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Sample records for mouse express n-acyl

  1. Mouse Siglec-1 Mediates trans-Infection of Surface-bound Murine Leukemia Virus in a Sialic Acid N-Acyl Side Chain-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Elina; Wratil, Paul R.; Frank, Martin; Ambiel, Ina; Pahnke, Katharina; Pino, Maria; Azadi, Parastoo; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Meier, Chris; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Crocker, Paul R.; Reutter, Werner; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2015-01-01

    Siglec-1 (sialoadhesin, CD169) is a surface receptor on human cells that mediates trans-enhancement of HIV-1 infection through recognition of sialic acid moieties in virus membrane gangliosides. Here, we demonstrate that mouse Siglec-1, expressed on the surface of primary macrophages in an interferon-α-responsive manner, captures murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles and mediates their transfer to proliferating lymphocytes. The MLV infection of primary B-cells was markedly more efficient than that of primary T-cells. The major structural protein of MLV particles, Gag, frequently co-localized with Siglec-1, and trans-infection, primarily of surface-bound MLV particles, efficiently occurred. To explore the role of sialic acid for MLV trans-infection at a submolecular level, we analyzed the potential of six sialic acid precursor analogs to modulate the sialylated ganglioside-dependent interaction of MLV particles with Siglec-1. Biosynthetically engineered sialic acids were detected in both the glycolipid and glycoprotein fractions of MLV producer cells. MLV released from cells carrying N-acyl-modified sialic acids displayed strikingly different capacities for Siglec-1-mediated capture and trans-infection; N-butanoyl, N-isobutanoyl, N-glycolyl, or N-pentanoyl side chain modifications resulted in up to 92 and 80% reduction of virus particle capture and trans-infection, respectively, whereas N-propanoyl or N-cyclopropylcarbamyl side chains had no effect. In agreement with these functional analyses, molecular modeling indicated reduced binding affinities for non-functional N-acyl modifications. Thus, Siglec-1 is a key receptor for macrophage/lymphocyte trans-infection of surface-bound virions, and the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is a critical determinant for the Siglec-1/MLV interaction. PMID:26370074

  2. Exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactones enhance the expression of flagella of Pseudomonas syringae and activate defence responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feifei; Ma, Anzhou; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Fray, Rupert G

    2016-10-18

    In order to cope with pathogens, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense pathogenic attacks and to induce defence responses. The N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in bacteria regulates diverse physiological processes, including those involved in pathogenicity. In this work, we study the interactions between AHL-producing transgenic tobacco plants and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 (P. syringae 11528). Both a reduced incidence of disease and decrease in the growth of P. syringae 11528 were observed in AHL-producing plants compared with wild-type plants. The present data indicate that plant-produced AHLs enhance disease resistance against this pathogen. Subsequent RNA-sequencing analysis showed that the exogenous addition of AHLs up-regulated the expression of P. syringae 11528 genes for flagella production. Expression levels of plant defence genes in AHL-producing and wild-type plants were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These data showed that plant-produced AHLs activated a wide spectrum of defence responses in plants following inoculation, including the oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, cell wall strengthening, and the production of certain metabolites. These results demonstrate that exogenous AHLs alter the gene expression patterns of pathogens, and plant-produced AHLs either directly or indirectly enhance plant local immunity during the early stage of plant infection.

  3. Cloning and expression of quorum sensing N-acyl-homoserine synthase (LuxI) gene detected in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Modarresi, Farzan; Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Mansouri, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In present study we aimed to clone the luxI gene encoding N-acyl-homoserine synthase detected in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and study its expression in Escherichia coli transformants. Materials and Methods: Four A. baumannii hospital strains which demonstrated strong biofilm activity were selected in this investigation. The presence of luxI gene was detected using PCR technique. Purified PCR product DNA was initially cloned into pTG19 and transformed to E. coli DH5α. The gene was then recovered from agarose gel and ligated by T4 DNA ligase into pET28a expression vector using NdeI and XhoI enzymes. pET28a + luxI was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). The luxI putative gene was further detected in the transformants by colony PCR. Expression of the luxI gene in the recombinant E. coli BL21 cells was studied by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the presence of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) was checked by colorimetric assay and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Results: We successfully cloned AHL gene from A. baumannii strain 23 to pET28a expression vector. There was four fold increases in expression of luxI in the transformants (P ≤ 0.05). It was found that, strain 23 and the transformants showed highest amount of AHL activity (OD = 1.524). The FT-IR analysis indicated stretching C=O bond of the lactone ring and primary amides (N=H) at 1764.69 cm−1 and 1659.23 cm−1 respectively. Conclusion: From above results we concluded that, luxI in A. baumannii is indeed responsible for AHL production and not regulation and pET28a vector allows efficient AHL expression in E. coli BL21 transformants. PMID:27307980

  4. N-acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated regulation of phenazine gene expression by Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D W; Gong, F; Daykin, M M; Williams, P; Pierson, L S

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is a soilborne bacterium that colonizes the wheat rhizosphere. This strain produces three phenazine antibiotics which suppress take-all disease of wheat by inhibition of the causative agent Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Phenazines also enhance survival of 30-84 within the wheat rhizosphere in competition with other organisms. Expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon is controlled by the phzR/phzI N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) response system (L. S. Pierson III et al., J. Bacterial 176:3966-3974, 1994; D. W. Wood and L. S. Pierson III, Gene 168:49-53, 1996). By using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the AHL produced by PhzI has now been identified as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (HHL). In addition, the ability of HHL to serve as an interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere has been examined by using isogenic reporter strains. Disruption of phzI reduced expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon 1,000-fold in the wheat rhizosphere. Coinoculation of an isogenic strain which produced the endogenous HHL signal restored phenazine gene expression in the phzI mutant to wild-type levels in situ. These results demonstrate that HHL is required for phenazine expression in situ and is an effective interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere. PMID:9401023

  5. Endogenous N-acyl-dopamines induce COX-2 expression in brain endothelial cells by stabilizing mRNA through a p38 dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Carmen M; Pérez, Moisés; de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Collado, Juan A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells play an active role in maintaining cerebral blood flow, microvascular tone and blood brain barrier (BBB) functions. Endogenous N-acyl-dopamines like N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) and N-oleoyl-dopamine (OLDA) have been recently identified as a new class of brain neurotransmitters sharing endocannabinoid and endovanilloid biological activities. Endocannabinoids are released in response to pathogenic insults and may play an important role in neuroprotection. In this study we demonstrate that NADA differentially regulates the release of PGE(2) and PGD(2) in the microvascular brain endothelial cell line, b.end5. We found that NADA activates a redox-sensitive p38 MAPK pathway that stabilizes COX-2 mRNA resulting in the accumulation of the COX-2 protein, which depends on the dopamine moiety of the molecule and that is independent of CB(1) and TRPV1 activation. In addition, NADA inhibits the expression of mPGES-1 and the release of PGE(2) and upregulates the expression of L-PGD synthase enhancing PGD(2) release. Hence, NADA and other molecules of the same family might be included in the group of lipid mediators that could prevent the BBB injury under inflammatory conditions and our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the anti-inflammatory activities of NADA in the central nervous system and its potential to design novel therapeutic strategies to manage neuroinflammatory diseases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quorum Sensing N-acyl Homoserine Lactones-SdiA Suppresses Escherichia coli-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Conjugation through Inhibiting traI Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Zeng, Jianming; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Wang, Lina; Cai, Renxin; Zhang, Ni; Li, Youqiang; Huang, Xianzhang; Huang, Bin; Chen, Cha

    2017-01-01

    Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer and plays an important role in bacterial evolution, especially with respect to antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about the role of donor and recipient cells in regulation of conjugation. Here, using an Escherichia coli (SM10λπ)-Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) conjugation model, we demonstrated that deficiency of lasI/rhlI, genes associated with generation of the quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in PAO1, or deletion of the AHLs receptor SdiA in the donor SM10λπ both facilitated conjugation. When using another AHLs-non-producing E. coli strain EC600 as recipient cells, deficiency of sdiA in donor SM10λπ hardly affect the conjugation. More importantly, in the presence of exogenous AHLs, the conjugation efficiency between SM10λπ and EC600 was dramatically decreased, while deficiency of sdiA in SM10λπ attenuated AHLs-inhibited conjugation. These data suggest the conjugation suppression function of AHLs-SdiA chemical signaling. Further bioinformatics analysis, β-galactosidase reporter system and electrophoretic mobility shift assays characterized the binding site of SdiA on the promoter region of traI gene. Furthermore, deletion of lasI/rhlI or sdiA promoted traI mRNA expression in SM10λπ and PAO1 co-culture system, which was abrogated by AHLs. Collectively, our results provide new insight into an important contribution of quorum sensing system AHLs-SdiA to the networks that regulate conjugation. PMID:28164039

  7. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-08

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE).

  8. A calcium-dependent acyltransferase that produces N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Parsons, William H; Kamat, Siddhesh S; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-09-01

    More than 30 years ago, a calcium-dependent enzyme activity was described that generates N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs), which are precursors for N-acyl ethanolamine (NAE) lipid transmitters, including the endocannabinoid anandamide. The identity of this calcium-dependent N-acyltransferase (Ca-NAT) has remained mysterious. Here, we use activity-based protein profiling to identify the poorly characterized serine hydrolase PLA2G4E as a mouse brain Ca-NAT and show that this enzyme generates NAPEs and NAEs in mammalian cells.

  9. A calcium-dependent acyltransferase that produces N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yuji; Parsons, William H.; Kamat, Siddhesh S.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    More than 30 years ago, a calcium-dependent enzyme activity was described that generates N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs), which are precursors for N-acyl ethanolamine (NAE) lipid transmitters, including the endocannabinoid anandamide. The identity of this calcium-dependent N-acyltransferase (Ca-NAT) has remained mysterious. Here, we use activity-based protein profiling to identify the poorly characterized serine hydrolase PLA2G4E as a mouse brain Ca-NAT and show that this enzyme generates NAPEs and NAEs in mammalian cells. PMID:27399000

  10. Endogenous N-acyl taurines regulate skin wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Pontis, Silvia; Armirotti, Andrea; Cardinali, Giorgia; Kovacs, Daniela; Migliore, Marco; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Picardo, Mauro; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular serine amidase, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), degrades a heterogeneous family of lipid-derived bioactive molecules that include amides of long-chain fatty acids with taurine [N-acyl-taurines (NATs)]. The physiological functions of the NATs are unknown. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological disruption of FAAH activity accelerates skin wound healing in mice and stimulates motogenesis of human keratinocytes and differentiation of human fibroblasts in primary cultures. Using untargeted and targeted lipidomics strategies, we identify two long-chain saturated NATs—N-tetracosanoyl-taurine [NAT(24:0)] and N-eicosanoyl-taurine [NAT(20:0)]—as primary substrates for FAAH in mouse skin, and show that the levels of these substances sharply decrease at the margins of a freshly inflicted wound to increase again as healing begins. Additionally, we demonstrate that local administration of synthetic NATs accelerates wound closure in mice and stimulates repair-associated responses in primary cultures of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and an increase in intracellular calcium levels, under the permissive control of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptors. The results point to FAAH-regulated NAT signaling as an unprecedented lipid-based mechanism of wound-healing control in mammalian skin, which might be targeted for chronic wound therapy. PMID:27412859

  11. Phospholipase activity on N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines is critically dependent on the N-acyl chain length.

    PubMed Central

    Caramelo, Julio J; Florin-Christensen, Jorge; Delfino, José M

    2003-01-01

    We have recently shown that an endogenous phospholipase A2 from bovine erythrocytes does not hydrolyse NAPEs (N-acyl L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamines), which accumulate remarkably in this system [Florin-Christensen, Suarez, Florin-Christensen, Wainszelbaum, Brown, McElwain and Palmer (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7736-7741]. Here we investigate the causes underlying this resistance. N-acylation of PE (L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine) results in alteration of charge, head-group volume and conformation, the last two features depending on the N-acyl chain length. To evaluate each effect separately, we synthesized NAPEs with selected N-acyl chain length. We found that phospholipase A2 has considerable activity against N-acetyl PE, but is poorly active against N-butanoyl PE and only marginally active against N-hexanoyl PE, whereas the activity is completely lost when N-hexadecanoyl PE is presented as a substrate. On the other hand, N-hexanoyl PE does not inhibit phospholipase A2 activity, suggesting that this substrate fails to enter the hydrophobic channel. Phospholipase C presents a similar, but less sharp pattern. Molecular dynamics simulations of the polar head group of selected NAPEs reveal a substantially increased conformational variability as the N-acyl chain grows. This larger conformational space represents an increased impairment limiting the access of these molecules to the active site. Our data indicate that, whereas a change in charge contributes to diminished activity, the most relevant effects come from steric hindrance related to the growth of the N-acyl chain. PMID:12765548

  12. Copper(II)/amine synergistically catalyzed enantioselective alkylation of cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-07-07

    The first catalytic asymmetric alkylation of N-acyl quinoliniums with aldehydes has been described. A copper/amine synergistic catalytic system has been developed, allowing the addition of functionalized aldehydes to a wide range of electronically varied N-acyl quinoliniums in good yields with excellent enantiocontrol. The synergistic catalytic system was also effective for N-acyl dihydroisoquinoliniums and β-caboliniums, demonstrating the general applicability of the protocol in the enantioselective alkylation of diverse cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals.

  13. Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of N-acyl Homoserine Lactones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), molecules integral to bacterial quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the...SUBJECT TERMS quorum sensing Michael A. Bertucci, Stephen J. Lee, Michel R. Gagné University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Office of Sponsored... quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the control in CD3CN. Mild catalysis in other polar aprotic solvents is

  14. N-Acylation During Glidobactin Biosynthesis by the Tridomain Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module GlbF

    PubMed Central

    Imker, Heidi J.; Krahn, Daniel; Clerc, Jérôme; Kaiser, Markus; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Glidobactins are hybrid NRPS-PKS natural products that function as irreversible proteasome inhibitors. A variety of medium chain 2(E),4(E)-diene fatty acids N-acylate the peptidolactam core and contribute significantly to the potency of proteasome inhibition. We have expressed the initiation NRPS module GlbF (C-A-T) in Escherichia coli and observe soluble active protein only on co-expression with the 8 kDa MbtH-like protein, GlbE. Following adenylation and installation of Thr as a T-domain thioester, the starter condensation domain utilizes fatty acyl-CoA donors to acylate the Thr1 amino group and generate the fatty acyl-Thr1-S-pantetheinyl-GlbF intermediate to be used in subsequent chain elongation. Previously proposed to be mediated via acyl carrier protein fatty acid donors, direct utilization of fatty acyl-CoA donors for N-acylation of T-domain tethered amino acids is likely a common strategy for chain initiation in NRPS-mediated lipopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:21035730

  15. AidP, a novel N-Acyl homoserine lactonase gene from Antarctic Planococcus sp.

    PubMed

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2017-02-22

    Planococcus is a Gram-positive halotolerant bacterial genus in the phylum Firmicutes, commonly found in various habitats in Antarctica. Quorum quenching (QQ) is the disruption of bacterial cell-to-cell communication (known as quorum sensing), which has previously been described in mesophilic bacteria. This study demonstrated the QQ activity of a psychrotolerant strain, Planococcus versutus strain L10.15(T), isolated from a soil sample obtained near an elephant seal wallow in Antarctica. Whole genome analysis of this bacterial strain revealed the presence of an N-acyl homoserine lactonase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes the ester bond of the homoserine lactone of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHLs). Heterologous gene expression in E. coli confirmed its functions for hydrolysis of AHLs, and the gene was designated as aidP (autoinducer degrading gene from Planococcus sp.). The low temperature activity of this enzyme suggested that it is a novel and uncharacterized class of AHL lactonase. This study is the first report on QQ activity of bacteria isolated from the polar regions.

  16. AidP, a novel N-Acyl homoserine lactonase gene from Antarctic Planococcus sp.

    PubMed Central

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A.; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2017-01-01

    Planococcus is a Gram-positive halotolerant bacterial genus in the phylum Firmicutes, commonly found in various habitats in Antarctica. Quorum quenching (QQ) is the disruption of bacterial cell-to-cell communication (known as quorum sensing), which has previously been described in mesophilic bacteria. This study demonstrated the QQ activity of a psychrotolerant strain, Planococcus versutus strain L10.15T, isolated from a soil sample obtained near an elephant seal wallow in Antarctica. Whole genome analysis of this bacterial strain revealed the presence of an N-acyl homoserine lactonase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes the ester bond of the homoserine lactone of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHLs). Heterologous gene expression in E. coli confirmed its functions for hydrolysis of AHLs, and the gene was designated as aidP (autoinducer degrading gene from Planococcus sp.). The low temperature activity of this enzyme suggested that it is a novel and uncharacterized class of AHL lactonase. This study is the first report on QQ activity of bacteria isolated from the polar regions. PMID:28225085

  17. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca2+ fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD+ fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD+/calretinin+ cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD+ puncta surrounded the calretinin+ cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions. PMID:24672435

  18. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD(+) fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD(+)/calretinin(+) cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD(+) puncta surrounded the calretinin(+) cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions.

  19. Inhibiting N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis and quenching Pseudomonas quinolone quorum sensing to attenuate virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Liu, Yi-Chia; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense their own population size, tune the expression of responding genes, and behave accordingly to environmental stimuli by secreting signaling molecules. This phenomenon is termed as quorum sensing (QS). By exogenously manipulating the signal transduction bacterial population behaviors could be controlled, which may be done through quorum quenching (QQ). QS related regulatory networks have been proven their involvement in regulating many virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria in the course of infections. Interfering with QS signaling system could be a novel strategy against bacterial infections and therefore requires more understanding of their fundamental mechanisms. Here we review the development of studies specifically on the inhibition of production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL), a common proteobacterial QS signal. The opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, equips the alkylquinolone (AQ)-mediated QS which also plays crucial roles in its pathogenicity. The studies in QQ targeting on AQ are also discussed. PMID:26539190

  20. N-acyl amino acids and N-acyl neurotransmitter conjugates: neuromodulators and probes for new drug targets.

    PubMed

    Connor, Mark; Vaughan, Chris W; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    The myriad functions of lipids as signalling molecules is one of the most interesting fields in contemporary pharmacology, with a host of compounds recognized as mediators of communication within and between cells. The N-acyl conjugates of amino acids and neurotransmitters (NAANs) have recently come to prominence because of their potential roles in the nervous system, vasculature and the immune system. NAAN are compounds such as glycine, GABA or dopamine conjugated with long chain fatty acids. More than 70 endogenous NAAN have been reported although their physiological role remains uncertain, with various NAAN interacting with a low affinity at G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels. Regardless of their potential physiological function, NAAN are of great interest to pharmacologists because of their potential as flexible tools to probe new sites on GPCRs, transporters and ion channels. NAANs are amphipathic molecules, with a wide variety of potential fatty acid and headgroup moieties, a combination which provides a rich source of potential ligands engaging novel binding sites and mechanisms for modulation of membrane proteins such as GPCRs, ion channels and transporters. The unique actions of subsets of NAAN on voltage-gated calcium channels and glycine transporters indicate that the wide variety of NAAN may provide a readily exploitable resource for defining new pharmacological targets. Investigation of the physiological roles and pharmacological potential of these simple lipid conjugates is in its infancy, and we believe that there is much to be learnt from their careful study.

  1. [Comparative anorexigenic activity and other pharmacological properties of quipazine and its N-acyl derivatives].

    PubMed

    Trubitsyna, T K; Asnina, V V; Mashkovskiĭ, M D

    1986-01-01

    In experiments on mice and rats quipazine exerts a moderate and short-term anorexigenic activity. N-acyl quipazine derivatives are markedly less toxic, do not exert anorexigenic action and influence weakly the serotoninergic and adrenergic systems.

  2. Facile formation of N-acyl-oxazolidinone derivatives using acid fluorides.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Corinna S; Forster, Patrik M; Carreira, Erick M

    2010-09-17

    A mild method is presented for the formation of N-acylated oxazolidinones that employs acid fluorides and mild bases, such as (i)Pr(2)NEt and NEt(3). Optimized reaction conditions for two types of substrates have been developed utilizing either the oxazolidinone itself or the corresponding in situ generated O-silyloxazolidinones resulting in the formation of the desired N-acylated products in high yields of up to 98%.

  3. New N-acyl taurine from the sea urchin Glyptocidaris crenularis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Xu, Tunhai; Wen, Kewei; Yang, Xian-Wen; Xu, Shi-Hai; Liu, Yonghong

    2010-01-01

    A new N-acyl taurine (1), together with a new natural product, l-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-1,2,4-triazole (4), and two known compounds (2 and 3), were isolated from the sea urchin, Glyptocidaris crenularis. The new N-acyl taurine was elucidated as 2-(5R,15S-dihydroxyeicosanoylamino) ethanesulfonic acid on the basis of spectroscopic (NMR, MS) analyses and the modified Mosher ester method. Compound 2 showed significant toxicity against brine shrimp larvae.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1207 Section 180.1207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1207 N-acyl sarcosines and sodium...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1207 Section 180.1207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1207 N-acyl sarcosines and sodium...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1207 Section 180.1207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1207 N-acyl sarcosines and sodium...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (surfactants) at levels not to exceed 10% in pesticide formulations containing glyphosate: Name CAS Reg. No. N... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1207 N-acyl sarcosines and sodium...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (surfactants) at levels not to exceed 10% in pesticide formulations containing glyphosate: Name CAS Reg. No. N... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1207 N-acyl sarcosines and sodium...

  9. Proteomic assessment of the role of N-acyl homoserine lactone in Shewanella putrefaciens spoilage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Pan, Yurong; Zeng, Mingyong

    2017-08-21

    Shewanella spp. are the common spoilage organisms found in aquatic food products stored at low temperature and their spoilage mechanism has been reported to be mediated by quorum sensing (QS). However, the specifically expressed proteins responding to N-acyl homoserine-lactone (AHLs) were seldom reported. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of different AHL signal molecules on Shewanella putrefaciens Z4 isolated from refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) at the proteome level. The results revealed that exogenous AHLs were utilized as QS signal molecules by S. putrefaciens Z4, and AHLs were not degraded by intracellular or extracellular enzymes secreted by S. putrefaciens Z4. Twenty-three differently expressed spots upon the addition of AHLs were selected and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The results indicated that proteins involving in growth and metabolism (i.e., citrate synthase, succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), environment adaptation and regulators (i.e., polysaccharide deacetylases, transaldolase) were down-regulated upon three kinds of AHLs (C4-HSL, C6-HSL, and O-C6-HSL), whereas the abundance of stress response protein and DNA ligase were elevated by the addition of exogenous AHLs. Moreover, the effects of exogenous C6-HSL and O-C6-HSLwere prominent. These results provide evidence that AHL-based QS signal molecules affected some important metabolic properties of S. putrefaciens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of a dual fluorescence whole-cell biosensor to detect N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xuemei; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Ma, Anzhou; Yu, Qing; Zhuang, Xuliang

    2014-02-01

    Detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) is useful for understanding quorum sensing (QS) behaviors, including biofilm formation, virulence and metabolism. For detecting AHLs and indicating the host cells in situ, we constructed the plasmid pUCGMA2T(1-4) to make a dual fluorescent whole-cell biosensor based on the AhlIR AHL system of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a. The plasmid contains three components: constitutively expressed P(npatII::gfp) for indicating host cells, P(ahlI::mcherry) that produces red fluorescence in response to AHL, and the ahlR gene that encodes an AHL regulatory protein. Meanwhile, two copies of T(1-4) (four tandem copies of a transcriptional terminator) were added into the plasmid to reduce background. The results showed that when the plasmid was placed into Escherichia coli, the dual fluorescence whole-cell biosensor was able to respond with red fluorescence within 6 hr to 5 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-5) mol/L of 3OC6-HSL. Bright green fluorescence indicated the host cells. Furthermore, when the plasmid was transferred to wildtype Pseudomonas PhTA125 (an AHL-producing bacterium), it also showed both green and red fluorescence. This result demonstrates that this plasmid can be used to construct whole-cell indicators that can indicate the AHL response and spatial behaviors of microbes in a microenvironmental niche.

  11. Long Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Enterobacter sp. Isolated from Human Tongue Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wai-Fong; Purmal, Kathiravan; Chin, Shenyang; Chan, Xin-Yue; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    We report the isolation of N-acyl homoserine lactone-producing Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surfaces of the tongue of a healthy individual. Spent supernatants extract from Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 activated the biosensor Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4(pZLR4), suggesting production of long chain AHLs by these isolates. High resolution mass spectrometry analysis of these extracts confirmed that Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 produced a long chain N-acyl homoserine lactone, namely N-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first isolation of Enterobacter sp., strain T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surface of the human tongue and N-acyl homoserine lactones production by this bacterium. PMID:23202161

  12. Exploring chemoselective S-to-N acyl transfer reactions in synthesis and chemical biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Helen M.; McSweeney, Lauren; Scanlan, Eoin M.

    2017-05-01

    S-to-N acyl transfer is a high-yielding chemoselective process for amide bond formation. It is widely utilized by chemists for synthetic applications, including peptide and protein synthesis, chemical modification of proteins, protein-protein ligation and the development of probes and molecular machines. Recent advances in our understanding of S-to-N acyl transfer processes in biology and innovations in methodology for thioester formation and desulfurization, together with an extension of the size of cyclic transition states, have expanded the boundaries of this process well beyond peptide ligation. As the field develops, this chemistry will play a central role in our molecular understanding of Biology.

  13. Modified N-acyl-homoserine lactones as chemical probes for the elucidation of plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Thomanek, Heike; Schenk, Sebastian T; Stein, Elke; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam; Maison, Wolfgang

    2013-09-25

    Gram-negative bacteria often use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules to monitor their local population densities and to regulate gene-expression in a process called "Quorum Sensing" (QS). This cell-to-cell communication allows bacteria to adapt to environmental changes and to behave as multicellular communities. QS plays a key role in both bacterial virulence towards the host and symbiotic interactions with other organisms. Plants also perceive AHLs and respond to them with changes in gene expression or modifications in development. Herein, we report the synthesis of new AHL-derivatives for the investigation and identification of AHL-interacting proteins. We show that our new compounds are still recognised by different bacteria and that a novel biotin-tagged-AHL derivative interacts with a bacterial AHL receptor.

  14. Lipoproteins of slow-growing Mycobacteria carry three fatty acids and are N-acylated by apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase BCG_2070c.

    PubMed

    Brülle, Juliane K; Tschumi, Andreas; Sander, Peter

    2013-10-05

    Lipoproteins are virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial lipoproteins are modified by the consecutive action of preprolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt), prolipoprotein signal peptidase (LspA) and apolipoprotein N- acyltransferase (Lnt) leading to the formation of mature triacylated lipoproteins. Lnt homologues are found in Gram-negative and high GC-rich Gram-positive, but not in low GC-rich Gram-positive bacteria, although N-acylation is observed. In fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis, the molecular structure of the lipid modification of lipoproteins was resolved recently as a diacylglyceryl residue carrying ester-bound palmitic acid and ester-bound tuberculostearic acid and an additional amide-bound palmitic acid. We exploit the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG as model organism to investigate lipoprotein modifications in slow-growing mycobacteria. Using Escherichia coli Lnt as a query in BLASTp search, we identified BCG_2070c and BCG_2279c as putative lnt genes in M. bovis BCG. Lipoproteins LprF, LpqH, LpqL and LppX were expressed in M. bovis BCG and BCG_2070c lnt knock-out mutant and lipid modifications were analyzed at molecular level by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight analysis. Lipoprotein N-acylation was observed in wildtype but not in BCG_2070c mutants. Lipoprotein N- acylation with palmitoyl and tuberculostearyl residues was observed. Lipoproteins are triacylated in slow-growing mycobacteria. BCG_2070c encodes a functional Lnt in M. bovis BCG. We identified mycobacteria-specific tuberculostearic acid as further substrate for N-acylation in slow-growing mycobacteria.

  15. Lipoproteins of slow-growing Mycobacteria carry three fatty acids and are N-acylated by Apolipoprotein N-Acyltransferase BCG_2070c

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipoproteins are virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial lipoproteins are modified by the consecutive action of preprolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt), prolipoprotein signal peptidase (LspA) and apolipoprotein N- acyltransferase (Lnt) leading to the formation of mature triacylated lipoproteins. Lnt homologues are found in Gram-negative and high GC-rich Gram-positive, but not in low GC-rich Gram-positive bacteria, although N-acylation is observed. In fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis, the molecular structure of the lipid modification of lipoproteins was resolved recently as a diacylglyceryl residue carrying ester-bound palmitic acid and ester-bound tuberculostearic acid and an additional amide-bound palmitic acid. Results We exploit the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG as model organism to investigate lipoprotein modifications in slow-growing mycobacteria. Using Escherichia coli Lnt as a query in BLASTp search, we identified BCG_2070c and BCG_2279c as putative lnt genes in M. bovis BCG. Lipoproteins LprF, LpqH, LpqL and LppX were expressed in M. bovis BCG and BCG_2070c lnt knock-out mutant and lipid modifications were analyzed at molecular level by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight analysis. Lipoprotein N-acylation was observed in wildtype but not in BCG_2070c mutants. Lipoprotein N- acylation with palmitoyl and tuberculostearyl residues was observed. Conclusions Lipoproteins are triacylated in slow-growing mycobacteria. BCG_2070c encodes a functional Lnt in M. bovis BCG. We identified mycobacteria-specific tuberculostearic acid as further substrate for N-acylation in slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:24093492

  16. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Morris, Quaid D; Chang, Richard; Shai, Ofer; Bakowski, Malina A; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Mohammad, Naveed; Robinson, Mark D; Zirngibl, Ralph; Somogyi, Eszter; Laurin, Nancy; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Sat, Eric; Grigull, Jörg; Pan, Qun; Peng, Wen-Tao; Krogan, Nevan; Greenblatt, Jack; Fehlings, Michael; van der Kooy, Derek; Aubin, Jane; Bruneau, Benoit G; Rossant, Janet; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J; Hughes, Timothy R

    2004-01-01

    Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics. PMID:15588312

  17. Thermoregulation of N-acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing in the soft rot bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Latour, Xavier; Diallo, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Morin, Danièle; Smadja, Bruno; Burini, Jean-François; Haras, Dominique; Orange, Nicole

    2007-06-01

    The psychrotolerant bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum produces four N-acyl homoserine lactones under a wide range of temperatures. Their thermoregulation differs from that of the exoenzyme production, described as being under quorum-sensing control. A mechanism involved in this thermoregulation consists of controlling N-acyl homoserine lactones synthase production at a transcriptional level.

  18. N-acyl homoserinelactone-mediated gene regulation in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eberl, L

    1999-12-01

    The view of bacteria as unicellular organisms has strong roots in the tradition of culturing bacteria in liquid media. However, in nature microbial activity is mainly associated with surfaces where bacteria form highly structured and cooperative consortia which are commonly referred to as biofilms. The ability of bacteria to organize structurally and to distribute metabolic activities between the different members of the consortium demands a high degree of coordinated cell-cell interaction. Recent work has established that many bacteria employ sophisticated intercellular communication systems that rely on small signal molecules to control the expression of multiple target genes. In Gram-negative bacteria, the most intensively investigated signal molecules are N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which are utilized by the bacteria to monitor their own population densities in a process known as 'quorum sensing'. These density-dependent regulatory systems rely on two proteins, an AHL synthase, usually a member of the LuxI family of proteins, and an AHL receptor protein belonging to the LuxR family of transcriptional regulators. At low population densities cells produce a basal level of AHL via the activity of an AHL synthase. As the cell density increases, AHL accumulates in the growth medium. On reaching a critical threshold concentration, the AHL molecule binds to its cognate receptor which in turn leads to the induction/repression of AHL-regulated genes. To date, AHL-dependent quorum sensing circuits have been identified in a wide range of gram-negative bacteria where they regulate various functions including bioluminescence, plasmid conjugal transfer, biofilm formation, motility, antibiotic biosynthesis, and the production of virulence factors in plant and animal pathogens. Moreover, AHL signal molecules appear to play important roles in the ecology of complex consortia as they allow bacterial populations to interact with each other as well as with their

  19. Light-induced ruthenium-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions: a photochemical approach towards N-acyl sulfimides and sulfoximines.

    PubMed

    Bizet, Vincent; Buglioni, Laura; Bolm, Carsten

    2014-05-26

    1,4,2-Dioxazol-5-ones are five-membered heterocycles known to decarboxylate under thermal or photochemical conditions, thus yielding N-acyl nitrenes. Described herein is a light-induced ruthenium-catalyzed N-acyl nitrene transfer to sulfides and sulfoxides by decarboxylation of 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones at room temperature, thus providing direct access to N-acyl sulfimides and sulfoximines under mild reaction conditions. In addition, a one-pot sulfur imidation/oxidation sequence catalyzed by a single ruthenium complex is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. N-acylated bacteriohopanehexol-mannosamides from the thermophilic bacterium Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomáš; Siristova, Lucie; Melzoch, Karel; Sigler, Karel

    2011-03-01

    Identification of molecular species of various N-acylated bacteriohopanehexol-mannosamides from the thermophilic bacterium Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris by semipreparative HPLC and by RP-HPLC with ESI is described. We used triple-quadrupole type mass spectrometer, (1)H and (13)C NMR for analyzing this complex lipid. CD spectra of two compounds (model compound--7-deoxy-D: -glycero-D: -allo-heptitol obtained by stereospecific synthesis, and an isolated derivative of hopane) were also measured and the absolute configuration of both compounds was determined. On the basis of all the above methods, we identified the full structure of a new class of bacteriohopanes, represented by various N-acylated bacteriohopanehexol-mannosamides.

  1. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines.

  2. N-Acyl-phosphoramidates as potential novel form of gemcitabine prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Baraniak, Janina; Pietkiewicz, Aleksandra; Kaczmarek, Renata; Radzikowska, Ewa; Kulik, Katarzyna; Krolewska, Karolina; Cieslak, Marcin; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    Gemcitabine (dFdC) is a cytidine analog remarkably active against a wide range of solid tumors. Inside a cell, gemcitabine is phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to yield gemcitabine monophosphate, further converted to gemcitabine di- and triphosphate. The most frequent form of acquired resistance to gemcitabine in vitro is the deoxycytidine kinase deficiency. Thus, proper prodrugs carrying the 5'-pdFdC moiety may help to overcome this problem. A series of new derivatives of gemcitabine possessing N-acyl(thio)phosphoramidate moieties were prepared and their cytotoxic properties were determined. N-Acyl-phosphoramidate derivatives of gemcitabine have similar cytotoxicity as gemcitabine itself, and have been found accessible to the cellular enzymes. The nicotinic carboxamide derivative of gemcitabine 5'-O-phosphorothioate occurred to be the best inhibitor of bacterial DNA polymerase I and human DNA polymerase α.

  3. Arylpiperazines with N-acylated amino acids as 5-HT1A receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Paweł; Subra, Gilles; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Duszyńska, Beata; Pawłowski, Maciej; Martinez, Jean

    2006-07-01

    A library consisting of 60 arylpiperazines modified with N-acylated amino acids was prepared on BAL linker SynPhasetrade mark Lanterns and evaluated in vitro for 5-HT(1A) receptor affinity. Biological screening, followed by a simple Fujita-Ban analysis, enabled the description of structure-activity relationships and allowed the selection of some potent, high-affinity ligands for in vivo pharmacological investigations.

  4. Syntheses and Antibacterial Activity of N-Acylated Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Based on the Trimethyl Lock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several N-acyl ciprofloxacin quinone derivatives based on a trimethyl lock structure were synthesized, and their in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria was evaluated. A few new analogues displayed enhanced activity against Gram-positive species compared to the parent drug. Additionally, studies of 8-Cip, which was the most potent compound tested, indicate that it may act through a dual-action mechanism. PMID:26101578

  5. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  6. Facile synthesis of N-acyl 2-aminobenzothiazoles by NHC-catalyzed direct oxidative amidation of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Premaletha, Sethulekshmy; Ghosh, Arghya; Joseph, Sumi; Yetra, Santhivardhana Reddy; Biju, Akkattu T

    2017-01-26

    A mild, general, and high yielding synthesis of N-acyl 2-aminobenzothiazoles has been demonstrated by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-organocatalyzed direct amidation of aldehydes with 2-aminobenzothiazoles proceeding via acyl azolium intermediates. The carbene generated from the triazolium salt under oxidative conditions was the key for the success of this reaction. The method was subsequently applied to the synthesis of various biologically important N-acyl 2-aminobenzothiazoles.

  7. Fast, Continuous, and High-Throughput (Bio)Chemical Activity Assay for N-Acyl-l-Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Quenching Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Last, Daniel; Krüger, Georg H. E.; Dörr, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing, the bacterial cell-cell communication by small molecules, controls important processes such as infection and biofilm formation. Therefore, it is a promising target with several therapeutic and technical applications besides its significant ecological relevance. Enzymes inactivating N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, the most common class of communication molecules among Gram-negative proteobacteria, mainly belong to the groups of quorum-quenching lactonases or quorum-quenching acylases. However, identification, characterization, and optimization of these valuable biocatalysts are based on a very limited number of fundamentally different methods with their respective strengths and weaknesses. Here, a (bio)chemical activity assay is described, which perfectly complements the other methods in this field. It enables continuous and high-throughput activity measurements of purified and unpurified quorum-quenching enzymes within several minutes. For this, the reaction products released by quorum-quenching lactonases and quorum-quenching acylases are converted either by a secondary enzyme or by autohydrolysis to l-homoserine. In turn, l-homoserine is detected by the previously described calcein assay, which is sensitive to α-amino acids with free N and C termini. Besides its establishment, the method was applied to the characterization of three previously undescribed quorum-quenching lactonases and variants thereof and to the identification of quorum-quenching acylase-expressing Escherichia coli clones in an artificial library. Furthermore, this study indicates that porcine aminoacylase 1 is not active toward N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones as published previously but instead converts the autohydrolysis product N-acyl-l-homoserine. IMPORTANCE In this study, a novel method is presented for the identification, characterization, and optimization of quorum-quenching enzymes that are active toward N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones. These are the most common

  8. [Isolation and identification of Rhodosporidium toruloides R1 degrading N-acyl homoserine lactone].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Jia, Zhen-hua; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Xia; Song, Shui-shan

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, a AHL-utilizing strain RI was isolated and identified as the genus Rhodosporidium toruloides R1 by physi-biochemical approaches and 18S rDNA sequence analysis, and this strain was designated as R. toruloides R1. Results showed that R. toruloides R1 exhibited the ability to utilize and degrade the all N-acyl homoserine lactones tested in this study. Coculture of R. toruloides R1 with Erwinia carotovora subsp. Carotovora effectively inhibit the soft rot disease of patato caused by E. carotovora. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on AHL-degradation of yeast cells.

  9. Structure, supramolecular organization and phase behavior of N-acyl-β-alanines: Structural homologues of mammalian brain constituents N-acylglycine and N-acyl-GABA.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, D; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-12-01

    N-Acyl-β-alanines (NABAs) are structural homologues of N-acylglycines (NAGs) and N-acyl-γ-aminobutyric acids (NAGABAs), and achiral isomers of N-acylalanines, which are all present in mammalian brain and other tissues and modulate activity of biological receptors with various functions. In the present study, we synthesized and characterized a homologous series of NABAs bearing saturated acyl chains (n=8-20) and investigated their supramolecular organization and thermotropic phase behavior. In differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies, most of the NABAs gave one or two minor transitions before the main chain-melting phase transition in the dry state as well as upon hydration with water, but gave only a single transition when hydrated with buffer (pH7.6). Transition enthalpies (ΔHt) and entropies (ΔSt), obtained from the DSC studies showed linear dependence on the chain length in the dry state and upon hydration with buffer, whereas odd-even alteration was observed when hydrated with water. The crystal structures of N-lauroyl-β-alanine (NLBA) and N-myristoyl-β-alanine (NMBA) were solved in monoclinic system in the P21/c space group. Both NLBA and NMBA were packed in tilted bilayers with head-to-head (and tail-to-tail) arrangement with tilt angles of 33.28° and 34.42°, respectively. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions between COOH groups of the molecules from opposite leaflets as well as NH⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amide groups from adjacent molecules in the same leaflet as well as dispersion interactions between the acyl chains stabilize the bilayer structure. The d-spacings calculated from powder X-ray diffraction studies showed odd-even alteration with odd-chain length compounds exhibiting higher values as compared to the even-chain length ones and the tilt angles calculated from the PXRD data are higher for the even chain NABAs. These observations are relevant to developing structure-activity relationships for these amphiphiles and understand

  10. Orally administered thermostable N-acyl homoserine lactonase from Bacillus sp. strain AI96 attenuates Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanan; He, Suxu; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhang, Meichao; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Huitu; Yao, Bin

    2012-03-01

    N-Acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonases are capable of degrading signal molecules involved in bacterial quorum sensing and therefore represent a new approach to control bacterial infection. Here a gene responsible for the AHL lactonase activity of Bacillus sp. strain AI96, 753 bp in length, was cloned and then expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence of Bacillus sp. AI96 AiiA (AiiA(AI96)) is most similar to those of other Bacillus sp. AHL lactonases (~80% sequence identity) and was consequently categorized as a member of the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. AiiA(AI96) maintains ~100% of its activity at 10°C to 40°C at pH 8.0, and it is very stable at 70°C at pH 8.0 for at least 1 h; no other Bacillus AHL lactonase has been found to be stable under these conditions. AiiA(AI96) resists digestion by proteases and carp intestinal juice, and it has broad-spectrum substrate specificity. The supplementation of AiiA(AI96) into fish feed by oral administration significantly attenuated Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish. This is the first report of the oral administration of an AHL lactonase for the efficient control of A. hydrophila.

  11. A New N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Synthase in an Uncultured Symbiont of the Red Sea Sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Britstein, Maya; Devescovi, Giulia; Handley, Kim M.; Malik, Assaf; Haber, Markus; Saurav, Kumar; Teta, Roberta; Costantino, Valeria; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sher, Noa; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Sponges harbor a remarkable diversity of microbial symbionts in which signal molecules can accumulate and enable cell-cell communication, such as quorum sensing (QS). Bacteria capable of QS were isolated from marine sponges; however, an extremely small fraction of the sponge microbiome is amenable to cultivation. We took advantage of community genome assembly and binning to investigate the uncultured majority of sponge symbionts. We identified a complete N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-QS system (designated TswIR) and seven partial luxI homologues in the microbiome of Theonella swinhoei. The TswIR system was novel and shown to be associated with an alphaproteobacterium of the order Rhodobacterales, here termed Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309. The tswI gene, when expressed in Escherichia coli, produced three AHLs, two of which were also identified in a T. swinhoei sponge extract. The taxonomic affiliation of the 16S rRNA of Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309 to a sponge-coral specific clade, its enrichment in sponge versus seawater and marine sediment samples, and the presence of sponge-specific features, such as ankyrin-like domains and tetratricopeptide repeats, indicate a likely symbiotic nature of this bacterium. PMID:26655754

  12. Variations on a theme: diverse N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing mechanisms in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Debra; Wang, Jin-Hong; Swatton, Jane E; Davenport, Peter; Price, Bianca; Mikkelsen, Helga; Stickland, Hannah; Nishikawa, Kahoko; Gardiol, Noémie; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria employ a mechanism of cell-cell communication known as quorum sensing (QS). The role of QS is to enable the cells in a culture to coordinate their gene expression profile with changes in the population cell density. The best characterized mechanisms of QS employ N-acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signalling molecules. These AHLs are made by enzymes known as LuxI homologs, and accumulate in the culture supernatant at a rate proportional to the increase in cell density. Once the AHL concentration exceeds a certain threshold value, these ligands bind to intracellular receptors known as LuxR homologs. The latter are transcriptional regulators, whose activity alters upon binding the AHL ligand, thereby eliciting a change in gene transcription. Over the last five years, it has become increasingly obvious that this is a rather simplistic view of AHL-dependent QS, and that in fact, there is considerable diversity in the way in which LuxI-R homologs operate. The aim of the current review is to describe these variations on the basic theme, and to show how functional genomics is revolutionizing our understanding of QS-controlled regulons.

  13. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Mono- and Di-N-acylated Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite issues with oto/nephrotoxicity and bacterial resistance, aminoglycosides (AGs) remain an effective and widely used class of antibacterial agents. For decades now, efforts toward the development of novel AGs with potential to overcome some of these problems have been major research focuses. 1-N-Acylation, especially γ-amino-β-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) derivatization, has proven to be one of the most successful strategies for improving the overall properties of AGs, including their ability to avoid certain resistance mechanisms. More recently, 6′-N-acylation arose as another possible strategy to improve the properties of these drugs. In this study, we report on the glycinyl, carboxybenzyl, and AHB mono- and diderivatization at the 1-, 6′-, and/or 4‴-amines of the AGs amikacin, kanamycin A, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. We also present the antibacterial activities and the reduced reactivity of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) toward these new AG derivatives, and identify the AMEs present in the bacterial strains tested. PMID:26617967

  14. Novel endogenous N-acyl amides activate TRPV1-4 receptors, BV-2 microglia, and are regulated in brain in an acute model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raboune, Siham; Stuart, Jordyn M.; Leishman, Emma; Takacs, Sara M.; Rhodes, Brandon; Basnet, Arjun; Jameyfield, Evan; McHugh, Douglas; Widlanski, Theodore; Bradshaw, Heather B.

    2014-01-01

    A family of endogenous lipids, structurally analogous to the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (Anandamide), and called N-acyl amides have emerged as a family of biologically active compounds at TRP receptors. N-acyl amides are constructed from an acyl group and an amine via an amide bond. This same structure can be modified by changing either the fatty acid or the amide to form potentially hundreds of lipids. More than 70 N-acyl amides have been identified in nature. We have ongoing studies aimed at isolating and characterizing additional members of the family of N-acyl amides in both central and peripheral tissues in mammalian systems. Here, using a unique in-house library of over 70 N-acyl amides we tested the following three hypotheses: (1) Additional N-acyl amides will have activity at TRPV1-4, (2) Acute peripheral injury will drive changes in CNS levels of N-acyl amides, and (3) N-acyl amides will regulate calcium in CNS-derived microglia. Through these studies, we have identified 20 novel N-acyl amides that collectively activate (stimulating or inhibiting) TRPV1-4. Using lipid extraction and HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry we showed that levels of at least 10 of these N-acyl amides that activate TRPVs are regulated in brain after intraplantar carrageenan injection. We then screened the BV2 microglial cell line for activity with this N-acyl amide library and found overlap with TRPV receptor activity as well as additional activators of calcium mobilization from these lipids. Together these data provide new insight into the family of N-acyl amides and their roles as signaling molecules at ion channels, in microglia, and in the brain in the context of inflammation. PMID:25136293

  15. TRPM3 expression in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Brown, R Lane; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Peters, James H; Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Strycharska-Orczyk, Iwona; Reed, Brian T; Morgans, Catherine W; Duvoisin, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3(-/-) mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS), stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1(‑/‑) mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice.

  16. Ceramide metabolism in mouse tissue.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Männich, Julia; Eberle, Max; Wegner, Marthe-Susanna; Wanger, Ruth; Hartmann, Daniela; Ferreiros, Nerea; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides with different N-acyl chains can act as second messengers in various signaling pathways. They are involved in cell processes such as apoptosis, differentiation and inflammation. Ceramide synthases (CerS) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and dihydroceramides. Six isoenzymes (CerS1-6) catalyze the N-acylation of the sphingoid bases, albeit with strictly acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) chain length specificity. We analyzed the mRNA expression, the protein expression, the specific activity of the CerS, and acyl-CoA, dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in different tissues by LC-MS/MS. Our data indicate that each tissue express a distinct composition of CerS, whereby the CerS mRNA expression levels do not correlate with the respective protein expression levels in the tissues. Furthermore, we found a highly significant negative correlation between the protein expression level of CerS6 and the C16:0-acyl-CoA amounts as well as between the protein expression of CerS2 and C24:0-acyl-CoA amounts. These data indicate that in mouse tissues low substrate availability is compensated by higher CerS protein expression level and vice versa. Apart from the expression level and the specific activity of the CerS, other enzymes of the sphingolipid pathway also influence the composition of ceramides with distinct chain lengths in each cell. Acyl-CoA availability seems to be less important for ceramide composition and might be compensated for by CerS expression/activity.

  17. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  19. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  20. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  1. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain.

  2. Cyclin A1 is expressed in mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongquan; Li, Yuanhong; Zhao, Chen; Jiang, Xuejun; Chen, Hongduo; Lang, Ming-Fei; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin A1 belongs to the type-A cyclins and participates in cell cycle regulation. Since its discovery, cyclin A1 has been shown mostly in testis. It plays important roles in spermatogenesis. However, there were also reports on ovary expression of cyclin A1. Therefore, we intended to revisit the expression of cyclin A1 in mouse ovary. Our study showed that cyclin A1 was expressed at the mRNA level and the protein level in mouse ovary. Tissue staining revealed that cyclin A1 was expressed in maturating oocytes. With the recent data on the functions of cyclins in somatic and stem cells, we also discussed the possibilities of further studies of cyclin A1 in mouse oocytes and perhaps in the oogonial stem cells. Our findings not only add to the supportive evidence of cyclin A1 expression in oocytes, but also may promote more interest in exploring cyclin A1 functions in ovary.

  3. Triazole-containing N-acyl homoserine lactones targeting the quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette R; Jakobsen, Tim H; Bang, Claus G; Cohrt, Anders Emil; Hansen, Casper L; Clausen, Janie W; Le Quement, Sebastian T; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to devise new antimicrobial treatments for biofilm infections, the bacterial cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing has emerged as an attractive target. It has proven possible to intercept the communication system by synthetic non-native ligands and thereby lower the pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance of a bacterial biofilm. To identify the structural elements important for antagonistic or agonistic activity against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR protein, we report the synthesis and screening of new triazole-containing mimics of natural N-acyl homoserine lactones. A series of azide- and alkyne-containing homoserine lactone building blocks was used to prepare an expanded set of 123 homoserine lactone analogues through a combination of solution- and solid-phase synthesis methods. The resulting compounds were subjected to cell-based quorum sensing screening assays, thereby revealing several bioactive compounds, including 13 compounds with antagonistic activity and 9 compounds with agonistic activity.

  4. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07. PMID:24984061

  5. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. PMID:25234390

  6. Pantoea sp. Isolated from Tropical Fresh Water Exhibiting N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen-Si; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) serves as signaling molecule for quorum sensing (QS) in Gram-negative bacteria to regulate various physiological activities including pathogenicity. With the aim of isolating freshwater-borne bacteria that can cause outbreak of disease in plants and portrayed QS properties, environmental water sampling was conducted. Here we report the preliminary screening of AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] as AHL biosensors. The 16S rDNA gene sequence of isolate M009 showed the highest sequence similarity to Pantoea stewartii S9-116, which is a plant pathogen. The isolated Pantoea sp. was confirmed to produce N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-HSL (3-oxo-C6-HSL) through analysis of high resolution mass tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25197715

  7. Pantoea sp. isolated from tropical fresh water exhibiting N-acyl homoserine lactone production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Muhamad Yunos, Nina Yusrina; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) serves as signaling molecule for quorum sensing (QS) in Gram-negative bacteria to regulate various physiological activities including pathogenicity. With the aim of isolating freshwater-borne bacteria that can cause outbreak of disease in plants and portrayed QS properties, environmental water sampling was conducted. Here we report the preliminary screening of AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] as AHL biosensors. The 16S rDNA gene sequence of isolate M009 showed the highest sequence similarity to Pantoea stewartii S9-116, which is a plant pathogen. The isolated Pantoea sp. was confirmed to produce N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-HSL (3-oxo-C6-HSL) through analysis of high resolution mass tandem mass spectrometry.

  8. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens.

  9. Biofilm activity and sludge characteristics affected by exogenous N-acyl homoserine lactones in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huizhi; He, Junguo; Liu, Jian; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study verified the effect of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentrations on mature biofilm systems. Three concentrations of an AHL mixture were used in the batch test. Introducing of 5nM AHLs significantly increased biofilm activity and increased sludge characteristics, which resulted in better pollutant removal performance, whereas exogenous 50nM and 500nM AHLs limited pollutant removal, especially COD and nitrogen removal. To further identify how exogenous signal molecular affects biofilm system nitrogen removal, analyzing of nitrifying bacteria through real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that these additional signal molecules affect nitrifying to total bacteria ratio. In addition, the running state of the system was stable during 15days of operation without an AHL dose, which suggests that the changes in the system due to AHL are irreversible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. gfp-Based N-Acyl Homoserine-Lactone Sensor Systems for Detection of Bacterial Communication

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Heydorn, Arne; Hentzer, Morten; Eberl, Leo; Geisenberger, Otto; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Molin, So/ren; Givskov, Michael

    2001-01-01

    In order to perform single-cell analysis and online studies of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated communication among bacteria, components of the Vibrio fischeri quorum sensor encoded by luxR-PluxI have been fused to modified versions of gfpmut3∗ genes encoding unstable green fluorescent proteins. Bacterial strains harboring this green fluorescent sensor detected a broad spectrum of AHL molecules and were capable of sensing the presence of 5 nM N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone in the surroundings. In combination with epifluorescent microscopy, the sensitivity of the sensor enabled AHL detection at the single-cell level and allowed for real-time measurements of fluctuations in AHL concentrations. This green fluorescent AHL sensor provides a state-of-the-art tool for studies of communication between the individuals present in mixed bacterial communities. PMID:11157219

  11. Efficacious Cyclic N-Acyl O-Amino Phenol Duocarmycin Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Amanda L.; Duncan, Katharine K.; Parelkar, Nikhil K.; Brown, Douglas; Vielhauer, George A.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Two novel cyclic N-acyl O-amino phenol prodrugs are reported as new members of a unique class of reductively cleaved prodrugs of the duocarmycin family of natural products. These prodrugs were explored with the expectation that they may be cleaved selectively within hypoxic tumor environments that have intrinsically higher concentrations of reducing nucleophiles and were designed to liberate the free drug without the release of an extraneous group. In vivo evaluation of the prodrug 6 showed that it exhibits extraordinary efficacy (T/C > 1500, L1210; 6/10 one year survivors) substantially exceeding that of the free drug, that its therapeutic window of activity is much larger permitting a dosing ≥ 40-fold higher than the free drug, and yet that it displays a potency in vivo that approaches the free drug (within 3-fold). Clearly, the prodrug 6 benefits from either its controlled slow release of the free drug or its preferential intracellular reductive cleavage. PMID:23627265

  12. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolysis by paraoxonases.

    PubMed

    Teiber, John F; Draganov, Dragomir I

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian paraoxonases (PONs) are a unique, highly conserved family of calcium-dependent esterases consisting of PON1, PON2, and PON3. The PONs can hydrolyze the lactone ring of a range of N-acyl-L: -homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules, rendering them inactive. This chapter describes a method that utilizes high-performance liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection for determining the rate of AHL hydrolysis in cell lysates, tissue homogenates, serum, and with purified proteins. Also described are the techniques used to prepare cell culture lysates and tissue homogenates for analysis and the use of class-specific enzyme inhibitors to determine the contribution of PONs to AHL hydrolysis in the samples.

  13. Comparative Toxicity and Metabolism of N-Acyl Homologues of Acetaminophen and Its Isomer 3'-Hydroxyacetanilide.

    PubMed

    Koen, Yakov M; Liu, Ke; Shinogle, Heather; Williams, Todd D; Hanzlik, Robert P

    2016-11-21

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP) is generally attributed to the formation of a reactive quinoneimine metabolite (NAPQI) that depletes glutathione and covalently binds to hepatocellular proteins. To explore the importance of the N-acyl group in APAP metabolism and toxicity, we synthesized 12 acyl side chain homologues of acetaminophen (APAP) and its 3'-regioisomer (AMAP), including the respective N-(4-pentynoyl) analogues PYPAP and PYMAP. Rat hepatocytes converted APAP, AMAP, PYPAP, and PYMAP extensively to O-glucuronide and O-sulfate conjugates in varying proportions, whereas glutathione or cysteine conjugates were observed only for APAP and PYPAP. PYPAP and PYMAP also underwent N-deacylation followed by O-sulfation and/or N-acetylation to a modest extent. The overall rates of metabolism in hepatocytes varied approximately 2-fold in the order APAP < AMAP ≈ PYPAP < PYMAP. Rat liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH and GSH converted APAP and PYPAP to their respective glutathione conjugates (formed via a reactive quinoneimine intermediate). With PYPAP only, a hydroxylated GSH conjugate was also observed. Thus, differences in biotransformation among these analogues were modest and mostly quantitative in nature. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in cultured hepatocytes by monitoring cell death using time-lapse photomicrography coupled with Hoechst 33342 and CellTox Green dyes to facilitate counting live cells vs dead cells, respectively. Progress curves for cell death and the areas under those curves showed that toxicity was markedly dependent on compound, concentration, and time. AMAP was essentially equipotent with APAP. Homologating the acyl side chain from C-2 to C-5 led to progressive increases in toxicity up to 80-fold in the para series. In conclusion, whereas N- or ring-substitution on APAP decrease metabolism and toxicity, homologating the N-acyl side chain increases metabolism about 2-fold, preserves the chemical reactivity of quinoneimine metabolites

  14. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-10-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain.

  15. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  16. Tropodithietic Acid Production in Phaeobacter gallaeciensis Is Regulated by N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing▿

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Martine; Neumann, Alexander; Schulz, Stefan; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    The production of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) is widely distributed within the marine Roseobacter clade, and it was proposed that AHL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) is one of the most common cell-to-cell communication mechanisms in roseobacters. The traits regulated by AHL-mediated QS are yet not known for members of the Roseobacter clade, but production of the antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA) was supposed to be controlled by AHL-mediated QS in Phaeobacter spp. We describe here for the first time the functional role of luxR and luxI homologous genes of an organism of the Roseobacter clade, i.e., pgaR and pgaI in Phaeobacter gallaeciensis. Our results demonstrate that the AHL synthase gene pgaI is responsible for production of N-3-hydroxydecanoylhomoserine lactone (3OHC10-HSL). Insertion mutants of pgaI and pgaR are both deficient in TDA biosynthesis and the formation of a yellow-brown pigment when grown in liquid marine broth medium. This indicates that in P. gallaeciensis the production of both secondary metabolites is controlled by AHL-mediated QS. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the transcription level of tdaA, which encodes an essential transcriptional regulator for TDA biosynthesis, decreased 28- and 51-fold in pgaI and pgaR genetic backgrounds, respectively. These results suggest that both the response regulator PgaR and the 3OHC10-HSL produced by PgaI induce expression of tdaA, which in turn positively regulates expression of the tda genes. Moreover, we confirmed that TDA can also act as autoinducer in P. gallaeciensis, as previously described for Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, but only in the presence of the response regulator PgaR. PMID:21949069

  17. A novel Dps-type protein from insect gut bacteria catalyses hydrolysis and synthesis of N-acyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ping, Liyan; Büchler, Rita; Mithöfer, Axel; Svatos, Ales; Spiteller, Dieter; Dettner, Konrad; Gmeiner, Sophie; Piel, Jörn; Schlott, Bernhard; Boland, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    A novel type of a microbial N-acyl amino acid hydrolase (AAH) from insect gut bacteria was purified, cloned and functionally characterized. The enzyme was obtained from Microbacterium arborescens SE14 isolated from the foregut of larvae of the generalist herbivore Spodoptera exigua. The substrates of AAH are N-acyl-glutamines previously reported to elicit plant defence reactions after introduction into the leaf during feeding. The isolated AAH catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond (K(m) = 36 micromol l(-1)) and, less efficient, the formation (K(m) = 3 mmol l(-1)) of the elicitor active N-acyl amino acids. The AAH from M. arborescens SE14 shows no homology to known fatty acyl amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but belongs to the family of Dps proteins (DNA-binding protein from starved cell). In line with other DPS proteins AAH is a homododecamer (monomer 17 181 Da) and contains iron atoms (c. 1-16 iron atoms per subunit). Unlike genuine DPS proteins the enzyme does not significantly bind DNA. Amino acid hydrolase is the first member of the DPS family that catalyses the cleavage or formation of amide bonds. The participation of a microbial enzyme in the homeostasis of N-acyl-glutamines in the insect gut adds further complexity to the interaction between plants and their herbivores.

  18. A General and Selective Rhodium-Catalyzed Reduction of Amides, N-Acyl Amino Esters, and Dipeptides Using Phenylsilane.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-05-17

    This article describes a selective reduction of functionalized amides, including N-acyl amino esters and dipeptides, to the corresponding amines using simple [Rh(acac)(cod)]. The catalyst shows excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of different sensitive functional moieties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  20. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  1. CREBZF expression and hormonal regulation in the mouse uterus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CREBZF is a member of the mammalian ATF/CREB family of the basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Two isoforms of CREBZF have been identified from the alternative usage of initiation codons, SMILE (long isoform of CREBZF) and Zhangfei (short isoform of CREBZF). Until recently, the physiological function of CREBZF in mammalian reproductions has not been reported. Methods Multiple techniques were performed to investigate the spatiotemporal expression and hormonal regulation of the CREBZF gene in the mouse uterus and its role in embryo implantation. Results Zhangfei was not detected in the mouse uterus. SMILE immunostaining was mainly expressed in the uterine luminal and glandular epithelium, and the expression levels of both SMILE mRNA and protein gradually decreased from days 1–3 of pregnancy, peaked on day 4, and then declined again on day 6. On day 5 of pregnancy, SMILE protein expression was detected only in the luminal epithelium at implantation sites compared with the expression at inter-implantation sites. SMILE protein was not detected in decidual cells from days 6–8 of pregnancy or artificial decidualisation. Furthermore, SMILE protein was not detected in the mouse uterus on days 3–6 of pseudopregnancy, and SMILE expression was also induced in the delayed-implantation uterus, indicating that the presence of an active blastocyst was required for SMILE expression at the implantation site. Oestrogen significantly stimulated SMILE expression in the ovariectomised mouse uterus. In addition, in cycling mice, high levels of SMILE protein and mRNA expression were also observed in proestrus and oestrus uteri. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggested that SMILE expression was closely related to mouse implantation and up-regulated by oestrogen. PMID:24325733

  2. Plants secrete substances that mimic bacterial N-acyl homoserine lactone signal activities and affect population density-dependent behaviors in associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Teplitski, M; Robinson, J B; Bauer, W D

    2000-06-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, many important changes in gene expression and behavior are regulated in a population density-dependent fashion by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Exudates from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were found to contain several separable activities that mimicked AHL signals in well-characterized bacterial reporter strains, stimulating AHL-regulated behaviors in some strains while inhibiting such behaviors in others. The chemical nature of the active mimic compounds is currently unknown, but all extracted differently into organic solvents than common bacterial AHLs. Various species of higher plants in addition to pea were found to secrete AHL mimic activities. The AHL signal-mimic compounds could prove to be important in determining the outcome of interactions between higher plants and a diversity of pathogenic, symbiotic, and saprophytic bacteria.

  3. Novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone analogs induce endoreduplication in the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hongbo; Hazawa, Masaharu; Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) analogs was investigated on the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS. One analog induced G2/M phase arrest at 5.3-10.6 µM and induced polyploidy at a higher dose (21.2 µM). Importantly, treatment of SAS cells with a combination of the AHL analog and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125, prevented mitosis and induced polyploidy. The AHL analog synergized with X-irradiation to inhibit clonogenic survival of SAS cells; however, its radiosensitizing effects were relative to not X-irradiation-induced apoptosis but mitotic failure following enhanced expression of Aurora A and B. These results suggest that the active AHL analog showed growth-suppressive and radiosensitizing effects, which involve polyploidy followed by G2/M accumulation and atypical cell death in the SAS cell line.

  4. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2017 update

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Xu, Jingxia; Law, Meiyee; Shaw, David R.; Baldarelli, Richard M.; Beal, Jon S.; Blodgett, Olin; Campbell, Jeff W.; Corbani, Lori E.; Lewis, Jill R.; Forthofer, Kim L.; Frost, Pete J.; Giannatto, Sharon C.; Hutchins, Lucie N.; Miers, Dave B.; Motenko, Howie; Stone, Kevin R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. Through curation of the scientific literature and by collaborations with large-scale expression projects, GXD collects and integrates data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. Expression data from both wild-type and mutant mice are included. The expression data are combined with genetic and phenotypic data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and made readily accessible to many types of database searches. At present, GXD includes over 1.5 million expression results and more than 300 000 images, all annotated with detailed and standardized metadata. Since our last report in 2014, we have added a large amount of data, we have enhanced data and database infrastructure, and we have implemented many new search and display features. Interface enhancements include: a new Mouse Developmental Anatomy Browser; interactive tissue-by-developmental stage and tissue-by-gene matrix views; capabilities to filter and sort expression data summaries; a batch search utility; gene-based expression overviews; and links to expression data from other species. PMID:27899677

  5. Application of hairless mouse strain to bioluminescence imaging of Arc expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hironori; Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Hisashi

    2017-01-23

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a powerful technique for monitoring the temporal and spatial dynamics of gene expression in the mouse brain. However, the black fur, skin pigmentation and hair regrowth after depilation of mouse interfere with BLI during developmental and daily examination. The aim of this study was to extend the application of Arc-Luc transgenic (Tg) mice to the BLI of neuronal activity in the mouse brain by introducing the hairless (HL) gene and to examine Arc-Luc expression at various developmental stages without interference from black fur, skin pigmentation, and hair regrowth. The Arc-Luc Tg HL mice were established by crossing the Tg C57BL/6 mouse strain with the HL mouse strain. Under physiological and pathological conditions, BLI was performed to detect the signal intensity changes at various developmental stages and at an interval of <7 days. The established Arc-Luc Tg HL mice exhibited clear and stable photon signals from the brain without interference during development. After surgical monocular deprivation during visual-critical period, large signal intensity changes in bioluminescence were observed in the mouse visual cortex. Exposure of mice to a novel object changed the photon distribution in the caudal and rostral cerebral areas. The temporal pattern of kainic-acid-induced Arc-Luc expression showed biphasic changes in signal intensity over 24 h. This study showed the advantages of using the mutant HL gene in BLI of Arc expression in the mouse brain at various developmental stages. Thus, the use of the Arc-Luc Tg HL mice enabled the tracking of neuronal-activity-dependent processes over a wide range from a focal area to the entire brain area with various time windows.

  6. Differential expression and regulation of Tdo2 during mouse decidualization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dang-Dang; Gao, Ying-Jie; Tian, Xue-Chao; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Cao, Hang; Zhang, Qiao-Ling; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (Tdo2) is a rate-limiting enzyme which directs the conversion of tryptophan to kynurenine. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and regulation of Tdo2 in mouse uterus during decidualization. Tdo2 mRNA was mainly expressed in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. By real-time PCR, a high level of Tdo2 expression was observed in the uteri from days 6 to 8 of pregnancy, although Tdo2 expression was observed on days 1-8. Simultaneously, Tdo2 mRNA was also detected under in vivo and in vitro artificial decidualization. Estrogen, progesterone, and 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP could induce the expression of Tdo2 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus and uterine stromal cells. Tdo2 could regulate cell proliferation and stimulate the expression of decidual marker Dtprp in the uterine stromal cells and decidual cells. Overexpression of Tdo2 could upregulate the expression of Ahr, Cox2, and Vegf genes in uterine stromal cells, while Tdo2 inhibitor 680C91 could downregulate the expression of Cox2 and Vegf genes in uterine decidual cells. These data indicate that Tdo2 may play an important role during mouse decidualization and be regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and cAMP.

  7. MicroRNA expression in the aging mouse thymus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaqiong; Li, Daotong; Ouyang, Dan; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Ma, Yongjiang; Li, Yugu

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the process of aging in many model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, and in many organs, such as the mouse lung and human epididymis. However, the role of miRNAs in the thymus tissues of the aging mouse remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the miRNA expression profiles in the thymuses of 1-, 10- and 19-month-old mice using miRNA array and qRT-PCR assays. A total of 223 mouse miRNAs were screened, and the expression levels of those miRNAs exhibited gradual increases and decreases over the course of thymus aging. Fifty miRNAs in the 10-month-old thymus and 81 miRNAs in the 19-month-old thymus were defined as differentially expressed miRNAs (p<0.05) in comparison with their levels in the 1-month-old mouse, and approximately one-third of these miRNAs were grouped within 11 miRNA clusters. Each miRNA cluster contained 2 to 5 miRNA genes, and most of the cluster members displayed similar expression patterns, being either increased or decreased. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and the IPA database were used to analyze the 12 miRNAs that exhibited significant expression changes, revealing that as many as 15 pathways may be involved. Thus, our current study determined the expression profiles of miRNAs in the mouse thymus during the process of aging. The results suggested that these miRNAs could become meaningful biomarkers for studying thymus aging and that the aging-related alternations in miRNA expression may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, development and carcinogenesis/tumorigenesis.

  8. Expression of murine Asb-9 during mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Man Ryul; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Jong Soo; Rhim, Si Youn; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2008-12-31

    We previously showed that Asb-4 and Asb-17 is uniquely expressed in developing male germ cells. A recent report showed that Asb-9 is specifically expressed in the kidney and testes; however, detailed expression patterns in developing germ cells have not been shown. Northern blot analysis in various tissues demonstrated that mAsb-9 was strongly expressed in the testes. Expression analysis by RT-PCR and Northern blot in developing mouse testes indicates that mAsb-9 is expressed from the fourth week after birth to adulthood, with the highest expression in round spermatids. Expression sites were further localized by in situ hybridization in the testes. Pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids expressed mAsb-9 but spermatogonia and generated spermatozoa did not. This study reveals that mAsb-9 could be a specific marker of active spermatogenesis and would be useful for studies of male germ cell development.

  9. Expression of HSG is essential for mouse blastocyst formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Guangjian; Pan Lei; Huang Xiuying; Han Mei; Wen Jinkun . E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn; Sun Fangzhen . E-mail: fzsun@genetics.ac.cn

    2005-09-23

    It has been shown recently that hyperplasia suppressor gene (HSG) is a powerful regulator for cell proliferation and has a critical role in mitochondrial fusion in many cells. However, little is known about its expression, localization, and function during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. In this study, with indirect immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting, we found that HSG was expressed in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos which primarily exhibited a submembrane distribution pattern in the cytoplasm. Moreover, HSG mainly associated with {beta}-tubulin during oocyte maturation and early embryonic development. When mouse zygotes were injected with HSG antisense plasmid and cultured in vitro, their capacity to form blastocysts was severely impaired. Our results indicate that HSG plays an essential role in mouse preimplantation development.

  10. Action of N-acylated ambroxol derivatives on secretion of chloride ions in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahiro; Takemura, Yoshizumi; Niisato, Naomi; Mitsuyama, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2009-03-13

    We report the effects of new N-acylated ambroxol derivatives (TEI-588a, TEI-588b, TEI-589a, TEI-589b, TEI-602a and TEI-602b: a, aromatic amine-acylated derivative; b, aliphatic amine-acylated derivative) induced from ambroxol (a mucolytic agent to treat human lung diseases) on Cl(-) secretion in human submucosal serous Calu-3 cells under a Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter-1 (NKCC1)-mediated hyper-secreting condition. TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a diminished hyper-secretion of Cl(-) by diminishing the activity of NKCC1 without blockade of apical Cl(-) channel (TEI-589a>TEI-602a>TEI-589b), while any other tested compounds including ambroxol had no effects on Cl(-) secretion. These indicate that the inhibitory action of an aromatic amine-acylated derivative on Cl(-) secretion is stronger that that of an aliphatic amine-acylated derivative, and that 3-(2,5-dimethyl)furoyl group has a strong action in inhibition of Cl(-) secretion than cyclopropanoyl group. We here indicate that TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a reduce hyper-secretion to an appropriate level in the airway, providing a possibility that the compound can be an effective drug in airway obstructive diseases including COPD by reducing the airway resistance under a hyper-secreting condition.

  11. In vitro and in vivo aspects of N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vermehren, Charlotte; Hansen, Harald S; Clausen-Beck, Brian; Frøkjaer, Sven

    2003-03-18

    Incorporation of the phospholipid, N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), has shown to increase the liposomal stability towards plasma components in vitro. Besides increasing the circulation-time, NAPE has been shown to contain fusiogenic properties. Hence, fusion between NAPE-liposomes and target cells may be expected, resulting in a favorable delivery of drug to the target cell. In this study, NAPE has been tested as a potential liposomal component of phosphatidylcholine-liposomes. The liposomes were characterized by size, long-term stability and phase transition temperature (T(m)). In vivo behavior of NAPE-liposomes was determined by the blood-circulation half-life in mice. A characterization of the liposomes revealed that high content of NAPE resulted in liposomes of increased size compared to pure phosphatidylcholine-liposomes. However, the liposomes showed only a slight increase in size during storage for 5 weeks. Determination of T(m) for NAPE-liposomes showed increasing values of T(m) by increasing percentage of NAPE in the liposomal bilayer, due to the higher T(m) of NAPE compared to phosphatidylcholine. Blood-clearance studies showed an initial increase in blood-circulation of liposomes containing high amounts of NAPE. Thus, these results suggest that liposomes containing high percentage of NAPE may be a promising candidate for long-circulating liposomes, possibly in combination with other stabilizing components, e.g. cholesterol. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. A Marine Mesorhizobium sp. Produces Structurally Novel Long-Chain N-Acyl-l-Homoserine Lactones▿

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Anja; Kehraus, Stefan; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin; Anke, Heidrun; Kaesler, Ines; Graeber, Ingeborg; Szewzyk, Ulrich; König, Gabriele M.

    2007-01-01

    Our study focused on a Mesorhizobium sp. that is phylogenetically affiliated by 16S rRNA gene sequence to other marine and saline bacteria of this genus. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry investigations of the extract obtained from solid-phase extraction of cultures of this bacterium indicated the presence of several N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), with chain lengths of C10 to C16. Chromatographic separation of the active bacterial extract yielded extraordinarily large amounts of two unprecedented acylated homoserine lactones, 5-cis-3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone (5-cis-3-oxo-C12-HSL) (compound 1) and 5-cis-C12-HSL (compound 2). Quorum-sensing activity of compounds 1 and 2 was shown in two different biosensor systems [Escherichia coli MT102(pSB403) and Pseudomonas putida F117(pKR-C12)]. Furthermore, it was shown that both compounds can restore protease and pyoverdin production of an AHL-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 lasI rhlI double mutant, suggesting that these signal molecules maybe used for intergenus signaling. In conclusion, these data indicate that the quorum-sensing activity of compounds 1 and 2 is modulated by the chain length and functional groups of the acyl moiety. Additionally, compound 1 showed antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. PMID:17400774

  13. Toxicological safety assessment of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis with additional N-acyl homoserine lactonase gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Chenfei; Chen, Shouwen; Ruan, Lifang; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicology safety to mammals of a genetically modified (GM) Bacillus thuringiensis with an additional N-acyl homoserine lactones gene (aiiA), which possesses insecticidal activity together with restraint of bacterial pathogenicity and is intended for use as a multifunctional biopesticide. Safety assessments included an acute oral toxicity test and 28-d animal feeding study in Wistar rats, primary eye and dermal irritation in Zealand White rabbits, and delayed contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Tests were conducted using spray-dried powder preparation. This GM product showed toxicity neither in oral acute toxicity test nor in 28-d animal feeding test at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. During the animal feeding test, there were no significant differences in growth, food and water consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights, and histopathology finding between rats in controls and tested groups. Tested animals in primary eye and dermal irritation and delayed contact hypersensitivity test were also devoid of any toxicity compared to controls. All the above results demonstrated that the GM based multifunctional B. thuringiensis has low toxicity and low eye and dermal irritation and would not cause hypersensitivity to laboratory mammals and therefore could be regarded as safe for use as a pesticide.

  14. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Berghout, Joanne; Campbell, Jeff; Corbani, Lori E; Forthofer, Kim L; Frost, Pete J; Miers, Dave; Shaw, David R; Stone, Kevin R; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; http://www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD collects different types of expression data from studies of wild-type and mutant mice, covering all developmental stages and including data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. The data are acquired from the scientific literature and from researchers, including groups doing large-scale expression studies. Integration with the other data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and interconnections with other databases places GXD's gene expression information in the larger biological and biomedical context. Since the last report, the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by the addition of new data and by the implementation of more powerful and versatile search and display features. Web interface enhancements include the capability to search for expression data for genes associated with specific phenotypes and/or human diseases; new, more interactive data summaries; easy downloading of data; direct searches of expression images via associated metadata; and new displays that combine image data and their associated annotations. At present, GXD includes >1.4 million expression results and 250,000 images that are accessible to our search tools.

  15. Expression of two novel transcripts in the mouse definitive endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali S.; Hou, Juan; Wei, Wei; Hoodless, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the expression of two novel transcripts, Ende (AK014119) and Npe (AK084355), during early mouse embryogenesis. Ende mRNA was first detected at embryonic day (E) 7.0 in a small population of epiblast cells in the distal half of the embryo. At E7.5, Ende was expressed by newly formed definitive endoderm cells in the proximal half of the embryo, and was not expressed in extra-embryonic endoderm. This expression pattern then changed to the ventral aspect of the developing foregut pocket and the entire hindgut pocket at E8.0–8.5, before becoming restricted to the foregut overlying the heart and the posterior most hindgut. By E9.0 Ende expression was also observed in the posterior half of the ventral neural tube. Thus, Ende was expressed dynamically and in specific populations of the definitive endoderm from E7.0 to E8.5. We found Npe expression to be restricted to the node/posterior notochord region at the distal tip of the embryo between E7.0 and E8.0. By E9.5, Npe expression was observed in the posterior most population of dorsal hindgut cells and notochord cells. Given their expression in mouse definitive endoderm populations, Ende and Npe will be valuable tools to study formation and development of this tissue. PMID:20153842

  16. Aquaporin expression patterns in the developing mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the presence of the various membrane-located water channels, aquaporins (AQP), during the prenatal and postnatal development of the mouse submandibular salivary gland (SMG). To learn more about AQPs in the developing aspect of salivary glands, we investigated trends in the expression patterns of several AQPs using the embryonic, early postnatal, and young adult mouse SMGs as models. We have chosen AQPs previously found in salivary glands in other animals. Transcripts of AQPs 1, 3, 4, 5, and 8 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified. Aquaporin proteins 1, 3, 4, and 5, but not AQP protein 8, were detected and quantified using western blotting. The various AQPs showed distinct transcript and protein-expression patterns. The change in trends may indicate that the importance of the various AQPs varies throughout the developmental stages in the mouse SMG. Their presence might be related to cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, transepithelial transport, osmosensing, or cell volume regulation; all roles that in the literature are linked to the various AQPs. Overall, this study demonstrates that AQP presentation varies and has a specific expression pattern during the development of mouse SMG. This feature may be important for glandular anatomical and physiological development.

  17. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  18. Reduced Expression of SARM in Mouse Spleen during Polymicrobial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zou, Lin; Cen, Dongzhi; Chao, Wei; Chen, Dunjin

    2016-12-01

    Objective Immune dysfunction, including prominent apoptosis of immune cells and decreased functioning of the remaining immune cells, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Sterile α and HEAT/armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) is implicated in the regulation of immune cell apoptosis. This study aimed to elucidate SARM contributes to sepsis-induced immune cell death and immunosuppression. Methods A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). SARM gene and protein expression, caspase 3 cleavage and intracellular ATP production were measured in the mouse spleens. Results CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis specifically attenuated both the gene and protein expression of SARM in the spleens. Moreover, the attenuation of SARM expression synchronized with splenocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by increased caspase 3 cleavage and ATP depletion. Conclusions These findings suggest that SARM is a potential regulator of sepsis-induced splenocyte apoptosis.

  19. Expression and Function of Kisspeptin during Mouse Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Zong, Teng; Zhong, Chengxue; Zhang, BaoPing; Ren, Min; Kuang, HaiBin

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma kisspeptin levels dramatically increased during the first trimester of human pregnancy, which is similar to pregnancy specific glycoprotein-human chorionic gonadotropin. However, its particular role in the implantation and decidualization has not been fully unraveled. Here, the study was conducted to investigate the expression and function of kisspeptin in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and decidualization. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative PCR results demonstrated that Kiss1 and GPR54 mRNA levels showed dynamic increase in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy and artificially induced decidualization in vivo. KISS-1 and GPR54 proteins were spatiotemporally expressed in decidualizing stromal cells in intact pregnant females, as well as in pseudopregnant mice undergoing artificially induced decidualization. In the ovariectomized mouse uterus, the expression of Kiss1 mRNA was upregulated after progesterone or/and estradiol treatment. Moreover, in a stromal cell culture model, the expression of Kiss1 and GPR54 mRNA gradually rise with the progression of stromal cell decidualization, whereas the attenuated expression of Kiss1 using small interfering RNA approaches significantly blocked the progression of stromal cell decidualization. Conclusion our results demonstrated that Kiss1/GPR54 system was involved in promoting uterine decidualization during early pregnancy in mice. PMID:24830702

  20. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Moss, Julie; Graham, Liz; Burton, Nicholas; Hill, Bill; Rao, Jianguo; Baldock, Richard A.; Armit, Chris

    2014-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage/) is a freely available database of in situ gene expression patterns that allows users to perform online queries of mouse developmental gene expression. EMAGE is unique in providing both text-based descriptions of gene expression plus spatial maps of gene expression patterns. This mapping allows spatial queries to be accomplished alongside more traditional text-based queries. Here, we describe our recent progress in spatial mapping and data integration. EMAGE has developed a method of spatially mapping 3D embryo images captured using optical projection tomography, and through the use of an IIP3D viewer allows users to view arbitrary sections of raw and mapped 3D image data in the context of a web browser. EMAGE now includes enhancer data, and we have spatially mapped images from a comprehensive screen of transgenic reporter mice that detail the expression of mouse non-coding genomic DNA fragments with enhancer activity. We have integrated the eMouseAtlas anatomical atlas and the EMAGE database so that a user of the atlas can query the EMAGE database easily. In addition, we have extended the atlas framework to enable EMAGE to spatially cross-index EMBRYS whole mount in situ hybridization data. We additionally report on recent developments to the EMAGE web interface, including new query and analysis capabilities. PMID:24265223

  1. Specialization of Gene Expression during Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Liscovitch, Noa; Chechik, Gal

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome of the brain changes during development, reflecting processes that determine functional specialization of brain regions. We analyzed gene expression, measured using in situ hybridization across the full developing mouse brain, to quantify functional specialization of brain regions. Surprisingly, we found that during the time that the brain becomes anatomically regionalized in early development, transcription specialization actually decreases reaching a low, “neurotypic”, point around birth. This decrease of specialization is brain-wide, and mainly due to biological processes involved in constructing brain circuitry. Regional specialization rises again during post-natal development. This effect is largely due to specialization of plasticity and neural activity processes. Post-natal specialization is particularly significant in the cerebellum, whose expression signature becomes increasingly different from other brain regions. When comparing mouse and human expression patterns, the cerebellar post-natal specialization is also observed in human, but the regionalization of expression in the human Thalamus and Cortex follows a strikingly different profile than in mouse. PMID:24068900

  2. Expression profiling of the mouse early embryo: Reflections and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory mouse plays important role in our understanding of early mammalian development and provides invaluable model for human early embryos, which are difficult to study for ethical and technical reasons. Comprehensive collection of cDNA clones, their sequences, and complete genome sequence information, which have been accumulated over last two decades, have provided even more advantages to mouse models. Here the progress in global gene expression profiling in early mouse embryos and, to some extent, stem cells are reviewed and the future directions and challenges are discussed. The discussions include the restatement of global gene expression profiles as snapshot of cellular status, and subsequent distinction between the differentiation state and physiological state of the cells. The discussions then extend to the biological problems that can be addressed only through global expression profiling, which include: bird’s-eye view of global gene expression changes, molecular index for developmental potency, cell lineage trajectory, microarray-guided cell manipulation, and the possibility of delineating gene regulatory cascades and networks. PMID:16739220

  3. Expression of two cross-reactive idiotypes on mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    Two cross-reactive anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies were previously prepared from sera of rabbits immunized with mouse monoclonal antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC). Most of the anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming cells (PFC) were suppressed by either of the two anti-Id antibodies. The Id profiles of anti-BrMRBC PFC were almost identical among various cell populations in a strain, but different among various mouse strains. Mouse sera contained both of the Id-bearing immunoglobulins Ig, and a significant part of the Id-bearing Ig were eliminated by absorption with BrMRBC. Nude BALB/c mice were almost equal to normal BALB/c mice in the Id patterns of anti-BrMRBC PFC and in the concentrations of the Id-bearing Ig. The injections of anti-Id antibodies into suckling mice suppressed, specifically, the development of the B cells to produce the homologous Id-bearing Ig, but the injection of Id-bearing monoclonal antibodies barely affected Id expression. It is suggested that the two Id are encoded in germ-line genes of mice, and are expressed independently of each other and Id-anti-Id regulations by T cells or B cells. PMID:3327804

  4. Chemically Modified N-Acylated Hyaluronan Fragments Modulate Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Stimulated Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Babasola, Oladunni; Rees-Milton, Karen J.; Bebe, Siziwe; Wang, Jiaxi; Anastassiades, Tassos P.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular mass hyaluronans are known to induce inflammation. To determine the role of the acetyl groups of low molecular mass hyaluronan in stimulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines, partial N-deacetylation was carried out by hydrazinolysis. This resulted in 19.7 ± 3.5% free NH2 functional groups, which were then acylated by reacting with an acyl anhydride, including acetic anhydride. Hydrazinolysis resulted in bond cleavage of the hyaluronan chain causing a reduction of the molecular mass to 30–214 kDa. The total NH2 and N-acetyl moieties in the reacetylated hyaluronan were 0% and 98.7 ± 1.5% respectively, whereas for butyrylated hyaluronan, the total NH2, N-acetyl, and N-butyryl moieties were 0, 82.2 ± 4.6, and 22.7 ± 3.8%, respectively, based on 1H NMR. We studied the effect of these polymers on cytokine production by cultured human macrophages (THP-1 cells). The reacetylated hyaluronan stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production to levels similar to LPS, whereas partially deacetylated hyaluronan had no stimulatory effect, indicating the critical role of the N-acetyl groups in the stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Butyrylated hyaluronan significantly reduced the stimulatory effect on cytokine production by the reacetylated hyaluronan or LPS but had no stimulatory effect of its own. The other partially N-acylated hyaluronan derivatives tested showed smaller stimulatory effects than reacetylated hyaluronan. Antibody and antagonist experiments suggest that the acetylated and partially butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronans exert their effects through the TLR-4 receptor system. Selectively N-butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronan shows promise as an example of a novel semisynthetic anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:25053413

  5. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  6. Quorum quenching by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone acylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Sio, Charles F; Otten, Linda G; Cool, Robbert H; Diggle, Stephen P; Braun, Peter G; Bos, Rein; Daykin, Mavis; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Quax, Wim J

    2006-03-01

    The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is controlled by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system. During functional analysis of putative acylase genes in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, the PA2385 gene was found to encode an acylase that removes the fatty acid side chain from the homoserine lactone (HSL) nucleus of AHL-dependent quorum-sensing signal molecules. Analysis showed that the posttranslational processing of the acylase and the hydrolysis reaction type are similar to those of the beta-lactam acylases, strongly suggesting that the PA2385 protein is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. In a bioassay, the purified acylase was shown to degrade AHLs with side chains ranging in length from 11 to 14 carbons at physiologically relevant low concentrations. The substituent at the 3' position of the side chain did not affect activity, indicating broad-range AHL quorum-quenching activity. Of the two main AHL signal molecules of P. aeruginosa PAO1, N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL), only 3-oxo-C12-HSL is degraded by the enzyme. Addition of the purified protein to P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures completely inhibited accumulation of 3-oxo-C12-HSL and production of the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and reduced production of the virulence factors elastase and pyocyanin. Similar results were obtained when the PA2385 gene was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa. These results demonstrate that the protein has in situ quorum-quenching activity. The quorum-quenching AHL acylase may enable P. aeruginosa PAO1 to modulate its own quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenic potential and, moreover, offers possibilities for novel antipseudomonal therapies.

  7. Quorum Quenching by an N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Acylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Charles F.; Otten, Linda G.; Cool, Robbert H.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Braun, Peter G.; Bos, Rein; Daykin, Mavis; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Quax, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is controlled by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system. During functional analysis of putative acylase genes in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, the PA2385 gene was found to encode an acylase that removes the fatty acid side chain from the homoserine lactone (HSL) nucleus of AHL-dependent quorum-sensing signal molecules. Analysis showed that the posttranslational processing of the acylase and the hydrolysis reaction type are similar to those of the beta-lactam acylases, strongly suggesting that the PA2385 protein is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. In a bioassay, the purified acylase was shown to degrade AHLs with side chains ranging in length from 11 to 14 carbons at physiologically relevant low concentrations. The substituent at the 3′ position of the side chain did not affect activity, indicating broad-range AHL quorum-quenching activity. Of the two main AHL signal molecules of P. aeruginosa PAO1, N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL), only 3-oxo-C12-HSL is degraded by the enzyme. Addition of the purified protein to P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures completely inhibited accumulation of 3-oxo-C12-HSL and production of the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and reduced production of the virulence factors elastase and pyocyanin. Similar results were obtained when the PA2385 gene was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa. These results demonstrate that the protein has in situ quorum-quenching activity. The quorum-quenching AHL acylase may enable P. aeruginosa PAO1 to modulate its own quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenic potential and, moreover, offers possibilities for novel antipseudomonal therapies. PMID:16495538

  8. Diverse profiles of N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules found in cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Ransome, Emma; Munn, Colin B; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Tait, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Many marine habitats, such as the surface and tissues of marine invertebrates, including corals, harbour diverse populations of microorganisms, which are thought to play a role in the health of their hosts and influence mutualistic and competitive interactions. Investigating the presence and stability of quorum sensing (QS) in these ecosystems may shed light on the roles and control of these bacterial communities. Samples of 13 cnidarian species were screened for the presence and diversity of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs; a prevalent type of QS molecule) using thin-layer chromatography and an Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 biosensor. Ten of 13 were found to harbour species-specific, conserved AHL profiles. AHLs were confirmed in Anemonia viridis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. To assess temporal role and stability, AHLs were investigated in A. viridis from intertidal pools over 16 h. Patterns of AHLs showed conserved profiles except for two mid-chain length AHLs, which increased significantly over the day, peaking at 20:00, but had no correlation with pool chemistry. Denaturing gel electrophoresis of RT-PCR-amplified bacterial 16S rRNA showed the presence of an active bacterial community that changed in composition alongside AHL profiles and contained a number of bands that affiliate with known AHL-producing bacteria. Investigations into the quorum sensing-controlled, species-specific roles of these bacterial communities and how these regulatory circuits are influenced by the coral host and members of the bacterial community are imperative to expand our knowledge of these interactions with respect to the maintenance of coral health. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MomL, a Novel Marine-Derived N-Acyl Homoserine Lactonase from Muricauda olearia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaihao; Su, Ying; Brackman, Gilles; Cui, Fangyuan; Zhang, Yunhui; Shi, Xiaochong; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules for interspecies communication, and AHL-dependent QS is related with virulence factor production in many bacterial pathogens. Quorum quenching, the enzymatic degradation of the signaling molecule, would attenuate virulence rather than kill the pathogens, and thereby reduce the potential for evolution of drug resistance. In a previous study, we showed that Muricauda olearia Th120, belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, has strong AHL degradative activity. In this study, an AHL lactonase (designated MomL), which could degrade both short- and long-chain AHLs with or without a substitution of oxo-group at the C-3 position, was identified from Th120. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that MomL functions as an AHL lactonase catalyzing AHL degradation through lactone hydrolysis. MomL is an AHL lactonase belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily that harbors an N-terminal signal peptide. The overall catalytic efficiency of MomL for C6-HSL is ∼2.9 × 105 s−1 M−1. Metal analysis and site-directed mutagenesis showed that, compared to AiiA, MomL has a different metal-binding capability and requires the histidine and aspartic acid residues for activity, while it shares the “HXHXDH” motif with other AHL lactonases belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. This suggests that MomL is a representative of a novel type of secretory AHL lactonase. Furthermore, MomL significantly attenuated the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, which suggests that MomL has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent. PMID:25398866

  10. MomL, a novel marine-derived N-acyl homoserine lactonase from Muricauda olearia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kaihao; Su, Ying; Brackman, Gilles; Cui, Fangyuan; Zhang, Yunhui; Shi, Xiaochong; Coenye, Tom; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules for interspecies communication, and AHL-dependent QS is related with virulence factor production in many bacterial pathogens. Quorum quenching, the enzymatic degradation of the signaling molecule, would attenuate virulence rather than kill the pathogens, and thereby reduce the potential for evolution of drug resistance. In a previous study, we showed that Muricauda olearia Th120, belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, has strong AHL degradative activity. In this study, an AHL lactonase (designated MomL), which could degrade both short- and long-chain AHLs with or without a substitution of oxo-group at the C-3 position, was identified from Th120. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that MomL functions as an AHL lactonase catalyzing AHL degradation through lactone hydrolysis. MomL is an AHL lactonase belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily that harbors an N-terminal signal peptide. The overall catalytic efficiency of MomL for C6-HSL is ∼2.9 × 10(5) s(-1) M(-1). Metal analysis and site-directed mutagenesis showed that, compared to AiiA, MomL has a different metal-binding capability and requires the histidine and aspartic acid residues for activity, while it shares the "HXHXDH" motif with other AHL lactonases belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. This suggests that MomL is a representative of a novel type of secretory AHL lactonase. Furthermore, MomL significantly attenuated the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, which suggests that MomL has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent.

  11. N-acyl-ω-aminoaldehydes are efficient substrates of plant aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Frömmel, Jan; Šebela, Marek; Demo, Gabriel; Lenobel, René; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Soural, Miroslav; Kopečný, David

    2015-01-01

    Plant aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs, EC 1.2.1.19) belong to the family 10 of aldehyde dehydrogenases and participate in the metabolism of compounds related to amino acids such as polyamines or osmoprotectants. Their broad specificity covers ω-aminoaldehydes, aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes as well as nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aldehydes. The substrate preference of plant AMADHs is determined by the presence of aspartic acid and aromatic residues in the substrate channel. In this work, 15 new N-acyl derivates of 3-aminopropanal (APAL) and 4-aminobutanal (ABAL) were synthesized and confirmed as substrates of two pea AMADH isoenzymes (PsAMADH 1 and 2). The compounds were designed considering the previously demonstrated conversion of N-acetyl derivatives as well as substrate channel dimensions (5-8 Å × 14 Å). The acyl chain length and its branching were found less significant for substrate properties than the length of the initial natural substrate. In general, APAL derivatives were found more efficient than the corresponding ABAL derivatives because of the prevailing higher conversion rates and lower K m values. Differences in enzymatic performance between the two isoenzymes corresponded in part to their preferences to APAL to ABAL. The higher PsAMADH2 affinity to substrates correlated with more frequent occurrence of an excess substrate inhibition. Molecular docking indicated the possible auxiliary role of Tyr163, Ser295 and Gln451 in binding of the new substrates. The only derivative carrying a free carboxyl group (N-adipoyl APAL) was surprisingly better substrate than ABAL in PsAMADH2 reaction indicating that also negatively charged aldehydes might be good substrates for ALDH10 family.

  12. Differential expression of the glucose transporters in mouse gustatory papillae.

    PubMed

    Toyono, Takashi; Seta, Yuji; Kataoka, Shinji; Oda, Masafumi; Toyoshima, Kuniaki

    2011-08-01

    Taste receptors and their downstream signaling molecules are activated by sugars and sweeteners in the gut and participate in the regulation of glucose transport into enterocytes. The glucose transporter families GLUT and SGLT are responsible for the absorption of glucose, GLUT4 and SGLT1 being expressed preferentially in T1R3-positive taste cells. However, the expression patterns of the other glucose transporters in mouse gustatory tissues have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we have examined the expression patterns of the glucose transporters (GLUT1-4 and SGLT1-3) in mouse gustatory tissues. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction assays have revealed that GLUT1, 3, and 4 and SGLT1 mRNAs are expressed in the circumvallate papillae. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown that SGLT1 is expressed in a subset of the epithelial cells: from the basal cell layer to the prickle cell layer and in intragemmal and extragemmal epithelium cells in the circumvallate, foliate, and fungiform papillae. GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 are expressed in the prickle cell layers and/or basal cell layers in these papillae. Moreover, GLUT1, but not GLUT3 or GLUT4, is expressed in a subset of intragemmal and extragemmal epithelium cells in these papillae. Double-labeling experiments have demonstrated that GLUT1-positive taste bud cells coexpress gustducin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type III. These results suggest that SGLT1 and GLUT1 play a role in glucose-sensing and/or transport in mouse taste buds.

  13. Progesterone Regulates Secretin Expression in Mouse Uterus During Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhu; Wang, Tong-Song; Qi, Qian-Rong; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Zhao, Xu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Secretin, a classical gastrointestinal and neuroendocrine peptide, plays an important role in maintaining the body fluid balance. However, the expression and regulation of secretin in the reproductive system are still unknown. In our study, secretin is specifically expressed in the decidua on days 5 to 8 of pregnancy. Secretin expression is not detected under delayed implantation but is stimulated after estrogen activation and under artificial decidualization. Progesterone induces secretin expression in ovariectomized mice and cultured stromal cells, which is abrogated by specific LY294002. Because secretin is mainly localized in the decidua and also strongly expressed during in vitro decidualization, secretin may play a role during mouse decidualization through regulating cyclic adenosine monophosphate level. PMID:24336673

  14. Progesterone regulates secretin expression in mouse uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhu; Wang, Tong-Song; Qi, Qian-Rong; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Zhao, Xu-Yu; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Secretin, a classical gastrointestinal and neuroendocrine peptide, plays an important role in maintaining the body fluid balance. However, the expression and regulation of secretin in the reproductive system are still unknown. In our study, secretin is specifically expressed in the decidua on days 5 to 8 of pregnancy. Secretin expression is not detected under delayed implantation but is stimulated after estrogen activation and under artificial decidualization. Progesterone induces secretin expression in ovariectomized mice and cultured stromal cells, which is abrogated by specific LY294002. Because secretin is mainly localized in the decidua and also strongly expressed during in vitro decidualization, secretin may play a role during mouse decidualization through regulating cyclic adenosine monophosphate level.

  15. Expression profiling and gene discovery in the mouse lens.

    PubMed

    Wride, Michael A; Mansergh, Fiona C; Adams, Steffan; Everitt, Rebecca; Minnema, Stephanie E; Rancourt, Derrick E; Evans, Martin J

    2003-08-22

    Defects in the development and physiology of the lens can result in cataracts (opacification of the lens), which are currently treatable only by surgical removal. The lens is also an excellent system for understanding fundamental biological processes such as cellular differentiation and ageing. Here, microarrays have been used to gain insights into global patterns of gene expression in the mouse lens. Lens gene expression compared to non-lens tissues has been investigated in order to identify genes preferentially expressed in the lens and lenses of different ages have been compared to identify differentially regulated genes. Genes expressed in the lens were identified using mouse GeneFilters microarrays (GF400; ResGen). Each array comprises 5,184 mouse cDNAs representing sequence-verified known genes and uncharacterized ESTs spotted onto a nylon membrane. Target RNA (33P labeled) from lens and non-lens samples was hybridized to the arrays. The proportion of genes involved in various biological processes was investigated using Onto-Express to search for GeneOntology terms associated with them. Differential gene expression was investigated using K-means clustering analysis. Expression of known and uncharacterized genes selected from the arrays was investigated further using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. 1,668 genes were expressed in one or more of newborn, 7 day old, and adult mouse lenses at levels significantly above background. Raw data and bioinformatics data relating to these genes have been published herein. There were 543 (33%) known genes, 124 (7%) had some similarity to known genes, 400 (24%) were functionally uncharacterized, and the remaining 601 (36%) genes were novel (matching only existing ESTs). Onto-Express identified genes involved in various biological processes including several categories containing greater numbers of genes than would be expected by chance, such as transcription regulation and G-protein coupled receptor signaling genes. Semi

  16. Differential Gene Expression in Chemically Induced Mouse Lung Adenomas1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruisheng; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Because of similarities in histopathology and tumor progression stages between mouse and human lung adenocarcinomas, the mouse lung tumor model with lung adenomas as the endpoint has been used extensively to evaluate the efficacy of putative lung cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, a competitive cDNA library screening (CCLS) was employed to determine changes in the expression of mRNA in chemically induced lung adenomas compared with paired normal lung tissues. A total of 2555 clones having altered expression in tumors were observed following competitive hybridization between normal lung and lung adenomas after primary screening of over 160,000 clones from a mouse lung cDNA library. Among the 755 clones confirmed by dot blot hybridization, 240 clones were underexpressed, whereas 515 clones were overexpressed in tumors. Sixty-five clones with the most frequently altered expression in six individual tumors were confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. When examining the 58 known genes, 39 clones had increased expression and 19 had decreased expression, whereas the 7 novel genes showed overexpression. A high percentage (>60%) of overexpressed or underexpressed genes was observed in at least two or three of the lesions. Reproducibly overexpressed genes included ERK-1, JAK-1, surfactant proteins A, B, and C, NFAT1, α-1 protease inhibitor, helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase (CHUK), α-adaptin, α-1 PI2, thioether S-methyltransferase, and CYP2C40. Reproducibly underexpressed genes included paroxanase, ALDH II, CC10, von Ebner salivary gland protein, and α- and β-globin. In addition, CCLS identified several novel genes or genes not previously associated with lung carcinogenesis, including a hypothetical protein (FLJ11240) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor homologue. This study shows the efficacy of this methodology for identifying genes with altered expression. These genes may prove to be helpful in our understanding of the genetic basis of lung

  17. Altered glucocorticoid receptor expression and function during mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Kang, H; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1997-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most potent inhibitors of tumor promotion in mouse skin, when applied with a promoting agent at the early stages of promotion. However, established skin papillomas become resistant to growth inhibition by glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid control of cellular functions is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a well-known transcription factor. Here we present data on GR expression and function in mouse papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors were produced in SENCAR mice by a 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate two-stage protocol. In early papillomas (after 15-20 wk of promotion), northern blotting revealed a decrease in the GR mRNA level that was confirmed by a binding assay. However, in late papillomas (after 30-40 wk of promotion), and especially in squamous cell carcinomas, the level of GR in both assays was similar to or higher than the GR level in normal epidermis. To test the functional capability of GR in tumors, we compared the effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid fluocinolone acetonide (FA) on keratinocyte proliferation and on expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in normal epidermis, hyperplastic skin surrounding tumors, and mouse skin papillomas. FA strongly inhibited DNA synthesis in keratinocytes in normal skin and tumor-surrounding skin but had no effect on DNA synthesis in papillomas. In addition, FA strongly induced metallothionein 1 expression and inhibited connexin 26 expression in skin but did not affect expression of these genes in tumors. These data suggest that alteration of both the expression and function of GR may be an important mechanism of tumor promotion in skin.

  18. Gene expression and dental enamel structure in developing mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Risnes, Steinar; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Khuu, Cuong; Osmundsen, Harald

    2010-04-01

    At the mouse incisor tip the initially differentiated ameloblasts produce a thin, prism-free enamel, while further apically, in the immediate adjacent segment, the enamel thickness increases and the four-layered enamel of mouse incisor is formed. Comparative gene-expression profiling was carried out on RNA isolated from these two segments of incisor tooth germs at embryonic day (E)17.5 and at postnatal days (P)0, 1, 2, and 10 using microarrays to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) species present in the segments. Validation of expression data was achieved using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Bioinformatic data suggested enhanced cellular apoptosis in the incisal tip segment, which, together with diminished expression of the Amelx and Enam genes, may contribute to the production of the thin enamel seen in this tooth segment. For genes exhibiting higher levels of expression in the adjacent segment where complex enamel is being formed, bioinformatic analysis suggested significant associations with cellular functions involving the actin cytoskeleton, cellular development, morphology, and movement. This is suggested to reflect that ameloblasts with Tomes' process are being organized in transverse rows, facilitating the transverse movement that results in prism decussation in the inner enamel of the adjacent segment. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression data lends support to these suggestions.

  19. Expression of luteinizing hormone receptors in the mouse penis.

    PubMed

    Kokk, Kersti; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Keisala, Tiina; Purmonen, Sami; Kaipia, Antti; Tammela, Teuvo; Orro, Helen; Simovart, Helle-Evi; Pöllänen, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    The role of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the regulation of normal reproductive functions in males and females is quite well established. Besides the expression of LH receptors in the target cells in gonads, it has been found in several extragonadal organs. There is no information about the expression of LH receptors in the penis up to now. The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of the LH receptor in the mouse penis to see if LH effects are possible in the penis. BALB/c mice were used as donors of normal penis and testis tissue. Immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) were used for the detection of the LH receptor. Positive immunoreaction for LH receptors was present in the nuclei of urethral epithelium and endothelial cells of cavernous spaces in the corpus cavernosum and corpus spongiosum penis. Western blotting experiments demonstrated the presence of LH antigen at M(r) = 97.4 and 78 kd. Quantitative RT-PCRs confirmed the expression of LH receptor in the penis. Our results show that LH receptor is expressed in the body of the mouse penis; thus, it may directly regulate functions of penile tissue.

  20. PRDM16 expression in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kristin H; Warner, Dennis R; Pisano, Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2011-02-01

    PRDM16 is a member of the PR domain-containing protein family and is associated with various disease states including myelodysplastic syndrome and adult T-cell leukemia, as well as developmental abnormalities such as cleft palate. It is also known to act as a regulator of cell differentiation. Expression analysis of PRDM16 is limited, especially within the developing embryo. The current study evaluated the temporal and spatial localization of PRDM16 during early mouse development (embryonic days 8.5-14.5). PRDM16 was first detected on E9.5 in a limited number of tissues and by E14.5, was expressed in a broad range of developing tissues including those of the brain, lung, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract. The expression pattern is consistent with a role for PRDM16 in the development of multiple tissues. Collectively, these studies are the first to characterize the expression of the PRDM16 gene during early murine development.

  1. 3D confocal reconstruction of gene expression in mouse.

    PubMed

    Hecksher-Sørensen, J; Sharpe, J

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer reconstructions of gene expression data will become a valuable tool in biomedical research in the near future. However, at present the process of converting in situ expression data into 3D models is a highly specialized and time-consuming procedure. Here we present a method which allows rapid reconstruction of whole-mount in situ data from mouse embryos. Mid-gestation embryos were stained with the alkaline phosphotase substrate Fast Red, which can be detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and cut into 70 microm sections. Each section was then scanned and digitally reconstructed. Using this method it took two days to section, digitize and reconstruct the full expression pattern of Shh in an E9.5 embryo (a 3D model of this embryo can be seen at genex.hgu.mrc.ac.uk). Additionally we demonstrate that this technique allows gene expression to be studied at the single cell level in intact tissue.

  2. Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Daniel M; Zhao, Ni; Chesler, Elissa J; Bradford, Blair U; Shabalin, Andrey A; Yordanova, Roumyana; Lu, Lu; Rusyn, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    Differences in clinical phenotypes between the sexes are well documented and have their roots in differential gene expression. While sex has a major effect on gene expression, transcription is also influenced by complex interactions between individual genetic variation and environmental stimuli. In this study, we sought to understand how genetic variation affects sex-related differences in liver gene expression by performing genetic mapping of genomewide liver mRNA expression data in a genetically defined population of naive male and female mice from C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, B6D2F1, and 37 C57BL/6J x DBA/2J (BXD) recombinant inbred strains. As expected, we found that many genes important to xenobiotic metabolism and other important pathways exhibit sexually dimorphic expression. We also performed gene expression quantitative trait locus mapping in this panel and report that the most significant loci that appear to regulate a larger number of genes than expected by chance are largely sex independent. Importantly, we found that the degree of correlation within gene expression networks differs substantially between the sexes. Finally, we compare our results to a recently released human liver gene expression data set and report on important similarities in sexually dimorphic liver gene expression between mouse and human. This study enhances our understanding of sex differences at the genome level and between species, as well as increasing our knowledge of the molecular underpinnings of sex differences in responses to xenobiotics.

  3. A chemoenzymatic route to mannosamine derivatives bearing different N-acyl groups.

    PubMed

    Kristová, Veronika; Martínková, Ludmila; Husáková, Lucie; Kuzma, Marek; Rauvolfová, Jana; Kavan, Daniel; Pompach, Petr; Bezouska, Karel; Kren, Vladimír

    2005-01-26

    The chemoenzymatic route to 2-deoxy-2-propionamido-D-mannose (1b), 2-butyramido-2-deoxy-D-mannose (2b) and 2-deoxy-2-phenylacetamido-D-mannose (3b) involved N-acylation of 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose followed by alkaline C-2 epimerization and selective microbial removal of the epimers with gluco-configuration. The latter step employed whole cells of Rhodococcus equi A4 able to degrade 2-deoxy-2-propionamido-D-glucose (1a), 2-butyramido-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2a) and 2-deoxy-2-phenylacetamido-D-glucose (3a) but inactive towards the corresponding manno-isomers. The metabolism of the gluco-isomers probably involved phosphorylation and subsequent deacylation. 2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-phospho-D-glucose amidohydrolase [EC 3.5.1.25] but not 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose amidohydrolase was detected in the cell extract, the former enzyme being partially purified (15.8-fold with an overall yield of 18.1% and a specific activity of 0.95 units mg-1 protein). According to SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, gel filtration and mass spectrometry, the enzyme was a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 60 degrees C and 8.0-9.0, respectively. 2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-phospho-D-glucose and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-sulfo-D-glucose but not 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-O-phospho-D-glucose or 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose were substrates of the enzyme. Its activity was slightly inhibited by the addition of 1 mM Al3+, Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mn2+ or Zn2+ and activated by 1 mM Mg2+. The concentrated enzyme is highly stable at 4 degrees C in the presence of 0.1 M ammonium sulfate.

  4. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2010 update

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Burton, Nicholas; Rao, Jianguo; Fisher, Malcolm; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.; Christiansen, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage) is a freely available online database of in situ gene expression patterns in the developing mouse embryo. Gene expression domains from raw images are extracted and integrated spatially into a set of standard 3D virtual mouse embryos at different stages of development, which allows data interrogation by spatial methods. An anatomy ontology is also used to describe sites of expression, which allows data to be queried using text-based methods. Here, we describe recent enhancements to EMAGE including: the release of a completely re-designed website, which offers integration of many different search functions in HTML web pages, improved user feedback and the ability to find similar expression patterns at the click of a button; back-end refactoring from an object oriented to relational architecture, allowing associated SQL access; and the provision of further access by standard formatted URLs and a Java API. We have also increased data coverage by sourcing from a greater selection of journals and developed automated methods for spatial data annotation that are being applied to spatially incorporate the genome-wide (∼19 000 gene) ‘EURExpress’ dataset into EMAGE. PMID:19767607

  5. Murine Asb-17 expression during mouse testis development and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Seong; Kim, Myung-Sun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2004-05-01

    In this study we isolated a murine mAsb-17 from mouse testis by RT-PCR using primers designed based on the sequences from the GenBank database. The sequence analysis showed that mAsb-17 encodes a 295 amino acid polypeptide with a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa containing two ankyrin repeats and one SOCS box. The amino acid sequence of mASB-17 showed 87.5%, 98.3% and 92.9% identity with that of human, rat and dog, respectively. Interestingly, northern blot analysis showed that mAsb-17 was expressed only in the testis. The expression analysis by RT-PCR for mAsb-17 in mouse indicates that mAsb-17 is expressed from the fourth week after birth to adult, with the highest expression in round spermatids. Both northern blot and RT-PCR analyses suggest that mASB-17 may play essential roles in testis development and spermatogenesis.

  6. The expression of SEIPIN in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Xie, Beibei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Shaoshi; Zhang, Yumei; Paxinos, George; Yang, Hongyuan; Liang, Huazheng

    2016-11-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was used to investigate the expression pattern of SEIPIN in the mouse central nervous system. SEIPIN was found to be present in a large number of areas, including the motor and somatosensory cortex, the thalamic nuclei, the hypothalamic nuclei, the mesencephalic nuclei, some cranial motor nuclei, the reticular formation of the brainstem, and the vestibular complex. Double labeling with NeuN antibody confirmed that SEIPIN-positive cells in some nuclei were neurons. Retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord revealed that SEIPIN-positive neurons in the motor and somatosensory cortex and other movement related nuclei project to the mouse spinal cord. The present study found more nuclei positive for SEIPIN than shown using in situ hybridization and confirmed the presence of SEIPIN in neurons projecting to the spinal cord. The results of this study help to explain the clinical manifestations of patients with Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (Bscl2) gene mutations.

  7. Divergent and nonuniform gene expression patterns in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John A.; Royall, Joshua J.; Bertagnolli, Darren; Boe, Andrew F.; Burnell, Josh J.; Byrnes, Emi J.; Copeland, Cathy; Desta, Tsega; Fischer, Shanna R.; Goldy, Jeff; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Kidney, Jolene M.; Lemon, Tracy; Orta, Geralyn J.; Parry, Sheana E.; Pathak, Sayan D.; Pearson, Owen C.; Reding, Melissa; Shapouri, Sheila; Smith, Kimberly A.; Soden, Chad; Solan, Beth M.; Weller, John; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding variations in gene sequence and expression level associated with phenotype, yet how genetic diversity translates into complex phenotypic differences remains poorly understood. Here, we examine the relationship between genetic background and spatial patterns of gene expression across seven strains of mice, providing the most extensive cellular-resolution comparative analysis of gene expression in the mammalian brain to date. Using comprehensive brainwide anatomic coverage (more than 200 brain regions), we applied in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial expression patterns of 49 genes encoding well-known pharmaceutical drug targets. Remarkably, over 50% of the genes examined showed interstrain expression variation. In addition, the variability was nonuniformly distributed across strain and neuroanatomic region, suggesting certain organizing principles. First, the degree of expression variance among strains mirrors genealogic relationships. Second, expression pattern differences were concentrated in higher-order brain regions such as the cortex and hippocampus. Divergence in gene expression patterns across the brain could contribute significantly to variations in behavior and responses to neuroactive drugs in laboratory mouse strains and may help to explain individual differences in human responsiveness to neuroactive drugs. PMID:20956311

  8. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  9. Expression of DMP1 in the developing mouse tongue embryo.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hidetaka; Sunohara, Msataka; Sato, Iwao

    2015-07-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) is an important factor in the mineralization of hard tissues. However, it has many other functions in addition to the regulation of mineralized tissues. We analyzed the expression and localization of DMP-1 by immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization in the developing mouse tongue during embryonic days 12.5 (E12.5), E14.5, E17.5, and E18.5. We also detected the mRNA abundance of tongue morphogenesis markers such as FGF6, TGF-β1, Collagen I, osteocalcin, chondromodulin 1, tenomodulin, Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), caspase-3, and Aifm from embryonic stages by real-time RT-PCR. The antisense probe for DMP-1 was detected in a few mesenchymal cells surrounding blood vessels at E12.5, and faint localization was seen at E18.5 in the embryonic mouse tongue by in situ hybridization. The DMP-1 and osteocalcin abundance levels gradually increased compared with the other tongue markers from E12.5 to E18.5 (p<0.001). Cluster analyses identified the following distinct clusters for mRNA abundance in the tongue: cluster 1, E12.5; cluster 2, E14.5 and E17.5; and cluster 3, E18.5. The positive correlation between DMP-1 and osteocalcin (Pearson's r=0.685; p<0.05) and negative correlation between DMP-1 and Caspase-3 (Pearson's r=-0.632; p<0.05) were analyzed. These data suggested that DMP-1 potentially influences osteocalcin and Caspase-3 during mouse tongue development and morphogenesis. DMP-1 also affects the angiogenic marker VEGF in specific stages and areas, terminating the differentiation of the tongue from other developing tissues. We conclude that DMP-1 may be involved in regulating the temporal expression at embryonic stages in the mouse tongue.

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel N-acyl-homoserine lactonase gene in Sphingomonas ursincola isolated from industrial cooling water systems.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Sato, Niina; Iizumi, Taro; Tanaka, Airi; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is one of the main causes of fouling in industrial cooling water systems. In many gram-negative bacteria, biofilm formation is regulated by N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing. In this study, we isolated three AHL-degrading bacteria from cooling water systems and identified them as Sphingomonas ursincola. The draft genome sequence of S. ursincola A1 revealed the presence of an AHL-degrading gene homolog, designated qsdS. The qsdS region was also amplified by PCR from the genomes of the other two S. ursincola strains, SF1 and SF8. Escherichia coli DH5α harboring a QsdS-expressing plasmid showed high degradative activity against AHLs with short and 3-oxo-substituted acyl chains. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that QsdS is an AHL lactonase, an enzyme that catalyzes AHL ring opening. Furthermore, heterologous expression of QsdS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resulted in degradation of endogenous AHLs and interfered with the quorum-sensing-regulated phenotype. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Developmental expression profiles of Celsr (Flamingo) genes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tissir, F; De-Backer, O; Goffinet, A M; Lambert de Rouvroit, C

    2002-03-01

    Celsr, also called Flamingo (Fmi) genes encode proteins of the cadherin superfamily. Celsr cadherins are seven-pass transmembrane proteins with nine cadherin repeats in the extracellular domain, and an anonymous intracellular C-terminus. The Drosophila Fmi gene regulates epithelial planar cell polarity and dendritic field deployment. The three Flamingo gene orthologs in man and rodents are named, respectively, CELSR1-3 and Celsr1-3. Celsr1 and 2 are expressed during early development, in the brain and epithelia. In this report, we characterized further Celsr genes in the mouse, and examined their developmental pattern of expression. Each Celsr is expressed prominently in the developing brain following a specific pattern, suggesting that they serve distinct functions.

  12. Identification and characterization of a new gene from Variovorax paradoxus Iso1 encoding N-acyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase responsible for D-amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Hsun; Su, Shiun-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2002-10-01

    An N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolase (N-D-AAase) was identified in cell extracts of a strain, Iso1, isolated from an environment containing N-acetyl-d-methionine. The bacterium was classified as Variovorax paradoxus by phylogenetic analysis. The gene was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of a 1467-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 488 amino acids. The V. paradoxusN-D-AAase showed significant amino acid similarity to the N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolases of the two eubacteria Alcaligenes xylosoxydans A-6 (44-56% identity), Alcaligenes facelis DA1 (54% identity) and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi (42% identity). After over-expression of the N-D-AAase protein in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified by multistep chromatography. The native molecular mass was 52.8 kDa, which agreed with the predicted molecular mass of 52 798 Da and the enzyme appeared to be a monomer protein by gel-filtration chromatography. A homogenous protein with a specific activity of 516 U.mg-1 was finally obtained. After peptide sequencing by LC/MS/MS, the results were in agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence of the N-D-AAase. The pI of the enzyme was 5.12 and it had an optimal pH and temperature of 7.5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. After 30 min heat treatment at 45 degrees C, between pH 6 and pH 8, 80% activity remained. The N-D-AAase had higher hydrolysing activity against N-acetyl-d-amino acid derivates containing d-methionine, d-leucine and d-alanine and against N-chloroacetyl-d-phenylalanine. Importantly, the enzyme does not act on the N-acetyl-l-amino acid derivatives. The enzyme was inhibited by chelating agents and certain metal ions, but was activated by 1 mm of Co2+ and Mg2+. Thus, the N-D-AAase from V. paradoxus can be considered a chiral specific and metal-dependent enzyme.

  13. Gene expression profiling of mouse embryos with microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Global expression profiling by DNA microarrays provides a snapshot of cell and tissue status and becomes an essential tool in biological and medical sciences. Typical questions that can be addressed by microarray analysis in developmental biology include: (1) to find a set of genes expressed in a specific cell type; (2) to identify genes expressed commonly in multiple cell types; (3) to follow the time-course changes of gene expression patterns; (4) to demonstrate cell’s identity by showing similarities or differences among two or multiple cell types; (5) to find regulatory pathways and/or networks affected by gene manipulations, such as overexpression or repression of gene expression; (6) to find downstream target genes of transcription factors; (7) to find downstream target genes of cell signaling; (8) to examine the effects of environmental manipulation of cells on gene expression patterns; and (9) to find the effects of genetic manipulation in embryos and adults. Here we describe strategies for executing these experiments and monitoring changes of cell state with gene expression microarrays in application to mouse embryology. Both statistical assessment and interpretation of data are discussed. We also present a protocol for performing microarray analysis on a small amount of embryonic materials. PMID:20699157

  14. Expression of aquaporin isoforms during human and mouse tooth development.

    PubMed

    Felszeghy, S; Módis, L; Németh, P; Nagy, G; Zelles, T; Agre, P; Laurikkala, J; Fejerskov, O; Thesleff, I; Nielsen, S

    2004-04-01

    Previously, we described the development of hyaluronan (HA) deposition in human tooth germ tissues that are consistent with water transport in different stages of tooth development. The aquaporins (AQP) constitute a family of membrane water channels that are expressed in many organs. However, there are no data available about the expression pattern of aquaporin water channels in dental structures. In the present study we have characterised the expression of six different aquaporin isoforms (AQP1-5, AQP-9) in developing human and mouse tooth germs by immunohistochemistry using isoform specific antibodies. In the "bell stage" AQP1 was expressed in endothelial cells of small vessels whereas no other structures of the tooth primordial were labeled. AQP2, AQP3 and AQP9 immunoreactivity was not observed in tooth germs, whereas strong AQP4 and AQP5 expression was observed in dental lamina, inner enamel epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum and the outer enamel epithelium. Oral epithelium also exhibited AQP4 and AQP5 immunolabeling. During development of the matrices of the dental hard tissues AQP4 and AQP5 immunostaining was observed in the odontoblasts and their processes, as well as in the secretory ameloblast and their apical processes. Immunolabeling controls were negative. In conclusion, AQP4 and AQP5 are expressed in tooth germ tissues in early development in cells that previously have been shown to express HA and/or CD44, indicating that AQP water channels may play a role for ECM hydration during tooth development.

  15. Expression of liver alpha-amylase in obese mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Afsartala, Zohreh; Savabkar, Sanaz; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Tanha, Shima; Bijangi, Khosro; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the relation between the expression of liver alpha-amylase and obesity. Background: Alpha-amylase catalyses the hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-glucosidic linkages in polysaccharides and has three main subtypes, including: salivary, pancreatic, and hepatic. Hepatic alpha-amylase is involved in glycogen metabolism, and has a role in obesity and its management. In this study, we aimed to analyze the expression of liver alpha-amylase in overweight and obese mouse. Material and methods: In this study, NMRI male mice were randomly divided into two groups. The sample group (obese) took a high-fat and carbohydrate diet, while the control group (normal) took a laboratory pellet chow for eight weeks. During this period, their weight was measured. After eight weeks, liver hepatocytes were isolated using an enzymatic digestion method. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and flow cytometry analysis were performed to measure alpha amylase protein expression in mouse liver hepatocyte cells. Results: A significant difference in the body weight was observed between the two groups (p<0.05). The qualitative protein expression of liver alpha-amylase was found to be higher in the obese group in both tests (immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry). Animals from the test group presented higher alpha-amylase expression, which suggests that this hepatic protein may constitute a potential indicator of susceptibility for fat tissue accumulation and obesity. The present data demonstrates an increased expression of liver amylase in obese mice. Conclusion: These results suggest that liver amylase secretion might be useful for predicting susceptibility to obesity induced by consumption of a high-fat and carbohydrate diet. PMID:27895853

  16. Expression of GATA-3 During Lymphocyte Differentiation and Mouse Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oosterwegel, Mariëtte; Timmerman, Janneke; Leiden, Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    The GATA family of C4 zinc-finger transcription factors has been implicated in tissuespecific gene regulation in birds and mammals. One of the members of this family, GATA-3, is reportedly expressed specifically in the T-cell lineage, where it interacts with GATA motifs in the TCR-αα, TCR-β/, and TCR-δ enhancers, thereby controlling the T-cell phenotype. To evaluate the differentiation control properties of GATA-3, we have now documented its expression pattern during lymphoid differentiation and murine embryogenesis. The onset of GATA-3 expression in the lymphoid lineage was studied in a panel of lymphoid (precursor) cell lines by Northern blot analysis. GATA-3 was uniquely expressed in T-lineage lymphocytes expressing TCR and CD3 genes; it was absent from TCR/CD3 mRNA-negative prothymocytes and from all B-lineage cells. In order to obtain information on the expression of GATA-3 outside the immune system, in situ hybridization was performed on mouse embryos on day 11.5-14.5 of gestation. GATA-3 mRNA was detected in fetal thymus and in erythroid cells. Outside the haemopoietic system, we detected GATA-3 mRNA throughout the central nervous system, in kidney, in the epidermis, lens fibers, the inner ear, whisker follicles, and in the primary palate. These data provide new clues about the potential role of GATA-3 during mouse development, and will aid the interpretation of currently ongoing gene knockout experiments. PMID:1343100

  17. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  18. Differential extra-renal expression of the mouse renin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C C; Carter, A T; Brooks, J I; Lovell-Badge, R H; Brammar, W J

    1989-01-01

    We have used RNase-protection analyses to study renin gene expression in one- and two-gene mouse strains. The RNase-protection assay is capable of discriminating between the transcripts from the different renin genes. In a two-gene strain containing Ren-1D and Ren-2, we demonstrate transcriptional activity from Ren-1D in kidney, submandibular gland (SMG), testes, liver, brain and heart. Ren-2 is clearly expressed in kidney, SMG and testes. Similar analyses of one gene strains (containing Ren-1C only) show expression in kidney, SMG, testes, brain and heart. We cannot detect renin mRNA in the liver of these mice. Ren-1C and Ren-1D thus display quite different tissue-specificities. In order to determine whether the different tissue-specificities of the highly homologous Ren-1C and Ren-1D genes are due to different trans-acting factors in the different mouse strains or to different cis-acting DNA elements inherent to the genes, we introduced a Ren-1D transgene (Ren-1*) into a background strain containing only the Ren-1C gene. The transgene exhibits the same tissue-specificity as the Ren-1D gene of two-gene strains suggesting the presence of different cis-acting DNA elements in Ren-1C and Ren-1D. Images PMID:2657654

  19. Inheritance and expression of the mouse metallothionein gene in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Wagner, G.J.; Yeargan, R.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Genetically engineered seedlings obtained from self-fertilized transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) contained and expressed the mouse metallothionein and kanamycin resistance marker genes and were more tolerant to cadmium stress than untransformed controls. Cadmium accumulation in leaves of transgenic seedlings exposed to a low, field-like Cd concentration (0.02 micromolar) was about 20% lower than that in untransformed controls. Genetic analysis of R1 and R2 progeny showed inheritance of the marker gene to be as a dominant Mendelian trait. These results suggest the possibility of developing transgenic plants with modified tolerance to heavy metal stress and food crops having lower Cd content.

  20. Detection of Diverse N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactones in Vibrio alginolyticus and Regulation of Biofilm Formation by N-(3-Oxodecanoyl) Homoserine Lactone In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfei; Fu, Kaifei; Wang, Yuxiao; Wu, Chenglin; Li, Fei; Shi, Lei; Ge, Yinlin; Zhou, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication system based on the exchange of small intercellular signal molecules, such as N-Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which act as cell-density mediators of QS gene expression, and are highly variable both in types and amounts in most Gram-negative Proteobacteria. Understanding the regulation of AHLs may contribute to the elucidation of cell density-dependent phenomena, such as biofilm formation. Vibrio alginolyticus is among the most frequently observed marine opportunistic Vibrio pathogens. However, AHL production of this species and its effects on biofilm formation remain to be understood. Here, our study reported the diverse AHL profiles of 47 marine-isolated V. alginolyticus strains and the effects of exogenous 3-oxo-C10-HSL on biofilm formation under different temperature conditions (16°C and 28°C). A total of 11 detected AHLs were produced by the isolates, of which 3-OH-C4-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL and 3-oxo-C14-HSL comprised the largest proportions. We also observed that moderate levels of exogenous 3-oxo-C10-HSL (10 and 20 μM) could induce or enhance biofilm formation and alter its structure, while high levels (40 and 100 μM) did not significantly improve and even inhibited biofilm formation in V. alginolyticus. Further, regulation by exogenous 3-oxo-C10-HSL was both concentration- and temperature-dependent in V. alginolyticus. PMID:28670299

  1. The expression of Prox1 during mouse cochlear development

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Stone, Jennifer S.; Hume, Clifford R.; Huynh, Huy M.; Hayashi, Toshinori

    2008-01-01

    We have carried out an analysis of the expression of Prox1, a homeodomain transcription factor, during mouse inner ear development with particular emphasis on the auditory system. Prox1 is expressed in the otocyst beginning at embryonic day 11, in the developing vestibular sensory patches. Expression is down-regulated in maturing (myosin VIIA immunoreactive) vestibular hair cells and subsequently in the underlying support cell layer by E16.5. In the auditory sensory epithelium, Prox1 is initially expressed at embryonic day 14.5 in a narrow stripe of cells at the base of the cochlea. This stripe encompasses the full thickness of the sensory epithelium, including developing hair cells and support cells. Over the next several days, the stripe of expression extends to the apex, and as the sensory epithelium differentiates, Prox1 becomes restricted to a subset of support cells. Double labeling for Prox1 and cell-type specific markers revealed that the outer hair cells transiently express Prox1. After E18, Prox1 protein is no longer detectable in hair cells, but it continues to be expressed in support cells for the rest of embryogenesis and into the second postnatal week. During this time, Prox1 is not expressed in all support cell types in the organ of Corti, but is restricted to developing Deiters’ and pillar cells. The expression is maintained in these cells into the second week of postnatal life, at which time Prox1 is dynamically down-regulated. These studies form a baseline from which we can analyze the role of Prox1 in vertebrate sensory development. PMID:16538679

  2. Identification of human telomerase inhibitors having the core of N-acyl-4,5-dihydropyrazole with anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Ni, Yong; Jia, Ying-Ming; Zheng, Min; Xu, Han-Fei; Xu, Jun; Liao, Chenzhong

    2016-03-15

    Eight human telomerase inhibitors (5a-5h) having the core of N-acyl-4,5-dihydropyrazole with anticancer effects were identified in this study. Biological results revealed that a few compounds had potent anticancer activities against three common tumor cell lines (SGC-7901, HepG2 and MGC-803). Among them, compound 5c, with a molecular weight of only 272.2 Da, had antiproliferative activities against SGC-7901 and MGC-803 with EC50 values of 2.06 ± 0.17 and 2.89 ± 0.62 μM, respectively, better than 5-Fluorouracil. Compound 5c inhibited the enzyme of telomerase with an IC50 value of 1.86 ± 0.51 μM, surpassing the control compound, ethidium bromide. Modeling study showed that this compound can reside in the binding pocket of the telomerase/TNA:DNA hairpin complex. When the moiety of N-acyl was changed to N-sulfonyl, the gotten compounds (8a-8i) had deteriorative activities against both these three cancer cell lines and the enzyme of telomerase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid bilayers containing sphingomyelins and ceramides of varying N-acyl lengths: a glimpse into sphingolipid complexity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; García-Arribas, Aritz B; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-01-01

    The thermotropic properties of aqueous dispersions of sphingomyelins (SM) and ceramides (Cer) with N-acyl chains varying from C6:0 to C24:1, either pure or in binary mixtures, have been examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Even in the pure state, Cer and particularly SM exhibited complex endotherms, and their thermal properties did not vary in a predictable way with changes in structure. In some cases, e.g. C18:0 SM, atomic force microscopy revealed coexisting lamellar domains made of a single lipid. Partial chain interdigitation and metastable crystalline states were deemed responsible for the complex behavior. SM:Cer mixtures (90:10mol ratio) gave rise to bilayers containing separate SM-rich and Cer-rich domains. In vesicles made of more complex mixtures (SM:PE:Chol, 2:1:1), it is known that sphingomyelinase degradation of SM to Cer is accompanied by vesicle aggregation and release of aqueous contents. These vesicles did not reveal observable domain separation by confocal microscopy. Vesicle aggregation occurred at a faster rate for those bilayers that appeared to be more fluid according to differential scanning calorimetry. Content efflux rates measured by fluorescence spectroscopy were highest with C18:0 and C18:1 SM, and in general those rates did not vary regularly with other physical properties of SM or Cer. In general the individual SM and Cer appear to have particular thermotropic properties, often unrelated to the changes in N-acyl chain.

  4. Expression of FGFs during early mouse tongue development

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen; Prochazka, Jan; Prochazkova, Michaela; Klein, Ophir D.

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute one of the largest growth factor families, and several ligands and receptors in this family are known to play critical roles during tongue development. In order to provide a comprehensive foundation for research into the role of FGFs during the process of tongue formation, we measured the transcript levels by quantitative PCR and mapped the expression patterns by in situ hybridization of all 22 Fgfs during mouse tongue development between embryonic days (E) 11.5 and E14.5. During this period, Fgf5, Fgf6, Fgf7, Fgf9, Fgf10, Fgf13, Fgf15, Fgf16 and Fgf18 could all be detected with various intensities in the mesenchyme, whereas Fgf1 and Fgf2 were expressed in both the epithelium and the mesenchyme. Our results indicate that FGF signaling regulates tongue development at multiple stages. PMID:26748348

  5. Expression of lymphatic markers during avian and mouse cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Yang, Ke; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Wikenheiser, Jamie; Bader, David; Barnett, Joey; Austin, Anita; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Watanabe, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    The adult heart has been reported to have an extensive lymphatic system, yet the development of this important system during cardiogenesis is still largely unexplored. The nuclear-localized transcription factor Prox-1 identified a sheet of Prox-1-positive cells on the developing aorta and pulmonary trunk in avian and murine embryos just prior to septation of the four heart chambers. The cells coalesced into a branching lymphatic network that spread within the epicardium to cover the heart. These vessels eventually expressed the lymphatic markers LYVE-1, VEGFR-3, and podoplanin. Before the Prox-1-positive cells were detected in the mouse epicardium, LYVE-1, a homologue of the CD44 glycoprotein, was primarily expressed in individual epicardial cells. Similar staining patterns were observed for CD44 in avian embryos. The proximity of these LYVE-1/CD44-positive mesenchymal cells to Prox-1-positive vessels suggests that they may become incorporated into the lymphatics. Unexpectedly, we detected LYVE-1/PECAM/VEGFR-3-positive vessels within the embryonic and adult myocardium which remained Prox-1/podoplanin-negative. Lymphatic markers were surprisingly found in adult rat and embryonic mouse epicardial cell lines, with Prox-1 also exhibiting nuclear-localized expression in primary cultures of embryonic avian epicardial cells. Our data identified three types of cells in the embryonic heart expressing lymphatic markers: (1) Prox-1-positive cells from an extracardiac source that migrate within the serosa of the outflow tract into the epicardium of the developing heart, (2) individual LYVE-1-positive cells in the epicardium that may be incorporated into the Prox-1-positive lymphatic vasculature, and (3) LYVE-1-positive cells/vessels in the myocardium that do not become Prox-1-positive even in the adult heart. PMID:19938109

  6. Mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene: cloning, structure, and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, M; McConlogue, L; van Daalen Wetters, T; Coffino, P

    1988-01-01

    We used molecular cloning to isolate a functional gene for mouse ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase; L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) from a cell line in which that gene had been selectively amplified. The position of the 5' terminus of the mRNA was identified, and the coding sequence was shown to be preceded by a 312- or 313-nucleotide (nt) untranslated leader. The latter is highly G + C rich, particularly in its 5'-most portion. The leader can be anticipated to have extensive and stable secondary structure. The transcription unit of the gene is of relatively small size, approximately equal to 6.2 kilobases (kb) from the start site to the proximal site of polyadenylylation. Sequence analysis of DNA near the transcription start position demonstrated the presence of a "TATA" box, but no "CAAT" box. Functional properties of the cloned gene were tested by transfecting it into cultured cells. Expression of the putative full-length gene efficiently conferred ornithine decarboxylase activity on recipient mutant cells deficient in that activity. To assess the function and strength of the OrnDCase promoter region and to delimit its boundaries, we used a transient expression assay. Upstream of a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed a portion of the OrnDCase gene, including the presumed promoter region, spanning a region from approximately equal to 3.0 kb 5' of the site of transcription initiation to the first 250 nt of the transcript. When expressed in mouse NIH 3T3 cells, this OrnDCase genomic element was comparable in strength to the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter. A similar construct, truncated so as to retain only 264 base pairs of the OrnDCase gene 5' to the site of transcription start, yielded undiminished levels of expression. Images PMID:3353375

  7. Differential expression of microRNAs in mouse embryonic bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Benchun; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2009-08-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in several biological processes including development, differentiation and proliferation. Analysis of miRNA expression patterns in the process of embryogenesis may have substantial value in determining the mechanism of embryonic bladder development as well as for eventual therapeutic intervention. The miRNA expression profiles are distinct among the cellular types and embryonic stages as demonstrated by microarray technology and validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR approach. Remarkably, the miRNA expression patterns suggested that unique miRNAs from epithelial and submucosal areas are responsible for mesenchymal cellular differentiation, especially regarding bladder smooth muscle cells. Our data show that miRNA expression patterns are unique in particular cell types of mouse bladder at specific developmental stages, reflecting the apparent lineage and differentiation status within the embryonic bladder. The identification of unique miRNAs expression before and after smooth muscle differentiation in site-specific area of the bladder indicates their roles in embryogenesis and may aid in future clinical intervention.

  8. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  9. TRP channel gene expression in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Jared C; Wensel, Theodore G

    2011-12-08

    In order to identify candidate cation channels important for retinal physiology, 28 TRP channel genes were surveyed for expression in the mouse retina. Transcripts for all TRP channels were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing. Northern blotting revealed that mRNAs for 12 TRP channel genes are enriched in the retina. The strongest signals were observed for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPM1, TRPM3, and TRPML1, and clear signals were obtained for TRPC4, TRPM7, TRPP2, TRPV2, and TRPV4. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence revealed widespread expression throughout multiple retinal layers for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPML1, PKD1, and TRPP2. Striking localization of enhanced mRNA expression was observed for TRPC1 in the photoreceptor inner segment layer, for TRPM1 in the inner nuclear layer (INL), for TRPM3 in the INL, and for TRPML1 in the outer plexiform and nuclear layers. Strong immunofluorescence signal in cone outer segments was observed for TRPM7 and TRPP2. TRPC5 immunostaining was largely confined to INL cells immediately adjacent to the inner plexiform layer. TRPV2 antibodies stained photoreceptor axons in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of TRPM1 splice variants was strong in the ciliary body, whereas TRPM3 was strongly expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium.

  10. Gene expression profiling of the developing mouse kidney and embryo.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lisa; Johnson, Penny A; Kimber, Susan J

    2010-02-01

    The metanephros is formed from the reciprocal inductive interaction of two precursor tissues, the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The UB induces MM to condense and differentiate forming the glomerulus and renal tubules, whilst the MM induces the UB to differentiate into the collecting tubules of the mature nephron. Uninduced MM is considered the progenitor cell population of the developing metanephros because of its potential to differentiate into more renal cell types than the UB. Previous studies have identified the phenotype of renal precursor cells; however, expression of candidate marker genes have not been analysed in other tissues of the murine embryo. We have assayed up to 19 candidate genes in eight embryonic tissues at five gestation stages of the mouse embryo to identify markers definitively expressed by renal cells during metanephric induction and markers developmentally regulated during kidney maturation. We then analysed their expression in other developing tissues. Results show Dcn, Hoxc9, Mest, Wt1 and Ywhaq were expressed at moderate to high levels during the window of metanephric specification and early differentiation (E10.5-E12.5 dpc), and Hoxc9, Ren1 and Wt1 expression was characteristic of mature renal cells. We demonstrated Cd24a, Cdh11, Mest, Scd2 and Sim2 were regulated during brain development, and Scd2, Cd24a and Sip1 expression was enriched in developing liver. These markers may be useful negative markers of kidney development. Use of a combination of highly expressed and negative markers may aid in the identification and removal of non-renal cells from heterogeneous populations of differentiating stem cells.

  11. Aquaporin7 expression during perinatal development of mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Incheol; Kim, Hyun J; Lee, Jae E; Gye, Myung C

    2006-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that brain aquaporins (AQPs) play important roles in the dynamic regulation of brain water homeostasis and the production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under normal, as well as pathological, conditions. To date, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of AQP1, 4, and 9 have been elucidated in brain tissues. However, the expression of AQP7, an aquaglyceroporin associated with brain development, has not been shown. In the present study, we examined expression of AQP7 during perinatal and adult brain development in the mouse. Throughout brain development, the immunoreactivity of AQP7 was largely found in the choroid plexus (CP). AQP7 immunoreactivity in ependyma (Ep), pia, and blood vessels (BV) was increased during perinatal to postnatal development. Cells in the different layers of cerebral cortex became a little positive for AQP7 immunoreactivity during postnatal development. Optimized semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that AQP7 mRNA and protein levels increased during perinatal development of brain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the pattern of AQP7 expression in brain tissues. These results suggest that AQP7 is an important structural element in the choroid plexus and is possibly involved in the production of CSF during brain development in mice.

  12. Altered gene expression profiles in mouse tetraploid blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ryung; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Song, Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Wook; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it was demonstrated that tetraploid-derived blastocyst embryos had very few Oct4-positive cells at the mid-blastocyst stage and that the inner cell mass at biomarkers Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4 was expressed at less than 10% of the level observed in diploid blastocysts. In contrast, trophectoderm-related gene transcripts showed an approximately 10 to 40% increase. Of 32,996 individual mouse genes evaluated by microarray, 50 genes were differentially expressed between tetraploid or diploid and parthenote embryos at the blastocyst stage (P<0.05). Of these 50 genes, 28 were more highly expressed in tetraploid-derived blastocysts, whereas 22 were more highly downregulated. However, some genes involved in receptor activity, cell adhesion molecule, calcium ion binding, protein biosynthesis, redox processes, transport, and transcription showed a significant decrease or increase in gene expression in the tetraploid-derived blastocyst embryos. Thus, microarray analysis can be used as a tool to screen for underlying defects responsible for the development of tetraploid-derived embryos.

  13. Redundancy in Kiss1 Expression Safeguards Reproduction in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Simina M.; Moriyama, Ryutaro M.; Caligioni, Claudia S.; Yang, Jasmine J.; Cho, Caroline M.; Concepcion, Tessa L.; Oakley, Amy E.; Lee, In Hae; Sanz, Elisenda; Amieux, Paul S.; Caraty, Alain; Palmiter, Richard D.; Navarro, Victor M.; Chan, Yee-Ming; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Clifton, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) signaling to GnRH neurons is widely acknowledged to be a prerequisite for puberty and reproduction. Animals lacking functional genes for either kisspeptin or its receptor exhibit low gonadotropin secretion and infertility. Paradoxically, a recent study reported that genetic ablation of nearly all Kiss1-expressing neurons (Kiss1 neurons) does not impair reproduction, arguing that neither Kiss1 neurons nor their products are essential for sexual maturation. We posited that only minute quantities of kisspeptin are sufficient to support reproduction. If this were the case, animals having dramatically reduced Kiss1 expression might retain fertility, testifying to the redundancy of Kiss1 neurons and their products. To test this hypothesis and to determine whether males and females differ in the required amount of kisspeptin needed for reproduction, we used a mouse (Kiss1-CreGFP) that has a severe reduction in Kiss1 expression. Mice that are heterozygous and homozygous for this allele (Kiss1Cre/+ and Kiss1Cre/Cre) have ∼50% and 95% reductions in Kiss1 transcript, respectively. We found that although male Kiss1Cre/Cre mice sire normal-sized litters, female Kiss1Cre/Cre mice exhibit significantly impaired fertility and ovulation. These observations suggest that males require only 5% of normal Kiss1 expression to be reproductively competent, whereas females require higher levels for reproductive success. PMID:23736293

  14. Expression of cloned immunoglobulin genes introduced into mouse L cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, S D; Tonegawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Functionally rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain (gamma 2b) and light-chain (lambda 1 and kappa) genes were introduced into mouse L tk- cells by co-transformation with the Herpes virus tk gene. Cloned cell lines were selected in HAT medium and tested for the presence of transfected immunoglobulin gene sequences by Southern blotting analysis. It was found that the gamma 2b gene was accurately transcribed at a low level in transfected mouse L cells and cytoplasmic gamma 2b, heavy-chain protein was detected by immunoprecipitation of cell extracts. Light-chain genes, on the other hand, were not accurately transcribed. Instead, lambda 1 or kappa RNA species were detected which were approximately 200 to 300 bases longer than the authentic mRNAs. These results suggest that the expression of rearranged heavy-chain and light-chain genes are controlled differently and that these differences can be seen in transfected, non-lymphoid cells. Images PMID:6316279

  15. A gene expression fingerprint of mouse stomach ECL cells.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Niklas; Skrtic, Sofia Movérare; Håkanson, Rolf; Ohlsson, Claes

    2005-07-01

    Many of the endocrine cells in the stomach are poorly characterized with respect to physiological significance. In some cases, the anticipated hormone has not yet been identified. Global gene expression analysis of mouse stomach was performed in an attempt to identify the ECL-cell peptide/protein. Specific functional activation (omeprazole-induced hypergastrinaemia) was used as a tool to generate a gene expression fingerprint of the ECL cells. The proposed fingerprint includes 14 genes, among them six are known to be expressed by ECL cells (=positive controls), and some novel ones, which are likely to be ECL-cell-related. The known ECL-cell-related genes are those encoding histidine decarboxylase, chromogranin A and B, vesicular monoamine transporter 2, synaptophysin, and the cholecystokinin-B receptor. In addition, the fingerprint included five genes, which might be involved in the process of secretion and three ESTs with unknown function. Interestingly, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) was identified as a candidate ECL-cell peptide hormone.

  16. SSAO/VAP-1 protein expression during mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Valente, Tony; Solé, Montse; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2008-09-01

    SSAO/VAP-1 is a multifunctional enzyme depending on in which tissue it is expressed. SSAO/VAP-1 is present in almost all adult mammalian tissues, especially in highly vascularised ones and in adipocytes. SSAO/VAP-1 is an amine oxidase able to metabolise various endogenous or exogenous primary amines. Its catalytic activity can lead to cellular oxidative stress, which has been implicated in several pathologies (atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease). The aim of this work is to achieve a study of SSAO/VAP-1 protein expression during mouse embryogenesis. Our results show that SSAO/VAP-1 appears early in the development of the vascular system, adipose tissue, and smooth muscle cells. Moreover, its expression is strong in several epithelia of the sensory organs, as well as in the development of cartilage sites. Altogether, this suggests that SSAO/VAP-1 enzyme could be involved in the differentiation processes that take place during embryonic development, concretely in tissue vascularisation.

  17. Cyclic regulation of apoptotic gene expression in the mouse oviduct

    PubMed Central

    Jeoung, Myoungkun; Bridges, Phillip J.

    2011-01-01

    The oviduct is a dynamic structure whose function relies upon cyclic changes in the morphology of both ciliated and secretory luminal epithelial cells. Unfortunately, infection of these epithelial cells by sexually transmitted pathogens can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancies and infertility. The disruption of normal, cyclic apoptosis in the oviductal epithelium appears to be a causal factor of sexually-transmitted oviductal pathology and therefore, these pathways represent a potential target for diagnosis and/or therapeutic intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the normal, cyclic pattern of expression for apoptotic genes in the oviduct of the naturally cycling mouse, generating fundamental information that can be applied to the development of animal models for research and/or the identification of targets for disease intervention. Whole oviducts were collected from regular cycling mice killed at 1 pm on each day of the estrous cycle and the expression of 84 key apoptotic genes determined by targeted PCR super-array. Intact and cleaved caspases were then evaluated by western blotting. The expression of mRNA for genes classified as pro-apoptotic (Bad, Bak1 and Bok) and anti-apoptotic (Bag3, Bnip2 and Xiap) was regulated by day of the estrous cycle (P < 0.05). Differences in the temporal expression of several p53-related genes (Trp53bp2, Trp53inp1 and Trp73), those specific to the TNF superfamily (Tnfrsf10 and Tnfsf10b) and one caspase (Casp14) were also observed (P < 0.05). The cleaved forms of Capases-3, −6 and −12 were all detected throughout the estrous cycle. These results represent the first pathway wide analysis of apoptotic gene expression in the murine oviduct. PMID:21635812

  18. Cyclic regulation of apoptotic gene expression in the mouse oviduct.

    PubMed

    Jeoung, Myoungkun; Bridges, Phillip J

    2011-01-01

    The oviduct is a dynamic structure whose function relies upon cyclic changes in the morphology of both ciliated and secretory luminal epithelial cells. Unfortunately, infection of these epithelial cells by sexually transmitted pathogens can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancies and infertility. The disruption of normal, cyclic apoptosis in the oviducal epithelium appears to be a causal factor of oviducal pathology and therefore, these pathways represent a potential target for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of expression for apoptotic genes in the oviduct of the naturally cycling mouse, generating fundamental information that can be applied to the development of animal models for research and the identification of targets for disease intervention. Whole oviducts were collected from regular cycling mice killed at 1p.m. on each day of the oestrous cycle and the expression of 84 apoptotic genes determined by targeted PCR super-array. Intact and cleaved caspases were then evaluated by western blotting. The expression of mRNA for genes classified as pro-apoptotic (Bad, Bak1 and Bok) and anti-apoptotic (Bag3, Bnip2 and Xiap) was regulated by day (P < 0.05). Differences in the temporal expression of several p53-related genes (Trp53bp2, Trp53inp1 and Trp73), those specific to the TNF superfamily (Tnfrsf10 and Tnfsf10b) and one caspase (Casp14) were also observed (P < 0.05). The cleaved forms of Caspases-3, -6 and -12 were all detected throughout the oestrous cycle. These results represent the first pathway-wide analysis of apoptotic gene expression in the murine oviduct.

  19. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation. PMID:26694615

  20. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-02-12

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation.

  1. Solid-phase synthesis and screening of N-acylated polyamine (NAPA) combinatorial libraries for protein binding.

    PubMed

    Iera, Jaclyn A; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Appella, Daniel H

    2010-11-15

    Inhibitors for protein-protein interactions are challenging to design, in part due to the unique and complex architectures of each protein's interaction domain. Most approaches to develop inhibitors for these interactions rely on rational design, which requires prior structural knowledge of the target and its ligands. In the absence of structural information, a combinatorial approach may be the best alternative to finding inhibitors of a protein-protein interaction. Current chemical libraries, however, consist mostly of molecules designed to inhibit enzymes. In this manuscript, we report the synthesis and screening of a library based on an N-acylated polyamine (NAPA) scaffold that we designed to have specific molecular features necessary to inhibit protein-protein interactions. Screens of the library identified a member with favorable binding properties to the HIV viral protein R (Vpr), a regulatory protein from HIV, that is involved in numerous interactions with other proteins critical for viral replication.

  2. Asymmetric Synthesis of a CBI-Based Cyclic N-Acyl O-Amino Phenol Duocarmycin Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A short, asymmetric synthesis of a cyclic N-acyl O-amino phenol duocarmycin prodrug subject to reductive activation based on the simplified 1,2,9,9a-tetrahydrocyclopropa[c]benz[e]indol-4-one (CBI) DNA alkylation subunit is described. A key element of the approach entailed treatment of iodo-epoxide 7, prepared by N-alkylation of 6 with (S)-glycidal 3-nosylate, with EtMgBr at room temperature to directly provide the optically pure alcohol 8 in 78% yield (99% ee) derived from an effective metal–halogen exchange and subsequent regioselective intramolecular 6-endo-tet cyclization. Following O-debenzylation, introduction of a protected N-methylhydroxamic acid, direct trannannular spirocyclization, and subsequent stereoelectronically controlled acid-catalyzed cleavage of the resulting cyclopropane (HCl), further improvements in a unique intramolecular cyclization with N–O bond formation originally introduced for formation of the reductively labile prodrug functionality are detailed. PMID:25247380

  3. GXD: a Gene Expression Database for the laboratory mouse: current status and recent enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; the Gene Expression Database Group

    2000-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. The database is designed as an open-ended system that can integrate different types of expression data. New expression data are made available on a daily basis. Thus, GXD provides increasingly complete information about what transcripts and proteins are produced by what genes; where, when and in what amounts these gene products are expressed; and how their expression varies in different mouse strains and mutants. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Continuously refined interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species place the gene expression information in the larger biological and analytical context. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics Web site at http://www. informatics.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics. jax.org/menus/expression_menu.shtml PMID:10592197

  4. Genome sequencing-assisted identification and the first functional validation of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone synthases from the Sphingomonadaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Dailey, Lucas K.; Halliday, Nigel; Williams, Paul; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus Novosphingobium have been isolated from a variety of environmental niches. Although genomics analyses have suggested the presence of genes associated with quorum sensing signal production e.g., the N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase (luxI) homologs in various Novosphingobium species, to date, no luxI homologs have been experimentally validated. Methods In this study, we report the draft genome of the N-(AHL)-producing bacterium Novosphingobium subterraneum DSM 12447 and validate the functions of predicted luxI homologs from the bacterium through inducible heterologous expression in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain NTL4. We developed a two-dimensional thin layer chromatography bioassay and used LC-ESI MS/MS analyses to separate, detect and identify the AHL signals produced by the N. subterraneum DSM 12447 strain. Results Three predicted luxI homologs were annotated to the locus tags NJ75_2841 (NovINsub1), NJ75_2498 (NovINsub2), and NJ75_4146 (NovINsub3). Inducible heterologous expression of each luxI homologs followed by LC-ESI MS/MS and two-dimensional reverse phase thin layer chromatography bioassays followed by bioluminescent ccd camera imaging indicate that the three LuxI homologs are able to produce a variety of medium-length AHL compounds. New insights into the LuxI phylogeny was also gleemed as inferred by Bayesian inference. Discussion This study significantly adds to our current understanding of quorum sensing in the genus Novosphingobium and provide the framework for future characterization of the phylogenetically interesting LuxI homologs from members of the genus Novosphingobium and more generally the family Sphingomonadaceae. PMID:27635318

  5. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; van der Spek, Sophie J. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. Methods We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. Results Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural) developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. Conclusion Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE between mouse and

  6. URB expression in human bone marrow stromal cells and during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Monticone, Massimiliano; Tonachini, Laura; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Marigo, Valeria; Cancedda, Ranieri; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2004-09-17

    Seven genes preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) with respect to BMSC-derived osteoblasts were previously identified by differential display. Here we characterize the expression of one of these genes, URB, belonging to the sushi-repeat-containing protein superfamily. In culture, URB is expressed in both human primary and cloned BMSC, and is drastically downregulated during osteoblastic differentiation of these cells. Here we show that in mouse tissues a single 3.8kb Urb transcript is detected and that the mouse Urb protein is secreted as a 150kDa glycoprotein. During mouse development Urb RNA is barely detectable in 9dpc embryos and increases at later stages. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analysis show Urb expression in mouse embryos starting from 14dpc mostly in cartilage. The temporal and spatial expression pattern of Urb suggests its role in mouse skeletogenesis.

  7. Cloning and expression of hepatic synaptotagmin 1 in mouse.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Knapik, Sara; Guillén, Natalia; Osada, Jesús

    2015-05-15

    Mouse hepatic synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) cDNA was cloned, characterized and compared to the brain one. The hepatic transcript was 1807 bp in length, smaller than the brain, and only encoded by 9 of 11 gene exons. In this regard, 5'-and 3'-untranslated regions were 66 and 476 bp, respectively; the open reading frame of 1266 bp codified for a protein of 421 amino acids, identical to the brain, with a predicted molecular mass of 47.4 kDa and highly conserved across different species. Immunoblotting of protein showed two isoforms of higher molecular masses than the theoretical prediction based on amino acid sequence suggesting posttranslational modifications. Subcellular distribution of protein isoforms corresponded to plasma membrane, lysosomes and microsomes and was identical between the brain and liver. Nonetheless, the highest molecular weight isoform was smaller in the liver, irrespective of subcellular location. Quantitative mRNA tissue distribution showed that it was widely expressed and that the highest values corresponded to the brain, followed by the liver, spleen, abdominal fat, intestine and skeletal muscle. These findings indicate tissue-specific splicing of the gene and posttranslational modification and the variation in expression in the different tissues might suggest a different requirement of SYT1 for the specific function in each organ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  9. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Confers Resistance toward Biotrophic and Hemibiotrophic Pathogens via Altered Activation of AtMPK61[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T.; Stein, Elke; Molitor, Alexandra; Zuccaro, Alga; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria rely on quorum sensing to coordinate the collective behavior during the interactions with their eukaryotic hosts. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals in such communication. Here we show that plants have evolved means to perceive AHLs and that the length of acyl moiety and the functional group at the γ position specify the plant’s response. Root treatment with the N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) reinforced the systemic resistance to the obligate biotrophic fungi Golovinomyces orontii in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. In addition, oxo-C14-HSL-treated Arabidopsis plants were more resistant toward the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Oxo-C14-HSL promoted a stronger activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases AtMPK3 and AtMPK6 when challenged with flg22, followed by a higher expression of the defense-related transcription factors WRKY22 and WRKY29, as well as the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 gene. In contrast to wild-type Arabidopsis and mpk3 mutant, the mpk6 mutant is compromised in the AHL effect, suggesting that AtMPK6 is required for AHL-induced resistance. Results of this study show that AHLs commonly produced in the rhizosphere are crucial factors in plant pathology and could be an agronomic issue whose full impact has to be elucidated in future analyses. PMID:21940998

  10. Expression of cubilin in mouse testes and Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Seo, J T; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2016-04-01

    Cubilin (cubn) is a receptor for vitamins and various protein ligands. Cubn lacks a transmembrane domain but anchors to apical membranes by forming complexes with Amnionless or Megalin. In an effort to better understand the uptake of nutrients in testis, we analysed cubn expression in the developing mice testes. In testes, cubn mRNA increased from birth to adulthood. In the inter-stitium and isolated seminiferous tubules, neonatal increase in cubn mRNA until 14 days post-partum (pp) was followed by a marked increase at puberty (28 days pp). Cubn was found in the gonocytes, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testes. In adult testes, strong Cubn immunoreactivity was found in the elongating spermatids, suggesting the role of Cubn in endocytosis during early spermiogenesis. In Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, Cubn immunoreactivity was weak throughout the testis development. In the inter-stitium, Cubn immunoreactivity was found in foetal Leydig cells, was weak to negligible in the stem cells and progenitor Leydig cells and was strong in immature and adult Leydig cells, demonstrating a positive association between Cubn and steroidogenic activity of Leydig cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cubn may participate in the endocytotic uptake of nutrients in germ cells and somatic cells, supporting the spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in mouse testes.

  11. Genetic expression of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Robinson, J R; Niwa, A; Kumaki, K; Poland, A P

    1975-04-01

    Monooxygenases require NADPH and molecular oxygen during the metabolism of numerous endogenous hydrophobic substrates and carcinogenic and toxic exogenous chemicals. The complexity of these membrane-bound multicomponent drug-metabolizing enzyme systems is reviewed. What "aryl hydrocarbon (benzo[a]pyrene) hydroxylase activity" actually represents is reviewed and discussed. At least two forms of the hydroxylase activity exist and we suggest that they are associated with different molecular species of membrane-bound CO-binding hemoprotein (i.e., they are associated with different enzyme active-sties). At least two, and probably more than two, nonlinked loci are responsible for the genetic expression of new cytochrome P1450 formation and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction--and the stimulation of 10 other monooxygenase "activities"--in the mouse treated with certain aromatic hydrocarbons. The individual variability of hydroxylase activity in an inbred and in a random-bred strain of micr is illustrated. The basal hydroxylase activity appears to be inherited differently from the aromatic hydrocarbon-inducible hydroxylase activity. The potent inducer 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin can stimulate increases in these hepatic monooxygenase activities and p1450 formation in so-called "nonresponsive" mice, whereas inducers such as beta-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene cannot. Thus, the genetically "nonresponsive" micr apparently possess the structural and regulatory genes necessary for expression of these inducible monooxygenase activities and associated new formation of cytochrome P1450. We suggest that a mutation has occurred in the "nonresponsive" inbred strains that results in production of an inducer-binding receptor having a diminished affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons.

  12. Expression profile and transcription factor binding site exploration of imprinted genes in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Christine; Paulsen, Martina; Kielbasa, Szymon; Walter, Jörn; Vingron, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, imprinted genes are regulated by an epigenetic mechanism that results in parental origin-specific expression. Though allele-specific regulation of imprinted genes has been studied for several individual genes in detail, little is known about their overall tissue-specific expression patterns and interspecies conservation of expression. Results We performed a computational analysis of microarray expression data of imprinted genes in human and mouse placentae and in a variety of adult tissues. For mouse, early embryonic stages were also included. The analysis reveals that imprinted genes are expressed in a broad spectrum of tissues for both species. Overall, the relative tissue-specific expression levels of orthologous imprinted genes in human and mouse are not highly correlated. However, in both species distinctive expression profiles are found in tissues of the endocrine pathways such as adrenal gland, pituitary, pancreas as well as placenta. In mouse, the placental and embryonic expression patterns of imprinted genes are highly similar. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) prediction reveals correlation of tissue-specific expression patterns and the presence of distinct TFBS signatures in the upstream region of human imprinted genes. Conclusion Imprinted genes are broadly expressed pre- and postnatally and do not exhibit a distinct overall expression pattern when compared to non-imprinted genes. The relative expression of most orthologous gene pairs varies significantly between human and mouse suggesting rapid species-specific changes in gene regulation. Distinct expression profiles of imprinted genes are confined to certain human and mouse hormone producing tissues, and placentae. In contrast to the overall variability, distinct expression profiles and enriched TFBS signatures are found in human and mouse endocrine tissues and placentae. This points towards an important role played by imprinted gene regulation in these tissues. PMID

  13. [Construction and characterization of a novel recombinant retroviral vector expressing mouse T-bet].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejie; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Xuyu

    2014-10-01

    In order to study T-bet function in mouse cells, a novel retroviral vector expressing mouse T-bet and reporter gene Thy1.1 was constructed. Retrovirus particles were then produced by transfection of the recombinant retroviral plasmid into a packaging cell line Platinum-E. The recombinant retrovirus played considerable infection ability. T-bet expression was then identified by FACS after infection of CD4+ primary T cells from T-bet knockout mouse with recombinant retrovirus. To determine if exogenous expressing T-bet has normal function, we checked the expression level of T-bet target gene, Ifng. IFN-y expression was upregulated in the T-bet knockout T cells infected with recombinant retrovirus. In conclusion, we successfully constructed an effective mouse T-bet recombinant retroviral vector.

  14. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  15. Properties of recombinant mouse thrombospondin 2 expressed in Spodoptera cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Sottile, J; O'Rourke, K M; Dixit, V M; Mosher, D F

    1994-12-23

    A baculovirus system was used to express full-length recombinant mouse thrombospondin 2 (rTSP2) as a disulfide-bonded homotrimer with an NH2 terminus beginning with Asp20.rTSP2, like TSP1, was more sensitive to trypsin digestion if depleted of calcium ion. The trypsin digestion pattern of rTSP2 and TSP1 differed in that trypsin cut between the first and second type 1 modules of rTSP2. For bovine aortic endothelial cells adhering to TSP-coated polystyrene plates, reduction after coating caused both TSPs to be much more adhesive; these adhesions were blocked completely by RGDS peptide or antibody to alpha v beta 3 integrin.rTSP2 and TSP1 also mediated the adhesion of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells that carry alpha v beta 5 but not alpha v beta 3 integrin. Antibody to alpha v beta 5 did not inhibit adhesion of HT-29 cells to TSP1 or rTSP2. Rather, adhesion of HT-29 cells was decreased by treatment of TSPs with EDTA, abolished by reduction of the TSPs, and, in the case of rTSP2, blocked by heparin. Adhesion of MG63 cells to both TSPs was complex. Treatment with EDTA enhanced the adhesive activity of rTSP2 but decreased the adhesive activity of TSP1. These results show that TSP2 can be processed and secreted when overexpressed using baculovirus, TSP1 and rTSP2 differ in protease susceptibility in the type 1 module region, and TSP1 and rTSP2 mediate cell adhesion by complex and similar but not identical mechanisms.

  16. The molecular structure and catalytic mechanism of a quorum-quenching N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hee; Choi, Won-Chan; Kang, Hye Ok; Lee, Jong Suk; Kang, Beom Sik; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Derewenda, Zygmunt S; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jung-Kee

    2005-12-06

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, including a number of pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Erwinia carotovora, virulence factor production and biofilm formation are linked to the quorum-sensing systems that use diffusible N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as intercellular messenger molecules. A number of organisms also contain genes coding for lactonases that hydrolyze AHLs into inactive products, thereby blocking the quorum-sensing systems. Consequently, these enzymes attract intense interest for the development of antiinfection therapies. However, the catalytic mechanism of AHL-lactonase is poorly understood and subject to controversy. We here report a 2.0-angstroms resolution structure of the AHL-lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis and a 1.7-angstroms crystal structure of its complex with L-homoserine lactone. Despite limited sequence similarity, the enzyme shows remarkable structural similarities to glyoxalase II and RNase Z proteins, members of the metallo-beta-lactamase superfamily. We present experimental evidence that AHL-lactonase is a metalloenzyme containing two zinc ions involved in catalysis, and we propose a catalytic mechanism for bacterial metallo-AHL-lactonases.

  17. Beneficial effects of bacteria-plant communication based on quorum sensing molecules of the N-acyl homoserine lactone group.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Hartmann, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms play a crucial role in the proper performance and ecological fitness of bacterial populations. Many key physiological processes are regulated in a QS-dependent manner by auto-inducers, like the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in numerous Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, also the interaction between bacteria and eukaryotic hosts can be regulated by AHLs. Those mechanisms gained much attention, because of the positive effects of different AHL molecules on plants. This positive impact ranges from growth promotion to induced resistance and is quite contrasting to the rather negative effects observed in the interactions between bacterial AHL molecules and animals. Only very recently, we began to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant responses to AHL molecules. In this review, we gathered the latest information in this research field. The first part gives an overview of the bacterial aspects of quorum sensing. Later we focus on the impact of AHLs on plant growth and AHL-priming, as one of the most understood phenomena in respect to the inter-kingdom interactions based on AHL-quorum sensing molecules. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits of the understanding of bacteria-plant interaction for the future agricultural applications.

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Triazole-Containing N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Danielle M.; Le Quement, Sebastian T.; Hansen, Casper L.; Clausen, Janie W.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Brummond, Jacob W.; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial species are capable of assessing their local population densities through a cell-cell signaling mechanism termed quorum sensing (QS). This intercellular communication process is mediated by small molecule or peptide ligands and their cognate protein receptors. Numerous pathogens use QS to initiate virulence once they achieve a threshold cell number on a host. Consequently, approaches to intercept QS have attracted considerable attention as potential anti-infective therapies. Our interest in the development of small molecule tools to modulate QS pathways motivated us to evaluate triazole-containing analogs of natural N-acyl L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals as non-native QS agonists and antagonists in Gram-negative bacteria. We synthesized 72 triazole derivatives of five broad structure types in high yields and purities using efficient Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne couplings. These compounds were evaluated for their ability to activate or inhibit two QS receptors from two prevalent pathogens – LasR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and AbaR from Acinetobacter baumannii – using bacterial reporter strains. Several triazole derivatives were identified that were capable of strongly modulating the activity of LasR and AbaR. These compounds represent a new and synthetically accessible class of AHL analogs, and could find utility as chemical tools to study QS and its role in bacterial virulence. PMID:23258305

  19. Identification of N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 cultured in complex and synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Peñalver, Carlos G; Bertini, Elisa V; de Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2012-07-01

    The endophytic diazotrophic Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 was originally isolated from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum). The biological nitrogen fixation, phytohormones secretion, solubilization of mineral nutrients and phytopathogen antagonism allow its classification as a plant growth-promoting bacterium. The recent genomic sequence of PAL5 unveiled the presence of a quorum sensing (QS) system. QS are regulatory mechanisms that, through the production of signal molecules or autoinducers, permit a microbial population the regulation of the physiology in a coordinated manner. The most studied autoinducers in gram-negative bacteria are the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). The usage of biosensor strains evidenced the presence of AHL-like molecules in cultures of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 grown in complex and synthetic media. Analysis of AHLs performed by LC-APCI-MS permitted the identification of eight different signal molecules, including C6-, C8-, C10-, C12- and C14-HSL. Mass spectra confirmed that this diazotrophic strain also synthesizes autoinducers with carbonyl substitutions in the acyl chain. No differences in the profile of AHLs could be determined under both culture conditions. However, although the level of short-chain AHLs was not affected, a decrease of 30% in the production of long-chain AHLs could be measured in synthetic medium.

  20. Diversity and N-acyl-homoserine lactone production by Gammaproteobacteria associated with Avicennia marina rhizosphere of South Indian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Ganga; Jegan, Sekar; Baskaran, Viswanathan; Kathiravan, Raju; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam

    2015-07-01

    The diversity of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing rhizosphere bacterial community associated with Avicennia marina in the mangrove ecosystems of South India was investigated. Approximately 800 rhizobacteria were isolated from A. marina, and they were screened for the production of AHL using two biosensors, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4). Among the total isolates screened, 7% of the rhizobacteria showed positive induction for AHL signals. The BOX-PCR profile of 56 positive isolates represented 11 distinct genotypic groups. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences of 16 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which represented six different genera: Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium, Serratia and Halomonas. The study also identified three AHL-producing species, namely, Photobacterium halotolerans MSSRF QS48, Vibrio xiamenensis MSSRF QS47 and Pseudomonas sp. MSSRF QS1 that had not been reported previously. AHL profiling by TLC detected short chains C4, C6 and C8-HSL, and long chains C10 and C12-HSL with both unsubstituted and substituted side chains among the 16 representative AHL positives. This is the first report concerning the diversity of AHL-producing Gammaproteobacteria from mangrove ecosystems exhibiting diverse AHL profiles.

  1. Bacterial signals N-acyl homoserine lactones induce the changes of morphology and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ge; Ma, Anzhou; Liu, Weifeng; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2016-12-01

    The bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are able to regulate a diverse array of physiological activities, such as symbiosis, virulence and biofilm formation, depending on population density. Recently, it has been discovered that the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules can induce extensive response of higher eukaryotes including plants and mammalian cells. However, little is known about the response of fungi reacting to these bacterial signals. Here we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an ancient eukaryote and widely used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production, exposed to short-chain 3-OC6-HSL and long-chain C12-HSL appeared obvious changes in morphology and ethanol tolerance. AHLs could increase the frequency of cells with bipolar and multipolar buds, and these changes did not present distinct differences when induced by different types (3-OC6-HSL and C12-HSL) and varied concentrations (200 nM and 2 μM) of AHLs. Further investigation by flow cytometer displayed that the cells untreated by AHLs reduced cell size (decreased FSC) and enhanced intracellular density (increased in SSC), compared with the AHLs-induced cells after incubation 6 h. In addition, the long-chain C12-HSL could slightly increase the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae while the short-chain HSL obviously decreased it. Our study would be valuable to further research on the interaction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, and be reference for industrial production of bioethanol.

  2. Three-dimensional structure of the quorum-quenching N-acyl homoserine lactone hydrolase from Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dali; Lepore, Bryan W.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Thomas, Pei W.; Stone, Everett M.; Fast, Walter; Ringe, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone hydrolase (AHL lactonase) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been determined, by using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) phasing, to 1.6-Å resolution. AHLs are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria as signaling molecules used in quorum-sensing pathways that indirectly sense cell density and regulate communal behavior. Because of their importance in pathogenicity, quorum-sensing pathways have been suggested as potential targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Quorum-sensing can be disrupted by enzymes evolved to degrade these lactones, such as AHL lactonases. These enzymes are members of the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily and contain two zinc ions in their active sites. The zinc ions are coordinated to a number of ligands, including a single oxygen of a bridging carboxylate and a bridging water/hydroxide ion, thought to be the nucleophile that hydrolyzes the AHLs to ring-opened products, which can no longer act as quorum signals. PMID:16087890

  3. [Synthesis of signaling N-acyl-homoserine-lactones participating in quorum sensing in rhizosphere and soil bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas].

    PubMed

    Khmel', I A; Veselova, M A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Klein, S; Lipasova, V A; Maiatskaia, A V; Chernin, L S

    2002-04-01

    Signaling molecules assigned to N-acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHL) serve as autoinducers for the genes controlling the quorum sensing regulatory system. In many gram-negative bacteria, AHL are the key factors responsible for density-dependent regulation of exoenzyme and secondary metabolite production; they also participate in interaction between bacteria and higher organisms. The soil and rhisosphere bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas from different geographical zones of Russia and the former USSR were analyzed for the presence of the AHL producers. Screening was conducted by using a test system based on the mutant strain Chromobacterium violaceum, which was unable to synthesize AHL but produced a pigment violacein in the presence of exogenous AHL. The AHL-like compounds proved to be formed by 9.7% of the studied bacteria. Various Pseudomonas species differed in the capacity to synthesize this compounds. In at least a half of the isolated P. aureofaciens and P. aeruginosa, an intense AHL production was observed, whereas the AHL-producers were far less frequent among the P. fluorescens, P. chlororaphis, P. lemonnieri, P. geniculata, and P. putida. None of the 41 Xanthomonas maltophilia strains examined synthesized AHL.

  4. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals the N-Acyl-Taurine Geodiataurine in Extracts from the Marine Sponge Geodia macandrewii (Bowerbank).

    PubMed

    Olsen, Elisabeth K; Søderholm, Kine L; Isaksson, Johan; Andersen, Jeanette H; Hansen, Espen

    2016-05-27

    A metabolomic approach was used to identify known and new natural products from the marine sponges Geodia baretti and G. macandrewii. G. baretti is known to produce bioactive natural products such as barettin (1), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (2), and bromobenzisoxazolone barettin (3), while secondary metabolites from G. macandrewii are not reported in the literature. Specimens of the two sponges were collected from different sites along the coast of Norway, and their extracts were analyzed using UHPLC-HR-MS. Metabolomic analyses revealed that extracts from both species contained barettin (1) and 8,9-dihydrobarettin (2), and all samples of G. baretti contained higher amounts of both compounds compared to G. macandrewii. The analysis of the MS data also revealed that samples of G. macandrewii contained a compound that was not present in any of the G. baretti samples. This new compound was isolated and identified as the N-acyl-taurine geodiataurine (4), and it was tested for antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial properties.

  5. Circadian clock and steroidogenic-related gene expression profiles in mouse Leydig cells following dexamethasone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huatao; Gao, Lei; Xiong, Yongjie; Yang, Dan; Li, Cuimei; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2017-01-29

    Previous studies have shown that circadian clock genes are expressed in mammalian testes; however, it remains unclear if the expression patterns of these genes are cyclic. Furthermore, it is unknown whether Leydig cells, the primary androgen secreting cells in the testis, play a role in the rhythmicity of circadian clock and steroidogenic-related gene transcription. Here, we examine the circadian clock of mouse Leydig cells, and the link to steroidogenic-related gene transcription. We confirm, via sampling over a full circadian time (CT) period, a lack of circadian rhythmicity in mouse testes in comparison with the robust gene expression cycling of circadian clock genes in mouse livers. Immunofluorescence imaging of mouse testes collected at CT0 and CT12 show that the BMAL1 protein is exclusively expressed in mouse Leydig cells, and clearly linked to the circadian oscillation. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment synchronized the expression of several of these canonical circadian clock and steroidogenic-related genes. Bioinformatic analyses revealed the presence of several circadian clock-related sequence motifs in the promoters of these steroidogenic-related genes. Our results suggest mouse Leydig cells may contain a functional circadian oscillator and the circadian clockwork in mouse Leydig cells regulates steroidogenic-related gene transcription by binding to the E-box, RORE, and D-box motifs in their promoters. However, additional research is required to determine the specific molecular mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The gene expression database for mouse development (GXD): putting developmental expression information at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Because molecular mechanisms of development are extraordinarily complex, the understanding of these processes requires the integration of pertinent research data. Using the Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD) as an example, we illustrate the progress made toward this goal, and discuss relevant issues that apply to developmental databases and developmental research in general. Since its first release in 1998, GXD has served the scientific community by integrating multiple types of expression data from publications and electronic submissions and by making these data freely and widely available. Focusing on endogenous gene expression in wild-type and mutant mice and covering data from RNA in situ hybridization, in situ reporter (knock-in), immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, and Western blot experiments, the database has grown tremendously over the years in terms of data content and search utilities. Currently, GXD includes over 1.4 million annotated expression results and over 260,000 images. All these data and images are readily accessible to many types of database searches. Here we describe the data and search tools of GXD; explain how to use the database most effectively; discuss how we acquire, curate, and integrate developmental expression information; and describe how the research community can help in this process. Copyright © 2014 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  7. Striking differences of LDL receptor-related protein 1B expression in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2005-08-05

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) is a member of the expanding LDL receptor family, and is closely related to LRP. It was discovered as a putative tumor suppressor, and is frequently inactivated in human malignant tissues. However, the expression pattern of LRP1B in normal human tissues was unclear. In the present study, we analyzed LRP1B expression in normal mouse and human tissues. By using RT-PCR, we found that, while mouse LRP1B expression is mostly restricted to the brain, human LRP1B expression is more widespread with highest expression levels detected in the brain, adrenal gland, salivary gland, and testis. Although mouse LRP1B expresses in the forms of both full-length receptor tail and an alternatively spliced form lacking a 33-amino acid insert, human LRP1B is expressed exclusively in the form of full-length receptor tail. Finally, we found that, unlike mouse LRP1B, human LRP1B is cleaved by furin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that there are striking differences between LRP1B expression in mouse and human tissues. The broader expression pattern of LRP1B in human tissues suggests that this putative tumor suppressor may play roles in several types of human cancer.

  8. Cloning and expression of the mouse histamine H3 receptor: evidence for multiple isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Agnès; Héron, Anne; Cochois, Véronique; Pillot, Catherine; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-01

    The existence of mouse H3-receptor isoforms was investigated by PCR analysis and cDNA cloning. Splicing mechanisms previously reported in various species are conserved in the mouse. The retention/deletion of a fragment in the third intracellular loop of the mouse receptor leads to the existence of three isoforms designated mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) according to the length of their deduced amino acid sequence. PCR analysis showed that mouse H3-receptor isoforms display different expression patterns in the brain. Following expression in Cos-1 cells, [125I]iodoproxyfan binding indicated similar pharmacological profiles of the mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) isoforms. The pharmacological profile of the mouse H3 receptor is more similar to the rat receptor than to the human receptor, although some differences were also observed between the mouse and rat receptors. For example, the potency of thioperamide and ciproxifan is slightly higher at the mouse receptor than at the rat receptor but 40-100-fold higher than at the human receptor. In situ hybridization histochemistry showed that the distribution of H3-receptor mRNAs in the mouse brain is rather similar to that previously reported in the rat brain. However, the autoradiographic and cellular expression patterns observed in several brain areas such as the thalamus or hippocampus reveal important differences between the two species.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and stereochemistry of N-acyl-r-2,c-4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, A.; Ponnuswamy, S.; Shreevidhyaa Suressh, V.; Usha, G.

    2015-08-01

    Four new N-acyl-2,4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes 3-6 have been synthesized. The structural characterization and the conformational preferences of the compounds 3-6 have been carried out using IR, 1D and 2D NMR and Mass spectral data. The NMR spectral data indicates that the N-acyl-2,4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes 3-6 prefer to exist in twin-chair conformation with partial flattening at nitrogen end. To avoid A1,3-strain, the anisyl groups at C2 and C4 are forced to occupy the quasi-axial orientation. X-ray crystal structure of the N-dichloroacetyl-2,4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane 6 also supports the similar conformation in the solid state.

  10. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  11. Glycogen phosphorylase as a target for type 2 diabetes: synthetic, biochemical, structural and computational evaluation of novel N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Parmenopoulou, Vanessa; Bakalov, Dimitar N; Snelgrove, Laura; Stravodimos, George A; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Manta, Stella; Panagiotopoulou, Angeliki; Hayes, Joseph M; Komiotis, Dimitri; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a validated target for the development of anti-hyperglycaemic agents, has been targeted for the design of novel glycopyranosylamine inhibitors. Exploiting the two most potent inhibitors from our previous study of N-acyl-β-D-glucopyranosylamines (Parmenopoulou et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2014, 22, 4810), we have extended the linking group to -NHCONHCO- between the glucose moiety and the aliphatic/aromatic substituent in the GP catalytic site β-cavity. The N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors were synthesized and their efficiency assessed by biochemical methods, revealing inhibition constant values of 4.95 µM and 2.53 µM. Crystal structures of GP in complex with these inhibitors were determined and analyzed, providing data for further structure based design efforts. A novel Linear Response - Molecular Mechanics Coulomb Surface Area (LR-MM-CBSA) method has been developed which relates predicted and experimental binding free energies for a training set of N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea ligands with a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.89 and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-cv) Q(2) statistic of 0.79. The method has significant applications to direct future lead optimization studies, where ligand entropy loss on binding is revealed as a key factor to be considered. ADMET property predictions revealed that apart from potential permeability issues, the synthesized N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors have drug-like potential without any toxicity warnings.

  12. Microwave-assisted tandem organocatalytic peptide-coupling intramolecular aza-Michael reaction: α,β-unsaturated N-acyl pyrazoles as Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Roselló, María; Mulet, Cristina; Guerola, Marta; del Pozo, Carlos; Fustero, Santos

    2014-11-24

    Conjugated N-acyl pyrazoles have been successfully employed in the organocatalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-Michael reaction as ester surrogates. Bifunctional squaramides under microwave irradiation provided the best results in this transformation. Furthermore, this protocol has been combined with a peptide-coupling reaction in a tandem sequence. The final products were easily converted into the corresponding ethyl esters. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A novel plasmid for detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Ling, Elizabeth A; Ellison, Matthew L; Pesci, Everett C

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria utilize acyl-homoserine lactones as cell to cell signals that can regulate the expression of numerous genes. Structural differences in acyl-homoserine lactones produced by different bacteria, such as acyl side chain length and the presence or absence of an oxy group, make many of the commonly used detection bioassays impractical for broad range detection. Here we present a simple, broad range acyl-homoserine lactone detection bioassay that can be used to detect a wide range of these chemical signals. A plasmid (pEAL01) was constructed and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain QSC105 to allow for detection of a broad range of acyl-homoserine lactones through induction of a lasB'-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Monitoring beta-galactosidase activity from this bioassay showed that P. aeruginosa strain QSC105 (pEAL01) could detect the presence of eight acyl-homoserine lactones tested at physiological concentrations. This novel strain could also detect acyl-homoserine lactones from the extracts of four different bacteria that produce different acyl-homoserine lactones signals. These data indicate that strain QSC105 (pEAL01) can be used to detect a wide variety of acyl-homoserine lactones by a simple beta-galactosidase assay and this bioassay could be a useful and inexpensive tool to quickly identify the presence of these signal molecules.

  14. Effects of stress on mouse β-defensin-3 expression in the upper digestive mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Rie; Shimizu, Tomoko; To, Masahiro; Saruta, Juri; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Gastrointestinal integrity and immune surveillance are affected by stress. Stress also adversely affects mucosal barrier function. β-defensins constitute an integral component of the innate immune system as antimicrobial peptides, serving as the first line of defense against microbial pathogens at the epithelial surfaces of the upper digestive mucosa. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress on the expression profile of mouse β-defensin-3 in the upper digestive mucosa of mice with diabetes. We established a mouse model of restraint stress by using NSY/Hos mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry to investigate the effects of stress and glucocorticoid administration on mouse β-defensin-3 expression in the upper digestive mucosa of the gingiva, esophagus, and stomach. Mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression was higher in the esophagus than in the gingiva or stomach (p<0.05). In the esophagus, mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression was lower in stressed mice than in non-stressed mice (p<0.05). Furthermore, immunoreactivity to mouse β-defensin-3 protein was lower in the esophagus of stressed mice than non-stressed mice, consistent with the results of mRNA expression analysis. Systemic glucocorticoid administration also downregulated esophageal mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression. Our novel findings show that stress decreases mouse β-defensin-3 expression in the esophagus of mice with diabetes, possibly due to increased endogenous glucocorticoid production. It appears to be highly likely that stress management may normalize mucosal antimicrobial defenses in patients with diabetes.

  15. Effects of Stress on Mouse β-Defensin-3 Expression in the Upper Digestive Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Rie; Shimizu, Tomoko; To, Masahiro; Saruta, Juri; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gastrointestinal integrity and immune surveillance are affected by stress. Stress also adversely affects mucosal barrier function. β-defensins constitute an integral component of the innate immune system as antimicrobial peptides, serving as the first line of defense against microbial pathogens at the epithelial surfaces of the upper digestive mucosa. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of stress on the expression profile of mouse β-defensin-3 in the upper digestive mucosa of mice with diabetes. Materials and Methods We established a mouse model of restraint stress by using NSY/Hos mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry to investigate the effects of stress and glucocorticoid administration on mouse β-defensin-3 expression in the upper digestive mucosa of the gingiva, esophagus, and stomach. Results Mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression was higher in the esophagus than in the gingiva or stomach (p<0.05). In the esophagus, mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression was lower in stressed mice than in non-stressed mice (p<0.05). Furthermore, immunoreactivity to mouse β-defensin-3 protein was lower in the esophagus of stressed mice than non-stressed mice, consistent with the results of mRNA expression analysis. Systemic glucocorticoid administration also downregulated esophageal mouse β-defensin-3 mRNA expression. Conclusion Our novel findings show that stress decreases mouse β-defensin-3 expression in the esophagus of mice with diabetes, possibly due to increased endogenous glucocorticoid production. It appears to be highly likely that stress management may normalize mucosal antimicrobial defenses in patients with diabetes. PMID:24532508

  16. Base- and acid-catalyzed interconversions of O-acyl- and N-acyl-ethanolamines: a cautionary note for lipid analyses.

    PubMed

    Markey, S P; Dudding, T; Wang, T C

    2000-04-01

    The isolation and quantification of ethanolamine containing lipids from animal tissues may expose neutral lipid extracts to acidic or basic conditions during chromatographic separations or derivatization chemistry. While investigating the acid- and base-catalyzed production of anandamide in chromatographic fractions of rat brain extracts not containing anandamide, we observed that O,N-acyl migrations are facile. O,N-acyl migrations are well documented in synthetic organic chemistry literature, but are not well described or recognized with regard to methods in lipid isolation or lipid enzyme studies. We report here the synthesis and characterization of O- and N-acyl (palmitoyl- or arachidonoyl-)ethanolamines. Their rearrangements in base and acid are quantified by liquid chromatography;-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The rearrangements proceed through a cyclic intermediate that is also formed during chemical reactions commonly used for derivatization of acylethanolamines for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of N- or O-acylethanolamines and their enzymatic formation requires awareness and consideration of the proclivity of these compounds to chemically rearrange.

  17. Plasma Membrane Association by N-Acylation Governs PKG Function in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin M; Long, Shaojun; Sibley, L David

    2017-05-02

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase G [PKG]) is essential for microneme secretion, motility, invasion, and egress in apicomplexan parasites, However, the separate roles of two isoforms of the kinase that are expressed by some apicomplexans remain uncertain. Despite having identical regulatory and catalytic domains, PKG(I) is plasma membrane associated whereas PKG(II) is cytosolic in Toxoplasma gondii To determine whether these isoforms are functionally distinct or redundant, we developed an auxin-inducible degron (AID) tagging system for conditional protein depletion in T. gondii By combining AID regulation with genome editing strategies, we determined that PKG(I) is necessary and fully sufficient for PKG-dependent cellular processes. Conversely, PKG(II) is functionally insufficient and dispensable in the presence of PKG(I) The difference in functionality mapped to the first 15 residues of PKG(I), containing a myristoylated Gly residue at position 2 that is critical for membrane association and PKG function. Collectively, we have identified a novel requirement for cGMP signaling at the plasma membrane and developed a new system for examining essential proteins in T. gondiiIMPORTANCEToxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite and important clinical and veterinary pathogen that causes toxoplasmosis. Since apicomplexans can only propagate within host cells, efficient invasion is critically important for their life cycles. Previous studies using chemical genetics demonstrated that cyclic GMP signaling through protein kinase G (PKG)-controlled invasion by apicomplexan parasites. However, these studies did not resolve functional differences between two compartmentalized isoforms of the kinase. Here we developed a conditional protein regulation tool to interrogate PKG isoforms in T. gondii We found that the cytosolic PKG isoform was largely insufficient and dispensable. In contrast, the plasma membrane-associated isoform

  18. Sustained Pax6 Expression Generates Primate-like Basal Radial Glia in Developing Mouse Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Fei, Ji-Feng; Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Taverna, Elena; Haffner, Christiane; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex in mammals has been linked to enlargement of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and increased proliferative capacity of basal progenitors (BPs), notably basal radial glia (bRG). The transcription factor Pax6 is known to be highly expressed in primate, but not mouse, BPs. Here, we demonstrate that sustaining Pax6 expression selectively in BP-genic apical radial glia (aRG) and their BP progeny of embryonic mouse neocortex suffices to induce primate-like progenitor behaviour. Specifically, we conditionally expressed Pax6 by in utero electroporation using a novel, Tis21-CreERT2 mouse line. This expression altered aRG cleavage plane orientation to promote bRG generation, increased cell-cycle re-entry of BPs, and ultimately increased upper-layer neuron production. Upper-layer neuron production was also increased in double-transgenic mouse embryos with sustained Pax6 expression in the neurogenic lineage. Strikingly, increased BPs existed not only in the SVZ but also in the intermediate zone of the neocortex of these double-transgenic mouse embryos. In mutant mouse embryos lacking functional Pax6, the proportion of bRG among BPs was reduced. Our data identify specific Pax6 effects in BPs and imply that sustaining this Pax6 function in BPs could be a key aspect of SVZ enlargement and, consequently, the evolutionary expansion of the neocortex.

  19. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse.

    PubMed

    Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Jiao, Xiaodan; Ashtari, Niloufar; Afsharinezhad, Pegah; Ghavami, Saeid; Marzban, Hassan

    2016-01-15

    Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) mouse (nax--naked-ataxia mutant mouse) correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc) degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR) plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5). In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  20. Sustained Pax6 Expression Generates Primate-like Basal Radial Glia in Developing Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Taverna, Elena; Haffner, Christiane; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A. Francis; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex in mammals has been linked to enlargement of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and increased proliferative capacity of basal progenitors (BPs), notably basal radial glia (bRG). The transcription factor Pax6 is known to be highly expressed in primate, but not mouse, BPs. Here, we demonstrate that sustaining Pax6 expression selectively in BP-genic apical radial glia (aRG) and their BP progeny of embryonic mouse neocortex suffices to induce primate-like progenitor behaviour. Specifically, we conditionally expressed Pax6 by in utero electroporation using a novel, Tis21–CreERT2 mouse line. This expression altered aRG cleavage plane orientation to promote bRG generation, increased cell-cycle re-entry of BPs, and ultimately increased upper-layer neuron production. Upper-layer neuron production was also increased in double-transgenic mouse embryos with sustained Pax6 expression in the neurogenic lineage. Strikingly, increased BPs existed not only in the SVZ but also in the intermediate zone of the neocortex of these double-transgenic mouse embryos. In mutant mouse embryos lacking functional Pax6, the proportion of bRG among BPs was reduced. Our data identify specific Pax6 effects in BPs and imply that sustaining this Pax6 function in BPs could be a key aspect of SVZ enlargement and, consequently, the evolutionary expansion of the neocortex. PMID:26252244

  1. Mouse opsin promoter-directed Cre recombinase expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Yun-Zheng; Zheng, Lixin; Zheng, Wei; Ash, John D; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Zhu, Meili; Anderson, Robert E

    2006-04-18

    Gene inactivation with homologous recombination in mice is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, many proteins play essential roles in a number of tissues and germline gene inactivation often results in embryonic lethality. To overcome this limitation and to dissect the functions of essential genes beyond embryonic development, we generated mouse rod opsin promoter-controlled cre transgenic mice with a goal of obtaining transgenic lines with a range of Cre activity in rod photoreceptors. Transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase directed by a long or short mouse opsin promoter were generated. Candidate Cre-expressing lines were identified with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Potentially useful Cre-expressing lines were characterized further with immunohistochemistry, PCR, and functional analysis using a Cre-activatable lacZ reporter mouse strain (R26R) to determine temporal and spatial patterns of Cre expression. Retinal function and morphology in these mouse lines were analyzed with electroretinography (ERG) and light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained retinal sections. Transgenic mice expressing Cre in rod photoreceptors were generated. Characterization of candidate photoreceptor-specific Cre mice using immunohistochemistry and functional assays demonstrated that an efficient Cre-mediated recombination occurred in rod photoreceptor cells in one mouse line and a mosaic Cre-mediated recombination occurred in rod photoreceptors and rod bipolar cells in another mouse line. Further analysis of these mice with ERG and morphological examination suggested that the retinas of eight-month-old adults were normal. We have generated transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase in rod photoreceptors. One transgenic mouse line was capable of carrying out efficient Cre-mediated recombination in rod photoreceptors. Another transgenic mouse line was capable of carrying out mosaic Cre-mediated recombination in rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells across the

  2. Differences in Gene Expression between Mouse and Human for Dynamically Regulated Genes in Early Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Madissoon, Elo; Töhönen, Virpi; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Katayama, Shintaro; Unneberg, Per; Inzunza, Jose; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide concern that can be treated with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Improvements in IVF and infertility treatment depend largely on better understanding of the molecular mechanisms for human preimplantation development. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to identify gene expression patterns for the first five days of human development, and many functional studies utilize mouse as a model system. We have identified genes of possible importance for this time period by analyzing human microarray data and available data from online databases. We selected 70 candidate genes for human preimplantation development and investigated their expression in the early mouse development from oocyte to the 8-cell stage. Maternally loaded genes expectedly decreased in expression during development both in human and mouse. We discovered that 25 significantly upregulated genes after fertilization in human included 13 genes whose orthologs in mouse behaved differently and mimicked the expression profile of maternally expressed genes. Our findings highlight many significant differences in gene expression patterns during mouse and human preimplantation development. We also describe four cancer-testis antigen families that are also highly expressed in human embryos: PRAME, SSX, GAGE and MAGEA. PMID:25089626

  3. Differences in gene expression between mouse and human for dynamically regulated genes in early embryo.

    PubMed

    Madissoon, Elo; Töhönen, Virpi; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Katayama, Shintaro; Unneberg, Per; Inzunza, Jose; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide concern that can be treated with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Improvements in IVF and infertility treatment depend largely on better understanding of the molecular mechanisms for human preimplantation development. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to identify gene expression patterns for the first five days of human development, and many functional studies utilize mouse as a model system. We have identified genes of possible importance for this time period by analyzing human microarray data and available data from online databases. We selected 70 candidate genes for human preimplantation development and investigated their expression in the early mouse development from oocyte to the 8-cell stage. Maternally loaded genes expectedly decreased in expression during development both in human and mouse. We discovered that 25 significantly upregulated genes after fertilization in human included 13 genes whose orthologs in mouse behaved differently and mimicked the expression profile of maternally expressed genes. Our findings highlight many significant differences in gene expression patterns during mouse and human preimplantation development. We also describe four cancer-testis antigen families that are also highly expressed in human embryos: PRAME, SSX, GAGE and MAGEA.

  4. N-acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum-sensing in Azospirillum: an exception rather than a rule.

    PubMed

    Vial, Ludovic; Cuny, Caroline; Gluchoff-Fiasson, Katia; Comte, Gilles; Oger, Phil M; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2006-11-01

    Forty Azospirillum strains were tested for their ability to synthesize N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). AHL production was detected for four strains belonging to the lipoferum species and isolated from a rice rhizosphere. AHL molecules were structurally identified for two strains: Azospirillum lipoferum TVV3 produces 3O,C(8)-HSL (N-3-oxo-octanoyl-homoserine-lactone), C(8)-HSL (N-3-octanoyl-homoserine-lactone), 3O,C(10)-HSL (N-3-oxo-decanoyl-homoserine-lactone), 3OH,C(10)-HSL (N-3-hydroxy-decanoyl-homoserine-lactone) and C(10)-HSL (N-3-decanoyl-homoserine-lactone), whereas A. lipoferum B518 produced 3O,C(6)-HSL (N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine-lactone), C(6)-HSL (N-3-hexanoyl-homoserine-lactone), 3O,C(8)-HSL, 3OH,C(8)-HSL and C(8)-HSL. Genes involved in AHL production were characterized for A. lipoferum TVV3 by generating a genomic library and complementing an AHL-deficient strain with sensor capabilities. Those genes, designated alpI and alpR, were found to belong to the luxI and luxR families, respectively. When cloned in a suitable heterologous host, alpI and alpR could direct the synthesis of the five cognate AHLs present in A. lipoferum TVV3. These two adjacent genes were found to be located on a 85 kb plasmid. Southern hybridization experiments with probes alpI/R indicated that genes involved in AHL production in the three other AHL-producing strains were not closely related to alpI and alpR. This study demonstrates that AHL-based quorum-sensing is not widespread among the genus Azospirillum and could be found only in some A. lipoferum strains.

  5. Attenuation of quorum sensing in the pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii using non-native N-acyl homoserine lactones

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Danielle M.; Welsh, Michael A.; Rather, Philip N.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2012-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum sensing (QS) to control virulence. As a result, the development of methods to intercept QS has attracted significant interest as a potential anti-infective therapy. Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a pan-drug resistant pathogen and displays a remarkable ability to persist in hospital settings despite desiccation and antimicrobial treatment. Recent studies have shown that A. baumannii QS mutants have limited motility and fail to form mature biofilms – these phenotypes are linked to its ability to persist on biotic and abiotic surfaces and increase its pathogenicity. A. baumannii uses N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (OH-dDHL) and its putative cognate receptor, AbaR, for QS. We sought to identify non-native ligands capable of blocking or promoting AbaR activity in A. baumannii for use as chemical probes to modulate QS phenotypes in this pathogen. We screened a focused library of synthetic, non-native N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) to identify such compounds, and several highly potent antagonists and agonists were uncovered, with IC50 and EC50 values in the low micromolar range, respectively. The strongest AbaR antagonists largely contained aromatic acyl groups, whereas the AbaR agonists closely resembled OH-dDHL. Notably, the 10 most potent AbaR antagonists also strongly inhibited A. baumannii motility, and five antagonists reduced biofilm formation in A. baumannii by up to 40%. The discovery of these compounds is significant, as they represent, to our knowledge, the first non-native modulators of QS in A. baumannii to be reported and could find utility as new tools to study the role and timing of QS phenotypes in A. baumannii infections. PMID:22853441

  6. Quorum sensing of bacteria and trans-kingdom interactions of N-acyl homoserine lactones with eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Anton; Schikora, Adam

    2012-06-01

    Many environmental and interactive important traits of bacteria, such as antibiotic, siderophore or exoenzyme (like cellulose, pectinase) production, virulence factors of pathogens, as well as symbiotic interactions, are regulated in a population density-dependent manner by using small signaling molecules. This phenomenon, called quorum sensing (QS), is widespread among bacteria. Many different bacterial species are communicating or "speaking" through diffusible small molecules. The production often is sophisticatedly regulated via an autoinducing mechanism. A good example is the production of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL), which occur in many variations of molecular structure in a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria. In Gram-positive bacteria, other compounds, such as peptides, regulate cellular activity and behavior by sensing the cell density. The degradation of the signaling molecule--called quorum quenching--is probably another important integral part in the complex quorum sensing circuit. Most interestingly, bacterial quorum sensing molecules also are recognized by eukaryotes that are colonized by QS-active bacteria. In this case, the cross-kingdom interaction can lead to specific adjustment and physiological adaptations in the colonized eukaryote. The responses are manifold, such as modifications of the defense system, modulation of the immune response, or changes in the hormonal status and growth responses. Thus, the interaction with the quorum sensing signaling molecules of bacteria can profoundly change the physiology of higher organisms too. Higher organisms are obligatorily associated with microbial communities, and these truly multi-organismic consortia, which are also called holobionts, can actually be steered via multiple interlinked signaling substances that originate not only from the host but also from the associated bacteria.

  7. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki K; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-03-11

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser(615) and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm(-1) s(-1), optimal pH was 7-8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met(16)-Glu(101)). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met(16)-Ala(126), which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu(127)-Met(495) (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala(496)-Phe(736) (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides.

  8. Plant responses to bacterial N-acyl L-homoserine lactones are dependent on enzymatic degradation to L-homoserine.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Andrew G; Senechal, Amanda C; Mukherjee, Arijit; Ané, Jean-Michel; Blackwell, Helen E

    2014-08-15

    Many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) to regulate phenotypes that ultimately benefit the bacterial population at high cell densities. These QS-dependent phenotypes are diverse and can have significant impacts on the bacterial host, including virulence factor production, motility, biofilm formation, bioluminescence, and root nodulation. As bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts have coevolved over millions of years, it is not surprising that certain hosts appear to be able to sense QS signals, potentially allowing them to alter QS outcomes. Recent experiments have established that eukaryotes have marked responses to the N-acyl L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals used by Gram-negative bacteria for QS, and the responses of plants to AHLs have received considerable scrutiny to date. However, the molecular mechanisms by which plants, and eukaryotes in general, sense bacterial AHLs remain unclear. Herein, we report a systematic analysis of the responses of the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula to a series of native AHLs and byproducts thereof. Our results establish that AHLs can significantly alter seedling growth in an acyl-chain length dependent manner. Based upon A. thaliana knockout studies and in vitro biochemical assays, we conclude that the observed growth effects are dependent upon AHL amidolysis by a plant-derived fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) to yield L-homoserine. The accumulation of l-homoserine appears to encourage plant growth at low concentrations by stimulating transpiration, while higher concentrations inhibit growth by stimulating ethylene production. These results offer new insights into the mechanisms by which plant hosts can respond to QS signals and the potential role of QS in interkingdom associations.

  9. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides*

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Takayuki K.; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser615 and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm−1 s−1, optimal pH was 7–8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met16–Glu101). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met16–Ala126, which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu127–Met495 (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala496–Phe736 (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides. PMID:26733202

  10. HBV life cycle is restricted in mouse hepatocytes expressing human NTCP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanjie; Zhuang, Qiuyu; Wang, Yuze; Zhang, Tianying; Zhao, Jinghua; Zhang, Yali; Zhang, Junfang; Lin, Yi; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ningshao; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (SLC10A1 or NTCP) is a functional cellular receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, whether human NTCP can support HBV infection in mouse hepatocyte cell lines has not been clarified. Because an HBV-permissible mouse model would be helpful for the study of HBV pathogenesis, it is necessary to investigate whether human NTCP supports the susceptibility of mouse hepatocyte cell lines to HBV. The results show that exogenous human NTCP expression can render non-susceptible HepG2 (human), Huh7 (human), Hepa1–6 (mouse), AML-12 (mouse) cell lines and primary mouse hepatocyte (PMH) cells susceptible to hepatitis D virus (HDV) which employs HBV envelope proteins. However, human NTCP could only introduce HBV susceptibility in human-derived HepG2 and Huh7 cells, but not in mouse-derived Hepa1–6, AML-12 or PMH cells. These data suggest that although human NTCP is a functional receptor that mediates HBV infection in human cells, it cannot support HBV infection in mouse hepatocytes. Our study indicated that the restriction of HBV in mouse hepatocytes likely occurs after viral entry but prior to viral transcription. We have excluded the role of mouse hepatocyte nuclear factors in the restriction of the HBV life cycle and showed that knockdown or inhibition of Sting, TBK1, IRF3 or IRF7, the components of the anti-viral signaling pathways, had no effect on HBV infection in mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, murine restriction factors that limit HBV infection need to be identified before a HBV-permissible mouse line can be created. PMID:24509445

  11. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean.

    PubMed

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants' pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  12. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    PubMed Central

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  13. Differential expression and regulation of angiopoietin-2 in mouse uterus during preimplantation period.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Wang, Wei; Li, Shi-Jie; Han, Yu-Shuai; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Xue-Ming; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2012-02-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial to successful implantation and decidualization, however, as an important angiogenic growth factor, the effect of Ang-2 in the process of implantation and decidualization is still unknown. This study is to investigate the differential expression of Ang-2 in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and its regulation by steroid hormones using in situ hybridization and RT-PCR. There is no detectable Ang-2 mRNA signal on days 1-5 of pregnancy by in situ hybridization. On days 6-8, Ang-2 mRNA is mainly expressed in the primary decidua of mesometrial side, and the expression gradually increases. By RT-PCR, a significantly higher level of Ang-2 expression is observed on day 8 of pregnancy, although Ang-2 expression can be found through days 1-8. Similarly, Ang-2 is highly expressed in decidualized cells under artificial decidualization. In the ovariectomized mouse uterus, Ang-2 expression gradually increases after estrogen injection and with peak levels at 12 hr, while progesterone injection can cause a decline in uterine Ang-2 mRNA level, which reaches a nadir at 12 hr. These results suggest that Ang-2 may play a key role in the process of mouse decidualization. Estrogen can induce the expression of Ang-2 while progesterone can inhibit its expression in the ovariectomized mouse uterus.

  14. Two novel transcripts encoding two Ankyrin repeat containing proteins have preponderant expression during the mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Hu, Jiarui; Song, Ping; Gong, Wuming

    2007-12-01

    The clone 4921537P18 expressed preponderantly in mouse testis was identified by screening the Riken cDNA database, and two new full-length isoforms of this clone, which were named gsarp1 (Gonad Specific Ankyrin Repeat (ANK) Protein 1) and gsarp2, were found and isolated from mouse testis in the course of the research. Both of the GSARP1 and GSARP2 contain an ANK region circular composed by seven ANKs, and their structural feature is very similar to that of the IkappaB family proteins, while IkappaB proteins associate with the transcription factor NF-kappaB via their ANKs in the NF-kappaB pathway. We investigated the expression pattern at the mRNA level by Reverse transcription PCR. The gsarp1 has high expression level in mouse testis, while has low expression level in the ovary, and the gsarp2 is only expressed in mouse testis. The gsarp1 and gsarp2 begin to be detected at the early and later pachytene stage of meiosis separately, while both have high-expression level at the stage of MI and MII. The result of in situ hybridization reveals that the gsarp1 is primarily expressed in spermatocytes, while gsarp2 is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids. In view of the structural feature and expression pattern of the GSARP1 and GSARP2, we speculate that they may play a certain role in a signal pathway of meiosis.

  15. Differential expression of the Wnt putative receptors Frizzled during mouse somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Borello, U; Buffa, V; Sonnino, C; Melchionna, R; Vivarelli, E; Cossu, G

    1999-12-01

    The expression of eight murine Frizzled (1,3-9) genes was studied during mouse somitogenesis, in order to correlate the Wnt-dependent activation of myogenesis with the expression of specific Frizzled putative receptors. Frizzled 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 9 have specific expression in the forming and differentiating somites. The genes analyzed have a complex and partly overlapping pattern of expression in other regions of the embryo.

  16. Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling Analysis of the Gene Expression Patterns Regulating the Early Stage of Mouse Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lijun; Liu, Meiling; Zhao, Lina; Hu, Fen; Ding, Cunbao; Wang, Yang; He, Baoling; Pan, Yuxin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Hu, Songnian; Jia, Mengchun

    2013-01-01

    Detailed characterization of the gene expression patterns in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes is critical to understand the processes which occur prior to meiosis during normal spermatogenesis. The genome-wide expression profiles of mouse type B spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes were investigated using the Solexa/Illumina digital gene expression (DGE) system, a tag based high-throughput transcriptome sequencing method, and the developmental processes which occur during early spermatogenesis were systematically analyzed. Gene expression patterns vary significantly between mouse type B spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes. The functional analysis revealed that genes related to junction assembly, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and pluripotency were most significantly differently expressed. Pathway analysis indicated that the Wnt non-canonical signaling pathway played a central role and interacted with the actin filament organization pathway during the development of spermatogonia. This study provides a foundation for further analysis of the gene expression patterns and signaling pathways which regulate the molecular mechanisms of early spermatogenesis. PMID:23554914

  17. Expression and regulation of Runx3 in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhi-Kun; Guo, Bin; Tian, Xue-Chao; Li, Dang-Dang; Wang, Shou-Tang; Cao, Hang; Wang, Qu-Yuan; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression and regulation of Runt-related transcription factor 3 (Runx3) in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and its regulation by steroid hormones using in situ hybridization. There was a low level of the Runx3 mRNA expression in the mouse uterus on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5 when embryo implanted, Runx3 mRNA signal was obviously observed in the stromal cells surrounding the implanting blastocyst. From day 6 to 8 of pregnancy, Runx3 mRNA was highly expressed in the decidual cells and mesometrial decidual beds. Similarly, Runx3 mRNA was strongly expressed in decidualized cells under artificial decidualization. Compared with the delayed uterus, a high level of Runx3 mRNA signal was detected in the uterus with activated implantation. In the ovariectomized mouse uterus, estrogen could induce the expression of Runx3, while progesterone had no effects. These results suggest that Runx3 may play an important role during mouse implantation and decidualization. Estrogen can induce the expression of Runx3 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus.

  18. Oxytocin receptor is differentially expressed in mouse endometrium and embryo during blastocyst implantation.

    PubMed

    Beretsos, Panagiotis; Loutradis, Dimitris; Koussoulakos, Stauros; Margaritis, Loukas H; Kiapekou, Erasmia; Mastorakos, George; Papaspirou, Irini; Makris, Nikolaos; Makrigiannakis, Antonis; Antsaklis, Aris

    2006-12-01

    The oxytocin (OT)-oxytocin receptor (OTR) system of the mammalian uterus has mainly been studied in relation to its involvement in the onset of labor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo expression and localization pattern of OTR in the mouse endometrium and embryo during implantation, as well as OTR mRNA expression in the in vitro developing mouse embryo. The expression of OTR or OT was detected immunohistochemically in uterine tissue sections of 5- to 8-week-old female mice between days 4 and 10 of an established pregnancy. In addition, the expression of OTR mRNA was detected by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in mouse oocytes and embryos up to the blastocyst stage. The mean ratios of normalized expression levels of OTR gene in all samples were also calculated. The recorded increase in OTR mRNA immediately after fertilization could mean a possible role of OT in this process, as OTR mRNA gradually decreased after the four-cell stage of pre-embryonic development. The differential expression of OTR during embryonic apposition and embryonic invasion/placentation in the mouse uterus suggests a potential role of OT in the implantation process of the mouse. It is possible that the interaction of OTR with the hormones included in the ovulation induction regiments utilized today in in vitro fertilization (IVF) could be affecting the receptivity/quality of the implanting endometrium.

  19. Cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization decreases the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco J; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Alen, Francisco; Rubio, Leticia; Vargas, Antonio; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Decara, Juan; Bilbao, Ainhoa; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Suárez, Juan

    2016-03-01

    In the reward mesocorticolimbic circuits, the glutamatergic and endocannabinoid systems are implicated in neurobiological mechanisms underlying cocaine addiction. However, the involvement of both systems in the hippocampus, a critical region to process relational information relevant for encoding drug-associated memories, in cocaine-related behaviors remains unknown. In the present work, we studied whether the hippocampal gene/protein expression of relevant glutamate signaling components, including glutamate-synthesizing enzymes and metabotropic and ionotropic receptors, and the hippocampal gene/protein expression of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes were altered following acute and/or repeated cocaine administration resulting in conditioned locomotion and locomotor sensitization. Results showed that acute cocaine administration induced an overall down-regulation of glutamate-related gene expression and, specifically, a low phosphorylation level of GluA1. In contrast, locomotor sensitization to cocaine produced an up-regulation of several glutamate receptor-related genes and, specifically, an increased protein expression of the GluN1 receptor subunit. Regarding the endocannabinoid system, acute and repeated cocaine administration were associated with an increased gene/protein expression of CB1 receptors and a decreased gene/protein expression of the endocannabinoid-synthesis enzymes N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine D (NAPE-PLD) and diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGLα). These changes resulted in an overall decrease in endocannabinoid synthesis/degradation ratios, especially NAPE-PLD/fatty acid amide hydrolase and DAGLα/monoacylglycerol lipase, suggesting a reduced endocannabinoid production associated with a compensatory up-regulation of CB1 receptor. Overall, these findings suggest that repeated cocaine administration resulting in locomotor sensitization induces a down-regulation of the endocannabinoid signaling that could

  20. Dataset of Sgo1 expression in cardiac, gastrointestinal, hepatic and neuronal tissue in mouse.

    PubMed

    Song, Andrew T; Galli, Antonella; Leclerc, Severine; Nattel, Stanley; Mandato, Craig; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2017-08-01

    The data shown in this article are related to the research article entitled "Characterization of Sgo1 expression pattern in developing and adult mouse" (Song et al., 2017) [3]. The article provides novel data on Sgo1 gene expression pattern utilizing Sgo1_LacZ_Knock in mouse line and immunohistochemistry in wild type mice. The data presents Sgo1 expression pattern during development, and in post-developmental proliferative and quiescent tissue. The article describes following tissues: developing heart, neural tube, adult colon, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, liver, and testis.

  1. Mouse matriptase-2: identification, characterization and comparative mRNA expression analysis with mouse hepsin in adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, John D; Campagnolo, Luisa; Goodarzi, Goodarz; Truong, Tony N; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Quigley, James P

    2003-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of mouse matriptase-2 (m-matriptase-2), an 811-amino-acid protein composed of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning domain, two CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domains, three LDLR (low-density-lipoprotein receptor class A) domains and a C-terminal serine-protease domain. All m-matriptase-2 protein domain boundaries corresponded with intron/exon junctions of the encoding gene, which spans approx. 29 kb and comprises 18 exons. Matriptase-2 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat, with the rat matriptase-2 gene ( r-maltriptase-2 ) predicted to encode transmembrane and soluble isoforms. Western-blot analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 migrates close to its theoretical molecular mass of 91 kDa, and immunofluorescence analysis was consistent with the proposed surface membrane localization of this protein. Reverse-transcription PCR and in-situ -hybridization analysis indicated that m-matriptase-2 expression overlaps with the distribution of mouse hepsin (m-hepsin, a cell-surface serine protease identified in hepatoma cells) in adult tissues and during embryonic development. In adult tissues both are expressed at highest levels in liver, kidney and uterus. During embryogenesis m-matriptase-2 expression peaked between days 12.5 and 15.5. m-hepsin expression was biphasic, with peaks at day 7.5 to 8.5 and again between days 12.5 and 15.5. In situ hybridization of embryonic tissues indicated abundant expression of both m-matriptase-2 and m-hepsin in the developing liver and at lower levels in developing pharyngo-tympanic tubes. While m-hepsin was detected in the residual embryonic yolk sac and with lower intensity in lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, developing kidney tubules and epithelium of the oral cavity, m-matriptase-2 was absent in these tissues, but strongly expressed within the nasal cavity by olfactory epithelial

  2. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  3. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-03-01

    Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  4. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland. PMID:28484746

  5. Structure and expression of mouse VL30 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, C.P.; Elder, P.K.; Ono, T.; Foster, D.N.; Getz, M.J.

    1983-12-01

    DNA sequencing and blot hybridization analyses have been used to study the structure of a mouse VL30 gene and the molecular nature of VL30-related RNA which is induced upon the stimulation of cultured AKR mouse embryo cells with defined peptide growth factors. An integrated mouse VL30 gene was found to contain identical 601-base-pair long terminal repeats (LTRs) which were themselves terminated in short inverted repeats. The entire VL30 gene was flanked by a 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular DNA. Thus, VL30 genes are structurally analogous to integrated forms of retrovirus proviruses and certain other classes of mobile genetic elements. The LTR sequence was found to contain putative promoter and polyadenylation signals and generally exhibited little sequence homology to murine leukemia virus proviral LTRs. Certain short regions of sequence conservation, however, were evident, including the inverted terminal repeat, LTR-adjacent regions corresponding to origins of murine leukemia virus proviral DNA synthesis, and a 36-base-pair direct repeat bearing homology to the 72-base-pair direct repeat (enhancer sequence) of the murine leukemia virus-related Moloney sarcoma virus. Upon mitogenic stimulation of quiescent cells with epidermal growth factor and insulin, a major 5.5-kilobase VL30-specific RNA complementary to both LTR and non-LTR sequences was rapidly induced. They conclude that a complete VL30 gene(s) is highly regulated by peptide growth factor binding to specific membrane receptors in these cells.

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    McConlogue, L; Gupta, M; Wu, L; Coffino, P

    1984-01-01

    We used mRNA from a mutant S49 mouse lymphoma cell line that produces ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase) as its major protein product to synthesize and clone cDNA. Plasmids containing OrnDCase cDNA were identified by hybrid selection of OrnDCase mRNA and in vitro translation. The two of these with the largest inserts together span 2.05 kilobases of cDNA. Southern blot analysis of DNA from wild-type or mutant S49 cells, cleaved with EcoRI or with BamHI, revealed multiple bands homologous to OrnD-Case cDNA, only one of which was amplified in the mutant cells. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the major OrnD-Case mRNA in the mouse lymphoma cells is 2.0 kilobases long. A similar size mRNA was found in mouse kidney and was more abundant in the kidneys of mice treated with testosterone, an inducer of OrnDCase activity in that tissue. Images PMID:6582509

  7. Significant variations in alternative splicing patterns and expression profiles between human-mouse orthologs in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Geng; Chen, Jiwei; Yang, Jianmin; Chen, Long; Qu, Xiongfei; Shi, Caiping; Ning, Baitang; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Zhao, Yongxiang; Zhang, Meixia; Shi, Tieliu

    2017-02-01

    Human and mouse orthologs are expected to have similar biological functions; however, many discrepancies have also been reported. We systematically compared human and mouse orthologs in terms of alternative splicing patterns and expression profiles. Human-mouse orthologs are divergent in alternative splicing, as human orthologs could generally encode more isoforms than their mouse orthologs. In early embryos, exon skipping is far more common with human orthologs, whereas constitutive exons are more prevalent with mouse orthologs. This may correlate with divergence in expression of splicing regulators. Orthologous expression similarities are different in distinct embryonic stages, with the highest in morula. Expression differences for orthologous transcription factor genes could play an important role in orthologous expression discordance. We further detected largely orthologous divergence in differential expression between distinct embryonic stages. Collectively, our study uncovers significant orthologous divergence from multiple aspects, which may result in functional differences and dynamics between human-mouse orthologs during embryonic development.

  8. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Szwarc, Maria M; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M; Lydon, John P

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse-when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic-will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues.

  9. Effects of CHO-expressed recombinant lactoferrins on mouse dendritic cell presentation and function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-07-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a natural iron-binding protein, has previously demonstrated effectiveness in enhancing the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) tuberculosis vaccine. This report investigates immune modulatory effects of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-expressed recombinant mouse and human LFs on mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), comparing homologous and heterologous functions. BCG-infected BMDCs were cultured with LF, and examined for class II presentation molecule expression. Culturing of BCG-infected BMDCs with either LF decreased the class II molecule-expressing population. Mouse LF significantly increased the production of IL-12p40, IL-1β and IL-10, while human LF-treated BMDCs increased only IL-1β and IL-10. Overlaying naïve CD4 T-cells onto BCG-infected BMDCs cultured with mouse LF increased IFN-γ, whereas the human LF-exposed group increased IFN-γ and IL-17 from CD4 T cells. Overlay of naïve CD8 T cells onto BCG-infected BMDCs treated with mouse LF increased the production of IFN-γ and IL-17, while similar experiments using human LF only increased IL-17. This report is the first to examine mouse and human recombinant LFs in parallel experiments to assess murine DC function. These results detail the efficacy of the human LF counterpart used in a heterologous system to understand LF-mediated events that confer BCG efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

  10. Differential expression and regulation of angiopoietin-3 in mouse uterus during preimplantation period.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Zhang, Xue-Ming; Li, Shi-Jie; Tian, Xue-Chao; Wang, Shou-Tang; Li, Dang-Dang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2012-06-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for successful implantation and decidualization. This study was to investigate the differential expression of angiopoietin-3 (Ang-3) in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and its regulation by steroid hormones using in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There was no detectable Ang-3 mRNA signal on days 1-5 of pregnancy by in situ hybridization. On day 6 of pregnancy, a low level of Ang-3 mRNA signal was seen in the primary decidua. Ang-3 mRNA expression gradually increased on days 7 and 8 of pregnancy along with the development of decidua, and its expression scope was also expanded. The RT-PCR result indicated that Ang-3 mRNA expression was low on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5, as embryo implanted, Ang-3 mRNA was highly expressed in mouse uterus, and the expression gradually increased on days 6-8 of pregnancy, with peak level on day 8 of pregnancy. Similarly, Ang-3 mRNA was also strongly expressed in decidualized cells under artificial decidualization. Compared with the delayed uterus, a high level of Ang-3 mRNA expression was detected in activated implantation uterus by RT-PCR. In the ovariectomized mouse uterus, Ang-3 mRNA expression increased and reached the highest level at 12 hr after injection of estrogen, progesterone, and estrogen plus progesterone, respectively. These results suggest that Ang-3 may play an important role during the process of mouse decidualization. Both estrogen and progesterone can induce the expression of Ang-3 in ovariectomized mouse uterus.

  11. GFAPδ expression in glia of the developmental and adolescent mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans.

  12. GFAPδ Expression in Glia of the Developmental and Adolescent Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mamber, Carlyn; Kamphuis, Willem; Haring, Nina L.; Peprah, Nuzrat; Middeldorp, Jinte; Hol, Elly M.

    2012-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. In the human brain, GFAP isoforms have unique expression patterns, which indicate that they play distinct functional roles. One isoform, GFAPδ, is expressed by proliferative radial glia in the developing human brain. In the adult human, GFAPδ is a marker for neural stem cells. However, it is unknown whether GFAPδ marks the same population of radial glia and astrocytes in the developing mouse brain as it does in the developing human brain. This study characterizes the expression pattern of GFAPδ throughout mouse embryogenesis and into adolescence. Gfapδ transcripts are expressed from E12, but immunohistochemistry shows GFAPδ staining only from E18. This finding suggests a translational uncoupling. GFAPδ expression increases from E18 to P5 and then decreases until its expression plateaus around P25. During development, GFAPδ is expressed by radial glia, as denoted by the co-expression of markers like vimentin and nestin. GFAPδ is also expressed in other astrocytic populations during development. A similar pattern is observed in the adolescent mouse, where GFAPδ marks both neural stem cells and mature astrocytes. Interestingly, the Gfapδ/Gfapα transcript ratio remains stable throughout development as well as in primary astrocyte and neurosphere cultures. These data suggest that all astroglia cells in the developing and adolescent mouse brain express GFAPδ, regardless of their neurogenic capabilities. GFAPδ may be an integral component of all mouse astrocytes, but it is not a specific neural stem cell marker in mice as it is in humans. PMID:23285135

  13. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ

    PubMed Central

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  14. Differential expression and regulation of Cryab in mouse uterus during preimplantation period.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue-Chao; Wang, Qu-Yuan; Li, Dang-Dang; Wang, Shou-Tang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression and regulation of the crystallin, alpha B (Cryab) gene in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period by in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. There was no detectable Cryab mRNA signal on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5 of pregnancy when embryo implanted, a high level of Cryab mRNA signal was found in the subluminal stroma surrounding the implanting blastocyst. On days 6-8, Cryab mRNA was strongly expressed in the primary decidua. By real-time PCR, a high level of Cryab expression was detected on days 7 and 8 of pregnancy, although Cryab expression was seen from days 1 to 8. Under in vivo and in vitro artificial decidualization, Cryab expression was significantly elevated. Compared with the progesterone-primed delayed implantation uterus, a high level of Cryab mRNA expression was observed in estrogen-activated implantation uterus. In the uterine stromal cells, cAMP, estrogen, and progesterone could induce the expression of Cryab gene. In the ovariectomized mouse uterus, estrogen could also induce the expression of Cryab while progesterone inhibited its expression. Our data suggest that Cryab may play an important role during mouse embryo implantation and decidualization and that estrogen and progesterone can regulate the expression of Cryab gene.

  15. Correlation between transgen expression and plasmid DNA loss in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Ryohei; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Transgene expression from plasmid DNA is dependent on the expression efficiency per plasmid and the amount of intranuclear plasmid. In the present study, intranuclear dispositions of two types of plasmid DNAs (i.e. the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmids) that maintain transgene expression in mouse liver were analyzed. In addition, the relationship between transgene expression and plasmid stability in the nucleus was examined. First, the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmid DNAs, bearing the mouse secreted alkaline phosphatase (Seap) gene, were administered into mouse liver by the hydrodynamics-based method. Next, various Seap-plasmid DNAs containing different promoters, upstream and downstream sequences, and backbones were injected into mice, and both SEAP expression and plasmid DNA amounts were monitored for 28 days. At the 14- and 28-day time points, the amount of the pCpGfree plasmid DNA was one order of magnitude less than that of the pLIVE plasmid. Meanwhile, the expression efficiency per plasmid was one order of magnitude more efficient for the pCpGfree plasmid DNA. Moreover, the administration of various Seap-plasmid DNAs revealed that negative correlations exist between plasmid stability and SEAP expression level. The results obtained suggest that the pCpGfree plasmid is unstable from the viewpoint of quantity and maintains transgene expression by its high expression efficiency and also that transgene expression negatively affects the stability of plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Long N-acyl fatty acids on sphingolipids are responsible for miscibility with phospholipids to form liquid-ordered phase.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    :phospholipid at 25 degrees C with pure phospholipid in gel phase and 42:58 mole ratio at 65 degrees C when the phospholipid was in the fluid phase. The results are discussed with reference to the role of the length of the N-acyl substituent of the sphingolipids in formation of complexes with phospholipids.

  17. Effect of ICSI on gene expression and development of mouse preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Giritharan, G.; Li, M.W.; De Sebastiano, F.; Esteban, F.J.; Horcajadas, J.A.; Lloyd, K.C.K.; Donjacour, A.; Maltepe, E.; Rinaudo, P.F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In vitro culture (IVC) and IVF of preimplantation mouse embryos are associated with changes in gene expression. It is however not known whether ICSI has additional effects on the transcriptome of mouse blastocysts. METHODS We compared gene expression and development of mouse blastocysts produced by ICSI and cultured in Whitten's medium (ICSIWM) or KSOM medium with amino acids (ICSIKSOMaa) with control blastocysts flushed out of the uterus on post coital Day 3.5 (in vivo). In addition, we compared gene expression in embryos generated by IVF or ICSI using WM. Global pattern of gene expression was assessed using the Affymetrix 430 2.0 chip. RESULTS Blastocysts from ICSI fertilization have a reduction in the number of trophoblastic and inner cell mass cells compared with embryos generated in vivo. Approximately 1000 genes are differentially expressed between ICSI blastocyst and in vivo blastocysts; proliferation, apoptosis and morphogenetic pathways are the most common pathways altered after IVC. Unexpectedly, expression of only 41 genes was significantly different between embryo cultured in suboptimal conditions (WM) or optimal conditions (KSOMaa). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that fertilization by ICSI may play a more important role in shaping the transcriptome of the developing mouse embryo than the culture media used. PMID:20889529

  18. Retinal cone photoreceptors of the deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus: development, topography, opsin expression and spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Patrick; Glösmann, Martin; Peichl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of photoreceptor properties was performed in the retina of the nocturnal deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, using pigmented (wildtype) and albino animals. The aim was to establish whether the deer mouse is a more suitable model species than the house mouse for photoreceptor studies, and whether oculocutaneous albinism affects its photoreceptor properties. In retinal flatmounts, cone photoreceptors were identified by opsin immunostaining, and their numbers, spectral types, and distributions across the retina were determined. Rod photoreceptors were counted using differential interference contrast microscopy. Pigmented P. maniculatus have a rod-dominated retina with rod densities of about 450.000/mm(2) and cone densities of 3000-6500/mm(2). Two cone opsins, shortwave sensitive (S) and middle-to-longwave sensitive (M), are present and expressed in distinct cone types. Partial sequencing of the S opsin gene strongly supports UV sensitivity of the S cone visual pigment. The S cones constitute a 5-15% minority of the cones. Different from house mouse, S and M cone distributions do not have dorsoventral gradients, and coexpression of both opsins in single cones is exceptional (<2% of the cones). In albino P. maniculatus, rod densities are reduced by approximately 40% (270.000/mm(2)). Overall, cone density and the density of cones exclusively expressing S opsin are not significantly different from pigmented P. maniculatus. However, in albino retinas S opsin is coexpressed with M opsin in 60-90% of the cones and therefore the population of cones expressing only M opsin is significantly reduced to 5-25%. In conclusion, deer mouse cone properties largely conform to the general mammalian pattern, hence the deer mouse may be better suited than the house mouse for the study of certain basic cone properties, including the effects of albinism on cone opsin expression.

  19. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  20. Gene activation properties of a mouse DNA sequence isolated by expression selection.

    PubMed Central

    von Hoyningen-Huene, V; Norbury, C; Griffiths, M; Fried, M

    1986-01-01

    The MES-1 element was previously isolated from restricted total mouse cellular DNA by "expression selection"--the ability to reactivate expression of a test gene devoid of its 5' enhancer sequences. Mes-1 has been tested in long-term transformation and short-term CAT expression assays. In both assays MES-1 is active independent of orientation and at a distance when placed 5' to the test gene. The element is active with heterologous promoters and functions efficiently in both rat and mouse cells. MES-1 activates expression by increasing transcription from the test gene's own start (cap) site. Thus the expression selection technique can be used for the isolation of DNA sequences with enhancer-like properties from total cellular DNA. Images PMID:3016657

  1. Thyroid receptor ligands. Part 8: Thyromimetics derived from N-acylated-alpha-amino acid derivatives displaying modulated pharmacological selectivity compared with KB-141.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj; Li, Yi-Lin; Garcia Collazo, Ana Maria; Litten, Chris; Ryono, Denis E; Zhang, Minsheng; Caringal, Yolanda; Brigance, Robert P; Meng, Wei; Washburn, William N; Agback, Peter; Mellström, Karin; Rehnmark, Stefan; Rahimi-Ghadim, Mahmoud; Norin, Thomas; Grynfarb, Marlena; Sandberg, Johnny; Grover, Gary; Malm, Johan

    2007-08-01

    Based on the scaffold of the pharmacologically selective thyromimetic 2b, structurally a close analog to KB-141 (2a), a number of novel N-acylated-alpha-amino acid derivatives were synthesized and tested in a TR radioligand binding assay as well as in a reporter cell assay. On the basis of TRbeta(1)-isoform selectivity and affinity, as well as affinity to the reporter cell assay, 3d was selected for further studies in the cholesterol-fed rat model. In this model 3d revealed an improved therapeutic window between cholesterol and TSH lowering but decreased margins versus tachycardia compared with 2a.

  2. Sensitive Whole-Cell Biosensor Suitable for Detecting a Variety of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones in Intact Rhizosphere Microbial Communities▿

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Firestone, Mary K.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate quorum sensing in rhizosphere soil, a whole-cell biosensor, Agrobacterium tumefaciens(pAHL-Ice), was constructed. The biosensor responded to all N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) tested, except C4 homoserine lactone, with a minimum detection limit of 10−12 M, as well as to both exogenously added AHLs and AHL-producing bacterial strains in soil. This highly sensitive biosensor reveals for the first time the increased AHL availability in intact rhizosphere microbial communities compared to that in bulk soil. PMID:17400771

  3. Direct synthesis of C-glycosides from unprotected 2-N-acyl-aldohexoses via aldol condensation-oxa-Michael reactions with unactivated ketones.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sherida; Tanaka, Fujie

    2016-01-07

    C-glycosides are important compounds as they are used as bioactive molecules and building blocks. We have developed methods to concisely synthesize C-glycosides from unprotected 2-N-acyl-aldohexoses and unactivated ketones; we designed aldol-condensation-oxa-Michael addition reactions catalyzed by amine-based catalysts using additives. Depending on the conditions used, C-glycosides were stereoselectively obtained. Our methods allowed the C-C bond formations at the anomeric centers of unprotected carbohydrates under mild conditions to lead the C-glycosides in atom- and step-economical ways.

  4. Insights into the Genome Sequences of an N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Molecule Producing Two Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Dharmaprakash, Akhilandeswarre; Reghunathan, Dinesh; Sivakumar, Krishnakutty C.; Prasannakumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We report for the first time the draft genome sequence of two psychrotrophic Pseudomonas species, Pseudomonas simiae RGCB 73 and Pseudomonas brenneri RGCB 108, from the Arctic that produce more than one acyl homoserine lactone molecule of varied N-acyl length. The study confirms the presence of a LuxR-LuxI (type) mediated quorum-sensing system in both the Pseudomonas species and enables us to understand the role of quorum sensing in their survival in extremely cold environments. PMID:27491995

  5. Systematic Expression Profiling of the Mouse Transcriptome Using RIKEN cDNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Hidemasa; Yagi, Ken; Kasukawa, Takeya; Nikaido, Itoshi; Tominaga, Naoko; Miki, Rika; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Goto, Hitoshi; Nitanda, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Daisuke; Makino, Hirochika; Morita, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Junshin; Sakai, Takehito; Shimoji, Takashi; Hume, David A.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    The number of known mRNA transcripts in the mouse has been greatly expanded by the RIKEN Mouse Gene Encyclopedia project. Validation of their reproducible expression in a tissue is an important contribution to the study of functional genomics. In this report, we determine the expression profile of 57,931 clones on 20 mouse tissues using cDNA microarrays. Of these 57,931 clones, 22,928 clones correspond to the FANTOM2 clone set. The set represents 20,234 transcriptional units (TUs) out of 33,409 TUs in the FANTOM2 set. We identified 7206 separate clones that satisfied stringent criteria for tissue-specific expression. Gene Ontology terms were assigned for these 7206 clones, and the proportion of `molecular function' ontology for each tissue-specific clone was examined. These data will provide insights into the function of each tissue. Tissue-specific gene expression profiles obtained using our cDNA microarrays were also compared with the data extracted from the GNF Expression Atlas based on Affymetrix microarrays. One major outcome of the RIKEN transcriptome analysis is the identification of numerous nonprotein-coding mRNAs. The expression profile was also used to obtain evidence of expression for putative noncoding RNAs. In addition, 1926 clones (70%) of 2768 clones that were categorized as “unknown EST,” and 1969 (58%) clones of 3388 clones that were categorized as “unclassifiable” were also shown to be reproducibly expressed. PMID:12819129

  6. Basigin expression and hormonal regulation in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-Juan; Chang, Hong; Ding, Nai-Zheng; Ni, Hua; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2002-09-01

    Basigin, a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, has been shown to be essential for fertilization and implantation. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and hormonal regulation of basigin gene in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period. Basigin immunostaining and mRNA were strongly localized in luminal and glandular epithelium on day 1 of pregnancy and gradually decreased to a basal level from day 2-4 of pregnancy. Basigin mRNA expression in the sub-luminal stroma was first detected on day 3 of pregnancy and increased on day 4 of pregnancy. On day 5 of pregnancy, the expression of basigin protein and mRNA was only detected in the implanting embryos, and the luminal epithelium and sub-luminal stroma surrounding the embryos. A similar expression pattern of basigin was also induced in the delayed-implantation uterus which was activated by estrogen injection. On day 6-8 of pregnancy, although a basal level of basigin protein was detected in the secondary decidual zone, basigin mRNA expression was strongly seen in this location. Basigin mRNA was also highly expressed in the decidualized cells under artificial decidualization. Estrogen significantly stimulated basigin expression in the ovariectomized mouse uterus. A high level of basigin immunostaining and mRNA was also seen in proestrus and estrus uteri. These results suggest that basigin expression is closely related to mouse implantation and up-regulated by estrogen.

  7. Connexin expression in epidermal cell lines from SENCAR mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1996-03-01

    Alteration of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has long been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported that the level of gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse skin carcinoma cell lines is significantly lower than in papilloma cell lines and normal mouse keratinocytes Klann et al., Cancer Res 49:699-705, 1989). Here, we present data on expression of the gap-junctional protein connexins (Cx) 26, Cx31.1, and Cx43 in a comprehensive panel of keratinocyte cell lines representing different stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis and the effect of different conditions of propagation on Cx phenotype. Northern and western blot analyses and immunostaining showed that all cell lines studied in vitro expressed Cx43 but most did not express Cx31.1 or Cx26. The abundance of Cx43 expression on plasma membranes correlated well with the level of GJIC. In vivo expression of Cx43 and Cx26 was strongly increased. Whereas none of tumorigenic cell lines expressed Cx26 gap junctions in culture, those growing as tumors in nude mice began to express Cx26 protein. The comparison of Cx expression on the keratinocyte membranes in three different groups of tumors (papillomas and squamous cell and spindle cell carcinomas) clearly revealed that the abundance of Cx43 and Cx26 expression directly correlated with the level of tumor differentiation. All studied tumors were Cx31.1 negative. These results suggest that both Cx expression and gap-junction permeability are gradually reduced during the tumor progression stage of mouse skin carcinogenesis.

  8. Expression of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin isoforms in mouse and rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hae; Byun, Hae Mi; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Min Seuk; Kim, Seung-Hyeoi; Hong, Jeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Taeg; Lee, Syng-Ill; Shin, Dong Min; Son, Heung-Kyu

    2006-02-28

    Synaptotagmin is a Ca2+ sensing protein, which triggers a fusion of synaptic vesicles in neuronal transmission. Little is known regarding the expression of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin isoforms and their contribution to the release of secretory vesicles in mouse and rat parotid acinar cells. We investigated a type of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin and Ca2+ signaling in both rat and mouse parotid acinar cells using RT-PCR, microfluorometry, and amylase assay. Mouse parotid acinar cells exhibited much more sensitive amylase release in response to muscarinic stimulation than did rat parotid acinar cells. However, transient [Ca2+]i increases and Ca2+ influx in response to muscarinic stimulation in both cells were identical, suggesting that the expression or activity of the Ca2+ sensing proteins is different. Seven Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmins, from 1 to 7, were expressed in the mouse parotid acinar cells. However, in the rat parotid acinar cells, only synaptotagmins 1, 3, 4 and 7 were expressed. These results indicate that the expression of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmins may contribute to the release of secretory vesicles in parotid acinar cells.

  9. Expression of Ca2+-dependent Synaptotagmin Isoforms in Mouse and Rat Parotid Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hae; Byun, Hae Mi; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Min Seuk; Kim, Seung-Hyeoi; Hong, Jeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Taeg; Lee, Syng-Ill

    2006-01-01

    Synaptotagmin is a Ca2+ sensing protein, which triggers a fusion of synaptic vesicles in neuronal transmission. Little is known regarding the expression of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin isoforms and their contribution to the release of secretory vesicles in mouse and rat parotid acinar cells. We investigated a type of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin and Ca2+ signaling in both rat and mouse parotid acinar cells using RT-PCR, microfluorometry, and amylase assay. Mouse parotid acinar cells exhibited much more sensitive amylase release in response to muscarinic stimulation than did rat parotid acinar cells. However, transient [Ca2+]i increases and Ca2+ influx in response to muscarinic stimulation in both cells were identical, suggesting that the expression or activity of the Ca2+ sensing proteins is different. Seven Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmins, from 1 to 7, were expressed in the mouse parotid acinar cells. However, in the rat parotid acinar cells, only synaptotagmins 1, 3, 4 and 7 were expressed. These results indicate that the expression of Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmins may contribute to the release of secretory vesicles in parotid acinar cells. PMID:16502487

  10. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  11. Contribution of Epigenetic Modifications to the Decline in Transgene Expression from Plasmid DNA in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lei; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ando, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Short-term expression of transgenes is one of the problems frequently associated with non-viral in vivo gene transfer. To obtain experimental evidence for the design of sustainable transgene expression systems, the contribution of epigenetic modifications to the decline in transgene expression needs to be investigated. Bisulfite sequencing and reactivation by hydrodynamic injection of isotonic solution were employed to investigate methylation statues of CpG in transiently expressing plasmid, pCMV-Luc, in mouse liver after hydrodynamic delivery. The cytosines of CpGs in the promoter region of pCMV-Luc were methylated in mouse liver, but the methylation was much later than the decline in the expression. The expression from pre-methylated pCMV-Luc was insensitive to reactivation. Neither an inhibitor of DNA methylation nor an inhibitor of histone deacetylation had significant effects on transgene expression after hydrodynamic injection of pCMV-Luc. Partial hepatectomy, which reduces the transgene expression from the non-integrated vector into the genome, significantly reduced the transgene expression of human interferon γ from a long-term expressing plasmid pCpG-Huγ, suggesting that the CpG-reduced plasmid was not significantly integrated into the genomic DNA. These results indicate that the CpG-reduced plasmids achieve prolonged transgene expression without integration into the host genome, although the methylation status of CpG sequences in plasmids will not be associated with the prolonged expression. PMID:26262639

  12. Expression of dynamin II in odontoblast during mouse tooth development.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Baik-Dong; Park, Jin-Ju; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Duk; Lim, Do-Seon; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Ick; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Odontoblasts secrete a collagen-based matrix and release numerous membrane-bound matrix vesicles, which are involved in dentin formation during tooth development. Dynamin II is a GTPase protein that contributes a variety of vesicular budding events, such as endocytotic membrane fission, caveolae internalization and protein trafficking in the Golgi apparatus. However, the expression and function of dynamin II in odontoblasts has not been reported. Therefore, this study examined the expression and possible role of dynamin II in odontoblasts during tooth development and mineralization. The levels of mRNA and protein expression in MDPC23 cells were significantly high at the early stages of differentiation and then decreased gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that dynamin II was not expressed near the region of the odontoblasts at embryonic day 17 (E17) and E21. However, dynamin II was expressed strongly in the odontoblast layer at postnatal day 1 (PN1) and decreased gradually at PN3 and PN5. In addition, at PN15 in the functional stage, the dynamin II protein was also expressed in the odontoblast process as well as adjacent to the nuclear region. In conclusion, dynamin II may be involved in the transport of vesicles containing collageneous and non-collageneous proteins for dentin formation in odontoblast, suggesting that it is a good nanomolecule as a candidate to regulate the secretion of collagen on the bone and other nano material.

  13. A gene expression resource generated by genome-wide lacZ profiling in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Elizabeth; Estabel, Jeanne; Oellrich, Anika; Maguire, Anna Karin; Adissu, Hibret A.; Souter, Luke; Siragher, Emma; Lillistone, Charlotte; Green, Angela L.; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Carragher, Damian M.; Karp, Natasha A.; Smedley, Damian; Adams, Niels C.; Bussell, James N.; Adams, David J.; Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Steel, Karen P.; Galli, Antonella; White, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Knowledge of the expression profile of a gene is a critical piece of information required to build an understanding of the normal and essential functions of that gene and any role it may play in the development or progression of disease. High-throughput, large-scale efforts are on-going internationally to characterise reporter-tagged knockout mouse lines. As part of that effort, we report an open access adult mouse expression resource, in which the expression profile of 424 genes has been assessed in up to 47 different organs, tissues and sub-structures using a lacZ reporter gene. Many specific and informative expression patterns were noted. Expression was most commonly observed in the testis and brain and was most restricted in white adipose tissue and mammary gland. Over half of the assessed genes presented with an absent or localised expression pattern (categorised as 0-10 positive structures). A link between complexity of expression profile and viability of homozygous null animals was observed; inactivation of genes expressed in ≥21 structures was more likely to result in reduced viability by postnatal day 14 compared with more restricted expression profiles. For validation purposes, this mouse expression resource was compared with Bgee, a federated composite of RNA-based expression data sets. Strong agreement was observed, indicating a high degree of specificity in our data. Furthermore, there were 1207 observations of expression of a particular gene in an anatomical structure where Bgee had no data, indicating a large amount of novelty in our data set. Examples of expression data corroborating and extending genotype-phenotype associations and supporting disease gene candidacy are presented to demonstrate the potential of this powerful resource. PMID:26398943

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Mouse Dural Afferent Neurons Expressing TRPM8, VGLUT3, and NF200.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lynn; Chang, Michelle Jaehee; Zhang, Zhiyu; Dhaka, Ajay; Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2017-09-19

    To quantify the abundance of dural afferent neurons expressing transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8), vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3), and neurofilament 200 (NF200) in adult mice. With the increasing use of mice as a model system to study headache mechanisms, it is important to understand the composition of dural afferent neurons in mice. In a previous study, we have measured the abundance of mouse dural afferent neurons that express neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide as well as two TRP channels TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively. Here, we conducted quantitative analysis of three other dural afferent subpopulations in adult mice. We used the fluorescent tracer Fluoro-Gold to retrogradely label dural afferent neurons in adult mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in discrete subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Mechanoreceptors with myelinated fibers were identified by NF200 immunoreactivity. We also conducted Ca(2+) -imaging experiments to test the overlap between TRPM8 and VGLUT3 expression in mouse primary afferent neurons (PANs). The abundance of TRPM8-expressing neurons in dural afferent neurons was significantly lower than that in total TG neurons. The percentages of dural afferent neurons expressing VGLUT3 and NF200 were comparable to those of total TG neurons, respectively. TRPM8 agonist menthol evoked Ca(2+) influx in less than 7% VGLUT3-expressing PANs in adult mice. TG neurons expressing TRPM8, VGLUT3, and NF200 all innervate adult mouse dura. TRPM8 and VGLUT3 are expressed in distinct subpopulations of PANs in adult mice. These results provide an anatomical basis to investigate headache mechanisms in mouse models. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  15. Assessment of a systematic expression profiling approach in ENU-induced mouse mutant lines.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Matthias; Horsch, Marion; Drobyshev, Alexei; Chen, Yali; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Beckers, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genomewide expression profiling is a powerful tool in the effort to annotate the mouse genome with biological function. The systematic analysis of RNA expression data of mouse lines from the Munich ENU mutagenesis screen might support the understanding of the molecular biology of such mutants and provide new insights into mammalian gene function. In a direct comparison of DNA microarray experiments of individual versus pooled RNA samples of organs from ENU-induced mouse mutants, we provide evidence that individual RNA samples may outperform pools in some aspects. Genes with high biological variability in their expression levels (noisy genes) are identified as false positives in pooled samples. Evidence suggests that highly stringent housing conditions and standardized procedures for the isolation of organs significantly reduce biological variability in gene expression profiling experiments. Data on wild-type individuals demonstrate the positive effect of controlling variables such as social status, food intake before organ sampling, and stress with regard to reproducibility of gene expression patterns. Analyses of several organs from various ENU-induced mutant lines in general show low numbers of differentially expressed genes. We demonstrate the feasibility to detect transcriptionally affected organs employing RNA expression profiling as a tool for molecular phenotyping.

  16. Immunohistochemical examination for the distribution of podoplanin-expressing cells in developing mouse molar tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yuri; Amano, Ikuko; Tsuruga, Eichi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2010-10-27

    We recently reported the expression of podoplanin in the apical bud of adult mouse incisal tooth. This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of podoplanin-expressing cells in mouse tooth germs at several developing stages. At the bud stage podoplanin was expressed in oral mucous epithelia and in a tooth bud. At the cap stage podoplanin was expressed on inner and outer enamel epithelia but not in mesenchymal cells expressing the neural crest stem cell marker nestin. At the early bell stage nestin and podoplanin were expressed in cervical loop and odontoblasts. At the root formation stage both nestin and podoplanin were weakly expressed in odontoblasts generating radicular dentin. Podoplanin expression was also found in the Hertwig epithelial sheath. These results suggest that epithelial cells of developing tooth germ acquire the ability to express nestin, and that tooth germ epithelial cells maintain the ability to express podoplanin in oral mucous epithelia. The expression of podoplanin in odontoblasts was induced as tooth germ development advanced, but was suppressed with the completion of the primary dentin, suggesting that podoplanin may be involved in the cell growth of odontoblasts. Nestin may function as an intermediate filament that binds podoplanin in odontoblasts.

  17. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  18. Temporal and spatial mouse brain expression of cereblon, an ionic channel regulator involved in human intelligence.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Joseph J; Tal, Adit L; Sun, Xiaowei; Hauck, Stefanie C R; Hao, Jin; Kosofosky, Barry E; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M

    2010-03-01

    A mild form of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromal intellectual disability (ARNSID) in humans is caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in the cereblon gene (mutCRBN). Rodent crbn protein binds to the intracellular C-terminus of the large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)channel (BK(Ca)). An mRNA variant (human SITE 2 INSERT or mouse strex) of the BK(Ca) gene (KCNMA1) that is normally expressed during embryonic development is aberrantly expressed in mutCRBN human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as compared to wild-type (wt) LCLs. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial distribution of crbn and kcnma1 mRNAs in the mouse brain by the quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The spatial expression pattern of endogenous and exogenous crbn proteins is characterized by immunostaining. The results show that neocortical (CTX) crbn and kcnma1 mRNA expression increases from embryonic stages to adulthood. The strex mRNA variant is >3.5-fold higher in embryos and decreases rapidly postnatally. Mouse crbn mRNA is abundant in the cerebellum (CRBM), with less expression in the CTX, hippocampus (HC), and striatum (Str) in adult mice. The intracytoplasmic distribution of endogenous crbn protein in the mouse CRBM, CTX, HC, and Str is similar to the immunostaining pattern described previously for the BK(Ca) channel. Exogenous hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged human wt- and mutCRBN proteins using cDNA transfection in HEK293T cell lines showed the same intracellular expression distribution as endogenous mouse crbn protein. The results suggest that mutCRBN may cause ARNSID by disrupting the developmental regulation of BK(Ca) in brain regions that are critical for memory and learning.

  19. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  20. Sox2 and JAGGED1 expression in normal and drug-damaged adult mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R

    2008-03-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear.

  1. Patterned expression of ion channel genes in mouse dorsal raphe nucleus determined with the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Templin, J. Scott; Bang, Sun Jung; Soiza-Reilly, Mariano; Berde, Charles B.; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is the major source of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the forebrain and dysfunction of this midbrain structure is implicated in affective disorders. The DR is composed of several types of 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons and their excitable-membrane properties are heterogeneous and overlapping. In order to understand how these properties may be generated, we examined the mRNA expression patterns of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels in the DR using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas. Since DR cytoarchitecture is organized with respect to the midline, we sought to identify genes that were expressed in a pattern with respect to the midline, either enriched or depleted, rather than those that were homogenously expressed throughout the DR. Less than 10% of the screened genes for voltage-gated ion channels showed patterned expression within the DR. Identified genes included voltage-gated sodium channel beta subunits, potassium channels, P/Q-, N-type calcium channels, as well as the alpha2/delta-1 calcium channel. Several voltage-gated chloride channels were also identified, although these may function within intracellular compartments. Of the ligand-gated ion channels examined, 20% showed patterned expression. These consisted primarily of glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits. The identified genes likely contribute to unique excitable properties of different groups of neurons in the DR and may include novel pharmacologic targets for affective disorders. PMID:22534482

  2. Slit and robo expression in the developing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James M; Thompson, Felisa Y; Brooks, Sherry K; Shannon, John M; Akeson, Ann L

    2004-06-01

    Mammalian lung development is mediated through complex interactions between foregut endoderm and surrounding mesenchyme. As airway branching progresses, the mesenchyme undergoes dramatic remodeling and differentiation. Little is understood about the mechanisms that direct mesenchymal organization during lung development. A screen for candidate genes mediating this process identified Slit, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptor previously associated with guidance of axonal projections during central nervous system development. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that two Slit genes (Slit-2 and Slit-3) and two Robo genes (Robo-1 and Robo-2) are expressed in fetal lung mesenchyme. Slit-2 and Robo-1 expression is present throughout mesenchyme at midgestation and is not detectable by newborn day 1. Slit-3 and Robo-2 expression is restricted to specific, complementary subsets of mesenchyme. Robo-2 is expressed in mesenchymal cells immediately adjacent to large airways, whereas Slit-3 expression predominates in mesenchyme remote from airway epithelium. The temporal and spatial distribution of Slit and Robo mRNAs indicate that these genes may direct the functional organization and differentiation of fetal lung mesenchyme.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A 950-GENE DNA ARRAY FOR EXAMINING GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of a 950-gene DNA array for examining gene expression patterns in mouse testis.

    Rockett JC, Christopher Luft J, Brian Garges J, Krawetz SA, Hughes MR, Hee Kirn K, Oudes AJ, Dix DJ.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effec...

  4. Temporal and spatial expression of AIF in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ying; Hua, Yu-Ping; An, Tie-Zhu; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Nie, Wei-Tian; Wang, Lian-Bang; Shan, Chun-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a phylogenetically old, bifunctional protein with a pro-apoptotic function and redox activity. AIF regulates apoptosis and also plays a role in the defense against stress depending on its subcellular localization. Embryo implantation is a complicated process, in which an activated blastocyst interacts with a receptive uterus. The expression and regulation of AIF were investigated in this study in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy, pseudopregnancy, delayed implantation, artificial decidualization and under hormonal treatment using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. During early pregnancy, temporally and spatially regulated patterns of AIF expression were found in the mouse uterus; AIF expression in the luminal epithelium and glandular epithelium is regulated by steroid hormones; AIF mRNA expression in the stroma is influenced by the active blastocyst; and AIF protein was found to be located in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus through confocal microscope. Our data suggest that AIF might play an important role during mouse embryo implantation and that the role of AIF might be implemented through its physiological activity rather than through its pro-apoptotic function in the mouse uterus during this period.

  5. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    SciTech Connect

    Pavone, Luigi Michele Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Avallone, Luigi

    2008-12-12

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  6. Androgen receptor is expressed in mouse cardiomyocytes at prenatal and early postnatal developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Pedernera, Enrique; Gómora, María José; Meneses, Iván; De Ita, Marlon; Méndez, Carmen

    2017-08-14

    Previous studies show that androgens are involved in hypertrophy and excitability of cardiomyocytes and that their effects are mediated through their receptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of androgen receptor (AR) in mouse heart during prenatal and early postnatal stages. The expression of AR and related genes, alpha myosin heavy chain -Myh6-, beta myosin heavy chain -Myh7- and atrial natriuretic factor -Nppa- was simultaneously evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR. AR was also detected by immunohistochemistry. Androgen receptor mRNA was detected in hearts from 10.5 days post coitum to 16 postnatal days. A higher expression of AR mRNA in atria compared to ventricles was observed in neonatal mouse. A positive correlation between mRNA levels of AR and Nppa was observed in mouse heart at early postnatal development. Androgen receptor expression is similar in males and females during cardiac development. Finally, androgen receptor protein was observed by immunohistochemistry in myocardial cells of atria and ventricles from 12.5 days onwards and restricted after 16.5 days post-coitum to nuclei of cardiomyocytes. Present results provide evidence that androgen receptor is expressed from prenatal stages in mouse heart, supporting the proposition that androgens could be involved in mammalian heart development.

  7. Developmental expression of Sp1 in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Saffer, J D; Jackson, S P; Annarella, M B

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the trans-acting transcription factor Sp1 in mice was defined by a combination of RNA analysis and immunohistochemical localization of the Sp1 protein. Although ubiquitously expressed, there was an unexpected difference of at least 100-fold in the amount of Sp1 message in different cell types. Sp1 protein levels showed corresponding marked differences. Substantial variations in Sp1 expression were also found in some cell types at different stages of development. Sp1 levels appeared to be highest in developing hematopoietic cells, fetal cells, and spermatids, suggesting that an elevated Sp1 level is associated with the differentiation process. These results indicate that Sp1 has a regulatory function in addition to its general role in the transcription of housekeeping genes. Images PMID:2005904

  8. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-04-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells.

  9. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells. Images PMID:6546970

  10. Nuclear hormone receptor expression in mouse kidney and renal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Jun; Wada, Jun; Terami, Naoto; Hatanaka, Takashi; Tachibana, Hiromi; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Horiguchi, Chikage Sato; Nishii, Naoko; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors that regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, immune responses, and inflammation. Although several NHRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and PPARα, demonstrate a renoprotective effect in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN), the expression and role of other NHRs in the kidney are still unrecognized. To investigate potential roles of NHRs in the biology of the kidney, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to profile the expression of all 49 members of the mouse NHR superfamily in mouse kidney tissue (C57BL/6 and db/m), and cell lines of mesangial (MES13), podocyte (MPC), proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) and collecting duct (mIMCD3) origins in both normal and high-glucose conditions. In C57BL/6 mouse kidney cells, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) and COUP-TFIII were highly expressed. During hyperglycemia, the expression of the NHR 4A subgroup including neuron-derived clone 77 (Nur77), nuclear receptor-related factor 1, and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 significantly increased in diabetic C57BL/6 and db/db mice. In renal cell lines, PPARδ was highly expressed in mesangial and proximal tubular epithelial cells, while COUP-TFs were highly expressed in podocytes, proximal tubular epithelial cells, and collecting duct cells. High-glucose conditions increased the expression of Nur77 in mesangial and collecting duct cells, and liver x receptor α in podocytes. These data demonstrate NHR expression in mouse kidney cells and cultured renal cell lines and suggest potential therapeutic targets in the kidney for the treatment of DN.

  11. EMAGE: a spatial database of gene expression patterns during mouse embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Jeffrey H.; Yang, Yiya; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Richardson, Lorna; Stevenson, Peter; Burton, Nicholas; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.

    2006-01-01

    EMAGE () is a freely available, curated database of gene expression patterns generated by in situ techniques in the developing mouse embryo. It is unique in that it contains standardized spatial representations of the sites of gene expression for each gene, denoted against a set of virtual reference embryo models. As such, the data can be interrogated in a novel and abstract manner by using space to define a query. Accompanying the spatial representations of gene expression patterns are text descriptions of the sites of expression, which also allows searching of the data by more conventional text-based methods. PMID:16381949

  12. EMAGE: a spatial database of gene expression patterns during mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Yang, Yiya; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Richardson, Lorna; Stevenson, Peter; Burton, Nicholas; Baldock, Richard A; Davidson, Duncan R

    2006-01-01

    EMAGE (http://genex.hgu.mrc.ac.uk/Emage/database) is a freely available, curated database of gene expression patterns generated by in situ techniques in the developing mouse embryo. It is unique in that it contains standardized spatial representations of the sites of gene expression for each gene, denoted against a set of virtual reference embryo models. As such, the data can be interrogated in a novel and abstract manner by using space to define a query. Accompanying the spatial representations of gene expression patterns are text descriptions of the sites of expression, which also allows searching of the data by more conventional text-based methods.

  13. Design, synthesis, characterisation, conformation and biological investigation of N-acyl r-2,c-6-bis (4-methoxyphenyl)-c-3,t-3-dimethylpiperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanraj, V.; Ponnuswamy, S.

    2017-09-01

    In a wide research programme towards the study of piperidin-4-ones with efficient pharmacological effect, a new series of N-acyl r-2,c-6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-c-3,t-3-dimethylpiperidin-4-ones 2-5 are synthesized and characterized by IR spectra, 1H, 13C, DEPT - 135 and 2D (COSY and HSQC) NMR and mass spectra. The parent compound 1 prefers to exist in a chair conformation whereas the extracted coupling constant, chemical shifts and estimated dihedral angles show that the N-acyl piperdine-4-ones 2-5 prefer to exist in a distorted boat conformation B1 (with C2 and C5 in prow and stern positions) with coplanar orientation of Nsbnd Cdbnd O moiety. The existence of a fast Nsbnd CO rotational equilibrium between the boat conformations B (I) and B (II) has also been observed. Anti bacterial activity of the above test compounds 1-5 is determined against pseudomonas sp. and salmonella sp. The antioxidant activities are determined by the ABTS, DPPH and superoxide assays. Furthermore, molecular docking studies have been carried out for the compounds 1-5 with target protein CHK1.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, stereochemistry and antibacterial activity of N-acyl-2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuswamy, S.; Pushpalatha, S.; Akila, A.; Raghuvarman, B.; Aravindhan, S.

    2016-12-01

    Three new N-acyl-2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes 3-5 have been synthesized. The structural characterization and the conformational preferences of the compounds 3-5 have been carried out using IR, 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. The NMR spectral data indicate that the N-acyl-2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes 3-5 prefer to exist in twin-chair conformation with partial flattening at amide nitrogen end. In order to avoid A1,3-strain with coplanar acyl groups, the phenyl groups at the amide nitrogen end are forced to occupy axial orientation. X-ray crystal structure of the N-dichloroacetyl-2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane 4 also supports the twin-chair conformation in the solid state. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity for the compounds 2-5 has been carried out.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of mouse epidermal growth factor-like domain 8.

    PubMed

    Song, Ik-Jin; Ikram, Muhammad; Subhan, Fazli; Choi, Da-Jeong; Lee, Ja-Rang; Kim, Heui-Soo; Lim, Young-Tak; Yoon, Sik

    2015-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like (EGFL) domain, a common structural module in numerous secreted or transmembrane proteins, is generally involved in protein-protein interactions. To date, several EGFL proteins have been identified and characterized, but little is known about EGFL domain 8 (EGFL8). The present study reported the molecular characterization and expression analysis of EGFL8 in mice. Mouse EGFL8 amplified using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach was sequenced and characterized. Mouse EGFL8 encodes a protein of 293 amino acids with two EGFL domains, an Emilin-like domain and a Ca(2+)-binding EGFL domain, which has a molecular mass of 32 kDa. The coding sequence has a high degree of amino acid sequence identity across species, and the EGFL domain has been highly conserved in various species during evolutionary radiation. A phylogenetic tree calculated using the neighbor-joining method revealed that EGFL8 and EGFL7 are more closely associated with each other than either is to EGFL3, and they cluster with EGFL6. It was found that mouse EGFL8 protein was highly expressed in diverse mouse tissue types, including the thymus, lymph nodes, testis, ovaries, epididymis, ductus deferens, ileum, colon, stomach, esophagus, lung, uterus, urinary bladder, skin, spleen, adrenal glands and penis. These results are of great use in understanding the biological roles of mouse EGFL8 for further study.

  16. Expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and matrix metalloproteinases during mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Nakai, Masaaki; Belton, Robert J; Nowak, Romana A

    2007-02-01

    Mouse embryo implantation is a highly invasive and controlled process that involves remodeling and degradation of the extracellular matrix of the uterus. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the main proteinases facilitating this process. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) can stimulate the production of MMPs and is required for successful implantation in the mouse. The aims of the present study were to examine the expression profiles of mRNA and proteins for EMMPRIN and MMPs in the developing mouse embryo in vitro, and to study whether EMMPRIN protein induces the production of MMPs by mouse blastocysts. EMMPRIN mRNA, detected by RT-PCR, was present at all stages of embryo development from the one-cell to the blastocyst outgrowth. EMMPRIN protein, observed by confocal microscopy, was present on the cell surface at the same stages of development as was the mRNA. Of seven MMPs studied, murine collagenase-like A (Mcol-A), murine collagenase-like B (Mcol-B) and gelatinase A (MMP-2) mRNAs were detected only in blastocyst outgrowths by RT-PCR. Gelatinase B (MMP-9) mRNA was detected both in expanded blastocysts and blastocyst outgrowths. MMP-2 and -9 proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of outgrowing trophoblast cells. Collagenase-2 (MMP-8), collagenase-3 (MMP-13), or stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) mRNAs were not present at any stage of pre- or peri-implantation mouse embryo development. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that recombinant EMMPRIN protein did not stimulate MMP-2 or -9 expression by mouse blastocyst outgrowths. These data suggest that EMMPRIN may regulate physiological functions other than MMP production by mouse embryos during implantation.

  17. Time course of gene expression during mouse skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonah D.; England, Jonathan H.; Esser, Karyn A.; McCarthy, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive transcriptome analysis during skeletal muscle hypertrophy to identify signaling pathways that are operative throughout the hypertrophic response. Global gene expression patterns were determined from microarray results on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 during plantaris muscle hypertrophy induced by synergist ablation in adult mice. Principal component analysis and the number of differentially expressed genes (cutoffs ≥2-fold increase or ≥50% decrease compared with control muscle) revealed three gene expression patterns during overload-induced hypertrophy: early (1 day), intermediate (3, 5, and 7 days), and late (10 and 14 days) patterns. Based on the robust changes in total RNA content and in the number of differentially expressed genes, we focused our attention on the intermediate gene expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a downregulation of genes encoding components of the branched-chain amino acid degradation pathway during hypertrophy. Among these genes, five were predicted by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis or previously shown to be regulated by the transcription factor Kruppel-like factor-15, which was also downregulated during hypertrophy. Moreover, the integrin-linked kinase signaling pathway was activated during hypertrophy, and the downregulation of muscle-specific micro-RNA-1 correlated with the upregulation of five predicted targets associated with the integrin-linked kinase pathway. In conclusion, we identified two novel pathways that may be involved in muscle hypertrophy, as well as two upstream regulators (Kruppel-like factor-15 and micro-RNA-1) that provide targets for future studies investigating the importance of these pathways in muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23869057

  18. Time course of gene expression during mouse skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lee, Jonah D; England, Jonathan H; Esser, Karyn A; McCarthy, John J

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive transcriptome analysis during skeletal muscle hypertrophy to identify signaling pathways that are operative throughout the hypertrophic response. Global gene expression patterns were determined from microarray results on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 during plantaris muscle hypertrophy induced by synergist ablation in adult mice. Principal component analysis and the number of differentially expressed genes (cutoffs ≥2-fold increase or ≥50% decrease compared with control muscle) revealed three gene expression patterns during overload-induced hypertrophy: early (1 day), intermediate (3, 5, and 7 days), and late (10 and 14 days) patterns. Based on the robust changes in total RNA content and in the number of differentially expressed genes, we focused our attention on the intermediate gene expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a downregulation of genes encoding components of the branched-chain amino acid degradation pathway during hypertrophy. Among these genes, five were predicted by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis or previously shown to be regulated by the transcription factor Kruppel-like factor-15, which was also downregulated during hypertrophy. Moreover, the integrin-linked kinase signaling pathway was activated during hypertrophy, and the downregulation of muscle-specific micro-RNA-1 correlated with the upregulation of five predicted targets associated with the integrin-linked kinase pathway. In conclusion, we identified two novel pathways that may be involved in muscle hypertrophy, as well as two upstream regulators (Kruppel-like factor-15 and micro-RNA-1) that provide targets for future studies investigating the importance of these pathways in muscle hypertrophy.

  19. Haemopexin affects iron distribution and ferritin expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Noemi; Tonoli, Elisabetta; Logrand, Federica; Fiorito, Veronica; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Haemopexin (Hx) is an acute phase plasma glycoprotein, mainly produced by the liver and released into plasma where it binds heme with high affinity and delivers it to the liver. This system provides protection against free heme-mediated oxidative stress, limits access by pathogens to heme and contributes to iron homeostasis by recycling heme iron. Hx protein has been found in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, retina, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a comparative proteomic analysis has shown an increase of Hx in CSF from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, thus suggesting its involvement in heme detoxification in brain. Here, we report that Hx is synthesised in brain by the ventricular ependymal cells. To verify whether Hx is involved in heme scavenging in brain, and consequently, in the control of iron level, iron deposits and ferritin expression were analysed in cerebral regions known for iron accumulation. We show a twofold increase in the number of iron-loaded oligodendrocytes in the basal ganglia and thalamus of Hx-null mice compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, there was no increase in H- and L-ferritin expression in these regions. This condition is common to several human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in which iron loading is not associated with an adequate increase in ferritin expression. However, a strong reduction in the number of ferritin-positive cells was observed in the cerebral cortex of Hx-null animals. Consistent with increased iron deposits and inadequate ferritin expression, malondialdehyde level and Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase-1 expression were higher in the brain of Hx-null mice than in that of wild-type controls. These data demonstrate that Hx plays an important role in controlling iron distribution within brain, thus suggesting its involvement in iron-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19120692

  20. Comprehensive gene expression changes associated with mouse postnatal kidney development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Sahoo, Debashis; Brooks, James D

    2013-06-01

    To provide a portrait of the molecular alterations in renal growth that occur in mice postnatally, we performed gene expression profiling at discrete time points during the first 5 weeks of life. Kidneys were harvested from C57BL/6 mice at embryonic day 19.5, and postnatal days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Total RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was done using microarrays (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, California). Transcripts whose expression levels changed during the study course were identified using StepMiner software (http://chicory.stanford.edu/sahoo/public/StepMiner/). Biological functions of the modulated genes were identified using IPA® software. Postnatal kidney growth and development are associated with widespread changes in gene expression with 6,949 transcripts significantly up-regulated and 6,696 down-regulated during the first 5 weeks of life. Pathway analysis showed progressive down-regulation of pathways associated with cell growth and embryonic development (postnatal days 5 to 7). This was followed by increased expression of transcripts associated with lipid/energy metabolism and molecular transport (postnatal days 10 to 14), and down-regulation of genes related to DNA replication, cell cycle, tissue development, protein trafficking and cell morphology (postnatal days 14 to 21). To our knowledge we report the most comprehensive temporal survey of postnatal kidney development to date. This data set provides a framework for interpreting nephropathy, such as that induced by congenital obstruction. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of mRNA Expression in the Mouse Distal Colon

    PubMed Central

    HOOGERWERF, WILLEMIJNTJE A.; SINHA, MALA; CONESA, ANA; LUXON, BRUCE A.; SHAHINIAN, VAHAKN B.; CORNÉLISSEN, GERMAINE; HALBERG, FRANZ; BOSTWICK, JONATHON; TIMM, JOHN; CASSONE, VINCENT M.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Intestinal epithelial cells and the myenteric plexus of the mouse gastrointestinal tract contain a circadian clock–based intrinsic timekeeping system. Because disruption of the biological clock has been associated with increased susceptibility to colon cancer and gastrointestinal symptoms, we aimed to identify rhythmically expressed genes in the mouse distal colon. Methods Microarray analysis was used to identify genes that were rhythmically expressed over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The transcripts were then classified according to expression pattern, function, and association with physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of the colon. Results A circadian gene expression pattern was detected in approximately 3.7% of distal colonic genes. A large percentage of these genes were involved in cell signaling, differentiation, and proliferation and cell death. Of all the rhythmically expressed genes in the mouse colon, approximately 7% (64/906) have been associated with colorectal cancer formation (eg, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 [Bcl2]) and 1.8% (18/906) with various colonic functions such as motility and secretion (eg, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Conclusions A subset of genes in the murine colon follows a rhythmic expression pattern. These findings may have significant implications for colonic physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:18848557

  2. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for multicopy testis genes showing postmeiotic expression.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jacob L; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Park, Peter J; Warburton, Peter E; Page, David C; Turner, James M A

    2008-06-01

    According to the prevailing view, mammalian X chromosomes are enriched in spermatogenesis genes expressed before meiosis and deficient in spermatogenesis genes expressed after meiosis. The paucity of postmeiotic genes on the X chromosome has been interpreted as a consequence of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the complete silencing of genes on the XY bivalent at meiotic prophase. Recent studies have concluded that MSCI-initiated silencing persists beyond meiosis and that most genes on the X chromosome remain repressed in round spermatids. Here, we report that 33 multicopy gene families, representing approximately 273 mouse X-linked genes, are expressed in the testis and that this expression is predominantly in postmeiotic cells. RNA FISH and microarray analysis show that the maintenance of X chromosome postmeiotic repression is incomplete. Furthermore, X-linked multicopy genes exhibit a similar degree of expression as autosomal genes. Thus, not only is the mouse X chromosome enriched for spermatogenesis genes functioning before meiosis, but in addition, approximately 18% of mouse X-linked genes are expressed in postmeiotic cells.

  3. Dynamic expression and heterogeneous intracellular location of En-1 during late mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shan-chuan; Chen, Xing-shu; Cai, Qi-yan; Luo, Xue; Chen, Xing-hua; Liu, Jing; Yao, Zhong-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Engrailed-1 (En-1) is a transcription factor involved in the development of the midbrain/hindbrain during mouse early embryogenesis. Although En-1 is expressed from embryogenesis to adulthood, there has been no detailed description of its expression during late mouse embryonic development. Here we report the expression pattern of En-1 in the mouse embryo from E10.5 to the neonatal state. With immunohistochemistry we found that En-1 was expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) from E10.5 to the neonatal state, mostly restricted to the midbrain/hindbrain junction. Outside the CNS, En-1 is dynamically expressed in several neural crest-associated structures including the cranial mesenchyme, the mandibular arches, the vagus nerve, the dorsal root ganglia, the sympathetic ganglia, the somites, the heart and the cloaca. Additionally, we found that in the CNS, most of the En-1 was located in the nuclei, while outside the CNS, En-1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm. These findings provided additional evidence that En-1 may be involved in the development of neural crest cells.

  4. Characterization and expression analysis during embryo development of the mouse ortholog of MLL3.

    PubMed

    Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Gasca, Stéphan; Girard, Cyrille; Bouton, Katia; De Massy, Bernard; De Sario, Albertina

    2006-04-12

    We characterized the mouse ortholog of the human MLL3 gene and a 10.6 kb-Mll3 transcript. The mouse Mll3 gene comprises 60 exons that encompass 226 kb in chromosome 5. The predicted protein of 3464 amino acids contains two PHD domains, an ATPase alpha_beta signature, an HMG, and a SET domain. We analyzed the expression of the Mll3 gene during the embryonic development of the mouse by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Low levels of expression throughout the embryo were first detected at 8.0 dpc. At this stage, the signal was already stronger in the forebrain neuroepithelium and absent in the heart. Next, expression outlined the ventral neural tube, the somites, the limbs, and the eye lens remaining at low levels throughout the embryo. By 13.0 dpc, expression became stronger in the spinal cord, in hand/foot plates, and in gonads. RT-PCR confirmed that Mll3 is expressed early during gametogenesis. We suggest that Mll3 is expressed early in pre-spermatogonia and then in spermatogonia.

  5. Differential expression and regulation of Runx1 in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhi-Kun; Li, Dang-Dang; Guo, Chuan-Hui; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Cao, Hang; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Runx1 transcription factor is a key developmental regulator. However, little is known about the effects of Runx1 on embryo implantation and decidualization. The aim of this study is to examine the expression and regulation of Runx1 in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period. There was no evident Runx1 mRNA signal on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5 of pregnancy, Runx1 mRNA was mainly localized in the subluminal stroma surrounding the implanting blastocyst. A similar result was observed in the estrogen-activated implantation uterus. Simultaneously, a high level of Runx1 mRNA expression was detected on days 6-8 of pregnancy and under artificial decidualization. 8-Br-cAMP could induce the expression of Runx1 mRNA in the uterine stromal cells. Moreover, the induction was obviously blocked by PKA inhibitor H89. Inhibition of Runx1 with specific siRNA could decrease the proliferation of stromal cells and expression of decidual markers Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 in the uterine stromal cells. Further study found that inhibition of Runx1 could also suppress the expression of Cox-2, mPGES-1 and Mmp2 genes in uterine stromal cells. Estrogen and progesterone could induce the expression of Runx1 mRNA in ovariectomized mouse uterus and uterine stromal cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Runx1 may play an important role during mouse decidualization.

  6. Divergent expression and roles for caveolin-1 in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines with varying invasive ability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Huimin; Jia Li; Wang Shujing; Wang Hongmei; Chu Haiying; Hu Yichuan; Cao Jun; Zhang Jianing . E-mail: jnzhang@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2006-06-23

    Caveolin-1 is the major component protein of caveolae and associated with a lot of cellular events such as endocytosis, cholesterol homeostasis, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. The majority of results suggest that caveolin-1 might not only act as a tumor suppressor gene but also a promoting metastasis gene. In this study, the divergent expression and roles of caveolin-1 were investigated in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines Hca-F, Hca-P, and Hepa1-6, which have high, low, and no metastatic potential in the lymph nodes, as compared with normal mouse liver cell line IAR-20. The results showed that expression of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein along with the amount of caveolae number in Hca-F cells was higher than that in Hca-P cells, but was not detectable in Hepa1-6 cells. When caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F cells was down-regulated by RNAi approach, Hca-F cells proliferation rate in vitro declined and the expression of lymphangiogenic factor VEGFA in Hca-F decreased as well. Furthermore, in vivo implantation assay indicated that reduction of caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F prevented the lymphatic metastasis tumor burden of Hca-F cells in 615 mice. These results suggest that caveolin-1 facilities the lymphatic metastasis ability of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells via regulation tumor cell growth and VEGFA expression.

  7. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  8. Comparative gene expression profiling in two congenic mouse strains following Bordetella pertussis infection

    PubMed Central

    Banus, Sander; Vandebriel, Rob J; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Gremmer, Eric R; Wester, Piet W; van Kranen, Henk J; Breit, Timo M; Demant, Peter; Mooi, Frits R; Hoebee, Barbara; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2007-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to Bordetella pertussis infection varies widely. These differences can partly be explained by genetic host factors. HcB-28 mice are more resistant to B. pertussis infection than C3H mice, which could partially be ascribed to the B. pertussis susceptibility locus-1 (Bps1) on chromosome 12. The presence of C57BL/10 genome on this locus instead of C3H genome resulted in a decreased number of bacteria in the lung. To further elucidate the role of host genetic factors, in particular in the Bps1 locus, in B. pertussis infection, and to identify candidate genes within in this region, we compared expression profiles in the lungs of the C3H and HcB-28 mouse strains following B. pertussis inoculation. Twelve and a half percent of the genomes of these mice are from a different genetic background. Results Upon B. pertussis inoculation 2,353 genes were differentially expressed in the lungs of both mouse strains. Two hundred and six genes were differentially expressed between the two mouse strains, but, remarkably, none of these were up- or down-regulated upon B. pertussis infection. Of these 206 genes, 17 were located in the Bps1 region. Eight of these genes, which showed a strong difference in gene expression between the two mouse strains, map to the immunoglobulin heavy chain complex (Igh). Conclusion Gene expression changes upon B. pertussis infection are highly identical between the two mouse strains despite the differences in the course of B. pertussis infection. Because the genes that were differentially regulated between the mouse strains only showed differences in expression before infection, it appears likely that such intrinsic differences in gene regulation are involved in determining differences in susceptibility to B. pertussis infection. Alternatively, such genetic differences in susceptibility may be explained by genes that are not differentially regulated between these two mouse strains. Genes in the Igh complex, among which Igh-1a

  9. Deep convolutional neural networks for annotating gene expression patterns in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Rongjian; Mukkamala, Ravi; Ye, Jieping; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-05-07

    Profiling gene expression in brain structures at various spatial and temporal scales is essential to understanding how genes regulate the development of brain structures. The Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas provides high-resolution 3-D in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression patterns in multiple developing stages of the mouse brain. Currently, the ISH images are annotated with anatomical terms manually. In this paper, we propose a computational approach to annotate gene expression pattern images in the mouse brain at various structural levels over the course of development. We applied deep convolutional neural network that was trained on a large set of natural images to extract features from the ISH images of developing mouse brain. As a baseline representation, we applied invariant image feature descriptors to capture local statistics from ISH images and used the bag-of-words approach to build image-level representations. Both types of features from multiple ISH image sections of the entire brain were then combined to build 3-D, brain-wide gene expression representations. We employed regularized learning methods for discriminating gene expression patterns in different brain structures. Results show that our approach of using convolutional model as feature extractors achieved superior performance in annotating gene expression patterns at multiple levels of brain structures throughout four developing ages. Overall, we achieved average AUC of 0.894 ± 0.014, as compared with 0.820 ± 0.046 yielded by the bag-of-words approach. Deep convolutional neural network model trained on natural image sets and applied to gene expression pattern annotation tasks yielded superior performance, demonstrating its transfer learning property is applicable to such biological image sets.

  10. The aflatoxin-detoxifizyme specific expression in mouse parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Guan, Li-zeng; Sun, Yu-ping; Cai, Jin-shun; Wu, Han-dong; Yu, Long-zheng; Zhang, Yong-liang; Xi, Qian-yun

    2015-06-01

    The aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) gene derived from Armillariella tabescens was cloned into parotid gland-specific expression vector (pPSPBGPneo) to construct the parotid gland-specific vector expressing ADTZ (pPSPBGPneo-ADTZ). Transgenic mice were generated by microinjection and identified by using PCR and Southern blotting analysis. PCR and Southern blotting analysis showed that total six transgenic mice carried the ADTZ gene were generated. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression of ADTZ mRNA could be detected only in parotid glands of the transgenic mice. The ADTZ activity in the saliva was found to be 3.72 ± 1.64 U/mL. After feeding a diet containing aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) for 14 days, the effect of ADTZ on serum biochemical indexes and AFB1 residues in serum and liver of mice were evaluated. The results showed that total protein and globulin contents in the test treatment (transgenic mice) produced ADTZ were significantly higher than that of the positive control, while alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in serum of the test treatment (transgenic mice) were remarkably lower compared to that of the positive control (P < 0.05). Moreover, AFB1 residues in serum and liver of the test treatment (transgenic mice) were significantly lower compared with that of the positive control (P < 0.05). These results in the study confirmed that ADTZ produced in transgenic mice could reduce, even eliminate the negative effects of AFB1 on mice.

  11. Differential Expression of Sclerostin In Adult and Juvenile Mouse Calvaria

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Matthew D.; Quarto, Natalina; Gupta, Deepak M.; Slater, Bethany; Wan, Derrick C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Background An understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling bone formation is central to skeletal tissue engineering efforts. The observation that immature animals are able to heal calvarial defects while adult animals are not has proven to be a useful tool for examining these mechanisms. Thus, we compared expression of sclerostin, a bone inhibitor, between the calvaria of juvenile and adult mice. Methods Parietal bone was harvested from juvenile (6 day old, n=20) and adult (60 day old, n=20) mice. Sclerostin transcript and protein levels were compared between the parietal bone of juvenile and adult mice using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Finally, osteoblasts from the parietal bone of juvenile and adult mice were harvested and cultured under osteogenic differentiation conditions with and without recombinant sclerostin (200ng/ml). Terminal osteogenic differentiation was assessed at 21 days with Alizarin red staining. Results PCR, Western blot analysis, and IHC all confirmed greater expression of sclerostin in the parietal bone of adult mice when compared to that of juvenile mice. Osteoblasts, whether from juvenile or adult parietal bones, demonstrated reduced capacity for osteogenic differentiation when exposed to recombinant sclerostin. Conclusion Given sclerostin’s role in inhibiting bone formation, our findings suggest that differences in expression levels of sclerostin may play a role in the differential regenerative capacity of calvaria from juvenile and adult animals. These findings suggest it as a potential target to abrogate in future tissue engineering studies. PMID:21285764

  12. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells) in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null). About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change), representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk) of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13) and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11) cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology. PMID:21223590

  13. Expression of the Lingo/LERN gene family during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Haines, Bryan P; Rigby, Peter W J

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed the expression during mouse development of the four member Lingo/LERN gene family which encodes type 1 transmembrane proteins containing 12 extracellular leucine rich repeats, an immunoglobulin C2 domain and a short intracellular tail. Each family member has a distinct pattern of expression in the mouse embryo as is the case for the related NLRR, FLRT and LRRTM gene families. Lingo1/LERN1 is expressed in the developing trigeminal, facio-acoustic and dorsal root ganglia. An interesting expression pattern is also observed in the somites with expression localising to the inner surface of the dermomyotome in the ventro-caudal lip. Further expression is seen in lateral cells of the hindbrain and midbrain, lateral cells in the motor horn of the neural tube, the otic vesicle epithelium and epithelium associated with the developing gut. Lingo3/LERN2 is expressed in a broad but specific pattern in many tissues across the embryo. Lingo2/LERN3 is seen in a population of cells lying adjacent to the epithelial lining of the olfactory pit while Lingo4/LERN4 is expressed in the neural tube in a subset of progenitors adjacent to the motor neurons. Expression of all Lingo/LERN genes increases as the embryo develops but is low in the adult with only Lingo1/LERN1 and Lingo2/LERN3 being detectable in adult brain.

  14. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  15. Building a 5-HT3A Receptor Expression Map in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshihisa; Kondo, Makoto; Shimada, Shoichi

    2017-01-01

    Of the many serotonin receptors, the type 3 receptors (5-HT3R) are the only ionotropic ones, playing a key role in fast synaptic transmission and cognitive and emotional brain function through controlled neuronal excitation. To better understand the various functions of 5-HT3Rs, it is very important to know their expression pattern in the central nervous system (CNS). To date, many distributional studies have shown localized 5-HT3R expression in the brain and spinal cord. However, an accurate pattern of 5-HT3R expression in the CNS remains to be elucidated. To investigate the distribution of 5-HT3R in the mouse brain in detail, we performed immunofluorescent staining using 5-HT3AR-GFP transgenic mice. We found strong 5-HT3AR expression in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala; and partial expression in the pons, medulla, and spinal cord. Meanwhile, the thalamus, hypothalamus, and midbrain exhibited a few 5-HT3AR-expressing cells, and no expression was detected in the cerebellum. Further, double-immunostaining using neural markers confirmed that 5-HT3AR is expressed in GABAergic interneurons containing somatostatin or calretinin. In the present study, we built a 5-HT3AR expression map in the mouse brain. Our findings make significant contributions in elucidating the novel functions of 5-HT3R in the CNS. PMID:28276429

  16. Cocaine-Induced Behavioral Sensitization Is Associated With Changes in the Expression of Endocannabinoid and Glutamatergic Signaling Systems in the Mouse Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Eduardo; Pavón, Francisco J.; Palomino, Ana; Luque-Rojas, María Jesús; Serrano, Antonia; Rivera, Patricia; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Alen, Francisco; Vida, Margarita; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endocannabinoids modulate the glutamatergic excitatory transmission by acting as retrograde messengers. A growing body of studies has reported that both signaling systems in the mesocorticolimbic neural circuitry are involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug addiction. Methods: We investigated whether the expression of both endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were altered by an acute and/or repeated cocaine administration schedule that resulted in behavioral sensitization. We measured the protein and mRNA expression of the main endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes and the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). We also analyzed the mRNA expression of relevant components of the glutamate-signaling system, including glutamate-synthesizing enzymes, metabotropic receptors, and ionotropic receptors. Results: Although acute cocaine (10mg/kg) produced no significant changes in the endocannabinoid-related proteins, repeated cocaine administration (20mg/kg daily) induced a pronounced increase in the CB1 receptor expression. In addition, acute cocaine administration (10mg/kg) in cocaine-sensitized mice (referred to as cocaine priming) induced a selective increase in the endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). These protein changes were accompanied by an overall decrease in the ratios of endocannabinoid synthesis/degradation, especially the N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D/FAAH and diacylglycerol lipase alpha/MAGL ratios. Regarding mRNA expression, while acute cocaine administration produced a decrease in CB1 receptors and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D, repeated cocaine treatment enhanced CB1 receptor expression. Cocaine-sensitized mice that were administered priming injections of cocaine mainly displayed an increased FAAH expression. These endocannabinoid changes were associated with modifications in glutamatergic

  17. Expression of cholecystokinin, gastrin, and their receptors in the mouse cornea.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Coto, Ana F; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Alcalde, Ignacio; Gallar, Juana; Meana, Álvaro; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-03-28

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that has been identified in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Gastrin (GAST) is a related peptide never explored in the cornea. The presence and role of both gastrointestinal peptides in the cornea and corneal sensory neurons remain to be established. We explored here in mice whether CCK, GAST, and their receptors CCK1R and CCK2R are expressed in the corneal epithelium and trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea. We used RT-PCR analysis to detect mRNAs of CCK, GAST, CCK1R, and CCK2R in mouse cornea epithelium, trigeminal ganglia, and primary cultured corneal epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to localize these peptides and their receptors in the cornea, cultured corneal epithelial cells, and corneal nerves, as well as in the cell bodies of corneal trigeminal ganglion neurons identified by retrograde labeling with Fast Blue. Mouse corneal epithelial cells in the cornea in situ and in cell cultures expressed CCK and GAST. Only the receptor CCK2R was found in the corneal epithelium. In addition, mouse corneal afferent sensory neurons expressed CCK and GAST, and the CCK1R receptors. The presence of CCK, GAST, and their receptors in the mouse corneal epithelium, and in trigeminal ganglion neurons supplying sensory innervation to the cornea, opens the possibility that these neuropeptides are involved in corneal neurogenic inflammation and in the modulation of repairing/remodeling processes following corneal injury.

  18. Differential expression of transcriptional repressor snail gene at implantation site in mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing-Hong; Hu, Shi-Jun; Yu, Hao; Xu, Li-Bin; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2006-02-01

    The snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors is involved in pronounced cell movements during both embryonic development and tumor progression. This study was to examine snail expression in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and its regulation under pseudopregnancy, delayed implantation, steroid hormone treatment, and artificial decidualization by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. There was a low level of snail mRNA signal and immunostaining in mouse uteri on day 1-4 of pregnancy. When embryo implanted on day 5, both snail mRNA signal and immunostaining were strongly detected in the subluminal stroma immediately surrounding the implanting blastocyst, but not detected in the inter-implantation sites. Under delayed implantation, there was no detectable snail expression. After delayed implantation was terminated by estrogen treatment and embryo implanted, there was a strong level of snail mRNA and immunostaining in the subluminal stroma surrounding the implanting blastocyst, which was similar to that on day 5 of pregnancy. Furthermore, there was no detectable snail expression in mouse uterus on day 5 of pseudopregnancy. From day 6-8 of pregnancy, both snail mRNA signal and immunostaining were detected in the decidua. Our data suggest that snail may play an important role during mouse embryo implantation.

  19. Broad AOX expression in a genetically tractable mouse model does not disturb normal physiology.

    PubMed

    Szibor, Marten; Dhandapani, Praveen K; Dufour, Eric; Holmström, Kira M; Zhuang, Yuan; Salwig, Isabelle; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Gainutdinov, Timur; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Wietelmann, Astrid; Rustin, Pierre; Gellerich, Frank N; Jacobs, Howard T; Braun, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Plants and many lower organisms, but not mammals, express alternative oxidases (AOXs) that branch the mitochondrial respiratory chain, transferring electrons directly from ubiquinol to oxygen without proton pumping. Thus, they maintain electron flow under conditions when the classical respiratory chain is impaired, limiting excess production of oxygen radicals and supporting redox and metabolic homeostasis. AOX from Ciona intestinalis has been used to study and mitigate mitochondrial impairments in mammalian cell lines, Drosophila disease models and, most recently, in the mouse, where multiple lentivector-AOX transgenes conferred substantial expression in specific tissues. Here, we describe a genetically tractable mouse model in which Ciona AOX has been targeted to the Rosa26 locus for ubiquitous expression. The AOX(Rosa26) mouse exhibited only subtle phenotypic effects on respiratory complex formation, oxygen consumption or the global metabolome, and showed an essentially normal physiology. AOX conferred robust resistance to inhibitors of the respiratory chain in organello; moreover, animals exposed to a systemically applied LD50 dose of cyanide did not succumb. The AOX(Rosa26) mouse is a useful tool to investigate respiratory control mechanisms and to decipher mitochondrial disease aetiology in vivo.

  20. Cloning, expression and characterization of mouse (Mus musculus) nicotinamide 5'-mononucleotide adenylyltransferase-2.

    PubMed

    Raches, David W; Xiao, Suhong; Kusumanchi, Praveen; Yalowitz, Joel; Sanghani, Paresh; Long, Eric C; Antony, Aśok C; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2011-11-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is synthesized by the action of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) from NMN and ATP. The mouse homolog of NMNAT-2 (mmNMNAT-2) was cloned, expressed, and subsequently identified using MALDI-TOF in conjunction with the ProFound database. Circular dichroism analyses of recombinant mmNMNAT-2 showed α helical and β sheet secondary structures, consistent with the known structure of the human isoform. Competition experiments using mouse pancreatic tissue lysates with recombinant mmNMNAT-2 demonstrated that the activity of the expressed protein was similar to the human isoform. Immunohistochemistry of mouse embryonic tissues with hNMNAT-2 also showed a tissue- and cellular-specific expression of this isoform. Therefore, our studies demonstrate for the first time the clear biological evidence for the existence of a mouse isoform of hNMNAT-2. These studies may help in future investigations aimed at understanding the regulation of this gene and its pathway, and in turn, will spur the development of novel therapies for diseases such as cancer and diabetes since mice are the most frequently used experimental system for in vivo studies.

  1. Broad AOX expression in a genetically tractable mouse model does not disturb normal physiology

    PubMed Central

    Szibor, Marten; Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Dufour, Eric; Holmström, Kira M.; Zhuang, Yuan; Salwig, Isabelle; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Wietelmann, Astrid; Rustin, Pierre; Gellerich, Frank N.; Braun, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants and many lower organisms, but not mammals, express alternative oxidases (AOXs) that branch the mitochondrial respiratory chain, transferring electrons directly from ubiquinol to oxygen without proton pumping. Thus, they maintain electron flow under conditions when the classical respiratory chain is impaired, limiting excess production of oxygen radicals and supporting redox and metabolic homeostasis. AOX from Ciona intestinalis has been used to study and mitigate mitochondrial impairments in mammalian cell lines, Drosophila disease models and, most recently, in the mouse, where multiple lentivector-AOX transgenes conferred substantial expression in specific tissues. Here, we describe a genetically tractable mouse model in which Ciona AOX has been targeted to the Rosa26 locus for ubiquitous expression. The AOXRosa26 mouse exhibited only subtle phenotypic effects on respiratory complex formation, oxygen consumption or the global metabolome, and showed an essentially normal physiology. AOX conferred robust resistance to inhibitors of the respiratory chain in organello; moreover, animals exposed to a systemically applied LD50 dose of cyanide did not succumb. The AOXRosa26 mouse is a useful tool to investigate respiratory control mechanisms and to decipher mitochondrial disease aetiology in vivo. PMID:28067626

  2. Regional and strain-specific gene expression mapping in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Rickard; Yasuda, Rie; Pankratz, Daniel G.; Carter, Todd A.; Del Rio, Jo A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Mayford, Mark; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2000-01-01

    To determine the genetic causes and molecular mechanisms responsible for neurobehavioral differences in mice, we used highly parallel gene expression profiling to detect genes that are differentially expressed between the 129SvEv and C57BL/6 mouse strains at baseline and in response to seizure. In addition, we identified genes that are differentially expressed in specific brain regions. We found that approximately 1% of expressed genes are differentially expressed between strains in at least one region of the brain and that the gene expression response to seizure is significantly different between the two inbred strains. The results lead to the identification of differences in gene expression that may account for distinct phenotypes in inbred strains and the unique functions of specific brain regions. PMID:11005875

  3. Regional Expression of MTG Genes in the Developing Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Alishahi, Amin; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid translocation gene (MTG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that are highly conserved across species. We studied the expression of three members of this gene family, MTGR1, MTG8, and MTG16 in developing mouse central nervous system by in situ hybridization. All of these genes are detected as early as embryonic day 11.5. Because these genes are known to be induced by proneural genes during neurogenesis, we analyzed the expression of MTG genes in relation to two proneural genes, Neurog2 (also known as Ngn2 or Neurogenin 2) and Ascl1 (also known as Mash1). While MTGR1 are generally expressed in regions that also express Neurog2, MTG8 and MTG16 expression is associated more tightly with that of Ascl1-expressing neural progenitor cells. These results suggest the possibility that expression of MTG genes is differentially controlled by specific proneural genes during neurogenesis. PMID:19618476

  4. Connective tissue growth factor expression and Smad signaling during mouse heart development and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Feijen, Alie; Korving, Jeroen; Korchynskyi, Olexander; Larsson, Jonas; Karlsson, Stefan; ten Dijke, Peter; Lyons, Karen M; Goldschmeding, Roel; Doevendans, Pieter; Mummery, Christine L

    2004-11-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is reported to be a target gene of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in vitro. Its physiological role in angiogenesis and skeletogenesis during mouse development has been described recently. Here, we have mapped expression of CTGF mRNA during mouse heart development, postnatal adult life, and after experimental myocardial infarction. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between CTGF and the BMP/TGFbeta signaling pathway in particular during heart development in mutant mice. Postnatally, CTGF expression in the heart became restricted to the atrium. Strikingly, 1 week after myocardial infarction, when myocytes have disappeared from the infarct zone, CTGF and TGFbeta expression as well as activated forms of TGFbeta but not BMP, Smad effector proteins are colocalized exclusively in the fibroblasts of the scar tissue, suggesting possible cooperation between CTGF and TGFbeta during the pathological fibrotic response.

  5. An integrated expression atlas of miRNAs and their promoters in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    de Rie, Derek; Abugessaisa, Imad; Alam, Tanvir; Arner, Erik; Arner, Peter; Ashoor, Haitham; Åström, Gaby; Babina, Magda; Bertin, Nicolas; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Carlisle, Ailsa J; Daub, Carsten O; Detmar, Michael; Deviatiiarov, Ruslan; Fort, Alexandre; Gebhard, Claudia; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guhl, Sven; Ha, Thomas J; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Herlyn, Meenhard; Heutink, Peter; Hitchens, Kelly J; Hon, Chung Chau; Huang, Edward; Ishizu, Yuri; Kai, Chieko; Kasukawa, Takeya; Klinken, Peter; Lassmann, Timo; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Lee, Weonju; Lizio, Marina; Makeev, Vsevolod; Mathelier, Anthony; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Mejhert, Niklas; Mungall, Christopher J; Noma, Shohei; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Persson, Helena; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roudnicky, Filip; Sætrom, Pål; Sato, Hiroki; Severin, Jessica; Shin, Jay W; Swoboda, Rolf K; Tarui, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Hiroo; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Winteringham, Louise; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yasuzawa, Kayoko; Yoneda, Misako; Yumoto, Noriko; Zabierowski, Susan; Zhang, Peter G; Wells, Christine A; Summers, Kim M; Kawaji, Hideya; Sandelin, Albin; Rehli, Michael; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; de Hoon, Michiel J L

    2017-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs with key roles in cellular regulation. As part of the fifth edition of the Functional Annotation of Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project, we created an integrated expression atlas of miRNAs and their promoters by deep-sequencing 492 short RNA (sRNA) libraries, with matching Cap Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE) data, from 396 human and 47 mouse RNA samples. Promoters were identified for 1,357 human and 804 mouse miRNAs and showed strong sequence conservation between species. We also found that primary and mature miRNA expression levels were correlated, allowing us to use the primary miRNA measurements as a proxy for mature miRNA levels in a total of 1,829 human and 1,029 mouse CAGE libraries. We thus provide a broad atlas of miRNA expression and promoters in primary mammalian cells, establishing a foundation for detailed analysis of miRNA expression patterns and transcriptional control regions.

  6. Distinct patterns of expression of the RB gene family in mouse and human retina.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Clarellen; Pajovic, Sanja; Devlin, Hollie; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Corson, Timothy W; Gallie, Brenda L

    2005-06-01

    Although RB1 function is disrupted in the majority of human cancers, an undefined cell of developing human retina is uniquely sensitive to cancer induction when the RB1 tumor suppressor gene is lost. Murine retinoblastoma is initiated only when two of the RB family of genes, RB1 and p107 or p130, are inactivated. Although whole embryonic retina shows RB family gene expression by several techniques, when E14 developing retina was depleted of the earliest differentiating cells, ganglion cells, the remaining proliferating murine embryonic retinal progenitor cells clearly did not express RB1 or p130, while the longer splice form of p107 was expressed. Each retinal cell type expressed some member of the RB family at some stage of differentiation. Rod photoreceptors stained for the RB1 protein product, pRB, and p107 in only a brief window of postnatal murine development, with no detectable staining for any of the RB family proteins in adult human and mouse rod photoreceptors. Adult mouse and human Muller glia, ganglion and rare horizontal cells, and adult human, but not adult mouse, cone photoreceptors stained for pRB. The RB gene family is dynamically and variably expressed through retinal development in specific retinal cells.

  7. Expression and regulation of androgen receptor in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy and decidualization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjie; Li, Mo; Zhang, Lu; Xiong, Hao; Lai, Lidan; Guo, Meijun; Zong, Teng; Zhang, Dalei; Yang, Bei; Wu, Lei; Tang, Min; Kuang, Haibin

    2015-11-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is important for both the male and female reproductive systems. The expression and regulation of AR in the uterine endometrium during early pregnancy and decidualization remain relatively under-investigated, so we sought to immunohistochemically examine the spatiotemporal expression of AR in mouse uteri during the peri-implantation period as well as in response to specific steroid hormones. AR protein was found in the nuclei of uterine stromal cells starting on pregnancy Days 1 and 2, with its abundance increasing on Days 3 and 4. From pregnancy Days 5 to 9, however, the expression of AR markedly declined in stromal zones of uteri. No signal was detected in the decidualized cells surrounding the site of embryo implantation; moreover, no AR immunostaining was observed in decidualized uterine cells in an artificial oil-induced model of decidualization. Progesterone significantly inhibited AR protein expression, whereas estrogen dramatically elevated AR abundance in the stroma of ovariectomized mouse uteri. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate that decidualization and progesterone significantly inhibited the AR protein expression in vivo, whereas estrogen increased AR protein levels in the stromal cells of mouse uteri. These responses might be advantageous for the proliferation and differentiation of uterine stroma and for embryo implantation during early pregnancy.

  8. Aberrant gene expression profile in a mouse model of endometriosis mirrors that observed in women

    PubMed Central

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Schroder, Amy L.; Kimball, Paul A.; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L.; Davis, J. W.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To define the altered gene expression profile of endometriotic lesions in a mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis Design Autologous experimental mouse model. Setting Medical school department. Animals Adult C57Bl6 mice. Intervention(s) Endometriosis was surgically-induced by auto-transplantation of uterine tissue to the intestinal mesentery. Endometriotic lesions and eutopic uteri were recovered at 3 or 29 days post-induction. Main Outcome Measure(s) Altered gene expression was measured in the endometriotic lesion relative to the eutopic uterus by genome wide cDNA microarray analysis and was confirmed by real time RT-PCR for six genes. Relevant categories of altered genes were identified using gene ontology analysis to determine groups of genes enriched for altered expression. Result(s) The expression of 479 and 114 genes was altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus at 3 or 29 days post-induction, respectively. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that genes associated with the extracellular matrix, cell adhesions, immune function, cell growth, and angiogenesis were altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus. Conclusion(s) Based on gene expression analysis, the mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis appears to be a good model for studying the pathophysiology and treatment of endometriosis. PMID:19473656

  9. Transcriptional control of transglutaminase 2 expression in mouse apoptotic thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Katalin; Daniel, Bence; Kiss, Bea; Kovács, Fruzsina; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-08-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein, which participates in various biological processes including thymocyte apoptosis. As a result, the transcriptional regulation of the gene is complex and must depend on the cell type. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that in dying thymocytes the expression of Tgm2 is induced by external signals derived from engulfing macrophages, such as retinoids, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and adenosine, the latter triggering the adenylate cyclase signaling pathway. The existence of TGF-β and retinoid responsive elements in the promoter region of Tgm2 has already been reported, but the intergenic regulatory elements participating in the regulation of Tgm2 have not yet been identified. Here we used publicly available results from DNase I hypersensitivity analysis followed by deep sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing against CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), H3K4me3, H3K4me1 and H3K27ac to map a putative regulatory element set for Tgm2 in thymocytes. By measuring eRNA expressions of these putative enhancers in retinoid, rTGF-β or dibutiryl cAMP-exposed thymocytes we determined which of them are functional. By applying ChIP-qPCR against SMAD4, retinoic acid receptor, retinoid X receptor, cAMP response element binding protein, P300 and H3K27ac under the same conditions, we identified two enhancers of Tgm2, which seem to act as integrators of the TGF-β, retinoid and adenylate cyclase signaling pathways in dying thymocytes. Our study describes a novel strategy to identify and characterize the signal-specific functional enhancer set of a gene by integrating genome-wide datasets and measuring the production of enhancer specific RNA molecules.

  10. Maternally imprinted microRNAs are differentially expressed during mouse and human lung development

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew E.; Moschos, Sterghios A.; Perry, Mark M.; Barnes, Peter J.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding genes that regulate the translation of target mRNA. More than 300 miRNAs have now been discovered in humans, although the function of most is still unknown. A highly sensitive, semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was utilised to reveal the differential expression of a number of miRNAs during the development of both mouse and human lung. Of note was the upregulation in neonatal mouse and fetal human lung of a maternally imprinted miRNA cluster located at human chromosome 14q32.21 (mouse chromosome 12F2), which includes the miR-154 and miR-335 families and is situated within the Gtl2-Dio3 domain. Conversely, several miRNAs were upregulated in adult compared to neonatal/fetal lung including miR-29a and miR-29b. Differences in the spatial expression patterns of miR-154, miR-29a and miR-26a was demonstrated using in situ hybridisation of mouse neonatal and adult tissue using miRNA-specific LNA probes. Interestingly, miR-154 appeared to be localised to the stroma of fetal but not adult lungs. The overall expression profile was similar for mouse and human tissue suggesting evolutionary conservation of miRNA expression during lung development and demonstrating the importance of maternally imprinted miRNAs in the developmental process. PMID:17191223

  11. TLRs and NODs mRNA expression pattern in healthy mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, S; Cancino-Díaz, M E; Jiménez-Zamudio, L; García-Latorre, E; Cancino-Díaz, J C

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To look for TLR and NOD mRNA expression in the healthy eye and in other immune privileged and non-immune privileged mouse organs. Methods: Semiquantitative RT-PCR was performed to look for TLR1–9 and NOD1 and NOD2 mRNA expressions in the whole eye, in the anterior (AP) and posterior (PP) portions of the eye, in corneal fibroblasts (CF) and in ovary, brain, testis, heart, lung, and spleen. Results: All the TLR mRNAs were expressed in the whole eye of Balb/c mice. NIH and C57BL/6 did not express TLR9 and TLR8, respectively. NIH expressed higher levels of TLR1, 2, 3, and 6 than the other strains. C57BL/6 expressed the lowest levels of all TLRs. TLR9, 5, and 4 were the less expressed in all strains. All TLRs were expressed in Balb/c PP and TLR1 was not expressed in AP. In NIH and Balb/c CF the majority of TLRs were overexpressed with LPS. In testis, expression of most TLRs was absent. Non-immune privileged organs expressed most of the TLRs. All the organs expressed NOD1 and NOD2. In PP NOD2 was not expressed. Conclusion: TLRs and NODs are expressed in the eye, and could have an important role in the innate immunity. PMID:15965176

  12. The expression pattern of Follistatin-like 1 in mouse central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Junhua; Mao, Huihua; Hu, Yu-An; Yan, Yan; Zhao, Chunjie

    2009-10-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), also named TSC-36 (TGF-beta-stimulated clone 36), was first cloned from the mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line and can be up-regulated by TGF-beta. To better study the function of Fstl1 during the development of the mouse central nervous system (CNS), we examined Fstl1 expression in the developing mouse CNS, in detail, by in situ hybridization. Our results show that Fstl1 is strongly expressed in the telencephalon, diencephalon, brainstem, limbic system and spinal cord. In the telencephalon, Fstl1 positive cells are mainly located in the ventricular zone (VZ) and the subventricular zone (SVZ); a relatively weak signal was observed in layers II and III of the neocortex at postnatal stages. Fstl1 expression is robust in the developing hippocampus and persists to P20. In the developing diencephalon and hindbrain, abundant Fstl1 signals were also detected in nuclei including the medial habenular nucleus, the medial dorsal nucleus, the cochlear nuclei and so on. In addition, a strong expression of Fstl1 was detected in the thalamencephalic signal center, as well as in the olfactory cortex from E14.5 to P0. Meanwhile, Fstl1 was expressed in the septal area and the cingulate gyrus of the limbic system after birth. A high level of expression was also observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. These results indicate that Fstl1 may play an important role during CNS development in the mouse.

  13. Angiopoietin-like Gene Expression in the Mouse Uterus During Implantation and in Response to Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Charles A; van Huyen, Doan; Bany, Brent M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine if and where Angiopoietin-like genes are expressed in the mouse uterus during the implantation period of pregnancy, and to determine if uterine expression of such genes is controlled by estrogen or progesterone. We found that all six known murine angiopoietin-like genes were expressed in the mouse uterus during implantation. The expression of four genes was controlled by either estrogen or progesterone. Only the levels of angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4) mRNA dramatically increased in implantation segments of the uterus during decidualization and was conceptus-independent. Due to this increased expression, and the fact that angiopoietin-like 4 protein plays a role in lipid metabolism and angiogenesis in other tissues, only the expression of Angptl4 was further examined in the uterus and developing placenta. Angptl4 mRNA was localized to subpopulations of the endometrial stromal fibroblast and endothelial cell populations during decidualization. It was also localized to the ectoplacental cone, trophoblast giant cells and parietal endoderm of the conceptus at this time. By mid-pregnancy, Angptl4 mRNA was localized mainly to the mesometrial lymphoid aggregate region plus mesometrial endothelial cells of the uterus as well as in various cell types of the conceptus. Additional work showed that Angptl4 expression increases in mouse endometrial stromal cells as they undergo decidualization in vitro. As in other cell types, the expression of Angptl4 in endometrial stromal cells was increased in response to an agonist of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors. Taken together, the results of this work support the hypothesis that locally expressed Angptl4 might play a role in local uterine/placental lipid metabolism and vascular changes during implantation and thus provides a basis for future research. PMID:22350948

  14. GRP78 expression and regulation in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, PengFei; Jin, YaPing; Lan, XiangLi; Yang, YanZhou; Chen, Fenglei; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiao; Sun, YuJie; Wang, AiHua

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal expression and regulation of GRP78 in the mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period. The GRP78 protein was mainly detected in the luminal and glandular epithelia on days 1-4 of pregnancy. On day 5 of pregnancy, the GRP78 protein was more highly observed around the implanted embryo at the implantation site. There was no detectable GRP78 protein signal on day 5 of pseudopregnancy. GRP78 mRNA and protein levels gradually increased on days 6-8 of pregnancy, and the expression pattern was also expanded, coinciding with the development of decidua. Similarly, GRP78 expression was also strongly expressed in decidualised cells following artificial decidualisation. Compared with the results obtained with the delayed uterus, a high level of GRP78 expression was detected in the implantation-activated uterus. In the uteri of ovariectomised mice, GRP78 expression increased and reached its highest level after injection of oestrogen, and progesterone seemed to have an antagonistic effect on oestrogen up-regulation of GRP78 expression. Our data indicate that GRP78 might play an important role during the process of mouse embryo implantation, and GRP78 expression was mainly regulated by active blastocysts and maternal oestrogen.

  15. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  16. Expression of DPP6 in Meckel's cartilage and tooth germs during mouse facial development.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Fan, Z; Ma, X; Wu, Y; Liu, S; Gao, Y; Shen, Y; Fan, M; Wang, S

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6), a member of the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase family, plays distinct roles in brain development, but its expression in embryonic Meckel's cartilage and tooth germs development is unknown. We analyzed the expression pattern of DPP6 in Meckel's cartilage and tooth germs development using in situ hybridization. DPP6 was detected in different patterns in Meckel's cartilage and tooth germs during mouse facial development from 11.5 to 13.5 days post-coitus (dpc) embryos. The expression pattern of DPP6 suggests that it may be involved in mandible and tooth development.

  17. Effect of microgravity on gene expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Desaphy, Jean Francois; Camerino, Diana Conte; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in gravitational force such as that experienced by astronauts during space flight induce a redistribution of fluids from the caudad to the cephalad portion of the body together with an elimination of normal head-to-foot hydrostatic pressure gradients. To assess brain gene profile changes associated with microgravity and fluid shift, a large-scale analysis of mRNA expression levels was performed in the brains of 2-week control and hindlimb-unloaded (HU) mice using cDNA microarrays. Although to different extents, all functional categories displayed significantly regulated genes indicating that considerable transcriptomic alterations are induced by HU. Interestingly, the TIC class (transport of small molecules and ions into the cells) had the highest percentage of up-regulated genes, while the most down-regulated genes were those of the JAE class (cell junction, adhesion, extracellular matrix). TIC genes comprised 16% of those whose expression was altered, including sodium channel, nonvoltage-gated 1 beta (Scnn1b), glutamate receptor (Grin1), voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (Vdac1), calcium channel beta 3 subunit (Cacnb3) and others. The analysis performed by Gene-MAPP revealed several altered protein classes and functional pathways such as blood coagulation and immune response, learning and memory, ion channels and cell junction. In particular, data indicate that HU causes an alteration in hemostasis which resolves in a shift toward a more hyper-coagulative state with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Furthermore, HU treatment seems to impact on key steps of synaptic plasticity and learning processes. PMID:18704384

  18. Effect of microgravity on gene expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, Antonio; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Desaphy, Jean Francois; Camerino, Diana Conte; Svelto, Maria; Spray, David C

    2008-11-01

    Changes in gravitational force such as that experienced by astronauts during space flight induce a redistribution of fluids from the caudad to the cephalad portion of the body together with an elimination of normal head-to-foot hydrostatic pressure gradients. To assess brain gene profile changes associated with microgravity and fluid shift, a large-scale analysis of mRNA expression levels was performed in the brains of 2-week control and hindlimb-unloaded (HU) mice using cDNA microarrays. Although to different extents, all functional categories displayed significantly regulated genes indicating that considerable transcriptomic alterations are induced by HU. Interestingly, the TIC class (transport of small molecules and ions into the cells) had the highest percentage of up-regulated genes, while the most down-regulated genes were those of the JAE class (cell junction, adhesion, extracellular matrix). TIC genes comprised 16% of those whose expression was altered, including sodium channel, nonvoltage-gated 1 beta (Scnn1b), glutamate receptor (Grin1), voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (Vdac1), calcium channel beta 3 subunit (Cacnb3) and others. The analysis performed by GeneMAPP revealed several altered protein classes and functional pathways such as blood coagulation and immune response, learning and memory, ion channels and cell junction. In particular, data indicate that HU causes an alteration in hemostasis which resolves in a shift toward a more hyper-coagulative state with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Furthermore, HU treatment seems to impact on key steps of synaptic plasticity and learning processes.

  19. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiaomin; Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  20. The structure and regulation of expression of the mouse growth hormone receptor and binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Talamantes, F.

    1994-12-31

    The mouse growth hormone receptor (mGHR) and the mouse growth hormone-binding protein (mGHBP) are products of a single gene which are generated alternative splicing. The factors that regulate the expression of mGHR and mGHBP mRNA and protein during pregnancy in the mouse are incompletely understood. During pregnancy in the mouse, there are parallel increases in circulating mouse growth hormone (mGH), liver mGHR, and serum mGHBP. The increase in both hepatic mGHR and serum mGHBP begins on Day 9 of gestation and by late gestation the hepatic mGHR content has increased 8-fold and serum mGHBP has increased 30-fold compared with values in nonpregnant controls. A parallel increase occurs in the steady state levels of liver GHR and GHBP encoding mRNAs. The increase in both messages begins on Day 9 of gestation; however, the GHR mRNA reaches maximum levels by Day 13, while the GHBP mRNA continues to increase until the end of pregnancy. The magnitude of the increase in the GHR-encoding message is 15- to 20-fold between nonpregnant and late pregnant mice, and the magnitude of the increase in the GHBP-encoding message is 30- to 50-fold. Both pituitary mGH and the number of conceptuses influence the receptors and binding protein for mGH during pregnancy. 22 refs.

  1. Regulation of LH/FSH expression by secretoglobin 3A2 in the mouse pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Yuki; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shioko; Kurotani, Reiko

    2014-04-01

    Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2 was originally identified as a downstream target for the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-1 in the lung. NKX2-1 plays a role in the genesis and expression of genes in the thyroid, lung and ventral forebrain; Nkx2-1-null mice have no thyroid and pituitary and severely hypoplastic lungs and hypothalamus. To demonstrate whether SCGB3A2 plays any role in pituitary hormone production, NKX2-1 and SCGB3A2 expression in the mouse pituitary gland was examined by immunohistochemical analysis and RT-PCR. NKX2-1 was localized in the posterior pituitary lobe, whereas SCGB3A2 was observed in both anterior and posterior lobes as shown by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs), which regulate mouse Scgb3a2 transcription, was also examined by RT-PCR. C/EBPβ, γ, δ and ζ were expressed in the adult mouse pituitary gland. SCGB3A2 was expressed in the anterior and posterior lobes from postnatal days 1 and 5, respectively and the areas where SCGB3A2 expression was found coincided with the area where FSH-secreting cells were found. Double-staining for SCGB3A2 and pituitary hormones revealed that SCGB3A2 was mainly localized in gonadotrophs in 49 % of FSH-secreting cells and 47 % of LH-secreting cells. In addition, SCGB3A2 dramatically inhibited LH and FSH mRNA expression in rat pituitary primary cell cultures. These results suggest that SCGB3A2 regulates FSH/LH production in the anterior pituitary lobe and that transcription factors other than NKX2-1 may regulate SCGB3A2 expression.

  2. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K; Halder, Sebok K; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R

    2016-12-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector-based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35-115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5-6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long-term curative

  3. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19127.001 PMID:27642011

  4. Expression and purification of active mouse and human NEIL3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Bandaru, Viswanath; Holmes, Alicia; Averill, April M.; Cannan, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) is one of the five DNA glycosylases found in mammals that recognize and remove oxidized bases, and initiate the Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway. Previous attempts to express and purify the mouse and human orthologs of Neil3 in their active form have not been successful. Here we report the construction of bicistronic expression vectors for expressing in Escherichia coli the full-length mouse Neil3 (MmuNeil3), its glycosylase domain (MmuNeil3Δ324), as well as the glycosylase domain of human Neil3 (NEIL3Δ324). The purified Neil3 proteins are all active, and NEIL3Δ324 exhibits similar glycosylase/lyase activity as MmuNeil3Δ324 on both single-stranded and double-stranded substrates containing thymine glycol (Tg), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) or an abasic site (AP). We show that N-terminal initiator methionine processing is critical for the activity of both mouse and human Neil3 proteins. Co-expressing an E. coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcoMap) Y168A variant with MmuNeil3, MmuNeil3Δ324 and NEIL3Δ324 improves the N-terminal methionine processing and increases the percentage of active Neil3 proteins in the preparation. The purified Neil3 proteins are suitable for biochemical, structural and functional studies. PMID:22569481

  5. Comparison of epigenetic mediator expression and function in mouse and human embryonic blastomeres.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Shawn L; McElroy, Sohyun L; Bossert, Nancy L; De Jonge, Christopher J; Rodriguez, Maria Vera; Leong, Denise E; Behr, Barry; Westphal, Lynn M; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-15

    A map of human embryo development that combines imaging, molecular, genetic and epigenetic data for comparisons to other species and across pathologies would be greatly beneficial for basic science and clinical applications. Here, we compared mRNA and protein expression of key mediators of DNA methylation and histone modifications between mouse and human embryos, embryos from fertile/infertile couples, and following growth factor supplementation. We observed that individual mouse and human embryos are characterized by similarities and distinct differences in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns especially at the single-cell level. In particular, while mouse embryos first exhibited sub-compartmentalization of different histone modifications between blastomeres at the morula stage and cell sub-populations in blastocysts, differential histone modification expression was detected between blastomeres earlier in human embryos at the four- to eight-cell stage. Likewise, differences in epigenetic mediator expression were also observed between embryos from fertile and infertile couples, which were largely equalized in response to growth factor supplementation, suggesting that select growth factors might prevent alterations in epigenetic profiles during prolonged embryo culture. Finally, we determined that reduced expression via morpholino technologies of a single histone-modifying enzyme, Rps6ka4/Msk2, resulted in cleavage-stage arrest as assessed by time-lapse imaging and was associated with aneuploidy generation. Taken together, data document differences in epigenetic patterns between species with implications for fertility and suggest functional roles for individual epigenetic factors during pre-implantation development.

  6. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-09-19

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos.

  7. Tg(Afp-GFP) Expression Marks Primitive and Definitive Endoderm Lineages during Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gloria S.; Fraser, Stuart T.; Eakin, Guy S.; Mangano, Michael; Isern, Joan; Sahr, Kenneth E.; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Baron, Margaret H.

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (Afp) is the most abundant serum protein in the developing embryo. It is secreted by the visceral endoderm, its derivative yolk sac endoderm, fetal liver hepatocytes, and the developing gut epithelium. The abundance of this protein suggested that Afp gene regulatory elements might serve to effectively drive reporter gene expression in developing endodermal tissues. To this end, we generated transgenic mouse lines Tg(Afp-GFP) using an Afp promoter/enhancer to drive expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Bright GFP fluorescence allowed the visualization, in real time, of visceral endoderm, yolk sac endoderm, fetal liver hepatocytes, and the epithelium of the gut and pancreas. Comparison of the localization of green fluorescence with that of endogenous Afp transcripts and protein indicated that the regulatory elements used to generate these mouse lines directed transgene expression in what appeared to be all Afp-expressing cells of the embryo, but only in a subset of fetal liver cells. The bright GFP signal permitted flow cytometric analysis of fetal liver hepatocytes. These mice represent a valuable resource for live imaging as well as identification, quantitation and isolation of cells from the primitive and definitive endoderm lineages of the developing mouse embryo. PMID:16708394

  8. Development, structure, and keratin expression in C57BL/6J mouse eccrine glands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D K; Bubier, J A; Silva, K A; Sundberg, J P

    2012-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands in the mouse are found only on the footpads and, when mature, resemble human eccrine glands. Eccrine gland anlagen were first apparent at 16.5 days postconception (DPC) in mouse embryos as small accumulations of cells in the mesenchymal tissue beneath the developing epidermis resembling hair follicle placodes. These cells extended into the dermis where significant cell organization, duct development, and evidence of the acrosyringium were observed in 6- to 7-postpartum day (PPD) mice. Mouse-specific keratin 1 (K1) and 10 (K10) expression was confined to the strata spinosum and granulosum. In 16.5 and 18.5 DPC embryos, K14 and K17 were both expressed in the stratum basale and diffusely in the gland anlagen. K5 expression closely mimicked K17 throughout gland development. K6 expression was not observed in the developing glands of the embryo but was apparent in the luminal cell layer of the duct by 6 to 7 PPD. By 21 PPD, the gland apertures appeared as depressions in the surface surrounded by cornified squames, and the footpad surface lacked the organized ridge and crease system seen in human fingers. These data serve as a valuable reference for investigators who use genetically engineered mice for skin research.

  9. Acute digoxin loading reduces ABCA8A mRNA expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Wakaumi, Michi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Ando, Hitoshi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2005-12-01

    Human ABCA8, a new member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, transports certain lipophilic drugs, such as digoxin. To investigate the roles of this transporter, we cloned a mouse homologue of ABCA8, from a mouse heart cDNA library, named ABCA8a. The deduced mouse ABCA8a protein is 66% identical with that of human ABCA8 and possesses features common to the ABC superfamily. It was found that ABCA8a was mainly expressed in the liver and heart, similar to human ABCA8. We further evaluated the effect of acute digoxin (a substrate for ABCA8) intoxication on the mRNA expression of ABCA8 using northern blotting with a 3' non-coding region as a probe to avoid cross-hybridization with other ABCA genes. Following acute digoxin infusion, the mRNA expression of ABCA8 was significantly reduced in the liver 12-24 h after injection (14.7% of vehicle treatment), but not in the heart and kidney. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the reduction in ABCA8a mRNA. Similar reductions in ABCA5, ABCA7, ABCA8b and ABCA9 mRNA were also observed. A comparable amount of digitoxin did not affect ABCA8a mRNA expression in the liver. The results suggest that ABCA8 may play a role in digoxin metabolism in the liver.

  10. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  11. PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression in mouse prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijie; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Wang, Alun R; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 play critical roles in maintaining an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the present study was to assess expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in mouse prostate tumors. A total of 33 mouse prostate tumors derived from Pten-null mice were examined using immunohistochemical staining for PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2. The animals were either with interleukin-17 receptor c (Il-17rc) wild-type or knockout genotype, or fed with regular diet or high-fat diet to 30 weeks of age. We found that Il-17rc wild-type mouse prostate tumors had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 than Il-17rc knockout mouse prostate tumors. High-fat diet-induced obese mice had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in their prostate tumors than lean mice fed with regular diet. Increased expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 was associated with increased number of invasive prostate tumors formed in the Il-17rc wild-type and obese mice compared to the Il-17rc knockout and lean mice, respectively. Our findings suggest that expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 may enhance development of mouse prostate cancer through creating an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  12. A conditional transgenic mouse line for targeted expression of the stem cell marker LGR5.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jens Henrik; Bergström, Åsa; Andersson, Agneta Birgitta; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hoelzl, Maria A; Sørlie, Therese; Toftgård, Rune

    2015-08-15

    LGR5 is a known marker of embryonic and adult stem cells in several tissues. In a mouse model, Lgr5+ cells have shown tumour-initiating properties, while in human cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and colon cancer, LGR5 expression levels are increased: however, the effect of increased LGR5 expression is not fully understood. To study the effects of elevated LGR5 expression levels we generated a novel tetracycline-responsive, conditional transgenic mouse line expressing human LGR5, designated TRELGR5. In this transgenic line, LGR5 expression can be induced in any tissue depending on the expression pattern of the chosen transcriptional regulator. For the current study, we used transgenic mice with a tetracycline-regulated transcriptional transactivator linked to the bovine keratin 5 promoter (K5tTA) to drive expression of LGR5 in the epidermis. As expected, expression of human LGR5 was induced in the skin of double transgenic mice (K5tTA;TRELGR5). Inducing LGR5 expression during embryogenesis and early development resulted in macroscopically and microscopically detectable phenotypic changes, including kink tail, sparse fur coat and enlarged sebaceous glands. The fur and sebaceous gland phenotypes were reversible upon discontinued expression of transgenic LGR5, but this was not observed for the kink tail phenotype. There were no apparent phenotypic changes if LGR5 expression was induced at three weeks of age. The results demonstrate that increased expression of LGR5 during embryogenesis and the neonatal period alter skin development and homeostasis.

  13. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Honda, A; Sugimoto, Y; Namba, T; Watabe, A; Irie, A; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1993-04-15

    A functional cDNA clone encoding mouse EP2 subtype of prostaglandin (PG) E receptor was isolated from a mouse cDNA library by cross-hybridization with the mouse EP3 subtype PGE receptor cDNA. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 513 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. In contrast to EP3 receptor, this receptor possesses long third intracellular loop and carboxyl-terminal tail. [3H] PGE2 specifically bound to the membrane of mammalian COS cells transfected with the cDNA. The binding to the membrane was displaced with unlabeled PG in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist, and SC-19220, an EP1 antagonist. PGE2 markedly increased cAMP level in COS cells transfected with the cDNA. These results suggest that this receptor is EP2 subtype. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the abundant expression being observed in ileum, thymus, and mastocytoma P-815 cells.

  14. Temporal and spatial expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development.

    PubMed

    Sel, Saadettin; Patzel, Eva; Poggi, Lucia; Kaiser, Delia; Kalinski, Thomas; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Nass, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Neuronatin (Nnat) was initially identified as a highly expressed gene in neonatal mammalian brain. In this study, we analyze the spatial and temporal expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development as well as in the adult. The expression of Nnat was analyzed on mRNA as well as protein level. The presence of Nnat transcripts in the adult retina was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nnat protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry during eye development at embryonic day (E) 12, 15, 16 and postnatal day (P) 7, 14, 30 and 175 (adult). Immunohistochemical studies of the developing mouse eye revealed Nnat expression in embryonic and adult neuroretina as well as in corneal epithelial, stromal, endothelial cells and in lens epithelium. Expression of Nnat was detected from E12 onwards and was also present in adult eyes. The expression pattern suggests that Nnat may play an important role during eye development and in the maintenance of mature eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The expression of Troponin T1 gene is induced by ketamine in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Xiu R; Lu, Xiaochen; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2007-10-12

    The glutamatergic system has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease, which also have a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Treatment with ketamine, a non-competitive glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is known to have paradoxical effects of neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. We investigated gene expression in brain tissue of adult mice treated with ketamine to characterize the expression profiles and to identify the affected metabolic pathways. Adult male mice were treated by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either s(+)ketamine (80 mg/kg) or distilled water (as the control). Fifty genes were differentially expressed in ketamine-treated mouse brains compared with control mice using oligonucleotide microarray analysis, and the expression of Troponin T1 (Tnnt1) gene was consistently elevated (2- to 4-fold) (p<0.001). Ketamine-induced Tnnt1 expression was confirmed and characterized using RNA in situ hybridization techniques in paraffin embedded brain tissue sections. Tnnt1 expression was induced in the granule layer of the hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, Purkinje cells of cerebellum (p<0.0001), and cerebral cortex. Tnnt1 gene is known to interact directly with FoxO1, which is involved in multiple peripheral metabolic pathways and central energy homeostasis. Our findings suggest that the induction of Tnnt1 gene expression in adult mouse brains by ketamine may illustrate the genes involved in the metabolic syndromes observed in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. Dynamic expression of a glutamate decarboxylase gene in multiple non-neural tissues during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Dennis M; Condie, Brian G

    2001-01-01

    Background Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mouse embryos lacking the 67-kDa isoform of GAD (encoded by the Gad1 gene) develop a complete cleft of the secondary palate. This phenotype suggests that this gene may be involved in the normal development of tissues outside of the CNS. Although Gad1 expression in adult non-CNS tissues has been noted previously, no systematic analysis of its embryonic expression outside of the nervous system has been performed. The objective of this study was to define additional structures outside of the central nervous system that express Gad1, indicating those structures that may require its function for normal development. Results Our analysis detected the localized expression of Gad1 transcripts in several developing tissues in the mouse embryo from E9.0-E14.5. Tissues expressing Gad1 included the tail bud mesenchyme, the pharyngeal pouches and arches, the ectodermal placodes of the developing vibrissae, and the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), mesenchyme and ectoderm of the limb buds. Conclusions Some of the sites of Gad1 expression are tissues that emit signals required for patterning and differentiation (AER, vibrissal placodes). Other sites correspond to proliferating stem cell populations that give rise to multiple differentiated tissues (tail bud mesenchyme, pharyngeal endoderm and mesenchyme). The dynamic expression of Gad1 in such tissues suggests a wider role for GABA signaling in development than was previously appreciated. PMID:11178105

  17. Expression and localization of aromatase during fetal mouse testis development.

    PubMed

    Borday, Caroline; Merlet, Jorge; Racine, Chrystèle; Habert, René

    2013-01-01

    Les androgènes et les oestrogènes sont indispensables au développement et aux fonctions du testicule. Le testicule est particulièrement sensible aux perturbateurs endocriniens pendant le développement fœtal et beaucoup de perturbateurs endocriniens agissent en modifiant la balance oestrogènes/androgènes. Physiologiquement, cette balance est régulée par une cascade enzymatique qui convertit irréversiblement les androgènes en oestrogènes. Le composant principal de cette cascade est le cytochrome p450 19A1 (appelé couramment aromatase). Le but de ce travail a été d’étudier l’expression de l’aromatase testiculaire au cours du développement fœtal chez la souris.En utilisant une approche par RT-PCR et par western blot, nous avons montré que l’aromatase est exprimée dès 12,5 jours post-conception (jpc) et que l’expression est maximum à 17,5 jpc. Deux transcripts tronqués ont également été détectés par RT-PCR. La localisation cellulaire de l’aromatase a été étudiée par immunohistologie et par immunomarquage après séparation des cellules testiculaires. Cette enzyme est très fortement exprimée dans les cellules de Leydig fœtales. Elle est également exprimée dans les gonocytes mais plus faiblement et à un niveau variable selon les cellules. En revanche, elle est indétectable dans les cellules de Sertoli.En conclusion, cette étude montre pour la première fois chez la souris que 1) l’aromatase est exprimée dès le début de l’ontogenèse testiculaire, 2) elle est exprimée dans les gonocytes suggérant que ces cellules interviennent dans l’endocrinologie testiculaire et que le rapport oestrogènes/androgènes est plus important dans les gonocytes que dans le liquide interstitiel. En outre, on sait que, chez le fœtus de rat l’aromatase est essentiellement exprimée par les cellules de Sertoli. Nous proposons de prendre en compte cette différence inter-espèces comme un nouveau concept pour comprendre les diff

  18. Gestational exposure to ethanol suppresses msx2 expression in developing mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Rifas, L; Towler, D A; Avioli, L V

    1997-07-08

    Ethanol acts as a teratogen in developing fetuses causing abnormalities of the brain, heart, craniofacial bones, and limb skeletal elements. To assess whether some teratogenic actions of ethanol might occur via dysregulation of msx2 expression, we examined msx2 expression in developing mouse embryos exposed to ethanol on embryonic day (E) 8 of gestation and subjected to whole mount in situ hybridization on E11-11.5 using a riboprobe for mouse msx2. Control mice exhibited expression of msx2 in developing brain, the developing limb buds and apical ectodermal ridge, the lateral and nasal processes, olfactory pit, palatal shelf of the maxilla, the eye, the lens of the eye, otic vesicle, prevertebral bodies (notochord), and endocardial cushion. Embryos exposed to ethanol in utero were significantly smaller than their normal counterparts and did not exhibit expression of msx2 in any structures. Similarly, msx2 expression, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot hybridization, was reduced approximately 40-50% in fetal mouse calvarial osteoblastic cells exposed to 1% ethanol for 48 hr while alkaline phosphatase was increased by 2-fold and bone morphogenetic protein showed essentially no change. Transcriptional activity of the msx2 promoter was specifically suppressed by alcohol in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. Taken together, these data demonstrate that fetal alcohol exposure decreases msx2 expression, a known regulator of osteoblast and myoblast differentiation, and suggest that one of the "putative" mechanisms for fetal alcohol syndrome is the inhibition of msx2 expression during key developmental periods leading to developmental retardation, altered craniofacial morphogenesis, and cardiac defects.

  19. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. PMID:24953867

  1. Expression analysis of the entire MMP and TIMP gene families during mouse tissue development.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Robert K; Sampieri, Clara L; Pennington, Caroline J; Gill, Sean E; Schultz, Gilbert A; Edwards, Dylan R

    2004-04-09

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs) cleave many extracellular proteins, including matrix, growth factors, and receptors. We profiled the RNA levels of every MMP, several ADAMs, and inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs and RECK) in numerous mouse tissues during development and in the uterus during pregnancy. Observations include: most secreted MMPs are expressed at low to undetectable levels in tissues, whereas membrane-bound MMPs, ADAMs and inhibitors are abundant; almost every proteinase and inhibitor is present in the uterus or placenta at some time during gestation; the mouse collagenases mColA and mColB are found exclusively in the uterus and testis; and each tissue has its unique signature of proteinase and inhibitor expression.

  2. Laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding RNAs in the mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Fertuzinhos, Sofia; Li, Mingfeng; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Ivic, Vedrana; Franjic, Daniel; Singh, Darshani; Crair, Michael; Sestan, Nenad

    2014-03-13

    The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  3. Acidic duodenal pH alters gene expression in the cystic fibrosis mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Norkina, Oxana; Ziemer, Donna; Samuelson, Linda C; De Lisle, Robert C

    2004-08-01

    The duodenum is abnormally acidic in cystic fibrosis (CF) due to decreased bicarbonate ion secretion that is dependent on the CF gene product CFTR. In the CFTR null mouse, the acidic duodenum results in increased signaling from the intestine to the exocrine pancreas in an attempt to stimulate pancreatic bicarbonate ion secretion. Excess stimulation is proposed to add to the stress/inflammation of the pancreas in CF. DNA microarray analysis of the CF mouse revealed altered pancreatic gene expression characteristic of stress/inflammation. When the duodenal pH was corrected genetically (crossing CFTR null with gastrin null mice) or pharmacologically (use of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole), expression levels of genes measured by quantitative RT-PCR were significantly normalized. It is concluded that the acidic duodenal pH in CF contributes to the stress on the exocrine pancreas and that normalizing duodenal pH reduces this stress.

  4. Expression of Slit and Robo genes in the developing mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Medioni, Caroline; Bertrand, Nicolas; Mesbah, Karim; Hudry, Bruno; Dupays, Laurent; Wolstein, Orit; Washkowitz, Andrew J; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Mohun, Timothy J; Harvey, Richard P; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    Development of the mammalian heart is mediated by complex interactions between myocardial, endocardial, and neural crest-derived cells. Studies in Drosophila have shown that the Slit-Robo signaling pathway controls cardiac cell shape changes and lumen formation of the heart tube. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that multiple Slit ligands and Robo receptors are expressed in the developing mouse heart. Slit3 is the predominant ligand transcribed in the early mouse heart and is expressed in the ventral wall of the linear heart tube and subsequently in chamber but not in atrioventricular canal myocardium. Furthermore, we identify that the homeobox gene Nkx2-5 is required for early ventral restriction of Slit3 and that the T-box transcription factor Tbx2 mediates repression of Slit3 in nonchamber myocardium. Our results suggest that patterned Slit-Robo signaling may contribute to the control of oriented cell growth during chamber morphogenesis of the mammalian heart.

  5. Expression of Gpr177, a Wnt trafficking regulator, in mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiao-Man Ivy; Jin, Ying; Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei

    2010-07-01

    Wls/Evi/Srt encoding a multipass transmembrane protein has been identified as a regulator for proper sorting and secretion of Wnt in flies. We have previously demonstrated that Gpr177 is the mouse ortholog required for axis determination. Gpr177 is a transcriptional target of Wnt that is activated to assist its subcellular distribution in a feedback regulatory loop. We, therefore, proposed that reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the Wnt-dependent developmental and pathogenic processes. Here, we examine the expression pattern of Gpr177 in mouse development. Gpr177 is expressed in a variety of tissues and cell types during organogenesis. Furthermore, Gpr177 is a glycoprotein primarily accumulating in the Golgi apparatus in signal-producing cells. The glycosylation of Gpr177 is necessary for proper transportation in the secretory pathway. Our findings suggest that the Gpr177-mediated regulation of Wnt is crucial for organogenesis in health and disease.

  6. [Activation of the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones in the presence of nitrofurans and NO generators].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, Iu V; Granik, V G; Belik, A S; Koksharova, O A; Khmel', I A

    2010-01-01

    Nitrofurans (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin, furazidin, nifuroxazide), and nitric oxide generators (sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate) in subinhibitory concentrations were shown to significantly increase the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones, signaling molecules of Quorum Sensing (QS) regulatory systems. The highest activation of bioluminescence (up to 250-400 fold) was observed in the presence of nitrofurazone on E. coli DH5alpha biosensors containing lux-reporter plasmids pSB401 or pSB536. However, this activation was not specifically associated with the functioning of QS systems. We suggest that the effect observed results from a direct action of nitrofurans and NO donors on the process of bioluminescence. The data indicate the necessity of using the biosensors that make it possible to detect specific effects of substances tested on QS regulation.

  7. Matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (UV-MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of N-acylated and N,O-acylated glycosylamines.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuto; Fukuyama, Yuko; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Stortz, Carlos A; Cerezo, Alberto S; Matulewicz, María C

    2007-12-10

    Matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI-TOF-MS) has shown to be a very useful technique for the study of the non-volatile and thermally non-stable N-acylated glycopyranosyl- and glycofuranosyl-amines. Of the several matrices tested, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was the most effective giving good spectra in the positive-ion mode. In the linear and reflectron modes, the [M+Na](+) ions appeared with high intensity. Their fragmentation patterns were investigated by post-source decay (PSD) UV-MALDI-TOF-MS showing mainly cross-ring cleavages. In addition, N,O-acylated glycopyranosyl- and glycofuranosyl-amines were also analyzed by this technique. PSD UV-MALDI-TOF-MS gave significant signals for several primary fragment ions, which were proposed but not detected, or observed with very low abundance, in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) experiments.

  8. Biochemical engineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acids alters the kinetics of a glycosylated potassium channel Kv3.1.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Reutter, Werner; Lindhorst, Thisbe; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2011-10-20

    The sialic acid of complex N-glycans can be biochemically engineered by substituting the physiological precursor N-acetylmannosamine with non-natural N-acylmannosamines. The Kv3.1 glycoprotein, a neuronal voltage-gated potassium channel, contains sialic acid. Western blots of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein isolated from transfected B35 neuroblastoma cells incubated with N-acylmannosamines verified sialylated N-glycans attached to the Kv3.1 glycoprotein. Outward ionic currents of Kv3.1 transfected B35 cells treated with N-pentanoylmannosamine or N-propanoylmannosamine had slower activation and inactivation rates than those of untreated cells. Therefore, the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is intimately connected with the activation and inactivation rates of this glycosylated potassium channel.

  9. Investigations into the post-translational modification and mechanism of isopenicillin N:acyl-CoA acyltransferase using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, R T; Baldwin, J E; Roach, P L; Robinson, C V; Schofield, C J

    1993-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry (e.s.m.s.) was used to confirm the position of the post-translational cleavage of the isopenicillin N:acyl-CoA acyltransferase preprotein to give the alpha- and beta-subunits. The e.s.m.s. studies suggested partial modification of the alpha-subunit in vivo by exogenously added substituted acetic acids. E.s.m.s. has also allowed the observation in vitro of the transfer of the acyl group from several acyl-CoAs to the beta-subunit. N.m.r. data for the CoA species have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 500173 (2 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre (DSC), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1993) 289, 9. Images Figure 1 PMID:8396910

  10. Synthesis, characterization stereochemistry and anti-bacterial evaluation of certain N-acyl-c-3,t-3-dimethyl-r-2,c-6-diphenylpiperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuswamy, S.; Kayalvizhi, R.; Jamesh, M.; Uma Maheswari, J.; Thenmozhi, M.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    A new series of N-acyl-c-3,t-3-dimethyl-r-2,c-6-diphenylpiperidin-4-ones 2-6 has been synthesized and characterized using IR, mass, 1H, 13C, DEPT and 2D (COSY and HSQC) NMR spectral techniques. The NMR spectral data indicate that the N-acylpiperidin-4-ones 2-6 prefer to exist in a distorted boat conformation B1 with coplanar orientation of N-C=O moiety. The stereodynamics of these systems have been studied by recording the dynamic 1H NMR spectra of compound 4, and the energy barrier for N-CO rotation is determined to be 52.75 kJ/mol. Furthermore the compounds 1-5 show significant antibacterial activity.

  11. Anti-cancer agents based on N-acyl-2, 3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] quinoline derivatives and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. In particular, the invention relates to N-acyl derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinolines having the structural Formula (I), ##STR00001## stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. The meaning of R1 is independently selected from H; C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl substituents; R2 is selected from C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl; substituted or non-substituted, fused or non-fused to substituted or non-substituted aromatic ring, aryl or heteroaryl groups. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  12. Development of an extraction method and LC-MS analysis for N-acylated-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) in wastewater treatment biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Ding, Lili; Li, Kan; Schmieder, Wilhelm; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-01-15

    N-Acylated-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) play a vital role in Gram-negative bacteria communication by promoting the formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and biofilms. However, the low concentration of these AHL signals makes the process difficult to understand. A robust and sensitive pretreatment method for AHL detection was developed in this work. Compared with eight different solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns and three various solid extraction method, we found that the UE (ultrasonic extraction) and an Oasis hydrophilic-lipophilic-balanced (HLB) sorbent in column format combined with ultra-performance liquid chromatography linked to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) can be successfully used for systematic pretreating moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) biological samples to extract AHLs and determine concentration of AHLs in wastewater treatment biofilms. This easy-to-follow protocol makes it ideal for quantitative analyses of AHLs in wastewater treatment biofilms.

  13. Neuregulin 1 Expression and Electrophysiological Abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 Transmembrane Domain Heterozygous Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Elisabeth; Shaw, Alex; Liu, Shijie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pinault, Didier; Karl, Tim; O’Brien, Terence J.; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia; Jones, Nigel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma) electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile. Methods Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT) mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine. Results In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III) domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Interpretation We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function. PMID

  14. Sequence and neuronal expression of mouse endothelin-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kurama, M; Ishida, N; Matsui, M; Saida, K; Mitsui, Y

    1996-07-17

    We have isolated and sequenced a cDNA that encodes mouse endothelin-1 (ET-1). The putative protein contains 202 amino acids corresponds to the prepro-form of ET-1. Twenty-one amino acids sequence of the putative mature ET-1 was identical with that of rat, porcine, bovine, and human. In situ hybridization histochemistry indicate that ET-1 mRNA was expressed in several hypothalamic nuclei including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in rodent brain.

  15. Postnatal developmental expression of regulator of G protein signaling 14 (RGS14) in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul R; Lee, Sarah E; Smith, Yoland; Hepler, John R

    2014-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 14 (RGS14) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that integrates G protein and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. In the adult mouse brain, RGS14 mRNA and protein are found almost exclusively in hippocampal CA2 neurons. We have shown that RGS14 is a natural suppressor of CA2 synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. However, the protein distribution and spatiotemporal expression patterns of RGS14 in mouse brain during postnatal development are unknown. Here, using a newly characterized monoclonal anti-RGS14 antibody, we demonstrate that RGS14 protein immunoreactivity is undetectable at birth (P0), with very low mRNA expression in the brain. However, RGS14 protein and mRNA are upregulated during early postnatal development, with protein first detected at P7, and both increasing over time until reaching highest sustained levels throughout adulthood. Our immunoperoxidase data demonstrate that RGS14 protein is expressed in regions outside of hippocampal CA2 during development including the primary olfactory areas, the anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex, and the olfactory associated orbital and entorhinal cortices. RGS14 is also transiently expressed in neocortical layers II/III and V during postnatal development. Finally, we show that RGS14 protein is first detected in the hippocampus at P7, with strongest immunoreactivity in CA2 and fasciola cinerea and sporadic immunoreactivity in CA1; labeling intensity in hippocampus increases until adulthood. These results show that RGS14 mRNA and protein are upregulated throughout postnatal mouse development, and RGS14 protein exhibits a dynamic localization pattern that is enriched in hippocampus and primary olfactory cortex in the adult mouse brain.

  16. Expression of the prion-like protein Shadoo in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Bouet, Stéphan; Polyte, Jacqueline; Le Guillou, Sandrine; Passet, Bruno; Vilotte, Marthe; Castille, Johan; Beringue, Vincent; Le Provost, Fabienne; Laude, Hubert; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2011-12-09

    The prion-like protein Shadoo has been suggested to compensate for the lack of PrP in Prnp-knockout mice, explaining their lack of extreme phenotype. In adult mice, both PrP and Shadoo have shown overlapping expression patterns and shared functions. Their expression in the mouse embryo has also been suggested to be complementary, as invalidation of both genes results in embryonic lethality. The developmental expression profile of PrP has been described from post-implantation stages up until birth. However the spatial expression pattern of Shadoo in the developing mouse embryo is not known. We previously described the expression profile of the prion-like protein Shadoo in adult mice using Sprn reporter mice (Sprn-GFP and Sprn-LacZ). Here we used these mice to describe the developmental expression of Shadoo between 10.5 and 14.5 dpc. The observed pattern in specific embryonic cell lineages and in extra-embryonic tissues is consistent with the previously reported phenotype resulting from its knockdown.

  17. Expression of metallothionein mRNAs on mouse cerebellum microglia cells by thimerosal and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takeshi; Miyata, Eriko; Sakamoto, Yamato; Kohama, Azusa; Yamazaki, Hideo; Ichida, Seiji

    2009-06-30

    Effects of thimerosal and its metabolites, ethyl mercury and thiosalicylate, on the expression of metallothionein (MT) mRNAs in mouse cerebellum microglia cell line, C8-B4 cells, were studied. The level of MT-1 mRNA significantly decreased at early hours and recovered time-dependently 24h after thimerosal was added to the C8-B4 cells. However, MT-2 and MT-3 mRNA expressions did not change from the control group. In contrast, the expression of MT-1 mRNA increased in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line 6h after incubation with thimerosal. In addition, the level of MT-1 mRNA decreased in C8-B4 cells 6h after the addition of thiosalicylate, but ethyl mercury induced MT-1 mRNA expression. When cell viability was compared with thimerosal, thiosalicylate, and ethyl mercury, the viability of C8-B4 cells decreased dose-dependently 24h after either thimerosal or ethyl mercury was added; however, the viability increased dose-dependently until 15 microM thiosalicylate was added. From the present results, it is concluded that the expression of MT-1 mRNA may be mediated by different factors than the expression of MT-2 mRNA in C8-B4 cells. The reduction of MT-1 mRNA level by thiosalicylate may affect the proliferation of C8-B4 cells.

  18. Uterine micro-environment and estrogen-dependent regulation of osteopontin expression in mouse blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Zhen; Qi, Qian-Rong; Chen, Ying-Xian; Xu, Wang-Ming; Liu, Qian; Yang, Jing

    2013-07-11

    Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN) in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER). Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  19. Effect of light on global gene expression in the neuroglobin-deficient mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    ILMJÄRV, STEN; REIMETS, RIIN; HUNDAHL, CHRISTIAN ANSGAR; LUUK, HENDRIK

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have raised controversy over the functional role of neuroglobin (Ngb) in the retina. Certain studies indicate a significant impact of Ngb on retinal physiology, whereas others are conflicting. The present is an observational study that tested the effect of Ngb deficiency on gene expression in dark- and light-adapted mouse retinas. Large-scale gene expression profiling was performed using GeneChip® Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays and the results were compared to publicly available data sets. The lack of Ngb was found to have a minor effect on the light-induced retinal gene expression response. In addition, there was no increase in the expression of marker genes associated with hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum-stress and oxidative stress in the Ngb-deficient retina. By contrast, several genes were identified that appeared to be differentially expressed between the genotypes when the effect of light was ignored. The present study indicates that Ngb deficiency does not lead to major alternations in light-dependent gene expression response, but leads to subtle systemic differences of a currently unknown functional significance. PMID:25279145

  20. Sequence analysis, chromosomal location, and developmental expression of the mouse preproendothelin-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Maemura, Koji; Kurihara, Hiroki; Kurihara, Yukiko

    1996-01-15

    Recent studies have designated endothelins (ETs) as morphogenetic factors in embryonic development. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the mouse preproendothelin-1 (preproET-1) gene (Edn1) and examined its expression in reference to development. Edn1 comprises five exons, and the open reading frame encodes the 202-amino-acid preproET-1. The sequences and structural organization of Edn1 are highly homologous to those of other species, especially in the terminal 200-bp sequence of the 3{prime}-noncoding region. Interspecific backcross mapping located Edn1 in the central region of chromosomal 13, where a mouse mutation, congenital hydrocephalus (ch), is also mapped. The highest expression of Edn1 mRNA is detected in the lung in adult mice, whereas Edn1 is predominantly expressed in the epithelium and mesenchyme of the pharyngeal arches and in the endothelium of the large arteries. Edn1 expression and ET-1 peptide levels in the lung progressively increase during the perinatal stage, whereas the expression of Edn3, a gene encoding ET-3, reciprocally decreases. These results suggest that Edn1 expression is developmentally regulated in different tissues and organs in mice in a spatial- and temporal-specific manner. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (NdpAP). In the CNS, NdpAP expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of NdpAP expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, NdpAP expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. PMID:21055480

  2. Probe-Level Analysis of Expression Microarrays Characterizes Isoform-Specific Degradation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Jesse; Hutchison, Keith W.; Wigglesworth, Karen; Eppig, John J.; Graber, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarrays have provided many insights into changes in gene expression patterns between different tissue types, developmental stages, and disease states. Analyses of these data focused primarily measuring the relative abundance of transcripts of a gene, while treating most or all transcript isoforms as equivalent. Differences in the selection between transcript isoforms can, however, represent critical changes to either the protein product or the posttranscriptional regulation of the transcript. Novel analyses on existing microarray data provide fresh insights and new interpretations into transcriptome-wide changes in expression. Methodology A probe-level analysis of existing gene expression arrays revealed differences in mRNA processing, primarily affecting the 3′-untranslated region. Working with the example of microarrays drawn from a transcriptionally silent period of mouse oocyte development, probe-level analysis (implemented here as rmodel) identified genes whose transcript isoforms have differing stabilities. Comparison of micorarrays measuring cDNA generated from oligo-dT and random primers revealed further differences in the polyadenylation status of some transcripts. Additional analysis provided evidence for sequence-targeted cleavage, including putative targeting sequences, as one mechanism of degradation for several hundred transcripts in the maturing oocyte. Conclusions The capability of probe-level analysis to elicit novel findings from existing expression microarray data was demonstrated. The characterization of differences in stability between transcript isoforms in maturing mouse oocytes provided some mechanistic details of degradation. Similar analysis of existing archives of expression microarray data will likely provide similar discoveries. PMID:19834616

  3. Restricted development of mouse triploid fetuses with disorganized expression of imprinted genes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Takahashi, Masashi; Kawahara, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic species commonly contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. The diploid state appears to be advantageous for mammals because it enables sexual reproduction and facilitates genetic recombination. Nonetheless, the effects of DNA ploidy on mammalian ontogeny have yet to be understood. The present study shows phenotypic features and expression patterns of imprinted genes in tripronucleate diandric and digynic triploid (DAT and DGT) mouse fetuses on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). Measurement of crown-rump length revealed that the length of DGT fetuses (1.87 ± 0.13 mm; mean ± standard error of the mean) was much smaller than that of diploid fetuses (4.81 ± 0.05 mm). However, no significant difference was observed in the crown-rump length between diploid and DAT fetuses (3.86 ± 0.43 mm). In DGT fetuses, the expression level of paternally expressed genes, Igf2, Dlk1, Ndn, and Peg3, remained significantly reduced and that of maternally expressed genes, Igf2r and Grb10, increased. Additionally, in DAT fetuses, the Igf2 mRNA expression level was approximately twice that in diploid fetuses, as expected. These results provide the first demonstration that imprinted genes in mouse triploid fetuses show distinctive expression patterns independent of the number of parental-origin haploid sets. These data suggest that both DNA ploidy and asymmetrical functions of parental genomes separately influence mammalian ontogeny.

  4. Spatiotemporal expression of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN during mouse tooth development.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Li, Lingyun; Wang, Ding; Li, Shu; Chen, Zhi; An, Zhengwen

    2016-06-01

    Caveolin-1 is a scaffolding protein involved in the formation of cholesterol-rich caveolae lipid rafts within the plasma membrane and is capable of collecting signaling molecules into the caveolae and regulating their activity, including extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). However, detailed expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing dental germ are largely unknown. The present study investigated the expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing mouse tooth germ by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the bud stage, caveolin-1 expression was initiated in the epithelium bud and mesenchymal cells, while EMMPRIN was weakly expressed at this stage. At the cap stage, caveolin-1 protein was located in the lingual part of the tooth germ; however, EMMPRIN protein was located in the labial part. From the bell stage to 2 days postnatal, caveolin-1 expression was detected in the ameloblasts and cervical loop area; with EMMPRIN expression in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN mRNA levels increased gradually with progression of developmental stages, and peaked at day two postnatal. The current finding suggests that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN take part in mouse tooth development, especially in the differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues.

  5. A genome-scale map of expression for a mouse brain section obtained using voxelation

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Mark H.; Geng, Alex B.; Khan, Arshad H.; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Boline, Jyl; Levy, Shawn; Toga, Arthur W.; Smith, Richard D.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2007-08-20

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological diseases. We have reconstructed 2- dimensional images of gene expression for 20,000 genes in a coronal slice of the mouse brain at the level of the striatum by using microarrays in combination with voxelation at a resolution of 1 mm3. Good reliability of the microarray results were confirmed using multiple replicates, subsequent quantitative RT-PCR voxelation, mass spectrometry voxelation and publicly available in situ hybridization data. Known and novel genes were identified with expression patterns localized to defined substructures within the brain. In addition, genes with unexpected patterns were identified and cluster analysis identified a set of genes with a gradient of dorsal/ventral expression not restricted to known anatomical boundaries. The genome-scale maps of gene expression obtained using voxelation will be a valuable tool for the neuroscience community.

  6. High-throughput microarray detection of olfactory receptor gene expression in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinmin; Rogers, Matthew; Tian, Huikai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zou, Dong-Jing; Liu, Jian; Ma, Minghong; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Firestein, Stuart J.

    2004-01-01

    The large number of olfactory receptor genes necessitates high throughput methods to analyze their expression patterns. We have therefore designed a high-density oligonucleotide array containing all known mouse olfactory receptor (OR) and V1R vomeronasal receptor genes. This custom array detected a large number of receptor genes, demonstrating specific expression in the olfactory sensory epithelium for ≈800 OR genes previously designated as ORs based solely on genomic sequences. The array also enabled us to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of gene expression for the entire OR family. Interestingly, OR genes showing spatially segregated expression patterns were also segregated on the chromosomes. This correlation between genomic location and spatial expression provides unique insights about the regulation of this large family of genes. PMID:15377787

  7. Estrogen effects on the expression of Brx in the brain and pituitary of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David O; Baldwin, Emily L; Segars, James H; Wu, T J

    2006-04-28

    A member of the Dbl family of oncoproteins was discovered in breast cancer tissue extracts. This novel protein, designated Brx, contains an estrogen-receptor binding motif and is highly expressed in hormone-responsive breast tissue. Due to its ability to augment ligand-dependent activation of estrogen receptors, we analyzed the expression of Brx in the adult mouse brain and pituitary. Results indicated that Brx was expressed in specific regions of the brain and pituitary. Furthermore, the results indicate that differences exist in both brain and pituitary tissue of male and female mice with greater expression in the female. However, estrogen did not influence Brx expression in ovariectomized mice. The anatomical studies support a role for Brx in its association with the estrogen receptor and that Brx may be involved in neuronal and pituitary function in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  8. Dynamic changes in stanniocalcin gene expression in the mouse uterus during early implantation.

    PubMed

    Stasko, S E; DiMattia, G E; Wagner, G F

    2001-03-28

    Blastocyst implantation is accompanied by dramatic changes in gene expression to facilitate decidualization and remodelling of uterine architecture. Stanniocalcin (STC) is a new mammalian polypeptide hormone with roles in ion transport, reproduction and development. Here we report dynamic changes in STC mRNA and protein distributions in the early post-implantation mouse uterus. In the non-pregnant state, STC gene expression was confined to the uterine lumenal epithelium. Following implantation STC gene expression shifted to mesometrial stromal cells bordering the uterine lumen. Between E6.5-E8.5 expression shifted once more to cells of the mesometrial lateral sinusoids, and then declined thereafter. Intriguingly immunoreactive STC did not entirely co-localize with areas of high STC gene activity and instead appeared to accumulate in presumptive targets of the hormone (uterine epithelium, stromal and decidual cells, trophoblastic giant cells). STC is only the fourth gene identified as being expressed mesometrially in the uterus following implantation.

  9. A genome-scale map of expression for a mouse brain section obtained using voxelation

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Mark H.; Geng, Alex B.; Khan, Arshad H.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Boline, Jyl; Levy, Shawn; Toga, Arthur W.; Smith, Richard D.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological diseases. We have reconstructed two-dimensional images of gene expression for 20,000 genes in a coronal slice of the mouse brain at the level of the striatum by using microarrays in combination with voxelation at a resolution of 1 mm3. Good reliability of the microarray results were confirmed using multiple replicates, subsequent quantitative RT-PCR voxelation, mass spectrometry voxelation, and publicly available in situ hybridization data. Known and novel genes were identified with expression patterns localized to defined substructures within the brain. In addition, genes with unexpected patterns were identified, and cluster analysis identified a set of genes with a gradient of dorsal/ventral expression not restricted to known anatomical boundaries. The genome-scale maps of gene expression obtained using voxelation will be a valuable tool for the neuroscience community. PMID:17504947

  10. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Human coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression in transgenic mouse prostate tumors enhances adenoviral delivery of genes.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yunhua; Peng, Weidan; Verbitsky, Amy; Chen, Jiping; Wu, Lily; Rauen, Katherine A; Sawicki, Janet A

    2005-09-01

    Transgenic mice that recapitulate the progression of human diseases are potentially useful models for testing the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Their use in pre-clinical testing of adenovirally-delivered gene therapies, however, is limited because of restricted cell surface expression of Coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) in mice. To develop a more suitable transgenic mouse model for testing adenoviral-based gene therapies for prostate cancer, we generated prostate specific antigen/human CAR (PSA/hCAR) transgenic mice in which a chimeric enhancer/promoter sequence of the human PSA gene drives expression of a functional hCAR coding sequence. Expression of an adenovirally-delivered luciferase reporter gene in prostate tumor cells in bigenic mice (PSA/hCAR + TRAMP) was enhanced compared to the level in tumor cells lacking the PSA/hCAR transgene. Breeding PSA/hCAR mice to existing transgenic mouse models for prostate cancer (e.g., TRAMP) results in improved mouse models for testing adenovirally-delivered therapeutic genes. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Prostaglandin F2α upregulates Slit/Robo expression in mouse corpus luteum during luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejing; Li, Jianhua; Liu, Jiali; Luo, Haoshu; Gou, Kemian; Cui, Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Prostaglandin F2 α (PGF2 α) is a key factor in the triggering of the regression of the corpus luteum (CL). Furthermore, it has been reported that Slit/Robo signaling is involved in the regulation of luteolysis. However, the interactions between PGF2 α and Slit/Robo in the progression of luteolysis remain to be established. This study was designed to determine whether luteolysis is regulated by the interactions of PGF2 α and Slit/Robo in the mouse CL. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry results showed that Slit2 and its receptor Robo1 are highly and specifically co-expressed in the mouse CL. Functional studies showed that Slit/Robo participates in mouse luteolysis by enhancing cell apoptosis and upregulating caspase3 expression. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that PGF2 α significantly increases the expression of Slit2 and Robo1 during luteolysis through protein kinase C-dependent ERK1/2 and P38 MAPK signaling pathways, whereas an inhibitor of Slit/Robo signaling significantly decreases the stimulating effect of PGF2 α on luteolysis. These findings indicate that Slit/Robo signaling plays important roles in PGF2 α-induced luteolysis by mediating the PGF2 α signaling pathway in the CL.

  13. BRD4 regulates Nanog expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Stein, P; Cheng, X; Yang, W; Shao, N-Y; Morrisey, E E; Schultz, R M; You, J

    2014-12-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important epigenetic reader implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of different cancers and other diseases. Brd4-null mouse embryos die shortly after implantation and are compromised in their ability to maintain the inner cell mass, which gives rise to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we report that BRD4 regulates expression of the pluripotency factor Nanog in mouse ESCs and preimplantation embryos, as well as in human ESCs and embryonic cancer stem cells. Inhibition of BRD4 function using a chemical inhibitor, small interfering RNAs, or a dominant-negative approach suppresses Nanog expression, and abolishes the self-renewal ability of ESCs. We also find that BRD4 associates with BRG1 (brahma-related gene 1, aka Smarca4 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4)), a key regulator of ESC self-renewal and pluripotency, in the Nanog regulatory regions to regulate Nanog expression. Our study identifies Nanog as a novel BRD4 target gene, providing new insights for the biological function of BRD4 in stem cells and mouse embryos. Knowledge gained from these non-cancerous systems will facilitate future investigations of how Brd4 dysfunction leads to cancers.

  14. Structure and expression of the mouse beta-hexosaminidase genes, Hexa and Hexb.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, S; Johnson, O N; Norflus, F; Boles, D J; Proia, R L

    1994-06-01

    Two genes, HEXA and HEXB, encode the alpha- and beta-subunits, respectively, of human beta-hexosaminidase. In the mouse, the corresponding genes are termed Hexa and Hexb. The subunits dimerize to yield three isozymes, beta-hexosaminidase A (alpha beta), B (beta beta), and S (alpha alpha), that have the capacity to degrade a variety of substrates containing beta-linked N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine residues. Mutations in the HEXA or HEXB gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase deficiency cause Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease, respectively. As a prelude to the creation of mouse models of these lysosomal storage diseases, we have characterized the molecular biology of the mouse beta-hexosaminidase system. Protein sequences derived from the cloned Hexa and Hexb cDNAs were 55% identical to each other and were also very similar to the cognate human sequences: 84% sequence identity with human HEXA and 75% with HEXB. The mouse hexosaminidase subunits, when expressed in HeLa cells from the cDNAs, displayed specificity toward synthetic substrates similar to the human subunits. The Hexa and Hexb genes were 25 and 22 kb in length, respectively. Each gene was divided into 14 exons, with the positions of introns precisely matching those of the corresponding human genes. The 5' flanking regions of the mouse genes demonstrated promoter activity as ascertained by their ability to drive chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The sequences of these regulatory regions were G+C-rich in the 200 bp upstream of the respective initiator ATGs. Several putative promoter elements were present, including Sp1, AP2, CAAT, and TATA motifs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL EXPRESSING EXCLUSIVELY HUMAN HEMOGLOBIN E: INDICATIONS OF A MILD OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuying; Fabry, Mary E.; Rybicki, Anne C.; Suzuka, Sandra M.; Balazs, Tatiana C.; Etzion, Zipora; de Jong, Kitty; Akoto, Edna K.; Canterino, Joseph E.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.; Kuypers, Frans A.; Lefer, David; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) E (β26 Glu→ Lys) is the most common abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) variant in the world. Homozygotes for HbE are mildly thalassemic as a result of the alternate splice mutation and present with a benign clinical picture (microcytic and mildly anemic) with rare clinical symptoms. Given that the human red blood cell (RBC) contains both HbE and excess α-chains along with minor hemoglobins, the consequence of HbE alone on RBC pathophysiology has not been elucidated. This becomes critical for the highly morbid βE-thalassemia disease. We have generated transgenic mice exclusively expressing human HbE (HbEKO) that exhibit the known aberrant splicing of βE globin mRNA, but are essentially non-thalassemic as demonstrated by RBC α/β (human) globin chain synthesis. These mice exhibit hematological characteristics similar to presentations in human EE individuals: microcytic RBC with low MCV and MCH but normal MCHC; target RBC; mild anemia with low Hb, HCT and mildly elevated reticulocyte levels and decreased osmotic fragility, indicating altered RBC surface area to volume ratio. These alterations are correlated with a mild RBC oxidative stress indicated by enhanced membrane lipid peroxidation, elevated zinc protoporphyrin levels, and by small but significant changes in cardiac function. The C57 (background) mouse and full KO mouse models expressing HbE with the presence of HbS or HbA are used as controls. In select cases, the HbA full KO mouse model is compared but found to be limited due to its RBC thalassemic characteristics. Since the HbEKO mouse RBC lacks an abundance of excess α-chains that would approximate a mouse thalassemia (or a human thalassemia), the results indicate that the observed in vivo RBC mild oxidative stress arises, at least in part, from the molecular consequences of the HbE mutation. PMID:22260787

  16. Distribution and characterisation of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Cork, Simon C.; Richards, James E.; Holt, Marie K.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although Glucagon-like peptide 1 is a key regulator of energy metabolism and food intake, the precise location of GLP-1 receptors and the physiological relevance of certain populations is debatable. This study investigated the novel GLP-1R-Cre mouse as a functional tool to address this question. Methods Mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Glp1r promoter were crossed with either a ROSA26 eYFP or tdRFP reporter strain to identify GLP-1R expressing cells. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on tdRFP-positive neurons in acute coronal brain slices from adult mice and selective targeting of GLP-1R cells in vivo was achieved using viral gene delivery. Results Large numbers of eYFP or tdRFP immunoreactive cells were found in the circumventricular organs, amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei and the ventrolateral medulla. Smaller numbers were observed in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the thalamic paraventricular nucleus. However, tdRFP positive neurons were also found in areas without preproglucagon-neuronal projections like hippocampus and cortex. GLP-1R cells were not immunoreactive for GFAP or parvalbumin although some were catecholaminergic. GLP-1R expression was confirmed in whole-cell recordings from BNST, hippocampus and PVN, where 100 nM GLP-1 elicited a reversible inward current or depolarisation. Additionally, a unilateral stereotaxic injection of a cre-dependent AAV into the PVN demonstrated that tdRFP-positive cells express cre-recombinase facilitating virally-mediated eYFP expression. Conclusions This study is a comprehensive description and phenotypic analysis of GLP-1R expression in the mouse CNS. We demonstrate the power of combining the GLP-1R-CRE mouse with a virus to generate a selective molecular handle enabling future in vivo investigation as to their physiological importance. PMID:26500843

  17. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  18. Expression of simple epithelial cytokeratins in mouse epidermal keratinocytes harboring Harvey ras gene alterations.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Guerra, M; Haddow, S; Bauluz, C; Jorcano, J L; Cano, A; Balmain, A; Quintanilla, M

    1992-02-01

    Activation of a Harvey ras (H-ras) protooncogene is a frequent event associated with mouse epidermal carcinogenesis. We report that the transfection of a human H-ras oncogene into an immortalized mouse epidermal cell line (MCA3D) induces the anomalous expression of cytokeratins (CKs) 8 and 18 characteristic of simple epithelia. The comparison of various transfectant cell clones indicated a direct correlation between the levels of CK8 expression and the mutated H-ras p21s. The expression of simple epithelial CKs is also described in cell lines derived from mouse skin carcinomas (HaCa4, CarC) and in keratinocytes transformed in vitro by a chemical carcinogen (PDV, PDVC57), all of which contain altered H-ras genes. The induction of CK8 and CK18 occurs at the mRNA level and, although both CK8 and CK18 mRNAs are expressed, CK18 protein does not accumulate whereas CK8 is incorporated into intermediate filaments. Immunofluorescence studies show that the pattern of CK8 protein expression is heterogeneous; some cells express very low amounts of CK8, whereas others synthesize relatively high levels of this protein. However, selection of strongly CK8-positive cells was found in one case where a more malignant population of cells (PDVC57) was derived by tumor transplantation of PDV. Our results suggest that activation of a H-ras gene can alter the normal differentiation program of epidermal cells and that the ability to synthesize CK8 and CK18 could be related to tumor progression.

  19. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  20. Transcriptomic profiling comparison of YAP over-expression and conditional knockout mouse tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2015-09-01

    To identify the downstream target genes of YAP, we used RNA-Seq technology to compare the transcriptomic profilings of Yap conditional knockout (Yap CKO) and YAP over-expression mouse tooth germs. Our results showed that some Hox, Wnt and Laminin family genes had concurrent changes with YAP transcripts, indicating that the expression of these genes may be regulated by YAP. Here, we provide the detailed experimental procedure for the transcriptomic profiling results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE65524). The associated study on the regulation of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 genes by YAP was published in Molecular Cellular Biology in 2015 [Liu et al., 2015].

  1. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1{sub C}YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+){sub s}evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  2. Specific pattern of ionic channel gene expression associated with pacemaker activity in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Marionneau, Céline; Couette, Brigitte; Liu, Jie; Li, Huiyu; Mangoni, Matteo E; Nargeot, Joël; Lei, Ming; Escande, Denis; Demolombe, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    Even though sequencing of the mammalian genome has led to the discovery of a large number of ionic channel genes, identification of the molecular determinants of cellular electrical properties in different regions of the heart has been rarely obtained. We developed a high-throughput approach capable of simultaneously assessing the expression pattern of ionic channel repertoires from different regions of the mouse heart. By using large-scale real-time RT-PCR, we have profiled 71 channels and related genes in the sinoatrial node (SAN), atrioventricular node (AVN), the atria (A) and ventricles (V). Hearts from 30 adult male C57BL/6 mice were microdissected and RNA was isolated from six pools of five mice each. TaqMan data were analysed using the threshold cycle (C(t)) relative quantification method. Cross-contamination of each region was checked with expression of the atrial and ventricular myosin light chains. Two-way hierarchical clustering analysis of the 71 genes successfully classified the six pools from the four distinct regions. In comparison with the A, the SAN and AVN were characterized by higher expression of Nav beta 1, Nav beta 3, Cav1.3, Cav3.1 and Cav alpha 2 delta 2, and lower expression of Kv4.2, Cx40, Cx43 and Kir3.1. In addition, the SAN was characterized by higher expression of HCN1 and HCN4, and lower expression of RYR2, Kir6.2, Cav beta 2 and Cav gamma 4. The AVN was characterized by higher expression of Nav1.1, Nav1.7, Kv1.6, Kvbeta1, MinK and Cav gamma 7. Other gene expression profiles discriminate between the ventricular and the atrial myocardium. The present study provides the first genome-scale regional ionic channel expression profile in the mouse heart.

  3. Expression of cadherin-8 mRNA in the developing mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Korematsu, K; Redies, C

    1997-10-20

    The expression of cadherin-8 was mapped by in situ hybridization in the embryonic and postnatal mouse central nervous system (CNS). From embryonic day 18 (E18) to postnatal day 6 (P6), cadherin-8 expression is restricted to a subset of developing brain nuclei and cortical areas in all major subdivisions of the CNS. The anlagen of some of the cadherin-8-positive structures also express this molecule at earlier developmental stages (E12.5-E16). The cadherin-8-positive neuroanatomical structures are parts of several functional systems in the brain. In the limbic system, cadherin-8-positive regions are found in the septal region, habenular nuclei, amygdala, interpeduncular nucleus, raphe nuclei, and hippocampus. Cerebral cortex shows expression in several limbic areas at P6. In the basal ganglia and related nuclei, cadherin-8 is expressed by parts of the striatum, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, and pedunculopontine nuclei. A third group of cadherin-8-positive gray matter structures has functional connections with the cerebellum (superior colliculus, anterior pretectal nucleus, red nucleus, nucleus of posterior commissure, inferior olive, pontine, pontine reticular, and vestibular nuclei). The cerebellum itself shows parasagittal stripes of cadherin-8 expression in the Purkinje cell layer. In the hindbrain, cadherin-8 is expressed by several cranial nerve nuclei. Results from this study show that cadherin-8 expression in the embryonic and postnatal mouse brain is restricted to specific developing gray matter structures. These data support the idea that cadherins are a family of molecules whose expression provides a molecular code for the regionalization of the developing vertebrate brain.

  4. Analysis of the gene expression profile of mouse male meiotic germ cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Pellegrino; Dolci, Susanna; Sette, Claudio; Capolunghi, Federica; Pellegrini, Manuela; Loiarro, Maria; Di Agostino, Silvia; Paronetto, Maria Paola; Grimaldi, Paola; Merico, Daniele; Martegani, Enzo; Geremia, Raffaele

    2004-05-01

    Wide genome analysis of difference in gene expression between spermatogonial populations from 7-day-old mice and pachytene spermatocytes from 18-day-old mice was performed using Affymetrix gene chips representing approximately 12,500 mouse known genes or EST sequences, spanning approximately 1/3rd of the mouse genome. To delineate differences in the profile of gene expression between mitotic and meiotic stages of male germ cell differentiation, expressed genes were grouped in functional clusters. The analysis confirmed the previously described pre-meiotic or meiotic expression for several genes, in particular for those involved in the regulation of the mitotic and meiotic cell cycle, and for those whose transcripts are accumulated during the meiotic stages to be translated later in post-meiotic stages. Differential expression of several additional genes was discovered. In few cases (pro-apoptotic factors Bak, Bad and Bax), data were in conflict with the previously published stage-dependent expression of genes already known to be expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis of selected genes confirmed the results obtained with the microarray chips. Six of these were novel genes specifically expressed in pachytene spermatocytes: a chromatin remodeling factor (chrac1/YCL1), a homeobox gene (hmx1), a novel G-coupled receptor for an unknown ligand (Gpr19), a glycoprotein of the intestinal epithelium (mucin 3), a novel RAS activator (Ranbp9), and the A630056B21Rik gene (predicted to encode a novel zinc finger protein). These studies will help to delineate the global patterns of gene expression characterizing male germ cell differentiation for a better understanding of regulation of spermatogenesis in mammals.

  5. Transient expression of neuropeptide W in postnatal mouse hypothalamus--a putative regulator of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Motoike, T; Skach, A G; Godwin, J K; Sinton, C M; Yamazaki, M; Abe, M; Natsume, R; Sakimura, K; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-08-20

    Neuropeptide B and W (NPB and NPW) are cognate peptide ligands for NPBWR1 (GPR7), a G protein-coupled receptor. In rodents, they have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine/autonomic responses, and social interactions. Although localization of these peptides and their receptors in adult rodent brain has been well documented, their expression in mouse brain during development is unknown. Here we demonstrate the transient expression of NPW mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of postnatal mouse brain and its co-localization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA. Neurons expressing both NPW and NPY mRNAs begin to emerge in the DMH at about postnatal day 0 (P-0) through P-3. Their expression is highest around P-14, declines after P-21, and by P-28 only a faint expression of NPW and NPY mRNA remains. In P-18 brains, we detected NPW neurons in the region spanning the subincertal nucleus (SubI), the lateral hypothalamic (LH) perifornical (PF) areas, and the DMH, where the highest expression of NPW mRNA was observed. The majority of these postnatal hypothalamic NPW neurons co-express NPY mRNA. A cross of NPW-iCre knock-in mice with a Cre-dependent tdTomato reporter line revealed that more than half of the reporter-positive neurons in the adult DMH, which mature from the transiently NPW-expressing neurons, are sensitive to peripherally administrated leptin. These data suggest that the DMH neurons that transiently co-express NPW and NPY in the peri-weaning period might play a role in regulating energy homeostasis during postnatal development. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential distribution of cubilin and megalin expression in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Drake, Christopher J; Fleming, Paul A; Larue, Amanda C; Barth, Jeremy L; Chintalapudi, Mastan R; Argraves, W Scott

    2004-03-01

    Cubilin and megalin are cell surface proteins that work cooperatively in many absorptive epithelia to mediate endocytosis of lipoproteins, vitamin carriers, and other proteins. Here we have investigated the coordinate expression of these receptors during mouse development. Our findings indicate that while there are sites where the receptors are co-expressed, there are other tissues where expression is not overlapping. Apical cubilin expression is pronounced in the extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) of 6-9.5 days postcoitum (dpc) embryos. By contrast, little megalin expression is evident in the VE at 6 dpc. However, megalin expression in the VE increases as development progresses (7.5-9.5 dpc), although it is not as uniformly distributed as cubilin. Punctate expression of megalin is also apparent in the region of the ectoplacental cone associated with decidual cells, whereas cubilin expression is not seen in association with the ectoplacenta. Strong expression of megalin is observed in the neural ectoderm, neural plate and neural tube (6-8.5 dpc), but cubilin expression is not apparent in any of these tissues. At 8.5 dpc, megalin is expressed in the developing endothelial cells of blood islands, whereas cubilin is absent from these cells. Finally, cubilin, but not megalin, is expressed by a subpopulation of cells dispersed within the 7.5 dpc embryonic endoderm and having a migratory morphology. In summary, the co-expression of cubilin and megalin in the VE is consistent with the two proteins functioning jointly in this tissue. However, the differential distribution pattern indicates that the proteins also function independent of one another. Furthermore, the finding of megalin expression in blood island endothelial cells and cubilin expression in embryonic endoderm highlight potential new developmental roles for these proteins.

  7. Inference of immune cell composition on the expression profiles of mouse tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziyi; Huang, Anfei; Sun, Jiya; Jiang, Taijiao; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng; Wu, Aiping

    2017-01-01

    Mice are some of the widely used experimental animal models for studying human diseases. Defining the compositions of immune cell populations in various tissues from experimental mouse models is critical to understanding the involvement of immune responses in various physiological and patho-physiological conditions. However, non-lymphoid tissues are normally composed of vast and diverse cellular components, which make it difficult to quantify the relative proportions of immune cell types. Here we report the development of a computational algorithm, ImmuCC, to infer the relative compositions of 25 immune cell types in mouse tissues using microarray-based mRNA expression data. The ImmuCC algorithm showed good performance and robustness in many simulated datasets. Remarkable concordances were observed when ImmuCC was used on three public datasets, one including enriched immune cells, one with normal single positive T cells, and one with leukemia cell samples. To validate the performance of ImmuCC objectively, thorough cross-comparison of ImmuCC predicted compositions and flow cytometry results was done with in-house generated datasets collected from four distinct mouse lymphoid tissues and three different types of tumor tissues. The good correlation and biologically meaningful results demonstrate the broad utility of ImmuCC for assessing immune cell composition in diverse mouse tissues under various conditions. PMID:28084418

  8. Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinchao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Fengfang; Lin, Weinian

    2015-01-01

    Damage-activated stem/progenitor cells play important roles in regenerating lost cells and in tissue repair. Previous studies reported that the mouse utricle has limited hair cell regeneration ability after hair cell ablation. However, the potential progenitor cell population regenerating new hair cells remains undiscovered. In this study, we first found that Lgr5, a Wnt target gene that is not usually expressed in the neonatal mouse utricle, can be activated by 24 h neomycin treatment in a sub-population of supporting cells in the striolar region of the neonatal mouse utricle. Lineage tracing demonstrated that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate new hair cells in explant culture. We isolated the damage-activated Lgr5-positive cells with flow cytometry and found that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate hair cells in vitro, and self-renew to form spheres, which maintained the capacity to differentiate into hair cells over seven generations of passages. Our results suggest that damage-activated Lgr5-positive supporting cells act as hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse utricle, which may help to uncover a potential route to regenerate hair cell in mammals. PMID:25883551

  9. Gene expression based mouse brain parcellation using Markov random field regularized non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Haynor, David R.; Thompson, Carol L.; Lein, Ed; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the geography of genetic expression in the mouse brain has opened previously unexplored avenues in neuroinformatics. The Allen Brain Atlas (www.brain-map.org) (ABA) provides genome-wide colorimetric in situ hybridization (ISH) gene expression images at high spatial resolution, all mapped to a common three-dimensional 200μm3 spatial framework defined by the Allen Reference Atlas (ARA) and is a unique data set for studying expression based structural and functional organization of the brain. The goal of this study was to facilitate an unbiased data-driven structural partitioning of the major structures in the mouse brain. We have developed an algorithm that uses nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to perform parts based analysis of ISH gene expression images. The standard NMF approach and its variants are limited in their ability to flexibly integrate prior knowledge, in the context of spatial data. In this paper, we introduce spatial connectivity as an additional regularization in NMF decomposition via the use of Markov Random Fields (mNMF). The mNMF algorithm alternates neighborhood updates with iterations of the standard NMF algorithm to exploit spatial correlations in the data. We present the algorithm and show the sub-divisions of hippocampus and somatosensory-cortex obtained via this approach. The results are compared with established neuroanatomic knowledge. We also highlight novel gene expression based sub divisions of the hippocampus identified by using the mNMF algorithm.

  10. Integrative analysis of the connectivity and gene expression atlases in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shuiwang; Fakhry, Ahmed; Deng, Houtao

    2014-01-01

    Brain function is the result of interneuron signal transmission controlled by the fundamental biochemistry of each neuron. The biochemical content of a neuron is in turn determined by spatiotemporal gene expression and regulation encoded into the genomic regulatory networks. It is thus of particular interest to elucidate the relationship between gene expression patterns and connectivity in the brain. However, systematic studies of this relationship in a single mammalian brain are lacking to date. Here, we investigate this relationship in the mouse brain using the Allen Brain Atlas data. We employ computational models for predicting brain connectivity from gene expression data. In addition to giving competitive predictive performance, these models can rank the genes according to their predictive power. We show that gene expression is predictive of connectivity in the mouse brain when the connectivity signals are discretized. When the expression patterns of 4084 genes are used, we obtain a predictive accuracy of 93%. Our results also show that a small number of genes can almost give the full predictive power of using thousands of genes. We can achieve a prediction accuracy of 91% by using only 25 genes. Gene ontology analysis of the highly ranked genes shows that they are enriched for connectivity related processes.

  11. Genomic analysis of sexual dimorphism of gene expression in the mouse adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    El Wakil, A; Mari, B; Barhanin, J; Lalli, E

    2013-11-01

    A relevant gender difference exists in adrenal physiology and propensity to disease. In mice, a remarkable sexual dimorphism is present in several components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with females displaying higher adrenal weight, plasma ACTH, corticosterone, and aldosterone levels than males. The molecular bases of this sexual dimorphism are little known. We have compared global gene expression profiles in males vs. female mouse adrenal glands and also studied the effect that testosterone treatment and castration have on adrenal gene expression in female vs. male mice, respectively. Our study evidenced a set of 71 genes that are coordinately modulated according to sex and hormonal treatments and represent the core sexually dimorphic expression program in the mouse adrenal gland. Moreover, we show that some genes involved in steroid metabolism have a remarkable sexual dimorphic expression and identify new potential markers for the adrenal X-zone, a transitory cellular layer in the inner adrenal cortex, which spontaneously regresses at puberty in males and during the first pregnancy in females and has an uncertain physiological role. Finally, sexually dimorphic expression of the transcriptional regulators Nr5a1 and Nr0b1 may explain at least in part the differences in adrenal steroidogenesis between sexes.

  12. Cloning and expression of mouse peroxiredoxin I in IEC-6 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Su, Yong-Ping; Wang, Tao; Wang, Feng-Chao; Ai, Guo-Ping; Xu, Hui; Wang, Jun-Ping; Huang, Yue-Sheng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2004-07-15

    To clone and express mouse peroxiredoxin I in IEC-6 cells. Total RNAs were isolated from cultured IEC-6 cells, and the coding region of peroxiredoxin I was amplified by RT-PCR. After it was cloned into T-vector and sequenced, pSG5 was used to transiently express peroxiredoxin I in IEC-6 by liposome-mediated transfection, and the expression of peroxiredoxin I was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot. A DNA fragment about 750 bp was amplified from total RNAs of IEC-6 cells using specific primers of peroxiredoxin I. The sequencing confirmed the coding region was successfully cloned into T-vector, which was completely coincident with the sequence in GeneBank. After the EcoRI-BamHI fragment of T-vector containing peroxiredoxin I was inserted into pSG5, the recombinant plasmid was transferred to IEC-6 cells. RT-PCR assay showed that a DNA fragment of 930 bp could be amplified, which indicated the transcription of pSG5-Prx. Western blot confirmed the expression of peroxiredoxin I in IEC-6 cells. Mouse peroxiredoxin I can be successfully expressed in IEC-6 cells.

  13. Huddling facilitates expression of daily torpor in the large Japanese field mouse Apodemus speciosus.

    PubMed

    Eto, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H; Okubo, Yoshinobu; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Kashimura, Atsushi; Morita, Tetsuo

    2014-06-22

    Small endotherms employ multiple adaptations to maintain energy balance in winter, including spontaneous daily torpor and simultaneous huddling. The relationships between these adaptations have been discussed in several previous studies, but it has not been well-established if huddling actually affects the expression of torpor in small endotherms. We examine whether and how huddling affects the expression of torpor in the large Japanese field mouse Apodemus speciosus, which is known to become torpid under artificial winter conditions. The mice were found to adjust expression of torpor in response to the number of cage mates. Torpor frequency and minimum torpid body temperature were both significantly elevated when the number of cage mates was increased, but there was no significant change in torpor bout length. Rewarming rate on arousal was lower when the number of cage mates was increased, suggesting reduction in endogenous rewarming due to exogenous passive rewarming. Food consumption per mouse decreased significantly with increasing number of cage mates. Thus, our study demonstrates that social thermoregulatory behaviors such as huddling can facilitate expression of spontaneous daily torpor in small rodents. These findings suggest that energy constraints, such as ambient temperature and food availability may not be the only modulating factors on the expression of daily torpor.

  14. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  15. Expression of the Bgp gene and characterization of mouse colon biliary glycoprotein isoforms.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, K; Rosenberg, M; Nédellec, P; Turbide, C; Beauchemin, N

    1993-05-30

    The biliary glycoprotein (BGP)-encoding gene is a member of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family. We have now cloned several mouse Bgp cDNAs from an outbred CDR-1 mouse colon cDNA library, as well as by reverse transcription-PCR amplification of colon RNA. The distinguishing features of the deduced Bgp protein isoforms are found in the two divergent N-terminal domains, the highly conserved internal C2-set immunoglobulin domains, and an intracytoplasmic domain of either 10 or 73 amino acids (aa). The cDNA structures suggest that these mRNAs are produced through alternative splicing of a Bgp gene and the usage of multiple transcriptional terminators. The Bgp deduced aa sequences are highly homologous to several well characterized rat hepatocyte proteins such as the cell CAM105/ecto-ATPase/pp120/HA4 proteins. Oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes representing the various cDNA isoform domains revealed predominant transcripts of 1.8, 3.1 and 4.0 kb on Northern analyses of mouse colon RNA; some of these bands are actually composed of several co-migrating transcripts. The transcripts encoding the long intracytoplasmic-tailed Bgp proteins are expressed at one-tenth the relative abundance of the shorter-tailed species. We have previously demonstrated that several mouse Bgp cDNAs, when transfected into eukaryotic cells, express BGP proteins at the cell surface and function in vitro as cell adhesion molecules, much like their human and rat counterparts. The expression of the many Bgp isoforms at the surface of epithelial cells, such as colon, suggests that these proteins play a determinant role, through self- or heterologous contact, in renewal and/or differentiation of their epithelia.

  16. Studies on the Detection, Expression, Glycosylation, Dimerization, and Ligand Binding Properties of Mouse Siglec-E.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shoib; Schwarz, Flavio; Springer, Stevan; Khedri, Zahra; Yu, Hai; Deng, Lingquan; Verhagen, Andrea; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Jiang, Weiping; Kim, Daniel; Zhou, Jie; Ding, Beibei; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit

    2017-01-20

    CD33-related Siglecs are a family of proteins widely expressed on innate immune cells. Binding of sialylated glycans or other ligands triggers signals that inhibit or activate inflammation. Immunomodulation by Siglecs has been extensively studied, but relationships between structure and functions are poorly explored. Here we present new data relating to the structure and function of Siglec-E, the major CD33-related Siglec expressed on mouse neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. We generated nine new rat monoclonal antibodies specific to mouse Siglec-E, with no cross-reactivity to Siglec-F. Although all antibodies detected Siglec-E on transfected human HEK-293T cells, only two reacted with mouse bone marrow neutrophils by flow cytometry and on spleen sections by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, whereas all antibodies recognized Siglec-E-Fc on immunoblots, binding was dependent on intact disulfide bonds and N-glycans, and only two antibodies recognized native Siglec-E within spleen lysates. Thus, we further investigated the impact of Siglec-E homodimerization. Homology-based structural modeling predicted a cysteine residue (Cys-298) in position to form a disulfide bridge between two Siglec-E polypeptides. Mutagenesis of Cys-298 confirmed its role in dimerization. In keeping with the high level of 9-O-acetylation found in mice, sialoglycan array studies indicate that this modification has complex effects on recognition by Siglec-E, in relationship to the underlying structures. However, we found no differences in phosphorylation or SHP-1 recruitment between dimeric and monomeric Siglec-E expressed on HEK293A cells. Phylogenomic analyses predicted that only some human and mouse Siglecs form disulfide-linked dimers. Notably, Siglec-9, the functionally equivalent human paralog of Siglec-E, occurs as a monomer.

  17. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  18. Passenger mutations and aberrant gene expression in congenic tissue plasminogen activator-deficient mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, R.; Samson, A. L.; Lawrence, D. A.; Medcalf, R. L.; Bugge, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The ability to generate defined null mutations in mice revolutionized the analysis of gene function in mammals. However, gene-deficient mice generated by using 129-derived embryonic stem cells may carry large segments of 129 DNA, even when extensively backcrossed to reference strains, such as C57BL/6J, and this may confound interpretation of experiments performed in these mice. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), encoded by the PLAT gene, is a fibrinolytic serine protease that is widely expressed in the brain. A number of neurological abnormalities have been reported in tPA-deficient mice. Objectives To study genetic contamination of tPA-deficient mice. Materials and methods Whole genome expression array analysis, RNAseq expression profiling, low- and high-density SNP analysis, bioinformatics, and genome editing was used to analyze gene expression in tPA-deficient mouse brains. Results and conclusions Genes differentially expressed in the brain of Plat−/− mice from two independent colonies highly backcrossed onto the C57BL/6J strain clustered near Plat on chromosome 8. SNP analysis attributed this anomaly to about 20 Mbp of DNA flanking Plat being of 129 origin in both strains. Bioinformatic analysis of these 129-derived chromosomal segments identified a significant number of mutations in genes co-segregating with the targeted Plat allele, including several potential null mutations. Using zinc finger nuclease technology, we generated novel “passenger mutation”-free isogenic C57BL/6J-Plat−/− and FVB/NJ-Plat−/− mouse strains by introducing an 11 bp deletion in the exon encoding the signal peptide. These novel mouse strains will be a useful community resource for further exploration of tPA function in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:27079292

  19. Expression and function of the ion channel TRPA1 in vagal afferent nerves innervating mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Kwong, Kevin; Taylor-Clark, Thomas; Kollarik, Marian; Macglashan, Donald M; Braun, Armin; Undem, Bradley J

    2008-03-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 and TRPM8 are ion channels that have been localized to afferent nociceptive nerves. These TRP channels may be of particular relevance to respiratory nociceptors in that they can be activated by various inhaled irritants and/or cold air. We addressed the hypothesis that mouse vagal sensory nerves projecting to the airways express TRPA1 and TRPM8 and that they can be activated via these receptors. Single cell RT-PCR analysis revealed that TRPA1 mRNA, but not TRPM8, is uniformly expressed in lung-labelled TRPV1-expressing vagal sensory neurons. Neither TRPA1 nor TRPM8 mRNA was expressed in TRPV1-negative neurons. Capsaicin-sensitive, but not capsaicin-insensitive, lung-specific neurons responded to cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, with increases in intracellular calcium. Menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, was ineffective at increasing cellular calcium in lung-specific vagal sensory neurons. Cinnamaldehyde also induced TRPA1-like inward currents (as measured by means of whole cell patch clamp recordings) in capsaicin-sensitive neurons. In an ex vivo vagal innervated mouse lung preparation, cinnamaldehyde evoked action potential discharge in mouse vagal C-fibres with a peak frequency similar to that observed with capsaicin. Cinnamaldehyde inhalation in vivo mimicked capsaicin in eliciting strong central-reflex changes in breathing pattern. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that TRPA1, but not TRPM8, is expressed in vagal sensory nerves innervating the airways. TRPA1 activation provides a mechanism by which certain environmental stimuli may elicit action potential discharge in airway afferent C-fibres and the consequent nocifensor reflexes.

  20. Differential methylation persists at the mouse Rasgrf1 DMR in tissues displaying monoallelic and biallelic expression.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Lauren; Gerfen, Jennifer; Harview, Christina; Rahn-Lee, Charlotte; Horton, Rachel; Park, Yaena; Davis, Tamara L

    2009-05-16

    A subset of mammalian genes exhibits genomic imprinting, whereby one parental allele is preferentially expressed. Differential DNA methylation at imprinted loci serves both to mark the parental origin of the alleles and to regulate their expression. In mouse, the imprinted gene Rasgrf1 is associated with a paternally methylated imprinting control region which functions as an enhancer blocker in its unmethylated state. Because Rasgrf1 is imprinted in a tissue-specific manner, we investigated the methylation pattern in monoallelic and biallelic tissues to determine if methylation of this region is required for both imprinted and non-imprinted expression. Our analysis indicates that DNA methylation is restricted to the paternal allele in both monoallelic and biallelic tissues of somatic and extraembryonic lineages. Therefore, methylation serves to mark the paternal Rasgrf1 allele throughout development, but additional factors are required for appropriate tissue-specific regulation of expression at this locus.

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Following Levitation in an Ultrasound Standing Wave Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08–0.85 MPa) and times (5–60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (E-mail: Bazoud@tcd.ie) PMID:21208732

  2. Gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells following levitation in an ultrasound standing wave trap.

    PubMed

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08-0.85 MPa) and times (5-60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing NOG mouse for analyzing the microenvironment of xenograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yuichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Ando, Yasuhiko; Katano, Ikumi; Nakamura, Masato; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between transplanted cells and host tissues is important for the growth and maintenance of transplanted cells. To analyze the mechanisms of these interactions, a systemic fluorescent protein-expressing mouse is a useful recipient. In this study, we generated a novel NOG strain, which strongly expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; PgkEGFP-NOG), especially in the liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and testis. Because the host tissues expressed EGFP, xenotransplanted human cancer cells were clearly identified as EGFP-negative colonies in PgkEGFP-NOG mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that EGFP-expressing stromal tissues formed a complicated tumor microenvironment within xenograft tissues. Moreover, a similar microenvironment was observed in human iPS cell-derived teratomas. Collectively, these results indicated that a suitable microenvironment is essential for the growth and maintenance of xenotransplanted cells and that PgkEGFP-NOG mice represent a useful animal model for analyzing the mechanisms of microenvironment formation.

  4. Heterologous expression of the adenosine A1 receptor in transgenic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Salom, David; Zhang, Li; Harris, Tim; Ballesteros, Juan A; Golczak, Marcin; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kurahara, Carole; Juan, Todd; Jordan, Steven; Salon, John A

    2007-07-17

    Traditional cell-based systems used to express integral membrane receptors have yet to produce protein samples of sufficient quality for structural study. Herein we report an in vivo method that harnesses the photoreceptor system of the retina to heterologously express G protein-coupled receptors in a biochemically homogeneous and pharmacologically functional conformation. As an example we show that the adenosine A1 receptor, when placed under the influence of the mouse opsin promoter and rhodopsin rod outer segment targeting sequence, localized to the photoreceptor cells of transgenic retina. The resulting receptor protein was uniformly glycosylated and pharmacologically well behaved. By comparison, we demonstrated in a control experiment that opsin, when expressed in the liver, had a complex pattern of glycosylation. Upon solubilization, the retinal adenosine A1 receptor retained binding characteristics similar to its starting material. This expression method may prove generally useful for generating high-quality G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

  5. Mesp2: a novel mouse gene expressed in the presegmented mesoderm and essential for segmentation initiation.

    PubMed

    Saga, Y; Hata, N; Koseki, H; Taketo, M M

    1997-07-15

    We isolated a novel bHLH protein gene Mesp2 (for mesoderm posterior 2) that cross-hybridizes with Mesp1 expressed in the early mouse mesoderm. Mesp2 is expressed in the rostral presomitic mesoderm, but down-regulated immediately after the formation of the segmented somites. To determine the function of MesP2 protein (MesP2) in somitogenesis, we generated Mesp2-deficient mice by gene targeting. The homozygous Mesp2 (-/-) mice died shortly after birth and had fused vertebral columns and dorsal root ganglia, with impaired sclerotomal polarity. The earliest defect in the homozygous embryos was a lack of segmented somites. Their disruption of the metameric features, altered expression of Mox-1, Pax-1, and Dll1, and lack of expression of Notch1, Notch2, and FGFR1 suggested that MesP2 controls sclerotomal polarity by regulating the signaling systems mediated by notch-delta and FGF, which are essential for segmentation.

  6. Dissecting the heterogeneity of gene expressions in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Thomson, Matt; Liu, S. John; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2011-03-01

    A population of genetically identical cells, of the same nominal cell type, and cultured in the same petri dish, will nevertheless often exhibit varying patterns of gene expression. Taking mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system, we use immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to examine in detail the distribution of expression levels for various transcription factors key to the maintenance of the ES cell identity. We find the population-level distribution of many proteins, once rescaled by the average expression level, have very similar shapes. This suggest the largest component of observed heterogeneity comes from a single source. More subtly, we find the expression many of genes appears to modulate with the cell cycle. This may suggest that the program for maintaining ES cell identity is tightly coupled to the cell cycle machinery. This work is supported by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research.

  7. Identification and developmental analysis of endothelin receptor type-A expressing cells in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Taro; Sato, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Koichi; Asai, Rieko; Arima, Yuichiro; Uchijima, Yasunobu; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki

    2011-10-01

    The endothelin (Edn) system plays pleiotropic roles in renal function and various disease processes through two distinct G protein-coupled receptors, Edn receptors type-A (Ednra) and type-B (Ednrb). However, difficulties in the accurate identification of receptor-expressing cells in situ have made it difficult to dissect their diverse action in renal (patho)physiology. We have recently established mouse lines in which lacZ and EGFP are 'knocked-in' to the Ednra locus to faithfully mark Ednra-expressing cells. Here we analyzed these mice for their expression in the kidney to characterize Ednra-expressing cells. Ednra expression was first observed in undifferentiated mesenchymal cells around the ureteric bud at E12.5. Thereafter, Ednra expression was widely observed in vascular smooth muscle cells, JG cells and mesenchymal cells in the interstitium. After growth, the expression became confined to vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes and renin-producing JG cells. By contrast, most cells in the nephron and vascular endothelial cells did not express Ednra. These results indicate that Ednra expression may be linked with non-epithelial fate determination and differentiation of metanephric mesenchyme. Ednra-lacZ/EGFP knock-in mice may serve as a useful tool in studies on renal function and pathophysiology of various renal diseases.

  8. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  9. Expression of macro non-coding RNAs Meg8 and Irm in mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tiantian; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zeng, Tiebo; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Qi; Gu, Ning; Chen, Yan; Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie; Wu, Qiong

    2012-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Meg8 and Irm were previously identified as alternatively splicing isoforms of Rian gene. Ascertaining ncRNAs spatiotemporal expression patterns is crucial for understanding the physiological roles of ncRNAs during tissue and organ development. In this study in mouse embryos, we focused on the developmental regulation expression of imprinted macro ncRNAs, Meg8 and Irm by using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). The in situ hybridization results showed that Meg8 and Irm were expressed in the developing brain at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E11.5, while Irm expression signals were strikingly detected in the somite, where Meg8 expression signals were undetectable. By E15.5, they were expressed in brain, tongue, liver, lung and neuroendocrine tissues, while Irm displayed more restricted expression in tongue and skeletal muscle than Meg8. Furthermore, quantitative analysis confirmed that they were highly expressed in tongue and brain at E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5. These results indicated that Meg8 and Irm might be coordinately expressed and functionally correlated in diverse of organs. Notably, Irm was more closely associated with morphogenesis of skeletal muscle in contrast to Meg8 during embryonic development.

  10. Immunohistochemical expression of heat shock protein27 in the mouse dental pulp after immediate teeth separation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aim After immediate teeth separation, expression of HSP27 in the mouse dental pulp was examined. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the incidence of HSP27 expression. Materials and methods A total of 36 8-week-old ddY mice were used as experimental subjects and a wedge was inserted in between maxillary right molars. The wedge was removed 30 min or 3 h after insertion. Animals were immediately sacrificed after the removal of wedge or until 1 week later and serial sections from paraffin-embedded tissues were prepared. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to examine the expression of HSP27. The untreated side served as the control. Results In the control group, the endothelial cells and some pulp fibroblasts weakly expressed HSP27 suggesting that the expression is due to mechanical stress brought about by physiological masticatory force and pressure from the tongue. In both 30 min and 3 h experimental groups, HSP27 expression was highest at 24 h after wedge removal and the expression remained the same or started to decrease thereafter. The expression decreased at the same level as that of the control group 1 week after wedge removal. Conclusion HSP27 may serve as an indicator of stimulus strong enough to show its expression. PMID:22027643

  11. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  12. Mining and characterization of ubiquitin E3 ligases expressed in the mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ubiquitin-mediated protein modification and degradation are believed to play important roles in mammalian spermatogenesis. The catalogues of ubiquitin activating enzymes, conjugating enzymes, and ligases (E3s) have been known for mammals such as mice and humans. However, a systematic characterization of E3s expressed during spermatogenesis has not been carried out. Results In present study, we set out to mine E3s from the mouse genome and to characterize their expression pattern, subcellular localization, and enzymatic activities based on microarray data and biochemical assays. We identified 398 putative E3s belonging to the RING, U-box, and HECT subfamilies and found that most genes were conserved between mice and humans. We discovered that 73 of them were highly or specifically expressed in the testes based on the microarray expression data. We selected 10 putative E3 genes to examine their mRNA expression pattern, and several genes to study their subcellular localization and E3 ligase activity. RT-PCR results showed that all the selected genes were predominately expressed in the testis. Some putative E3s were localized in the cytoplasm while others were in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Moreover, all the selected proteins were enzymatically active as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo assays. Conclusions We have identified a large number of putative E3s that are expressed during mouse spermatogenesis. Among these, a significant portion is highly or specifically expressed in the testis. Subcellular localization and enzymatic activity assays suggested that these E3s might execute diverse functions in mammalian spermatogenesis. Our results may serve as an initial guide to the field for further functional analysis. PMID:22992278

  13. Differential gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem cells and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yinshan; Feng, Meiying; Liu, Shanshan; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xianwei; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Shouquan; Ma, Ningfang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) may be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells under in vitro culture conditions, due to epigenetic modifications, which are closely associated with the expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. Thus, this study was conducted to compare the gene expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors in mSSCs and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Firstly, the freshly isolated mSSCs [mSSCs (f)] were enriched by magnetic-activated cell sorting with Thy1.2 (CD90.2) microbeads, and the typical morphological characteristics were maintained under in vitro culture conditions for over 5 months to form long-term propagated mSSCs [mSSCs (l)]. These mSSCs (l) expressed pluripotency-associated genes and were induced to differentiate into sperm. Our findings indicated that the mSSCs (l) expressed high levels of the transcription factors, Lin28 and Prmt5, and the epigenetic factors, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1, in comparison with the mESCs, with the levels of Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1 and Tert significantly higher than those in the mESCs. There was no significant difference in Kdm2b expression between mSSCs (l) and mESCs. Furthermore, the gene expression of N-Myc, Dppa2, Tbx3, Nr5a2, Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1 in the mSSCs (l) was markedly higher in comparison to that in the mSSCs (f). Collectively, our results suggest that the mSSCs and the mESCs displayed differential gene expression profiles, and the mSSCs possessed the potential to acquire pluripotency based on the high expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. These data may provide novel insights into the reprogramming mechanism of mSSCs. PMID:27353491

  14. Quantitative PCR for glucose transporter and tristetraprolin family gene expression in cultured mouse adipocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cao, Heping; Cao, Fangping; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Anderson, Richard A

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) such as TaqMan and SYBR Green qPCR are widely used for gene expression analysis. The drawbacks of SYBR Green assay are that the dye binds to any double-stranded DNA which can generate false-positive signals and that the length of the amplicon affects the intensity of the amplification. Previous results demonstrate that TaqMan assay is more sensitive but generates lower calculated expression levels than SYBR Green assay in quantifying seven mRNAs in tung tree tissues. The objective of this study is to expand the analysis using animal cells. We compared both qPCR assays for quantifying 24 mRNAs including those coding for glucose transporter (Glut) and mRNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The results showed that SYBR Green and TaqMan qPCR were reliable for quantitative gene expression in animal cells. This result was supported by validation analysis of Glut and TTP family gene expression. However, SYBR Green qPCR overestimated the expression levels in most of the genes tested. Finally, both qPCR instruments (Bio-Rad's CFX96 real-time system and Applied Biosystems' Prism 7700 real-time PCR instrument) generated similar gene expression profiles in the mouse cells. These results support the conclusion that both qPCR assays (TaqMan and SYBR Green qPCR) and both qPCR instruments (Bio-Rad's CFX96 real-time system and Applied Biosystems' Prism 7700 real-time PCR instrument) are reliable for quantitative gene expression analyses in animal cells but SYBR Green qPCR generally overestimates gene expression levels than TaqMan qPCR.

  15. miR-29 regulates Tet1 expression and contributes to early differentiation of mouse ESCs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dehua; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The ten-eleven translocation-1 (Tet1), which converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethycytosine (5hmC), plays important roles in many important biological processes, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintenance. However, the mechanisms for Tet-1 regulation remain largely unknown. Here we showed that miR-29 family (miR-29a, miR-29b and miR-29c) can directly repress Tet1 expression. We found that Tet1 was highly expressed and 5hmC was presented at relatively high levels in mouse ESCs, but the levels of both Tet1 and 5hmC were reduced during the early differentiation of ESCs. On the contrary, miR-29 level was increased in this process. ESCs stably transfecting with miR-29 precursors showed lower levels of Tet1 protein and 5hmC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-29 overexpression selectively affected cell lineage markers and skewed ESC differentiation, which was similar in Tet1 knockdown ESCs. Our results indicate that miR-29 is a direct regulator of Tet1 in mouse ESCs. PMID:27449105

  16. Expression of the adaptor protein m-Numb in mouse male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Corallini, Serena; Fera, Stefania; Grisanti, Laura; Falciatori, Ilaria; Muciaccia, Barbara; Stefanini, Mario; Vicini, Elena

    2006-12-01

    Numb is an adaptor protein that is asymmetrically inherited at mitosis and controls the fate of sibling cells in different species. The role of m-Numb (mammalian Numb) as an important cell fate-determining factor has extensively been described mostly in neural tissues, particularly in progenitor cells, in the mouse. Biochemical and genetic analyses have shown that Numb acts as an inhibitor of the Notch signaling pathway, an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the present study, we sought to determine m-Numb distribution in germ cells in the postnatal mouse testis. We show that all four m-Numb isoforms are widely expressed during postnatal testis development. By reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blot analyses, we further identify p71 as the predominantly expressed isoform in germ cells. Moreover, we demonstrate through co-immunoprecipitation studies that m-Numb physically associates with Ap2a1, a component of the endocytotic clathrin-coated vesicles. Finally, we employed confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of whole mount seminiferous tubules and isolated germ cells to gain more insight into the subcellular localization of m-Numb. These morphological analyses confirmed m-Numb and Ap2a1 co-localization. However, we did not observe asymmetric localization of m-Numb neither in mitotic spermatogonial stem cells nor in more differentiated spermatogonial cells, suggesting that spermatogonial stem cell fate in the mouse does not rely on asymmetric partitioning of m-Numb.

  17. The mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype: cloning, expression, and northern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, M; Nishigaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Morimoto, K; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1995-09-25

    A functional cDNA clone for the mouse prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was isolated from a mouse cDNA library. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 362 amino acid residues with seven putative transmembrane domains. [3H]PGE2 bound specifically to the membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned receptor. This binding was displaced by unlabeled prostanoids in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost, a stable PGI2 agonist > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. Binding was also inhibited by butaprost (an EP2 agonist) and to a lesser extent by M&B 28767 (an EP3 agonist), but not by sulprostone (an EP1 and EP3 agonist) or SC-19220 (an EP1 antagonist). PGE2 and butaprost increased the cAMP level in the Chinese hamster ovary cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis revealed that EP2 mRNA is expressed most abundantly in the uterus, followed by the spleen, lung, thymus, ileum, liver, and stomach.

  18. Increased expression of miRNA-146a in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.Y.; Cui, J.G.; Hill, J.M.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhao, Y.; Lukiw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    A mouse and human brain-enriched micro-RNA-146a (miRNA-146a) is known to be important in modulating the innate immune response and inflammatory signaling in certain immunological and brain cell types. In this study we examined miRNA-146a levels in early-, moderate- and late-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neocortex and hippocampus, in several human primary brain and retinal cell lines, and in 5 different transgenic mouse models of AD including Tg2576, TgCRND8, PSAPP, 3xTg-AD and 5xFAD. Inducible expression of miRNA-146a was found to be significantly up-regulated in a primary co-culture of human neuronal–glial (HNG) cells stressed using interleukin1-beta (IL-1β), and this up-regulation was quenched using specific NF-κB inhibitors including curcumin. Expression of miRNA-146a correlated with senile plaque density and synaptic pathology in Tg2576 and in 5xFAD transgenic mouse models used in the study of this common neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:20934487

  19. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  20. Generation of a neuro-specific microarray reveals novel differentially expressed noncoding RNAs in mouse models for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gstir, Ronald; Schafferer, Simon; Scheideler, Marcel; Misslinger, Matthias; Griehl, Matthias; Daschil, Nina; Humpel, Christian; Obermair, Gerald J.; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Striessnig, Joerg; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a novel, neuro-specific ncRNA microarray, covering 1472 ncRNA species, to investigate their expression in different mouse models for central nervous system diseases. Thereby, we analyzed ncRNA expression in two mouse models with impaired calcium channel activity, implicated in Epilepsy or Parkinson's disease, respectively, as well as in a mouse model mimicking pathophysiological aspects of Alzheimer's disease. We identified well over a hundred differentially expressed ncRNAs, either from known classes of ncRNAs, such as miRNAs or snoRNAs or which represented entirely novel ncRNA species. Several differentially expressed ncRNAs in the calcium channel mouse models were assigned as miRNAs and target genes involved in calcium signaling, thus suggesting feedback regulation of miRNAs by calcium signaling. In the Alzheimer mouse model, we identified two snoRNAs, whose expression was deregulated prior to amyloid plaque formation. Interestingly, the presence of snoRNAs could be detected in cerebral spine fluid samples in humans, thus potentially serving as early diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease. In addition to known ncRNAs species, we also identified 63 differentially expressed, entirely novel ncRNA candidates, located in intronic or intergenic regions of the mouse genome, genomic locations, which previously have been shown to harbor the majority of functional ncRNAs. PMID:25344396

  1. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G.; Ressler, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools. PMID:26402844

  2. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  3. Expression Profiling of the Solute Carrier Gene Family in the Mouse BrainS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Amber; Royall, Josh; Hohmann, John G.; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    The solute carrier (Slc) superfamily is a major group of membrane transport proteins present in mammalian cells. Although Slc transporters play essential and diverse roles in the central nervous system, the localization and function of the vast majority of Slc genes in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization data generated by the Allen Brain Atlas, we systematically and quantitatively analyzed the spatial and cellular distribution of 307 Slc genes, which represent nearly 90% of presently known mouse Slc genes, in the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain. Our analysis showed that 252 (82%) of the 307 Slc genes are present in the brain, and a large proportion of these genes were detected at low to moderate expression levels. Evaluation of 20 anatomical brain subdivisions demonstrated a comparable level of Slc gene complexity but significant difference in transcript enrichment. The distribution of the expressed Slc genes was diverse, ranging from near-ubiquitous to highly localized. Functional annotation in 20 brain regions, including the blood-brain and blood-cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) barriers, suggests major roles of Slc transporters in supporting brain energy utilization, neurotransmission, nutrient supply, and CSF production. Furthermore, hierarchical cluster analysis revealed intricate Slc expression patterns associated with neuroanatomical organization. Our studies also revealed Slc genes present within defined brain microstructures and described the putative cell types expressing individual Slc genes. These results provide a useful resource for investigators to explore the roles of Slc genes in neurophysiological and pathological processes. PMID:19179540

  4. Continued Discovery of Transcriptional Units Expressed in Cells of the Mouse Mononuclear Phagocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christine A.; Ravasi, Timothy; Sultana, Razvan; Yagi, Ken; Carninci, Piero; Bono, Hidemasa; Faulkner, Geoffrey; Okazaki, Yasushi; Quackenbush, John; Hume, David A.; Lyons, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The current RIKEN transcript set represents a significant proportion of the mouse transcriptome but transcripts expressed in the innate and acquired immune systems are poorly represented. In the present study we have assessed the complexity of the transcriptome expressed in mouse macrophages before and after treatment with lipopolysaccharide, a global regulator of macrophage gene expression, using existing RIKEN 19K arrays. By comparison to array profiles of other cells and tissues, we identify a large set of macrophage-enriched genes, many of which have obvious functions in endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, a significant number of LPS-inducible genes were identified. The data suggest that macrophages are a complex source of mRNA for transcriptome studies. To assess complexity and identify additional macrophage expressed genes, cDNA libraries were created from purified populations of macrophage and dendritic cells, a functionally related cell type. Sequence analysis revealed a high incidence of novel mRNAs within these cDNA libraries. These studies provide insights into the depths of transcriptional complexity still untapped amongst products of inducible genes, and identify macrophage and dendritic cell populations as a starting point for sampling the inducible mammalian transcriptome. PMID:12819134

  5. Impact of Cigarette Smoke on the Human and Mouse Lungs: A Gene-Expression Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, Mathieu C.; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Gaschler, Gordon; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole; Couture, Christian; Laviolette, Michel; Hogg, James C.; Timens, Wim; Halappanavar, Sabina; Stampfli, Martin R.; Bossé, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is well known for its adverse effects on human health, especially on the lungs. Basic research is essential to identify the mechanisms involved in the development of cigarette smoke-related diseases, but translation of new findings from pre-clinical models to the clinic remains difficult. In the present study, we aimed at comparing the gene expression signature between the lungs of human smokers and mice exposed to cigarette smoke to identify the similarities and differences. Using human and mouse whole-genome gene expression arrays, changes in gene expression, signaling pathways and biological functions were assessed. We found that genes significantly modulated by cigarette smoke in humans were enriched for genes modulated by cigarette smoke in mice, suggesting a similar response of both species. Sixteen smoking-induced genes were in common between humans and mice including six newly reported to be modulated by cigarette smoke. In addition, we identified a new conserved pulmonary response to cigarette smoke in the induction of phospholipid metabolism/degradation pathways. Finally, the majority of biological functions modulated by cigarette smoke in humans were also affected in mice. Altogether, the present study provides information on similarities and differences in lung gene expression response to cigarette smoke that exist between human and mouse. Our results foster the idea that animal models should be used to study the involvement of pathways rather than single genes in human diseases. PMID:24663285

  6. Simultaneous expression of salivary and pancreatic amylase genes in cultured mouse hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, G J; Tsai, C C; Samuelson, L C; Gumucio, D L; Meisler, M H

    1986-01-01

    The tissue-specific expression of two types of mouse amylase genes does not overlap in vivo; the Amy-1 locus is transcribed in the parotid gland and the liver, while expression of Amy-2 is limited to the pancreas. We identified a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa 1-6, in which both amylase genes can be simultaneously expressed. Amy-1 is constitutively active in these cells and is inducible by dexamethasone at the level of mRNA. We demonstrated that the liver-specific promoter of Amy-1 is utilized by the dexamethasone-treated hepatoma cells, and that glucocorticoid consensus sequences are present upstream of this promoter. Amy-2 is not detectable constitutively, but can be activated if the cells are cultured in serum-free medium containing dexamethasone. Expression of Amy-2 in a nonpancreatic cell type has not previously been observed. We speculate that induction of Amy-1 and activation of Amy-2 may involve different regulatory mechanisms. Hepa 1-6 cells provide an experimental system for molecular analysis of these events. Images PMID:2431276

  7. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Cultured Murine Muscle Cells Reproduces Gene Expression Changes of Trained Mouse Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Nathalie; Arnold, Anne-Sophie; Item, Flurin; Summermatter, Serge; Brochmann Santana Santos, Gesa; Christe, Martine; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco; Handschin, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle. PMID:20532042

  8. HEX: a novel homeobox gene expressed during haematopoiesis and conserved between mouse and human.

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, F K; Ashworth, A; Enver, T; Wiedemann, L M

    1993-01-01

    We describe the cloning of a novel homeodomain-containing gene, which is highly conserved between mouse and human. The human cDNA was initially isolated from human haematopoietic tissue and denoted HEX (haematopoietically expressed homeobox). Sequence analysis of the coding sequences from mouse and the partial cDNA from human shows that the homeodomain is most closely related to those of the HIx and HOX11 proteins. The HEX gene is present as a single copy in the human genome. Analysis of murine genomic DNA shows, in addition to an intron-containing gene homologous to HEX, the presence of a processed copy of the gene which has arisen within the last few million years. Analysis of human and murine haematopoietic cells and cell lines, revealed expression of the HEX gene in multipotential progenitors, as well as cells of the B-lymphocyte and myeloid lineages. However HEX was not expressed in T-lymphocytes or erythroid cells. This pattern of HEX gene expression suggests that it may play a role in haematopoietic differentiation. Images PMID:8096636

  9. Expression of the ankyrin repeat domain 6 gene (Ankrd6) during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Tissir, F; Bar, I; Goffinet, A M; Lambert De Rouvroit, C

    2002-08-01

    The structure and developmental expression pattern of the ankyrin repeat domain 6 (Ankrd6) gene, initially named Diversin, were studied in the mouse. Ankrd6 is transcribed as a 5.8-kb mRNA composed of 15 exons that encodes a 712 amino acid protein with 6 ankyrin repeats. Ankrd6 is expressed prominently in the developing brain from E12 to maturity, suggesting a role during brain development. In embryos, expression is maximal in ventricular zones of neuronal proliferation and intermediate zones of neuronal migration and extends to postmigratory neuronal fields during the postnatal period. In the mature brain, the Ankrd6-related signal is highest in cortical layer II, granule cells of the dentate gyrus, olfactory granules and a subset of Purkinje cells in the vestibulocerebellum. Ankrd6 is related to the Drosophila gene Diego, which interacts with Flamingo in the regulation of planar cell polarity (Feiguin et al., 2001). However, the canvas of Ankrd6 expression does not match closely that of the three mouse Flamingo homologs, Celsr1-3 (Tissir et al., 2002). These data suggest that Ankrd6 may be involved in brain development in interaction with Celsr/Flamingo but also other signaling pathways.

  10. Expression of chondrogenic potential of mouse trunk neural crest cells by FGF2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Ido, Atsushi; Ito, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    There is a significant difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells in the amniote. Thus, whereas cranial neural crest cells generate bone and cartilage, trunk neural crest cells do not contribute to skeletal derivatives. We examined whether mouse trunk neural crest cells can undergo chondrogenesis to analyze how the difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells arises. Our present data demonstrate that mouse trunk neural crest cells have chondrogenic potential and that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 is an inducing factor for their chondrogenesis in vitro. FGF2 altered the expression patterns of Hox9 genes and Id2, a cranial neural crest cell marker. These results suggest that environmental cues may play essential roles in generating the difference between developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  12. Estrogen receptor β controls MMP-19 expression in mouse ovaries during ovulation.

    PubMed

    Nalvarte, Ivan; Töhönen, Virpi; Lindeberg, Maria; Varshney, Mukesh; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Inzunza, José

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ/ESR2) has a central role in mouse ovaries, as ERβ knockout (BERKO) mice are subfertile due to an increase in fibrosis around the maturing follicle and a decrease in blood supply. This has a consequence that these follicles rarely rupture to release the mature oocyte. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are modulators of the extracellular matrix, and the expression of one specific MMP, MMP-19, is normally increased in granulosa cells during their maturation until ovulation. In this study, we demonstrate that MMP-19 levels are downregulated in BERKO mouse ovaries. Using human MCF-7 cells that overexpress ERβ, we could identify MMP-19 to be a transcriptional target of ligand-bound activated ERβ acting on a specificity protein-1 binding site. These data provide a molecular explanation for the observed follicle rupture defect that contributes to the subfertility of female BERKO mice. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  13. A high resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carol L.; Ng, Lydia; Menon, Vilas; Martinez, Salvador; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Glattfelder, Katie; Sunkin, Susan M.; Henry, Alex; Lau, Christopher; Dang, Chinh; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Martinez-Ferre, Almudena; Pombero, Ana; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Wakeman, Wayne B.; Hohmann, John; Dee, Nick; Sodt, Andrew J.; Young, Rob; Smith, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thuc-Nghi; Kidney, Jolene; Kuan, Leonard; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaykas, Ajamete; Miller, Jeremy; Page, Damon; Orta, Geri; Bernard, Amy; Riley, Zackery; Smith, Simon; Wohnoutka, Paul; Hawrylycz, Mike; Puelles, Luis; Jones, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, in situ hybridization data were generated for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at 7 developmental stages for ~2100 genes, processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, 7 reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore co-expression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (developingmouse.brain-map.org). PMID:24952961

  14. Proteomic Study of Differential Protein Expression in Mouse Lung Tissues after Aerosolized Ricin Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhendong; Han, Chao; Du, Jiajun; Zhao, Siyan; Fu, Yingying; Zheng, Guanyu; Sun, Yucheng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu; Qian, Jun; Liu, Linna

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning. PMID:24786090

  15. Proteomic study of differential protein expression in mouse lung tissues after aerosolized ricin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhendong; Han, Chao; Du, Jiajun; Zhao, Siyan; Fu, Yingying; Zheng, Guanyu; Sun, Yucheng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu; Qian, Jun; Liu, Linna

    2014-04-28

    Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning.

  16. Cloning and recombinant expression of a novel mouse-secreted phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Valentin, E; Koduri, R S; Scimeca, J C; Carle, G; Gelb, M H; Lazdunski, M; Lambeau, G

    1999-07-02

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) form a class of structurally related enzymes that are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological effects including inflammation and associated diseases, cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cancer, and are now known to bind to specific membrane receptors. Here, we report the cloning and expression of a novel sPLA2 isolated from mouse thymus. Based on its structural features, this sPLA2 is most similar to the previously cloned mouse group IIA sPLA2 (mGIIA sPLA2). As for mGIIA sPLA2, the novel sPLA2 is made up of 125 amino acids with 14 cysteines, is basic (pI = 8.71) and its gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 4. However, the novel sPLA2 has only 48% identity with mGIIA and displays similar levels of identity with the other mouse group IIC and V sPLA2s, indicating that the novel sPLA2 is not an isoform of mGIIA sPLA2. This novel sPLA2 has thus been called mouse group IID (mGIID) sPLA2. In further contrast with mGIIA, which is found mainly in intestine, transcripts coding for mGIID sPLA2 are found in several tissues including pancreas, spleen, thymus, skin, lung, and ovary, suggesting distinct functions for the two enzymes. Recombinant expression of mGIID sPLA2 in Escherichia coli indicates that the cloned sPLA2 is an active enzyme that has much lower specific activity than mGIIA and displays a distinct specificity for binding to various phospholipid vesicles. Finally, recombinant mGIID sPLA2 did not bind to the mouse M-type sPLA2 receptor, while mGIIA was previously found to bind to this receptor with high affinity.

  17. In vitro manipulation of early mouse embryos induces HIV1-LTRlacZ transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Vernet, M; Cavard, C; Zider, A; Fergelot, P; Grimber, G; Briand, P

    1993-12-01

    We report here that the transcriptional activity of early mouse embryos is affected by their manipulation and culture in vitro, using transgenic embryos that express the reporter gene lacZ. We examined the pattern of expression of the lacZ gene fused to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat during the preimplantation stages. Transgene expression is induced as early as the two-cell stage in embryos developed in vitro, while there is no constitutive expression at the same stage in embryos developed in vivo. We have established a relation between this inducible expression occurring in vitro and an oxidative stress phenomenon. Indeed, when the culture medium is supplemented with antioxidants such N-acetyl-cysteine or CuZn-superoxide dismutase the transgene expression is markedly reduced. We also present evidence that the transgene expression in vitro coincides with the onset of the embryonic genome activation as attested by the synthesis of the 70 x 10(3) M(r) protein complex. Therefore, this transgene expression could prove to be a useful tool in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this crucial developmental event.

  18. Expression analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lattin, Jane E; Schroder, Kate; Su, Andrew I; Walker, John R; Zhang, Jie; Wiltshire, Tim; Saijo, Kaoru; Glass, Christopher K; Hume, David A; Kellie, Stuart; Sweet, Matthew J

    2008-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages express an extensive repertoire of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) that regulate inflammation and immunity. In this study we performed a systematic micro-array analysis of GPCR expression in primary mouse macrophages to identify family members that are either enriched in macrophages compared to a panel of other cell types, or are regulated by an inflammatory stimulus, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results Several members of the P2RY family had striking expression patterns in macrophages; P2ry6 mRNA was essentially expressed in a macrophage-specific fashion, whilst P2ry1 and P2ry5 mRNA levels were strongly down-regulated by LPS. Expression of several other GPCRs was either restricted to macrophages (e.g. Gpr84) or to both macrophages and neural tissues (e.g. P2ry12, Gpr85). The GPCR repertoire expressed by bone marrow-derived macrophages and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages had some commonality, but there were also several GPCRs preferentially expressed by either cell population. Conclusion The constitutive or regulated expression in macrophages of several GPCRs identified in this study has not previously been described. Future studies on such GPCRs and their agonists are likely to provide important insights into macrophage biology, as well as novel inflammatory pathways that could be future targets for drug discovery. PMID:18442421

  19. Expression of the Astrocyte Water Channel Aquaporin-4 in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Jacqueline A; Hsu, Mike S; Seldin, Marcus M; Binder, Devin K

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a bidirectional water channel that is found on astrocytes throughout the central nervous system. Expression is particularly high around areas in contact with cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that AQP4 plays a role in fluid exchange between the cerebrospinal fluid compartments and the brain. Despite its significant role in the brain, the overall spatial and region-specific distribution of AQP4 has yet to be fully characterized. In this study, we used Western blotting and immunohistochemical techniques to characterize AQP4 expression and localization throughout the mouse brain. We observed AQP4 expression throughout the forebrain, subcortical areas, and brainstem. AQP4 protein levels were highest in the cerebellum with lower expression in the cortex and hippocampus. We found that AQP4 immunoreactivity was profuse on glial cells bordering ventricles, blood vessels, and subarachnoid space. Throughout the brain, AQP4 was expressed on astrocytic end-feet surrounding blood vessels but was also heterogeneously expressed in brain tissue parenchyma and neuropil, often with striking laminar specificity. In the cerebellum, we showed that AQP4 colocalized with the proteoglycan brevican, which is synthesized by and expressed on cerebellar astrocytes. Despite the high abundance of AQP4 in the cerebellum, its functional significance has yet to be investigated. Given the known role of AQP4 in synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, the widespread and region-specific expression pattern of AQP4 suggests involvement not only in fluid balance and ion homeostasis but also local synaptic plasticity and function in distinct brain circuits.

  20. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  1. Mouse oocytes suppress miR-322-5p expression in ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    SUMITOMO, Jun-ichi; EMORI, Chihiro; MATSUNO, Yuta; UENO, Mizuki; KAWASAKI, Kurenai; ENDO, Takaho A.; SHIROGUCHI, Katsuyuki; FUJII, Wataru; NAITO, Kunihiko; SUGIURA, Koji

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that oocyte-derived paracrine factors (ODPFs) regulate miRNA expression in mouse granulosa cells. Expression of mmu-miR-322-5p (miR-322) was higher in mural granulosa cells (MGCs) than in cumulus cells of the Graafian follicles. The expression levels of miR-322 decreased when cumulus cells or MGCs were co-cultured with oocytes denuded of their cumulus cells. Inhibition of SMAD2/3 signaling by SB431542 increased miR-322 expression by cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). Moreover, the cumulus cells but not the MGCs in Bmp15–/–/Gdf9+/– (double-mutant) mice exhibited higher miR-322 expression than those of wild-type mice. Taken together, these results show that ODPFs suppress the expression of miR-322 in cumulus cells. Gene ontology analysis of putative miR-322 targets whose expression was detected in MGCs with RNA-sequencing suggested that multiple biological processes are affected by miR-322 in MGCs. These results demonstrate that ODPFs regulate miRNA expression in granulosa cells and that this regulation may participate in the differential control of cumulus cell versus MGC functions. Therefore, the ODPF-mediated regulation of cumulus cells takes place at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:27180925

  2. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular

  3. Cerebral endothelial expression of Robo1 affects brain infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils during mouse stroke recovery.

    PubMed

    Gangaraju, Sandhya; Sultan, Khadeejah; Whitehead, Shawn N; Nilchi, Ladan; Slinn, Jacqueline; Li, Xuesheng; Hou, Sheng T

    2013-06-01

    Increased brain infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) occurs early after stroke and is important in eliciting brain inflammatory response during stroke recovery. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of PMN entry, we investigated the expression and requirement for Slit1, a chemorepulsive guidance cue, and its cognate receptor, Robo1, in a long-term recovery mouse model of cerebral ischemia. The expression levels of Robo1 were significantly decreased bilaterally at 24h following reperfusion. Robo1 expression levels remained suppressed in the ipsilateral cortex until 28d post MCAO-reperfusion, while the levels of Robo1 in the contralateral cortex recovered to the level of sham-operated mouse by 7d reperfusion. Circulating PMNs express high levels of Slit1, but not Robo1. Influx of PMNs into the ischemic core area occurred early (24h) after cerebral ischemia, when endothelial Robo1 expression was significantly reduced in the ischemic brain, indicating that Robo1 may form a repulsive barrier to PMN entry into the brain parenchyma. Indeed, blocking Slit1 on PMNs in a transwell migration assay in combination with an antibody blocking of Robo1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) significantly increased PMN transmigration during oxygen glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of ischemia. Collectively, in the normal brain, the presence of Slit1 on PMNs, and Robo1 on cerebral endothelial cells, generated a repulsive force to prevent the infiltration of PMNs into the brain. During stroke recovery, a transient reduction in Robo1 expression on the cerebral endothelial cells allowed the uncontrolled infiltration of Slit1-expressing PMNs into the brain causing inflammatory reactions.

  4. Ectopic Expression of Mouse Melanopsin in Drosophila Photoreceptors Reveals Fast Response Kinetics and Persistent Dark Excitation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Bushra; Kohn, Elkana; Peters, Maximilian; Zaguri, Rachel; Weiss, Shirley; Schopf, Krystina; Katz, Ben; Huber, Armin; Minke, Baruch

    2017-03-03

    The intrinsically photosensitive M1 retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) initiate non-image-forming light-dependent activities and express the melanopsin (OPN4) photopigment. Several features of ipRGC photosensitivity are characteristic of fly photoreceptors. However, the light response kinetics of ipRGC is much slower due to unknown reasons. Here we used transgenic Drosophila, in which the mouse OPN4 replaced the native Rh1 photopigment of Drosophila R1-6 photoreceptors, resulting in deformed rhabdomeric structure. Immunocytochemistry revealed OPN4 expression at the base of the rhabdomeres, mainly at the rhabdomeral stalk. Measurements of the early receptor current, a linear manifestation of photopigment activation, indicated large expression of OPN4 in the plasma membrane. Comparing the early receptor current amplitude and action spectra between WT and the Opn4-expressing Drosophila further indicated that large quantities of a blue absorbing photopigment were expressed, having a dark stable blue intermediate state. Strikingly, the light-induced current of the Opn4-expressing fly photoreceptors was ∼40-fold faster than that of ipRGC. Furthermore, an intense white flash induced a small amplitude prolonged dark current composed of discrete unitary currents similar to the Drosophila single photon responses. The induction of prolonged dark currents by intense blue light could be suppressed by a following intense green light, suggesting induction and suppression of prolonged depolarizing afterpotential. This is the first demonstration of heterologous functional expression of mammalian OPN4 in the genetically emendable Drosophila photoreceptors. Moreover, the fast OPN4-activated ionic current of Drosophila photoreceptors relative to that of mouse ipRGC, indicates that the slow light response of ipRGC does not arise from an intrinsic property of melanopsin. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Differential expression of c-kit in mouse undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Schrans-Stassen, B H; van de Kant, H J; de Rooij, D G; van Pelt, A M

    1999-12-01

    The proto-oncogene c-kit is encoded at the white-spotting locus and in the mouse mutations at this locus affect the precursor cells of melanocytes, hematopoietic cells, and germ cells. c-kit is expressed in type A spermatogonia, but whether or not c-kit is present both in undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia or only in the latter cell type is still a matter of debate. Using the vitamin A-deficient mouse model, we studied messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in undifferentiated and differentiating type A spermatogonia. Furthermore, we quantified the immuno-positive type A spermatogonia in the epithelial stages VI, VII, IX/X, and XII in normal mice to correlate c-kit expression in type A spermatogonia with the differentiation of these cells. Our results show that in the VAD situation undifferentiated type A spermatogonia express little c-kit mRNA. The A spermatogonia with a larger nucleus expressed c-Kit protein, whereas the A spermatogonia with a smaller one did not. After induction of differentiation of these cells into type A1 spermatogonia, c-kit mRNA was enhanced. The percentage of A spermatogonia expressing c-Kit protein did not change during this process, suggesting that A spermatogonia, which are committed to differentiate express c-kit. Under normal circumstances in epithelial stage VI 16%+/-2% (mean +/- SD), in VII 45%+/-15%, in IX/X 78%+/-14% and in XII 90%+/-1.9% of the type A spermatogonia were c-kit positive, suggesting that Aaligned spermatogonia gradually change from c-Kit negative to c-Kit positive cells before their differentiation into A1 spermatogonia. It is concluded that c-kit can be used as a marker for differentiation of undifferentiated into differentiating type A spermatogonia.

  6. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K.; Halder, Sebok K.; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector–based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35–115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5–6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long

  7. Expression of TPM1κ, a Novel Sarcomeric Isoform of the TPM1 Gene, in Mouse Heart and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Syamalima; Panebianco, Lauren; Matoq, Amr A.; Chionuma, Henry N.; Denz, Christopher R.; Poiesz, Bernard J.; Dube, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the expression of TPM1α and TPM1κ in mouse striated muscles. TPM1α and TMP1κ were amplified from the cDNA of mouse heart by using conventional RT-PCR. We have cloned the PCR amplified DNA and determined the nucleotide sequences. Deduced amino acid sequences show that there are three amino acid changes in mouse exon 2a when compared with the human TPM1κ. However, the deduced amino acid sequences of human TPM1α and mouse