six months, although most dramatic changes are over by three months. While our results emphasize that mice should be at least three months old when adult animals are needed for brain studies, preferred choice of one particular metric for future investigation goals will result in somewhat varying age windows of stabilization.

  4. Involvement of ceramide in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the neonatal mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Hegde, Medha; Ohsie, Jason; Paik, Sun-Mee; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    Acute administration of ethanol to 7-day-old mice is known to cause robust apoptotic neurodegeneration in the brain. Our previous studies have shown that such ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is accompanied by increases in lipids including ceramide, triglyceride, cholesterol ester, and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain. In this study, the effects of ethanol on lipid profiles as well as caspase-3 activation were examined in the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and inferior colliculus of the P7 mouse brain. We found that the cortex, hippocampus, and inferior colliculus, which showed substantial caspase-3 activation by ethanol, manifested significant elevations in ceramide, triglyceride, and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine. In contrast, the cerebellum, with the least caspase-3 activation, failed to show significant changes in ceramide and triglyceride, and exhibits much smaller increases in N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine than other brain regions. Ethanol-induced increases in cholesterol ester were observed in all brain regions tested. Inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase effectively blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation as well as elevations in ceramide, cholesterol ester, and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that the expression of serine palmitoyltransferase was mainly localized in neurons and was enhanced in activated caspase-3-positive neurons generated by ethanol. These results indicate that de novo ceramide synthesis has a vital role in ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain. PMID:20663015

  5. Morphological maturation of the mouse brain: An in vivo MRI and histology investigation.

    PubMed

    Hammelrath, Luam; Škokić, Siniša; Khmelinskii, Artem; Hess, Andreas; van der Knaap, Noortje; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-01-15

    With the wide access to studies of selected gene expressions in transgenic animals, mice have become the dominant species as cerebral disease models. Many of these studies are performed on animals of not more than eight weeks, declared as adult animals. Based on the earlier reports that full brain maturation requires at least three months in rats, there is a clear need to discern the corresponding minimal animal age to provide an "adult brain" in mice in order to avoid modulation of disease progression/therapy studies by ongoing developmental changes. For this purpose, we have studied anatomical brain alterations of mice during their first six months of age. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI, structural and volume changes of the brain were identified and compared with histological analysis of myelination. Mouse brain volume was found to be almost stable already at three weeks, but cortex thickness kept decreasing continuously with maximal changes during the first three months. Myelination is still increasing between three and six months, although most dramatic changes are over by three months. While our results emphasize that mice should be at least three months old when adult animals are needed for brain studies, preferred choice of one particular metric for future investigation goals will result in somewhat varying age windows of stabilization. PMID:26458518

  6. S100A6 (calcyclin) is a novel marker of neural stem cells and astrocyte precursors in the subgranular zone of the adult mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Jinno, Shozo

    2014-01-01

    S100A6 (calcyclin), an EF-hand calcium binding protein, is considered to play various roles in the brain, for example, cell proliferation and differentiation, calcium homeostasis, and neuronal degeneration. In addition to some limbic nuclei, S100A6 is distributed in the rostral migratory stream, one of the major neurogenic niches of the adult brain. However, the potential involvement of S100A6 in adult neurogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of S100A6 in the other major neurogenic niche, the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adult mouse hippocampus. Immunofluorescent multiple labeling showed that S100A6 was highly expressed in neural stem cells labeled by sex determining region Y-box 2, brain lipid-binding protein protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein. S100A6+ cells often extended a long process typical of radial glial morphology. In addition, S100A6 was found in some S100β+ astrocyte lineage cells. Interestingly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen was detected in a fraction of S100A6+/S100β+ cells. These cells were considered to be lineage-restricted astrocyte precursors maintaining mitotic potential. On the other hand, S100A6 was rarely seen in neural lineage cells labeled by T-box brain protein 2, doublecortin, calretinin and calbindin D28K. Cell fate-tracing experiment using BrdU showed that the majority of newly generated immature astrocytes were immunoreactive for S100A6, while mature astrocytes lacked S100A6 immunoreactivity. Administration of S100 protein inhibitor, trifluoperazine, caused a reduction in production of S100β+ astrocyte lineage cells, but had no impact on neurogenesis. Overall, our data provide the first evidence that S100A6 is a specific marker of neural stem cells and astrocyte precursors, and may be especially important for generation of astrocytes in the adult hippocampus.

  7. Restricted nature of adult neural stem cells: re-evaluation of their potential for brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Obernier, Kirsten; Tong, Cheuk Ka; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the walls of the lateral ventricles continue to produce new neurons and oligodendrocytes throughout life. The identification of NSCs, long-range neuronal migration, and the integration of new neurons into fully formed mature neural circuits—all in the juvenile or adult brain—has dramatically changed concepts in neurodevelopment and suggests new strategies for brain repair. Yet, the latter has to be seen in perspective: NSCs in the adult are heterogeneous and highly regionally specified; young neurons derived from these primary progenitors migrate and integrate in specific brain regions. Neurogenesis appears to have a function in brain plasticity rather than brain repair. If similar processes could be induced in regions of the brain that are normally not a target of new neurons, therapeutic neuronal replacement may one day reinstate neural circuit plasticity and possibly repair broken neural circuits. PMID:24987325

  8. Proteomic analysis of the mouse brain after repetitive exposure to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Can; Zhou, Tao; Li, Jingyi; Wang, Hong; Li, Xiaorong; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Pingxiang; Xue, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) is known to have a protective effect against hypoxic damage; however, the precise mechanisms involved remain unknown. In this study, an acute and repetitive hypoxia mouse model, two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS), and Western blot experiments were used to identify the differential expression of key proteins in the mouse brain during HPC. Approximately 2100 2D-DIGE spots were observed following gel imaging and spot detection. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the expression of 66 proteins were observed between the 3× HPC treatment group and the control group, 45 proteins were observed between the 6× HPC treatment group and the control group, and 70 proteins were observed between the 3× HPC treatment group and the 6× HPC group. Consistent results among Western blot, 2D-DIGE and MS methods were observed for the proteins, ATP synthase subunit alpha, malate dehydrogenase, guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-1 and proteasome subunit alpha type-2. The proteins associated with ATP synthesis and the citric acid cycle were down-regulated, while those linked to glycolysis and oxygen-binding were up-regulated. This proteomic analysis of the mouse brain after HPC furthers understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the protective effect of HPC and these findings provide new insight into the mechanisms of hypoxia and HPC. PMID:25937538

  9. Akhirin regulates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in intact and injured mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaleem, Felemban Athary M; Song, Xiaohong; Kawano, Rie; Uezono, Naohiro; Ito, Ayako; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Hossain, Mahmud; Nakashima, Kinichi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    Although the central nervous system is considered a comparatively static tissue with limited cell turnover, cells with stem cell properties have been isolated from most neural tissues. The spinal cord ependymal cells show neural stem cell potential in vitro and in vivo in injured spinal cord. However, very little is known regarding the ependymal niche in the mouse spinal cord. We previously reported that a secreted factor, chick Akhirin, is expressed in the ciliary marginal zone of the eye, where it works as a heterophilic cell-adhesion molecule. Here, we describe a new crucial function for mouse Akhirin (M-AKH) in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors in the mouse spinal cord. During embryonic spinal cord development, M-AKH is transiently expressed in the