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Sample records for mouse brain stem

  1. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  2. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  3. Isolation and Perivascular Localization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Gu; Shinojima, Naoki; Hossain, Anwar; Gumin, Joy; Yong, Raymund L.; Colman, Howard; Marini, Frank; Andreeff, Michael; Lang, Frederick F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although originally isolated from the bone marrow, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been detected in other tissues. However, little is known about MSCs in the brain. OBJECTIVE To determine the extent to which cells with the features of MSCs exist in normal brain tissue and to determine the location of these cells in the brain. METHODS Single-cell suspensions from mouse brains were cultured according to the same methods used for culturing bone marrow–derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). These brain-derived cells were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for surface markers associated with BM-MSCs (stem cell antigen 1 [Sca-1+], CD9+, CD45−, CD11b−, and CD31−). Brain-derived cells were exposed to mesenchymal differentiation conditions. To determine the locations of these cells within the brain, sections of normal brains were analyzed by immunostaining for Sca-1, CD31, and nerve/glial antigen 2. RESULTS Cells morphologically similar to mouse BM-MSCs were identified and called brain-derived MSCs (Br-MSCs). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting indicated that the isolated cells had a surface marker profile similar to BM-MSCs, ie, Sca-1+, CD9+, CD45−, and CD11b−. Like BM-MSCs, Br-MSCs were capable of differentiation into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Immunostaining indicated that Sca-1+ Br-MSCs are located around blood vessels and may represent progenitor cells that serve as a source of mesenchymal elements (eg, pericytes) within the brain. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that cells similar to BM-MSCs exist in the brain. These Br-MSCs appear to be located within the vascular niche and may provide the mesenchymal elements of this niche. Because MSCs may be part of the cellular response to tissue injury, Br-MSCs may represent targets in the therapy of pathological processes such as stroke, trauma, and tumorigenesis. PMID:20651630

  4. Brain transplantation of genetically engineered human neural stem cells globally corrects brain lesions in the mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mouse.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing-Li; Shen, Jin-Song; Ohashi, Toya; Maeda, Hiroshi; Kim, Seung Up; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2003-10-15

    In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of using human neural stem cells (NSCs) in the treatment of diffuse central nervous system (CNS) alterations in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII), a lysosomal storage disease caused by a genetic defect in the beta-glucuronidase gene. An immortalized NSC line derived from human fetal telencephalon was genetically engineered to overexpress beta-glucuronidase and transplanted into the cerebral ventricles of neonatal MPS VII mouse. Transplanted human NSCs were found to integrate and migrate in the host brain and to produce large amount of beta-glucuronidase. Brain contents of the substrates of beta-glucuronidase were reduced to nearly normal levels, and widespread clearing of lysosomal storage was observed in the MPS VII mouse brain at 25 days posttransplantation. The number of engrafted cells decreased markedly after the transplantation, and it appears that the major cause of the cell death was not the immune response of the host but apoptotic cell death of grafted human NSCs. Results showed that human NSCs would serve as a useful gene transfer vehicle for the treatment of diffuse CNS lesions in human lysosomal storage diseases and are potentially applicable in the treatment of patients suffering from neurological disorders.

  5. In Vivo Fate Imaging of Intracerebral Stem Cell Grafts in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nelles, Melanie; Beyrau, Andreas; Hoehn, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    We generated transgenic human neural stem cells (hNSCs) stably expressing the reporter genes Luciferase for bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and GFP for fluorescence imaging, for multimodal imaging investigations. These transgenic hNSCs were further labeled with a clinically approved perfluoropolyether to perform parallel 19F MRI studies. In vitro validation demonstrated normal cell proliferation and differentiation of the transgenic and additionally labeled hNSCs, closely the same as the wild type cell line, making them suitable for in vivo application. Labeled and unlabeled transgenic hNSCs were implanted into the striatum of mouse brain. The time profile of their cell fate after intracerebral grafting was monitored during nine days following implantation with our multimodal imaging approach, assessing both functional and anatomical condition. The 19F MRI demarcated the graft location and permitted to estimate the cell number in the graft. BLI showed a pronounce cell loss during this monitoring period, indicated by the decrease of the viability signal. The in vivo obtained cell fate results were further validated and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. We could show that the surviving cells of the graft continued to differentiate into early neurons, while the severe cell loss could be explained by an inflammatory reaction to the graft, showing the graft being surrounded by activated microglia and macrophages. These results are different from earlier cell survival studies of our group where we had implanted the identical cells into the same mouse strain but in the cortex and not in the striatum. The cortical transplanted cells did not show any loss in viability but only pronounced and continuous neuronal differentiation. PMID:26641453

  6. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Kosi, Nina; Alić, Ivan; Kolačević, Matea; Vrsaljko, Nina; Jovanov Milošević, Nataša; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland; Mitrečić, Dinko

    2015-02-09

    The nucleolar protein 2 gene encodes a protein specific for the nucleolus. It is assumed that it plays a role in the synthesis of ribosomes and regulation of the cell cycle. Due to its link to cell proliferation, higher expression of Nop2 indicates a worse tumor prognosis. In this work we used Nop2(gt1gaj) gene trap mouse strain. While lethality of homozygous animals suggested a vital role of this gene, heterozygous animals allowed the detection of expression of Nop2 in various tissues, including mouse brain. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy techniques, applied to a mature mouse brain, human brain and on mouse neural stem cells revealed expression of Nop2 in differentiating cells, including astrocytes, as well as in mature neurons. Nop2 was detected in various regions of mouse and human brain, mostly in large pyramidal neurons. In the human, Nop2 was strongly expressed in supragranular and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex and in layer III of the cingulate cortex. Also, Nop2 was detected in CA1 and the subiculum of the hippocampus. Subcellular analyses revealed predominant location of Nop2 within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. To test if Nop2 expression correlates to cell proliferation occurring during tissue regeneration, we induced strokes in mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two weeks after stroke, the number of Nop2/nestin double positive cells in the region affected by ischemia and the periventricular zone substantially increased. Our findings suggest a newly discovered role of Nop2 in both mature neurons and in cells possibly involved in the regeneration of nervous tissue. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. TGFβ lengthens the G1 phase of stem cells in aged mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Pineda, Jose R; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Gauthier, Laurent R; Morizur, Lise; Boussin, François D; Mouthon, Marc-André

    2014-12-01

    Neurogenesis decreases during aging causing a progressive cognitive decline but it is still controversial whether proliferation defects in neurogenic niches result from a loss of neural stem cells or from an impairment of their progression through the cell cycle. Using an accurate fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique, we show that the pool of neural stem cells is maintained in the subventricular zone of middle-aged mice while they have a reduced proliferative potential eventually leading to the subsequent decrease of their progeny. In addition, we demonstrate that the G1 phase is lengthened during aging specifically in activated stem cells, but not in transit-amplifying cells, and directly impacts on neurogenesis. Finally, we report that inhibition of TGFβ signaling restores cell cycle progression defects in stem cells. Our data highlight the significance of cell cycle dysregulation in stem cells in the aged brain and provide an attractive foundation for the development of anti-TGFβ regenerative therapies based on stimulating endogenous neural stem cells. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Using brain slice cultures of mouse brain to assess the effect of growth factors on differentiation of bone marrow derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bratincsák, András; Lonyai, Anna; Shahar, Tal; Hansen, Arne; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Mezey, Eva

    2007-03-30

    Bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDSCs) have been reported to form neurons and supportive cells in the brain. We describe a technique that combines the simplicity of in vitro studies with many of the advantages of in vivo experiments. We cultured mouse brain slices, deposited GFP-tagged BMDSCs evenly distributed on their surfaces, and then added test factors to the culture medium. Addition of both SDF-1 and EGF resulted in morphological changes of BMDSC and in the induction of islet-1, a marker of neuroepithelial progenitors. We conclude that organotypic tissue culture (OTC) may allow us to detect the effects of exogenous factors on the differentiation of BMDSCs (or any other type of stem cells) in an environment that may resemble the CNS after brain injury. Once such factors have been identified they could be evaluated for tissue regeneration in more complex, whole animal models.

  9. Neuronal degeneration in the brain of the brindled mouse. Histochemical demonstration of decreased cytochrome oxidase activity in the cerebellum and brain stem.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, N

    1988-06-01

    In order to investigate the levels of cytochrome oxidase activity in neuronal mitochondria in the brain of the brindled mouse hemizygote (BM), the cerebella and brain stems from 12 pairs of brindled and normal littermates aged 13-16 days were examined. The diaminobenzidine method for light- and electronmicroscopic histochemistry was adopted. Light microscopy revealed that mitochondria in the normal cerebellum showed an intensely positive reaction to diaminobenzidine, whereas those in the BM cerebellum showed a very weak reaction indicating an evident reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity. Electron microscopy disclosed a diaminobenzidine-OsO4 product densely appearing on the inner membranes of most mitochondria in Purkinje cells in the normal cerebellum. However, it was very faint or absent in those in the BM cerebellum. The same was true in Golgi II cells, granule cells, glomeruli and brain stem nuclei, but the degree of reduction was not uniform among these structures. In conclusion, there is not only a generalized reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity but also a topographical predilection of areas showing a reduction of the enzyme in the BM cerebellum and brain stem. These facts may explain the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration in the brain of the BM.

  10. Taurine Induces Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells and Synapse Development in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, Mattu Chetana; Marcy, Guillaume; Low, Guoliang; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Zhao, Xianfeng; Rosales, Francisco J.; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5) hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems. PMID:22916184

  11. Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease in Stem-Cell-Derived Human Neurons Transplanted into Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Espuny-Camacho, Ira; Arranz, Amaia M; Fiers, Mark; Snellinx, An; Ando, Kunie; Munck, Sebastian; Bonnefont, Jerome; Lambot, Laurie; Corthout, Nikky; Omodho, Lorna; Vanden Eynden, Elke; Radaelli, Enrico; Tesseur, Ina; Wray, Selina; Ebneth, Andreas; Hardy, John; Leroy, Karelle; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; De Strooper, Bart

    2017-03-08

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) provide a unique entry to study species-specific aspects of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, in vitro culture of neurons deprives them of their natural environment. Here we transplanted human PSC-derived cortical neuronal precursors into the brain of a murine AD model. Human neurons differentiate and integrate into the brain, express 3R/4R Tau splice forms, show abnormal phosphorylation and conformational Tau changes, and undergo neurodegeneration. Remarkably, cell death was dissociated from tangle formation in this natural 3D model of AD. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we observed upregulation of genes involved in myelination and downregulation of genes related to memory and cognition, synaptic transmission, and neuron projection. This novel chimeric model for AD displays human-specific pathological features and allows the analysis of different genetic backgrounds and mutations during the course of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with headache and extreme hypertension. Computed tomography showed diffuse brain stem hypodensity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse brain stem vasogenic edema. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hypertensive encephalopathy, which classically occurs at parietooccipital white matter. Because of its atypical location, the diagnosis can be challenging. Moreover, the coexistence of hypertension and brain stem edema could also direct clinicians toward a diagnosis of ischemic infarction, leading to a completely contradictory treatment goal.

  13. Establishment of mouse-immortalized hybrid clones expressing characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Gallyas, F; Endoh, M; Yamamura, T; Kunishita, T; Kobayashi, T; Tabira, T

    1992-09-01

    Two clonal immortalized neurons designated CL8c4.7 and CL8a5.2 were established by somatic cell fusion between a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-(HPRT-) deficient neuroblastoma N18TG2 and newborn mouse cerebellar/brain stem neurons. In the serum-containing medium without extra differentiating agents, both clones exhibited a morphology of differentiated neurons. They contained high levels of glutamate but no gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The CL8a5.2 clone synthesized choline acetyltransferase and serotonin. In immunocytochemical studies, both clones expressed 200 kD neurofilament protein, neuron-specific enolase, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), tau protein, neuronal cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), HNK-1, Thy-1.2, saxitoxin-binding sodium channel protein, and glutamate. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity was identified in the neuritic terminals of CL8c4.7 cells. Most of these antigens were barely detectable on N18TG2 cells. Electrophysiologically, both clones generated action potentials in response to electrical stimuli. The hybrid clones that express characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions might be invaluable for the study of the molecular basis of neuronal differentiation and degeneration in these regions.

  14. HETEROTOPICALLY TRANSPLANTED CVO NEURAL STEM CELLS GENERATE NEURONS AND MIGRATE WITH SVZ CELLS IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lori B.; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ [3]. The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the Nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU+ cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:20298755

  15. Induced neural stem cells achieve long-term survival and functional integration in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Kathrin; Zhang, Mingyue; van Wüllen, Thea; Sakalem, Marna; Tapia, Natalia; Baumuratov, Aidos; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Schöler, Hans R; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2014-09-09

    Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]). iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications.

  16. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  17. Treatment of adult MPSI mouse brains with IDUA-expressing mesenchymal stem cells decreases GAG deposition and improves exploratory behavior

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPSI) is caused by a deficiency in alpha-L iduronidase (IDUA), which leads to lysosomal accumulation of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan and heparan sulfate. While the currently available therapies have good systemic effects, they only minimally affect the neurodegenerative process. Based on the neuroprotective and tissue regenerative properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), we hypothesized that the administration of MSCs transduced with a murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector expressing IDUA to IDUA KO mouse brains could reduce GAG deposition in the brain and, as a result, improve neurofunctionality, as measured by exploratory activity. Methods MSCs infected with an MLV vector encoding IDUA were injected into the left ventricle of the brain of 12- or 25-month-old IDUA KO mice. The behavior of the treated mice in the elevated plus maze and open field tests was observed for 1 to 2 months. Following these observations, the brains were removed for biochemical and histological analyses. Results After 1 or 2 months of observation, the presence of the transgene in the brain tissue of almost all of the treated mice was confirmed using PCR, and a significant reduction in GAG deposition was observed. This reduction was directly reflected in an improvement in exploratory activity in the open field and the elevated plus maze tests. Despite these behavioral improvements and the reduction in GAG deposition, IDUA activity was undetectable in these samples. Overall, these results indicate that while the initial level of IDUA was not sustainable for a month, it was enough to reduce and maintain low GAG deposition and improve the exploratory activity for months. Conclusions These data show that gene therapy, via the direct injection of IDUA-expressing MSCs into the brain, is an effective way to treat neurodegeneration in MPSI mice. PMID:22520214

  18. Quiescent Oct4(+) Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) Repopulate Ablated Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein(+) NSCs in the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Rachel L; Yammine, Samantha Z; Morshead, Cindi M; van der Kooy, Derek

    2017-09-01

    Adult primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) are a rare population of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)(-) Oct4(+) cells in the mouse forebrain subependymal zone bordering the lateral ventricles that give rise to clonal neurospheres in leukemia inhibitory factor in vitro. pNSC neurospheres can be passaged to self-renew or give rise to GFAP(+) NSCs that form neurospheres in epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, which we collectively refer to as definitive NSCs (dNSCs). Label retention experiments using doxycycline-inducible histone-2B (H2B)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice and several chase periods of up to 1 year quantified the adult pNSC cell cycle time as 3-5 months. We hypothesized that while pNSCs are not very proliferative at baseline, they may exist as a reserve pool of NSCs in case of injury. To test this function of pNSCs, we obtained conditional Oct4 knockout mice, Oct4(fl/fl) ;Sox1(Cre) (Oct4(CKO) ), which do not yield adult pNSC-derived neurospheres. When we ablated the progeny of pNSCs, namely all GFAP(+) dNSCs, in these Oct4(CKO) mice, we found that dNSCs did not recover as they do in wild-type mice, suggesting that pNSCs are necessary for dNSC repopulation. Returning to the H2B-GFP mice, we observed that the cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside ablation of proliferating cells including dNSCs-induced quiescent pNSCs to proliferate and significantly dilute their H2B-GFP label. In conclusion, we demonstrate that pNSCs are the most quiescent stem cells in the adult brain reported to date and that their lineage position upstream of GFAP(+) dNSCs allows them to repopulate a depleted neural lineage. Stem Cells 2017;35:2071-2082. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Comparative analysis of the frequency and distribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, Mohammad G; Blackmore, Daniel G; Large, Beatrice; Azari, Hassan; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Paxinos, George; Franklin, Keith B J; Reynolds, Brent A; Rietze, Rodney L

    2008-04-01

    The neurosphere assay can detect and expand neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitor cells, but it cannot discriminate between these two populations. Given two assays have purported to overcome this shortfall, we performed a comparative analysis of the distribution and frequency of NSCs and progenitor cells detected in 400 mum coronal segments along the ventricular neuraxis of the adult mouse brain using the neurosphere assay, the neural colony forming cell assay (N-CFCA), and label-retaining cell (LRC) approach. We observed a large variation in the number of progenitor/stem cells detected in serial sections along the neuraxis, with the number of neurosphere-forming cells detected in individual 400 mum sections varying from a minimum of eight to a maximum of 891 depending upon the rostral-caudal coordinate assayed. Moreover, the greatest variability occurred in the rostral portion of the lateral ventricles, thereby explaining the large variation in neurosphere frequency previously reported. Whereas the overall number of neurospheres (3730 +/- 276) or colonies (4275 +/- 124) we detected along the neuraxis did not differ significantly, LRC numbers were significantly reduced (1186 +/- 188, 7 month chase) in comparison to both total colonies and neurospheres. Moreover, approximately two orders of magnitude fewer NSC-derived colonies (50 +/- 10) were detected using the N-CFCA as compared to LRCs. Given only 5% of the LRCs are cycling (BrdU+/Ki-67+) or competent to divide (BrdU+/Mcm-2+), and proliferate upon transfer to culture, it is unclear whether this technique selectively detects endogenous NSCs. Overall, caution should be taken with the interpretation and employment of all these techniques.

  20. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neurogenesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Jose R; Daynac, Mathieu; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Cebrian-Silla, Arantxa; Sii Felice, Karine; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Boussin, François D; Mouthon, Marc-André

    2013-04-01

    Neurogenesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the subventricular zone of high dose-irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neurogenesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neurogenesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging.

  1. Inhibition of autophagy prevents irradiation-induced neural stem and progenitor cell death in the juvenile mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafeng; Zhou, Kai; Li, Tao; Xu, Yiran; Xie, Cuicui; Sun, Yanyan; Zhang, Yaodong; Rodriguez, Juan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-03-23

    Radiotherapy is an effective tool in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. However, damage to brain stem and progenitor cells constitutes a major problem and is associated with long-term side effects. Autophagy has been shown to be involved in cell death, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of autophagy inhibition on neural stem and progenitor cell death in the juvenile brain. Ten-day-old selective Atg7 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to a single 6Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation. Cell death and proliferation as well as microglia activation and inflammation were evaluated in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the cerebellum at 6 h after irradiation. We found that cell death was reduced in Atg7 KO compared with WT mice at 6 h after irradiation. The number of activated microglia increased significantly in both the dentate gyrus and the cerebellum of WT mice after irradiation, but the increase was lower in the Atg7 KO mice. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines decreased, especially in the cerebellum, in the Atg7 KO group. These results suggest that autophagy might be a potential target for preventing radiotherapy-induced neural stem and progenitor cell death and its associated long-term side effects.

  2. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-induced disruption of gene expression in mouse embryonic brain and single neural stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kalebic, Nereo; Taverna, Elena; Tavano, Stefania; Wong, Fong Kuan; Suchold, Dana; Winkler, Sylke; Huttner, Wieland B; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system in vivo to disrupt gene expression in neural stem cells in the developing mammalian brain. Two days after in utero electroporation of a single plasmid encoding Cas9 and an appropriate guide RNA (gRNA) into the embryonic neocortex of Tis21::GFP knock-in mice, expression of GFP, which occurs specifically in neural stem cells committed to neurogenesis, was found to be nearly completely (≈ 90%) abolished in the progeny of the targeted cells. Importantly, upon in utero electroporation directly of recombinant Cas9/gRNA complex, near-maximal efficiency of disruption of GFP expression was achieved already after 24 h. Furthermore, by using microinjection of the Cas9 protein/gRNA complex into neural stem cells in organotypic slice culture, we obtained disruption of GFP expression within a single cell cycle. Finally, we used either Cas9 plasmid in utero electroporation or Cas9 protein complex microinjection to disrupt the expression of Eomes/Tbr2, a gene fundamental for neocortical neurogenesis. This resulted in a reduction in basal progenitors and an increase in neuronal differentiation. Thus, the present in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in neural stem cells provides a rapid, efficient and enduring disruption of expression of specific genes to dissect their role in mammalian brain development. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  4. Human neural stem cells genetically modified to overexpress brain-derived neurotrophic factor promote functional recovery and neuroprotection in a mouse stroke model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong J; Lim, In J; Lee, Min C; Kim, Seung U

    2010-11-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a lethal stroke type; mortality approaches 50%, and current medical therapy against ICH shows only limited effectiveness, so an alternative approach is required, such as stem cell-based cell therapy. Previously we have shown that intravenously transplanted human neural stem cells (NSCs) selectively migrate to the brain and promote functional recovery in rat ICH model, and others have shown that intracerebral infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results in improved structural and functional outcome from cerebral ischemia. We postulated that human NSCs overexpressing BDNF transplanted into cerebral cortex overlying ICH lesion could provide improved survival of grafted NSCs and increased angiogenesis and behavioral recovery in mouse ICH model. ICH was induced in adult mice by injection of bacterial collagenase into striatum. The HB1.F3.BDNF (F3.BDNF) human NSC line produces sixfold higher amounts of BDNFF over the parental F3 cell line in vitro, induces behavioral improvement, and produces a threefold increase in cell survival at 2 weeks and 8 weeks posttransplantation. Brain transplantation of human NSCs overexpressing BDNF provided differentiation and survival of grafted human NSCs and renewed angiogenesis of host brain and functional recovery of ICH animals. These results indicate that the F3.BDNF human NSCs should be of great value as a cellular source for experimental studies involving cellular therapy for human neurological disorders, including ICH.

  5. Assessment of long-term safety and efficacy of intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Donega, Vanessa; Nijboer, Cora H; van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Youssef, Sameh A; de Bruin, Alain; van Bel, Frank; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2015-11-01

    For clinical translation, we assessed whether intranasal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induces neoplasia in the brain or periphery at 14 mo. Furthermore, the long-term effects of MSCs on behavior and lesion size were determined. HI was induced in 9-d-old mice. Pups received an intranasal administration of 0.5 × 10(6) MSCs or vehicle at 10 d post-HI. Full macroscopical and microscopical pathological analysis of 39 organs per mouse was performed. Sensorimotor behavior was assessed in the cylinder-rearing test at 10 d, 28 d, 6 mo, and 9 mo. Cognition was measured with the novel object recognition test at 3 and 14 mo post-HI. Lesion size was determined by analyzing mouse-anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and mouse-anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) staining at 5 wk and 14 mo. At 14 mo post-HI, we did not observe any neoplasia in the nasal turbinates, brain, or other organs of HI mice treated with MSCs. Furthermore, our results show that MSC-induced improvement of sensorimotor and cognitive function is long lasting. In contrast, HI-vehicle mice showed severe behavioral impairment. Recovery of MAP2- and MBP-positive area lasted up to 14 mo following MSC treatment. Our results provide strong evidence of the long-term safety and positive effects of MSC treatment following neonatal HI in mice.

  6. Mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cells reveal niches that support neuronal differentiation in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Maya-Espinosa, Guadalupe; Collazo-Navarrete, Omar; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Drucker-Colín, René; Covarrubias, Luis; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    A neurogenic niche can be identified by the proliferation and differentiation of its naturally residing neural stem cells. However, it remains unclear whether "silent" neurogenic niches or regions suitable for neural differentiation, other than the areas of active neurogenesis, exist in the adult brain. Embryoid body (EB) cells derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are endowed with a high potential to respond to specification and neuralization signals of the embryo. Hence, to identify microenvironments in the postnatal and adult rat brain with the capacity to support neuronal differentiation, we transplanted dissociated EB cells to conventional neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions. Our results show a neuronal differentiation pattern of EB cells that was dependent on the host region. Efficient neuronal differentiation of EB cells occurred within an adjacent region to the rostral migratory stream. EB cell differentiation was initially patchy and progressed toward an even distribution along the graft by 15-21 days post-transplantation, giving rise mostly to GABAergic neurons. EB cells in the striatum displayed a lower level of neuronal differentiation and derived into a significant number of astrocytes. Remarkably, when EB cells were transplanted to the striatum of adult rats after a local ischemic stroke, increased number of neuroblasts and neurons were observed. Unexpectedly, we determined that the adult substantia nigra pars compacta, considered a non-neurogenic area, harbors a robust neurogenic environment. Therefore, neurally uncommitted cells derived from ESCs can detect regions that support neuronal differentiation within the adult brain, a fundamental step for the development of stem cell-based replacement therapies. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Assessing cell cycle progression of neural stem and progenitor cells in the mouse developing brain after genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Olivier; Bery, Amandine; Roque, Telma; Desmaze, Chantal; Boussin, François D

    2014-05-07

    Neurons of the cerebral cortex are generated during brain development from different types of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPC), which form a pseudostratified epithelium lining the lateral ventricles of the embryonic brain. Genotoxic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, have highly deleterious effects on the developing brain related to the high sensitivity of NSPC. Elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved depends on the characterization of the DNA damage response of these particular types of cells, which requires an accurate method to determine NSPC progression through the cell cycle in the damaged tissue. Here is shown a method based on successive intraperitoneal injections of EdU and BrdU in pregnant mice and further detection of these two thymidine analogues in coronal sections of the embryonic brain. EdU and BrdU are both incorporated in DNA of replicating cells during S phase and are detected by two different techniques (azide or a specific antibody, respectively), which facilitate their simultaneous detection. EdU and BrdU staining are then determined for each NSPC nucleus in function of its distance from the ventricular margin in a standard region of the dorsal telencephalon. Thus this dual labeling technique allows distinguishing cells that progressed through the cell cycle from those that have activated a cell cycle checkpoint leading to cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. An example of experiment is presented, in which EdU was injected before irradiation and BrdU immediately after and analyzes performed within the 4 hr following irradiation. This protocol provides an accurate analysis of the acute DNA damage response of NSPC in function of the phase of the cell cycle at which they have been irradiated. This method is easily transposable to many other systems in order to determine the impact of a particular treatment on cell cycle progression in living tissues.

  8. Assessing Cell Cycle Progression of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells in the Mouse Developing Brain after Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Olivier; Bery, Amandine; Roque, Telma; Desmaze, Chantal; Boussin, François D.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebral cortex are generated during brain development from different types of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPC), which form a pseudostratified epithelium lining the lateral ventricles of the embryonic brain. Genotoxic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, have highly deleterious effects on the developing brain related to the high sensitivity of NSPC. Elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved depends on the characterization of the DNA damage response of these particular types of cells, which requires an accurate method to determine NSPC progression through the cell cycle in the damaged tissue. Here is shown a method based on successive intraperitoneal injections of EdU and BrdU in pregnant mice and further detection of these two thymidine analogues in coronal sections of the embryonic brain. EdU and BrdU are both incorporated in DNA of replicating cells during S phase and are detected by two different techniques (azide or a specific antibody, respectively), which facilitate their simultaneous detection. EdU and BrdU staining are then determined for each NSPC nucleus in function of its distance from the ventricular margin in a standard region of the dorsal telencephalon. Thus this dual labeling technique allows distinguishing cells that progressed through the cell cycle from those that have activated a cell cycle checkpoint leading to cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. An example of experiment is presented, in which EdU was injected before irradiation and BrdU immediately after and analyzes performed within the 4 hr following irradiation. This protocol provides an accurate analysis of the acute DNA damage response of NSPC in function of the phase of the cell cycle at which they have been irradiated. This method is easily transposable to many other systems in order to determine the impact of a particular treatment on cell cycle progression in living tissues. PMID:24837791

  9. Intranasal delivery of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in mouse models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Lusine; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Stolzing, Alexandra; Schäfer, Richard; Siegel, Georg; Fabian, Claire; Kahle, Philipp; Biedermann, Tilo; Lourhmati, Ali; Buadze, Marine; Novakovic, Ana; Proksch, Barbara; Gleiter, Christoph H; Frey, William H; Schwab, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In view of the rapid preclinical development of cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disorders, traumatic brain injury, and tumors, the safe and efficient delivery and targeting of therapeutic cells to the central nervous system is critical for maintaining therapeutic efficacy and safety in the respective disease models. Our previous data demonstrated therapeutically efficacious and targeted delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the brain in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The present study examined delivery of bone marrow-derived MSCs, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in a transgenic model of PD [(Thy1)-h[A30P] αS] and an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) via intranasal application (INA). INA of microglia in naive BL/6 mice led to targeted and effective delivery of cells to the brain. Quantitative PCR analysis of eGFP DNA showed that the brain contained the highest amount of eGFP-microglia (up to 2.1 × 10(4)) after INA of 1 × 10(6) cells, while the total amount of cells detected in peripheral organs did not exceed 3.4 × 10(3). Seven days after INA, MSCs expressing eGFP were detected in the olfactory bulb (OB), cortex, amygdala, striatum, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem of (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS transgenic mice, showing predominant distribution within the OB and brainstem. INA of eGFP-expressing macrophages in 13-month-old APP/PS1 mice led to delivery of cells to the OB, hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. Both MSCs and macrophages contained Iba-1-positive population of small microglia-like cells and Iba-1-negative large rounded cells showing either intracellular amyloid β (macrophages in APP/PS1 model) or α-synuclein [MSCs in (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS model] immunoreactivity. Here, we show, for the first time, intranasal delivery of cells to the brain of transgenic PD and AD mouse models. Additional work is needed to determine the optimal dosage (single treatment regimen or repeated

  10. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Loaded PS80 PBCA Nanocarrier for In Vitro Neural Differentiation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chiu-Yen; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lee, I-Neng; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Yang, Jen-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can induce neural differentiation in stem cells and has the potential for repair of the nervous system. In this study, a polysorbate 80-coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarrier (PS80 PBCA NC) was constructed to deliver plasmid DNAs (pDNAs) containing BDNF gene attached to a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE-cmvBDNF). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism of BDNF expression and inductiveness of the nano-formulation on mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate into neurons following hypoxia was tested in vitro with immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting. The HRE-cmvBDNF appeared to adsorb onto the surface of PS80 PBCA NC, with a resultant mean diameter of 92.6 ± 1.0 nm and zeta potential of −14.1 ± 1.1 mV. HIF-1α level in iPSCs was significantly higher in hypoxia, which resulted in a 51% greater BDNF expression when transfected with PS80 PBCA NC/HRE-cmvBDNF than those without hypoxia. TrkB and phospho-Akt were also elevated which correlated with neural differentiation. The findings suggest that PS80 PBCA NC too can be endocytosed to serve as an efficient vector for genes coupled to the HRE in hypoxia-sensitive cells, and activation of the PI3/Akt pathway in iPSCs by BDNF is capable of neural lineage specification. PMID:28335495

  11. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Loaded PS80 PBCA Nanocarrier for In Vitro Neural Differentiation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chiu-Yen; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lee, I-Neng; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Yang, Jen-Tsung

    2017-03-19

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can induce neural differentiation in stem cells and has the potential for repair of the nervous system. In this study, a polysorbate 80-coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarrier (PS80 PBCA NC) was constructed to deliver plasmid DNAs (pDNAs) containing BDNF gene attached to a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE-cmvBDNF). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism of BDNF expression and inductiveness of the nano-formulation on mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate into neurons following hypoxia was tested in vitro with immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting. The HRE-cmvBDNF appeared to adsorb onto the surface of PS80 PBCA NC, with a resultant mean diameter of 92.6 ± 1.0 nm and zeta potential of -14.1 ± 1.1 mV. HIF-1α level in iPSCs was significantly higher in hypoxia, which resulted in a 51% greater BDNF expression when transfected with PS80 PBCA NC/HRE-cmvBDNF than those without hypoxia. TrkB and phospho-Akt were also elevated which correlated with neural differentiation. The findings suggest that PS80 PBCA NC too can be endocytosed to serve as an efficient vector for genes coupled to the HRE in hypoxia-sensitive cells, and activation of the PI3/Akt pathway in iPSCs by BDNF is capable of neural lineage specification.

  12. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  13. Ganglioside GD3 Is Required for Neurogenesis and Long-Term Maintenance of Neural Stem Cells in the Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cheng, Allison; Wakade, Chandramohan

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of a neural stem cell (NSC) population in mammalian postnatal and adult life is crucial for continuous neurogenesis and neural repair. However, the molecular mechanism of how NSC populations are maintained remains unclear. Gangliosides are important cellular membrane components in the nervous system. We previously showed that ganglioside GD3 plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the self-renewal capacity of NSCs in vitro. Here, we investigated its role in postnatal and adult neurogenesis in GD3-synthase knock-out (GD3S-KO) and wild-type mice. GD3S-KO mice with deficiency in GD3 and the downstream b-series gangliosides showed a progressive loss of NSCs both at the SVZ and the DG of the hippocampus. The decrease of NSC populations in the GD3S-KO mice resulted in impaired neurogenesis at the granular cell layer of the olfactory bulb and the DG in the adult. In addition, defects of the self-renewal capacity and radial glia-like stem cell outgrowth of postnatal GD3S-KO NSCs could be rescued by restoration of GD3 expression in these cells. Our study demonstrates that the b-series gangliosides, especially GD3, play a crucial role in the long-term maintenance NSC populations in postnatal mouse brain. Moreover, the impaired neurogenesis in the adult GD3S-KO mice led to depression-like behaviors. Thus, our results provide convincing evidence linking b-series gangliosides deficiency and neurogenesis defects to behavioral deficits, and support a crucial role of gangliosides in the long-term maintenance of NSCs in adult mice. PMID:25297105

  14. Ganglioside GD3 is required for neurogenesis and long-term maintenance of neural stem cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cheng, Allison; Wakade, Chandramohan; Yu, Robert K

    2014-10-08

    The maintenance of a neural stem cell (NSC) population in mammalian postnatal and adult life is crucial for continuous neurogenesis and neural repair. However, the molecular mechanism of how NSC populations are maintained remains unclear. Gangliosides are important cellular membrane components in the nervous system. We previously showed that ganglioside GD3 plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the self-renewal capacity of NSCs in vitro. Here, we investigated its role in postnatal and adult neurogenesis in GD3-synthase knock-out (GD3S-KO) and wild-type mice. GD3S-KO mice with deficiency in GD3 and the downstream b-series gangliosides showed a progressive loss of NSCs both at the SVZ and the DG of the hippocampus. The decrease of NSC populations in the GD3S-KO mice resulted in impaired neurogenesis at the granular cell layer of the olfactory bulb and the DG in the adult. In addition, defects of the self-renewal capacity and radial glia-like stem cell outgrowth of postnatal GD3S-KO NSCs could be rescued by restoration of GD3 expression in these cells. Our study demonstrates that the b-series gangliosides, especially GD3, play a crucial role in the long-term maintenance NSC populations in postnatal mouse brain. Moreover, the impaired neurogenesis in the adult GD3S-KO mice led to depression-like behaviors. Thus, our results provide convincing evidence linking b-series gangliosides deficiency and neurogenesis defects to behavioral deficits, and support a crucial role of gangliosides in the long-term maintenance of NSCs in adult mice. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413790-11$15.00/0.

  15. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  16. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27203695

  17. Heterocellular Contacts with Mouse Brain Endothelial Cells Via Laminin and α6β1 Integrin Sustain Subventricular Zone (SVZ) Stem/Progenitor Cells Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Alexandra I.; Grade, Sofia; Santos, Sofia D.; Bernardino, Liliana; Chen, Thomas C.; Relvas, João; Hofman, Florence M.; Agasse, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) is regulated by diffusible factors and cell–cell contacts. In vivo, SVZ stem cells are associated with the abluminal surface of blood vessels and such interactions are thought to regulate their neurogenic capacity. SVZ neural stem cells (NSCs) have been described to contact endothelial-derived laminin via α6β1 integrin. To elucidate whether heterocellular contacts with brain endothelial cells (BEC) regulate SVZ cells neurogenic capacities, cocultures of SVZ neurospheres and primary BEC, both obtained from C57BL/6 mice, were performed. The involvement of laminin-integrin interactions in SVZ homeostasis was tested in three ways. Firstly, SVZ cells were analyzed following incubation of BEC with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) prior to coculture, a treatment expected to decrease membrane proteins. Secondly, SVZ cells were cocultured with BEC in the presence of an anti-α6 integrin neutralizing antibody. Thirdly, BEC were cultured with β1−/− SVZ cells. We showed that contact with BEC supports, at least in part, proliferation and stemness of SVZ cells, as evaluated by the number of BrdU positive (+) and Sox2+ cells in contact with BEC. These effects are dependent on BEC-derived laminin binding to α6β1 integrin and are decreased in cocultures incubated with anti-α6 integrin neutralizing antibody and in cocultures with SVZ β1−/− cells. Moreover, BEC-derived laminin sustains stemness in SVZ cell cultures via activation of the Notch and mTOR signaling pathways. Our results show that BEC/SVZ interactions involving α6β1 integrin binding to laminin, contribute to SVZ cell proliferation and stemness. PMID:28018177

  18. [Stem cells of mammalian brain: biology of the stem cells in vivo and in vitro].

    PubMed

    Viktorov, I V

    2001-01-01

    Stem cells are totipotent cells of the blastocyst (embryonal stem cells) and multipotent germinative cells of ento-, ecto-, and mesoderm that give rise to all tissues during embryogenesis. The stem cells have high proliferation activity and an unlimited capacity for self-production by symmetrical mitosis. Asymmetrical mitosis of the stem cells generates daughter cells ("progenitor cells") with unlimited proliferation potential. During differentiation, the progenitor cells give rise to definitive somatic cells. The stem and progenitor cells are preserved in most tissues of adult organism and provide for the constant replacement of the cells after their physiological death and damage. At the end of last century, stem cells were found in the brain of the adult mouse and rat and later in the brain of other mammals including humans. The subependymal zone of the lateral ventricles is considered the site of stem cells localization; however, there are indications of stem cells origination from ependyma while the subependymal zone serves as a collector of the progenitor cells where these cells divide. The problem of the localization of stem cells in a mature brain has not yet been resolved and is actively discussed. The stem and progenitor cells, as well as neuro- and gliogenesis, are most explored in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The progenitor cells migrate to the olfactory bulb from the subependymal zone of the lateral ventricles via a rostral migratory stream formed by the astrocytes, and then they differentiate to neural and glial cells. In the hippocampus, the neurons are formed in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus. The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the mature brain and their subsequent investigation point to an ongoing neuro- and gliogenesis in all periventricular sections of the brain and spinal cord during the whole animal or human lifespan. These processes proved to be related to the functional condition of CNS, and the de novo formed neural

  19. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J C; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Dantuma, Nico P; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin.

  20. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J. C.; Van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  1. Ocular microtremor in brain stem death

    PubMed

    Bolger; Bojanic; Phillips; Sheahan; Coakley; Malone

    1999-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to establish whether measurement of ocular microtremor (OMT) activity could be used as a method to establish brain stem death. Presently, the diagnosis of brain stem death can be made using clinical criteria alone. OMT is a high-frequency, low-amplitude physiological tremor of the eye caused by impulses emanating from the brain stem. There have been a number of reports indicating that the recording of OMT may be useful in the assessment of comatose states and in establishing brain stem viability or death. METHODS: We obtained the OMT recordings of 32 patients suspected of having brain stem death using the piezoelectric strain gauge technique. This method involves mounting the piezoelectric probe in a headset and lowering the rubber-tipped end piece onto the anesthetized scleral surface of the subject. The signal produced is recorded on audiomagnetic tape and later played back and analyzed on an electrocardiographic tape analyzer. RESULTS: In 28 patients, initial clinical assessment confirmed the diagnosis of brain stem death and no OMT activity was recorded from these subjects. In three patients in whom initial clinical assessment demonstrated brain stem function, OMT activity was present; when brain stem death was subsequently diagnosed in these three patients, no OMT activity could be demonstrated. In the remaining patient, two of three OMT recordings demonstrated activity in spite of the absence of clinical evidence of brain stem function. A post mortem revealed bacterial cerebritis in this subject. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that OMT is a sensitive method of detecting brain stem life and that it could play an important role in the assessment of brain stem death.

  2. Cell cycle deregulation and loss of stem cell phenotype in the subventricular zone of TGF-beta adaptor elf-/- mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Golestaneh, Nady; Tang, Yi; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Jogunoori, Wilma; Mishra, Lopa; Mishra, Bibhuti

    2006-09-07

    The mammalian forebrain subependyma contains neural stem cells and other proliferating progenitor cells. Recent studies have shown the importance of TGF-beta family members and their adaptor proteins in the inhibition of proliferation in the nervous system. Previously, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta induces phosphorylation and association of ELF (embryonic liver fodrin) with Smad3 and Smad4 resulting in nuclear translocation. Elf(-/-) mice manifest abnormal neuronal differentiation, with loss of neuroepithelial progenitor cell phenotype in the subventricular zone (SVZ) with dramatic marginal cell hyperplasia and loss of nestin expression. Here, we have analyzed the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins cdk4, mdm2, p21, and pRb family members in the brain of elf(-/-) mice to verify the role of elf in the regulation of neural precursor cells in the mammalian brain. Increased proliferation in SVZ cells of the mutant mice coincided with higher levels of cdk4 and mdm2 expression. A lesser degree of apoptosis was observed in the mutant mice compared to the wild-type control. Elf(-/-) embryos showed elevated levels of hyperphosphorylated forms of pRb, p130 and p107 and decreased level of p21 compared to the wild-type control. These results establish a critical role for elf in the development of a SVZ neuroepithelial stem cell phenotype and regulation of neuroepithelial cell proliferation, suggesting that a mutation in the elf locus renders the cells susceptible to a faster entry into S phase of cell cycle and resistance to senescence and apoptotic stimuli.

  3. Neural stem/progenitor cells differentiate into oligodendrocytes, reduce inflammation, and ameliorate learning deficits after transplantation in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudaki, Paraskevi N; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Stamatakis, Antonios; Kouroupi, Georgia; Xingi, Evangelia; Stylianopoulou, Fotini; Matsas, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system has limited capacity for regeneration after traumatic injury. Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach while insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has neuroprotective properties following various experimental insults to the nervous system. We have previously shown that NPCs transduced with a lentiviral vector for IGF-I overexpression have an enhanced ability to give rise to neurons in vitro but also in vivo, upon transplantation in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Here we studied the regenerative potential of NPCs, IGF-I-transduced or not, in a mouse model of hippocampal mechanical injury. NPC transplantation, with or without IGF-I transduction, rescued the injury-induced spatial learning deficits as revealed in the Morris Water Maze. Moreover, it had beneficial effects on the host tissue by reducing astroglial activation and microglial/macrophage accumulation while enhancing generation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells. One or two months after transplantation the grafted NPCs had migrated towards the lesion site and in the neighboring myelin-rich regions. Transplanted cells differentiated toward the oligodendroglial, but not the neuronal or astrocytic lineages, expressing the early and late oligodendrocyte markers NG2, Olig2, and CNPase. The newly generated oligodendrocytes reached maturity and formed myelin internodes. Our current and previous observations illustrate the high plasticity of transplanted NPCs which can acquire injury-dependent phenotypes within the host CNS, supporting the fact that reciprocal interactions between transplanted cells and the host tissue are an important factor to be considered when designing prospective cell-based therapies for CNS degenerative conditions.

  4. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  5. Brain tumor stem cells: the cancer stem cell hypothesis writ large.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Peter B

    2010-10-01

    Brain tumors, which are typically very heterogeneous at the cellular level, appear to have a stem cell foundation. Recently, investigations from multiple groups have found that human as well as experimental mouse brain tumors contain subpopulations of cells that functionally behave as tumor stem cells, driving tumor growth and generating tumor cell progeny that form the tumor bulk, but which then lose tumorigenic ability. In human glioblastomas, these tumor stem cells express neural precursor markers and are capable of differentiating into tumor cells that express more mature neural lineage markers. In addition, modeling brain tumors in mice suggests that neural precursor cells more readily give rise to full blown tumors, narrowing potential cells of origin to those rarer brain cells that have a proliferative potential. Applying stem cell concepts and methodologies is giving fresh insight into brain tumor biology, cell of origin and mechanisms of growth, and is offering new opportunities for development of more effective treatments. The field of brain tumor stem cells remains very young and there is much to be learned before these new insights are translated into new patient treatments. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shinoyama, Mizuya; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kida, Hiroyuki; Kajiwara, Koji; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Maeda, Yoshihiko; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) at birth could cause cerebral palsy (CP), mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual's lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs) to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  7. The Virtual Mouse Brain: A Computational Neuroinformatics Platform to Study Whole Mouse Brain Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Melozzi, Francesca; Woodman, Marmaduke M; Jirsa, Viktor K; Bernard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Connectome-based modeling of large-scale brain network dynamics enables causal in silico interrogation of the brain's structure-function relationship, necessitating the close integration of diverse neuroinformatics fields. Here we extend the open-source simulation software The Virtual Brain (TVB) to whole mouse brain network modeling based on individual diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI)-based or tracer-based detailed mouse connectomes. We provide practical examples on how to use The Virtual Mouse Brain (TVMB) to simulate brain activity, such as seizure propagation and the switching behavior of the resting state dynamics in health and disease. TVMB enables theoretically driven experimental planning and ways to test predictions in the numerous strains of mice available to study brain function in normal and pathological conditions.

  8. Stem cell therapies for perinatal brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Vawda, Reaz; Woodbury, Jennifer; Covey, Matthew; Levison, Steven W; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2007-08-01

    This chapter reviews four groups of paediatric brain injury. The pathophysiology of these injuries is discussed to establish which cells are damaged and therefore which cells represent targets for cell replacement. Next, we review potential sources of cellular replacements, including embryonic stem cells, fetal and neonatal neural stem cells and a variety of mesenchymal stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of each source are discussed. We review published studies to illustrate where stem cell therapies have been evaluated for therapeutic gain and discuss the hurdles that will need to be overcome to achieve therapeutic benefit. Overall, we conclude that children with paediatric brain injuries or inherited genetic disorders that affect the brain are worthy candidates for stem cell therapeutics.

  9. [Brain stem encephalitis in childhood].

    PubMed

    Bodegas, I; Martínez-Bermejo, A; García de Miguel, M J; López-Martín, V; de José, M I; García-Hortelano, J

    1998-07-01

    To present two cases of post-infectious encephalitis of the brain stem (ETC) in infancy, which is very infrequent at this age. Two patients aged 4 months and 9 months respectively had a previous history of a catarrhal illness a few days before the onset of encephalitis. The clinical condition was of subacute onset and torpid course, characterized by ataxia, reduced level of consciousness, involvement of the pyramidal tracts and paralysis of the cranial nerves. No significant information for the diagnosis of either case was obtained from CT. MR showed lesions at the level of the pons. However, the MR image did not correspond in seventy to the clinical condition. The clinical courses of the two patients were different. One case recovered with no sequelae. In the other case the cranial nerves and gait did not return to normal. In our experience, ETC is rarely seen in infancy. A high degree of suspicion and early treatment of ETC caused by the herpes simplex virus is necessary, since there is usually a high mortality or serious neurological sequelae.

  10. Evaluation of Atlas based Mouse Brain Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohwi; Jomier, Julien; Aylward, Stephen; Tyszka, Mike; Moy, Sheryl; Lauder, Jean; Styner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Magentic Reasonance Imaging for mouse phenotype study is one of the important tools to understand human diseases. In this paper, we present a fully automatic pipeline for the process of morphometric mouse brain analysis. The method is based on atlas-based tissue and regional segmentation, which was originally developed for the human brain. To evaluate our method, we conduct a qualitative and quantitative validation study as well as compare of b-spline and fluid registration methods as components in the pipeline. The validation study includes visual inspection, shape and volumetric measurements and stability of the registration methods against various parameter settings in the processing pipeline. The result shows both fluid and b-spline registration methods work well in murine settings, but the fluid registration is more stable. Additionally, we evaluated our segmentation methods by comparing volume differences between Fmr1 FXS in FVB background vs C57BL/6J mouse strains. PMID:20640188

  11. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A.; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M.; Mortrud, Marty T.; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A.; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E.; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M.; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Phillips, John W.; Hohmann, John G.; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R.; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R.; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain’s wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  12. Auditory brain stem responses in the detection of brain death.

    PubMed

    Ozgirgin, O Nuri; Ozçelik, Tuncay; Sevimli, Nilay Kizilkaya

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated comatose patients by auditory brain stem responses (ABR) to determine the role of ABR in the diagnosis of impending brain death. Sixty comatose patients in the intensive care unit were evaluated by brain stem evoked response audiometry. Correlations were sought between the absence or presence of ABRs and the presenting pathology, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and ultimate diagnoses. The brain stem responses were totally absent in 41 patients. Presence of wave I could be obtained in only 10 patients. All the waveforms were found in nine patients; however, in eight patients the potentials disappeared as the GCS scores decreased to 3. Detection of wave I alone strongly suggested dysfunction of the brain stem. However, loss of wave I particularly in trauma patients aroused doubt as to whether the absence was associated with auditory end organ injury or brain stem dysfunction. The results suggest that evaluation of ABR may support brain death in a comatose patient (i) when wave I is present alone, (ii) the absence of wave I is accompanied by a documented auditory end organ injury, or (iii) when previously recorded potentials are no longer detectable.

  13. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states.

  14. BRAIN STEM SYSTEMS AND BEHAVIOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SLEEP, *BLOOD CIRCULATION), (*ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, * CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM), BLOOD PRESSURE, ARTERIES, HYPOTENSION, CHEMORECEPTORS, BRAIN, INHIBITION, AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, NERVE CELLS, ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY, ITALY

  15. [An efficient way in mouse brain dissection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhao; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2014-04-25

    Laboratory mice are common experimental animals in biological, medical, pharmacological and psychological researches primarily because they are easy to maintain and reproduce quickly. The protection of the welfare of experimental animals is gaining greater attention during the application of a large number of mice. It's therefore essential to consider how to reduce the unnecessary use of animals and fully exploit each experimental animal. We report, in this article, an efficient way to dissect various brain regions from a mouse for protein immunoblot and/or neuronal culture, providing technical reference information for minimizing the number of animals used in projects, and refining methods and procedures to quick brain dissection.

  16. Brain stem glioma: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Ruth K

    2005-01-01

    The paths taken by each family in coming to terms with the dismal prognosis associated with brain stem glioma can be quite different. The case studies of 2 school-age girls diagnosed with a brain stem glioma within weeks of each other are presented. The multi-disciplinary team response to each family was individualized at each stage of diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care, as expected. The ultimate chronologic union of these 2 families as each child neared death was somewhat uncanny. The experience of each family, and their relationship with the team through this process, was an intense challenge and learning experience.

  17. [Features of brain stem tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Antonela; Miron, Ingrith; Tansanu, I

    2012-01-01

    Brain stem tumors account for about 10-20% of childhood brain tumors. Peak incidence for these tumors occurs around age 6 to 7 years. Despite their severity and poor prognosis, brain stem tumors remain an area of intense research with regard to their diagnosis and management. In the interval 2003-2010, 8 children (4 girls and 4 boys) aged 2-13 years (mean age 6.82), diagnosed with brain stem tumors were followed up. Disease history, onset symptoms, complete physical, laboratory and imaging investigations, and individualized therapeutic approach have been reviewed. Family history was considered to be of particular clinical importance. Monitoring the disease progression was possible until the time of death (when it occurred in hospital) or by information provided by the family and family physician in cases where death occurred at patient's home. Clinical signs and symptoms depend on tumor location, its aggressiveness, and patient's age. Progressive neurological deficits, signs and symptoms caused by increased intracranial pressure, visual disturbances, behavioral disorders, seizures, endocrine disruption, failure to thrive may occur in various combinations. In only 50% of our cases the tumor could be removed. Imaging proved highly suggestive for a brain stem tumor. Histopathological examination diagnosed one pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), one fibrillary astrocytoma (grade II), one anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III), and one glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV). In the remaining 4 cases imaging was suggestive for glial tumors. Multimodal therapy was used in 2 patients, 7 received adjuvant chemotherapy, and in 1 case no therapy was administered because the tumor rapidly progressed to death. Seven of our patients died on an average of 6.28 months after the diagnosis (range 2 to 9 months). A family history of brain tumors in 2 of our cases supports the hypothesis of genetic factors involvement. Brain stem tumors are still difficult to investigate, and the results on

  18. Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embroyonic Stem Cell Diffferentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. Abcg2 is a multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter whose activity may be considered a hallmark of stem cell plasticity. The role of Abcg2 during early embryogenesis, however, is unclear. Studies...

  19. Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embroyonic Stem Cell Diffferentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. Abcg2 is a multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter whose activity may be considered a hallmark of stem cell plasticity. The role of Abcg2 during early embryogenesis, however, is unclear. Studies...

  20. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V.; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F.; Madden, David T.; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping ß-actin promoter. The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759–769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies. PMID:21874159

  1. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Madden, David T; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J; Bredesen, Dale E; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-02-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping β-actin promoter The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759-769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies.

  2. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Mawad, M.E.; Silver, A.J.; Hilal, S.K.; Ganti, S.R.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed.

  3. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation and manipulation of mouse trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Koji; Himeno, Emi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kunath, Tilo

    2015-02-02

    The isolation of stable trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines from early mouse embryos has provided a useful cell culture model to study trophoblast development. TS cells are derived from pre-implantation blastocysts or from the extraembryonic ectoderm of early post-implantation embryos. The derivation and maintenance of mouse TS cells is dependent upon continuous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Gene expression analysis, differentiation in culture, and chimera formation show that TS cells accurately model the mouse trophoblast lineage. This unit describes how to derive, maintain, and manipulate TS cells, including DNA transfection and chimera formation.

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Affects Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; Michalski, Stephanie; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proven to enhance neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, various groups have reported contradictory results on whether TBI increases neurogenesis, partially due to a wide range in the severities of injuries seen with different TBI models. To address whether the severity of TBI affects neurogenesis in the injured brain, we assessed neurogenesis in mouse brains receiving different severities of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with the same injury device. The mice were subjected to mild, moderate, or severe TBI by a CCI device. The effects of TBI severity on neurogenesis were evaluated at three stages: NSC proliferation, immature neurons, and newly-generated mature neurons. The results showed that mild TBI did not affect neurogenesis at any of the three stages. Moderate TBI promoted NSC proliferation without increasing neurogenesis. Severe TBI increased neurogenesis at all three stages. Our data suggest that the severity of injury affects adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and thus it may partially explain the inconsistent results of different groups regarding neurogenesis following TBI. Further understanding the mechanism of TBI-induced neurogenesis may provide a potential approach for using endogenous NSCs to protect against neuronal loss after trauma.

  6. Brain Biomarkers in Familial Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Kuttner-Hirshler, Yafit; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Apolinario, Joan; Bonds, Jacqueline; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Lazarov, Orly

    2017-09-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognitive deterioration. It is thought that the onset of the disease takes place several decades before memory deficits are apparent. Reliable biomarkers for the diagnosis or prognostication of the disease are highly desirable. Neural stem cells (NSC) exist in the adult brain throughout life and give rise to neural progenitor cells (NPC), which differentiate into neurons or glia. The level of NPC proliferation and new neuron formation is significantly compromised in mouse models of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). These deficits are readily detected in young adults, at 2-3 months of age, preceding amyloid deposition and cognitive impairments, which may indicate that impaired neurogenesis can be an early biomarker for cognitive deficits in AD. Recent studies suggest that NSC can be detected in live rodents, noninvasively, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 1.28 ppm signal. Here we examined the use of 1H-MRS for determining the extent of neurogenesis in the brains of FAD mice. We observed that the reduction in neurogenesis in the FAD mice as observed by immunohistochemistry, was not manifested by a reduction in the 1.28 ppm signal, suggesting that this marker is either not specific for neurogenesis or not sensitive enough for the detection of alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis in the brains of FAD mice.

  7. Widespread sites of brain stem ventilatory chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Coates, E L; Li, A; Nattie, E E

    1993-07-01

    We produced local tissue acidosis in various brain stem regions with 1-nl injections of acetazolamide (AZ) to locate the sites of central chemoreception. To determine whether the local acidosis resulted in a stimulation of breathing, we performed the experiment in chloralose-urethan anesthetized vagotomized carotid-denervated (cats) paralyzed servo-ventilated cats and rats and measured phrenic nerve activity (PNA) as the response index. Measurements of extracellular brain tissue pH by glass microelectrodes showed that AZ injections induced a change in pH at the injection center equivalent to that produced by an increase in end-tidal PCO2 of approximately 36 Torr and that the change in brain pH was limited to a tissue volume with a radius of < 350 microns. We found AZ injections sites that caused a significant increase in PNA to be located 1) within 800 microns of the ventrolateral medullary surface at locations within traditional rostral and caudal chemosensitive areas and the intermediate area, 2) within the vicinity of the nucleus tractus solitarii, and 3) within the vicinity of the locus coeruleus. Single AZ injections produced increases in PNA that were < or = 69% of the maximum value observed with an increase in end-tidal PCO2. We conclude that central chemoreceptors are distributed at many locations within the brain stem, all within 1.5 mm of the surface, and that stimulation of a small fraction of all central chemoreceptors can result in a large ventilatory response.

  8. Leptin targets in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Lachey, Jennifer L; Sternson, Scott M; Lee, Charlotte E; Elias, Carol F; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-06-10

    The central actions of leptin are essential for homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass, glucose metabolism, and many autonomic and neuroendocrine systems. In the brain, leptin acts on numerous different cell types via the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) to elicit its effects. The precise identification of leptin's cellular targets is fundamental to understanding the mechanism of its pleiotropic central actions. We have systematically characterized LepRb distribution in the mouse brain using in situ hybridization in wildtype mice as well as by EYFP immunoreactivity in a novel LepRb-IRES-Cre EYFP reporter mouse line showing high levels of LepRb mRNA/EYFP coexpression. We found substantial LepRb mRNA and EYFP expression in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sites described before, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus, ventral tegmental area, parabrachial nucleus, and the dorsal vagal complex. Expression in insular cortex, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, rostral linear nucleus, and in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus was also observed and had been previously unreported. The LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to chemically characterize a population of leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the midbrain. Tyrosine hydroxylase and Cre reporter were found to be coexpressed in the ventral tegmental area and in other midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, the LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to map the extent of peripheral leptin sensing by central nervous system (CNS) LepRb neurons. Thus, we provide data supporting the use of the LepRb-IRES-Cre line for the assessment of the anatomic and functional characteristics of neurons expressing leptin receptor.

  9. Mouse differentiating spermatogonia can generate germinal stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Lassalle, Bruno; Coureuil, Mathieu; Louis, Jean Paul; Le Page, Florence; Testart, Jacques; Allemand, Isabelle; Riou, Lydia; Fouchet, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    In adults, stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of many actively renewing tissues, such as haematopoietic, skin, gut and germinal tissues. These stem cells can self-renew or be committed to becoming progenitors. Stem-cell commitment is thought to be irreversible but in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, it was shown recently that differentiating germ cells can revert to functional stem cells that can restore germinal lineage. Whether progenitors are also able to generate stem cells in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that purified mouse spermatogonial progenitors committed to differentiation can generate functional germinal stem cells that can repopulate germ-cell-depleted testes when transplanted into adult mice. We found that GDNF, a key regulator of the stem-cell niche, and FGF2 are able to reprogram in vitro spermatogonial progenitors for reverse differentiation. This study supports the emerging concept that the stem-cell identity is not restricted in adults to a definite pool of cells that self-renew, but that stemness could be acquired by differentiating progenitors after tissue injury and throughout life.

  10. GFAPδ expression in glia of the developmental and adolescent mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans.

  11. GFAPδ Expression in Glia of the Developmental and Adolescent Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L.; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M.

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans. PMID:23285135

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Mouse Stem Cells and Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A; Piao, Yulan; Matoba, Ryo; Dudekula, Dawood B; Qian, Yong; VanBuren, Vincent; Falco, Geppino; Martin, Patrick R; Stagg, Carole A; Bassey, Uwem C; Wang, Yuxia; Carter, Mark G; Hamatani, Toshio; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Akutsu, Hidenori; Sharova, Lioudmila; Tanaka, Tetsuya S; Kimber, Wendy L; Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Jaradat, Saied A; Pantano, Serafino; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Boheler, Kenneth R; Taub, Dennis; Hodes, Richard J; Longo, Dan L; Schlessinger, David; Keller, Jonathan; Klotz, Emily; Kelsoe, Garnett; Umezawa, Akihiro; Vescovi, Angelo L; Rossant, Janet; Kunath, Tilo; Hogan, Brigid L. M; Curci, Anna; D'Urso, Michele; Kelso, Janet; Hide, Winston

    2003-01-01

    Understanding and harnessing cellular potency are fundamental in biology and are also critical to the future therapeutic use of stem cells. Transcriptome analysis of these pluripotent cells is a first step towards such goals. Starting with sources that include oocytes, blastocysts, and embryonic and adult stem cells, we obtained 249,200 high-quality EST sequences and clustered them with public sequences to produce an index of approximately 30,000 total mouse genes that includes 977 previously unidentified genes. Analysis of gene expression levels by EST frequency identifies genes that characterize preimplantation embryos, embryonic stem cells, and adult stem cells, thus providing potential markers as well as clues to the functional features of these cells. Principal component analysis identified a set of 88 genes whose average expression levels decrease from oocytes to blastocysts, stem cells, postimplantation embryos, and finally to newborn tissues. This can be a first step towards a possible definition of a molecular scale of cellular potency. The sequences and cDNA clones recovered in this work provide a comprehensive resource for genes functioning in early mouse embryos and stem cells. The nonrestricted community access to the resource can accelerate a wide range of research, particularly in reproductive and regenerative medicine. PMID:14691545

  13. Brain stem cell division and maintenance studied using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Enikolopov, G; Guillermier, C; Wang, M; Trakimas, L; Steinhauser, M; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    New neurons are continuously produced from neural stem cells in specific regions of the adult brain of animals and humans. In the hippocampus, a region crucial for cognitive function, neurogenesis responds to a multitude of extrinsic stimuli; emerging evidence indicates that it may be important for behavior, pathophysiology, brain repair, and response to drugs. We have developed an approach to identify and quantify the cellular targets of pro- and anti-neurogenic stimuli, based on reporter transgenic mouse lines in which neural stem and progenitor cells or their progeny are marked by fluorescent proteins. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using MIMS for studying adult neurogenesis.

  14. Aquaporin-4 expression contributes to decreases in brain water content during mouse postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumiao; Gao, Junying; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    The water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is implicated to facilitate water efflux from the brain parenchyma into the blood and CSF, playing a critical role in maintaining brain water homeostasis. Nevertheless, its contribution to decreases in brain water content during postnatal development remains unknown. A quantitative Western blot analysis was performed to investigate developmental expression of AQP4 in the whole mouse brain and showed that AQP4 expression level in 1 week-old brain was only 21.3% of that in the adult brain, but significantly increased to 67.4% of the adult level by 2 weeks after birth. Statistical analysis demonstrated that increased AQP4 expression partially relates to decreased brain water content in postnatal mice (r(2)=0.92 and P=0.002). Moreover, AQP4 null mice had greater brain water content than littermate controls from 2 weeks up to adult age. Consistently, mature pattern of AQP4 localization at the brain-blood and brain-CSF interfaces were completed at approximately at 2 weeks after birth. In addition, AQP4 expression in the brain stem and hypothalamus was earlier than that in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, suggesting a brain regional variation in developmental expression of AQP4. These results characterize the developmental feature of AQP4 expression in the postnatal brain and provide direct evidence for a role of AQP4 in postnatal brain water uptake.

  15. [Rehabilitation of patients with brain stem damage].

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, F O; Osten, P E; Stanghelle, J K

    1992-08-10

    We describe seven patients with serious brain stem damage who were admitted to Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital over a period of two years (1989-91). Our patients had quadriplegia and anarthria with some or completely preserved cognitive function. They experienced varying degrees of restitution, but all remained severely impaired. Important areas for rehabilitation include communication, alimentation, mobility, emotional reactions, medical complications and daily living arrangements. Severely impaired patients can enhance their quality of life by use of technical devices. Minimal motor function is necessary to control a switch, but preserved cognitive function is essential.

  16. Distribution of Cytoglobin in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Stefan; Wystub, Sylvia; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex (CCo), in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells), in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes), basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum (VP)), and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes) were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei), epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus (SC). The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive (Cygb-IR) fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide (NO)-synthase in neurons, which supports a

  17. Characterization of GD3 ganglioside as a novel biomarker of mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Suzuki, Yusuke; Yu, Robert K

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are undifferentiated neural cells characterized by their high proliferative potential and the capacity for self-renewal with retention of multipotency. Over the past two decades, there has been a huge effort to identify NSCs morphologically, genetically, and molecular biologically. It is still controversial, however, what bona fide NSCs are. To define and characterize NSCs more systematically, it is crucial to explore novel cell-surface marker molecules of NSCs. In this study, we focused on GD3, a b-series ganglioside that is enriched in the immature brain and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the postnatal and adult brain, and evaluated the usefulness of GD3 as a cell-surface biomarker for identifying NSCs. We demonstrated that GD3 was expressed in more than 80% of NSCs prepared from embryonic, postnatal, and adult mouse brain tissue by the neurosphere culture method. The percentage of GD3-expressing NSCs in neurospheres was nearly the same as it was in neurospheres derived from embryonic, postnatal, and adult brains but decreased drastically to about 40% after differentiation. GD3(+) cells isolated from embryonic mouse striata, postnatal, and adult mouse SVZs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting with an R24 anti-GD3 monoclonal antibody efficiently generated neurospheres compared with GD3(-) cells. These cells possessed multipotency to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. These data indicate that GD3 is a unique and powerful cell-surface biomarker to identify and isolate NSCs.

  18. Staining and embedding the whole mouse brain for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Shawn; Binding, Jonas; Denk, Winfried

    2012-12-01

    The development of methods for imaging large contiguous volumes with the electron microscope could allow the complete mapping of a whole mouse brain at the single-axon level. We developed a method based on prolonged immersion that enables staining and embedding of the entire mouse brain with uniform myelin staining and a moderate preservation of the tissue's ultrastructure. We tested the ability to follow myelinated axons using serial block-face electron microscopy.

  19. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain.

  20. Barbiturate competition for TRH receptors in mouse brain: neuromodulation of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, M D

    1983-01-01

    In vitro thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) radioligand binding assays were performed using purified presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes derived from various regions of mouse brain. These studies revealed the pattern of central distribution of specific TRH binding sites. The highest concentrations of both types of membrane receptors were localized in the limbic forebrain. The brain stem contained a high density of only presynaptic receptors, and the cerebral cortex contained a moderate-high level of only postsynaptic receptors. Barbiturate analogues effectively competed for all forebrain and brain stem, but not cortical, TRH receptors, thus implicating these specific receptors in the neuromodulation of barbiturate anesthesia. The results of in vivo radioligand binding assays for [3H] TRH disposition after central infusions concomitant with barbiturate vs. saline challenges further support this viewpoint.

  1. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  2. A cancer stem cell model for studying brain metastases from primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Sara M; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Morozova, Olena; Hallett, Robin M; O'Farrell, Erin; Manoranjan, Branavan; Murty, Naresh K; Klurfan, Paula; Kachur, Edward; Provias, John P; Farrokhyar, Forough; Hassell, John A; Marra, Marco; Singh, Sheila K

    2013-04-17

    Brain metastases are most common in adults with lung cancer, predicting uniformly poor patient outcome, with a median survival of only months. Despite their frequency and severity, very little is known about tumorigenesis in brain metastases. We applied previously developed primary solid tumor-initiating cell models to the study of brain metastases from the lung to evaluate the presence of a cancer stem cell population. Patient-derived brain metastases (n = 20) and the NCI-H1915 cell line were cultured as stem-enriching tumorspheres. We used in vitro limiting-dilution and sphere-forming assays, as well as intracranial human-mouse xenograft models. To determine genes overexpressed in brain metastasis tumorspheres, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis. All statistical analyses were two-sided. Patient-derived brain metastasis tumorspheres had a mean sphere-forming capacity of 33 spheres/2000 cells (SD = 33.40) and median stem-cell frequency of 1/60 (range = 0-1/141), comparable to that of primary brain tumorspheres (P = .53 and P = .20, respectively). Brain metastases also expressed CD15 and CD133, markers suggestive of a stemlike population. Through intracranial xenotransplantation, brain metastasis tumorspheres were found to recapitulate the original patient tumor heterogeneity. We also identified several genes overexpressed in brain metastasis tumorspheres as statistically significant predictors of poor survival in primary lung cancer. For the first time, we demonstrate the presence of a stemlike population in brain metastases from the lung. We also show that NCI-H1915 tumorspheres could be useful in studying self-renewal and tumor initiation in brain metastases. Our candidate genes may be essential to metastatic stem cell populations, where pathway interference may be able to transform a uniformly fatal disease into a more localized and treatable one.

  3. Transcription factors and the genetic organization of brain stem respiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Gray, Paul A

    2008-05-01

    Breathing is a genetically determined behavior generated by neurons in the brain stem. Transcription factors, in part, determine the basic developmental identity of neurons, but the relationships between these genes and the neural populations generating and modulating respiration are unclear. The diversity of brain stem populations has been proposed to result from a combinatorial code of transcription factor expression corresponding to the anterior-posterior (A-P) and dorsal-ventral (D-V) location of a neuron's birth. I provide a schematic of transcription factor coding identifying at least 15 genetically distinct D-V subdivisions of brain stem neurons that, combined with A-P patterning, may provide a genetic organization of the brain stem in general, with the eventual goal of describing respiratory populations in particular. Using a combination of fate mapping in transgenic mouse lines and immunohistochemistry, we confirm the parabrachial nuclei are derived from a subset of Atoh1 expression progenitor neurons. I hypothesize the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus can be uniquely defined in the neonate mouse by the coexpression of the transcription factor FoxP2 in Atoh1-derived neurons of rhombomere 1.

  4. Isolation of retinal stem cells from the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Coles, Brenda L K; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-09-11

    The adult mouse retinal stem cell (RSC) is a rare quiescent cell found within the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the mammalian eye(1,2,3). The CE is made up of non-pigmented inner and pigmented outer cell layers, and the clonal RSC colonies that arise from a single pigmented cell from the CE are made up of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells which can be differentiated to form all the cell types of the neural retina and the RPE. There is some controversy about whether all the cells within the spheres all contain at least some pigment(4); however the cells are still capable of forming the different cell types found within the neural retina(1-3). In some species, such as amphibians and fish, their eyes are capable of regeneration after injury(5), however; the mammalian eye shows no such regenerative properties. We seek to identify the stem cell in vivo and to understand the mechanisms that keep the mammalian retinal stem cells quiescent(6-8), even after injury as well as using them as a potential source of cells to help repair physical or genetic models of eye injury through transplantation(9-12). Here we describe how to isolate the ciliary epithelial cells from the mouse eye and grow them in culture in order to form the clonal retinal stem cell spheres. Since there are no known markers of the stem cell in vivo, these spheres are the only known way to prospectively identify the stem cell population within the ciliary epithelium of the eye.

  5. Your brain under the microscope: the promise of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, scientists primarily worked with two kinds of stem cells from animals and humans: embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells. Scientists are just now beginning to improve their understanding of a third kind: induced pluripotent stem cells. Our authors describe how they were discovered, what they are, and why a growing number of researchers and clinicians believe that they may be one of the keys in helping address various brain disorders.

  6. Brain mesenchymal stem cells: The other stem cells of the brain?

    PubMed

    Appaix, Florence; Nissou, Marie-France; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Wion, Didier

    2014-04-26

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), have the potential to differentiate into cells of the mesenchymal lineage and have non-progenitor functions including immunomodulation. The demonstration that MSCs are perivascular cells found in almost all adult tissues raises fascinating perspectives on their role in tissue maintenance and repair. However, some controversies about the physiological role of the perivascular MSCs residing outside the bone marrow and on their therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine exist. In brain, perivascular MSCs like pericytes and adventitial cells, could constitute another stem cell population distinct to the neural stem cell pool. The demonstration of the neuronal potential of MSCs requires stringent criteria including morphological changes, the demonstration of neural biomarkers expression, electrophysiological recordings, and the absence of cell fusion. The recent finding that brain cancer stem cells can transdifferentiate into pericytes is another facet of the plasticity of these cells. It suggests that the perversion of the stem cell potential of pericytes might play an even unsuspected role in cancer formation and tumor progression.

  7. [Pathologic findings in auditory brain stem evoked potentials in 10 children with brain stem tumors].

    PubMed

    Kraus, J; Lehovský, M; Procházková, M

    1990-11-01

    The authors examined brain stem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEP) in 10 children aged 2-14 years with tumours in the posterior cranial fossa infiltrating the cerebellum and brain stem. The tumours were diagnosed by computed tomography and in eight patients confirmed on operation. For stimulation a monaural click was used. The authors assessed the latency of waves, intervals between and investigated the presence of waves and evaluated their amplitudes. They compared the results with normal values. In abnormal findings the latency of components was delayed, the components were generated in a rostral manner from the site of the lesion in all children. In four patients with severe affections of the brain stem the investigated components were lacking. In nine patients the BAEP evoked by monaural stimulation helped to asses the lateralization of the lesion. In eight patients a bilateral abnormality of the V wave was recorded. The most sensitive indicator for assessment of the site of the lesion was assessment of the interval between two consecutive waves.

  8. Brain Cancer Stem Cells Display Preferential Sensitivity to Akt Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Eyler, Christine E.; Foo, Wen-Chi; LaFiura, Katherine M.; McLendon, Roger E.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are among the most lethal cancers, and conventional therapies are largely limited to palliation. Novel therapies targeted against specific molecular pathways may offer improved efficacy and reduced toxicity compared to conventional therapies, but initial clinical trials of molecular targeted agents in brain cancer therapy have been frequently disappointing. In brain tumors and other cancers, subpopulations of tumor cells have recently been characterized by their ability to self-renew and initiate tumors. Although these cancer stem cells, or tumor initiating cells, are often only present in small numbers in human tumors, mounting evidence suggests that cancer stem cells contribute to tumor maintenance and therapeutic resistance. Thus, the development of therapies that target cancer stem cell signal transduction and biologies may improve brain tumor patient survival. We now demonstrate that populations enriched for cancer stem cells are preferentially sensitive to an inhibitor of Akt, a prominent cell survival and invasion signaling node. Treatment with an Akt inhibitor more potently reduced the numbers of viable brain cancer stem cells relative to matched non-stem cancer cells associated with a preferential induction of apoptosis and a suppression of neurosphere formation. Akt inhibition also reduced the motility and invasiveness of all tumor cells but had a greater impact on cancer stem cell behaviors. Furthermore, inhibition of Akt activity in cancer stem cells increased survival of immunocompromised mice bearing human glioma xenografts in vivo. Together, these results suggest that Akt inhibitors may function as effective anti-cancer stem cell therapies. PMID:18802038

  9. Posterior foss avenous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, T.R.; Truwit, C.L. ); Dowd, C.F. ); Symonds, D.L. )

    1994-04-01

    To describe 11 cases of posterior fossa venous angiomas with drainage through the brain stem. Eleven cases of posterior fossa venous angioma with drainage through the brain stem were evaluated using MR. Correlation with known routes of venous drainage for the cerebellum and brain stem is made. Six of the 11 venous angiomas were found in the cerebellum, four in the brain stem; one involved both the cerebellum and brain stem. The cerebellar venous angiomas drained to subependymal veins about the fourth ventricle and dorsal pons. These then connected with an enlarged transmesencephalic or transpontine vein, to drain anteriorly to the anterior pontine veins. The brain stem angiomas had variable drainage depending on location. Evidence of hemorrhage was seen in five cases. Cerebellar and brain stem venous angiomas have several potential routes of drainage, including an enlarged vein traversing the pons, midbrain, or medulla. A knowledge of the normal venous anatomy of this region helps to understand the occurrence of these uncommon routes of venous drainage. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0719 TITLE: Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-Induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse Mammary Epithelium PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of the Stem Cell Niche in Hormone-induced Tumorigenesis in Fetal Mouse 5b. GRANT NUMBER Mammary Epithelium...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT SEE PAGE 4 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , Stem Cell niche, Immunohistochemistry, mammary gland, breast cancer 16

  11. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  12. Specialization of Gene Expression during Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Liscovitch, Noa; Chechik, Gal

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome of the brain changes during development, reflecting processes that determine functional specialization of brain regions. We analyzed gene expression, measured using in situ hybridization across the full developing mouse brain, to quantify functional specialization of brain regions. Surprisingly, we found that during the time that the brain becomes anatomically regionalized in early development, transcription specialization actually decreases reaching a low, “neurotypic”, point around birth. This decrease of specialization is brain-wide, and mainly due to biological processes involved in constructing brain circuitry. Regional specialization rises again during post-natal development. This effect is largely due to specialization of plasticity and neural activity processes. Post-natal specialization is particularly significant in the cerebellum, whose expression signature becomes increasingly different from other brain regions. When comparing mouse and human expression patterns, the cerebellar post-natal specialization is also observed in human, but the regionalization of expression in the human Thalamus and Cortex follows a strikingly different profile than in mouse. PMID:24068900

  13. Depleting dietary valine permits nonmyeloablative mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taya, Yuki; Ota, Yasunori; Wilkinson, Adam C; Kanazawa, Ayano; Watarai, Hiroshi; Kasai, Masataka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Yamazaki, Satoshi

    2016-12-02

    A specialized bone marrow microenvironment (niche) regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and commitment. For successful donor-HSC engraftment, the niche must be emptied via myeloablative irradiation or chemotherapy. However, myeloablation can cause severe complications and even mortality. Here we report that the essential amino acid valine is indispensable for the proliferation and maintenance of HSCs. Both mouse and human HSCs failed to proliferate when cultured in valine-depleted conditions. In mice fed a valine-restricted diet, HSC frequency fell dramatically within 1 week. Furthermore, dietary valine restriction emptied the mouse bone marrow niche and afforded donor-HSC engraftment without chemoirradiative myeloablation. These findings indicate a critical role for valine in HSC maintenance and suggest that dietary valine restriction may reduce iatrogenic complications in HSC transplantation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J.; Semënov, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  15. Absence of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations in mouse brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kiebish, Michael A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2005-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome occur in numerous tumor types including brain tumors. These mutations are generally found in the hypervariable regions I and II of the displacement loop and unlikely alter mitochondrial function. Two hypervariable regions of mononucleotide repeats occur in the mouse mitochondrial genome, i.e., the origin of replication of the light strand (OL) and the Arg tRNA. Methods In this study we examined the entire mitochondrial genome in a series of chemically induced brain tumors in the C57BL/6J strain and spontaneous brain tumors in the VM mouse strain. The tumor mtDNA was compared to that of mtDNA in brain mitochondrial populations from the corresponding syngeneic mouse host strain. Results Direct sequencing revealed a few homoplasmic base pair insertions, deletions, and substitutions in the tumor cells mainly in regions of mononucleotide repeats. A heteroplasmic mutation in the 16srRNA gene was detected in a spontaneous metastatic VM brain tumor. Conclusion None of the mutations were considered pathogenic, indicating that mtDNA somatic mutations do not likely contribute to the initiation or progression of these diverse mouse brain tumors. PMID:16105171

  16. Therapeutic potentials of human adipose-derived stem cells on the mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Soon; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Hyeong-Geun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Chang, Keun-A; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) using stem cells has long been the focus of many researchers, but the ideal therapeutic strategy has not yet been developed. The consistency and high reliability of the experimental results confirmed by animal models are considered to be a critical factor in the stability of stem cell transplantation for PD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the preventive and therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) for PD and was to identify the related factors to this therapeutic effect. The hASC were intravenously injected into the tail vein of a PD mouse model induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Consequently, the behavioral performances were significantly improved at 3 weeks after the injection of hASC. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons were rescued, the number of structure-modified mitochondria was decreased, and mitochondrial complex I activity was restored in the brains of the hASC-injected PD mouse model. Overall, this study underscores that intravenously transplanted hASC may have therapeutic potential for PD by recovering mitochondrial functions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-09-02

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo.

  18. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J.; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  19. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  20. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stem cells for brain repair in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chicha, L; Smith, T; Guzman, R

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic insults are a significant cause of pediatric encephalopathy, developmental delays, and spastic cerebral palsy. Although the developing brain's plasticity allows for remarkable self-repair, severe disruption of normal myelination and cortical development upon neonatal brain injury are likely to generate life-persisting sensory-motor and cognitive deficits in the growing child. Currently, no treatments are available that can address the long-term consequences. Thus, regenerative medicine appears as a promising avenue to help restore normal developmental processes in affected infants. Stem cell therapy has proven effective in promoting functional recovery in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury and therefore represents a hopeful therapy for this unmet medical condition. Neural stem cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal tissues as well as umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have all shown initial success in improving functional outcomes. However, much still remains to be understood about how those stem cells can safely be administered to infants and what their repair mechanisms in the brain are. In this review, we discuss updated research into pathophysiological mechanisms of neonatal brain injury, the types of stem cell therapies currently being tested in this context, and the potential mechanisms through which exogenous stem cells might interact with and influence the developing brain.

  2. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-09-26

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system.

  3. Recruited brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to brain tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Behnan, Jinan; Isakson, Pauline; Joel, Mrinal; Cilio, Corrado; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Badn, Wiaam

    2014-05-01

    The identity of the cells that contribute to brain tumor structure and progression remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been isolated from normal mouse brain. Here, we report the infiltration of MSC-like cells into the GL261 murine glioma model. These brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BT-MSCs) are defined with the phenotype (Lin-Sca-1+CD9+CD44+CD166+/-) and have multipotent differentiation capacity. We show that the infiltration of BT-MSCs correlates to tumor progression; furthermore, BT-MSCs increased the proliferation rate of GL261 cells in vitro. For the first time, we report that the majority of GL261 cells expressed mesenchymal phenotype under both adherent and sphere culture conditions in vitro and that the non-MSC population is nontumorigenic in vivo. Although the GL261 cell line expressed mesenchymal phenotype markers in vitro, most BT-MSCs are recruited cells from host origin in both wild-type GL261 inoculated into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice and GL261-GFP cells inoculated into wild-type mice. We show the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 on different recruited cell populations. In vivo, the GL261 cells change marker profile and acquire a phenotype that is more similar to cells growing in sphere culture conditions. Finally, we identify a BT-MSC population in human glioblastoma that is CD44+CD9+CD166+ both in freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells. Our data indicate that cells with MSC-like phenotype infiltrate into the tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we suggest that targeting BT-MSCs could be a possible strategy for treating glioblastoma patients. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Stem cell therapy for neonatal brain injury: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Titomanlio, Luigi; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dalous, Jeremie; Mani, Shyamala; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Heijnen, Cobi; Baud, Olivier; Gressens, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major health problem caused by brain damage during pregnancy, delivery, or the immediate postnatal period. Perinatal stroke, intraventricular hemorrhage, and asphyxia are the most common causes of neonatal brain damage. Periventricular white matter damage (periventricular leukomalacia) is the predominant form in premature infants and the most common antecedent of cerebral palsy. Stem cell treatment has proven effective in restoring injured organs and tissues in animal models. The potential of stem cells for self-renewal and differentiation translates into substantial neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in the animal brain, with minimal risks of rejection and side effects. Stem cell treatments described to date have used neural stem cells, embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Most of these treatments are still experimental. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of stem cell therapy in animal models of cerebral palsy, and discuss potential implications for current and future clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  5. Using the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) to evaluate the embryotoxicity of haloacetic acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combining the data from cytotoxicity assays in undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and differentiated mouse cells with the data from a differentiation assay in mES ...

  6. Using the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) to evaluate the embryotoxicity of haloacetic acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combining the data from cytotoxicity assays in undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and differentiated mouse cells with the data from a differentiation assay in mES ...

  7. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  8. Transcriptomic study of mouse embryonic neural stem cell differentiation under ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Mi Ran; Kim, Sun Hwa; Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can be differentiated into one of three cell lineages: neurons, astrocytes or, oligodendrocytes. Some neurotoxins have the ability to deregulate this dynamic process. NSC cell fate can be altered by ethanol as reported previously. Our aim was to investigate the alteration of genes by ethanol during NSC differentiation and to explore the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Here, mouse fetal forebrain derived NSCs were differentiated for 2 days with or without of ethanol (50 mM). We performed a comparative microarray analysis at day two using GeneChip(®) Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 arrays. Microarray analysis showed that the expressions of 496 genes were altered by ethanol (56 and 440 were up- and down-regulated, respectively). Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed the association of the following altered genes in the Wnt signaling pathway: Wnt5a, Csnk2a1, Tcf7l2, Ccnd2, Nlk, Tbl1x, Tbl1xr1, Rac2 and Nfatc3. Quantitative real time PCR analysis also demonstrated the relative expression levels of these genes. As Wnt signaling is a player of brain development, ethanol-induced alterations may contribute to improper development of the brain. Our data could be a useful resource for elucidating the mechanism behind the ethanol neurotoxicity in developing brain.

  9. Islet Endothelial Cells Derived From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    The islet endothelium comprises a specialized population of islet endothelial cells (IECs) expressing unique markers such as nephrin and α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) that are not found in endothelial cells in surrounding tissues. However, due to difficulties in isolating and maintaining a pure population of these cells, the information on these islet-specific cells is currently very limited. Interestingly, we have identified a large subpopulation of endothelial cells exhibiting IEC phenotype, while deriving insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These cells were identified by the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and were successfully isolated and subsequently expanded in endothelial cell culture medium. Further analysis demonstrated that the mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (mESC-ECs) not only express classical endothelial markers, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM1), thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but also IEC-specific markers such as nephrin and AAT. Moreover, mESC-ECs secrete basement membrane proteins such as collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin in culture and form tubular networks on a layer of Matrigel, demonstrating angiogenic activity. Further, mESC-ECs not only express eNOS, but also its eNOS expression is glucose dependent, which is another characteristic phenotype of IECs. With the ability to obtain highly purified IECs derived from pluripotent stem cells, it is possible to closely examine the function of these cells and their interaction with pancreatic β-cells during development and maturation in vitro. Further characterization of tissue-specific endothelial cell properties may enhance our ability to formulate new therapeutic angiogenic approaches for diabetes.

  10. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment.

  11. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of paraquat accumulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kavita; Tarasewicz, Elizabeth; Mathew, Jason; Ohman Strickland, Pamela A.; Buckley, Brian; Richardson, Jason R.; Richfield, Eric K.

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a potential human neurotoxicant and is used in models of oxidative stress. We determined the toxicokinetics (TK) and toxicodynamics (TD) of PQ in adult mouse brain following repeated or prolonged PQ exposure. PQ accumulated in different brain regions and reached a plateau after ~18 i.p. (10 mg/kg) doses and resulted in modest morbidity and mortality unpredictably associated with dose interval and number. PQ had divergent effects on horizontal locomotor behavior depending on the number of doses. PQ decreased striatal dopamine levels after the 18th to 36th i.p. dose (10 mg/kg) and reduced the striatal level of tyrosine hydroxylase. Drinking water exposure to PQ (0.03– 0.05 mg/ml) did not result in any mortality and resulted in concentration and time dependent levels in the brain. The brain half-life of PQ varied with mouse strain. PQ accumulates and may saturate a site in mouse brain resulting in complex PQ level and duration-related consequences. These findings should alter our risk assessment of this compound and demonstrate a useful, but complex dynamic model for understanding the consequences of PQ in the brain. PMID:19084006

  12. Application of hairless mouse strain to bioluminescence imaging of Arc expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hironori; Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Hisashi

    2017-01-23

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a powerful technique for monitoring the temporal and spatial dynamics of gene expression in the mouse brain. However, the black fur, skin pigmentation and hair regrowth after depilation of mouse interfere with BLI during developmental and daily examination. The aim of this study was to extend the application of Arc-Luc transgenic (Tg) mice to the BLI of neuronal activity in the mouse brain by introducing the hairless (HL) gene and to examine Arc-Luc expression at various developmental stages without interference from black fur, skin pigmentation, and hair regrowth. The Arc-Luc Tg HL mice were established by crossing the Tg C57BL/6 mouse strain with the HL mouse strain. Under physiological and pathological conditions, BLI was performed to detect the signal intensity changes at various developmental stages and at an interval of <7 days. The established Arc-Luc Tg HL mice exhibited clear and stable photon signals from the brain without interference during development. After surgical monocular deprivation during visual-critical period, large signal intensity changes in bioluminescence were observed in the mouse visual cortex. Exposure of mice to a novel object changed the photon distribution in the caudal and rostral cerebral areas. The temporal pattern of kainic-acid-induced Arc-Luc expression showed biphasic changes in signal intensity over 24 h. This study showed the advantages of using the mutant HL gene in BLI of Arc expression in the mouse brain at various developmental stages. Thus, the use of the Arc-Luc Tg HL mice enabled the tracking of neuronal-activity-dependent processes over a wide range from a focal area to the entire brain area with various time windows.

  13. A Method for 3D Immunostaining and Optical Imaging of the Mouse Brain Demonstrated in Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, Jacqueline A.; Lerch, Jason P.; Henkelman, R. Mark; Nieman, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand changes in cell distribution that occur as a part of disease progression. This is typically achieved using standard sectioning and immunostaining, however, many structures and cell distribution patterns are not readily appreciated in two-dimensions, including the distribution of neural stem and progenitor cells in the mouse forebrain. Three-dimensional immunostaining in the mouse brain has been hampered by poor penetration. For this reason, we have developed a method that allows for entire hemispheres of the mouse brain to be stained using commercially available antibodies. Brains stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein, doublecortin and nestin were imaged in three-dimensions using optical projection tomography and serial two-photon tomography. This staining method is simple, using a combination of heat, time and specimen preparation procedures readily available, so that it can be easily implemented without the need for specialized equipment, making it accessible to most laboratories. PMID:23936537

  14. Nanomedicine Approaches to Modulate Neural Stem Cells in Brain Repair.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tiago; Boto, Carlos; Saraiva, Cláudia M; Bernardino, Liliana; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-06-01

    We explore the concept of modulating neural stem cells and their niches for brain repair using nanotechnology-based approaches. These approaches include stimulating cell proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation to functionally recover damaged areas. Nanoscale-engineered materials potentially overcome limited crossing of the blood-brain barrier, deficient drug delivery, and cell targeting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  16. Human neural stem cells can target and deliver therapeutic genes to breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyeung Min; Park, In H; Shin, Ji Y; Jin, Juyoun; Kang, Bong Gu; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Se Jeong; Jo, Mi-young; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2009-03-01

    The tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) led to the development of a novel strategy for delivering therapeutic genes to tumors in the brain. To apply this strategy to the treatment of brain metastases, we made a human NSC line expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer agent. In vitro, the F3.CD cells significantly inhibited the growth of tumor cell lines in the presence of the prodrug 5-FC. In vivo, MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells were implanted into the brain of immune-deficient mouse stereotactically, and F3.CD cells were injected into the contralateral hemisphere followed by systemic 5-FC administration. The F3.CD cells migrated selectively into the brain metastases located in the opposite hemisphere and resulted in significantly reduced volumes. The F3.CD and 5-FC treatment also decreased both tumor volume and number of tumor mass significantly, when immune-deficient mouse had MDA-MB-435 cells injected into the internal carotid artery and F3.CD cells were transplanted into the contralateral brain hemisphere stereotactically. Taken together, brain transplantation of human NSCs, encoding the suicide enzyme CD, combined with systemic administration of the prodrug 5-FC, is an effective treatment regimen for brain metastases of tumors.

  17. A versatile new technique to clear mouse and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Large volumes imaging with microscopic resolution is limited by light scattering. In the last few years based on refractive index matching, different clearing approaches have been developed. Organic solvents and water-based optical clearing agents have been used for optical clearing of entire mouse brain. Although these methods guarantee high transparency and preservation of the fluorescence, though present other non-negligible limitations. Tissue transformation by CLARITY allows high transparency, whole brain immunolabelling and structural and molecular preservation. This method however requires a highly expensive refractive index matching solution limiting practical applicability. In this work we investigate the effectiveness of a water-soluble clearing agent, the 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) to clear mouse and human brain. TDE does not quench the fluorescence signal, is compatible with immunostaining and does not introduce any deformation at sub-cellular level. The not viscous nature of the TDE make it a suitable agent to perform brain slicing during serial two-photon (STP) tomography. In fact, by improving penetration depth it reduces tissue slicing, decreasing the acquisition time and cutting artefacts. TDE can also be used as a refractive index medium for CLARITY. The potential of this method has been explored by imaging a whole transgenic mouse brain with the light sheet microscope. Moreover we apply this technique also on blocks of dysplastic human brain tissue transformed with CLARITY and labeled with different antibody. This clearing approach significantly expands the application of single and two-photon imaging, providing a new useful method for quantitative morphological analysis of structure in mouse and human brain.

  18. Biotransformation of the insecticide parathion by mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Soranno, T M; Sultatos, L G

    1992-01-01

    The acute toxicity of organothiophosphate insecticides like parathion results from their metabolic activation by cytochromes P450. The present study is directed towards the characterization of cytochrome-P450-dependent metabolism of parathion by various mouse brain regions. Intraperitoneal administration of [35S]parathion to mice led to covalently bound [35S]sulfur in various tissues, indicating their capacity to oxidatively desulfurate this insecticide. Liver contained the greatest amount of covalently bound sulfur, and brain the least. Among individual brain regions the olfactory bulb and hypothalamus possessed the highest levels of sulfur binding when expressed on a per milligram tissue basis. However, when expressed on a per brain region basis, sulfur binding was greatest within the cortex as a result of the large mass of this region, compared to the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. Incubation of the 78,000 x g fraction of mouse brain with parathion resulted in formation of p-nitrophenol, although paraoxon could not be detected. However, given the current understanding of parathion metabolism by cytochromes P450, and given that paraoxon can rapidly disappear through phosphorylation of serine hydroxyl groups, it is reasonable to assume that at least some paraoxon was formed. Production of p-nitrophenol required NADPH and was inhibited by carbon monoxide. In vitro incubations of parathion with the 78,000 x g fraction of mouse brain indicated that the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb had the greatest capacity to produce p-nitrophenol. These results demonstrate that various mouse brain regions possess different capacities to metabolize parathion.

  19. A-kinase anchoring protein 150 in the mouse brain is concentrated in areas involved in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ostroveanu, Anghelus; Van der Zee, Eddy A; Dolga, Amalia M; Luiten, Paul G M; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Nijholt, Ingrid M

    2007-05-11

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) form large macromolecular signaling complexes that specifically target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to unique subcellular compartments and thus, provide high specificity to PKA signaling. For example, the AKAP79/150 family tethers PKA, PKC and PP2B to neuronal membranes and postsynaptic densities and plays an important role in synaptic function. Several studies suggested that AKAP79/150 anchored PKA contributes to mechanisms associated with synaptic plasticity and memory processes, but the precise role of AKAPs in these processes is still unknown. In this study we established the mouse brain distribution of AKAP150 using two well-characterized AKAP150 antibodies. Using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry we showed that AKAP150 is widely distributed throughout the mouse brain. The highest AKAP150 expression levels were observed in striatum, cerebral cortex and several other forebrain regions (e.g. olfactory tubercle), relatively high expression was found in hippocampus and olfactory bulb and low/no expression in cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and brain stem. Although there were some minor differences in mouse AKAP150 brain distribution compared to the distribution in rat brain, our data suggested that rodents have a characteristic AKAP150 brain distribution pattern. In general we observed that AKAP150 is strongly expressed in mouse brain regions involved in learning and memory. These data support its suggested role in synaptic plasticity and memory processes.

  20. Mouse brain magnetic resonance microscopy: Applications in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Fu, Zhenrong; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Shuicai

    2015-05-01

    Over the past two decades, various Alzheimer's disease (AD) trangenetic mice models harboring genes with mutation known to cause familial AD have been created. Today, high-resolution magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) technology is being widely used in the study of AD mouse models. It has greatly facilitated and advanced our knowledge of AD. In this review, most of the attention is paid to fundamental of MRM, the construction of standard mouse MRM brain template and atlas, the detection of amyloid plaques, following up on brain atrophy and the future applications of MRM in transgenic AD mice. It is believed that future testing of potential drugs in mouse models with MRM will greatly improve the predictability of drug effect in preclinical trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  2. Brain Stem Hypoplasia Associated with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  3. Brown adipogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate microstrands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unser, Andrea Mannarino

    The ability of brown adipocytes (fat cells) to dissipate energy as heat shows great promise for the treatment of obesity and other metabolic disorders. Employing pluripotent stem cells, with an emphasis on directed differentiation, may overcome many issues currently associated with primary fat cell cultures. However, brown adipocytes are difficult to transplant in vivo due to the instability of fat, in terms of necrosis and neovascularization, once injected. Thus, 3D cell culture systems that have the potential to mimic adipogenic microenvironments are needed, not only to advance brown fat implantation, but also to better understand the role of brown adipocytes in treating obesity. To address this need, we created 3D "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" by microfluidic synthesis of alginate hydrogel microstrands that encapsulated cells and directly induced cell differentiation into brown adipocytes, using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model of pluripotent stem cells and brown preadipocytes as a positive control. The effect of hydrogel formation parameters on brown adipogenesis was studied, leading to the establishment of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands". Brown adipocyte differentiation within microstrands was confirmed by lipid droplet accumulation, immunocytochemistry and qPCR analysis of gene expression of brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in addition to adipocyte marker expression. Compared to a 2D approach, 3D differentiated "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" exhibited higher level of brown adipocyte marker expression. The functional analysis of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" was attempted by measuring the mitochondrial activity of ESC-differentiated brown adipocytes in 3D using Seahorse XF24 3 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. The ability to create "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" from pluripotent stem cells opens up a new arena to understanding brown adipogenesis and its implications in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  4. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  5. New insights on brain stem death: from bedside to bench.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H

    2005-12-01

    As much as brain stem death is currently the clinical definition of death in many countries and is a phenomenon of paramount medical importance, there is a dearth of information on its mechanistic underpinnings. A majority of the clinical studies are concerned only with methods to determine brain stem death. Whereas a vast amount of information is available on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell death, rarely are these studies directed specifically towards the understanding of brain stem death. This review presents a framework for translational research on brain stem death that is based on systematically coordinated clinical and laboratory efforts that center on this phenomenon. It begins with the identification of a novel clinical marker from patients that is related specifically to brain stem death. After realizing that this "life-and-death" signal is related to the functional integrity of the brain stem, its origin is traced to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Subsequent laboratory studies on this neural substrate in animal models of brain stem death provide credence to the notion that both "pro-life" and "pro-death" programs are at work during the progression towards death. Those programs (mitochondrial functions, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, superoxide anion, coenzyme Q10, heat shock proteins and ubiquitin-proteasome system) hitherto identified from the RVLM are presented, along with their cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is proposed that outcome of the interplay between the "pro-life" and "pro-death" programs (dying) in this neural substrate determines the final fate of the individual (being dead). Thus, identification of additional programs in the RVLM and delineation of their regulatory mechanisms should shed new lights on future directions for clinical management of life-and-death.

  6. Multi-Coil Shimming of the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Brown, Peter B.; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    MR imaging and spectroscopy allow the non-invasive measurement of brain function and physiology, but excellent magnetic field homogeneity is required for meaningful results. The homogenization of the magnetic field distribution in the mouse brain (i.e. shimming) is a difficult task due to complex susceptibility-induced field distortions combined with the small size of the object. To date, the achievement of satisfactory whole brain shimming in the mouse remains a major challenge. The magnetic fields generated by a set of 48 circular coils (diameter 13 mm) that were arranged in a cylinder-shaped pattern of 32 mm diameter and driven with individual dynamic current ranges of ±1 A are shown to be capable of substantially reducing the field distortions encountered in the mouse brain at 9.4 Tesla. Static multi-coil shim fields allowed the reduction of the standard deviation of Larmor frequencies by 31% compared to second order spherical harmonics shimming and a 66% narrowing was achieved with the slice-specific application of the multi-coil shimming with a dynamic approach. For gradient echo imaging, multi-coil shimming minimized shim-related signal voids in the brain periphery and allowed overall signal gains of up to 51% compared to spherical harmonics shimming. PMID:21442653

  7. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts into Multipotent Neural Stem Cells with a Single Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Karen L.; Tong, Leslie M.; Balestra, Maureen E.; Javier, Robyn; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Li, Gang; Walker, David; Zhang, William R.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and induced neuronal (iN) cells from somatic cells provides new avenues for basic research and potential transplantation therapies for neurological diseases. However, clinical applications must consider the risk of tumor formation by iPS cells and the inability of iN cells to self-renew in culture. Here we report the generation of induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) from mouse and human fibroblasts by direct reprogramming with a single factor, Sox2. iNSCs express NSC markers and resemble wild-type NSCs in their morphology, self-renewal, ability to form neurospheres, and gene expression profiles. Cloned iNSCs differentiate into several types of mature neurons, as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, indicating multipotency. Implanted iNSCs can survive and integrate in mouse brains and, unlike iPS cell-derived NSCs, do not generate tumors. Thus, self-renewable and multipotent iNSCs without tumorigenic potential can be generated directly from fibroblasts by reprogramming. PMID:22683203

  8. Induced expression of Fndc5 significantly increased cardiomyocyte differentiation rate of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, Farzaneh; Forouzanfar, Mahboobeh; Ghazvini Zadegan, Faezeh; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Ghaedi, Kamran; Motovali Bashi, Majid; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-11-10

    Fibronectin type III domain-containing 5 protein (Fndc5) is an exercise hormone and its transcript profile in mouse showed high degree of expression in heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our previous studies indicated a significant increase (approximately 10 fold) in mRNA level of Fndc5 when embryonic stem cells were differentiated into beating bodies. As a step closer to identify the involvement of Fndc5 in the process of cardiomyocyte differentiation, we generated a stably inducible transduced mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) line that overexpressed Fndc5 following Doxycycline induction. Our results indicated that the overexpression of Fndc5 during spontaneous cardiac differentiation significantly increased not only at RNA levels for mesodermal markers but also at the transcriptional levels for cardiac progenitor and cardiac genes. These data suggest that Fndc5 may be involved in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Therefore, a new hope will be arisen for potential application of this myokine for regeneration of damaged cardiac tissues especially in cardiac failure.

  9. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of neural stem cells alters neurogenesis in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Mutnal, Manohar B; Cheeran, Maxim C-J; Hu, Shuxian; Lokensgard, James R

    2011-01-13

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) brain infection causes serious neuro-developmental sequelae including: mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and sensorineural hearing loss. But, the mechanisms of injury and pathogenesis to the fetal brain are not completely understood. The present study addresses potential pathogenic mechanisms by which this virus injures the CNS using a neonatal mouse model that mirrors congenital brain infection. This investigation focused on, analysis of cell types infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and the pattern of injury to the developing brain. We used our MCMV infection model and a multi-color flow cytometry approach to quantify the effect of viral infection on the developing brain, identifying specific target cells and the consequent effect on neurogenesis. In this study, we show that neural stem cells (NSCs) and neuronal precursor cells are the principal target cells for MCMV in the developing brain. In addition, viral infection was demonstrated to cause a loss of NSCs expressing CD133 and nestin. We also showed that infection of neonates leads to subsequent abnormal brain development as indicated by loss of CD24(hi) cells that incorporated BrdU. This neonatal brain infection was also associated with altered expression of Oct4, a multipotency marker; as well as down regulation of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT3, which are essential to regulate the birth and differentiation of neurons during normal brain development. Finally, we report decreased expression of doublecortin, a marker to identify young neurons, following viral brain infection. MCMV brain infection of newborn mice causes significant loss of NSCs, decreased proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, and marked loss of young neurons.

  10. Generating Inner Ear Organoids from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Longworth-Mills, Emma; Koehler, Karl R; Hashino, Eri

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a three-dimensional culture method for generating inner ear sensory epithelia, which comprises sensory hair cells and a concurrently arising neuronal population. Mouse embryonic stem cells are initially plated in 96-well plates with differentiation media; following aggregation, Matrigel is added in order to promote epithelialization. A series of small molecule applications is then used over the first 14 days of culture to guide differentiation towards an otic lineage. After 16-20 days, vesicles containing inner ear sensory hair cells and supporting cells arise from the cultured aggregates. Aggregates may be analyzed using immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology techniques. This system serves as a simple and relatively inexpensive in vitro model of inner ear development.

  11. GATA-1 directly regulates Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-Zhong; Ai, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Lin-Lin; Guo, Ze-Kun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-25

    Nanog safeguards pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Insight into the regulation of Nanog is important for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pluripotency of mESCs. In a silico analysis, we identify four GATA-1 putative binding sites in Nanog proximal promoter. The Nanog promoter activity can be significantly repressed by ectopic expression of GATA-1 evidenced by a promoter reporter assay. Mutation studies reveal that one of the four putative binding sites counts for GATA-1 repressing Nanog promoter activity. Direct binding of GATA-1 on Nanog proximal promoter is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data provide new insights into the expanded regulatory circuitry that coordinates Nanog expression. - Highlights: • The Nanog proximal promoter conceives functional element for GATA-1. • GATA-1 occupies the Nanog proximal promoter in vitro and in vivo. • GATA-1 transcriptionally suppresses Nanog.

  12. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X.• We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology.• Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified.

  13. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  14. Tissue structure and inflammatory processes shape viscoelastic properties of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Millward, Jason M; Guo, Jing; Berndt, Dominique; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an imaging method that reveals the mechanical properties of tissue, modelled as a combination of " viscosity" and " elasticity" . We recently showed reduced brain viscoelasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared with healthy controls, and in the relapsing-remitting disease model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanisms by which these intrinsic tissue properties become altered remain unclear. This study investigates whether distinct regions in the mouse brain differ in their native viscoelastic properties, and how these properties are affected during chronic EAE in C57Bl/6 mice and in mice lacking the cytokine interferon-gamma. IFN-γ(-/-) mice exhibit a more severe EAE phenotype, with amplified inflammation in the cerebellum and brain stem. Brain scans were performed in the sagittal plane using a 7 T animal MRI scanner, and the anterior (cerebral) and posterior (cerebellar) regions analyzed separately. MRE investigations were accompanied by contrast-enhanced MRI scans, and by histopathology and gene expression analysis ex vivo. Compared with the cerebrum, the cerebellum in healthy mice has a lower viscoelasticity, i.e. it is intrinsically " softer" . This was seen both in the wild-type mice and the IFNγ(-/-) mice. During chronic EAE, C57Bl/6 mice did not show altered brain viscoelasticity. However, as expected, the IFNγ(-/-) mice showed a more severe EAE phenotype, and these mice did show altered brain elasticity during the course of disease. The magnitude of the elasticity reduction correlated with F4/80 gene expression, a marker for macrophages/microglia in inflamed central nervous system tissue. Together these results demonstrate that MRE is sensitive enough to discriminate between viscoelastic properties in distinct anatomical structures in the mouse brain, and to confirm a further relationship between cellular inflammation and mechanical alterations of the brain. This

  15. Aquaporin7 expression during perinatal development of mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Incheol; Kim, Hyun J; Lee, Jae E; Gye, Myung C

    2006-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that brain aquaporins (AQPs) play important roles in the dynamic regulation of brain water homeostasis and the production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under normal, as well as pathological, conditions. To date, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of AQP1, 4, and 9 have been elucidated in brain tissues. However, the expression of AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin associated with brain development, has not been shown. In the present study, we examined expression of AQP7 during perinatal and adult brain development in the mouse. Throughout brain development, the immunoreactivity of AQP7 was largely found in the choroid plexus (CP). AQP7 immunoreactivity in ependyma (Ep), pia, and blood vessels (BV) was increased during perinatal to postnatal development. Cells in the different layers of cerebral cortex became a little positive for AQP7 immunoreactivity during postnatal development. Optimized semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that AQP7 mRNA and protein levels increased during perinatal development of brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the pattern of AQP7 expression in brain tissues. These results suggest that AQP7 is an important structural element in the choroid plexus and is possibly involved in the production of CSF during brain development in mice.

  16. Mouse mutants from chemically mutagenized embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Robert J.; Bergstrom, Rebecca A.; Zheng, Qing Yin; Libby, Brian; Smith, Richard; John, Simon W.M.; Schimenti, Kerry J.; Browning, Victoria L.; Schimenti, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The drive to characterize functions of human genes on a global scale has stimulated interest in large-scale generation of mouse mutants. Conventional germ-cell mutagenesis with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is compromised by an inability to monitor mutation efficiency, strain1 and interlocus2 variation in mutation induction, and extensive husbandry requirements. To overcome these obstacles and develop new methods for generating mouse mutants, we devised protocols to generate germline chi-maeric mice from embryonic stem (ES) cells heavily mutagenized with ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS). Germline chimaeras were derived from cultures that underwent a mutation rate of up to 1 in 1,200 at the Hprt locus (encoding hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase). The spectrum of mutations induced by EMS and the frameshift mutagen ICR191 was consistent with that observed in other mammalian cells. Chimaeras derived from ES cells treated with EMS transmitted mutations affecting several processes, including limb development, hair growth, hearing and gametogenesis. This technology affords several advantages over traditional mutagenesis, including the ability to conduct shortened breeding schemes and to screen for mutant phenotypes directly in ES cells or their differentiated derivatives. PMID:10700192

  17. Paraquat toxicity in a mouse embryonic stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Perla, Venu; Perrin, Nancy A; Greenlee, Anne R

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to use a mouse embryonic stem (mES) cell model to better understand pesticide injury that may adversely affect early pregnancy and to evaluate an antioxidant intervention. Undifferentiated D3 mES cells were incubated 24h with control, reference dose (RfD), no observed effect level (NOEL), or lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of paraquat, a commonly used, toxic agricultural herbicide. Pesticide effects were evaluated at 0 and 24h using assays for cell proliferation, total reactive oxygen species (ROS), viability, and alkaline phosphatase activity. Compared to 0 h, cell proliferation increased significantly in the 24h control treatment and was stalled in all paraquat dilutions tested. ROS production and percent necrotic and apoptotic cells were significantly increased at all paraquat concentrations examined. Alkaline phosphatase activity suggested that cells remained undifferentiated during the study period. Experiments with ascorbic acid suggested that pesticide effects on cell viability and ROS production were minimized by the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin C. Data suggest pesticide-induced injury can occur very early in development and at concentrations predicted without health consequences. Mouse ES cells may provide a useful in vitro model for rapidly screening developmental toxicants and protective interventions.

  18. Mouse mutants from chemically mutagenized embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Munroe, R J; Bergstrom, R A; Zheng, Q Y; Libby, B; Smith, R; John, S W; Schimenti, K J; Browning, V L; Schimenti, J C

    2000-03-01

    The drive to characterize functions of human genes on a global scale has stimulated interest in large-scale generation of mouse mutants. Conventional germ-cell mutagenesis with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is compromised by an inability to monitor mutation efficiency, strain and interlocus variation in mutation induction, and extensive husbandry requirements. To overcome these obstacles and develop new methods for generating mouse mutants, we devised protocols to generate germline chimaeric mice from embryonic stem (ES) cells heavily mutagenized with ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS). Germline chimaeras were derived from cultures that underwent a mutation rate of up to 1 in 1,200 at the Hprt locus (encoding hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase). The spectrum of mutations induced by EMS and the frameshift mutagen ICR191 was consistent with that observed in other mammalian cells. Chimaeras derived from ES cells treated with EMS transmitted mutations affecting several processes, including limb development, hair growth, hearing and gametogenesis. This technology affords several advantages over traditional mutagenesis, including the ability to conduct shortened breeding schemes and to screen for mutant phenotypes directly in ES cells or their differentiated derivatives.

  19. Effects of hyperthermia and radiation on mouse testis stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.O.; Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.; West, J.

    1981-11-01

    The response of mouse testis stem cells to hyperthermia and combined hyperthermia-radiation treatments was assayed by spermatogenic colony regrowth, sperm head counts, testis weight loss, and fertility. With the use of spermatogenic colony assay, thermal enhancement ratios at an isosurvival level of 0.1 were 1.27 at 41 degrees, 1.80 at 42 degrees, and 3.97 at 43 degrees for testes exposed to heat for 30 min prior to irradiation. Sperm head counts were reduced by heat alone from a surviving fraction of 0.58 at 41 degrees to 0.003 at 42.5-43.5 degrees. Curves for sperm head survival measured 56 days after the testes had been heated for 30 min prior to irradiation were biphasic and showed a progressive downward displacement to lower survival with increasing temperature. The 41, 42, and 43 degrees curves were displaced downward by factors of 2, 58, and 175, respectively. The proportion of animals remaining sterile after 30 min of heat (41-43 degrees) and the median sterility period in days increased with increasing temperature. The minimum sperm count necessary to regain fertility was 13% of the normal mouse level.

  20. Resveratrol promotes differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells to cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xian; Yang, Chengjian; Feng, Qiuting

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are capable to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, with the potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, directed differentiation is still a challenge faced by scientists. As a natural substance in grapes, resveratrol (RV) is important for cardiovascular protection. The studies of RV and its effects on ESC differentiation have potential clinical applications. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), we investigated the effects of different concentrations of RV (5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μmol/L) exposure on mESCs viability, expression levels of cardiac marker genes in embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from mESCs, expression levels of maturity indicative cardiac markers in cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs, and the beating properties of EBs. About 10 μmol/L of RV showed no toxicity on cell viability and was the optimal concentration to promote mESC differentiation, induce mESC differentiation to cardiomyocytes, and gain the beating properties of EBs. RV can successfully direct the differentiation of mESCs into cardiomyocytes, shedding light on its future applications to treat cardiovascular diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Developmental ability of trophoblast stem cells in uniparental mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Shindo, N; Kumagai, T; Usami, Y; Shikanai, M; Jonwn, K; Fukuda, A; Kawahara, M; Sotomaru, Y; Tanaka, S; Arima, T; Kono, T

    2009-05-01

    Neither parthenogenetic (PG) nor androgenetic (AG) mouse embryos survive after day 9.5 of pregnancy, owing to the inadequate growth of extraembryonic tissues, including the placenta. At day 9.5 of pregnancy, the placental structures are poorly developed in PG embryos, while trophoblast giant cells are abundant at the implantation site in AG embryos. These findings suggest that both parental genomes are required for placental development. To gain further insight into the trophoblast lineage in PG and AG embryos, we attempted to derive trophoblast stem (TS)-like cell lines from uniparental embryos. Furthermore, we sought to assess their ability to differentiate into cells of the trophoblast lineage by using gene expression analysis. Three cell lines that expressed marker genes for undifferentiated TS cells (Cdx2 and Errbeta) were derived from AG embryos. Under differentiation conditions, these cells expressed the trophoblast giant cell-specific genes, but did not express the spongiotrophoblast-specific genes. In contrast, none of the four cell lines from PG embryos expressed marker genes for undifferentiated TS cells, but they expressed Oct3/4, a marker gene for embryonic stem cells. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that PG blastocysts expressed Oct3/4 and Cdx2 specifically in inner cell mass and the trophectoderm respectively. These results suggest that PG embryos do not possess TS cells, because of the lack of the developmental ability of trophoblast cells.

  2. The presence of family during brain stem death testing.

    PubMed

    Doran, Majella

    2004-02-01

    Prior to 1959, cardiac and respiratory cessation was universally and unambiguously accepted as confirming the death of a person [M. Morioka, J. Clin. Nurs. 10 (2001) 132; Reconsidering brain death: a lesson from Japan's fifteen years of experience, 2001, http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb]. However, with the rapid pace of modern technology and resuscitation techniques, the boundaries between life and death have become blurred [J. Bothamley, Organ donation: brain stem death, 2000, http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb; Re-examining death: against a higher brain criterion, 1999, http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb]. As a result, a redefinition of death, "brain death" has emerged [M. Brazier, Medicine, Patients and the Law, New ed., Penquin Books, London, 1992]. Most families faced with the brain stem death of a relative find the concept difficult to understand and have trouble in accepting that their relative is actually dead. In Part One of this two part series, the needs of families who are facing the brain stem death of a family member will be examined and explanations offered as to why families find the concept difficult to grasp. In addition, it will also advocate that family members are given the choice to be or not to be present during brain stem death testing. It is suggested that the presence of family members during brain stem death testing not only helps families to accept this concept of death but also promotes the grieving process. In Part Two, the barriers that inhibit family involvement and presence will be explored and methods for involving family proposed.

  3. Transplanting mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mouse otocysts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroki; Minoda, Ryosei; Miwa, Toru; Yamada, Takao; Ise, Momoko

    2017-03-27

    The otocyst is an attractive target for studying treatment strategies for genetic hearing loss and for understanding inner ear development. We have previously reported that trans-uterine supplemental gene therapy in vivo into the otocysts of mice, which had a loss of function mutation in a causative gene of deafness, was able to prevent putative hearing loss. We herein set out to clarify the feasibility of allogenic cell transplantation into the mouse otocysts in vivo. We transplanted naive mouse-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into the otocysts of wild type mice or connexin (Cx) 30 deficient mice, at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5). The transplanted m-iPSCs survived in the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and E15.5 in wild type mice. In the Cx30 deficient mouse, the transplanted cells survived similarly, with some of the transplanted cells migrating into the lining cells of the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and showing tumorigenic cell proliferation at E15.5. In addition, engrafted cells appear to be able to differentiate after the cell transplantation. Our results suggest that otocyst transplanted cells survived and differentiated. A Cx30 deficiency may facilitate cell migration. These findings may offer some hope for cell transplantation therapy for profound genetic hearing loss caused by a Cxs deficiency.

  4. Morphology and size of stem cells from mouse and whale: observational study

    PubMed Central

    van den Beukel, Johanna C; Wiersma, Lidewij C M; Ijzer, Jooske

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the morphology and size of stem cells from two mammals of noticeably different body size. Design Observational study. Setting The Netherlands. Participants A humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) and a laboratory mouse (Mus musculus). Main outcome measures Morphology and size of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue. Results Morphologically, mesenchymal stem cells of the mouse and whale are indistinguishable. The average diameter of 50 mesenchymal stem cells from the mouse was 28 (SD 0.86) µm and 50 from the whale was 29 (SD 0.71) µm. The difference in cell size between the species was not statistically significant. Although the difference in bodyweight between the species is close to two million-fold, the mesenchymal stem cells of each were of similar size. Conclusions The mesenchymal stem cells of whales and mice are alike, in both morphology and size. PMID:24336001

  5. Mouse B-Type Lamins Are Required for Proper Organogenesis But Not by Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngjo; Sharov, Alexei A.; McDole, Katie; Cheng, Melody; Hao, Haiping; Fan, Chen-Ming; Gaiano, Nicholas; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Zheng, Yixian

    2012-01-01

    B-type lamins, the major components of the nuclear lamina, are believed to be essential for cell proliferation and survival. We found that mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) do not need any lamins for self-renewal and pluripotency. Although genome-wide lamin-B binding profiles correlate with reduced gene expression, such binding is not directly required for gene silencing in ESCs or trophectoderm cells. However, B-type lamins are required for proper organogenesis. Defects in spindle orientation in neural progenitor cells and migration of neurons probably cause brain disorganizations found in lamin-B null mice. Thus, our studies not only disprove several prevailing views of lamin-Bs but also establish a foundation for redefining the function of the nuclear lamina in the context of tissue building and homeostasis. PMID:22116031

  6. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  7. [Primary brain stem hemorrhage: retrospective study of 25 cases].

    PubMed

    Raison, J S; Bourbotte, G; Baum, T P; Pagès, M

    2008-03-01

    We report a retrospective series of 25 cases of brain stem hemorrhage. Cases of spontaneous hemorrhage of the brain stem which were observed from 1990 to 2000 in a department of neurology were reviewed. Etiological factors, CT scan at admission, clinical signs and the course of the disease were analyzed retrospectively. There were 25 patients, 14 male and 11 female aged from 24 to 91. Fifteen hematomas were related to hypertension, four to coagulation disorders and two to a vascular malformation. The hemorrhage was located in the pons in 22 cases and in the midbrain in three cases. The death rate directly related to the hemorrhage was 14/25 (12 early and two delayed deaths). Prognosis factors were the size of the hemorrhage, a ventricular bleeding, disorders of consciousness and pupillary abnormalities on admission, the need for mechanical ventilation. In brain stem hemorrhage, the size of the hematoma is a more important prognosis factor than age or etiological factors.

  8. Reversible neurotoxicity following hyperfractionated radiation therapy of brain stem glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M.; Friedman, H.S.; Halperin, E.C.; Wiener, M.D.; Marks, L.; Oakes, W.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; DeLong, G.R.; Schold, S.C.; Hockenberger, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with brain stem gliomas were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFR) (7,020 and 7,560 cGy, respectively). Despite initial clinical improvement during irradiation, both patients demonstrated clinical deterioration approximately 3 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a progressive increase in distribution of abnormal brain stem signal consistent with either tumor or edema. {sup 18}FDG positron emission tomography (PET) was obtained in one patient and demonstrated a hypermetabolic lesion at diagnosis and a hypometabolic lesion at the time of clinical deterioration postirradiation. Management with a tapering dose of dexamethasone alone resulted in marked clinical (both patients) and radiographic (one patient) improvement, allowing reduction or discontinuation of this medication. These results suggest that patients with brain stem tumors demonstrating clinical and radiographic evidence of progressive tumor shortly after completion of HFR should be initially managed conservatively with dexamethasone, since these findings may be manifestations of reversible radiation-related neurotoxicity.

  9. Brain Glucose Transporter (Glut3) Haploinsufficiency Does Not Impair Mouse Brain Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Ross, Ian R.; Howell, Mary E. A.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Wood, Thomas G.; Ceci, Jeffrey D.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Mouse brain expresses three principle glucose transporters. Glut1 is an endothelial marker and is the principal glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier. Glut3 and Glut6 are expressed in glial cells and neural cells. A mouse line with a null allele for Glut3 has been developed. The Glut3−/− genotype is intrauterine lethal by seven days post-coitis, but the heterozygous (Glut3+/−) littermate survives, exhibiting rapid post-natal weight gain, but no seizures or other behavioral aberrations. At twelve weeks of age, brain uptake of tail vein-injected 3H-2-deoxy glucose in Glut3+/− mice was not different from Glut3+/+ littermates, despite 50% less Glut3 protein expression in the brain. The brain uptake of injected 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose was similarly not different from Glut3+/− littermates in the total amount, time course, or brain imaging in the Glut3+/− mice. Glut1 and Glut6 protein expressions evaluated by immunoblots were not affected by the diminished Glut3 expression in the Glut3+/− mice. We conclude that a 50% decrease in Glut3 is not limiting for the uptake of glucose into the mouse brain, since Glut3 haploinsufficiency does not impair brain glucose uptake or utilization. PMID:21316350

  10. Developmental Expression of Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor 50 in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mental disorders have a complex etiology resulting from interactions between multiple genetic risk factors and stressful life events. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor 50 (GPR50) has been identified as a genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder and major depression in women, and there is additional genetic and functional evidence linking GPR50 to neurite outgrowth, lipid metabolism, and adaptive thermogenesis and torpor. However, in the absence of a ligand, a specific function has not been identified. Adult GPR50 expression has previously been reported in brain regions controlling the HPA axis, but its developmental expression is unknown. In this study, we performed extensive expression analysis of GPR50 and three protein interactors using rt-PCR and immunohistochemistry in the developing and adult mouse brain. Gpr50 is expressed at embryonic day 13 (E13), peaks at E18, and is predominantly expressed by neurons. Additionally we identified novel regions of Gpr50 expression, including brain stem nuclei involved in neurotransmitter signaling: the locus coeruleus, substantia nigra, and raphe nuclei, as well as nuclei involved in metabolic homeostasis. Gpr50 colocalizes with yeast-two-hybrid interactors Nogo-A, Abca2, and Cdh8 in the hypothalamus, amygdala, cortex, and selected brain stem nuclei at E18 and in the adult. With this study, we identify a link between GPR50 and neurotransmitter signaling and strengthen a likely role in stress response and energy homeostasis. PMID:22860215

  11. Topodiagnostic investigations on the sympathoexcitatory brain stem pathway using a new method of three dimensional brain stem mapping

    PubMed Central

    Marx, J; Iannetti, G; Mika-Gruettner, A; Thoemke, F; Fitzek, S; Vucurevic, G; Urban, P; Stoeter, P; Cruccu, G; Hopf, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To study the incompletely understood sympathoexcitatory pathway through the human brain stem, using a new method of three dimensional brain stem mapping on the basis of digitally postprocessed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: 258 consecutive patients presenting with acute signs of brain stem ischaemia underwent biplane T2 and EPI diffusion weighted MRI, with slice orientation parallel and perpendicular to a transversal slice selection of the stereotactic anatomical atlas of Schaltenbrand and Wahren, 1977. The individual slices were digitally normalised and projected onto the appropriate slices of the anatomical atlas. For correlation analysis lesions were imported into a three dimensional model of the human brain stem. Results: 31 of the 258 patients had Horner's syndrome caused by acute brain stem ischaemia. Only four of the patients with Horner's syndrome had pontine infarctions, 12 had pontomedullary lesions, and 15 had medullary lesions. Correlation analysis showed significantly affected voxels in the dorsolateral medulla but not in the pons. A statistical comparison with infarct topology in patients with medullary lesions but without Horner's syndrome indicated that involvement of the medial and ventral part of affected voxels located in the ventrolateral medullary tegmentum was specific for Horner's syndrome. Conclusions: Based on this first in vivo topodiagnostic study, the central sympathoexcitatory pathway probably descends through the dorsal pons before converging on specific generators in the ventrolateral medullary tegmentum at a level below the IX and X nerve exits. PMID:14742599

  12. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  13. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  14. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  15. Accurate resistivity mouse brain mapping using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Delattre, Vincent; Fraering, Patrick C; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-10-15

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed in post-mortem mice brains using a flexible probe with an embedded micrometric electrode array. Combined with a peak resistance frequency method this allowed obtaining intrinsic resistivity values of brain tissues and structures with submillimetric resolution. Reproducible resistivity measurements are reported, which allows the resistivity in the cortex, ventricle, fiber tracts, thalamus and basal ganglia to be differentiated. Measurements of brain slices revealed resistivity profiles correlated with the local density of cell bodies hence allowing to discriminate between the different cortical layers. Finally, impedance measurements were performed on a model of cauterized mouse brain evidencing the possibility to measure the spatial extent and the degree of the tissue denaturation due to the cauterization.

  16. Neural localization of addicsin in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Akiduki, Saori; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Ikemoto, Mitsushi J

    2007-10-22

    Addicsin is a member of the prenylated Rab acceptor (PRA) 1 domain family and a murine homolog of the rat glutamate-transporter-associated protein 3-18 (GTRAP3-18). This protein is considered to function as a modulator of the neural glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1). However, its molecular functions remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the regional and cellular localization of addicsin in the central nervous system (CNS) by using a newly generated antibody specific for the protein. Distribution analysis by Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the protein was widely distributed in various regions of the mature CNS, including the olfactory bulbs, cerebral cortex, amygdala, hippocampus CA1-3 fields, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that addicsin was expressed in the somata of principal neurons in the CNS such as the pyramidal cells and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons scattered in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the protein showed pre-synaptic localization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 field of the hippocampal formation. Subcellular localization analysis of highly purified synaptic fractions prepared from mouse forebrain supported the cytoplasmic and pre-synaptic distribution of addicsin. These results suggest that addicsin has neural expression and may play crucial roles in the basic physiological functions of the mature CNS.

  17. Humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brain generated by neonatally engrafted human iPSC-derived primitive neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The creation of a humanized chimeric mouse nervous system permits the study of human neural development and disease pathogenesis using human cells in vivo. Humanized glial chimeric mice with the brain and spinal cord being colonized by human glial cells have been successfully generated. However, generation of humanized chimeric mouse brains repopulated by human neurons to possess a high degree of chimerism have not been well studied. Here we created humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brains by neonatally engrafting the distinct and highly neurogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived rosette-type primitive neural progenitors. These neural progenitors predominantly differentiate to neurons, which disperse widely throughout the mouse brain with infiltration of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 6 and 13 months after transplantation. Building upon the hiPSC technology, we propose that this potentially unique humanized neuronal chimeric mouse model will provide profound opportunities to define the structure, function, and plasticity of neural networks containing human neurons derived from a broad variety of neurological disorders. PMID:27882348

  18. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  19. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  20. Hypertensive encephalopathy presenting with isolated brain stem and cerebellar edema.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Chum, Florence; Choi, Jai

    2008-10-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache and confusion and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brain stem and cerebellar edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with these typical supratentorial changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here an uncommon hypertensive patient with isolated, severe, and symptomatic brain stem and cerebellar edema with fourth ventricular obstruction and mild hydrocephalus. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the cause and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients are crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression.

  1. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  2. Efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Emily; Ditzler, Sally; Lee, Donghoon; Richards, Andrew; Yagle, Kevin; Park, Joshua; Eslamy, Hedieh; Bobilev, Dmitri; Vrignaud, Patricia; Olson, James

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an unmet need in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors for chemotherapy that is efficacious, avoids damage to the developing brain, and crosses the blood-brain barrier. These experiments evaluated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors. Methods The antitumor activity of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were compared in flank and orthotopic xenograft models of patient-derived atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), medulloblastoma, and central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET). Efficacy of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were also assessed in the Smo/Smo spontaneous mouse medulloblastoma tumor model. Results This study observed significant tumor growth inhibition in pediatric patient-derived flank xenograft tumor models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET after treatment with either cabazitaxel or docetaxel. Cabazitaxel, but not docetaxel, treatment resulted in sustained tumor growth inhibition in the ATRT and medulloblastoma flank xenograft models. Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET showed significantly improved survival with treatment of cabazitaxel. Conclusion These data support further testing of cabazitaxel as a therapy for treating human pediatric brain tumors. PMID:25140037

  3. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  4. Human brain stem structures respond differentially to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH) with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by functional MRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). In a second experiment, we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e., the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  5. Dissecting integrin-dependent regulation of neural stem cell proliferation in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Porcheri, Cristina; Suter, Ueli; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2014-04-09

    Controlling neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation is critical to maintain neurogenesis in the mammalian brain throughout life. However, it remains poorly understood how niche-derived cues such as β1-integrin-mediated signaling are translated into NSPC-intrinsic molecular changes to regulate NSPC activity. Here we show that genetic deletion of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) increases NSPC proliferation through PINCH1/2-dependent enhancement of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activity in both neurogenic regions of the adult mouse brain. This effect downstream of ILK signaling is mediated through loss of Ras suppressor unit-1 (RSU-1), as virus-based reconstitution of RSU-1 expression rescued the ILK-dependent effects on NSPC proliferation. Thus, we here identified an intracellular signaling cascade linking extrinsic integrin-mediated signaling to NSPC proliferation and characterized a novel mechanism that regulates NSPC activity in the adult mammalian brain.

  6. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair.

    PubMed

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS.

  7. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. PMID:23827856

  8. Brain vascular pericytes following ischemia have multipotential stem cell activity to differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Kubo, Shuji; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Lu, Shan; Narita, Aya; Kawahara, Maiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2015-06-01

    Brain vascular pericytes (PCs) are a key component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit, along with neural and endothelial cells. Besides their crucial role in maintaining the BBB, increasing evidence shows that PCs have multipotential stem cell activity. However, their multipotency has not been considered in the pathological brain, such as after an ischemic stroke. Here, we examined whether brain vascular PCs following ischemia (iPCs) have multipotential stem cell activity and differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells to reconstruct the BBB/neurovascular unit. Using PCs extracted from ischemic regions (iPCs) from mouse brains and human brain PCs cultured under oxygen/glucose deprivation, we show that PCs developed stemness presumably through reprogramming. The iPCs revealed a complex phenotype of angioblasts, in addition to their original mesenchymal properties, and multidifferentiated into cells from both a neural and vascular lineage. These data indicate that under ischemic/hypoxic conditions, PCs can acquire multipotential stem cell activity and can differentiate into major components of the BBB/neurovascular unit. Thus, these findings support the novel concept that iPCs can contribute to both neurogenesis and vasculogenesis at the site of brain injuries.

  9. Stem cells for brain repair and recovery after stroke.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Ramos-Cejudo, Jaime; Otero-Ortega, Laura; Fuentes, Blanca; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is a major worldwide cause of death and disability. Currently, intravenous thrombolysis and reperfusion therapies, but not the so-called neuroprotectant drugs, have been shown to be effective for acute ischemic stroke. Thus, new strategies to promote brain plasticity are necessary. Stem cell administration is an attractive future therapeutic approach. Brain protection and repair mechanisms are activated after stroke. This article is focused on the capacity of stem cell-based therapy to enhance this postinfarct brain plasticity and recovery. Future therapeutic considerations and prospects for stroke are discussed. Although cell therapy is promising in stroke treatment, mechanisms of action need to be characterized in detail. Further, the different mechanisms of axonal plasticity and remodeling involucrated in brain repair, not only in the gray but also in white matter, must be investigated through noninvasive techniques, and a multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in this.

  10. Dynamic reorganization of intrinsic functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Preti, Maria Giulia; Bolton, Thomas A W; Buerge, Michaela; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rudin, Markus

    2017-03-14

    Functional connectivity (FC) derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) allows for the integrative study of neuronal processes at a macroscopic level. The majority of studies to date have assumed stationary interactions between brain regions, without considering the dynamic aspects of network organization. Only recently has the latter received increased attention, predominantly in human studies. Applying dynamic FC (dFC) analysis to mice is attractive given the relative simplicity of the mouse brain and the possibility to explore mechanisms underlying network dynamics using pharmacological, environmental or genetic interventions. Therefore, we have evaluated the feasibility and research potential of mouse dFC using the interventions of social stress or anesthesia duration as two case-study examples. By combining a sliding-window correlation approach with dictionary learning, several dynamic functional states (dFS) with a complex organization were identified, exhibiting highly dynamic inter- and intra-modular interactions. Each dFS displayed a high degree of reproducibility upon changes in analytical parameters and across datasets. They fluctuated at different degrees as a function of anesthetic depth, and were sensitive indicators of pathology as shown for the chronic psychosocial stress mouse model of depression. Dynamic functional states are proposed to make a major contribution to information integration and processing in the healthy and diseased brain.

  11. Differential gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem cells and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yinshan; Feng, Meiying; Liu, Shanshan; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xianwei; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Shouquan; Ma, Ningfang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) may be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells under in vitro culture conditions, due to epigenetic modifications, which are closely associated with the expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. Thus, this study was conducted to compare the gene expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors in mSSCs and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Firstly, the freshly isolated mSSCs [mSSCs (f)] were enriched by magnetic-activated cell sorting with Thy1.2 (CD90.2) microbeads, and the typical morphological characteristics were maintained under in vitro culture conditions for over 5 months to form long-term propagated mSSCs [mSSCs (l)]. These mSSCs (l) expressed pluripotency-associated genes and were induced to differentiate into sperm. Our findings indicated that the mSSCs (l) expressed high levels of the transcription factors, Lin28 and Prmt5, and the epigenetic factors, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1, in comparison with the mESCs, with the levels of Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1 and Tert significantly higher than those in the mESCs. There was no significant difference in Kdm2b expression between mSSCs (l) and mESCs. Furthermore, the gene expression of N-Myc, Dppa2, Tbx3, Nr5a2, Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1 in the mSSCs (l) was markedly higher in comparison to that in the mSSCs (f). Collectively, our results suggest that the mSSCs and the mESCs displayed differential gene expression profiles, and the mSSCs possessed the potential to acquire pluripotency based on the high expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. These data may provide novel insights into the reprogramming mechanism of mSSCs. PMID:27353491

  12. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  13. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A symmetrical Waxholm canonical mouse brain for NeuroMaps

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Douglas M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Zaborsky, Laszlo; Green, William D.K.; Moore, Eider; Badea, Alexandra; Dubach, Mark F.; Bookstein, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    NeuroMaps (2009) is a web-based application that enables investigators to map data from macaque studies to a canonical atlas of the macaque brain. It includes an image processor enabling one to create figures suitable for publication. Eventually it will enable investigators studying several species to analyze overlap between their data and multimodality data mapped by others. The purpose of this project was to incorporate the Waxholm canonical mouse brain (Hawrylycz, 2009) into NeuroMaps. An enhanced gradient echo (T2*) magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the Waxholm brain (Johnson et al., 2010) was warped to bring the irregular biological midplane of the MRI into line with the mathematically flat midsagittal plane of Waxholm space. The left hemisphere was deleted and the right reflected to produce a symmetrical 3D MRI. The symmetrical T2* image was imported into NeuroMaps. The map executing the warp was applied to four other voxellated volumes based on the same specimen and maintained at the Center for In-Vitro Microscopy (CIVM): a T2-weighted MRI, a T1 weighted MRI, a segmented image and an image reconstructed from Nissl-stained histological sections. Symmetric versions of those images were submitted to the CIVM repository where they are available to other laboratories. Utility of the symmetric atlas was demonstrated by mapping and comparing a cortical areas illustrated in three conventional mouse brain atlases. The symmetric Waxholm mouse brain atlas is now accessible in NeuroMaps. Investigators can map image data to standard templates over the Web and process them for publication, presentation and archival purposes: http://braininfo.rprc.washington.edu/MapViewData.aspx. PMID:21163300

  15. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  16. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  17. Decreased Contact Inhibition in Mouse Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yunmi; Lee, Myung Sook; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of embryonic cells or adult stem cells in tissue is critically regulated during development and repair. How limited the proliferation of cells, so far, is not much explored. Cell-cell contact proliferation inhibition is known as a crucial mechanism regulating cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In this study we examined the characters of mouse subcutaneous adipose derived stem cells (msADSC) whether they lost or get contact inhibition during in vitro culture. The characters of msADSC growth after confluence were analyzed using confocal microscope and the expression profiles of contact inhibition related genes were analyzed according to the morphological changes using real-time PCR method. msADSC showed overlapping growth between them but not after passage 14. The cell shapes were also changed after passage 14. The expression profiles of genes which are involved in contact inhibition were modified in the msADSC after passage 14. The differentiation ability of msADSCs to adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteocyte was not changed by such changes of gene expression profiles. Based on these results, it is revealed that smADSC were characterized by getting of strong cell-cell contact inhibition after passage 14 but the proliferation and developmental ability were not blocked by the change of cell-cell contact proliferation inhibition. These finding will help to understand the growth of adipose tissue, although further studies are needed to evaluate the physiological meaning of the cell-cell contact proliferation inhibition during in vitro culture of msADSC. PMID:25949108

  18. Hematopoietic stem cells do not repair the infarcted mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Deten, Alexander; Volz, Hans Christian; Clamors, Sören; Leiblein, Sabine; Briest, Wilfried; Marx, Grit; Zimmer, Heinz-Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can transdifferentiate into cardiomyoctes and contribute to myocardial regeneration after injury. This concept has recently been challenged by studies in which bone-marrow (BM)-derived cells do not acquire a cardiac phenotype after direct injection into ischemic myocardium. In this study, we analyzed the effect of increased circulating adult BM cells by stimulation with stem cell factor (SCF; 200 microg/kg/d for 7 days) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, 50 microg/kg/d for 7 days) or by peripheral delivery of isolated adult BM cells on morphological and hemodynamic parameters of mouse hearts 6 weeks after induction of chronic myocardial infarction (MI). All animals were splenectomized to prevent sequestration of BM cells 2 weeks prior to the induction of MI. Cytokine treatment was initiated either 3 days prior to or 6 h after MI. Isolated, either whole or by magnetic beads lineage-depleted BM cells were injected via a tail vein 6 h after MI. Left and right ventricular (LV and RV) function revealed no improvement in any treatment group when compared to untreated MI animals at baseline resting conditions as well as after stimulation with norepinephrine (NE; 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ng bolus i.v. in 10 microl each) as measured by catherization with ultraminiature 1.4 F tip pressure transducers 6 weeks after MI. Moreover, there was no sign of myocardial regeneration in histological or gene expression analyses. Mobilization or i.v. injection of BM cells do not have a measurable effect on cardiac regeneration.

  19. Confounding Brain Stem Function During Pediatric Brain Death Determination: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gregory; Joffe, Ari R

    2017-06-01

    A patient who has been declared brain dead is considered to be both legally and clinically dead. However, we report 2 pediatric cases in which the patients demonstrated clinical signs of brain stem function that are not recognized or tested in current Canadian or US guidelines.

  20. A cautionary tale: how to delete mouse haemopoietic stem cells with busulphan.

    PubMed

    Jopling, C; Rosendaal, M

    2001-06-01

    In this study treating mice with the 'correct' dose of busulphan did not necessarily destroy all haematopoietic stem cells. In certain circumstances host stem cells survived undetected and subsequently resumed haemopoiesis. This may apply to the use of busulphan clinically. We found that the following conditions determined the deletion of mouse stem cells using busulphan: (1) graft size--grafting more than 106 marrow cells ( approximately 0.3% of the animal's stem cells) concealed the survival of stem cells; (2) dose of busulphan--insufficient busulphan did not kill all host stem cells; (3) old or improperly stored busulphan failed to delete all host stem cells; furthermore (4) the survival of host stem cells should be assessed by typing many kinds of circulating cells; and (5) tests should be carried out to determine if busulphan has killed all host stem cells by typing circulating blood cells at appropriate intervals.

  1. Human Stem Cells Can Differentiate in Post-implantation Mouse Embryos.

    PubMed

    Tam, Patrick P L

    2016-01-07

    The potency of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to differentiate into germ layer derivatives is conventionally assessed by teratoma induction and in vitro differentiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Mascetti and Pedersen (2016) demonstrate that the human-mouse post-implantation chimera offers an efficient avenue to test the germ layer differentiation potential of hPSCs in mouse embryos ex vivo.

  2. Recent Progress in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Embryonic and Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic control mechanisms of mammalian brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool to characterize changes in brain anatomy in mutant mouse strains and injury progression in mouse models of fetal and neonatal brain injury. Progress in the last decade has enabled us to acquire MRI data with increasing anatomical details from the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain. High-resolution ex vivo MRI, especially with advanced diffusion MRI methods, can visualize complex microstructural organizations in the developing mouse brain. In vivo MRI of the embryonic mouse brain, which is critical for tracking anatomical changes longitudinally, has become available. Applications of these techniques may lead to further insights into the complex and dynamic processes of brain development. PMID:26973471

  3. Omics analysis of mouse brain models of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Loriod, Béatrice; Villard, Claude; Buee, Luc; Blum, David; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Cho, Yoon H; Gory-Faure, Sylvie; Mansour, Elodie; Gharbi, Ali; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2017-02-05

    The identification of common gene/protein profiles related to brain alterations, if they exist, may indicate the convergence of the pathogenic mechanisms driving brain disorders. Six genetically engineered mouse lines modelling neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders were considered. Omics approaches, including transcriptomic and proteomic methods, were used. The gene/protein lists were used for inter-disease comparisons and further functional and network investigations. When the inter-disease comparison was performed using the gene symbol identifiers, the number of genes/proteins involved in multiple diseases decreased rapidly. Thus, no genes/proteins were shared by all 6 mouse models. Only one gene/protein (Gfap) was shared among 4 disorders, providing strong evidence that a common molecular signature does not exist among brain diseases. The inter-disease comparison of functional processes showed the involvement of a few major biological processes indicating that brain diseases of diverse aetiologies might utilize common biological pathways in the nervous system, without necessarily involving similar molecules.

  4. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation. PMID:26694615

  5. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-02-12

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation.

  6. Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Christopher J; Carpenter, Austin B; Waitkus, Matthew S; Wang, Catherine Y; Zhu, Huishan; Hansen, Landon J; Chen, Lee H; Greer, Paula K; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yu; Bock, Cheryl B; Fan, Ping; Spasojevic, Ivan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2017-02-01

    IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo, Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. Additionally, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell of origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. Additionally, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1-mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy.

  7. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  8. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior–posterior, dorsal–ventral and medial– lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. Database URL: http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. PMID:25145340

  9. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial- lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. TSH stimulates adipogenesis in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Although TSH is the main regulator of thyroid growth and function, TSH binding activity in fat has long been reported. Since the TSH receptor (TSHR) has been detected in both preadipocytes and adipocytes, we hypothesized that it may play a role in adipose differentiation. Here, we use an in vitro model of adipogenesis from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to define TSH function. Directed differentiation of ES cells into the adipose lineage can be achieved over a 3-week period. Although adipocyte differentiation is initiated early in the development of cultured ES cells, TSHR up-regulation is precisely correlated with terminal differentiation of those adipocytes. The adipocytes express TSHR on the cell surface and respond to TSH with increased intracellular cAMP production, suggesting the activation of the protein kinase A signaling pathway. To determine whether TSH impacts adipogenesis, we examined how adipocytes responded to TSH at various points during their differentiation from cultured ES cells. We found that TSH greatly increases adipogenesis when added in the presence of adipogenic factors. More importantly, our data suggest that TSH also stimulates adipogenesis in cultured ES cells even in the absence of adipogenic factors. This finding provides the first evidence of TSH being a pro-adipogenic factor that converts ES cells into adipocytes. It further highlights the potential of ES cells as a model system for use in the study of TSH’s role in the regulation of physiologically relevant adipose tissue. PMID:18180327

  11. Mutator phenotype of MUTYH-null mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seiki; Tominaga, Yohei; Ichinoe, Akimasa; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Honda-Ohnishi, Yoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2003-10-03

    To evaluate the antimutagenic role of a mammalian mutY homolog, namely the Mutyh gene, which encodes adenine DNA glycosylase excising adenine misincorporated opposite 8-oxoguanine in the template DNA, we generated MUTYH-null mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In the MUTYH-null cells carrying no adenine DNA glycosylase activity, the spontaneous mutation rate increased 2-fold in comparison with wild type cells. The expression of wild type mMUTYH or mutant mMUTYH protein with amino acid substitutions at the proliferating cell nuclear antigen binding motif restored the increased spontaneous mutation rates of the MUTYH-null ES cells to the wild type level. The expression of a mutant mMUTYH protein with an amino acid substitution (G365D) that corresponds to a germ-line mutation (G382D) found in patients with multiple colorectal adenomas could not suppress the elevated spontaneous mutation rate of the MUTYH-null ES cells. Although the recombinant mMUTYH(G365D) purified from Escherichia coli cells had a substantial level of adenine DNA glycosylase activity as did wild type MUTYH, no adenine DNA glycosylase activity was detected in the MUTYH-null ES cells expressing the mMUTYH(G365D) mutant protein. The germ-line mutation (G382D) of the human MUTYH gene is therefore likely to be responsible for the occurrence of a mutator phenotype in these patients.

  12. Label-free structural photoacoustic tomography of intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Capitalizing on endogenous hemoglobin contrast, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a deep-tissue highresolution imaging modality, has drawn increasing interest in neuro-imaging. However, most existing studies are limited to functional imaging on the cortical surface, and the deep-brain structural imaging capability of PACT has never been demonstrated. Here, we explicitly studied the limiting factors of deep-brain PACT imaging. We found that the skull distorted the acoustic signal and blood suppressed the structural contrast from other chromophores. When the two effects are mitigated, PACT can provide high-resolution label-free structural imaging through the entire mouse brain. With 100 μm in-plane resolution, we can clearly identify major structures of the brain, and the image quality is comparable to that of magnetic resonance microscopy. Spectral PACT studies indicate that structural contrasts mainly originate from cytochrome and lipid. The feasibility of imaging the structure of the brain in vivo has also been discussed. Our results demonstrate that PACT is a promising modality for both structural and functional brain imaging.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation aggravates irradiation-induced injury to the young mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Roughton, Karolina; Andreasson, Ulf; Blomgren, Klas; Kalm, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment strategy in the treatment of brain tumors, but it is also a major cause of long-term complications, especially in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Cognitive decline caused by cranial radiotherapy is thought, at least partly, to depend on injury to stem and progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. This study investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation at the time of irradiation (IR) in the growing mouse brain. A single injection of LPS (0.3 mg/kg) was administered 24 h prior to cranial IR of 14-day-old male mice. LPS pretreatment increased the levels of the chemokine CCL2 and the cytokine IL-1β in the brain by 440 and 560%, respectively, compared to IR alone. IR disrupted hippocampal neurogenesis and the growth of the dentate gyrus, and the mice pretreated with LPS displayed an even more pronounced lack of growth than the vehicle-treated group 2 months after IR. The density of microglia was not affected, but LPS-pretreated mice displayed 48% fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells and 43% fewer doublecortin-positive cells in the granule cell layer 2 months after IR compared with the vehicle-treated group. In conclusion, an ongoing inflammation in the brain at the time of IR further enhanced the IR-induced loss of neurogenesis, and may aggravate future cognitive deficits in patients treated with cranial radiotherapy.

  14. Development of an invitro technique to use mouse embryonic stem cell in evaluating effects of xenobiotics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal has been to develop a high-throughput, in vitro technique for evaluating the effects of xenobiotics using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We began with the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST), which is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combin...

  15. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  16. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  17. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  18. Development of an invitro technique to use mouse embryonic stem cell in evaluating effects of xenobiotics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal has been to develop a high-throughput, in vitro technique for evaluating the effects of xenobiotics using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We began with the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST), which is used to predict the embryotoxic potential of a test compound by combin...

  19. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  20. The magnetism responsive gene Ntan1 in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuaki; Taniura, Hideo; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hirai, Takao; Sanada, Noriko; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    We have previously identified Ntan1 as a magnetism response gene by differential display screening in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Ntan1 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all the mouse tissues examined but relatively abundant in brain, retina and testis. Ntan1 mRNA expression was detectable in the embryonic 12-day mouse brain and gradually increased with ageing. In situ hybridization analysis showed high localization of Ntan1 mRNA in pyramidal cell layer of CA region and granular cell layer of dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, and Purkinje and granular cell layers in the cerebellum, respectively. Ntan1 mRNA expression was significantly increased about two-fold 12 h after brief exposure for 15 min to magnetism at 100 mT with a gradual decrease thereafter in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When embryonic 12-day-old or newborn mice were successively exposed to magnetic fields at 100 mT for 2 h, four times per day until the postnatal seventh day, Ntan1 mRNA was significantly increased about 1.5-2-fold in the hippocampus in vivo. The mice exposed to magnetic fields under the same condition showed significantly decreased locomotor activity. These results suggest that magnetic exposure affects higher order neural functions through modulation of genes expression.

  1. Sesamin attenuates neurotoxicity in mouse model of ischemic brain stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Haque, Rizwanul; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Ishrat, Tauheed; Shah, Zahoor A; Khan, Mohammad M; Ali, Mehboob; Jamal, Arshad; Katare, Deepshikha Pande; Liou, Gregory I; Bhatia, Kanchan

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a severe neurological disorder characterized by the abrupt loss of blood circulation into the brain resulting into wide ranging brain and behavior abnormalities. The present study was designed to evaluate molecular mechanism by which sesamin (SES) induces neuroprotection in mouse model of ischemic stroke. The results of this study demonstrate that SES treatment (30 mg/kg bwt) significantly reduced infarction volume, lipid per-oxidation, cleaved-caspase-3 activation, and increased GSH activity following MCAO in adult male mouse. SES treatment also diminished iNOS and COX-2 protein expression, and significantly restored SOD activity and protein expression level in the ischemic cortex of the MCAO animals. Furthermore, SES treatment also significantly reduced inflammatory and oxidative stress markers including Iba1, Nox-2, Cox-2, peroxynitrite compared to placebo MCAO animals. Superoxide radical production, as studied by DHE staining method, was also significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SES treated compared to placebo MCAO animals. Likewise, downstream effects of superoxide free radicals i.e. MAPK/ERK and P38 activation was also significantly attenuated in SES treated compared to placebo MCAO animals. In conclusion, these results suggest that SES induces significant neuroprotection, by ameliorating many signaling pathways activated/deactivated following cerebral ischemia in adult mouse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous brain repair after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Horie, Nobutaka; Hiu, Takeshi; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment has been a promising therapy in small and large animal models, and many clinical trials are ongoing to establish this strategy in a clinical setting. However, the mechanism underlying functional recovery after stem cell transplantation has not been fully established and there is still a need to determine the ideal subset of stem cells for such therapy. We herein reviewed the recent evidences showing the underlying mechanism of functional recovery after cell transplantation, focusing on endogenous brain repair. First, angiogenesis/neovascularization is promoted by trophic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor secreted from stem cells, and stem cells migrated to the lesion along with the vessels. Second, axonal sprouting, dendritic branching, and synaptogenesis were enhanced altogether in the both ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere remapping the pyramidal tract across the board. Finally, endogenous neurogenesis was also enhanced although little is known how much these neurogenesis contribute to the functional recovery. Taken together, it is clear that stem cell transplantation provides functional recovery via endogenous repair enhancement from multiple ways. This is important to maximize the effect of stem cell therapy after stroke, although it is still undetermined which repair mechanism is mostly contributed.

  3. Systemic Stimulation of TLR2 Impairs Neonatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongfu; D'angelo, Barbara; Sun, Yanyan; Zhu, Changlian; Hagberg, Henrik; Levy, Ofer; Mallard, Carina; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation is associated with perinatal brain injury but the underlying mechanisms are not completely characterized. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) through specific agonists induces inflammatory responses that trigger both innate and adaptive immune responses. The impact of engagement of TLR2 signaling pathways on the neonatal brain is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of a TLR2 agonist on neonatal brain development. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) once a day from postnatal day (PND) 3 to PND11 with endotoxin-free saline, a TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 (5 mg/kg) or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.3 mg/kg). Pups were sacrificed at PND12 or PND53 and brain, spleen and liver were collected and weighed. Brain sections were stained for brain injury markers. Long-term effects on memory function were assessed using the Trace Fear Conditioning test at PND50. After 9 days of Pam3CSK4 administration, we found a decreased volume of cerebral gray matter, white matter in the forebrain and cerebellar molecular layer that was accompanied by an increase in spleen and liver weight at PND12. Such effects were not observed in Pam3CSK4-treated TLR 2-deficient mice. Pam3CSK4-treated mice also displayed decreased hippocampus neuronal density, and increased cerebral microglia density, while there was no effect on caspase-3 or general cell proliferation at PND12. Significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-6, KC, and MCP-1 were detected after the first Pam3CSK4 injection in brain homogenates of PND3 mice. Pam3CSK4 administration did not affect long-term memory function nor the volume of gray or white matter. Conclusions/Significance Repeated systemic exposure to the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 can have a short-term negative impact on the neonatal mouse brain. PMID:21573120

  4. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  5. Identification of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Clarke, Ian D; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Bonn, Victoria E; Hawkins, Cynthia; Squire, Jeremy; Dirks, Peter B

    2003-09-15

    Most current research on human brain tumors is focused on the molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, there is overwhelming evidence in some malignancies that the tumor clone is heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. In human leukemia, the tumor clone is organized as a hierarchy that originates from rare leukemic stem cells that possess extensive proliferative and self-renewal potential, and are responsible for maintaining the tumor clone. We report here the identification and purification of a cancer stem cell from human brain tumors of different phenotypes that possesses a marked capacity for proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. The increased self-renewal capacity of the brain tumor stem cell (BTSC) was highest from the most aggressive clinical samples of medulloblastoma compared with low-grade gliomas. The BTSC was exclusively isolated with the cell fraction expressing the neural stem cell surface marker CD133. These CD133+ cells could differentiate in culture into tumor cells that phenotypically resembled the tumor from the patient. The identification of a BTSC provides a powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the central nervous system and to develop therapies targeted to the BTSC.

  6. The deubiquitinase USP21 maintains the stemness of mouse embryonic stem cells via stabilization of Nanog

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiali; Liu, Jian; Chen, Cong; Liu, Zhenping; Jiang, Cong; Chu, Hongshang; Pan, Weijuan; Wang, Xinbo; Zhang, Lingqiang; Li, Bin; Jiang, Cizhong; Ge, Xin; Xie, Xin; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Nanog is a master pluripotency factor of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Stable expression of Nanog is essential to maintain the stemness of ESCs. However, Nanog is a short-lived protein and quickly degraded by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome system. Here we report that the deubiquitinase USP21 interacts with, deubiquitinates and stabilizes Nanog, and therefore maintains the protein level of Nanog in mouse ESCs (mESCs). Loss of USP21 results in Nanog degradation, mESCs differentiation and reduces somatic cell reprogramming efficiency. USP21 is a transcriptional target of the LIF/STAT3 pathway and is downregulated upon differentiation. Moreover, differentiation cues promote ERK-mediated phosphorylation and dissociation of USP21 from Nanog, thus leading to Nanog degradation. In addition, USP21 is recruited to gene promoters by Nanog to deubiquitinate histone H2A at K119 and thus facilitates Nanog-mediated gene expression. Together, our findings provide a regulatory mechanism by which extrinsic signals regulate mESC fate via deubiquitinating Nanog. PMID:27886188

  7. Human and mouse adipose-derived cells support feeder-independent induction of pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugii, Shigeki; Kida, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Suzuki, Jotaro; Vassena, Rita; Yin, Yun-Qiang; Lutz, Margaret K.; Berggren, W. Travis; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Evans, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Although adipose tissue is an expandable and readily attainable source of proliferating, multipotent stem cells, its potential for use in regenerative medicine has not been extensively explored. Here we report that adult human and mouse adipose-derived stem cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with substantially higher efficiencies than those reported for human and mouse fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, both human and mouse iPS cells can be obtained in feeder-free conditions. We discovered that adipose-derived stem cells intrinsically express high levels of pluripotency factors such as basic FGF, TGFβ, fibronectin, and vitronectin and can serve as feeders for both autologous and heterologous pluripotent cells. These results demonstrate a great potential for adipose-derived cells in regenerative therapeutics and as a model for studying the molecular mechanisms of feeder-free iPS generation and maintenance. PMID:20133714

  8. Distribution of orexin-1 receptor-green fluorescent protein- (OX1-GFP) expressing neurons in the mouse brain stem and pons: Co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Darwinkel, A; Stanić, D; Booth, L C; May, C N; Lawrence, A J; Yao, S T

    2014-10-10

    We used a reporter mouse line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into the orexin-1 receptor (OX1) locus to systematically map the neuroanatomical distribution of the OX1 receptor in the mouse brainstem and pons. Here, we show that the OX1 receptor is expressed in a select subset of medullary and pontine nuclei. In the medulla, we observed OX1-GFP expression in the cuneate, gracile, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (10N), nucleus of the solitary tract and medullary raphe areas. In the pons, the greatest expression was found in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). High to moderate expression was found in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, A5 noradrenergic cell group (A5) and the periaqueductal gray. Double-labeling with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) revealed extensive co-localization in cell bodies and fibers of the 10N, A5 cell group and the PPTg. Double-staining with tyrosine hydroxylase revealed extensive co-expression in the LC, DRN and the lateral paragigantocellularis cell group in the ventral medulla. Our findings faithfully recapitulate the findings of OX1 mRNA expression previously reported. This is the first study to systematically map the neuroanatomical distribution of OX1 receptors within the mouse hindbrain and suggest that this OX1-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line might be a useful tool with which to study the neuroanatomy and physiology of OX1 receptor-expressing cells. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances, J.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 Tesla. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately two hours. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI based mouse brain atlas. PMID:23769916

  10. Chemoselective imaging of mouse brain tissue via multiplex CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohling, Christoph; Buckup, Tiago; Pagenstecher, Axel; Motzkus, Marcus

    2011-08-01

    The fast and reliable characterization of pathological tissue is a debated topic in the application of vibrational spectroscopy in medicine. In the present work we apply multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) to the investigation of fresh mouse brain tissue. The combination of imaginary part extraction followed by principal component analysis led to color contrast between grey and white matter as well as layers of granule and Purkinje cells. Additional quantitative information was obtained by using a decomposition algorithm. The results perfectly agree with HE stained references slides prepared separately making multiplex CARS an ideal approach for chemoselective imaging.

  11. Specialized mouse embryonic stem cells for studying vascular development.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Drew E; Burns, Andrew B; Hatano, Rachel; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; McCloskey, Kara E

    2014-01-01

    Vascular progenitor cells are desirable in a variety of therapeutic strategies; however, the lineage commitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cell from a common progenitor is not well-understood. Here, we report the generation of the first dual reporter mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines designed to facilitate the study of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle development in vitro. These mESC lines express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the endothelial promoter, Tie-2, and Discomsoma sp. red fluorescent protein (RFP) under the promoter for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). The lines were then characterized for morphology, marker expression, and pluripotency. The mESC colonies were found to exhibit dome-shaped morphology, alkaline phosphotase activity, as well as expression of Oct 3/4 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. The mESC colonies were also found to display normal karyotypes and are able to generate cells from all three germ layers, verifying pluripotency. Tissue staining confirmed the coexpression of VE (vascular endothelial)-cadherin with the Tie-2 GFP+ expression on endothelial structures and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain with the α-SMA RFP+ smooth muscle cells. Lastly, it was verified that the developing mESC do express Tie-2 GFP+ and α-SMA RFP+ cells during differentiation and that the GFP+ cells colocalize with the vascular-like structures surrounded by α-SMA-RFP cells. These dual reporter vascular-specific mESC permit visualization and cell tracking of individual endothelial and smooth muscle cells over time and in multiple dimensions, a powerful new tool for studying vascular development in real time.

  12. Chick embryos can form teratomas from microinjected mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Seiki; Matsubara, Yuko; Hosoe, Misa

    2016-02-01

    We examined whether chick embryos are a suitable experimental model for the evaluation of pluripotency of stem cells. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) expressing the reporter gene, LacZ or GFP were injected into the subgerminal cavity of blastoderms (freshly oviposited) or the marginal vein of chick embryos (2 days of incubation). Injected mESCs were efficiently incorporated into the body and extra-embryonic tissues of chick embryos and formed small clusters. Increased donor cell numbers injected were positively associated with the efficiency of chimera production, but with lower viability. A single mESC injected into the blastoderm proliferated into 34.7 ± 3.8 cells in 3 days, implying that the chick embryo provides an optimal environment for the growth of xenogenic cells. In the embryo body, mESCs were interspersed as small clustered chimeras in various tissues. Teratomas were observed in the yolk sac and the brain with three germ layers. In the yolk sac, clusters of mESCs gradually increased in volume and exhibited varied morphology such as a water balloon-like or dark-red solid mass. However, mESCs in the brain developed into a large soft tissue mass of whitish color and showed a tendency to differentiate into ectodermal lineage cells, including primitive neural ectodermal and neuronal cells expressing the neurofilament protein. These results indicate that chick embryos are useful for the teratoma formation assays of mESCs and have a broad-range potential as an experimental host model.

  13. Neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Thumanu, Kanjana; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Parnpai, Rangsun; Heraud, Philip

    2010-04-01

    Embryonic Stem-derived Neural Cells (ESNCs) hold potential as a source of neurons for a cell-based therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and other neurological diseases and disorders in the future. The sorting of neural cell types is envisaged to be one of the most important processed for clinical application of these cells in cell-based therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, laboratory-based FTIR and Synchrotron-FTIR (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy were used to identify FTIR marker for distinguishing different neural cell types derived from the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Unsupervised Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (UHCA) were shown to be able to distinguish the developmental stage of mESCs into three cell types: embryoid bodies (EBs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), and ESNCs. Moreover, PCA provided the mean for identifying potential FTIR "marker bands" that underwent dramatic changes during stem cell differentiation along neural lineages. These appeared to be associated with changes in lipids (bands from CH 2 and CH 3 stretching vibrations at ˜2959, 2923 and 2852 cm -1) and proteins (changes in the amide I band at ˜1659 and 1637 cm -1). The results suggested that lipid content of cells increased significantly over the time of differentiation, suggesting increased expression of glycerophospholipids. Changes in the amide I profile, suggested concomitant increases in α-helix rich proteins as mESCs differentiated towards ESNCs, with a corresponding decrease in β-sheet rich proteins, corresponding with changes in cytoskeleton protein which may have been taking place involved with the establishment of neural structure and function.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Deeb, George; Rahal, Rahaf; Atwi, Khairallah; Mondello, Stefania; Marei, Hany Elsayed; Gali, Amr; Sleiman, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a disruption in the normal function of the brain due to an injury following a trauma, which can potentially cause severe physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. The primary insult to the brain initiates secondary injury cascades consisting of multiple complex biochemical responses of the brain that significantly influence the overall severity of the brain damage and clinical sequelae. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers huge potential for application in the treatment of TBI. MSCs have immunosuppressive properties that reduce inflammation in injured tissue. As such, they could be used to modulate the secondary mechanisms of injury and halt the progression of the secondary insult in the brain after injury. Particularly, MSCs are capable of secreting growth factors that facilitate the regrowth of neurons in the brain. The relative abundance of harvest sources of MSCs also makes them particularly appealing. Recently, numerous studies have investigated the effects of infusion of MSCs into animal models of TBI. The results have shown significant improvement in the motor function of the damaged brain tissues. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI. The review starts with a brief introduction of the pathophysiology of TBI, followed by the biology of MSCs, and the application of MSCs in TBI treatment. The challenges associated with the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI and strategies to address those challenges in the future have also been discussed.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Anwarul; Deeb, George; Rahal, Rahaf; Atwi, Khairallah; Mondello, Stefania; Marei, Hany Elsayed; Gali, Amr; Sleiman, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a disruption in the normal function of the brain due to an injury following a trauma, which can potentially cause severe physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. The primary insult to the brain initiates secondary injury cascades consisting of multiple complex biochemical responses of the brain that significantly influence the overall severity of the brain damage and clinical sequelae. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers huge potential for application in the treatment of TBI. MSCs have immunosuppressive properties that reduce inflammation in injured tissue. As such, they could be used to modulate the secondary mechanisms of injury and halt the progression of the secondary insult in the brain after injury. Particularly, MSCs are capable of secreting growth factors that facilitate the regrowth of neurons in the brain. The relative abundance of harvest sources of MSCs also makes them particularly appealing. Recently, numerous studies have investigated the effects of infusion of MSCs into animal models of TBI. The results have shown significant improvement in the motor function of the damaged brain tissues. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI. The review starts with a brief introduction of the pathophysiology of TBI, followed by the biology of MSCs, and the application of MSCs in TBI treatment. The challenges associated with the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI and strategies to address those challenges in the future have also been discussed. PMID:28265255

  16. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  17. Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; Park, Jinkyu; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of labile low-molecular-mass (LMM, defined as < 10 kDa) metal complexes in cells and super-cellular structures such as the brain has been inferred from chelation studies, but direct evidence is lacking. To evaluate the presence of LMM metal complexes in the brain, supernatant fractions of fresh mouse brain homogenates were passed through a 10 kDa cutoff membrane and subjected to size-exclusion liquid chromatography under anaerobic refrigerated conditions. Fractions were monitored for Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, S and P using an on-line ICP-MS. At least 30 different LMM metal complexes were detected along with numerous P- and S- containing species. Reproducibility was assessed by performing the experiment 13 times, using different buffers, and by examining whether complexes changed with time. Eleven Co, 2 Cu, 5 Mn, 4 Mo, 3 Fe and 2 Zn complexes with molecular masses < 4 kDa were detected. One LMM Mo complex comigrated with the molybdopterin cofactor. Most Cu and Zn complexes appeared to be protein-bound with masses ranging from 4 – 20 kDa. Co was the only metal for which the “free” or aqueous complex was reproducibly observed. Aqueous Co may be sufficiently stable in this environment due to its relatively slow water-exchange kinetics. Attempts were made to assign some of these complexes, but further efforts will be required to identify them unambiguously and to determine their functions. This is among the first studies to detect low-molecular-mass transition metal complexes in the mouse brain using LC-ICP-MS. PMID:23443205

  18. Brain tissue banking for stem cells for our future

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Emily; Palmero, Sheryl; Murrell, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    In our lab we study neurogenesis and the development of brain tumors. We work towards treatment strategies for glioblastoma and towards using autologous neural stem cells for tissue regeneration strategies for brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders. It has been our policy to try to establish living cell cultures from all human biopsy material that we obtain. We hypothesized that small pieces of brain tissue could be cryopreserved and that live neural stem cells could be recovered at a later time. DMSO has been shown to possess a remarkable ability to diffuse through cell membranes and pass into cell interiors. Its chemical properties prevent the formation of damaging ice crystals thus allowing cell storage at or below −180 C. We report here a protocol for successful freezing of small pieces of tissue derived from human brain and human brain tumours. Virtually all specimens could be successfully revived. Assays of phenotype and behaviour show that the cell cultures derived were equivalent to those cultures previously derived from fresh tissue. PMID:27991551

  19. Divergent and nonuniform gene expression patterns in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John A.; Royall, Joshua J.; Bertagnolli, Darren; Boe, Andrew F.; Burnell, Josh J.; Byrnes, Emi J.; Copeland, Cathy; Desta, Tsega; Fischer, Shanna R.; Goldy, Jeff; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Kidney, Jolene M.; Lemon, Tracy; Orta, Geralyn J.; Parry, Sheana E.; Pathak, Sayan D.; Pearson, Owen C.; Reding, Melissa; Shapouri, Sheila; Smith, Kimberly A.; Soden, Chad; Solan, Beth M.; Weller, John; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding variations in gene sequence and expression level associated with phenotype, yet how genetic diversity translates into complex phenotypic differences remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the relationship between genetic background and spatial patterns of gene expression across seven strains of mice, providing the most extensive cellular-resolution comparative analysis of gene expression in the mammalian brain to date. Using comprehensive brainwide anatomic coverage (more than 200 brain regions), we applied in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial expression patterns of 49 genes encoding well-known pharmaceutical drug targets. Remarkably, over 50% of the genes examined showed interstrain expression variation. In addition, the variability was nonuniformly distributed across strain and neuroanatomic region, suggesting certain organizing principles. First, the degree of expression variance among strains mirrors genealogic relationships. Second, expression pattern differences were concentrated in higher-order brain regions such as the cortex and hippocampus. Divergence in gene expression patterns across the brain could contribute significantly to variations in behavior and responses to neuroactive drugs in laboratory mouse strains and may help to explain individual differences in human responsiveness to neuroactive drugs. PMID:20956311

  20. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  1. [New aspects of Wallenberg syndrome and other brain stem infarctions].

    PubMed

    Norrving, Bo; Hydén, Dag

    2004-09-02

    Studies with MRI and non-invasive vascular imaging have modified previous conceptions on clinical spectrum and causes of different types of brain stem infarcts. Wallenberg's syndrome caused by lateral medullary infarction (LMI) often presents with patterns of sensory loss different from the "classical" crossed type. LMI carries a risk for respiratory and cardiovascular complications in the acute phase, warranting close patient monitoring. Medial medullary infarcts often present with a lacunar syndrome mimicking capsular or pontine small vessel disease. Cerebellar infarcts are most often caused by cardiac embolism. Isolated vertigo may be the only presenting symptom. Neurosurgical intervention of expansive cerebellar infarcts may be life-saving. Clinical features of progressive multifocal brain-stem symptoms are often suggestive of basilar artery occlusion. CT-angiography is a useful initial diagnostic tool. Based on observational studies, intraarterial thrombolysis is used in selected patients with basilar artery occlusion, but further studies are needed to define treatment criteria more precisely.

  2. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI.

    PubMed

    Uchino, A; Hasuo, K; Uchida, K; Matsumoto, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohno, M; Masuda, K

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla.

  3. Pleiotropic effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lavandera, Jimena; Rodríguez, Jorge; Ruspini, Silvina; Meiss, Roberto; Zuccoli, Johanna Romina; Martínez, María Del Carmen; Gerez, Esther; Batlle, Alcira; Buzaleh, Ana María

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) seems to be responsible for the neuropsychiatric manifestations of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Our aim was to study the effect of ALA on the different metabolic pathways in the mouse brain to enhance our knowledge about the action of this heme precursor on the central nervous system. Heme metabolism, the cholinergic system, the defense enzyme system, and nitric oxide metabolism were evaluated in the encephalon of CF-1 mice receiving a single (40 mg/kg body mass) or multiple doses of ALA (40 mg/kg, every 48 h for 14 days). We subsequently found ALA accumulation in the encephalon of the mice. ALA also altered the brain cholinergic system. After one dose of ALA, a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity and a reduction in glutathione levels were detected, whereas malondialdehyde levels and catalase activity were increased. Heme oxygenase was also increased as an antioxidant response to protect the encephalon against injury. All nitric oxide synthase isoforms were induced by ALA, these changes were more significant for the inducible isoform in glial cells. In conclusion, ALA affected several metabolic pathways in mouse encephalon. Data indicate that a rapid response to oxidative stress was developed; however, with long-term intoxication, the redox balance was probably restored, thereby minimizing oxidative damage.

  4. Comparative mouse brain tractography of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Moldrich, Randal X; Pannek, Kerstin; Hoch, Renee; Rubenstein, John L; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Richards, Linda J

    2010-07-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography can be employed to simultaneously analyze three-dimensional white matter tracts in the brain. Numerous methods have been proposed to model diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance data for tractography, and we have explored the functionality of some of these for studying white and grey matter pathways in ex vivo mouse brain. Using various deterministic and probabilistic algorithms across a range of regions of interest we found that probabilistic tractography provides a more robust means of visualizing both white and grey matter pathways than deterministic tractography. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of probabilistic tractography profiles to streamline number, step size, curvature, fiber orientation distribution threshold, and wholebrain versus region of interest seeding. Using anatomically well-defined corticothalamic pathways, we show how projection maps can permit the topographical assessment of probabilistic tractography. Finally, we show how different tractography approaches can impact on dMRI assessment of tract changes in a mouse deficient for the frontal cortex morphogen, fibroblast growth factor 17. In conclusion, probabilistic tractography can elucidate the phenotypes of mice with neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental disorders in a quantitative manner.

  5. Effects of cannabinoids on the activities of mouse brain lipases.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Burstein, S; Renzulli, L

    1986-09-01

    Cannabinoids were found to augment phospholipase activities and modify lipid levels of mouse brain synaptosomes, myelin and mitochondria. Delta-1-tetra-hydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) and several of its metabolites induced a dose-dependent (0.32-16 microM) stimulation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity resulting in the increased release of free arachidonic acid from exogenous [1-14C]phosphatidylcholine (PC). The potencies of the cannabinoids in modulating PLA2 activity were approximately of the order: 7-OH-delta 1-THC greater than delta 1-THC greater than 7-oxo-delta 1-THC greater than delta 1-THC-7-oic acid = 6 alpha OH-delta 1-THC much greater than 6 beta-OH-delta 1-THC. The hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) by synaptosomal phospholipase C (PLC) was enhanced significantly by delta 1-THC and promoted diacylglyceride levels by greater than 100 percent compared to control values. In contrast, arachidonate was the major product resulting from phospholipase activities of a 20,000 g pellet. Synaptosomal diacylglyceride lipase activity was inhibited by delta 1-THC. [1-14C]Arachidonic acid was readily incorporated into subcellular membrane phospholipids and after exposure to cannabinoids led to diminished phosphoglyceride levels and concomitant increases in released neutral lipid products. These data suggest that cannabinoids control phospholipid turnover and metabolism in mouse brain preparations by the activation of phospholipases and, through this mechanism, may exert some of their effects.

  6. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein.

  7. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  8. Brain stem representation of thermal and psychogenic sweating in humans.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael J; Trevaks, David; Taylor, Nigel A S; McAllen, Robin M

    2013-05-15

    Functional MRI was used to identify regions in the human brain stem activated during thermal and psychogenic sweating. Two groups of healthy participants aged 34.4 ± 10.2 and 35.3 ± 11.8 years (both groups comprising 1 woman and 10 men) were either heated by a water-perfused tube suit or subjected to a Stroop test, while they lay supine with their head in a 3-T MRI scanner. Sweating events were recorded as electrodermal responses (increases in AC conductance) from the palmar surfaces of fingers. Each experimental session consisted of two 7.9-min runs, during which a mean of 7.3 ± 2.1 and 10.2 ± 2.5 irregular sweating events occurred during psychogenic (Stroop test) and thermal sweating, respectively. The electrodermal waveform was used as the regressor in each subject and run to identify brain stem clusters with significantly correlated blood oxygen level-dependent signals in the group mean data. Clusters of significant activation were found with both psychogenic and thermal sweating, but a voxelwise comparison revealed no brain stem cluster whose signal differed significantly between the two conditions. Bilaterally symmetric regions that were activated by both psychogenic and thermal sweating were identified in the rostral lateral midbrain and in the rostral lateral medulla. The latter site, between the facial nuclei and pyramidal tracts, corresponds to a neuron group found to drive sweating in animals. These studies have identified the brain stem regions that are activated with sweating in humans and indicate that common descending pathways may mediate both thermal and psychogenic sweating.

  9. Gene regulatory networks in embryonic stem cells and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Yan, Xiaowei; Tian, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are endowed with the ability to generate multiple cell lineages and carries great therapeutic potentials in regenerative medicines. Future application of ESCs in human health and diseases will embark on the delineation of molecular mechanisms that define the biology of ESCs. Here we discuss how the finite ESC components mediate the intriguing task of brain development and exhibits biomedical potentials to cure diverse neurological disorders. PMID:19530135

  10. Therapeutic Effect of Ligustilide-Stimulated Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Thromboembolic Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kang; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Huang, Pi-Chun; Lin, Po-Cheng; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a result of cerebral ischemia that triggers a cascade of both physiological and biochemical events. No effective treatment is available for stroke; however, stem cells have the potential to rescue tissue from the effects of stroke. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are an abundant source of adult stem cells; therefore, ADSC therapy can be considered as a future strategy for regenerative medicine. However, more research is required to improve the effectiveness of transplanted ADSCs as a treatment for stroke in the mouse stroke model. Ligustilide, isolated from the herb Angelica sinensis, exhibits a protective effect on neurons and inhibits inflammation. We also demonstrated that ligustilide treatment increases the expression levels of homing factors such as SDF-1 and CXCR4. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of ADSC transplantation and ligustilide treatment in a mouse thromboembolic stroke model by behavioral tests, including beam walking, locomotor activity, and rotarod analysis. ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide were transplanted into the brains of stroke mice. The results showed that the therapeutic effect of ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide was better than that of ADSCs without ligustilide pretreatment. There was no difference between the recovery of mice treated by ADSC transplantation combined with subcutaneous ligustilide injection and that of mice treated only with ADSCs. The TUNEL assay showed fewer apoptotic cells in the brains of mice transplanted with ADSCs pretreated with ligustilide as well as in those without pretreatment. In summary, pretreatment of ADSCs with ligustilide improves the therapeutic efficacy of ADSC transplantation. The results of this study will help improve stem cell therapies being developed for future clinical applications.

  11. [Brain stem auditory evoked potentials in brain death state].

    PubMed

    Kojder, I; Garell, S; Włodarczyk, E; Sagan, L; Jezewski, D; Slósarek, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors studied auditory brainstem evoked potentials (BAEP) in 27 organ donors aged 40 to 68 years treated in neurosurgery units in Szczecin and Grenoble. Abnormal results were found in all cases. In 63% of cases no evoked action potentials were obtained, in 34% only the 1st wave was obtained, and in two cases evolution was observed with activity extinction. The authors believe that in the process of shaping of BAEP morphotic extinction begins from the later waves to earlier ones in agreement with the rostrocaudal direction of extinction of the functions or brain midline structures, and in a single study various findings may be obtained.

  12. SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Maintains Stemness Signature in Mouse Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Thai-Yen; Lin, Hsing-Yu; Liou, Jeffrey Tsai-Jui; Liu, Fei-Chih; Chen, I-Chun; Lee, Sue-Wei; Hsu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    SDF-1 and its primary receptor, CXCR4, are highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system (CNS) and play a crucial role in brain architecture. Loss of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling causes abnormal development of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and cortex. However, the mechanism of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in NSCs/NPCs regulation remains unknown. In this study, we found that elimination of SDF-1/CXCR4 transduction caused NSCs/NPCs to lose their stemness characteristics and to encounter neurogenic differentiation. Moreover, Notch and RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) both play an essential role in NSCs/NPCs maintenance and neuronal differentiation and were dramatically downregulated following SDF-1/CXCR4 cascade inhibition. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1), a proneural gene, and p27, an antiproliferative gene, were significantly increased after genetic elimination of SDF-1 alleles. Our results support that the loss of functional SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway in NSCs/NPCs induces exit of cell cycle and promotes premature neural differentiation. PMID:28408934

  13. SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Maintains Stemness Signature in Mouse Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Yin; Ling, Thai-Yen; Lin, Hsing-Yu; Liou, Jeffrey Tsai-Jui; Liu, Fei-Chih; Chen, I-Chun; Lee, Sue-Wei; Hsu, Yu; Lai, Dar-Ming; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2017-01-01

    SDF-1 and its primary receptor, CXCR4, are highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system (CNS) and play a crucial role in brain architecture. Loss of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling causes abnormal development of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and cortex. However, the mechanism of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in NSCs/NPCs regulation remains unknown. In this study, we found that elimination of SDF-1/CXCR4 transduction caused NSCs/NPCs to lose their stemness characteristics and to encounter neurogenic differentiation. Moreover, Notch and RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) both play an essential role in NSCs/NPCs maintenance and neuronal differentiation and were dramatically downregulated following SDF-1/CXCR4 cascade inhibition. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1), a proneural gene, and p27, an antiproliferative gene, were significantly increased after genetic elimination of SDF-1 alleles. Our results support that the loss of functional SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway in NSCs/NPCs induces exit of cell cycle and promotes premature neural differentiation.

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury Stimulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Seekaew, Pich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural stem cells in the adult brain possess the ability to remain quiescent until needed in tissue homeostasis or repair. It was previously shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) stimulated neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the adult hippocampus, indicating an innate repair mechanism, but it is unknown how TBI promotes NSC proliferation. In the present study, we observed dramatic activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hippocampus of mice with TBI from controlled cortical impact (CCI). The peak of mTORC1 activation in the hippocampal subgranular zone, where NSCs reside, is 24–48 h after trauma, correlating with the peak of TBI-enhanced NSC proliferation. By use of a Nestin-GFP transgenic mouse, in which GFP is ectopically expressed in the NSCs, we found that TBI activated mTORC1 in NSCs. With 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine labeling, we observed that TBI increased mTORC1 activation in proliferating NSCs. Furthermore, administration of rapamycin abolished TBI-promoted NSC proliferation. Taken together, these data indicate that mTORC1 activation is required for NSC proliferation postinjury, and thus might serve as a therapeutic target for interventions to augment neurogenesis for brain repair after TBI. PMID:27822507

  15. Effect of prenatal lignocaine on auditory brain stem evoked response.

    PubMed Central

    Bozynski, M E; Schumacher, R E; Deschner, L S; Kileny, P

    1989-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that there would be a positive correlation between the interpeak wave (I-V) interval as measured by auditory brain stem evoked response and the ratio of umbilical cord blood arterial to venous lignocaine concentrations in infants born after maternal epidural anaesthesia, 10 normal infants born at full term by elective caesarean section were studied. Umbilical cord arterial and venous plasma samples were assayed for lignocaine, and auditory brain stem evoked responses were elicited at 35 and 70 dB at less than 4 (test 1) and greater than or equal to 48 hours (test 2). Mean wave I-V intervals were prolonged in test 1 when compared with test 2. Linear regression showed the arterial:venous ratio accounted for 66% (left ear) and 43% (right ear) of the variance in test 1 intervals. No association was found in test 2. In newborn infants, changes in serial auditory brain stem evoked response tests occur after maternal lignocaine epidural anaesthesia and these changes correlate with blood lignocaine concentrations. PMID:2774635

  16. Temporally-Patterned Deep Brain Stimulation in a Mouse Model of Multiple Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tabansky, Inna; Quinkert, Amy Wells; Rahman, Nadera; Muller, Salomon Zev; Löfgren, Jesper; Rudling, Johan; Goodman, Alyssa; Wang, Yingping; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    We report that mice with closed-head multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) show a decrease in the motoric aspects of generalized arousal, as measured by automated, quantitative behavioral assays. Further, we found that temporally-patterned deep brain stimulation (DBS) can increase generalized arousal and spontaneous motor activity in this mouse model of TBI. This arousal increase is input-pattern-dependent, as changing the temporal pattern of DBS can modulate its effect on motor activity. Finally, an extensive examination of mouse behavioral capacities, looking for deficits in this model of TBI, suggest that the strongest effects of TBI in this model are found in the initiation of any kind of movement. PMID:25072520

  17. Neural stem cell-based gene therapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung U

    2011-03-01

    Advances in gene-based medicine since 1990s have ushered in new therapeutic strategy of gene therapy for inborn error genetic diseases and cancer. Malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastoma remain virtually untreatable and lethal. Currently available treatment for brain tumors including radical surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy, have substantially improved the survival rate in patients suffering from these brain tumors; however, it remains incurable in large proportion of patients. Therefore, there is substantial need for effective, low-toxicity therapies for patients with malignant brain tumors, and gene therapy targeting brain tumors should fulfill this requirement. Gene therapy for brain tumors includes many therapeutic strategies and these strategies can be grouped in two major categories: molecular and immunologic. The widely used molecular gene therapy approach is suicide gene therapy based on the conversion of non-toxic prodrugs into active anticancer agents via introduction of enzymes and genetic immunotherapy involves the gene transfer of immune-stimulating cytokines including IL-4, IL-12 and TRAIL. For both molecular and immune gene therapy, neural stem cells (NSCs) can be used as delivery vehicle of therapeutic genes. NSCs possess an inherent tumor tropism that supports their use as a reliable delivery vehicle to target therapeutic gene products to primary brain tumors and metastatic cancers throughout the brain. Significance of the NSC-based gene therapy for brain tumor is that it is possible to exploit the tumor-tropic property of NSCs to mediate effective, tumor-selective therapy for primary and metastatic cancers in the brain and outside, for which no tolerated curative treatments are currently available.

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Microarray Gene Expression in Mouse Stem Cells: Redefining Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Yvonne J. K.; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T.

    2008-01-01

    Background While much progress has been made in understanding stem cell (SC) function, a complete description of the molecular mechanisms regulating SCs is not yet established. This lack of knowledge is a major barrier holding back the discovery of therapeutic uses of SCs. We investigated the value of a novel meta-analysis of microarray gene expression in mouse SCs to aid the elucidation of regulatory mechanisms common to SCs and particular SC types. Methodology/Principal Findings We added value to previously published microarray gene expression data by characterizing the promoter type likely to regulate transcription. Promoters of up-regulated genes in SCs were characterized in terms of alternative promoter (AP) usage and CpG-richness, with the aim of correlating features known to affect transcriptional control with SC function. We found that SCs have a higher proportion of up-regulated genes using CpG-rich promoters compared with the negative controls. Comparing subsets of SC type with the controls a slightly different story unfolds. The differences between the proliferating adult SCs and the embryonic SCs versus the negative controls are statistically significant. Whilst the difference between the quiescent adult SCs compared with the negative controls is not. On examination of AP usage, no difference was observed between SCs and the controls. However, comparing the subsets of SC type with the controls, the quiescent adult SCs are found to up-regulate a larger proportion of genes that have APs compared to the controls and the converse is true for the proliferating adult SCs and the embryonic SCs. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that looking at features associated with control of transcription is a promising future approach for characterizing “stemness” and that further investigations of stemness could benefit from separate considerations of different SC states. For example, “proliferating-stemness” is shown here, in terms of promoter

  19. Synergistic effect of therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-beta via apoptotic pathway in the metastatic mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-02-02

    As an approach to improve treatment of breast cancer metastasis to the brain, we employed genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs, HB1.F3 cells) consisting of neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing cytosine deaminase and the interferon-beta genes, HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β. In this model, MDA-MB-231/Luc breast cancer cells were implanted in the right hemisphere of the mouse brain, while pre-stained GESTECs with redfluorescence were implanted in the contralateral brain. Two days after stem cells injection, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) was administrated via intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis of extracted brain confirmed the therapeutic efficacy of GESTECs in the presence of 5-FC based on reductions in density and aggressive tendency of breast cancer cells, as well as pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis relative to a negative control. Additionally, expression of PCNA decreased in the stem cells treated group. Treatment of breast cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) increased the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative factor, BAX and p21 protein through phosphorylation of p53 and p38. Moreover, analysis of stem cell migratory ability revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells endogenously secreted VEGF, and stem cells expressed their receptor (VEGFR2). To confirm the role of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling in tumor tropism of stem cells, samples were treated with the VEGFR2 inhibitor, KRN633. The number of migrated stem cells decreased significantly in response to KRN633 due to Erk1/2 activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition. Taken together, these results indicate that treatment with GESTECs, particularly HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β co-expressing CD.IFN-β, may be a useful strategy for treating breast cancer metastasis to the brain in the presence of a prodrug.

  20. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different polymers and their MRI contrast effects in the mouse brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Songbo; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Xuan; Yang, Gao; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    PEG and PEG/PEI modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) (0 or 0.3 g). PEG/PEI-SPIONs were coated with Tween 80 (PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses indicated that PEG, PEG/PEI and PEG/PEI/Tween 80 were attached to the surfaces of the SPIONs. The PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs performed excellent colloidal stability in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and in deionized water with the mean hydrodynamic sizes of 19.5, 21.0, 24.0 nm and the zeta potentials of -5.0, 35.0, 19.0 mV, respectively. All the SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the Kunming (KM) mouse brains were performed, the PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs exhibited vascular imaging effects in bulbus olfactorius, frontal cortex, temporal, thalamus and brain stem of the mouse brains after 24 h intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The SPIONs have potentials as MRI contrast agents in the mouse brains.

  1. The proteome of mouse brain microvessel membranes and basal lamina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyun Bae; Scott, Michael; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Baird, Andrew; Yates, John; Torbett, Bruce E; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a multicellular vascular structure separating blood from the brain parenchyma that is composed of endothelial cells with tight intercellular junctions, surrounded by a basal lamina, astrocytes, and pericytes. Previous studies have generated detailed databases of the microvessel transcriptome; however, less information is available on the BBB at the protein level. In this study, we specifically focused on characterization of the membrane fraction of cells within the BBB to generate a more complete understanding of membrane transporters, tight junction proteins, and associated extracellular matrix proteins that are functional hallmarks of the BBB. We used Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology to identify a total of 1,143 proteins in mouse brain microvessels, of which 53% were determined to be membrane associated. Analyses of specific classes of BBB-associated proteins in the context of recent transcriptome reports provide a unique database to assess the relative contribution of genes at the level of both RNA and protein in the maintenance of normal BBB integrity. PMID:21792245

  2. Targeting self-renewal in high-grade brain tumors leads to loss of brain tumor stem cells and prolonged survival.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhe; Khan, Muhammad Amir; Weiler, Markus; Blaes, Jonas; Jestaedt, Leonie; Geibert, Madeleine; Zou, Peng; Gronych, Jan; Bernhardt, Olga; Korshunov, Andrey; Bugner, Verena; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Wick, Wolfgang; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2014-08-07

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets for treating malignant tumors, but the in vivo supporting evidence is still missing. Using a GFP reporter driven by the promoter of the nuclear receptor tailless (Tlx), we demonstrate that Tlx(+) cells in primary brain tumors are mostly quiescent. Lineage tracing demonstrates that single Tlx(+) cells can self-renew and generate Tlx(-) tumor cells in primary tumors, suggesting that they are brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). After introducing a BTSC-specific knock-out of the Tlx gene in primary mouse tumors, we observed a loss of self-renewal of BTSCs and prolongation of animal survival, accompanied by induction of essential signaling pathways mediating cell-cycle arrest, cell death, and neural differentiation. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of targeting glioblastomas and indicates the suitability of BTSCs as therapeutic targets, thereby supporting the CSC hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Examination of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) Integrity In A Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan; Savant, Sanjot D.; Bachmeier, Corbin. J.; Hatch, Grant M.; Miller, Donald W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluates, both functionally and biochemically, brain tumor-induced alterations in brain capillary endothelial cells. Brain tumors were induced in Balb/c mice via intracranial injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (3LL) cells into the right hemisphere of the mouse brain using stereotaxic apparatus. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was assessed at various stages of tumor development, using both radiolabeled tracer permeability and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate contrast enhancement (Gad-DTPA). The expression of the drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), in the BBB at various stages of tumor development was also evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Median mouse survival following tumor cell injection was 17 days. The permeability of the BBB to 3H-mannitol was similar in both brain hemispheres at 7 and 10 days post-injection. By day 15, there was a 2-fold increase in 3H-mannitol permeability in the tumor bearing hemispheres compared to the non-tumor hemispheres. Examination of BBB permeability with Gad-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI indicated cerebral vascular permeability changes were confined to the tumor area. The permeability increase observed at the later stages of tumor development correlated with an increase in cerebral vascular volume suggesting angiogenesis within the tumor bearing hemisphere. Furthermore, the Gad-DPTA enhancement observed within the tumor area was significantly less than Gad-DPTA enhancement within the circumventricular organs not protected by the BBB. Expression of P-gp in both the tumor bearing and non-tumor bearing portions of the brain appeared similar at all time points examined. These studies suggest that although BBB integrity is altered within the tumor site at later stages of development, the BBB is still functional and limiting in terms of solute and drug permeability in and around the tumor. PMID:23184143

  4. Transcription levels of sirtuin family in neural stem cells and brain tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Li, Q; Feng, R L; Wen, T Q

    2012-09-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) has been used as a well-known model to investigate apoptosis, differentiation, maintenance of stem cells status, and therapy of neurological disease. The C17.2 NSCs line was produced after v-myc transformation of neural progenitor from mouse cerebellar cortex. Sirtuin family plays important roles involved in neuronal differentiation, genomic stability, lifespan, cell survival. However, little is known about gene expression variation of sirtuin family in C17.2 NSCs, primary NSCs, and different brain tissues in adult mice. Here, we confirmed that the mRNA expression levels of sirt2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 in E14.5 NSCs were significantly higher than in C17.2 NSCs, whereas that sirt 6 displayed an opposing mode. Moreover, a higher mRNA level of sirtuin family was observed in the adult mouse brain compared to C17.2 NSCs. In addition, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors nicotinamide and Trichostatin A (TSA) were used to explore differential changes at the transcriptional level of sirtuins. Results indicated that the expression of sirt1, sirt5 and sirt6 was significant downregulated by nicotinamide treatment. Whereas, a significant downregulation in sirt1 and sirt3 and a significant upregulation in sirt2, sirt4, sirt6, and sirt7 were observed in the treatment of TSA. Thus our studies indicate different sirtuin mRNA expression profiles between C17.2 NSCs, E14.5 NSCs and brain tissues, suggesting the transcriptional regulation of sirtuin family could be mediated by different histone acetylation.

  5. In Vitro Derivation and Propagation of Spermatogonial Stem Cell Activity from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Yukiko; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Shirane, Kenjiro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori

    2016-12-06

    The in vitro derivation and propagation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a key goal in reproductive science. We show here that when aggregated with embryonic testicular somatic cells (reconstituted testes), primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) induced from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiate into spermatogonia-like cells in vitro and are expandable as cells that resemble germline stem cells (GSCs), a primary cell line with SSC activity. Remarkably, GSC-like cells (GSCLCs), but not PGCLCs, colonize adult testes and, albeit less effectively than GSCs, contribute to spermatogenesis and fertile offspring. Whole-genome analyses reveal that GSCLCs exhibit aberrant methylation at vulnerable regulatory elements, including those critical for spermatogenesis, which may restrain their spermatogenic potential. Our study establishes a strategy for the in vitro derivation of SSC activity from PSCs, which, we propose, relies on faithful epigenomic regulation.

  6. Novel Regenerative Therapies Based on Regionally Induced Multipotent Stem Cells in Post-Stroke Brains: Their Origin, Characterization, and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Sakuma, Rika; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2017-07-25

    Brain injuries such as ischemic stroke cause severe neural loss. Until recently, it was believed that post-ischemic areas mainly contain necrotic tissue and inflammatory cells. However, using a mouse model of cerebral infarction, we demonstrated that stem cells develop within ischemic areas. Ischemia-induced stem cells can function as neural progenitors; thus, we initially named them injury/ischemia-induced neural stem/progenitor cells (iNSPCs). However, because they differentiate into more than neural lineages, we now refer to them as ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells (iSCs). Very recently, we showed that putative iNSPCs/iSCs are present within post-stroke areas in human brains. Because iNSPCs/iSCs isolated from mouse and human ischemic tissues can differentiate into neuronal lineages in vitro, it is possible that a clearer understanding of iNSPC/iSC profiles and the molecules that regulate iNSPC/iSC fate (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, and survival) would make it possible to perform neural regeneration/repair in patients following stroke. In this article, we introduce the origin and traits of iNSPCs/iSCs based on our reports and recent viewpoints. We also discuss their possible contribution to neurogenesis through endogenous and exogenous iNSPC/iSC therapies following ischemic stroke.

  7. The isolation and characterization of putative mesenchymal stem cells from the spiny mouse.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hayley; Milton, Phillipa; Jenkin, Graham

    2012-10-01

    The bone marrow represents the most common source from which to isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are capable of differentiating into tissues of the three primary lineages and have the potential to enhance repair in damaged organs through the principals of regenerative medicine. Given the ease with which MSCs may be isolated from different species the aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative bone marrow derived MSCs from the spiny mouse, Acomys cahirinus. MSCs were isolated from the spiny mouse in a traditional manner, and based on plastic adherence, morphology, colony forming unit-fibroblast assays and functional assessment (adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential) a population of putative mesenchymal stem cells from the compact bone of the spiny mouse have been isolated and characterized. Such methodological approaches overcome the lack of species-specific antibodies for the spiny mouse and could be employed for other species where the cost of generating species-specific antibodies is not warranted.

  8. Cardiac repair in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction with trophoblast stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guannan; Chen, Jianzhou; Zhang, Xinlin; He, Guixin; Tan, Wei; Wu, Han; Li, Ran; Chen, Yuhan; Gu, Rong; Xie, Jun; Xu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Various stem cells have been explored for the purpose of cardiac repair. However, any individual stem cell population has not been considered as the ideal source. Recently, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs), a newly described stem cell type, have demonstrated extensive plasticity. The present study evaluated the therapeutic effect of TSCs transplantation for heart regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI) and made a direct comparison with the most commonly used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Transplantation of TSCs and MSCs led to a remarkably improved cardiac function in contrast with the PBS control, but only the TSCs exhibited the potential of differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vivo. In addition, a significantly high proliferation level of both transplanted stem cells and resident cardiomyocytes was observed in the TSCs group. These findings primary revealed the therapeutic potential of TSCs in transplantation therapy for MI. PMID:28295048

  9. Stem Cells for Ischemic Brain Injury: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Terry C.; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Low, Walter C.

    2014-01-01

    No effective therapy is currently available to promote recovery following ischemic stroke. Stem cells have been proposed as a potential source of new cells to replace those lost due to central nervous system injury, as well as a source of trophic molecules to minimize damage and promote recovery. We undertook a detailed review of data from recent basic science and preclinical studies to investigate the potential application of endogenous and exogenous stem cell therapies for treatment of cerebral ischemia. To date, spontaneous endogenous neurogenesis has been observed in response to ischemic injury, and can be enhanced via infusion of appropriate cytokines. Exogenous stem cells from multiple sources can generate neural cells that survive and form synaptic connections after transplantation in the stroke-injured brain. Stem cells from multiple sources cells also exhibit neuroprotective properties that may ameliorate stroke deficits. In many cases, functional benefits observed are likely independent of neural differentiation, though exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Future studies of neuroregeneration will require the demonstration of function in endogenously born neurons following focal ischemia. Further, methods are currently lacking to definitively demonstrate the therapeutic effect of newly introduced neural cells. Increased plasticity following stroke may facilitate the functional integration of new neurons, but the loss of appropriate guidance cues and supporting architecture in the infarct cavity will likely impede the restoration of lost circuitry. As such careful investigation of the mechanisms underlying trophic benefits will be essential. Evidence to date suggest that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for ischemic brain injury. PMID:19399885

  10. [Derivation of germ cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in culture].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, G

    2005-10-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells derive from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and give rise to the three primitive embryonic layers, which later will form all the different tissue types of an adult. Embryonic stem cells are thus defined as totipotent cells. In vitro, these cells can give rise to all the somatic cells. Different laboratories have now shown that cultured embryonic stem cells can also differentiate into germline cells. By using the transcription factor Oct-4 as a tool for the visualization of germ cells, it has been shown the derivation of oocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells. These works should contribute to various areas, including therapeutic cloning which associates nuclear transfer and selective production of a specific cell type.

  11. Establishment of mouse embryonic stem cells from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos using three derivation methods

    PubMed Central

    González, Sheyla; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study is to compare three previously described mouse embryonic stem cell derivation methods to evaluate the influence of culture conditions, number of isolated blastomeres and embryonic stage in the derivation process. Methods Three embryonic stem cell derivation methods: standard, pre-adhesion and defined culture medium method, were compared in the derivation from isolated blastomeres and whole embryos at 4- and 8-cell stages. Results A total of 200 embryonic stem cell lines were obtained with an efficiency ranging from 1.9% to 72%. Conclusions Using either isolated blastomeres or whole embryos, the highest rates of mouse embryonic stem cell establishment were achieved with the defined culture medium method and efficiencies increased as development progressed. Using isolated blastomeres, efficiencies increased in parallel to the proportion of the embryo volume used to start the derivation process. PMID:20862536

  12. Transcriptomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to thalidomide during spontaneous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is a potent developmental toxicant that induces a range of birth defects, notably severe limb malformations. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning the teratogenic effects of thalidomide, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and published the major findings in a research article entitled “Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells” [1]. The data presented herein contains complementary information related to the aforementioned research article. PMID:26217789

  13. Expression Pattern of Thyroid Hormone Transporters in the Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Julia; Heuer, Heike

    2014-01-01

    For a comprehensive description of the tissue-specific thyroidal state under normal as well as under pathophysiological conditions it is of utmost importance to include thyroid hormone (TH) transporters in the analysis as well. The current knowledge of the cell-specific repertoire of TH transporters, however, is still rather limited, although several TH transporting proteins have been identified. Here, we describe the temporal and spatial distribution pattern of the most prominent TH transporters in the postnatal mouse brain. For that purpose, we performed radioactive in situ hybridization studies in order to analyze the cellular mRNA expression pattern of the monocarboxylate transporters Mct8 and Mct10, the L-type amino acid transporters Lat1 and Lat2 as well as the organic anion transporting peptide Oatp1c1 at different postnatal time points. Highest TH transporter expression levels in the CNS were observed at postnatal day 6 and 12, while hybridization signal intensities visibly declined after the second postnatal week. The only exception was Mct10 for which the strongest signals could be observed in white matter regions at postnatal day 21 indicating that this transporter is preferentially expressed in mature oligodendrocytes. Whereas Mct8 and Lat2 showed an overlapping neuronal mRNA expression pattern in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and in the hypothalamus, Oatp1c1 and Lat1 specific signals were most prominent in capillary endothelial cells throughout the CNS. In the choroid plexus, expression of three transporters (Mct8, Lat2, and Oatp1c1) could be detected, whereas in other brain areas (e.g., striatum, thalamus, and brain stem nuclei) only one of the transporter candidates appeared to be present. Overall, our study revealed a distinct mRNA distribution pattern for each of the TH transporter candidates. Further studies will reveal to which extent these transporters contribute to the cell-specific TH uptake and efflux in the mouse CNS. PMID:24994998

  14. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  15. Effect of Erythropoietin and Stem Cells on Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tunc Ata, Melek; Turgut, Günfer; Akbulut, Metin; Kocyigit, Ali; Karabulut, Aysun; Senol, Hande; Turgut, Sebahat

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the healing effects of erythropoietin (EPO) and stem cells (SCs) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Twenty-nine Wistar albino rats were used and separated into the following groups: control (C), EPO, SC, and SC+EPO. Group C received a TBI only, with no treatment. In the EPO group, 1000 U/kg EPO was given intraperitoneally at 30 minutes after TBI. In SC group, immediately after formation of TBI, 3 × 10,000 CD34(+) stem cells were injected into the affected area. In the SC+EPO group, half an hour after TBI and the injection of stem cells, 1000 U/kg EPO was injected. Before and after injury, trauma coordination performance was measured by the rotarod and inclined plane tests. Seven weeks after trauma, rat brains were examined by radiology and histology. Rotarod performance test did not change remarkably, even after the injury. Compared with group C, the SC+EPO group was found to have significant differences in the inclined plane test results. Separately given, SCs and EPO have a positive effect on TBI, and our findings suggest that their coadministration is even more powerful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical clearing of the mouse brain and light attenuation quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Esposito, Angela; Nikitichev, Daniil; Desjardins, Adrien; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    Optical clearing allows the reduction of light scattering in biological tissue, enabling 3D morphological information to be obtained deep within tissue using techniques such as optical projection tomography and light sheet microscopy. However, the extent of the clearing is dependent on the technique that is used. There is therefore a need for methods to quantify the quality of the clearing process and thereby to compare clearing techniques. In this study, we developed such a method using a custom spectroscopy system and applied it to compare three techniques that were applied to mouse brain: BABB (Murray's clear), pBABB (a modification of BABB which includes the use of hydrogen peroxide), and passive CLARITY.

  17. Electrophysiological Properties of Subventricular Zone Cells in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bin; Mao, Xiao Ou; Xie, Lin; Chang, Su-Youne; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is a principal site of adult neurogenesis and appears to participate in the brain’s response to injury. Thus, measures that enhance SVZ neurogenesis may have a role in treatment of neurological disease. To better characterize SVZ cells and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention, we studied electrophysiological properties of SVZ cells in adult mouse brain slices using patch-clamp techniques. Electrophysiology was correlated with immunohistochemical phenotype by injecting cells with lucifer yellow and by studying transgenic mice carrying green fluorescent protein under control of the doublecortin (DCX) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. We identified five types of cells in the adult mouse SVZ: type 1 cells, with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)/tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive and CdCl2-sensitive inward currents; type 2 cells, with Ca2+-sensitive K+ and both 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive currents; type 3 cells, with 4-AP/TEA-sensitive and -insensitive and small Na+ currents; type 4 cells, with slowly activating, large linear outward current and sustained outward current without fast-inactivating component; and type 5 cells, with a large outward rectifying current with a fast inactivating component. Type 2 and 3 cells expressed DCX, types 4 and 5 cells expressed GFAP, and type 1 cells expressed neither. We propose that SVZ neurogenesis involves a progression of electrophysiological cell phenotypes from types 4 and 5 cells (astrocytes) to type 1 cells (neuronal progenitors) to types 2 and 3 cells (nascent neurons), and that drugs acting on. ion channels expressed during neurogenesis might promote therapeutic neurogenesis in the injured brain. PMID:20434436

  18. MNK Inhibition Disrupts Mesenchymal Glioma Stem Cells and Prolongs Survival in a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jonathan B; Eckerdt, Frank D; Alley, Kristen; Magnusson, Lisa P; Hussain, Hridi; Bi, Yingtao; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Clymer, Jessica; Alvarez, Angel A; Goldman, Stewart; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Nakano, Ichiro; Horbinski, Craig; Davuluri, Ramana V; James, C David; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme remains the deadliest malignant brain tumor, with glioma stem cells (GSC) contributing to treatment resistance and tumor recurrence. We have identified MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK) as potential targets for the GSC population in glioblastoma multiforme. Isoform-level subtyping using The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed that both MNK genes (MKNK1 and MKNK2) are upregulated in mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme as compared with other subtypes. Expression of MKNK1 is associated with increased glioma grade and correlated with the mesenchymal GSC marker, CD44, and coexpression of MKNK1 and CD44 predicts poor survival in glioblastoma multiforme. In established and patient-derived cell lines, pharmacologic MNK inhibition using LY2801653 (merestinib) inhibited phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, a crucial effector for MNK-induced mRNA translation in cancer cells and a marker of transformation. Importantly, merestinib inhibited growth of GSCs grown as neurospheres as determined by extreme limiting dilution analysis. When the effects of merestinib were assessed in vivo using an intracranial xenograft mouse model, improved overall survival was observed in merestinib-treated mice. Taken together, these data provide strong preclinical evidence that pharmacologic MNK inhibition targets mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme and its GSC population. These findings raise the possibility of MNK inhibition as a viable therapeutic approach to target the mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma multiforme. Mol Cancer Res; 14(10); 984-93. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemic volume‐controlled photothrombotic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun‐Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee‐Hoon; Seo, Young‐Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Various animal models of stroke have been developed to simulate the human stroke with the development of the ischemic method facilitates preclinical stroke research. The photothrombotic ischemia model, based on the intravascular photochemical reaction, is widely used for in vivo studies. However, this study has limitations, which generated a relatively small‐sized infarction model on superficial cortex compared to that of the MCAO stroke model. In this study, the photothorombosis mouse model is adapted and the optimum conditions for generation of cell death and deficits with high reproducibility is determined. The extent of damage within the cortex was assessed by infarct volume and cellular/behavioral analyses. In this model, the neural cell death and inflammatory responses is detected; moreover, the degree of behavioral impairment is correlated with the brain infarct volume. Further, to enhance the understanding of neural repair, the effect of neural differentiation by transplantation of human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) is analyzed. The authors demonstrated that transplantation of BM‐MSCs promoted the neural differentiation and behavioral performance in their photothrombosis model. Therefore, this research was meaningful to provide a stable animal model of stroke with low variability. Moreover, this model will facilitate development of novel MSC‐based therapeutics for stroke. PMID:27440447

  20. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  1. Tridermal tumorigenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells transplanted in ischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hiromi; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nagotani, Shoko; Zhang, Xuemei; Ikeda, Yoshio; Matsuura, Tohru; Abe, Koji

    2010-08-01

    Stroke is a major neurologic disorder. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be produced from basically any part of patients, with high reproduction ability and pluripotency to differentiate into various types of cells, suggesting that iPS cells can provide a hopeful therapy for cell transplantation. However, transplantation of iPS cells into ischemic brain has not been reported. In this study, we showed that the iPS cells fate in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Undifferentiated iPS cells (5 x 10(5)) were transplanted into ipsilateral striatum and cortex at 24 h after 30 mins of transient MCAO. Behavioral and histologic analyses were performed at 28 day after the cell transplantation. To our surprise, the transplanted iPS cells expanded and formed much larger tumors in mice postischemic brain than in sham-operated brain. The clinical recovery of the MCAO+iPS group was delayed as compared with the MCAO+PBS (phosphate-buffered saline) group. iPS cells formed tridermal teratoma, but could supply a great number of Dcx-positive neuroblasts and a few mature neurons in the ischemic lesion. iPS cells have a promising potential to provide neural cells after ischemic brain injury, if tumorigenesis is properly controlled.

  2. Injection of SDF-1 loaded nanoparticles following traumatic brain injury stimulates neural stem cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zamproni, Laura N; Mundim, Mayara V; Porcionatto, Marimelia A; des Rieux, Anne

    2017-03-15

    Recruiting neural stem cell (NSC) at the lesion site is essential for central nervous system repair. This process could be triggered by the local delivery of the chemokine SDF-1. We compared two PLGA formulations for local brain SDF-1 delivery: SDF-1 loaded microspheres (MS) and SDF-1 loaded nanoparticles (NP). Both formulations were able to encapsulate more than 80% of SDF-1 but presented different release profiles, with 100% of SDF-1 released after 6days for the MS and with 25% of SDF-1 released after 2 weeks for NP. SDF-1 bioactivity was demonstrated by a chemotactic assay. When injected in mouse brain after traumatic brain injury, only SDF-1 nanoparticles induced NSC migration to the damage area. More neuroblasts (DCX+ cells) could be visualized around the lesions treated with NP SDF-1 compared to the other conditions. Rostral migratory stream destabilization with massive migration of DCX+ cell toward the perilesional area was observed 2 weeks after NP SDF-1 injection. Local injection of SDF-1-loaded nanoparticles induces recruitment of NSC and could be promising for brain injury lesion.

  3. Implications of aneuploidy for stem cell biology and brain therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Devalle, Sylvie; Sartore, Rafaela C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Borges, Helena L.; Martins, Rodrigo A. P.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cellular basis of neurological disorders have advanced at a slow pace, especially due to the extreme invasiveness of brain biopsying and limitations of cell lines and animal models that have been used. Since the derivation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), a novel source of cells for regenerative medicine and disease modeling has become available, holding great potential for the neurology field. However, safety for therapy and accurateness for modeling have been a matter of intense debate, considering that genomic instability, including the gain and loss of chromosomes (aneuploidy), has been repeatedly observed in those cells. Despite the fact that recent reports have described some degree of aneuploidy as being normal during neuronal differentiation and present in healthy human brains, this phenomenon is particularly controversial since it has traditionally been associated with cancer and disabling syndromes. It is therefore necessary to appreciate, to which extent, aneuploid pluripotent stem cells are suitable for regenerative medicine and neurological modeling and also the limits that separate constitutive from disease-related aneuploidy. In this review, recent findings regarding chromosomal instability in PSCs and within the brain will be discussed. PMID:22973193

  4. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  5. Potent tumor tropism of induced pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells in the mouse intracerebral glioma model.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Amano, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Although neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been well-known to have a strong glioma tropism, this activity in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has not yet been fully studied. In the present study, we tested tumor tropic activity of mouse iPSCs and neural stem cells derived from the iPSC (iPS-NSCs) using in vitro Matrigel invasion chamber assay and in vivo mouse intracranial tumor model. Both iPSC and iPS-NSC had a similar potent in vitro tropism for glioma conditioned media. The migrated iPSCs to the gliomas kept expressing Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting no neuronal or glial differentiation. iPSCs or iPS-NSCs labeled with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine were intracranially implanted in the contralateral hemisphere to the GL261 glioma cell implantation in the allogeneic C57BL/6 mouse. Active migration of both stem cells was observed 7 days after implantation. Again, the iPSCs located in the tumor area expressed Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting that the migrated cells were still iPSCs. These findings demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPS-NSCs had potent glioma tropism and could be candidates as vehicles in stem cell-based glioma therapy.

  6. Isolation and cultivation of stem cells from adult mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Kaomei; Wolf, Frieder; Becker, Alexander; Engel, Wolfgang; Nayernia, Karim; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) as well as induction of SSCs into pluripotent stem cells will allow us to study their biological characteristics and their applications in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the isolation of testicular cells from adolescent mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the enrichment of undifferentiated spermatogonia by laminin selection or genetic selection using Stra8-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) transgenic mice; the cultivation and conversion of undifferentiated spermatogonia into embryonic stem-like cells, so-called multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs); and characterization of these cells. Normally, it will take about 16 weeks to obtain stable maGSC lines starting from the isolation of testicular cells.

  7. Physiologic changes during brain stem death--lessons for management of the organ donor.

    PubMed

    Smith, Martin

    2004-09-01

    The widespread physiologic changes that follow brain stem death lead to a high incidence of complications in the donor and jeopardize vital organ function. Strategies for the management of organ donors exist whereby the rapid physiologic decline seen after brain stem death can be stabilized by active donor resuscitation so that the functional integrity of potentially transplantable organs is maintained. Understanding the complex physiologic changes that occur after brain stem death is crucial to the development of effective donor management strategies. This article reviews the pathophysiologic changes that occur after brain stem death and discusses controversies in donor management.

  8. Cell cycle regulation of embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking functional Pax7.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Areta M; Nowacka, Joanna; Aszer, Magdalena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Archacka, Karolina; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Koblowska, Marta; Ciemerych, Maria A; Grabowska, Iwona

    2016-11-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and in adult organisms in that it sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Recently we have shown that lack of Pax7 does not prevent the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In the current work we show that the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells modulates cell cycle facilitating their proliferation. Surprisingly, deregulation of Pax7 function also positively impacts at the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Such phenotypes seem to be executed by modulating the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin E.

  9. Long-term proliferation in culture and germline transmission of mouse male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Ogonuki, Narumi; Inoue, Kimiko; Miki, Hiromi; Ogura, Atsuo; Toyokuni, Shinya; Shinohara, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process that originates in a small population of spermatogonial stem cells. Here we report the in vitro culture of spermatogonial stem cells that proliferate for long periods of time. In the presence of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and leukemia inhibitory factor, gonocytes isolated from neonatal mouse testis proliferated over a 5-month period (>10(14)-fold) and restored fertility to congenitally infertile recipient mice following transplantation into seminiferous tubules. Long-term spermatogonial stem cell culture will be useful for studying spermatogenesis mechanism and has important implications for developing new technology in transgenesis or medicine.

  10. Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Price, John C.; Guan, Shenheng; Burlingame, Alma; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2010-01-01

    Advances in systems biology have allowed for global analyses of mRNA and protein expression, but large-scale studies of protein dynamics and turnover have not been conducted in vivo. Protein turnover is an important metabolic and regulatory mechanism in establishing proteome homeostasis, impacting many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we have used organism-wide isotopic labeling to measure the turnover rates of ~2,500 proteins in multiple mouse tissues, spanning four orders of magnitude. Through comparison of the brain with the liver and blood, we show that within the respective tissues, proteins performing similar functions often have similar turnover rates. Proteins in the brain have significantly slower turnover (average lifetime of 9.0 d) compared with those of the liver (3.0 d) and blood (3.5 d). Within some organelles (such as mitochondria), proteins have a narrow range of lifetimes, suggesting a synchronized turnover mechanism. Protein subunits within complexes of variable composition have a wide range of lifetimes, whereas those within well-defined complexes turn over in a coordinated manner. Together, the data represent the most comprehensive in vivo analysis of mammalian proteome turnover to date. The developed methodology can be adapted to assess in vivo proteome homeostasis in any model organism that will tolerate a labeled diet and may be particularly useful in the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases in vivo. PMID:20699386

  11. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype. PMID:28400715

  12. Neural Stem Cell Delivery of Therapeutic Antibodies to Treat Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    cell numbers, and brain metastatic growth was monitored by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging . Figure 5 shows that, surprisingly, the ALDH1 negative...the brains of SCID mice and lesion growth followed by non- invasive bioluminescence imaging over time (x-axis in the graph denotes days after...mouse brain. Histological analysis of brain lesions 60 days after implanting 500 tumor cells of each subpopulation. Each image represents one mouse

  13. Brain Penetration and Efficacy of Different Mebendazole Polymorphs in a Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Wanjiku, Teresia; Rudek, Michelle A; Joshi, Avadhut; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mebendazole (MBZ), first used as an antiparasitic drug, shows preclinical efficacy in models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Three different MBZ polymorphs (A, B and C) exist and a detailed assessment of the brain penetration, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor properties of each individual MBZ polymorph is necessary to improve mebendazole-based brain cancer therapy. Experimental Design and Results In this study, various marketed and custom-formulated MBZ tablets were analyzed for their polymorph content by IR spectroscopy and subsequently tested in orthotopic GL261 mouse glioma model for efficacy and tolerability. The pharmacokinetics and brain concentration of MBZ polymorphs and two main metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. We found that polymorph B and C both increased survival in a GL261 glioma model, as B exhibited greater toxicity. Polymorph A showed no benefit. Both, polymorph B and C, reached concentrations in the brain that exceeded the IC50 in GL261 cells 29-fold. In addition, polymorph C demonstrated an AUC0-24h brain-to-plasma (B/P) ratio of 0.82, whereas B showed higher plasma AUC and lower B/P ratio. In contrast, polymorph A presented markedly lower levels in the plasma and brain. Furthermore, the combination with elacridar was able to significantly improve the efficacy of polymorph C in GL261 glioma and D425 medulloblastoma models in mice. Conclusion Among MBZ polymorphs, C reaches therapeutically effective concentrations in the brain tissue and tumor with less side effects and is the better choice for brain cancer therapy. Its efficacy can be further enhanced by combination with elacridar. PMID:25862759

  14. An MRI-based Atlas and Database of the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J.; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I.; W.Toga, Arthur; Sidman, Richard L.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2010-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases. PMID:20656042

  15. Auditory Brain Stem Responses Recorded With Uncushioned Earphones.

    PubMed

    Marsh, R R; Knightly, C A

    1992-11-01

    Although the cushion is essential to accurate pure-tone audiometry with conventional earphones, it may interfere with the auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing of small infants because of its size and the risk of ear canal collapse. To determine the consequences of ABR testing with an uncushioned earphone, adults were tested with and without the cushion, and probe-tube sound measurements were made. Although removing the cushion results in substantial signal attenuation below 1 kHz, there is little effect on the click-elicited ABR.

  16. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Germ and lineage restricted stem/progenitors regenerate the mouse digit tip

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Yuval; Lindau, Paul; Ueno, Hiroo; Longaker, Michael T.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The regrowth of amputated limbs and the distal tips of digits represent models of tissue regeneration in amphibians, fish, and mice. For decades it had been assumed that limb regeneration derived from the blastema, an undifferentiated pluripotent cell population thought to be derived from mature cells via dedifferentiation. Here we show that a wide-range of tissue stem/progenitor cells contribute to restore the mouse distal digit. Genetic fate mapping and clonal analysis of individual cells revealed that these stem cells are lineage restricted, mimicking digit growth during development. Transplantation of CFP expressing hematopoietic stem cells, and parabiosis between genetically marked mice, confirmed that the stem/progenitors are tissue resident, including the cells involved in angiogenesis. These results, combined with those from appendage development/regeneration in lower vertebrates, collectively demonstrate that tissue stem cells rather than pluripotent blastema cells are an evolutionarily conserved cellular mode for limb regeneration after amputation. PMID:21866153

  18. Stem cell-paved biobridges facilitate stem transplant and host brain cell interactions for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5h of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke; thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  20. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  1. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  2. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  3. Assessment of a 42 metal salts chemical library in mouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental effects of xenobiotics on differentiation can be profiled using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) technique was used to evaluate a library of 42 metal and metaloid salts. Jl mESCs were allowed to prolif...

  4. Assessment of a 42 metal salts chemical library in mouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental effects of xenobiotics on differentiation can be profiled using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) technique was used to evaluate a library of 42 metal and metaloid salts. Jl mESCs were allowed to prolif...

  5. Brain mesenchymal stem cells: physiology and pathological implications.

    PubMed

    Pombero, Ana; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as progenitor cells that give rise to a number of unique, differentiated mesenchymal cell types. This concept has progressively evolved towards an all-encompassing concept including multipotent perivascular cells of almost any tissue. In central nervous system, pericytes are involved in blood-brain barrier, and angiogenesis and vascular tone regulation. They form the neurovascular unit (NVU) together with endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. This functional structure provides an optimal microenvironment for neural proliferation in the adult brain. Neurovascular niche include both diffusible signals and direct contact with endothelial and pericytes, which are a source of diffusible neurotrophic signals that affect neural precursors. Therefore, MSCs/pericyte properties such as differentiation capability, as well as immunoregulatory and paracrine effects make them a potential resource in regenerative medicine.

  6. Brain inflammation and oxidative stress in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer-like brain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuemang; Chinnici, Cinzia; Tang, Hanguan; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia MY; Praticò, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence implicates both brain inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relevance of their interaction in vivo, however, is unknown. Previously, we have shown that separate pharmacological targeting of these two components results in amelioration of the amyloidogenic phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of AD-like brain amyloidosis (Tg2576). Methods In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of a combination of an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin, and a natural anti-oxidant, vitamin E, in the Tg2576 mice. For this reason, animals were treated continuously from 8 (prior to Aβ deposition) through 15 (when Aβ deposits are abundant) months of age. Results At the end of the study, these therapeutic interventions suppressed brain inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in the mice. This effect was accompanied by significant reductions of soluble and insoluble Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in neocortex and hippocampus, wherein the burden of Aβ deposits also was significantly decreased. Conclusions The results of the present study support the concept that brain oxidative stress and inflammation coexist in this animal model of AD-like brain amyloidosis, but they represent two distinct therapeutic targets in the disease pathogenesis. We propose that a combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant drugs may be a useful strategy for treating AD. PMID:15500684

  7. Uni-directional differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into neurons by the neural stem sphere method.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Masahiro; Sai, Tomoaki; Nakayama, Takashi; Murakami, Koji; Inoue, Nobuo

    2011-04-01

    We previously showed that our neural stem sphere (NSS) method promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse, monkey and human embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we analyzed changes in expression of marker genes and proteins during neuronal differentiation. When cultured in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) under free-floating conditions, colonies of ES cells formed floating cell spheres, which, within 4 days, gave rise to NSSs. In the spheres, the expression of ES cell marker genes was consistently down-regulated, while expression of an epiblast marker was transiently up-regulated, beginning on day 2, and the expression of neuroectoderm, neural stem cell and neuron markers was up-regulated, beginning on days 3, 4 and 6, respectively. The expression of the marker genes was consistent with that of marker proteins. The time course of expression of these markers in the spheres resembled that of neuronal differentiation from the inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastula. In contrast, the expression of endoderm, mesoderm, epidermis, astrocyte and oligodendrocyte markers was low and not up-regulated during differentiation. Only a small number of apoptotic cells were present in the spheres. These results suggest that mouse ES cells uni-directionally differentiate into neurons via epiblast cells, neuroectodermal cells and neural stem cells.

  8. Generation of stomach tissue from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Taka-aki K; Ninomiya, Naoto; Sekine, Mari; Komazaki, Shinji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Successful pluripotent stem cell differentiation methods have been developed for several endoderm-derived cells, including hepatocytes, β-cells and intestinal cells. However, stomach lineage commitment from pluripotent stem cells has remained a challenge, and only antrum specification has been demonstrated. We established a method for stomach differentiation from embryonic stem cells by inducing mesenchymal Barx1, an essential gene for in vivo stomach specification from gut endoderm. Barx1-inducing culture conditions generated stomach primordium-like spheroids, which differentiated into mature stomach tissue cells in both the corpus and antrum by three-dimensional culture. This embryonic stem cell-derived stomach tissue (e-ST) shared a similar gene expression profile with adult stomach, and secreted pepsinogen as well as gastric acid. Furthermore, TGFA overexpression in e-ST caused hypertrophic mucus and gastric anacidity, which mimicked Ménétrier disease in vitro. Thus, in vitro stomach tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells mimics in vivo development and can be used for stomach disease models.

  9. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell compartment in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis occurs throughout the adult lifetime of males and is supported by a robust stem cell system. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the stem cells of postnatal male germ cells, and not only self-renew but also produce differentiated progeny continuously. Recent report revealed that differentiating spermatogonia could revert into an undifferentiated state, although it was believed that SSCs were homogeneous and that differentiating spermatogonia was not reversible. Although several molecules, which regulate SSC, have been identified so far, molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of SSCs as well as the reversible developmental lineage of SSCs remain to be elucidated. In this review, we describe a brief overview of spermatogenesis and summarize the molecular regulation of SSC compartment.

  10. Haematopoietic progenitor cells from adult bone marrow differentiate into cells that express oligodendroglial antigens in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Sonia; Alarcón, Pedro; Villaverde, Ramón; Aparicio, Pedro; Silva, Augusto; Martínez, Salvador

    2002-02-01

    Stem cells are self-renewable, pluripotent cells that, in adult life, proliferate by a characteristic asymmetric division in which one daughter cell is committed to differentiation whereas the other remains a stem cell. These cells are also characterized by their ability to differentiate into various cell types under heterotopic environmental influences. In the present study, we have explored the potential of adult haematopoietic bone marrow cells to differentiate into cells of oligodendroglial lineage under physiological, active myelinating conditions. We present evidence of generation of cells expressing oligodendroglial specific markers from a bone marrow subpopulation enriched on adult haematopoietic progenitor cells (CD117+) in vivo after intracerebral transplantation into the neonatal mouse brain. Our results suggest that adult bone marrow cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation from haematopoietic to oligodendroglial cells and add support the validity of bone marrow transplants as an alternative treatment for demyelinating diseases of the CNS including Multiple Sclerosis.

  11. Cytokine immunopathogenesis of enterovirus 71 brain stem encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS). Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema.

  12. Cytokine Immunopathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Min; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS). Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema. PMID:22956971

  13. Location of cat brain stem neurons that drive sweating.

    PubMed

    Shafton, Anthony D; McAllen, Robin M

    2013-05-15

    The brain stem premotor pathways controlling most noncardiovascular sympathetic outflows are unknown. Here, we mapped the brain stem neurons that drive sweating, by microinjecting excitant amino acid (L-glutamate or D,L-homocysteate: 0.4-3 nmol) into 420 sites over the pons and medulla of eight chloralose-anesthetized cats (70 mg/kg iv). Sweating was recorded by the electrodermal potential at the ipsilateral forepaw pad. Responses were classified as immediate (<5 s latency) or delayed (>10 s latency). Immediate responses were obtained from 16 sites (1-3 per animal) and were accompanied by no change in blood pressure. Those sites were clustered between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM). Microinjections into 33 surrounding sites caused delayed electrodermal responses of lesser amplitude, while the remaining 371 sites evoked none. To retrogradely label bulbospinal neurons that may mediate electrodermal responses, fluorescent latex microspheres were injected into the region of the intermediolateral cell column in the fourth thoracic segment in an earlier preparatory procedure on six of the animals. A cluster of retrogradely labeled neurons was identified between the facial nucleus and the pyramidal tract. Neurons in this discrete region of the RVMM, thus, drive sweating in the cat's paw and may do so via direct spinal projections.

  14. Comparative computational analysis of pluripotency in human and mouse stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Mathias; Dawud, Raed Abu; Kurtz, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Taher, Leila; Fuellen, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent cells can be subdivided into two distinct states, the naïve and the primed state, the latter being further advanced on the path of differentiation. There are substantial differences in the regulation of pluripotency between human and mouse, and in humans only stem cells that resemble the primed state in mouse are readily available. Reprogramming of human stem cells into a more naïve-like state is an important research focus. Here, we developed a pipeline to reanalyze transcriptomics data sets that describe both states, naïve and primed pluripotency, in human and mouse. The pipeline consists of identifying regulated start-ups/shut-downs in terms of molecular interactions, followed by functional annotation of the genes involved and aggregation of results across conditions, yielding sets of mechanisms that are consistently regulated in transitions towards similar states of pluripotency. Our results suggest that one published protocol for naïve human cells gave rise to human cells that indeed share putative mechanisms with the prototypical naïve mouse pluripotent cells, such as DNA damage response and histone acetylation. However, cellular response and differentiation-related mechanisms are similar between the naïve human state and the primed mouse state, so the naïve human state did not fully reflect the naïve mouse state. PMID:25604210

  15. CD44v6 regulates growth of brain tumor stem cells partially through the AKT-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Jijiwa, Mayumi; Demir, Habibe; Gupta, Snehalata; Leung, Crystal; Joshi, Kaushal; Orozco, Nicholas; Huang, Tiffany; Yildiz, Vedat O; Shibahara, Ichiyo; de Jesus, Jason A; Yong, William H; Mischel, Paul S; Fernandez, Soledad; Kornblum, Harley I; Nakano, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Identification of stem cell-like brain tumor cells (brain tumor stem-like cells; BTSC) has gained substantial attention by scientists and physicians. However, the mechanism of tumor initiation and proliferation is still poorly understood. CD44 is a cell surface protein linked to tumorigenesis in various cancers. In particular, one of its variant isoforms, CD44v6, is associated with several cancer types. To date its expression and function in BTSC is yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of the variant form 6 of CD44 (CD44v6) in BTSC of a subset of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients with CD44(high) GBM exhibited significantly poorer prognoses. Among various variant forms, CD44v6 was the only isoform that was detected in BTSC and its knockdown inhibited in vitro growth of BTSC from CD44(high) GBM but not from CD44(low) GBM. In contrast, this siRNA-mediated growth inhibition was not apparent in the matched GBM sample that does not possess stem-like properties. Stimulation with a CD44v6 ligand, osteopontin (OPN), increased expression of phosphorylated AKT in CD44(high) GBM, but not in CD44(low) GBM. Lastly, in a mouse spontaneous intracranial tumor model, CD44v6 was abundantly expressed by tumor precursors, in contrast to no detectable CD44v6 expression in normal neural precursors. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse CD44v6 or OPN, but not its dominant negative form, resulted in enhanced growth of the mouse tumor stem-like cells in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that a subset of GBM expresses high CD44 in BTSC, and its growth may depend on CD44v6/AKT pathway.

  16. Subretinal injection of gene therapy vectors and stem cells in the perinatal mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Skeie, Jessica M; Davis, Richard J; Tsang, Stephen H; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2012-11-25

    The loss of sight affects approximately 3.4 million people in the United States and is expected to increase in the upcoming years.(1) Recently, gene therapy and stem cell transplantations have become key therapeutic tools for treating blindness resulting from retinal degenerative diseases. Several forms of autologous transplantation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), such as iris pigment epithelial cell transplantation, have generated encouraging results, and human clinical trials have begun for other forms of gene and stem cell therapies.(2) These include RPE65 gene replacement therapy in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis and an RPE cell transplantation using human embryonic stem (ES) cells in Stargardt's disease.(3-4) Now that there are gene therapy vectors and stem cells available for treating patients with retinal diseases, it is important to verify these potential therapies in animal models before applying them in human studies. The mouse has become an important scientific model for testing the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy vectors and stem cell transplantation in the eye.(5-8) In this video article, we present a technique to inject gene therapy vectors or stem cells into the subretinal space of the mouse eye while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue.

  17. Pathological and immunohistochemical study of lethal primary brain stem injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many of the deaths that occur shortly after injury or in hospitals are caused by mild trauma. Slight morphological changes are often found in the brain stems of these patients during autopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the histopathological changes involved in primary brain stem injuries (PBSI) and their diagnostic significance. Methods A total of 65 patients who had died of PBSI and other conditions were randomly selected. They were divided into 2 groups, an injury group (25 cases) and a control group (20 cases). Slides of each patient’s midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata were prepared and stained with HE, argentaffin, and immunohistochemical agents (GFAP, NF, amyloid-ß, MBP). Under low power (×100) and NF staining, the diameter of the thickest longitudinal axon was measured at its widest point. Ten such diameters were collected for each part of the brain (midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata). Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results Brain stem contusions, astrocyte activity, edema, and pathological changes in the neurons were visibly different in the injury and control groups (P < 0.05). Characteristic changes occurred in the neural axons, axon diameter varied from axon to axon and even over different segments of one axon, and several pathological phenomena were observed. These included segmental thickening and curving, wave-like processing, disarrangement, and irregular swelling. A few axons ruptured and intumesced into retraction balls. Immunohistochemical MBP staining showed enlargement and curving of spaces between the myelin sheaths and axons in certain areas. The myelin sheaths lining the surfaces of the axons were in some cases incomplete and even exfoliated, and segmentation disappeared. These pathological changes increased in severity over time (P < 0.05). Conclusions These histopathological changes may prove beneficial to the pathological diagnosis of PBSI during autopsy. The measurement of axon

  18. Pathological and immunohistochemical study of lethal primary brain stem injuries.

    PubMed

    Rongchao, Sun; Shudong, Yang; Zhiyi, Zhou

    2012-05-21

    Many of the deaths that occur shortly after injury or in hospitals are caused by mild trauma. Slight morphological changes are often found in the brain stems of these patients during autopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the histopathological changes involved in primary brain stem injuries (PBSI) and their diagnostic significance. A total of 65 patients who had died of PBSI and other conditions were randomly selected. They were divided into 2 groups, an injury group (25 cases) and a control group (20 cases). Slides of each patient's midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata were prepared and stained with HE, argentaffin, and immunohistochemical agents (GFAP, NF, amyloid-β, MBP). Under low power (×100) and NF staining, the diameter of the thickest longitudinal axon was measured at its widest point. Ten such diameters were collected for each part of the brain (midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata). Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Brain stem contusions, astrocyte activity, edema, and pathological changes in the neurons were visibly different in the injury and control groups (P < 0.05). Characteristic changes occurred in the neural axons, axon diameter varied from axon to axon and even over different segments of one axon, and several pathological phenomena were observed. These included segmental thickening and curving, wave-like processing, disarrangement, and irregular swelling. A few axons ruptured and intumesced into retraction balls. Immunohistochemical MBP staining showed enlargement and curving of spaces between the myelin sheaths and axons in certain areas. The myelin sheaths lining the surfaces of the axons were in some cases incomplete and even exfoliated, and segmentation disappeared. These pathological changes increased in severity over time (P < 0.05). These histopathological changes may prove beneficial to the pathological diagnosis of PBSI during autopsy. The measurement of axon diameters provides a referent quantitative index

  19. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  20. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  1. A high resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carol L.; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M.; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Wakeman, Wayne B.; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J.; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Mike; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, in situ hybridization data were generated for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at 7 developmental stages for ~2100 genes, processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, 7 reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore co-expression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (developingmouse.brain-map.org). PMID:24952961

  2. A high-resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carol L; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L R; Wakeman, Wayne B; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R

    2014-07-16

    To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, we generated in situ hybridization data for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at seven developmental stages for ∼2,100 genes, which were processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, seven reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore coexpression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (http://developingmouse.brain-map.org).

  3. Sulfurtransferases and cyanide detoxification in mouse liver, kidney, and brain.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, M; Jurkowska, H; Sliwa, L; Srebro, Z

    2004-01-01

    The activity of rhodanese, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) and cystathionase in mouse liver, kidney, and four brain regions: tele-, meso-, di- and rhombencephalon was studied 30 min and 2 h following a sublethal dose of cyanide (4 mg/ kg body weight) intraperitoneal injection. Simultaneously, sulfane sulfur levels and total sulfur content, a direct or indirect source of sulfur for CN(-) conversion to SCN(-), were also investigated in these tissues. In the liver this dose of cyanide seemed to impair the process of cyanide detoxification by MPST, as well as rhodanese inhibition. The effects of cyanide administration to mice proved to be totally different in the liver and kidney. In the kidney, a significant increase in the rhodanese activity was observed as early as 30 min following cyanide intoxication, and an elevated cystathionase activity after 2 h was detected. This suggests the involvement of cystathionase in cyanide detoxification in the kidney. The activity of MPST remained at the same level as in the control group. In the rhombencephalon, similarly as in the kidney, L-cysteine desulfuration pathways, which generate sulfane sulfur and sulfurtransferases that transfer sulfane sulfur atoms to CN(-), seemed to play an important role as a defense system against cyanide. The stable level of sulfane sulfur and total sulfur content was accompanied in the rhombencephalon by an increased activity of MPST, cystathionase and rhodanese. In other brain regions the role of these three sulfurtransferases was not so clear and it seemed that in the telencephalon, where the total sulfur content, but not the sulfane sulfur level, was significantly increased, some sulfur-containing compounds, such as GSH and/or cysteine, appeared in response to cyanide.

  4. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fast-growing childhood brain stem glioma that is difficult to treat and has a poor prognosis. A focal glioma grows more slowly, is easier to treat, and has a better prognosis. Learn about the diagnosis, cellular classification, staging, treatment, and clinical trials for pediatric brain stem glioma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    PubMed

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ).

  6. Interaction between nonviral reprogrammed fibroblast stem cells and trophic factors for brain repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Anisman, H; Bobyn, J; Hayley, S

    2014-10-01

    There are currently no known treatment options that actually halt or permanently reverse the pathology evident in any neurodegenerative condition. Arguably, one of the most promising avenues for creating viable neuronal treatments could involve the combined use of cell replacement and gene therapy. Given the complexity of the neurodegenerative process, it stands to reason that adequate therapy should involve not only the replacement of loss neurons/synapses but also the interruption of multiple pro-death pathways. Thus, we propose the use of stem cells that are tailored to express specific trophic factors, thereby potentially encouraging synergistic effects between the stem cell properties and those of the trophic factors. The trophic factors, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1, in particular, have demonstrated neuroprotective actions in a number of animal models. Importantly, we use a nonviral approach, thereby minimizing the potential risk for DNA integration and tumor formation. The present study involved the development of a nonviral reprogramming system to transform adult mature mouse fibroblasts into progressive stages of cell development. We also tailored these stem cells to individually express each of the trophic factors, including BDNF, GDNF, FGF2, and IGF1. Significantly, central infusion of BDNF-expressing stem cells prevented the in vivo loss of neurons associated with infusion of the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This is particularly important in light of the role of inflammatory processes that are posited to play in virtually all neurodegenerative states. Hence, the present results support the utility of using combined gene and cell-targeting approaches for neuronal pathology.

  7. Typical and atypical stem cells in the brain, vitamin C effect and neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nualart, Francisco; Salazar, Katterine; Oyarce, Karina; Cisternas, Pedro; Jara, Nery; Silva-Álvarez, Carmen; Pastor, Patricia; Martínez, Fernando; García, Andrea; García-Robles, María de los Ángeles; Tapia, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are considered a valuable cellular resource for tissue replacement therapies in most brain disorders. Stem cells have the ability to self-replicate and differentiate into numerous cell types, including neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. As a result, stem cells have been considered the "holy grail" of modern medical neuroscience. Despite their tremendous therapeutic potential, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate their differentiation. In this review, we analyze stem cells in embryonic and adult brains, and illustrate the differentiation pathways that give origin to most brain cells. We also evaluate the emergent role of the well known anti-oxidant, vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation. We believe that a complete understanding of all molecular players, including vitamin C, in stem cell differentiation will positively impact on the use of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Quantification of light attenuation in optically cleared mouse brains

    PubMed Central

    d’Esposito, Angela; Nikitichev, Daniil; Desjardins, Adrien; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clearing, in combination with recently developed optical imaging techniques, enables visualization and acquisition of high resolution, three-dimensional images of biological structures deep within tissue. Many different approaches can be used to reduce light absorption and scattering within the tissue, but there is a paucity of research on the quantification of clearing efficacy. With the use of a custom-made spectroscopy system, we developed a way to quantify the quality of clearing in biological tissue, and applied it to the mouse brain. Three clearing techniques were compared: BABB (Murray’s clear), pBABB (a modification of BABB which includes the use of hydrogen peroxide) and passive CLARITY. Despite being limited to autofluorescence studies, we found that pBABB produced the highest degree of optical clearing. Furthermore, the approach allows regional measurement of light attenuation to be performed, and. our results show that light is most attenuated in regions with high lipid content. This work provides a way to choose between the multiple clearing protocols available, and it could prove useful for evaluating images that are acquired with cleared tissues. PMID:26277988

  9. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is known concerning the regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells. In particular, the role of cytokines such as interleukin-1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the embryo has been largely unexplored. Recently, we observed that the adult pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 is involved in regulating aorta-gonad-mesonephros hematopoietic progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell activity. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether interleukin-1 also plays a role in regulating fetal liver progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Design and Methods We examined the interleukin-1 ligand and receptor expression pattern in the fetal liver. The effects of interleukin-1 on hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells were studied by FACS and transplantation analyses of fetal liver explants, and in vivo effects on hematopoietic stem cell and progenitors were studied in Il1r1−/− embryos. Results We show that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells express the IL-1RI and that interleukin-1 increases fetal liver hematopoiesis, progenitor cell activity and promotes hematopoietic cell survival. Moreover, we show that in Il1r1−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell activity is impaired and myeloid progenitor activity is increased. Conclusions The IL-1 ligand and receptor are expressed in the midgestation liver and act in the physiological regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. PMID

  10. Isolation and Functional Assessment of Mitochondria from Small Amounts of Mouse Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F.; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7–12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format. PMID:21913109

  11. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  12. Isolation of multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells from both the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of a single adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weixiang; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Jobe, Emily M.; Zhao, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    In adult mammals, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles (SVZ) and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) demonstrate ongoing neurogenesis, and multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) in these two regions exhibit different intrinsic properties. However, investigation of the mechanisms underlying such differences has been limited by a lack of efficient methods for isolating NSCs, particularly from the adult DG. Here we describe a protocol that enables us to isolate self-renewing and multipotent NSCs from the SVZ and the DG of the same adult mouse. The protocol involves the microdissection of the SVZ and DG from one adult mouse brain, isolation of NSCs from specific regions, and cultivation of NSCs in vitro. The entire procedure takes 2 to 3 hours. Since only one mouse is needed for each cell isolation procedure, this protocol will be particularly useful for studies with limited availability of mice, such as mice that contain multiple genetic modifications. PMID:23080272

  13. 3D culture of mouse gastric stem cells using porous microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, Razan; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali; Naciri, Mariam; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Saseedharan, Prashanth; Karam, Sherif M; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The lining epithelium of the stomach includes multipotent stem cells which undergo proliferation and migration-associated differentiation. These cells give rise to multiple cell lineages that produce mucus, acid, pepsinogen and various hormones/peptides. A 3D culture for stem cells would facilitate identification of the factors that control proliferation and/or differentiation programs. Here, we report on the use of disk-like ImmobaSil HD silicone-rubber matrix based microcarriers that are permeable to oxygen and reduce the creation of toxic environment within the center of the microcarrierd for culturing the mouse gastric stem (mGS) cells. We define several parameters that affect the initial cell attachment such as size of cell inoculum, serum concentration, mode and speed of agitation. We show that although such a microcarrier allows for attachment and growth of gastric stem cells, it does not lend itself and does not support the functional differentiation of such cells.

  14. Intraventricular injection of myxoma virus results in transient expression of viral protein in mouse brain ependymal and subventricular cells.

    PubMed

    France, Megan R; Thomas, Diana L; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; MacNeill, Amy L; Roy, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively infect and lyse cancer cells have potential as therapeutic agents. Myxoma virus, a poxvirus that is known to be pathogenic only in rabbits, has not been reported to infect normal tissues in humans or mice. We observed that when recombinant virus was injected directly into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain, virally encoded red fluorescent protein was expressed in ependymal and subventricular cells. Cells were positive for nestin, a marker of neural stem cells. Rapamycin increased the number of cells expressing the virally encoded protein. However, protein expression was transient. Cells expressing the virally encoded protein did not undergo apoptosis and the ependymal lining remained intact. Myxoma virus appears to be safe when injected into the brain despite the transient expression of virally derived protein in a small population of periventricular cells.

  15. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkova, Natalia N.; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50–70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200–2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  16. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction.

  17. Neural stem cells harvested from live brains by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lui, C N P; Tsui, Y P; Ho, A S L; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Wu, C T; Li, H W; Tsang, S C Edman; Yung, K K L

    2013-11-18

    It stems from the magnetism: The extraction of stem/progenitor cells from the brain of live animals is possible using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). The Ab-MNPs are introduced to a rat's brain with a superfine micro-syringe. The stem cells attach to the Ab-MNPs and are magnetically isolated and removed. They can develop into neurospheres and differentiate into different types of cells outside the subject body. The rat remains alive and healthy.

  18. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  19. Virus-Neuron Interactions in the Mouse Brain Infected with Japanese Encephalitis Virus,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Immi mi i WRPO" T TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE At 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Virus -neuron interactions in the mouse brain infected with Japanese encephalitis...rows of ribosomes surrounding irregular-shaped, membrane-unbounded custernae and resembled that observed in JE- virus - infected PC12 cells, were also...encephalitis virus - Mouse brain neuron - Rough endoplasmic’reticulum - Viral infection ’ 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CIASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY

  20. Measuring Complexity of Mouse Brain Morphological Changes Using GeoEntropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-fiqi, Heba Z.; Pham, Tuan D.; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Crane, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on research into human neurodegenerative diseases, an effective computing approach for the analysis of complex brain morphological changes would represent a significant technological innovation. The availability of mouse models of such disorders provides an experimental system to test novel approaches to brain image analysis. Here we utilize a mouse model of a neurodegenerative disorder to model changes to cerebellar morphology during the postnatal period, and have applied the GeoEntropy algorithm to measure the complexity of morphological changes.

  1. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-02-15

    Mitochondrial function in the brain is traditionally assessed through analysing respiration in isolated mitochondria, a technique that possesses significant tissue and time requirements while also disrupting the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum. We permeabilized brain tissue in situ to permit analysis of mitochondrial respiration with the native mitochondrial morphology intact, removing the need for isolation time and minimizing tissue requirements to ∼2 mg wet weight. The permeabilized brain technique was validated against the traditional method of isolated mitochondria and was then further applied to assess regional variation in the mouse brain with ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. A transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria was applied to show the contribution of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries in different brain regions. This technique enhances the accessibility of addressing physiological questions in small brain regions and in applying transgenic mouse models to assess mechanisms regulating mitochondrial function in health and disease. Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits

  2. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  3. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke.

  4. Semiautomated volumetry of the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Norio; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an automated method of segmenting the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe simultaneously on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We obtained T1-weighted MR images from 10 normal subjects and 19 patients with brain atrophy. To perform automated volumetry from MR images, we performed the following three steps: (1) segmentation of the brain region; (2) separation between the cerebrum and the cerebellum-brain stem; and (3) segmentation of the temporal lobe. Evaluation was based on the correctly recognized region (CRR) (i.e., the region recognized by both the automated and manual methods). The mean CRRs of the normal and atrophic brains were 98.2% and 97.9% for the cerebrum, 87.9% and 88.5% for the cerebellum-brain stem, and 76.9% and 85.8% for the temporal lobe, respectively. We introduce an automated volumetric method for the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain MR images. Our method can be applied to not only the normal brain but also the atrophic brain.

  5. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  6. Allelic specificity of Ube3a expression in the mouse brain during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Judson, Matthew C; Sosa-Pagan, Jason O; Del Cid, Wilmer A; Han, Ji Eun; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2014-06-01

    Genetic alterations of the maternal UBE3A allele result in Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe developmental delay, lack of speech, and difficulty with movement and balance. The combined effects of maternal UBE3A mutation and cell type-specific epigenetic silencing of paternal UBE3A are hypothesized to result in a complete loss of functional UBE3A protein in neurons. However, the allelic specificity of UBE3A expression in neurons and other cell types in the brain has yet to be characterized throughout development, including the early postnatal period when AS phenotypes emerge. Here we define maternal and paternal allele-specific Ube3a protein expression throughout postnatal brain development in the mouse, a species that exhibits orthologous epigenetic silencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons and AS-like behavioral phenotypes subsequent to maternal Ube3a deletion. We find that neurons downregulate paternal Ube3a protein expression as they mature and, with the exception of neurons born from postnatal stem cell niches, do not express detectable paternal Ube3a beyond the first postnatal week. By contrast, neurons express maternal Ube3a throughout postnatal development, during which time localization of the protein becomes increasingly nuclear. Unlike neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrotyes biallelically express Ube3a. Notably, mature oligodendrocytes emerge as the predominant Ube3a-expressing glial cell type in the cortex and white matter tracts during postnatal development. These findings demonstrate the spatiotemporal characteristics of allele-specific Ube3a expression in key brain cell types, thereby improving our understanding of the developmental parameters of paternal Ube3a silencing and the cellular basis of AS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Method to Identify and Isolate Pluripotent Human Stem Cells and Mouse Epiblast Stem Cells Using Lipid Body-Associated Retinyl Ester Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Thangaselvam; Mukherjee, Odity; Menon, Radhika; Megha, P.B.; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the use of a characteristic blue fluorescence to identify and isolate pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and human-induced pluripotent stem cells. The blue fluorescence emission (450–500 nm) is readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and correlates with the expression of pluripotency markers (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG). It allows easy identification and isolation of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells, high-throughput fluorescence sorting and subsequent propagation. The fluorescence appears early during somatic reprogramming. We show that the blue fluorescence arises from the sequestration of retinyl esters in cytoplasmic lipid bodies. The retinoid-sequestering lipid bodies are specific to human and mouse pluripotent stem cells of the primed or epiblast-like state and absent in naive mouse embryonic stem cells. Retinol, present in widely used stem cell culture media, is sequestered as retinyl ester specifically by primed pluripotent cells and also can induce the formation of these lipid bodies. PMID:25068130

  8. Human neural stem cells alleviate Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Shin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Haejin; Kim, Miri; Yun, Seokhwan; Hwang, Kyujin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-08-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an inexorable neurodegenerative disease that commonly occurs in the elderly. The cognitive impairment caused by AD is associated with abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau, which are accompanied by inflammation. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing, multipotential cells that differentiate into distinct neural cells. When transplanted into a diseased brain, NSCs repair and replace injured tissues after migration toward and engraftment within lesions. We investigated the therapeutic effects in an AD mouse model of human NSCs (hNSCs) that derived from an aborted human fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation. Cells were transplanted into the cerebral lateral ventricles of neuron-specific enolase promoter-controlled APPsw-expressing (NSE/APPsw) transgenic mice at 13 months of age. Implanted cells extensively migrated and engrafted, and some differentiated into neuronal and glial cells, although most hNSCs remained immature. The hNSC transplantation improved spatial memory in these mice, which also showed decreased tau phosphorylation and Aβ42 levels and attenuated microgliosis and astrogliosis. The hNSC transplantation reduced tau phosphorylation via Trk-dependent Akt/GSK3β signaling, down-regulated Aβ production through an Akt/GSK3β signaling-mediated decrease in BACE1, and decreased expression of inflammatory mediators through deactivation of microglia that was mediated by cell-to-cell contact, secretion of anti-inflammatory factors generated from hNSCs, or both. The hNSC transplantation also facilitated synaptic plasticity and anti-apoptotic function via trophic supplies. Furthermore, the safety and feasibility of hNSC transplantation are supported. These findings demonstrate the hNSC transplantation modulates diverse AD pathologies and rescue impaired memory via multiple mechanisms in an AD model. Thus, our data provide tangible preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a

  9. The Maintenance of Pluripotency Following Laser Direct-Write of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Schiele, Nathan R; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2010-01-01

    The ability to precisely pattern embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro into predefined arrays/geometries may allow for the recreation of stem cell niche for better understanding of how cellular microenvironmental factors govern stem cell maintenance and differentiation. In this study, a new gelatin-based laser direct-write (LDW) technique was utilized to deposit mouse ES cells into defined arrays of spots, while maintaining stem cell pluripotency. Results obtained from these studies showed that ES cells were successfully printed into specific patterns and remained viable. Furthermore, ES cells retained the expression of Oct4 in nuclei after LDW, indicating that the laser energy did not affect their maintenance of an undifferentiated state. The differentiation potential of mouse ES cells after LDW was confirmed by their ability to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and to spontaneously become cell lineages representing all three germ layers, revealed by the expression of marker proteins of nestin (ectoderm), Myf-5 (mesoderm) and PDX-1 (endoderm), after 7 days of cultivation. Gelatin-based LDW provides a new avenue for stem cell patterning, with precision and control of the cellular microenvironment. PMID:21168910

  10. Efficient derivation of extraembryonic endoderm stem cell lines from mouse postimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiangwei; Khan, Mona; Zapiec, Bolek; Mombaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Various types of stem cell lines have been derived from preimplantation or postimplantation mouse embryos: embryonic stem cell lines, epiblast stem cell lines, and trophoblast stem cell lines. It is not known if extraembryonic endoderm stem (XEN) cell lines can be derived from postimplantation mouse embryos. Here, we report the derivation of 77 XEN cell lines from 85 postimplantation embryos at embryonic day E5.5 or E6.5, in parallel to the derivation of 41 XEN lines from 69 preimplantation embryos at the blastocyst stage. We attain a success rate of 100% of XEN cell line derivation with our E5.5 whole-embryo and E6.5 disaggregated-embryo methods. Immunofluorescence and NanoString gene expression analyses indicate that the XEN cell lines that we derived from postimplantation embryos (post-XEN) are very similar to the XEN cell lines that we derived from preimplantation embryos (pre-XEN) using a conventional method. After injection into blastocysts, post-XEN cells contribute to extraembryonic endoderm in chimeras at E6.5 and E7.5. PMID:27991575

  11. Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Embryonic Mouse Submandibular Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Isabelle. M.A.; Hoffman, Matthew. P.

    2012-01-01

    Salivary gland organogenesis involves the specification, maintenance, lineage commitment, and differentiation of epithelial stem/progenitor cells. Identifying how stem/progenitor cells are directed along a series of cell fate decisions to form a functional salivary gland will be necessary for future stem cell regenerative therapy. The identification of stem/progenitor cells within the salivary gland has focused on their role in postnatal glands and little is known about them in embryonic glands. Here, we have reviewed the information available for other developing organ systems and used it to determine whether similar cell populations exist in the mouse submandibular gland. Additionally, using growth factors that influence salivary gland epithelial morphogenesis during development, we have taken a simple experimental approach asking whether any of these growth factors influence early developmental lineages within the salivary epithelium on a transcriptional level. These preliminary findings show that salivary epithelial stem/progenitor populations exist within the gland, and that growth factors that are reported to control epithelial morphogenesis may also impact cell fate decisions. Further investigation of the signaling networks that influence stem/progenitor cell behavior will allow us to hypothesize how we might induce autologous stem cells to regenerate damaged salivary tissue in a therapeutic context. PMID:20428013

  12. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Regulate Functional Assortment of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabra, S; Ranjan, M; Bhandari, R; Kaur, T; Aggrawal, M; Puri, V; Mahajan, N; Kaur, IP; Puri, S; Sobti, RC

    2011-01-01

    A rapid decline in self-renewability, viability and function, of isolated stem cells are major hurdles in developing cell based therapies. There has been an increasing interest towards identifying a support material for maintaining stem cell features of the isolated cells. Pioneering observations of the present paper, demonstrate functionally diverse potential of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) in deciding the fate & behavior of mouse mesenchymal stem cell. The evidences are provided to show the dual nature of the SLNs for being a scaffold for the stem cell attachment, to retain stemness, and as reagent for inducing stem cell differentiation. Scanning electron microscopic examinations together with expression analysis were used to conform to such observations. Results of the study thus suggest that Solid lipid nanoparticles can be used as a good support material when functionalized to achieve adhesive properties and as a molecular paradigm for studying the adipocytic differentiation. We envisage a new role of SLNs towards regulating stem cell character by orchestrating the structural alignment during preparation of Solid lipid nanoparticles PMID:24693174

  13. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  14. Early trophoblast determination and stem cell maintenance in the mouse--a review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, T; Strumpf, D; Rossant, J

    2004-04-01

    The first priority of a mammalian embryo is to establish an intimate relationship with its mother. This is accomplished by precocious differentiation of the trophoblast lineage, which mediates uterine implantation and initiates the process of placentation. Surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms that drive trophectoderm differentiation from the equipotent blastomeres of the morula. Somewhat more is known about the maintenance of trophoblast stem cells, once this lineage has been established. The first half of this review will focus on determination of the mouse trophoblast lineage and the second half will discuss the maintenance of trophoblast stem cells.

  15. Maintenance of Genomic Stability in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells: Relevance in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Claudia; Orlando, Luca; Turinetto, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) rely on a distinctive genome caretaking network. In this review, we will discuss how mESCs functionally respond to DNA damage and describe several modifications in mESC DNA damage response, which accommodate dynamic cycling and preservation of genetic information. Subsequently, we will discuss how the transition from mESCs to adult stem/progenitor cells can be involved in the decline of tissue integrity and function in the elderly. PMID:23358251

  16. Malignant glioma: lessons from genomics, mouse models, and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M; Parada, Luis F

    2012-03-30

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment.

  17. Behavior of neural stem cells in the Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed

    Waldau, B; Shetty, A K

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) and a progressive loss of neurons leading to dementia. Because hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to functions such as learning, memory and mood, there has been great interest in examining the effects of AD on hippocampal neurogenesis. This article reviews the pertinent studies and tries to unite them in one possible disease model. Early in the disease, oligomeric Abeta may transiently promote the generation of immature neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs). However, reduced concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors and higher levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 seem to induce a developmental arrest of newly generated neurons. Furthermore, fibrillary Abeta and down-regulation of oligodendrocyte-lineage transcription factor-2 (OLIG2) may cause the death of these nonfunctional neurons. Therefore, altering the brain microenvironment for fostering apt maturation of graft-derived neurons may be critical for improving the efficacy of NSC transplantation therapy for AD.

  18. Evaluation of five diffeomorphic image registration algorithms for mouse brain magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenrong; Lin, Lan; Tian, Miao; Wang, Jingxuan; Zhang, Baiwen; Chu, Pingping; Li, Shaowu; Pathan, Muhammad Mohsin; Deng, Yulin; Wu, Shuicai

    2017-06-14

    The development of genetically engineered mouse models for neuronal diseases and behavioural disorders have generated a growing need for small animal imaging. High-resolution magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides powerful capabilities for noninvasive studies of mouse brains, while avoiding some limits associated with the histological procedures. Quantitative comparison of structural images is a critical step in brain imaging analysis, which highly relies on the performance of image registration techniques. Nowadays, there is a mushrooming growth of human brain registration algorithms, while fine-tuning of those algorithms for mouse brain MRMs is rarely addressed. Because of their topology preservation property and outstanding performance in human studies, diffeomorphic transformations have become popular in computational anatomy. In this study, we specially tuned five diffeomorphic image registration algorithms [DARTEL, geodesic shooting, diffeo-demons, SyN (Greedy-SyN and geodesic-SyN)] for mouse brain MRMs and evaluated their performance using three measures [volume overlap percentage (VOP), residual intensity error (RIE) and surface concordance ratio (SCR)]. Geodesic-SyN performed significantly better than the other methods according to all three different measures. These findings are important for the studies on structural brain changes that may occur in wild-type and transgenic mouse brains. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Rebleeding and Outcome in Patients with Symptomatic Brain Stem Cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Antonio; Patiño-Rodriguez, Hernán M; Chavarria-Medina, Mónica; Becerril, Mayra; Longo, Gabriel Mauricio; Nathal, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the long-term functional outcomes and identify the potential risk factors for rebleeding in patients with brain stem cavernous malformations (BCMs) who presented with hemorrhages and were surgically or conservatively treated and prospectively monitored. From January 1990 to July 2015, we included patients with first hemorrhagic episodes secondary to single BCMs. Modified Rankin score (mRS) was used for neurological status assessment. Univariate and multivariate regression statistics were used to identify the risk factors for rebleeding. A total of 99 patients with BCMs hemorrhages were included (59 [59.6%] women, mean age 37± 13 years). As initial treatments, 37 patients (37.4%) underwent surgery and 62 (62.6%) received conservative treatment. The median follow-up was 3.33 years (interquartile range 1.16-7 years; 408.3 patient/years). The rebleeding rate by patient/year was 10% in conservatively treated patients. Deterioration was significantly more frequent in patients with rebleeding (p = 0.0001). At the end of the follow-up, the mRS were favorable in 49 patients (65.3%) without rebleeding, whereas only 8 (33.3%) with rebleeding evolved to favorable outcomes (p = 0.006). Lesion size >18 mm (hazards ratio, HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.54-7.26; p = 0.0001) and ventral location or crossing the brain stem's midpoint (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.14-5.46; p = 0.022) were associated with a major risk of rebleeding in the univariate analysis, but only a lesion >18 mm remained statistically significant (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.21; p = 0.016) in the multivariate analysis. A lesion size >18 mm was the principal factor associated with hemorrhage recurrence. The overall functional outcome was good. However, significant morbidity was attributable to rebleeding. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  1. Inference of Transcriptional Network for Pluripotency in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburatani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, various transcription factors (TFs) maintain pluripotency. To gain insights into the regulatory system controlling pluripotency, I inferred the regulatory relationships between the TFs expressed in ES cells. In this study, I applied a method based on structural equation modeling (SEM), combined with factor analysis, to 649 expression profiles of 19 TF genes measured in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs). The factor analysis identified 19 TF genes that were regulated by several unmeasured factors. Since the known cell reprogramming TF genes (Pou5f1, Sox2 and Nanog) are regulated by different factors, each estimated factor is considered to be an input for signal transduction to control pluripotency in mouse ESCs. In the inferred network model, TF proteins were also arranged as unmeasured factors that control other TFs. The interpretation of the inferred network model revealed the regulatory mechanism for controlling pluripotency in ES cells.

  2. Activated astrocytes enhance the dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells and promote brain repair through bFGF.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Yunhui; Tu, Jie; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Bifeng; Chen, Shanping; Zhou, Jiawei; Mu, Yangling; Wang, Liping

    2014-12-17

    Astrocytes provide neuroprotective effects against degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and play a fundamental role in DA differentiation of neural stem cells. Here we show that light illumination of astrocytes expressing engineered channelrhodopsin variant (ChETA) can remarkably enhance the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and significantly promote the DA differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro. Light activation of transplanted astrocytes in the substantia nigra (SN) also upregulates bFGF levels in vivo and promotes the regenerative effects of co-transplanted stem cells. Importantly, upregulation of bFGF levels, by specific light activation of endogenous astrocytes in the SN, enhances the DA differentiation of transplanted stem cells and promotes brain repair in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our study indicates that astrocyte-derived bFGF is required for regulation of DA differentiation of the stem cells and may provide a strategy targeting astrocytes for treatment of PD.

  3. A computational approach towards the microscale mouse brain connectome from the mesoscale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tielin; Zeng, Yi; Xu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The wiring diagram of the mouse brain presents an indispensable foundation for the research on basic and applied neurobiology. It is also essential as a structural foundation for computational simulation of the brain. Different scales of the connectome give us different hints and clues to understand the functions of the nervous system and how they process information. However, compared to the macroscale and most recent mesoscale mouse brain connectome studies, there is no complete whole brain microscale connectome available because of the scalability and accuracy of automatic recognition techniques. Different scales of the connectivity data are comprehensive descriptions of the whole brain at different levels of details. Hence connectivity results from a neighborhood scale may help to predict each other. Here we report a computational approach to bring the mesoscale connectome a step forward towards the microscale from the perspective of neuron, synapse and network motifs distribution by the connectivity data at the mesoscale and some facts from the anatomical experiments at the microscale. These attempts make a step forward towards the efforts of microscale mouse brain connectome given the fact that the detailed microscale connectome results are still far to be produced due to the limitation of current nano-scale 3-D reconstruction techniques. The generated microscale mouse brain will play a key role on the understanding of the behavioral and cognitive processes of the mouse brain. In this paper, the conversion method which could get the approximate number of neurons and synapses in microscale is proposed and tested in sub-regions of Hippocampal Formation (HF), and is generalized to the whole brain. As a step forward towards understanding the microscale connectome, we propose a microscale motif prediction model to generate understanding on the microscale structure of different brain region from network motif perspective. Correlation analysis shows that the

  4. caBIG® Spotlight - Solving Research Problems: Analyze Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Transcriptional Profiles —

    Cancer.gov

    Read a case study to learn more about how Dr. Bradley Merrill of the University of Illinois at Chicago and his lab were able to perform their first gene expression array experiment comparing a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line to a non-mutant control line using GenePattern, an application supported by the Molecular Analysis Tools Knowledge Center which provides bioinformatics tools for gene expression, proteomic and SNP analysis.

  5. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  6. Troika of the mouse blastocyst: lineage segregation and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Artus, Jerome; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The initial period of mammalian embryonic development is primarily devoted to cell commitment to the pluripotent lineage, as well as to the formation of extraembryonic tissues essential for embryo survival in utero. This phase of development is also characterized by extensive morphological transitions. Cells within the preimplantation embryo exhibit extraordinary cell plasticity and adaptation in response to experimental manipulation, highlighting the use of a regulative developmental strategy rather than a predetermined one resulting from the non-uniform distribution of maternal information in the cytoplasm. Consequently, early mammalian development represents a useful model to study how the three primary cell lineages; the epiblast, primitive endoderm (also referred to as the hypoblast) and trophoblast, emerge from a totipotent single cell, the zygote. In this review, we will discuss how the isolation and genetic manipulation of murine stem cells representing each of these three lineages has contributed to our understanding of the molecular basis of early developmental events.

  7. Petasites japonicus Stimulates the Proliferation of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Dong Gu; Kim, Bang-Jin; Kim, Ki-Jung; Kim, Byung-Gak; Oh, Myeong-Geun; Han, Chan Kyu; Lee, Sanghyun; Ryu, Buom-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oriental natural plants have been used as medical herbs for the treatment of various diseases for over 2,000 years. In this study, we evaluated the effect of several natural plants on the preservation of male fertility by assessing the ability of plant extracts to stimulate spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) proliferation by using a serum-free culture method. In vitro assays showed that Petasites japonicus extracts, especially the butanol fraction, have a significant effect on germ cells proliferation including SSCs. The activity of SSCs cultured in the presence of the Petasites japonicus butanol fraction was confirmed by normal colony formation and spermatogenesis following germ cell transplantation of the treated SSCs. Our findings could lead to the discovery of novel factors that activate SSCs and could be useful for the development of technologies for the prevention of male infertility. PMID:26207817

  8. Dependence of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells on Threonine Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Alexander, Peter; Wu, Leeju; Hammer, Robert; Cleaver, Ondine; McKnight, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the abundance of common metabolites in cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells revealed an unusual state with respect to one-carbon metabolism. These findings led to the discovery of copious expression of the gene encoding threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) in ES cells. TDH-mediated catabolism of threonine takes place in mitochondria to generate glycine and acetyl–coenzyme A (CoA), with glycine facilitating one-carbon metabolism via the glycine cleavage system and acetyl-CoA feeding the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Culture media individually deprived of each of the 20 amino acids were applied to ES cells, leading to the discovery that ES cells are critically dependent on one amino acid—threonine. These observations show that ES cells exist in a high-flux backbone metabolic state comparable to that of rapidly growing bacterial cells. PMID:19589965

  9. Auditory brain stem response to complex sounds: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2010-06-01

    This tutorial provides a comprehensive overview of the methodological approach to collecting and analyzing auditory brain stem responses to complex sounds (cABRs). cABRs provide a window into how behaviorally relevant sounds such as speech and music are processed in the brain. Because temporal and spectral characteristics of sounds are preserved in this subcortical response, cABRs can be used to assess specific impairments and enhancements in auditory processing. Notably, subcortical auditory function is neither passive nor hardwired but dynamically interacts with higher-level cognitive processes to refine how sounds are transcribed into neural code. This experience-dependent plasticity, which can occur on a number of time scales (e.g., life-long experience with speech or music, short-term auditory training, on-line auditory processing), helps shape sensory perception. Thus, by being an objective and noninvasive means for examining cognitive function and experience-dependent processes in sensory activity, cABRs have considerable utility in the study of populations where auditory function is of interest (e.g., auditory experts such as musicians, and persons with hearing loss, auditory processing, and language disorders). This tutorial is intended for clinicians and researchers seeking to integrate cABRs into their clinical or research programs.

  10. Comparison of the metabolic activation of environmental carcinogens in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Krais, Annette M.; Mühlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Kucab, Jill E.; Chinbuah, Helena; Cornelius, Michael G.; Wei, Quan-Xiang; Hollstein, Monica; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Schmeiser, Heinz H.

    2015-01-01

    We compared mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and fibroblasts (MEFs) for their ability to metabolically activate the environmental carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) and aristolochic acid I (AAI), measuring DNA adduct formation by 32P-postlabelling and expression of xenobiotic-metabolism genes by quantitative real-time PCR. At 2 μM, BaP induced Cyp1a1 expression in MEFs to a much greater extent than in ES cells and formed 45 times more adducts. Nqo1 mRNA expression was increased by 3-NBA in both cell types but induction was higher in MEFs, as was adduct formation. For AAI, DNA binding was over 450 times higher in MEFs than in ES cells, although Nqo1 and Cyp1a1 transcriptional levels did not explain this difference. We found higher global methylation of DNA in ES cells than in MEFs, which suggests higher chromatin density and lower accessibility of the DNA to DNA damaging agents in ES cells. However, AAI treatment did not alter DNA methylation. Thus mouse ES cells and MEFs have the metabolic competence to activate a number of environmental carcinogens, but MEFs have lower global DNA methylation and higher metabolic capacity than mouse ES cells. PMID:25230394

  11. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  12. Physiological modulators of Kv3.1 channels adjust firing patterns of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Maile R; El-Hassar, Lynda; Zhang, Yalan; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-07-01

    Many rapidly firing neurons, including those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brain stem, express "high threshold" voltage-gated Kv3.1 potassium channels that activate only at positive potentials and are required for stimuli to generate rapid trains of actions potentials. We now describe the actions of two imidazolidinedione derivatives, AUT1 and AUT2, which modulate Kv3.1 channels. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing rat Kv3.1 channels, we found that lower concentrations of these compounds shift the voltage of activation of Kv3.1 currents toward negative potentials, increasing currents evoked by depolarization from typical neuronal resting potentials. Single-channel recordings also showed that AUT1 shifted the open probability of Kv3.1 to more negative potentials. Higher concentrations of AUT2 also shifted inactivation to negative potentials. The effects of lower and higher concentrations could be mimicked in numerical simulations by increasing rates of activation and inactivation respectively, with no change in intrinsic voltage dependence. In brain slice recordings of mouse MNTB neurons, both AUT1 and AUT2 modulated firing rate at high rates of stimulation, a result predicted by numerical simulations. Our results suggest that pharmaceutical modulation of Kv3.1 currents represents a novel avenue for manipulation of neuronal excitability and has the potential for therapeutic benefit in the treatment of hearing disorders.

  13. BRD4 regulates Nanog expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Stein, P; Cheng, X; Yang, W; Shao, N-Y; Morrisey, E E; Schultz, R M; You, J

    2014-12-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important epigenetic reader implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of different cancers and other diseases. Brd4-null mouse embryos die shortly after implantation and are compromised in their ability to maintain the inner cell mass, which gives rise to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we report that BRD4 regulates expression of the pluripotency factor Nanog in mouse ESCs and preimplantation embryos, as well as in human ESCs and embryonic cancer stem cells. Inhibition of BRD4 function using a chemical inhibitor, small interfering RNAs, or a dominant-negative approach suppresses Nanog expression, and abolishes the self-renewal ability of ESCs. We also find that BRD4 associates with BRG1 (brahma-related gene 1, aka Smarca4 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4)), a key regulator of ESC self-renewal and pluripotency, in the Nanog regulatory regions to regulate Nanog expression. Our study identifies Nanog as a novel BRD4 target gene, providing new insights for the biological function of BRD4 in stem cells and mouse embryos. Knowledge gained from these non-cancerous systems will facilitate future investigations of how Brd4 dysfunction leads to cancers.

  14. [Activation of nucleolar organizers during in vitro cultivation of mouse R1 embryonic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kunafina, E R; Chaplina, M V; Filiasova, E I; Gibanova, N V; Khodarovich, Iu M; Larionov, O A; Zatsepina, O V

    2005-01-01

    We studies the activities of ribosomal genes (nucleolus forming regions of chromosomes) at successive stages of cultivation of the mouse R1 embryonic stem cells. The total number and number of active nucleolar organizers were estimated by means of in situ hybridization with mouse rDNA probes and argentophilic staining of nucleolus forming chromosomes regions from the 16th until the 32nd passages. The data we obtained suggest that the total number of nucleolar organizers per metaphase plate was constant (as a rule, eight), while the mean number of active nucleolar organizers progressively increased from the early (16th) to the late (32nd) passages: 5.2 +/- 0.4 versus 7.4 +/- 0.9 argentophilic organizers per cell. Cell heterogeneity by the number of active nucleolar organizers also increased during the late passages. Taken together, these data suggest activation of DNA transcription and synthesis of ribosomes during cultivation of mouse R1 embryonic stem cells. Based on the experimental and published data, it has been proposed that activation of ribosomal genes correlates in time with a decreased capacity of embryonic stem cells for pluripotent differentiation.

  15. Germ stem cells are active in postnatal mouse ovary under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kun; Li, Chao-hui; Wang, Xin-yi; He, Da-jian; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    STUDY HYPOTHESIS Are active ovarian germ stem cells present in postnatal mouse ovaries under physiological conditions? STUDY FINDING Active ovarian germ stem cells exist and function in adult mouse ovaries under physiological conditions. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY In vitro studies suggested the existence of germ stem cells in postnatal ovaries of mouse, pig and human. However, in vivo studies provided evidence against the existence of active germ stem cells in postnatal mouse ovaries. Thus, it remains controversial whether such germ stem cells really exist and function in vivo in postnatal mammalian ovaries. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4)-MerCreMer transgenic mice were crossed with R26R-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) mice to establish a tamoxifen-inducible tracing system so that Oct4-expressing potential ovarian germ stem cells in young adult mice (5–6 weeks old) can be labeled with EYFP. The germ cell activities of DNA replication, mitotic division, entry into meiosis and progression to primordial follicle stage were investigated by means of immunofluorescent staining of ovarian tissues collected at different time points post-tamoxifen injection (1 day, 3 days, 2 months and 4 months). Meiosis entry and primordial follicle formation were also measured by EYFP-labeled single-cell RT–PCR. Germ cell proliferation and mitotic division were examined through 5-bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate incorporation assay. At each time point, ovaries from two to three animals were used for each set of experiment. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE By labeling the Oct4-expressing small germ cells and tracing their fates for up to 4 months, we observed persistent meiosis entry and primordial follicle replenishment. Furthermore, we captured the transient processes of mitotic DNA replication as well as mitotic division of the marked germ cells at various time periods after tracing. These lines of evidence unambiguously

  16. Neurodevelopment. Live imaging of adult neural stem cell behavior in the intact and injured zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rosario; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Baumgart, Emily Violette; Theis, Fabian J; Götz, Magdalena; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2015-05-15

    Adult neural stem cells are the source for restoring injured brain tissue. We used repetitive imaging to follow single stem cells in the intact and injured adult zebrafish telencephalon in vivo and found that neurons are generated by both direct conversions of stem cells into postmitotic neurons and via intermediate progenitors amplifying the neuronal output. We observed an imbalance of direct conversion consuming the stem cells and asymmetric and symmetric self-renewing divisions, leading to depletion of stem cells over time. After brain injury, neuronal progenitors are recruited to the injury site. These progenitors are generated by symmetric divisions that deplete the pool of stem cells, a mode of neurogenesis absent in the intact telencephalon. Our analysis revealed changes in the behavior of stem cells underlying generation of additional neurons during regeneration.

  17. Characterization of benzodiazepine receptors in primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Barker, J L; Paul, S M; Moncada, V; Skolnick, P

    1980-05-26

    Primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord were examined for the presence of binding sites for [3H]diazepam. Both brain and spinal cord cultures contain high affinity binding sites which resemble benzodiazepine receptors found in mammalian CNS with respect to both pharmacologic profile and response to exogenously applied GABA. These observations, coupled with the electrophysiologic properties of these cells suggest that primary cultures of fetal mouse brain and spinal cord may be valid models for studying the role and regulation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  18. Production of chimeras by aggregation of embryonic stem cells with diploid or tetraploid mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Eakin, Guy S; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2006-01-01

    The production of mouse chimeras is a common step in the establishment of genetically modified animal strains. Chimeras also provide a powerful experimental tool for following cell behavior during both prenatal and postnatal development. This protocol outlines a simple and economical technique for the production of large numbers of mouse chimeras using traditional diploid morula<-->diploid embryonic stem (ES) cell aggregations. Additional steps are included to describe the procedures necessary to produce specialized tetraploid chimeras using tetraploid morula<-->diploid ES cell aggregations. This increasingly popular form of chimera produces embryos of nearly complete ES cell derivation that can be used to speed transgenic production or ask developmental questions. Using this protocol, mouse chimeras can be generated and transferred to pseudopregnant surrogate mothers in a 5-d period.

  19. Vitamin D is a determinant of mouse intestinal Lgr5 stem cell functions.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, Karina; Houston, Michele; Daroqui, Cecilia; Dhima, Elena; Sellers, Rani S; Augenlicht, Leonard H

    2015-01-01

    Lgr5+ intestinal crypt base columnar cells function as stem cells whose progeny populate the villi, and Lgr5+ cells in which Apc is inactivated can give rise to tumors. Surprisingly, these Lgr5+ stem cell properties were abrogated by the lower dietary vitamin D and calcium in a semi-purified diet that promotes both genetically initiated and sporadic intestinal tumors. Inactivation of the vitamin D receptor in Lgr5+ cells established that compromise of Lgr5 stem cell function was a rapid, cell autonomous effect of signaling through the vitamin D receptor. The loss of Lgr5 stem cell function was associated with presence of Ki67 negative Lgr5+ cells at the crypt base. Therefore, vitamin D, a common nutrient and inducer of intestinal cell maturation, is an environmental factor that is a determinant of Lgr5+ stem cell functions in vivo. Since diets used in reports that establish and dissect mouse Lgr5+ stem cell activity likely provided vitamin D levels well above the range documented for human populations, the contribution of Lgr5+ cells to intestinal homeostasis and tumor formation in humans may be significantly more limited, and variable in the population, then suggested by published rodent studies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 10(6) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells.

  1. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells. PMID:25206912

  2. SC-27CD13 REPRESENTS A NOVEL BRAIN TUMOR STEM CELL MARKER FOR GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Nathaniel; Markert, Tara; Oliva, Claudia; Griguer, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a very deadly and highly vascularized tumor, but targeting glioma angiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition has been minimally successful. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that control glioma angiogenesis and progression could lead to significant new therapies. We previously described that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induces increased tumor angiogenesis, decreased mouse survival, increased resistance to chemotherapy, and an increase in CD133 (a well-known stem cell marker). Because glioma enriched with brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) share similar properties with mtDNA depleted glioma cells, we hypothesize that genes up-regulated in mitochondrial depleted cells could be signature markers of BTSCs. Thus, mtDNA could be essential for the maintenance and expansion of BTSC populations. We ran an RT Profiler PCR array for angiogenesis on both U251 ρ° cells depleted of mtDNA and on the parental, isogenic U251 glioma cells. CD13 mRNA expression was increased 200 fold in ρ° cells over U251 cells. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and immunocytochemisty we found that CD13 is significantly increased in ρ° cells over U251 cells, and is not regulated by hypoxia (1% O2). Purification of the CD13+ population by magnetic-activated cell sorting revealed that these cells form neurospheres when cultured in Neurobasal (NB) medium. In addition, 60% of CD13+ cells were also CD133+ in NB medium, while only 10% of CD13+ cells were also CD133+ in DMEM/F-12 medium. These findings suggest CD13 may be a marker of cancer stem cells in GBM. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of CD13 may reveal novel therapuetic targets capable of improving the treatment of GBM.

  3. Generation of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem-Cell-Colonies in A Non-Adherent Culture.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas; Shahverdi, Abdolhossein

    2017-01-01

    The properties of self-renewal and division in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) support spermatogenesis. There is a number of reported methods for in vitro SSC culture systems. The development of a culture system that effectively supports isolation and selfrenewal of germline stem cells (GSCs) is of tremendous benefit for clinical trials, experimental research, and as potential treatment for male infertility. The current study aims to consider the cultivation and behavior of GSCs in a non-adherent culture system. In this experimental study, we cultured testicular cells from neonatal mice in agarose coated plates in the presence of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) medium (CTRL group), 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)+DMEM (10% group), and growth factor (G group) that contained 2% FBS, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Mouse spermatogonial stem-like colonies were isolated approximately 3 weeks after digestion of the testis tissue. After passages 2-3, the identity of the mouse spermatogonial stem-like cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and flow cytometry against the germ cell markers α6, β1, c-Kit, Thy-1, c-Ret, Plzf, and Oct4. The statistical significance between mean values in different groups was determined by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). We observed spermatogonial stem-like colonies in the G and 10% groups, but not the CTRL group. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR confirmed expressions of germ cell markers in these cells. In the spermatogonial stem-like cells, we observed a significant expression (P<0.05) of germ cell markers in the G and 10% groups versus the testis cells (T). Their proliferative and apoptotic activities were examined by Ki67 and PI/annexin V-FITC. Alkaline phosphatase assay showed that mouse spermato- gonial stem-like colonies were partially positive. A non

  4. Pluripotent stem cells derived from mouse and human white mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Abdmaulen, Raushan; Ly, Albert; Cubberly, Mark R; Shahmirian, Laurine J; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Dumesic, Daniel A; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I

    2014-02-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to so-called dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that spontaneously undergo multilineage differentiation. In this study, we defined stem cell characteristics of DFAT cells as they are generated from adipocytes and the relationship between these characteristics and lineage differentiation. Both mouse and human DFAT cells, prepared from adipose tissue and lipoaspirate, respectively, showed evidence of pluripotency, with a maximum 5-7 days after adipocyte isolation. The DFAT cells spontaneously formed clusters in culture, which transiently expressed multiple stem cell markers, including stage-specific embryonic antigens, and Sca-1 (mouse) and CD105 (human), as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunostaining. As the stem cell markers decreased, markers characteristic of the three germ layers and specific lineage differentiation, such as α-fetoprotein (endoderm, hepatic), Neurofilament-66 (ectoderm, neurogenic), and Troponin I (mesoderm, cardiomyogenic), increased. However, no teratoma formation was detected after injection in immunodeficient mice. A novel modification of the adipocyte isolation aimed at ensuring the initial purity of the adipocytes and avoiding ceiling culture allowed isolation of DFAT cells with pluripotent characteristics. Thus, the adipocyte-derived DFAT cells represent a plastic stem cell population that is highly responsive to changes in culture conditions and may benefit cell-based therapies.

  5. Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Mouse and Human White Mature Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abdmaulen, Raushan; Ly, Albert; Cubberly, Mark R.; Shahmirian, Laurine J.; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Dumesic, Daniel A.; Yao, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to so-called dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that spontaneously undergo multilineage differentiation. In this study, we defined stem cell characteristics of DFAT cells as they are generated from adipocytes and the relationship between these characteristics and lineage differentiation. Both mouse and human DFAT cells, prepared from adipose tissue and lipoaspirate, respectively, showed evidence of pluripotency, with a maximum 5–7 days after adipocyte isolation. The DFAT cells spontaneously formed clusters in culture, which transiently expressed multiple stem cell markers, including stage-specific embryonic antigens, and Sca-1 (mouse) and CD105 (human), as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunostaining. As the stem cell markers decreased, markers characteristic of the three germ layers and specific lineage differentiation, such as α-fetoprotein (endoderm, hepatic), Neurofilament-66 (ectoderm, neurogenic), and Troponin I (mesoderm, cardiomyogenic), increased. However, no teratoma formation was detected after injection in immunodeficient mice. A novel modification of the adipocyte isolation aimed at ensuring the initial purity of the adipocytes and avoiding ceiling culture allowed isolation of DFAT cells with pluripotent characteristics. Thus, the adipocyte-derived DFAT cells represent a plastic stem cell population that is highly responsive to changes in culture conditions and may benefit cell-based therapies. PMID:24396033

  6. Efficient femtosecond driven SOX 17 delivery into mouse embryonic stem cells: differentiation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang; Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Lemboumba, Satuurnin Ombinda; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Embryonic stem cells have great promise in regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cell types. Delivery of therapeutic genes into cells has already been achieved using of chemical agents and viral vectors with high transfection efficiencies. However, these methods have also been documented as toxic and in the latter case they can cause latent cell infections. In this study we use femtosecond laser pulses to optically deliver genetic material in mouse embryonic stem cells. Femtosecond laser pulses in contrast to the conventional approach, minimises the risk of unwanted side effects because photons are used to create transient pores on the membrane which allow free entry of molecules with no need for delivery agents. Using an Olympus microscope, fluorescence imaging of the samples post irradiation was performed and decreased expression of stage specific embryonic antigen one (SSEA-1) consistent with on-going cellular differentiation was observed. Our results also show that femtosecond laser pulses were effective in delivering SOX 17 plasmid DNA (pSOX17) which resulted in the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into endoderm cells. We thus concluded that laser transfection of stem cells for the purpose of differentiation, holds potential for applications in tissue engineering as a method of generating new cell lines.

  7. Novel and Robust Transplantation Reveals the Acquisition of Polarized Processes by Cortical Cells Derived from Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Ikuo K.; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Sakaguchi, Haruko; Iwashita, Misato; Kobayashi, Taeko; Tone, Shigenobu; Toida, Kazunori; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Current stem cell technologies have enabled the induction of cortical progenitors and neurons from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro. To understand the mechanisms underlying the acquisition of apico-basal polarity and the formation of processes associated with the stemness of cortical cells generated in monolayer culture, here, we developed a novel in utero transplantation system based on the moderate dissociation of adherens junctions in neuroepithelial tissue. This method enables (1) the incorporation of remarkably higher numbers of grafted cells and (2) quantitative morphological analyses at single-cell resolution, including time-lapse recording analyses. We then grafted cortical progenitors induced from mouse ESCs into the developing brain. Importantly, we revealed that the mode of process extension depends on the extrinsic apico-basal polarity of the host epithelial tissue, as well as on the intrinsic differentiation state of the grafted cells. Further, we successfully transplanted cortical progenitors induced from human ESCs, showing that our strategy enables investigation of the neurogenesis of human neural progenitors within the developing mouse cortex. Specifically, human cortical cells exhibit multiple features of radial migration. The robust transplantation method established here could be utilized both to uncover the missing gap between neurogenesis from ESCs and the tissue environment and as an in vivo model of normal and pathological human corticogenesis. PMID:24325299

  8. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  9. In vivo tracking of stem cell by nanotechnologies: future prospects for mouse to human translation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Farini, Andrea; Meregalli, Mirella; Belicchi, Marzia; Torrente, Yvan

    2011-02-01

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. Dynamic determination of stem cell migration and distribution in real time is essential for optimizing treatments in preclinical models and designing clinical protocols. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including the positron emission tomography, the single-photon emission computed tomography, the magnetic resonance imaging, and microcomputed tomography. This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking, the many contrast agents, and detectors that have been proposed and suggest future directions for mouse to human translation of these techniques, for both therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

  10. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  11. Cell cycle regulation of embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking functional Pax7

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Nowacka, Joanna; Aszer, Magdalena; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A.; Grabowska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and in adult organisms in that it sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Recently we have shown that lack of Pax7 does not prevent the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In the current work we show that the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells modulates cell cycle facilitating their proliferation. Surprisingly, deregulation of Pax7 function also positively impacts at the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Such phenotypes seem to be executed by modulating the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin E. PMID:27610933

  12. Mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes in a cell culture dish.

    PubMed

    Glass, Carley; Singla, Reetu; Arora, Anshu; Singla, Dinender K

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent stem cells capable of self-renewal and have broad differentiation potential yielding cell types from all three germ layers. In the absence of differentiation inhibitory factors, when cultured in suspension, ES cells spontaneously differentiate and form three-dimensional cell aggregates termed embryoid bodies (EBs). Although various methods exist for the generation of EBs, the hanging drop method offers reproducibility and homogeneity from a predetermined number of ES cells. Herein, we describe the in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into cardiac myocytes using the hanging drop method and immunocytochemistry to identify cardiomyogenic differentiation. In brief, ES cells, placed in droplets on the lid of culture dishes following a 2-day incubation, yield embryoid bodies, which are resuspended and plated. 1-2 weeks following plating of the EBs, spontaneous beating areas can be observed and staining for specific cardiac markers can be achieved.

  13. Infant brain stem is prone to the generation of spreading depression during severe hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Funke, Frank; Kron, Miriam; Dutschmann, Mathias; Müller, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Spreading depression (SD) resembles a concerted, massive neuronal/glial depolarization propagating within the gray matter. Being associated with cerebropathology, such as cerebral ischemia or hemorrhage, epileptic seizures, and migraine, it is well studied in cortex and hippocampus. We have now analyzed the susceptibility of rat brain stem to hypoxia-induced spreading depression-like depolarization (HSD), which could critically interfere with cardiorespiratory control. In rat brain stem slices, severe hypoxia (oxygen withdrawal) triggered HSD within minutes. The sudden extracellular DC potential shift of approximately -20 mV showed the typical profile known from other brain regions and was accompanied by an intrinsic optical signal (IOS). Spatiotemporal IOS analysis revealed that in infant brain stem, HSD was preferably ignited within the spinal trigeminal nucleus and then mostly spread out medially, invading the hypoglossal nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and the ventral respiratory group (VRG). The neuronal hypoxic depolarizations underlying the generation of HSD were massive, but incomplete. The propagation velocity of HSD and the associated extracellular K(+) rise were also less marked than in other brain regions. In adult brain stem, HSD was mostly confined to the NTS and its occurrence was facilitated by hypotonic solutions, but not by glial poisoning or block of GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. In conclusion, brain stem tissue reliably generates propagating HSD episodes, which may be of interest for basilar-type migraine and brain stem infarcts. The preferred occurrence of HSD in the infant brain stem and its propagation into the VRG may be of importance for neonatal brain stem pathology such as sudden infant death syndrome.

  14. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  15. Experiences of families when a relative is diagnosed brain stem dead: understanding of death, observation of brain stem death testing and attitudes to organ donation.

    PubMed

    Ormrod, J A; Ryder, T; Chadwick, R J; Bonner, S M

    2005-10-01

    Brain stem death may be a difficult concept for relatives to understand. Our ITU practice follows published recommendations that the use of explanatory leaflets showing CT scans and observing brain stem death testing in some cases may help relatives to understand that death has occurred. Using this strategy, we interviewed 27 relatives 12 months after bereavement following certification by brain stem testing, investigating their understanding of brain stem death, subsequent attitudes to organ donation, grief reactions and attitudes of those who had observed the tests. Most relatives understood that the brain stem death tests indicated that survival was not possible, although three relatives had not fully understood this and valued the opportunity to discuss it again. Only five relatives observed the tests, all were pleased that they had done so as this had confirmed their understanding that death had occurred; however, these relatives had more evidence of psychological distress. No relatives who agreed to organ donation regretted this but three who did not allow donation subsequently expressed regret. Several relatives thought that observing the tests would have helped them to understand that death had occurred, making easier the decision to allow organ donation.

  16. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    John, Sebastian; Mishra, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galectins, a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside binding proteins is involved in several brain disorders; however, no systematic knowledge on the normal neuroanatomical distribution and functions of galectins exits. Hence, the major purpose of this study was to understand spatial distribution and predict functions of galectins in brain and also compare the degree of conservation vs. divergence between mouse and human species. The latter objective was required to determine the relevance and appropriateness of studying galectins in mouse brain which may ultimately enable us to extrapolate the findings to human brain physiology and pathologies. Results: In order to fill this crucial gap in our understanding of brain galectins, we analyzed the in situ hybridization and microarray data of adult mouse and human brain respectively, from the Allen Brain Atlas, to resolve each galectin-subtype’s spatial distribution across brain distinct cytoarchitecture. Next, transcription factors (TFs) that may regulate galectins were identified using TRANSFAC software and the list obtained was further curated to sort TFs on their confirmed transcript expression in the adult brain. Galectin-TF cluster analysis, gene-ontology annotations and co-expression networks were then extrapolated to predict distinct functional relevance of each galectin in the neuronal processes. Data shows that galectins have highly heterogeneous expression within and across brain sub-structures and are predicted to be the crucial targets of brain enriched TFs. Lgals9 had maximal spatial distribution across mouse brain with inferred predominant roles in neurogenesis while LGALS1 was ubiquitously expressed in human. Limbic region associated with learning, memory and emotions and substantia nigra associated with motor movements showed strikingly high expression of LGALS1 and LGALS8 in human vs. mouse brain. The overall expression profile of galectin-8 was most preserved across both these

  17. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain.

    PubMed

    John, Sebastian; Mishra, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galectins, a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside binding proteins is involved in several brain disorders; however, no systematic knowledge on the normal neuroanatomical distribution and functions of galectins exits. Hence, the major purpose of this study was to understand spatial distribution and predict functions of galectins in brain and also compare the degree of conservation vs. divergence between mouse and human species. The latter objective was required to determine the relevance and appropriateness of studying galectins in mouse brain which may ultimately enable us to extrapolate the findings to human brain physiology and pathologies. Results: In order to fill this crucial gap in our understanding of brain galectins, we analyzed the in situ hybridization and microarray data of adult mouse and human brain respectively, from the Allen Brain Atlas, to resolve each galectin-subtype's spatial distribution across brain distinct cytoarchitecture. Next, transcription factors (TFs) that may regulate galectins were identified using TRANSFAC software and the list obtained was further curated to sort TFs on their confirmed transcript expression in the adult brain. Galectin-TF cluster analysis, gene-ontology annotations and co-expression networks were then extrapolated to predict distinct functional relevance of each galectin in the neuronal processes. Data shows that galectins have highly heterogeneous expression within and across brain sub-structures and are predicted to be the crucial targets of brain enriched TFs. Lgals9 had maximal spatial distribution across mouse brain with inferred predominant roles in neurogenesis while LGALS1 was ubiquitously expressed in human. Limbic region associated with learning, memory and emotions and substantia nigra associated with motor movements showed strikingly high expression of LGALS1 and LGALS8 in human vs. mouse brain. The overall expression profile of galectin-8 was most preserved across both these

  18. Method of derivation and differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells generating synchronous neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Gazina, Elena V; Morrisroe, Emma; Mendis, Gunarathna D C; Michalska, Anna E; Chen, Joseph; Nefzger, Christian M; Rollo, Benjamin N; Reid, Christopher A; Pera, Martin F; Petrou, Steven

    2017-08-18

    Stem cells-derived neuronal cultures hold great promise for in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. However, currently stem cells-derived neuronal cultures do not recapitulate the functional properties of primary neurons, such as network properties. Cultured primary murine neurons develop networks which are synchronised over large fractions of the culture, whereas neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) display only partly synchronised network activity and human pluripotent stem cells-derived neurons have mostly asynchronous network properties. Therefore, strategies to improve correspondence of derived neuronal cultures with primary neurons need to be developed to validate the use of stem cell-derived neuronal cultures as in vitro models. By combining serum-free derivation of ESCs from mouse blastocysts with neuronal differentiation of ESCs in morphogen-free adherent culture we generated neuronal networks with properties recapitulating those of mature primary cortical cultures. After 35days of differentiation ESC-derived neurons developed network activity very similar to that of mature primary cortical neurons. Importantly, ESC plating density was critical for network development. Compared to the previously published methods this protocol generated more synchronous neuronal networks, with high similarity to the networks formed in mature primary cortical culture. We have demonstrated that ESC-derived neuronal networks recapitulating key properties of mature primary cortical networks can be generated by optimising both stem cell derivation and differentiation. This validates the approach of using ESC-derived neuronal cultures for disease modelling and in vitro drug screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multicolor karyotype analyses of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianli; Jauch, Anna; Heidi, Holtgreve-Grez; Schoell, Brigitte; Erz, Dorothee; Schrank, Martina; Janssen, Johannes W G

    2005-01-01

    The manipulation of embryonic stem (ES) cells to introduce directional genetic changes into the genome of mice has become an important tool in biomedical research. Monitoring of cell morphology before and after DNA manipulation and special culture conditions are a prerequisite to preserve the pluripotent properties of ES cells and thus their ability to generate chimera and effective germline transmission (GLT). It has been reported that prolonged cell culturing may affect the diploid chromosomal composition of cells and therefore the percentage of chimerism and GLT. Herein, we report multicolor-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) analysis of four different ES cell lines/clones. Although the morphology of all four ES cell lines/clones appeared normal and all four expressed the early markers Oct-3/4 and Nanog, two cell lines presented consistent numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. We demonstrate that M-FISH is a sensitive and accurate method for a comprehensive karyotype analysis of ES cells and may minimize time, costs, and disappointments due to inadequate ES cell sources.

  20. Cotransformation and gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, L H; Shesely, E G; Kim, H S; Smithies, O

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated cotransformation in mammalian cells and its potential for identifying cells that have been modified by gene targeting. Selectable genes on separate DNA fragments were simultaneously introduced into cells by coelectroporation. When the introduced fragments were scored for random integration, 75% of the transformed cells integrated both fragments within the genome of the same cell. When one of the cointroduced fragments was scored for integration at a specific locus by gene targeting, only 4% of the targeted cells cointegrated the second fragment. Apparently, cells that have been modified by gene targeting with one DNA fragment rarely incorporate a second DNA fragment. Despite this limitation, we were able to use the cotransformation protocol to identify targeted cells by screening populations of colonies that had been transformed with a cointroduced selectable gene. When hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) targeting DNA was coelectroporated with a selectable neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene into embryonic stem (ES) cells, hprt-targeted colonies were isolated from the population of neo transformants at a frequency of 1 per 70 G418-resistant colonies. In parallel experiments with the same targeting construct, hprt-targeted cells were found at a frequency of 1 per 5,500 nonselected colonies. Thus, an 80-fold enrichment for targeted cells was observed within the population of colonies transformed with the cointroduced DNA compared with the population of nonselected colonies. This enrichment for targeted cells after cotransformation should be useful in the isolation of colonies that contain targeted but nonselectable gene alterations. Images PMID:1850104

  1. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  2. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  3. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Multipotent Stem Cells in Human Brain Tissue Following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tatebayashi, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasue; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Kamachi, Saeko; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Hiroto; Takagi, Toshinori; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Perivascular regions of the brain harbor multipotent stem cells. We previously demonstrated that brain pericytes near blood vessels also develop multipotency following experimental ischemia in mice and these ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells (iSCs) can contribute to neurogenesis. However, it is essential to understand the traits of iSCs in the poststroke human brain for possible applications in stem cell-based therapies for stroke patients. In this study, we report for the first time that iSCs can be isolated from the poststroke human brain. Putative iSCs were derived from poststroke brain tissue obtained from elderly stroke patients requiring decompressive craniectomy and partial lobectomy for diffuse cerebral infarction. Immunohistochemistry showed that these iSCs were localized near blood vessels within poststroke areas containing apoptotic/necrotic neurons and expressed both the stem cell marker nestin and several pericytic markers. Isolated iSCs expressed these same markers and demonstrated high proliferative potential without loss of stemness. Furthermore, isolated iSCs expressed other stem cell markers, such as Sox2, c-myc, and Klf4, and differentiated into multiple cells in vitro, including neurons. These results show that iSCs, which are likely brain pericyte derivatives, are present within the poststroke human brain. This study suggests that iSCs can contribute to neural repair in patients with stroke. PMID:28323540

  5. Identification of Multipotent Stem Cells in Human Brain Tissue Following Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tatebayashi, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasue; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Kamachi, Saeko; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Hiroto; Takagi, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular regions of the brain harbor multipotent stem cells. We previously demonstrated that brain pericytes near blood vessels also develop multipotency following experimental ischemia in mice and these ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells (iSCs) can contribute to neurogenesis. However, it is essential to understand the traits of iSCs in the poststroke human brain for possible applications in stem cell-based therapies for stroke patients. In this study, we report for the first time that iSCs can be isolated from the poststroke human brain. Putative iSCs were derived from poststroke brain tissue obtained from elderly stroke patients requiring decompressive craniectomy and partial lobectomy for diffuse cerebral infarction. Immunohistochemistry showed that these iSCs were localized near blood vessels within poststroke areas containing apoptotic/necrotic neurons and expressed both the stem cell marker nestin and several pericytic markers. Isolated iSCs expressed these same markers and demonstrated high proliferative potential without loss of stemness. Furthermore, isolated iSCs expressed other stem cell markers, such as Sox2, c-myc, and Klf4, and differentiated into multiple cells in vitro, including neurons. These results show that iSCs, which are likely brain pericyte derivatives, are present within the poststroke human brain. This study suggests that iSCs can contribute to neural repair in patients with stroke.

  6. An Anatomically Resolved Mouse Brain Proteome Reveals Parkinson Disease-relevant Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Yun; Choi, Jong Min; Rousseaux, Maxime W C; Malovannaya, Anna; Kim, Jean J; Kutzera, Joachim; Wang, Yi; Huang, Yin; Zhu, Weimin; Maity, Suman; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya; Qin, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present a mouse brain protein atlas that covers 17 surgically distinct neuroanatomical regions of the adult mouse brain, each less than 1 mm(3) in size. The protein expression levels are determined for 6,500 to 7,500 gene protein products from each region and over 12,000 gene protein products for the entire brain, documenting the physiological repertoire of mouse brain proteins in an anatomically resolved and comprehensive manner. We explored the utility of our spatially defined protein profiling methods in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. We compared the proteome from a vulnerable region (substantia nigra pars compacta) of wild type and parkinsonian mice with that of an adjacent, less vulnerable, region (ventral tegmental area) and identified several proteins that exhibited both spatiotemporal- and genotype-restricted changes. We validated the most robustly altered proteins using an alternative profiling method and found that these modifications may highlight potential new pathways for future studies. This proteomic atlas is a valuable resource that offers a practical framework for investigating the molecular intricacies of normal brain function as well as regional vulnerability in neurological diseases. All of the mouse regional proteome profiling data are published on line at http://mbpa.bprc.ac.cn/. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Basal cells as stem cells of the mouse trachea and human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Jason R.; Onaitis, Mark W.; Rawlins, Emma L.; Lu, Yun; Clark, Cheryl P.; Xue, Yan; Randell, Scott H.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2009-01-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the mouse trachea and human airways contains a population of basal cells expressing Trp-63 (p63) and cytokeratins 5 (Krt5) and Krt14. Using a KRT5-CreERT2 transgenic mouse line for lineage tracing, we show that basal cells generate differentiated cells during postnatal growth and in the adult during both steady state and epithelial repair. We have fractionated mouse basal cells by FACS and identified 627 genes preferentially expressed in a basal subpopulation vs. non-BCs. Analysis reveals potential mechanisms regulating basal cells and allows comparison with other epithelial stem cells. To study basal cell behaviors, we describe a simple in vitro clonal sphere-forming assay in which mouse basal cells self-renew and generate luminal cells, including differentiated ciliated cells, in the absence of stroma. The transcriptional profile identified 2 cell-surface markers, ITGA6 and NGFR, which can be used in combination to purify human lung basal cells by FACS. Like those from the mouse trachea, human airway basal cells both self-renew and generate luminal daughters in the sphere-forming assay. PMID:19625615

  8. Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and Accutase dramatically increase mouse embryonic stem cell derivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Xinglong; Hu, Chunchao; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Xiangyun

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been 30 yr since the development of derivation methods for mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, the biology of derivation of ES cells is poorly understood and the efficiency varies dramatically between cell lines. Recently, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and the cell dissociation reagent Accutase were reported to significantly inhibit apoptosis of human ES cells during passaging. Therefore, in the current study, C57BL/6×129/Sv mouse blastocysts were used to evaluate the effect of the combination of the two reagents instead of using the conventional 129 line in mouse ES cell derivation. The data presented in this study suggests that the combination of Y-27632 and Accutase significantly increases the efficiency of mouse ES cell derivation; furthermore, no negative side effects were observed with Y-27632 and Accutase treatment. The newly established ES cell lines retain stable karyotype, surface markers expression, formed teratomas, and contributed to viable chimeras and germline transmission by tetraploid complementation assay. In addition, Y-27632 improved embryoid body formation of ES cells. During ES cell microinjection, Y-27632 prevented the formation of dissociation-induced cell blebs and facilitates the selection and the capture of intact cells. The methods presented in this study clearly demonstrate that inhibition of Rho kinase with Y-27632 and Accutase dissociation improve the derivation efficiently and reproducibility of mouse ES cell generation which is essential for reducing variability in the results obtained from different cell lines.

  9. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  10. OAT3-mediated extrusion of the 99mTc-ECD metabolite in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Okada, Maki; Odaka, Kenichi; Yui, Joji; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-01-01

    After administration of the 99mTc complex with N,N'-1,2-ethylenediylbis-L-cysteine diethyl ester (99mTc-ECD), a brain perfusion imaging agent, the radioactive metabolite is trapped in primate brain, but not in mouse and rat. Here, we investigate the involvement of metabolite extrusion by organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), which is highly expressed at the blood–brain barrier in mice, in this species difference. The efflux rate of radioactivity in the cerebrum of Oat3−/− mice at later phase was 20% of that of control mice. Thus, organic anion transporters in mouse brain would be involved in the low brain retention of radioactivity after 99mTc-ECD administration. PMID:24496177

  11. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains. PMID:23820224

  12. Brain stem death testing after thiopental use:A survey of UK neuro critical care practice.

    PubMed

    Pratt, O W; Bowles, B; Protheroe, R T

    2006-11-01

    A postal survey was conducted to determine how thiopental is used in UK neurosurgery critical care units. Thirty units were contacted and 26 replied. Thiopental is used in 23 units. The majority (60%) of these units govern the use of thiopental with protocols or guidelines and 74% use cerebral monitoring to guide dosage. When patients have had thiopental, 20 units delay brain stem testing, two will not perform tests and one unit incorporates cerebral angiography into their protocol. Twelve units use serum thiopental assays in their brain stem testing procedures, but there is wide variation in the interpretation of the results. We found inconsistency and confusion surrounding brain stem testing in this patient group, raising the possibility of misdiagnosis of brain stem death.

  13. Myogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells That Lack a Functional Pax7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Grabowska, Iwona; Archacka, Karolina; Bem, Joanna; Swierczek, Barbara; Helinska, Anita; Streminska, Wladyslawa; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Koblowska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Overexpression of Pax7 has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. However, the effects of the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have not yet been directly tested. Herein, we studied mouse stem cells that lacked a functional Pax7 gene and characterized the differentiation of these stem cells under conditions that promoted the derivation of myoblasts in vitro. We analyzed the expression of myogenic factors, such as myogenic regulatory factors and muscle-specific microRNAs, in wild-type and mutant cells. Finally, we compared the transcriptome of both types of cells and did not find substantial differences in the expression of genes related to the regulation of myogenesis. As a result, we showed that the absence of functional Pax7 does not prevent the in vitro myogenic differentiation of ESCs. PMID:26649785

  14. Resolving stem and progenitor cells in the adult mouse incisor through gene co-expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Kerstin; Marangoni, Pauline; Tang, Cynthia; Houshmand, Bahar; Du, Wen; Maas, Richard L; Murray, Steven; Oldham, Michael C; Klein, Ophir D

    2017-01-01

    Investigations into stem cell-fueled renewal of an organ benefit from an inventory of cell type-specific markers and a deep understanding of the cellular diversity within stem cell niches. Using the adult mouse incisor as a model for a continuously renewing organ, we performed an unbiased analysis of gene co-expression relationships to identify modules of co-expressed genes that represent differentiated cells, transit-amplifying cells, and residents of stem cell niches. Through in vivo lineage tracing, we demonstrated the power of this approach by showing that co-expression module members Lrig1 and Igfbp5 define populations of incisor epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells. We further discovered that two adjacent mesenchymal tissues, the periodontium and dental pulp, are maintained by distinct pools of stem cells. These findings reveal novel mechanisms of incisor renewal and illustrate how gene co-expression analysis of intact biological systems can provide insights into the transcriptional basis of cellular identity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24712.001 PMID:28475038

  15. High-fat diet-induced downregulation of anorexic leukemia inhibitory factor in the brain stem.

    PubMed

    Licursi, Maria; Alberto, Christian O; Dias, Alex; Hirasawa, Kensuke; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2016-11-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is known to induce low-grade hypothalamic inflammation. Whether inflammation occurs in other brain areas remains unknown. This study tested the effect of short-term HFD on cytokine gene expression and identified leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a responsive cytokine in the brain stem. Thus, functional and cellular effects of LIF in the brain stem were investigated. Male rats were fed chow or HFD for 3 days, and then gene expression was analyzed in different brain regions for IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and LIF. The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of LIF on chow intake and body weight was also tested. Patch clamp recording was performed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). HFD increased pontine TNF-α mRNA while downregulating LIF in all major parts of the brain stem, but not in the hypothalamus or hippocampus. LIF injection into the cerebral aqueduct suppressed food intake without conditioned taste aversion, suggesting that LIF can induce anorexia via lower brain regions without causing malaise. In the NTS, a key brain stem nucleus for food intake regulation, LIF induced acute changes in neuronal excitability. HFD-induced downregulation of anorexic LIF in the brain stem may provide a permissive condition for HFD overconsumption. This may be at least partially mediated by the NTS. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Micron-scale Resolution Optical Tomography of Entire Mouse Brains with Confocal Light Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Bria, Alessandro; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Peng, Hanchuan; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the architecture of mammalian brain at single-cell resolution is one of the key issues of neuroscience. However, mapping neuronal soma and projections throughout the whole brain is still challenging for imaging and data management technologies. Indeed, macroscopic volumes need to be reconstructed with high resolution and contrast in a reasonable time, producing datasets in the TeraByte range. We recently demonstrated an optical method (confocal light sheet microscopy, CLSM) capable of obtaining micron-scale reconstruction of entire mouse brains labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Combining light sheet illumination and confocal detection, CLSM allows deep imaging inside macroscopic cleared specimens with high contrast and speed. Here we describe the complete experimental pipeline to obtain comprehensive and human-readable images of entire mouse brains labeled with fluorescent proteins. The clearing and the mounting procedures are described, together with the steps to perform an optical tomography on its whole volume by acquiring many parallel adjacent stacks. We showed the usage of open-source custom-made software tools enabling stitching of the multiple stacks and multi-resolution data navigation. Finally, we illustrated some example of brain maps: the cerebellum from an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are selectively labeled, and the whole brain from a thy1-GFP-M mouse, characterized by a random sparse neuronal labeling. PMID:24145191

  17. Deep convolutional neural networks for annotating gene expression patterns in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Rongjian; Mukkamala, Ravi; Ye, Jieping; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-05-07

    Profiling gene expression in brain structures at various spatial and temporal scales is essential to understanding how genes regulate the development of brain structures. The Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas provides high-resolution 3-D in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression patterns in multiple developing stages of the mouse brain. Currently, the ISH images are annotated with anatomical terms manually. In this paper, we propose a computational approach to annotate gene expression pattern images in the mouse brain at various structural levels over the course of development. We applied deep convolutional neural network that was trained on a large set of natural images to extract features from the ISH images of developing mouse brain. As a baseline representation, we applied invariant image feature descriptors to capture local statistics from ISH images and used the bag-of-words approach to build image-level representations. Both types of features from multiple ISH image sections of the entire brain were then combined to build 3-D, brain-wide gene expression representations. We employed regularized learning methods for discriminating gene expression patterns in different brain structures. Results show that our approach of using convolutional model as feature extractors achieved superior performance in annotating gene expression patterns at multiple levels of brain structures throughout four developing ages. Overall, we achieved average AUC of 0.894 ± 0.014, as compared with 0.820 ± 0.046 yielded by the bag-of-words approach. Deep convolutional neural network model trained on natural image sets and applied to gene expression pattern annotation tasks yielded superior performance, demonstrating its transfer learning property is applicable to such biological image sets.

  18. Benzo(a)pyrene Is Mutagenic in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Dividing Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although many environmental agents are established male germ cell mutagens, few are known to induce mutations in spermatogonial stem cells. Stem cell mutations are of great concern because they result in a permanent increase in the number of mutations carried in sperm. We investigated mutation induction during mouse spermatogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). MutaMouse males were given 0, 12.5, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg bw/day BaP for 28 days by oral gavage. Germ cells were collected from the cauda epididymis and seminiferous tubules 3 days after exposure and from cauda epididymis 42 and 70 days after exposure. This design enabled targeted investigation of effects on post-spermatogonia, dividing spermatogonia, and spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. BaP increased lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in cauda sperm after exposure of dividing spermatogonia (4.2-fold at highest dose, P < .01) and spermatogonial stem cells (2.1-fold at highest dose, P < .01). No significant increases in MF were detected in cauda sperm or seminiferous tubule cells collected 3 days post-exposure. Dose-response modelling suggested that the mutational response in male germ cells to BaP is sub-linear at low doses. Our results demonstrate that oral exposure to BaP causes spermatogonial stem cell mutations, that different phases of spermatogenesis exhibit varying sensitivities to BaP, with dividing spermatogonia representing a window of peak sensitivity, and that sampling spermatogenic cells from the seminiferous tubules at earlier time-points may underestimate germ cell mutagenicity. This information is critical to optimize the use of the international test guideline for transgenic rodent mutation assays for detecting germ cell mutagens. PMID:27208087

  19. Fusion-independent expression of functional ACh receptors in mouse mesoangioblast stem cells contacting muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Francesca; Pagani, Francesca; Spinelli, Gabriele; Angelis, Luciana De; Cossu, Giulio; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2004-01-01

    Mesoangioblasts are vessel-associated fetal stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into skeletal muscle, both in vitro and in vivo. Whether this is due to fusion or to transdifferentiation into bona fide satellite cells is still an open question, for mesoangioblasts as well as for other types of stem cells. The early steps of satellite cell myogenic differentiation involve MyoD activation, membrane hyperpolarization and the appearance of ACh sensitivity and gap junctional communication. If mesoangioblasts differentiate into satellite cells, these characteristics should be observed in stem cells prior to fusion into multinucleated myotubes. We have investigated the functional properties acquired by mononucleated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive mesoangioblasts co-cultured with differentiating C2C12 myogenic cells, using the patch-clamp technique. Mesoangioblasts whose membrane contacted myogenic cells developed a hyperpolarized membrane resting potential and ACh-evoked current responses. Dye and electrical coupling was observed among mesoangioblasts but not between mesoangioblasts and myotubes. Mouse MyoD was detected by RT-PCR both in single, mononucleated mesoangioblasts co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes and in the total mRNA from mouse mesoangioblasts co-cultured with human myotubes, but not in human myotubes or stem cells cultured in isolation. In conclusion, when co-cultured with muscle cells, mesoangioblasts acquire many of the functional characteristics of differentiating satellite cells in the absence of cell fusion, strongly indicating that these stem cells undergo transdifferentiation into satellite cells, when exposed to a myogenic environment. PMID:15319417

  20. Translation of the prion protein mRNA is robust in astrocytes but does not amplify during reactive astrocytosis in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walker S; Krost, Clemens; Borkowski, Andrew W; Kaczmarczyk, Lech

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases induce neurodegeneration in specific brain areas for undetermined reasons. A thorough understanding of the localization of the disease-causing molecule, the prion protein (PrP), could inform on this issue but previous studies have generated conflicting conclusions. One of the more intriguing disagreements is whether PrP is synthesized by astrocytes. We developed a knock-in reporter mouse line in which the coding sequence of the PrP expressing gene (Prnp), was replaced with that for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Native GFP fluorescence intensity varied between and within brain regions. GFP was present in astrocytes but did not increase during reactive gliosis induced by scrapie prion infection. Therefore, reactive gliosis associated with prion diseases does not cause an acceleration of local PrP production. In addition to aiding in Prnp gene activity studies, this reporter mouse line will likely prove useful for analysis of chimeric animals produced by stem cell and tissue transplantation experiments.

  1. Possible role of brain stem respiratory neurons in mediating vomiting during space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if brain stem expiratory neurons control abdominal muscle activity during vomiting. The activity of 27 ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons, which are known to be of primary importance for control of abdominal muscle activity during respiration, was recorded. It is concluded that abdominal muscle activity during vomiting must be controlled not only by some brain stem expiratory neurons but also by other input(s).

  2. Possible role of brain stem respiratory neurons in mediating vomiting during space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if brain stem expiratory neurons control abdominal muscle activity during vomiting. The activity of 27 ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons, which are known to be of primary importance for control of abdominal muscle activity during respiration, was recorded. It is concluded that abdominal muscle activity during vomiting must be controlled not only by some brain stem expiratory neurons but also by other input(s).

  3. Brain stem responses evoked by stimulation of the mature cochlear nucleus with an auditory brain stem implant.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Martin; El-Deredy, Wael; Ramsden, Richard T

    2011-01-01

    The Nucleus auditory brain stem implant (ABI) has been used in the hearing rehabilitation of totally deaf individuals for whom a cochlear implant is not an option such as in the case of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Intraoperative electrically evoked auditory brain stem responses (EABRs) are recorded to assist in the placement of the electrode array over the dorsal and ventral cochlear nuclei in the lateral recess of the IVth ventricle of the brain stem. This study had four objectives: (1) to characterize EABRs evoked by stimulation with an ABI in adolescents and adults with NF2, (2) to evaluate how the EABR morphology relates to auditory sensations elicited from stimulation by an ABI, (3) to establish whether there is evidence of morphology changes in the EABR with site of stimulation by the ABI, and (4) to investigate how the threshold of the EABR relates to behavioral threshold and comfortably loud sensations measured at initial device activation. Intraoperative EABRs were recorded from 34 subjects with ABIs: 19 male and 15 female, mean age 27 yrs (range 12 to 52 yrs). ABI stimulation was applied at seven different sites using either wide bipolar stimulation across the array or in subsections of the array from medial to lateral and inferior to superior. The EABRs were analyzed with respect to morphology, peak latency, and changes in these characteristics with the site of stimulation. In a subset of eight subjects, additional narrow bipolar sites were stimulated to compare the intraoperative EABR threshold levels with the behavioral threshold (T) and comfortably loud (C) levels of stimulation required at initial device activation. EABRs were elicited from 91% of subjects. Morphology varied from one to four vertex-positive peaks with mean latencies of 0.76, 1.53, 2.51, and 3.64 msecs, respectively. The presence of an EABR from stimulation by electrodes across the whole array had a high predictive value for the presence of auditory electrodes at initial device

  4. Brain stem responses evoked by stimulation with an auditory brain stem implant in children with cochlear nerve aplasia or hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Martin; El-Deredy, Wael; Atas, Ahmet; Sennaroglu, Gonca; Sennaroglu, Levent; Ramsden, Richard T

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion criteria for an auditory brain stem implant (ABI) have been extended beyond the traditional, postlingually deafened adult with Neurofibromatosis type 2, to include children who are born deaf due to cochlear nerve aplasia or hypoplasia and for whom a cochlear implant is not an option. Fitting the ABI for these new candidates presents a challenge, and intraoperative electrically evoked auditory brain stem responses (EABRs) may assist in the surgical placement of the electrode array over the dorsal and ventral cochlear nucleus in the brain stem and in the postoperative programming of the device. This study had four objectives: (1) to characterize the EABR by stimulation of the cochlear nucleus in children, (2) to establish whether there are any changes between the EABR recorded intraoperatively and again just before initial behavioral testing with the device, (3) to establish whether there is evidence of morphology changes in the EABR depending on the site of stimulation with the ABI, and (4) to investigate how the EABR relates to behavioral measurements and the presence of auditory and nonauditory sensations perceived with the ABI at initial device activation. Intra- and postoperative EABRs were recorded from six congenitally deaf children with ABIs, four boys and two girls, mean age 4.2 yrs (range 3.2 to 5.0 yrs). The ABI was stimulated at nine different bipolar sites on the array, and the EABRs recorded were analyzed with respect to the morphology and peak latency with site of stimulation for each recording session. The relationship between the EABR waveforms and the presence or absence of auditory electrodes at initial device activation was investigated. The EABR threshold levels were compared with the behavioral threshold (T) and comfortably loud (C) levels of stimulation required at initial device activation. EABRs were elicited from all children on both test occasions. Responses contained a possible combination of one to three peaks from a total

  5. Stroke increases neural stem cells and angiogenesis in the neurogenic niche of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction.

  6. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  7. Targeted delivery of neural stem cells to the brain using MRI-guided focused ultrasound to disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A; Ganguly, Milan; Jordão, Jessica F; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. For stem cells to progress towards clinical use, the risks associated with invasive intracranial surgery used to deliver the cells to the brain, needs to be reduced. Here, we show that MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) is a novel method for non-invasive delivery of stem cells from the blood to the brain by opening the blood brain barrier (BBB) in specific brain regions. We used MRI guidance to target the ultrasound beam thereby delivering the iron-labeled, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing neural stem cells specifically to the striatum and the hippocampus of the rat brain. Detection of cellular iron using MRI established that the cells crossed the BBB to enter the brain. After sacrifice, 24 hours later, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of GFP-positive cells in the targeted brain regions. We determined that the neural stem cells expressed common stem cell markers (nestin and polysialic acid) suggesting they survived after transplantation with MRIgFUS. Furthermore, delivered stem cells expressed doublecortin in vivo indicating the stem cells were capable of differentiating into neurons. Together, we demonstrate that transient opening of the BBB with MRIgFUS is sufficient for transplantation of stem cells from the blood to targeted brain structures. These results suggest that MRIgFUS may be an effective alternative to invasive intracranial surgery for stem cell transplantation.

  8. Knowledge and attitudes toward brain stem death among university undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Leung, K K H; Fung, C O Y; Au, C C; Chan, D M K; Leung, G K K

    2009-06-01

    Withdrawal of life support and organ procurement for transplantation are the main implications of a diagnosis of brain stem death (BSD). Various factors may impact this important decision-making process. The present study sought to investigate the knowledge and attitudes about BSD among university undergraduates as a "well-informed" subgroup of our local population. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of nonmedical university undergraduate students in Hong Kong. The subjects' overall knowledge of BSD was unsatisfactory. Only 24% of subjects knew that BSD was the equivalent of legal death in Hong Kong. Among subjects who agreed to withdraw life support treatment from themselves upon the diagnosis of BSD, 30% and 24% refused to do so for their family members or a stranger, respectively. Subjects who agreed to withdraw life support showed significantly better knowledge about BSD than did those who did not agree. Concerns about doctors' inclination to diagnose BSD to save resources and extract organs for transplantation were not observed to negatively affect subjects' decisions about life support withdrawal. The level of knowledge is an important factor affecting an individual's decision concerning withdrawal of life support therapy upon the diagnosis of BSD. Adequate explanation and counseling are important to facilitate family members in coping with this important end-of-life issue.

  9. Behavior of neural stem cells in the Alzheimer brain

    PubMed Central

    Waldau, B.; Shetty, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and a progressive loss of neurons leading to dementia. Because hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to functions such as learning, memory and mood, there has been great interest in examining the effects of AD on hippocampal neurogenesis. This article reviews the pertinent studies and tries to unite them in one possible disease model. Early in the disease, oligomeric Aβ may transiently promote the generation of immature neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs). However, reduced concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors and higher levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 seem to induce a developmental arrest of newly generated neurons. Furthermore, fibrillary Aβ and down-regulation of oligodendrocyte-lineage transcription factor-2 (OLIG2) may cause the death of these nonfunctional neurons. Therefore, altering the brain microenvironment for fostering apt maturation of graft-derived neurons may be critical for improving the efficacy of NSC transplantation therapy for AD. PMID:18500448

  10. Computational identification of putative lincRNAs in mouse embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Lyu, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Gao, Yang; Guo, Jing; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    As the regulatory factors, lncRNAs play critical roles in embryonic stem cells. And lincRNAs are most widely studied lncRNAs, however, there might still might exist a large member of uncovered lncRNAs. In this study, we constructed the de novo assembly of transcriptome to detect 6,701 putative long intergenic non-coding transcripts (lincRNAs) expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which might be incomplete with the lack coverage of 5′ ends assessed by CAGE peaks. Comparing the TSS proximal regions between the known lincRNAs and their closet protein coding transcripts, our results revealed that the lincRNA TSS proximal regions are associated with the characteristic genomic and epigenetic features. Subsequently, 1,293 lincRNAs were corrected at their 5′ ends using the putative lincRNA TSS regions predicted by the TSS proximal region prediction model based on genomic and epigenetic features. Finally, 43 putative lincRNAs were annotated by Gene Ontology terms. In conclusion, this work provides a novel catalog of mouse ESCs-expressed lincRNAs with the relatively complete transcript length, which might be useful for the investigation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of lincRNA in mouse ESCs and even mammalian development. PMID:27713513

  11. In Situ-Synthesized Novel Microarray Optimized for Mouse Stem Cell and Early Developmental Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Mark G.; Hamatani, Toshio; Sharov, Alexei A.; Carmack, Condie E.; Qian, Yong; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Ko, Naomi T.; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Brzoska, Pius M.; Hwang, S. Stuart; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Applications of microarray technologies to mouse embryology/genetics have been limited, due to the nonavailability of microarrays containing large numbers of embryonic genes and the gap between microgram quantities of RNA required by typical microarray methods and the miniscule amounts of tissue available to researchers. To overcome these problems, we have developed a microarray platform containing in situ-synthesized 60-mer oligonucleotide probes representing approximately 22,000 unique mouse transcripts, assembled primarily from sequences of stem cell and embryo cDNA libraries. We have optimized RNA labeling protocols and experimental designs to use as little as 2 ng total RNA reliably and reproducibly. At least 98% of the probes contained in the microarray correspond to clones in our publicly available collections, making cDNAs readily available for further experimentation on genes of interest. These characteristics, combined with the ability to profile very small samples, make this system a resource for stem cell and embryogenomics research. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org and at the NIA Mouse cDNA Project Web site, http://lgsun.grc.nia.nih.gov/cDNA/cDNA.html.] PMID:12727912

  12. Ionizing radiation is a potent inducer of mitotic recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Denissova, Natalia G; Tereshchenko, Irina V; Cui, Eric; Stambrook, Peter J; Shao, Changshun; Tischfield, Jay A

    2011-10-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity in embryonic cells is pivotal to proper embryogenesis, organogenesis and to the continuity of species. Cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), a model for early embryonic cells, differ from cultured somatic cells in their capacity to remodel chromatin, in their repertoire of DNA repair enzymes, and in the regulation of cell cycle checkpoints. Using 129XC3HF1 mESCs heterozygous for Aprt, we characterized loss of Aprt heterozygosity after exposure to ionizing radiation. We report here that the frequency of loss of heterozygosity mutants in mESCs can be induced several hundred-fold by exposure to 5-10Gy of X-rays. This induction is 50-100-fold higher than the induction reported for mouse adult or embryonic fibroblasts. The primary mechanism underlying the elevated loss of heterozygosity after irradiation is mitotic recombination, with lesser contributions from deletions and gene conversions that span Aprt. Aprt point mutations and epigenetic inactivation are very rare in mESCs compared to fibroblasts. Mouse ESCs, therefore, are distinctive in their response to ionizing radiation and studies of differentiated cells may underestimate the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on ESC or other stem cells. Our findings are important to understanding the biological effects of ionizing radiation on early development and carcinogenesis.

  13. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  14. Neural Stem Cell Engraftment and Myelination in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nalin; Henry, Roland G.; Strober, Jonathan; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lim, Daniel A.; Bucci, Monica; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Gaetano, Laura; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Ryan, Tamara; Perry, Rachel; Farrell, Jody; Jeremy, Rita J.; Ulman, Mary; Huhn, Stephen L.; Barkovich, A. James; Rowitch, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a rare leukodystrophy caused by mutation of the proteolipid protein 1 gene. Defective oligodendrocytes in PMD fail to myelinate axons, causing global neurological dysfunction. Human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SCs) can develop into oligodendrocytes and confer structurally normal myelin when transplanted into a hypomyelinating mouse model. A 1-year open-label phase 1 study was undertaken to evaluate safety and to detect evidence of myelin formation after HuCNS-SC transplantation. Allogeneic HuCNS-SCs were surgically implanted into the frontal lobe white matter in four male subjects with an early-onset severe form of PMD. Immunosuppression was administered for 9 months. Serial neurological evaluations, developmental assessments, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy, including high-angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), were performed at baseline and after transplantation. The neurosurgical procedure, immunosuppression regimen, and HuCNS-SC transplantation were well tolerated. Modest gains in neurological function were observed in three of the four subjects. No clinical or radiological adverse effects were directly attributed to the donor cells. Reduced T1 and T2 relaxation times were observed in the regions of transplantation 9 months after the procedure in the three subjects. Normalized DTI showed increasing fractional anisotropy and reduced radial diffusivity, consistent with myelination, in the region of transplantation compared to control white matter regions remote to the transplant sites. These phase 1 findings indicate a favorable safety profile for HuCNS-SCs in subjects with PMD. The MRI results suggest durable cell engraftment and donor-derived myelin in the transplanted host white matter. PMID:23052294

  15. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  16. In vivo three-photon microscopy of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Nicholas G.; Wang, Ke; Kobat, Demirhan; Clark, Catharine G.; Wise, Frank W.; Schaffer, Chris B.; Xu, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy enables scientists in various fields including neuroscience, embryology and oncology to visualize in vivo and ex vivo tissue morphology and physiology at a cellular level deep within scattering tissue. However, tissue scattering limits the maximum imaging depth of two-photon fluorescence microscopy to the cortical layer within mouse brain, and imaging subcortical structures currently requires the removal of overlying brain tissue or the insertion of optical probes. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive, high-resolution, in vivo imaging of subcortical structures within an intact mouse brain using three-photon fluorescence microscopy at a spectral excitation window of 1,700 nm. Vascular structures as well as red fluorescent protein-labelled neurons within the mouse hippocampus are imaged. The combination of the long excitation wavelength and the higher-order nonlinear excitation overcomes the limitations of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, enabling biological investigations to take place at a greater depth within tissue.

  17. PIWI Proteins Are Dispensable for Mouse Somatic Development and Reprogramming of Fibroblasts into Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ee-Chun; Kang, Dongwan; Wang, Zhong; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    PIWI proteins play essential and conserved roles in germline development, including germline stem cell maintenance and meiosis. Because germline regulators such as OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 are known to be potent factors that reprogram differentiated somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we investigated whether the PIWI protein family is involved in iPSC production. We find that all three mouse Piwi genes, Miwi, Mili, and Miwi2, are expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) at higher levels than in fibroblasts, with Mili being the highest. However, mice lacking all three Piwi genes are viable and female fertile, and are only male sterile. Furthermore, embryonic fibroblasts derived from Miwi/Mili/Miwi2 triple knockout embryos can be efficiently reprogrammed into iPS cells. These iPS cells expressed pluripotency markers and were capable of differentiating into all three germ layers in teratoma assays. Genome-wide expression profiling reveals that the triple knockout iPS cells are very similar to littermate control iPS cells. These results indicate that PIWI proteins are dispensable for direct reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:25238487

  18. s-SHIP promoter expression marks activated stem cells in developing mouse mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lixia; Rohrschneider, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) play critical roles in normal development and perhaps tumorigenesis of the mammary gland. Using combined cell markers, adult MaSCs have been enriched in a basal cell population, but the exact identity of MaSCs remains unknown. We used the s-SHIP promoter to tag presumptive stem cells with GFP in the embryos of a transgenic mouse model. Here we show, in postnatal mammary gland development, that GFP+ cap cells in puberty and basal alveolar bud cells in pregnancy each exhibit self-renewal and regenerative capabilities for all mammary epithelial cells of a new functional mammary gland upon transplantation. Single GFP+ cells can regenerate the mammary epithelial network. GFP+ mammary epithelial cells are p63+, CD24mod, CD49fhigh, and CD29high; are actively proliferating; and express s-SHIP mRNA. Overall, our results identify the activated MaSC population in vivo at the forefront of rapidly developing terminal end buds (puberty) and alveolar buds (pregnancy) in the mammary gland. In addition, GFP+ basal cells are expanded in MMTV-Wnt1 breast tumors but not in ErbB2 tumors. These results enable MaSC in situ identification and isolation via a consistent single parameter using a new mouse model with applications for further analyses of normal and potential cancer stem cells. PMID:20810647

  19. Establishment of an exogenous LIF-free culture system for mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shumei; Mo, Lijuan; Wu, Rongrong; Chen, Xiaopan; Zhang, Ming

    2009-09-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have played a key role in the newly emerging fields of stem cell research. The traditional derivation and culture of mESCs have been based on the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) treated with exogenous leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). However, the rapid senescence of MEFs, coupled with the high cost of LIF, has significantly hampered the widespread use of mESCs in stem cell research. Thus, we present a novel exogenous LIF-free culture system for general mESCs applications, comprising fibroblast-like cells derived from the rabbit spleen (RSFs). We demonstrated that mESCs cultured on RSFs (mESCs-RSFs) maintained all mESC features after prolonged LIF-free culture, including alkaline phosphatase, cell surface markers (SSEA-1), molecular markers (OCT-4, NANOG, TERT, REX-1), karyotype, and pluripotency. The high expression level of both LIF and WNT3A in the RSFs may account for their ability to maintain mESCs without exogenous LIF. Moreover, this exogenous LIF-free culture system was verified to be of microbiological quality through analysis with electron transmission microscopy.

  20. The importance of three-dimensional scaffold structure on stemness maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianshu; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-09-01

    Revealing the mechanisms of cell fate regulation is important for scientific research and stem cell-based therapy. The traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultured mES cells are in a very different 2D niche from the in vivo equivalent-inner cell mass (ICM). Because the cell fate decision could be regulated by many cues which could be impacted by geometry, the traditional 2D culture system would hamper us from understanding the in vivo situations correctly. Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold was believed to provide a 3D environment closed to the in vivo one. In this work, three different scaffolds were prepared for cell culture. Several characters of mES cells were changed under 3D scaffolds culture compared to 2D, and these changes were mainly due to the alteration in geometry but not the matrix. The self-renewal of mES cells was promoted by the introducing of dimensionality. The stemness maintenance of mES was supported by all three 3D scaffolds without feeder cells in the long-time culture. Our findings demonstrated that the stemness maintenance of mES cells was promoted by the 3D geometry of scaffolds and this would provide a promising platform for ES cell research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of Perivascular Neural Stem Cells and Possible Contribution to Neurogenesis Following Transient Brain Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Masayo; Nakagomi, Takayuki; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Momota, Yoshihiro; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2017-04-01

    Recent therapeutic advances have increased the likelihood of recanalizing the obstructed brain arteries in patients with stroke. Therefore, it is important to understand the fate of neural cells under transient ischemia/reperfusion injury. Accumulating evidence shows that neurogenesis occurs in perivascular regions following brain injury, although the precise mechanism and origin of these newborn neurons under transient ischemia/reperfusion injury remain unclear. Using a mouse model of transient brain ischemia/reperfusion injury, we found that neural stem cells (NSCs) develop within injured areas. This induction of NSCs following ischemia/reperfusion injury was observed even in response to nonlethal ischemia, although massive numbers of NSCs were induced by lethal ischemia. Immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies indicated that platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta-positive (PDGFRβ(+)) pericytes within injured areas following nonlethal ischemia began to express the NSC marker nestin as early as 3 days after transient ischemia/reperfusion. Some PDGFRβ(+) pericytes expressed the immature neuronal marker doublecortin at day 7. These findings indicate that brain pericytes are a potential source of the perivascular NSCs that generate neuronal cells under lethal and nonlethal ischemic conditions following transient ischemia/reperfusion. Thus, brain pericytes might be a target for neurogenesis mediation in patients with nonlethal and lethal ischemia following transient ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  2. Therapeutic effects of mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Seok; Yi, Tac-Ghee; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Seon Ji; Lee, Kyuheon; Lee, Youn Sook; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Song, Sun U; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells (mcMSCs), which were originated from a single cell by a subfractionation culturing method, are recognized as new paradigm for stem cell therapy featured with its homogenous cell population. Next to proven therapeutic effects against pancreatitis, in the current study we demonstrated that mcMSCs showed significant therapeutic effects in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis model supported with anti-inflammatory and restorative activities. mcMSCs significantly reduced the disease activity index (DAI) score, including weight loss, stool consistency, and intestinal bleeding and significantly increased survival rates. The pathological scores were also significantly improved with mcMSC. We have demonstrated that especial mucosal regeneration activity accompanied with significantly lowered level of apoptosis as beneficiary actions of mcMSCs in UC models. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 were all significantly concurrent with significantly repressed NF-κB activation compared to the control group and significantly decreased infiltrations of responsible macrophage and neutrophil. Conclusively, our findings provide the rationale that mcMSCs are applicable as a potential source of cell-based therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially contributing either to prevent relapse or to accelerate healing as solution to unmet medical needs in IBD therapy. PMID:26566304

  3. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jennifer E

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis on student competencies such as scientific process, scientific communication, and societal relevance while teaching foundational neurobiological content such as brain anatomy, cellular neurophysiology, and activity modulation. Student feedback indicates that the BRAIN Initiative is an engaging and instructional context for this course. Course module organization, suitable BRAIN Initiative commentary literature, sample primary literature, and important assignments are presented.

  4. Brain-stem Listeriosis: A Comparison of SPECT and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sevki; Arisoy, Ayse S.; Topkaya, Aynur E.; Karsidag, Sibel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract and Introduction Abstract Listeria monocytogenes, although uncommon as a cause of illness in the general population, can result in serious illness when it affects pregnant women, neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Typically, it is a food-borne organism. This report describes a case of brain-stem listeriosis in a previously healthy 51-year-old woman. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings, the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, CSF culture, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MRI demonstrated upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle involvement. In addition, Tc-99m exametazime (HMPAO)-labeled single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain revealed bilateral cerebellar hypoperfusion. Antibiotic therapy resulted in partial clinical recovery after 3 weeks. At the end of 6 months, brain-stem findings had nearly resolved. However, although minimal residual findings were observed on MRI at 6 months, bilateral diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion remained on Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT. PMID:17415328

  5. E-cadherin regulates the behavior and fate of epithelial stem cells and their progeny in the mouse incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Ying; Cha, Wanghee; Luder, Hans-Ulrich; Charles, Roch-Philippe; McMahon, Martin; Mitsiadis, Thimios; Klein, Ophir D.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are essential for the regeneration and homeostasis of many organs, such as tooth, hair, skin, and intestine. Although human tooth regeneration is limited, a number of animals have evolved continuously growing teeth that provide models of stem cell-based organ renewal. A well-studied model is the mouse incisor, which contains dental epithelial stem cells in structures known as cervical loops. These stem cells produce progeny that proliferate and migrate along the proximo-distal axis of the incisor and differentiate into enamel-forming ameloblasts. Here, we studied the role of E-cadherin in behavior of the stem cells and their progeny. Levels of E-cadherin are highly dynamic in the incisor, such that E-cadherin is expressed in the stem cells, downregulated in the transit-amplifying cells, re-expressed in the pre-ameloblasts and then downregulated again in the ameloblasts. Conditional inactivation of E-cadherin in the cervical loop led to decreased numbers of label-retaining stem cells, increased proliferation, and decreased cell migration in the mouse incisor. Using both genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that Fibroblast Growth Factors regulate E-cadherin expression, cell proliferation and migration in the incisor. Together, our data indicate that E-cadherin is an important regulator of stem cells and their progeny during growth of the mouse incisor. PMID:22537490

  6. Are human dental papilla-derived stem cell and human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantations suitable for treatment of Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung Ho; Min, Joongkee; Shin, Nari; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Mo; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Hwang, Onyou; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2013-05-05

    Transplantation of neural stem cells has been reported as a possible approach for replacing impaired dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we tested the efficacy of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells and human brain-derived neural stem cells in rat models of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease. Rats received a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into right medial forebrain bundle, followed 3 weeks later by injections of PBS, early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells, or human brain-derived neural stem cells into the ipsilateral striatum. All of the rats in the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group died from tumor formation at around 2 weeks following cell transplantation. Postmortem examinations revealed homogeneous malignant tumors in the striatum of the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group. Stepping tests revealed that human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation did not improve motor dysfunction. In apomorphine-induced rotation tests, neither the human brain-derived neural stem cell group nor the control groups (PBS injection) demonstrated significant changes. Glucose metabolism in the lesioned side of striatum was reduced by human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation. [(18)F]-FP-CIT PET scans in the striatum did not demonstrate a significant increase in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. Tyrosine hydroxylase (dopaminergic neuronal marker) staining and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (A9 dopaminergic neuronal marker) were positive in the lesioned side of striatum in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. The use of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells confirmed its tendency to form tumors. Human brain-derived neural stem cells could be partially differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, but they did not secrete dopamine.

  7. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  8. Non-specific Immunostaining by a Rabbit Antibody against Gustducin α Subunit in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Kevin; Chen, Bei; Cohen, Akiva S.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2014-01-01

    Gustducin is a guanosine nucleotide-binding protein functionally coupled with taste receptors and thus originally identified in taste cells of the tongue. Recently, bitter taste receptors and gustducin have been detected in the airways, digestive tracts and brain. The existing studies showing taste receptors and gustducin in the brain were carried out exclusively on frozen sections. In order to avoid the technical shortcomings associated with frozen sectioning, we performed immunofluorescence staining using vibratome-cut sections from mouse brains. Using a rabbit gustducin antibody, we could not detect neurons or astrocytes as reported previously. Rather, we found dense fibers in the nucleus accumbens and periventricular areas. We assumed these staining patterns to be specific after confirmation with conventional negative control staining. For the verification of this finding, we stained gustducin knockout mouse brain and tongue sections with the same rabbit gustducin antibody. Whereas negative staining was confirmed in the tongue, intensive fibers were constantly stained in the brain. Moreover, immunostaining with a goat gustducin antibody could not demonstrate the fibers in the brain tissue. The present study implies a cross immunoreaction that occurs with the rabbit gustducin antibody in mouse brain samples, suggesting that the conventional negative controls may not be sufficient when an immunostaining pattern is to be verified. PMID:25411190

  9. Local Application of Drugs to Study Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function in Mouse Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Staci E.; Broderick, Hilary J.; Drenan, Ryan M.

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco use leads to numerous health problems, including cancer, heart disease, emphysema, and stroke. Addiction to cigarette smoking is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that stems from the biophysical and cellular actions of nicotine on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the central nervous system. Understanding the various nAChR subtypes that exist in brain areas relevant to nicotine addiction is a major priority. Experiments that employ electrophysiology techniques such as whole-cell patch clamp or two-electrode voltage clamp recordings are useful for pharmacological characterization of nAChRs of interest. Cells expressing nAChRs, such as mammalian tissue culture cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, are physically isolated and are therefore easily studied using the tools of modern pharmacology. Much progress has been made using these techniques, particularly when the target receptor was already known and ectopic expression was easily achieved. Often, however, it is necessary to study nAChRs in their native environment: in neurons within brain slices acutely harvested from laboratory mice or rats. For example, mice expressing "hypersensitive" nAChR subunits such as α4 L9′A mice 1 and α6 L9′S mice 2, allow for unambiguous identification of neurons based on their functional expression of a specific nAChR subunit. Although whole-cell patch clamp recordings from neurons in brain slices is routinely done by the skilled electrophysiologist, it is challenging to locally apply drugs such as acetylcholine or nicotine to the recorded cell within a brain slice. Dilution of drugs into the superfusate (bath application) is not rapidly reversible, and U-tube systems are not easily adapted to work with brain slices. In this paper, we describe a method for rapidly applying nAChR-activating drugs to neurons recorded in adult mouse brain slices. Standard whole-cell recordings are made from neurons in slices, and a second micropipette filled with a drug of

  10. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  11. Dynamics of the mouse brain cortical synaptic proteome during postnatal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Miguel A.; Klemmer, Patricia; Gebuis, Titia; Hassan, Chopie; van Nierop, Pim; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Smit, August B.; Li, Ka Wan

    2016-01-01

    Development of the brain involves the formation and maturation of numerous synapses. This process requires prominent changes of the synaptic proteome and potentially involves thousands of different proteins at every synapse. To date the proteome analysis of synapse development has been studied sparsely. Here, we analyzed the cortical synaptic membrane proteome of juvenile postnatal days 9 (P9), P15, P21, P27, adolescent (P35) and different adult ages P70, P140 and P280 of C57Bl6/J mice. Using a quantitative proteomics workflow we quantified 1560 proteins of which 696 showed statistically significant differences over time. Synaptic proteins generally showed increased levels during maturation, whereas proteins involved in protein synthesis generally decreased in abundance. In several cases, proteins from a single functional molecular entity, e.g., subunits of the NMDA receptor, showed differences in their temporal regulation, which may reflect specific synaptic development features of connectivity, strength and plasticity. SNARE proteins, Snap 29/47 and Stx 7/8/12, showed higher expression in immature animals. Finally, we evaluated the function of Cxadr that showed high expression levels at P9 and a fast decline in expression during neuronal development. Knock down of the expression of Cxadr in cultured primary mouse neurons revealed a significant decrease in synapse density. PMID:27748445

  12. A multimodal, multidimensional atlas of the C57BL/6J mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Lee, Erh-Fang; Dinov, Ivo D; Bota, Mihail; Shattuck, David W; Ruffins, Seth; Yuan, Heng; Konstantinidis, Fotios; Pitiot, Alain; Ding, Yi; Hu, Guogang; Jacobs, Russell E; Toga, Arthur W

    2004-01-01

    Strains of mice, through breeding or the disruption of normal genetic pathways, are widely used to model human diseases. Atlases are an invaluable aid in understanding the impact of such manipulations by providing a standard for comparison. We have developed a digital atlas of the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain as a comprehensive framework for storing and accessing the myriad types of information about the mouse brain. Our implementation was constructed using several different imaging techniques: magnetic resonance microscopy, blockface imaging, classical histology and immunohistochemistry. Along with raw and annotated images, it contains database management systems and a set of tools for comparing information from different techniques. The framework allows facile correlation of results from different animals, investigators or laboratories by establishing a canonical representation of the mouse brain and providing the tools for the insertion of independent data into the same space as the atlas. This tool will aid in managing the increasingly complex and voluminous amounts of information about the mammalian brain. It provides a framework that encompasses genetic information in the context of anatomical imaging and holds tremendous promise for producing new insights into the relationship between genotype and phenotype. We describe a suite of tools that enables the independent entry of other types of data, facile retrieval of information and straightforward display of images. Thus, the atlas becomes a framework for managing complex genetic and epigenetic information about the mouse brain. The atlas and associated tools may be accessed at http://www.loni.ucla.edu/MAP. PMID:15032916

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  14. Expression Profiling of the Solute Carrier Gene Family in the Mouse BrainS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Amber; Royall, Josh; Hohmann, John G.; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    The solute carrier (Slc) superfamily is a major group of membrane transport proteins present in mammalian cells. Although Slc transporters play essential and diverse roles in the central nervous system, the localization and function of the vast majority of Slc genes in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization data generated by the Allen Brain Atlas, we systematically and quantitatively analyzed the spatial and cellular distribution of 307 Slc genes, which represent nearly 90% of presently known mouse Slc genes, in the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain. Our analysis showed that 252 (82%) of the 307 Slc genes are present in the brain, and a large proportion of these genes were detected at low to moderate expression levels. Evaluation of 20 anatomical brain subdivisions demonstrated a comparable level of Slc gene complexity but significant difference in transcript enrichment. The distribution of the expressed Slc genes was diverse, ranging from near-ubiquitous to highly localized. Functional annotation in 20 brain regions, including the blood-brain and blood-cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) barriers, suggests major roles of Slc transporters in supporting brain energy utilization, neurotransmission, nutrient supply, and CSF production. Furthermore, hierarchical cluster analysis revealed intricate Slc expression patterns associated with neuroanatomical organization. Our studies also revealed Slc genes present within defined brain microstructures and described the putative cell types expressing individual Slc genes. These results provide a useful resource for investigators to explore the roles of Slc genes in neurophysiological and pathological processes. PMID:19179540

  15. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Rockland, Kathleen S; Seung, H Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2015-01-13

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here, we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate-early-gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP+ neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse.

  16. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Rockland, Kathleen; Seung, H. Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse. PMID:25558063

  17. Efficient introduction of specific TP53 mutations into mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Quan-Xiang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Hollstein, Monica; Odell, Adam F

    2012-05-17

    This protocol describes a rapid, precise method for generating sets of embryonic stem (ES) cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring point mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene (officially known as Trp53). The strategy uses cells from the Trp53 (p53-null) 'platform' mouse, which allows site-specific integration of plasmid DNA into the Trp53 locus. Simple PCR protocols identify correctly targeted clones and immunoblots verify re-expression of the protein. We also present protocol modifications needed for efficient recovery of MEF clones expressing p53 constructs that retain wild-type function, including growth at low (3%) oxygen and transient downregulation of p53 regulators to forestall cell senescence of primary MEFs. A library of cell lines expressing various p53 mutants derived from the same population of primary fibroblasts or platform ES cells can be acquired and screened in less than 1 month.

  18. Sensitive and quantitative detection of botulinum neurotoxin in neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Du, Zhong-wei; Pier, Christina L.; Tepp, William H.; Zhang, Su-chun; Johnson, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous protein toxins known, represent a serious bioterrorism threat but are also used as a unique and important bio-pharmaceutical to treat an increasing myriad of neurological disorders. The only currently accepted detection method by the United States Food and Drug Administration for biological activity of BoNTs and for potency determination of pharmaceutical preparations is the mouse bioassay (MBA). Recent advances have indicated that cell-based assays using primary neuronal cells can provide an equally sensitive and robust detection platform as the MBA to reliably and quantitatively detect biologically active BoNTs. This study reports for the first time a BoNT detection assay using mouse embryonic stem cells to produce a neuronal cell culture. The data presented indicate that this assaycan reliably detect BoNT/A with a similar sensitivity as the MBA. PMID:21130748

  19. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  20. RNAi Knockdown of Ape1 Gene in the Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Yu, Jieqing; LeBron, Cynthia; Fu, Yumei

    2017-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells (ES) are pluripotent cells and have the potential to become a wide variety of specialized cell types. Mouse ES cell differentiation can be regarded as a valuable biological tool that has led to major advances in our understanding of cell and developmental biology. In vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells can be directed to a specific lineage formation, such as hematopoietic lineage, by appropriate cytokine and/or growth factor stimulation. To study specific gene function in early developmental events, gene knockout approaches have been traditionally used, however, this is a time-consuming and expensive approach. Recently, we have shown that siRNA is an effective strategy to knock down target gene expression, such as Ape1, during ES cell differentiation, and consequently, one can alter cell fates in ES-derived differentiated cells. This approach will be applicable to test the function of a wide variety of gene products using the ES cell differentiation system.

  1. RNAi knockdown of redox signaling protein Ape1 in the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Lebron, Cynthia; Fu, Yumei

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells (ES) are pluripotent cells and have the potential to become a wide variety of specialized cell types. Mouse ES cell differentiation can be regarded as a valuable biological tool that has led to major advances in our understanding of cell and developmental biology. In vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells can be directed to a specific lineage formation, such as hematopoietic lineage, by appropriate cytokine and/or growth factor stimulation. To study specific gene function in early developmental events, gene knockout approaches have been traditionally used; however, this is a time-consuming and expensive approach. Recently, we have shown that siRNA is an effective strategy to knockdown target gene expression, such as Ape1, during ES cell differentiation, and consequently, one can alter cell fates in ES-derived differentiated cells. This approach will be applicable to test the function of a wide variety of gene products using the ES cell differentiation system.

  2. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  3. 3D brain Organoids derived from pluripotent stem cells: promising experimental models for brain development and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Bendriem, Raphael M; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2017-08-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) brain organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), appear to recapitulate the brain's 3D cytoarchitectural arrangement and provide new opportunities to explore disease pathogenesis in the human brain. Human iPSC (hiPSC) reprogramming methods, combined with 3D brain organoid tools, may allow patient-derived organoids to serve as a preclinical platform to bridge the translational gap between animal models and human clinical trials. Studies using patient-derived brain organoids have already revealed novel insights into molecular and genetic mechanisms of certain complex human neurological disorders such as microcephaly, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, the combination of hiPSC technology and small-molecule high-throughput screening (HTS) facilitates the development of novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies, while transcriptome sequencing enables the transcriptional profiling of patient-derived brain organoids. Finally, the addition of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing provides incredible potential for personalized cell replacement therapy with genetically corrected hiPSCs. This review describes the history and current state of 3D brain organoid differentiation strategies, a survey of applications of organoids towards studies of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and the challenges associated with their use as in vitro models of neurological disorders.

  4. Zinc Chloride Transiently Maintains Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency by Activating Stat3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Jinbo; Yu, Jia; Guo, Jing; Liu, Shiying; Qian, Chunmei; Song, Liwen; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing

    2016-01-01

    An improved understanding of the pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cells is important for investigations of early embryo development and for cell replacement therapy, but the mechanism behind pluripotency is still incompletely understood. Recent findings show that zinc, an essential trace element in humans, is critically involved in regulating various signaling pathways and genes expression. However, its role in ES cell fate determination remains to be further explored. Here we showed that 2μM zinc chloride (ZnCl2) transiently maintained mouse ES cell pluripotency in vitro. The cultured mouse ES cells remained undifferentiated under 2μM ZnCl2 treatment in leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) withdrawal, retinoic acid (RA) or embryoid bodies (EBs) differentiation assays. In addition, ZnCl2 increased pluripotency genes expression and inhibited differentiation genes expression. Further mechanistic studies revealed that ZnCl2 transiently activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling through promoting Stat3 phosphorylation. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling abrogated the effects of ZnCl2 on mouse ES cell pluripotency. Taken together, this study demonstrated a critical role of zinc in the pluripotency maintenance of mouse ES cells, as well as an important regulator of Stat3 signaling.

  5. Mouse stem cells seeded into decellularized rat kidney scaffolds endothelialize and remodel basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Edward A.; Abrahamson, Dale R.; St. John, Patricia; Clapp, William L.; Williams, Matthew J.; Terada, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Takashi; Ellison, Gary W.; Batich, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To address transplant organ shortage, a promising strategy is to decellularize kidneys in a manner that the scaffold retains signals for seeded pluripotent precursor cells to differentiate and recapitulate native structures: matrix-to-cell signaling followed by cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, thereby remodeling and replacing the original matrix. This would reduce scaffold antigenicity and enable xeno-allografts. Results DAPI-labeled cells in arterial vessels and glomeruli were positive for both endothelial lineage markers, BsLB4 and VEGFR2. Rat scaffold’s basement membrane demonstrated immunolabeling with anti-mouse laminin β1. Labeling intensified over time with 14 day incubations. Conclusion We provide new evidence for matrix-to-cell signaling in acellular whole organ scaffolds that induces differentiation of pluripotent precursor cells to endothelial lineage. Production of mouse basement membrane supports remodeling of host (rat)-derived scaffolds and thereby warrants further investigation as a promising approach for xenotransplantation. Methods We previously showed that murine embryonic stem cells arterially seeded into acellular rat whole kidney scaffolds multiply and demonstrate morphologic, immunohistochemical and gene expression evidence for differentiation. Vascular cell endothelialization was now further tested by endothelial specific BsLB4 lectin and anti-VEGFR2 (Flk1) antibodies. Remodeling of the matrix basement membranes from rat to mouse (“murinization”) was assessed by a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse laminin β1 chain. PMID:22692231

  6. Formation of gut-like structures in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from the three germ layers; however, there are still few reports about the formation of functional organs from embryonic stem cells. Recently, we reported that by hanging drops of mouse ES cells, embryoid bodies (EBs) formed gut-like structures in vitro composed of three layers corresponding to the epithelium, lamina propria, and musculature. The morphological features and the process of formation are similar to gut and its organogenesis in vivo. Thus, this is a good model for development of the gut and a useful tool for analysis of the factors required for gut organogenesis. The protocol basically involves a method of hanging drops to make EBs, which are then plated on coated dishes for outgrowth. EBs develop to form gut-like structures when induced to spontaneously enter a program of differentiation in vitro without addition of any extrinsic factors.

  7. Neuralization of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate hydrogels under retinoic acid and SAG treatment.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Peto, Heather

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the differentiation of a mouse embryonic stem cell line (CGR8) into neurons, under retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. When stem cells underwent through an embryoid body (EB) formation stage, dissociation and seeding on glass coverslips, immunofluorescent labelling for neuronal markers (Nestin, b-Tubulin III, MAP2) revealed the presence of both immature neural progenitors and mature neurons. Undifferentiated CGR8 were also encapsulated in tubular, alginate-gelatin hydrogels and incubated in differentiation media containing retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG). Cryo-sections of the hydrogel tubes were positive for Nestin, Pax6 and b-Tubulin III, verifying the presence of neurons and neural progenitors. Provided neural induction can be more precisely directed in the tubular hydrogels, these scaffolds will become a powerful model of neural tube development in embryos and will highlight potential strategies for spinal cord regeneration.

  8. Reconstitution of a Patterned Neural Tube from Single Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keisuke; Ranga, Adrian; Lutolf, Matthias P; Tanaka, Elly M; Meinhardt, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The recapitulation of tissue development and patterning in three-dimensional (3D) culture is an important dimension of stem cell research. Here, we describe a 3D culture protocol in which single mouse ES cells embedded in Matrigel under neural induction conditions clonally form a lumen containing, oval-shaped epithelial structure within 3 days. By Day 7 an apicobasally polarized neuroepithelium with uniformly dorsal cell identity forms. Treatment with retinoic acid at Day 2 results in posteriorization and self-organization of dorsal-ventral neural tube patterning. Neural tube organoid growth is also supported by pure laminin gels as well as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based artificial extracellular matrix hydrogels, which can be fine-tuned for key microenvironment characteristics. The rapid generation of a simple, patterned tissue in well-defined culture conditions makes the neural tube organoid a tractable model for studying neural stem cell self-organization.

  9. Forward and reverse mouse genetics through derivation of haploid embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Elling, Ulrich; Taubenschmid, Jasmin; Wirnsberger, Gerald; O'Malley, Ronan; Demers, Simon; Vanhaelen, Quentin; Shukalyuk, Andrey I.; Schmauss, Gerald; Schramek, Daniel; Schnuetgen, Frank; von Melchner, Harald; Ecker, Joseph R.; Stanford, William L.; Zuber, Johannes; Stark, Alexander; Penninger, Josef M.

    2014-01-01

    All somatic mammalian cells carry two copies of chromosomes (diploidy), whereas organisms with a single copy of their genome such as yeast provide a basis for recessive genetics. Here we report the generation of haploid mouse ES cell lines from parthenogenetic embryos. These cells carry 20 chromosomes, express stem cell markers, and develop into all germ-layers in vitro and in vivo. We also developed a reversible mutagenesis protocol that allows saturated genetic recessive screens and results in homozygous alleles. This system allowed us to generate the first knock-out cell line for the microRNA processing enzyme Drosha. In a forward genetic screen, we identified Gpr107 as a molecule essential for killing by ricin, a toxin being used as bioweapon. Our results open the possibility to combine the power of a haploid genome with pluripotency of embryonic stem cells to uncover fundamental biological processes in defined cell types at a genomic scale. PMID:22136931

  10. Dissecting the heterogeneity of gene expressions in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Thomson,